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Sample records for research association symposia

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association Containing the Abstracts of Discussion Sessions, Display Sessions, Symposia, and Training Sessions (30th, Little Rock, Arkansas, November 14-16, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.

    This volume contains abstracts of the approximately 200 discussion papers, symposia, displays, and training sessions of the 2001 annual meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA). Papers deal with elementary, secondary, and higher education and cover a broad spectrum of educational issues. Although many papers focus on the…

  2. SUPPORT FOR CHEMISTRY SYMPOSIA AT THE 2011 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE MEETING FEBRUARY 17-21, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Charles Casey, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2011-08-20

    This proposal supported Chemistry Symposia at the 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Meeting in Washington, DC February 17-21, 2011. The Chemistry Section of AAAS presented an unusually strong set of symposia for the 2011 AAAS meeting to help celebrate the 2011 International Year of Chemistry. The AAAS meeting provided an unusual opportunity to convey the excitement and importance of chemistry to a very broad audience and allowed access to a large contingent of the scientific press. Excellent suggestions for symposia were received from AAAS Chemistry Fellows and from the chairs of the American Chemical Society Technical Divisions. The AAAS Chemistry executive committee selected topics that would have wide appeal to scientists, the public, and the press for formal proposals of symposia. The symposia proposals were peer reviewed by AAAS. The Chemistry Section made a strong case to the program selection committee for approval of the chemistry symposia and 6 were approved for the 2011 annual meeting. The titles of the approved symposia were: (1) Powering the Planet: Generation of Clean Fuels from Sunlight and Water, (2) Biological Role and Consequences of Intrinsic Protein Disorder, (3) Chemically Speaking: How Organisms Talk to Each Other, (4) Molecular Self-Assembly and Artificial Molecular Machines, (5) Frontiers in Organic Materials for Information Processing, Energy and Sensors, and (6) Celebrating Marie Curie's 100th Anniversary of Her Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The Chemistry Section of AAAS is provided with funds to support only 1-2 symposia a year. Because of the much greater number of symposia approved in conjunction with observance of the 2011 International Year of Chemistry, additional support was sought from DOE to help support the 30 invited speakers and 8 symposia moderators/organizers. Support for the symposia provided the opportunity to highlight the excitement of current chemical research, to educate the public about the

  3. Support for chemistry symposia at the 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, February 17-21 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Casey

    2011-08-20

    This proposal supported Chemistry Symposia at the 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Meeting in Washington, DC February 17-21, 2011. The Chemistry Section of AAAS presented an unusually strong set of symposia for the 2011 AAAS meeting to help celebrate the 2011 International Year of Chemistry. The AAAS meeting provided an unusual opportunity to convey the excitement and importance of chemistry to a very broad audience and allowed access to a large contingent of the scientific press. Excellent suggestions for symposia were received from AAAS Chemistry Fellows and from the chairs of the American Chemical Society Technical Divisions. The AAAS Chemistry executive committee selected topics that would have wide appeal to scientists, the public, and the press for formal proposals of symposia. The symposia proposals were peer reviewed by AAAS. The Chemistry Section made a strong case to the program selection committee for approval of the chemistry symposia and 6 were approved for the 2011 annual meeting. The titles of the approved symposia were: (1) Powering the Planet: Generation of Clean Fuels from Sunlight and Water, (2) Biological Role and Consequences of Intrinsic Protein Disorder, (3) Chemically Speaking: How Organisms Talk to Each Other, (4) Molecular Self-Assembly and Artificial Molecular Machines, (5) Frontiers in Organic Materials for Information Processing, Energy and Sensors, and (6) Celebrating Marie Curie's 100th Anniversary of Her Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The Chemistry Section of AAAS is provided with funds to support only 1-2 symposia a year. Because of the much greater number of symposia approved in conjunction with observance of the 2011 International Year of Chemistry, additional support was sought from DOE to help support the 30 invited speakers and 8 symposia moderators/organizers. Support for the symposia provided the opportunity to highlight the excitement of current chemical research, to educate the public about the

  4. JCA–AACR Joint Symposia in the 73rd Annual Meeting of the Japanese Cancer Association, Yokohama, 25–26 September 2014

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ryoji; Mori, Seiichi; Noda, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    To integrate and discuss the cutting-edge science and revolutionized therapeutics of cancer in Japan and the United States, JCA (Japanese Cancer Association)–AACR (American Association for Cancer Research) Joint Symposia were held on 25th (Symposium 2) and 26th (Symposium 1) in September 2014 as a part of the 73rd Annual Meeting of the Japanese Cancer Association at Pacifico Yokohama in Yokohama, Japan. The symposia focused on mouse genetics and human genomics in cancer research. Eight prominent scientists from JCA and AACR discussed their own research in the symposia. They provided substantial fruitful information not only for identification of novel target molecules and pathways in cancer therapeutics but also for direct translation of cancer genomics into clinics PMID:25898792

  5. Environmental Design Research. Volume Two: Symposia and Workshops. Community Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preiser, Wolfgang F. E., Ed.

    The contents of this volume represent the invited contributions to the conference and are categorized according to special (invited) addresses, symposia, and workshops. Special addresses were conceptualized to view environmental design research in a holistic way, incorporating changing societal and political conditions. Lynton K. Caldwell spoke on…

  6. PATRAM symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Pryor, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The series of Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials (PATRAM) symposia is nearing the completion of a second decade. There has been a marked growth in interest from its inception in 1965 to the present as shown by the increasing number of participants, the countries represented, and the variety of the subjects addressed. This paper presents highlights of the six symposia held during the period from January 1965 to November 1980.

  7. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  8. Approaches and considerations for setting occupational exposure limits for sensory irritants: report of recent symposia.

    PubMed

    Paustenbach, D

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 50 years significant strides have been made in reducing occupational exposure to airborne chemicals. To a large extent, the impetus behind the reductions has been the identification of presumably safe levels of exposure, or occupational exposure limits (OELs). Most of the reduction in exposure has been to chemicals such as hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, nephrotoxins, and carcinogens that cause frank toxic effects. Recently, however, a number of industrial hygiene and occupational medicine initiatives have sought to identify acceptable levels of exposure to sensory irritants and reduce exposure to this class of chemicals. This article presents an overview of the field with emphasis on the work presented at two symposia sponsored by the Chemical Manufacturers Association: "How Do We Set an Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) for Irritation?" (1998) at the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition and "Respiratory Tract Irritation and Olfaction Conference" (1997). The two symposia reviewed clinical and experimental methods used to assess odor and sensory irritation, to increase understanding of the research needed to establish OELs for sensory irritants, and to discuss how to use this information to identify appropriate values. The symposia illustrated that research in this area is evolving quickly and that there is already sufficient understanding to permit scientists to identify chemicals likely to be sensory irritants. Further, there appears to be an ample number of research methods for identification of airborne concentrations that should protect most workers. This article summarizes some of the key points raised at these symposia and suggests areas deserving of future study.

  9. International brain edema symposia 1967-2011.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    This is a brief review of previous international brain edema symposia. The symposia that took place from 1965 to 1999 were summarized by Igor Klatzo and A. Marmarou in the proceedings Brain Edema XI [1]. In this article the author summarized the symposia, including latest five. Images from previous symposia such as the cover pages of the proceedings and snapshots of organizers were included. The outline and key words of the symposia were summarized in tables. The name of the prize winner and the title of the memorial lectures in recent symposia were also summarized in a table. PMID:23564096

  10. Mid-South Educational Research Association Proceedings (21st, Knoxville, Tennessee, November 11-13, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; And Others

    The Mid-South Educational Research Association is a non-profit organization that exists to encourage quality educational research in the mid-south and to promote the applications of such research in the schools. These proceedings contain abstracts of the discussion sessions, display sessions, symposia, and training sessions of the 1992 annual…

  11. Presidential Events and Symposia: Philadelphia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    During 2008, ACS President Bruce E. Bursten is highlighting energy development, education initiatives, enhanced communication of the centrality of chemistry, and international cooperation between chemists and chemical engineers. At the Philadelphia meeting there is a symposium on global energy challenges and opportunities on Monday afternoon. Beginning Sunday afternoon with a special symposium, and continuing throughout the week, we will celebrate the centrality of chemistry through the disciplines of agriculture and food chemistry, industrial and engineering chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry, as we observe the centennial of the divisions representing those disciplines. Other symposia sponsored by the president include the 40th Anniversary of Project SEED and the Astellas Foundation Award Lectures in Transitional Chemistry, a new national award. It promises to be an exciting time. These and other events that are cosponsored by the ACS President are listed.

  12. Mid-South Educational Research Association Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (26th, Memphis, Tennessee, November 12-14, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; Post, Kathy, Ed.; Allen, Lorraine; Welch, Elizabeth

    The Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA) is a nonprofit organization with the purpose of encouraging quality educational research in the mid-south and promoting the application of results of quality research in the schools. This volume contains summaries of the papers, discussion sessions, display sessions, symposia, and training…

  13. Index of aerospace mechanisms symposia proceedings 1-19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Wilson, J.

    1986-01-01

    This index, organized in five sections (by symposium, by title, by author, by subject, and by project), brings together information on the first 19 Aerospace Mechanisms symposia. Key words are included, cross-referencing all the symposia, and the eighteenth and nineteenth symposia are cross-indexed by project. The Aerospace Mechanisms symposia are devoted to discussions of design, fabrication, test, and operational use of aerospace mechanisms; this is the first index that compiles information on symposia held from 1966 through 1985.

  14. PREFACE: Joint European Magnetic Symposia - JEMS 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spałek, Jozef

    2011-07-01

    Conference banner The Joint European Magnetic Symposia JEMS 2010 took place in the complex Auditorium Maximum of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland, between 23-28 August 2010. It followed the series of the conferences in Grenoble (2001), Dresden (2004), San Sebastian (2006), and Dublin (2008). The next Symposia will be held in 2012 in Parma (Italy). The Symposia cover a broad range of aspects of magnetism and magnetic materials, as well as providing a forum for the magnetism community to discuss new concepts, properties, and developments in all branches of fundamental and applied magnetism. The JEMS 2010 Symposia were organized by the Institute of Physics of Jagiellonian University, in cooperation with AGH University of Science and Technology (Kraków), Cracow University of Technology, Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Kraków, and the Silesian University in Katowice. I thank the Local Committee, and in particular Professor Krzysztof Tomala, for their hard work long before, during, and after the Conference. We dedicate this volume to Professor Henryk Szymczak from the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences for his long lasting service to the magnetism community and the organizational effort in bringing this Conference to our community. Thank you Henryk! The Conference contained Plenary Sessions and 16 Symposia, which are listed below. Most of them had two chairpersons (also listed), one from abroad and one from Poland. I believe that a collective chairmanship of the Symposia is very helpful in both their organization, as well as in the reviewing process of the papers submitted to the Conference Proceedings. I would like to cordially thank all the persons listed below, who have contributed enormously to the success of our meeting. The Proceedings comprises 116 invited and contributed papers. I thank the Co-editors for their continuing work long after the Conference. Arrivederci in Parma! Jozef Spa

  15. Presidential Symposia and Events: Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walworth, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During 2009 ACS President Thomas H. Lane is committed to promoting education, building new and productive relationships that support the ACS strategic plan, and developing outcome-based metrics to guide the Society. At the 237th ACS national meeting in Salt Lake City, Lane is supporting six presidential symposia and events. Please consult the online technical program (accessed Jan 2009) for up-to-date information.

  16. International Symposia on Integrated Exposure Assessment for Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Jang; Ha, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives On September 2, 2010 and November 25, 2011, the Korean Research Project on Integrated Exposure Assessment to Hazardous Materials for Food Safety (KRIEFS) organized two international symposia in Seoul, Korea. KRIEFS, established by the Korean Food and Drug Administration in March 2010, envisioned these international symposia as means to obtain advanced experiences from other countries and to reflect on and refine the KRIEFS's survey design and methods. Methods For the first symposium KRIEFS invited human biomonitoring (HBM) experts from Germany, the US, and Canada. The visiting HBM experts shared the details of their national studies while the KRIEFS discussed study design, as well as the methods, results and policymaking processes of the KRIEFS project. The second symposium was organized to share the survey design and results on endocrine disruptors from Taiwan. Results The Speaker from Germany introduced the German Environmental Survey and shared their experiences in HBM design, such as the process of developing reference values, and discussed the new HBM plan in Germany and the European Union. The Representative from Canada shared insights from national HBM approach. In the case of the US, the speaker focused on risk communication with subjects in epidemiological studies. In the second international symposium, the speaker shared the experience of endocrine disruptors'studies from Taiwan. Conclusions KRIEFS was able to better understand previous nationwide HBM research designs, policy making process, and risk communication with research subjects.

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (23rd, Nashville, Tennessee, November 9-11, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; And Others

    This volume of proceedings of the Mid-South Educational Research Association's 23rd annual meeting contains abstracts of discussion sessions, display sessions, symposia, and training sessions. Over 320 abstracts and annotations are included, for sessions that cover the whole range of educational research. Assessment and measurement, educational…

  18. Science and Math Education Information Report: National Association for Research in Science Teaching. 43rd Annual Meeting. Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science Education, Columbus, OH.

    This report contains abstracts of most of the research papers in science education presented at the 43rd annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching in Minneapolis, Minnesota, March 5-8, 1970. Also included are the topics and names of participants of several symposia at the conference. The abstracts are organized…

  19. Indexes of the proceedings for the nine symposia (international) on detonation, 1951--89

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, S.L.; Deal, W.E.; Ramsay, J.B.; Roach, A.M.; Takala, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Proceedings of the nine Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal, yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the nine existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

  20. Indexes of the Proceedings for the Ten International Symposia on Detonation 1951-93

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, William E.; Ramsay, John B.; Roach, Alita M.; Takala, Bruce E.

    1998-09-01

    The Proceedings of the ten Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal; yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the ten existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

  1. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Conference (64th, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, April 7-10, 1991). Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Research in Science Teaching.

    Abstracts of most of the papers, symposia, discussion groups, round tables, and poster sessions presented at the 64th conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) are provided. Subject areas addressed are as follows: teacher knowledge, cognitive development, conceptual change, curriculum issues, reform in science…

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (28th, Point Clear, Alabama, November 17-19, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; Allen, Lorraine, Ed.; Brignole, Mary, Ed.

    This volume contains abstracts of the more than 300 discussion papers, symposia, displays, and training sessions presented at the Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA) 1999 annual meeting. Papers deal with elementary, secondary, and higher education and cover a broad spectrum of educational issues. Although many papers focus on the…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (25th, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, November 6-8, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; McCree, Herbert L., Ed.

    This volume contains abstracts of the more than 250 discussion papers, symposia, displays, and training sessions presented at the Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA) 1996 annual meeting. Papers deal with elementary, secondary, and higher education, and cover a broad spectrum of educational issues. Although many papers focus on the…

  4. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014-2015).

    PubMed

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H; Brenna, J Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-07-29

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted.

  5. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted. PMID:27483308

  6. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014-2015).

    PubMed

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H; Brenna, J Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted. PMID:27483308

  7. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres.

  8. Researching Teacher Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard; Kuchah, Kuchah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue not only for more research "into" English language teacher associations (TAs) but also for research to be carried out "by" and "within" TAs. That is, we advocate their becoming "Researching TAs" themselves. This suggestion derives from our recent collaborative work with/within the…

  9. Fewer invited talks by women in evolutionary biology symposia

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, J; Dugdale, H L; Radersma, R; Hinsch, M; Buehler, D M; Saul, J; Porter, L; Liker, A; De Cauwer, I; Johnson, P J; Santure, A W; Griffin, A S; Bolund, E; Ross, L; Webb, T J; Feulner, P G D; Winney, I; Szulkin, M; Komdeur, J; Versteegh, M A; Hemelrijk, C K; Svensson, E I; Edwards, H; Karlsson, M; West, S A; Barrett, E L B; Richardson, D S; van den Brink, V; Wimpenny, J H; Ellwood, S A; Rees, M; Matson, K D; Charmantier, A; dos Remedios, N; Schneider, N A; Teplitsky, C; Laurance, W F; Butlin, R K; Horrocks, N P C

    2013-01-01

    Lower visibility of female scientists, compared to male scientists, is a potential reason for the under-representation of women among senior academic ranks. Visibility in the scientific community stems partly from presenting research as an invited speaker at organized meetings. We analysed the sex ratio of presenters at the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) Congress 2011, where all abstract submissions were accepted for presentation. Women were under-represented among invited speakers at symposia (15% women) compared to all presenters (46%), regular oral presenters (41%) and plenary speakers (25%). At the ESEB congresses in 2001–2011, 9–23% of invited speakers were women. This under-representation of women is partly attributable to a larger proportion of women, than men, declining invitations: in 2011, 50% of women declined an invitation to speak compared to 26% of men. We expect invited speakers to be scientists from top ranked institutions or authors of recent papers in high-impact journals. Considering all invited speakers (including declined invitations), 23% were women. This was lower than the baseline sex ratios of early-mid career stage scientists, but was similar to senior scientists and authors that have published in high-impact journals. High-quality science by women therefore has low exposure at international meetings, which will constrain Evolutionary Biology from reaching its full potential. We wish to highlight the wider implications of turning down invitations to speak, and encourage conference organizers to implement steps to increase acceptance rates of invited talks. PMID:23786459

  10. PREFACE: Continuum Models and Discrete Systems Symposia (CMDS-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2011-09-01

    The 12th International Symposium on Continuum Models and Discrete Systems (CMDS-12) (http://www.saha.ac.in/cmp/cmds.12/) took place at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kolkata from 21-25 February 2011. Previous CMDS symposia were held in Kielce (Poland, 1975), Mont Gabriel (Canada, 1977), Freudenstadt (Federal Republic of Germany, 1979), Stockholm (Sweden, 1981), Nottingham (United Kingdom, 1985), Dijon (France, 1989), Paderborn (Germany, 1992), Varna (Bulgaria, 1995), Istanbul (Turkey, 1998), Shoresh (Israel, 2003) and Paris (France, 2007). The broad interdisciplinary character, limited number of participants (not exceeding 100) and informal and friendly atmosphere of these meetings has made them a well-acknowledged place to make highly fruitful contacts and exchange ideas, methods and results. The purpose of CMDS is to bring together scientists with different backgrounds who work on continuum theories of discrete mechanical and thermodynamical systems in the fields of mathematics, theoretical and applied mechanics, physics, material science, and engineering. The spirit of the CMDS meetings is to stimulate extensive and active interdisciplinary research. The International Scientific Committee members of this conference were: David J Bergman (Chairman CMDS 10), Tel Aviv University, Israel; Bikas K Chakrabarti (Chairman CMDS 12), Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India; Alex Hansen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Hans Jürgen Herrmann, Institute for Building Materials, ETH, Switzerland; Esin Inan (Chairman CMDS 9), Istanbul Technical University, Turkey; Dominique Jeulin (Chairman CMDS 11), Ecole des Mines de Paris, France; Frank Juelicher, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Germany; Hikaru Kawamura, University of Osaka, Japan; Graeme Milton, University of Utah, USA; Natalia Movchan, University of Liverpool, UK; and Ping Sheng, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong. At CMDS-12 the topics

  11. Not "Pulling up the Ladder": Women Who Organize Conference Symposia Provide Greater Opportunities for Women to Speak at Conservation Conferences.

    PubMed

    Sardelis, Stephanie; Drew, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community faces numerous challenges in achieving gender equality among its participants. One method of highlighting the contributions made by female scientists is through their selection as featured speakers in symposia held at the conferences of professional societies. Because they are specially invited, symposia speakers obtain a prestigious platform from which to display their scientific research, which can elevate the recognition of female scientists. We investigated the number of female symposium speakers in two professional societies (the Society of Conservation Biology (SCB) from 1999 to 2015, and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) from 2005 to 2015), in relation to the number of female symposium organizers. Overall, we found that 36.4% of symposia organizers and 31.7% of symposia speakers were women at the Society of Conservation Biology conferences, while 19.1% of organizers and 28% of speakers were women at the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists conferences. For each additional female organizer at the SCB and ASIH conferences, there was an average increase of 95% and 70% female speakers, respectively. As such, we found a significant positive relationship between the number of women organizing a symposium and the number of women speaking in that symposium. We did not, however, find a significant increase in the number of women speakers or organizers per symposium over time at either conference, suggesting a need for revitalized efforts to diversify our scientific societies. To further those ends, we suggest facilitating gender equality in professional societies by removing barriers to participation, including assisting with travel, making conferences child-friendly, and developing thorough, mandatory Codes of Conduct for all conferences.

  12. Not "Pulling up the Ladder": Women Who Organize Conference Symposia Provide Greater Opportunities for Women to Speak at Conservation Conferences.

    PubMed

    Sardelis, Stephanie; Drew, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community faces numerous challenges in achieving gender equality among its participants. One method of highlighting the contributions made by female scientists is through their selection as featured speakers in symposia held at the conferences of professional societies. Because they are specially invited, symposia speakers obtain a prestigious platform from which to display their scientific research, which can elevate the recognition of female scientists. We investigated the number of female symposium speakers in two professional societies (the Society of Conservation Biology (SCB) from 1999 to 2015, and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) from 2005 to 2015), in relation to the number of female symposium organizers. Overall, we found that 36.4% of symposia organizers and 31.7% of symposia speakers were women at the Society of Conservation Biology conferences, while 19.1% of organizers and 28% of speakers were women at the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists conferences. For each additional female organizer at the SCB and ASIH conferences, there was an average increase of 95% and 70% female speakers, respectively. As such, we found a significant positive relationship between the number of women organizing a symposium and the number of women speaking in that symposium. We did not, however, find a significant increase in the number of women speakers or organizers per symposium over time at either conference, suggesting a need for revitalized efforts to diversify our scientific societies. To further those ends, we suggest facilitating gender equality in professional societies by removing barriers to participation, including assisting with travel, making conferences child-friendly, and developing thorough, mandatory Codes of Conduct for all conferences. PMID:27467580

  13. PREFACE: Continuum Models and Discrete Systems Symposia (CMDS-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2011-09-01

    The 12th International Symposium on Continuum Models and Discrete Systems (CMDS-12) (http://www.saha.ac.in/cmp/cmds.12/) took place at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kolkata from 21-25 February 2011. Previous CMDS symposia were held in Kielce (Poland, 1975), Mont Gabriel (Canada, 1977), Freudenstadt (Federal Republic of Germany, 1979), Stockholm (Sweden, 1981), Nottingham (United Kingdom, 1985), Dijon (France, 1989), Paderborn (Germany, 1992), Varna (Bulgaria, 1995), Istanbul (Turkey, 1998), Shoresh (Israel, 2003) and Paris (France, 2007). The broad interdisciplinary character, limited number of participants (not exceeding 100) and informal and friendly atmosphere of these meetings has made them a well-acknowledged place to make highly fruitful contacts and exchange ideas, methods and results. The purpose of CMDS is to bring together scientists with different backgrounds who work on continuum theories of discrete mechanical and thermodynamical systems in the fields of mathematics, theoretical and applied mechanics, physics, material science, and engineering. The spirit of the CMDS meetings is to stimulate extensive and active interdisciplinary research. The International Scientific Committee members of this conference were: David J Bergman (Chairman CMDS 10), Tel Aviv University, Israel; Bikas K Chakrabarti (Chairman CMDS 12), Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India; Alex Hansen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Hans Jürgen Herrmann, Institute for Building Materials, ETH, Switzerland; Esin Inan (Chairman CMDS 9), Istanbul Technical University, Turkey; Dominique Jeulin (Chairman CMDS 11), Ecole des Mines de Paris, France; Frank Juelicher, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Germany; Hikaru Kawamura, University of Osaka, Japan; Graeme Milton, University of Utah, USA; Natalia Movchan, University of Liverpool, UK; and Ping Sheng, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong. At CMDS-12 the topics

  14. Virtualization of the Y.E.S. Congress 2009 Roundtable Symposia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Gaines, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Y.E.S. Congress 2009 was the first international conference organized by the Y.E.S. Network, an association of early-career geoscientists who represent professional societies, geoscience companies, geoscience departments, and interested policy makers from across the world, in collaboration with the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE). The conference, hosted by the China University of Geosciences in Beijing, focused on scientific and career challenges faced by early-career geoscientists, with a particular emphasis on how the Y.E.S. Network can work collaboratively and internationally towards solving these challenges and furthering the IYPE motto of “Earth Sciences for Society”. A key features of the Y.E.S. Congress was the implementation of “virtualized” roundtable symposia which engaged senior and early-career geoscientists via presentations, panel discussions, and working group sessions in which strategies related to scientific challenges (i.e. climate change in the polar regions, natural hazards, natural resource sustainability) and academic and career pathway challenges (i.e. academic-industry linkages, gender parity in the geosciences, geoscience education sustainability, and international licensure issues) were developed. These strategies were then tasked to the Y.E.S. Network for further development and implementation. The virtualization of the roundtable symposia facilitated active discussion between those participants and speakers who were physically located at the conference facilities in Beijing with a wider international audience of virtual participants and speakers. This talk will address the key features of the roundtable virtualization, the successes and challenges faced during the pre-conference set-up as well as during the roundtable sessions, and potential future applications.

  15. Proceedings of the College Reading Association, Volume 2, Summer 1961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketcham, Clay A., Ed.

    The proceedings of the fourth annual meeting of the College Reading Association (a fledgling organization in 1961 when this meeting was held) consisted of two symposia, a number of papers, and special reports on research related to reading, as follows: (1) "Opening Remarks" (Albert J. Mazurkiewicz); (2) "Improving Reading in the English Classroom"…

  16. Linking Early Brain and Biological Development to Psychiatry: Introduction and Symposia Review

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Mark; Ghali, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper introduces the special issue of the Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry on the theme of how multiple factors in early brain and biological development can influence a variety of outcomes in mental health and addictions in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Method: In Part 1, we preview three papers in this issue. In Part 2, we highlight two recent innovative knowledge-transfer symposia featuring the application of the science in early development and addictions. Results: The papers focus on the subtopics of brain plasticity, mood disorders, and comparative research with monkeys on gene-environment interactions and parent-child attachment. In addition, the research presented at the Early Brain and Biological Development Symposium and the Recovery from Addiction Symposium is also reviewed. Held in 2010 in Banff, Alberta, each five-day program was intended to bridge the gap between scientific and clinical experts and those in the province responsible for policy, programs, and services. Conclusions: The science now links common neurobiological maturation processes, adverse early childhood experiences, and key aspects of the social environment with risks for mental health disorders and addictions later in life. The final paper in this issue examines the clinical and policy implications of this research knowledge. PMID:22114607

  17. Not “Pulling up the Ladder”: Women Who Organize Conference Symposia Provide Greater Opportunities for Women to Speak at Conservation Conferences

    PubMed Central

    Sardelis, Stephanie; Drew, Joshua A.

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community faces numerous challenges in achieving gender equality among its participants. One method of highlighting the contributions made by female scientists is through their selection as featured speakers in symposia held at the conferences of professional societies. Because they are specially invited, symposia speakers obtain a prestigious platform from which to display their scientific research, which can elevate the recognition of female scientists. We investigated the number of female symposium speakers in two professional societies (the Society of Conservation Biology (SCB) from 1999 to 2015, and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) from 2005 to 2015), in relation to the number of female symposium organizers. Overall, we found that 36.4% of symposia organizers and 31.7% of symposia speakers were women at the Society of Conservation Biology conferences, while 19.1% of organizers and 28% of speakers were women at the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists conferences. For each additional female organizer at the SCB and ASIH conferences, there was an average increase of 95% and 70% female speakers, respectively. As such, we found a significant positive relationship between the number of women organizing a symposium and the number of women speaking in that symposium. We did not, however, find a significant increase in the number of women speakers or organizers per symposium over time at either conference, suggesting a need for revitalized efforts to diversify our scientific societies. To further those ends, we suggest facilitating gender equality in professional societies by removing barriers to participation, including assisting with travel, making conferences child-friendly, and developing thorough, mandatory Codes of Conduct for all conferences. PMID:27467580

  18. NASA/OAI Research Associates program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The intent of this activity was the development of a cooperative program between the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center with the objective of better preparing recent university graduates for careers in government aerospace research laboratories. The selected individuals were given the title of research associate. To accomplish the aims of this effort: (1) the research associates were introduced to the NASA Lewis Research Center and its mission/programs, (2) the research associates directly participated in NASA research and development programs, and (3) the research associates were given continuing educational opportunities in specialized areas. A number of individuals participated in this project during the discourse of this cooperative agreement. Attached are the research summaries of eight of the research associates. These reports give a very good picture of the research activities that were conducted by the associates.

  19. Black Child in Crisis. Final Report of the Public Forums and Symposia May-October, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, William E., Ed.

    The negative effects of poverty, alienation, and racism influence the lives of black children most heavily. This report covering Michigan presents information and recommendations concerning the continuing decline in the quality of life for black children. It is the culmination of a series of activities including forums, symposia, and conferences…

  20. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics: Keystone resort, CO, January 17-22, 2012.

    PubMed

    Ravnskjaer, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively, there was plenty happening in these sessions that it did not seem to matter that the ski-slope conditions were not ideal. PMID:22491067

  1. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Commemoration of the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 February 2009; Joint session of the Research Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation, 18 March 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalatnikov, Isaak M.; Fortov, Vladimir E.; Makarov, Aleksandr A.; Fridman, Aleksei M.; Martynenko, Yurii V.

    2009-12-01

    The scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) devoted to the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich was held on 18 February 2009 in the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Khalatnikov I M (L D Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) "Nonaccidental coincidences (Lev Andreevich Artsimovich)"; (2) Pashinin P P (A M Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and inertial thermonuclear fusion"; (3) Fortov V E (Institute of Thermophysics of Extreme States of the Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS, Moscow) "High-power shock waves and extreme states of plasma"; (4) Fridman A M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "Prediction and discovery of ultrastrong hydrodynamic instabilities caused by a velocity jump: theory and experiment"; (5) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy". On 18 March 2009, a joint session of the Learned Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' (RNTsKI in Russ. abbr.), the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation took place at RNTsKI; the session was devoted to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich. The following talks were presented at the session: (1) Velikhov E P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Academician L A Artsimovich—the founder of our field of science and industry"; (2) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy"; (3) Boyarchuk A A (Division of General Physics and Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and astronomy"; (4) Martynenko Yu V (Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow

  2. Essays on the History of Rocketry and Astronautics: Proceedings of the Third through the Sixth History Symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. C. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    This two volume publication presents the proceedings of the third through sixth history symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics. Thirty-nine papers are divided into four categories: (1) Early Solid Propellant Rocketry; (2) Rocketry and Astronautics: Concepts, Theory, and Analyses after 1880; (3) The Development of Liquid and Solid Propellant Rockets from 1880 to 1945; and (4) Rocketry and Astronautics after 1945. Categories 1 and 2 will be found in volume 1 and the remainder in volume 2. Among other diciplines, Rocketry and Astronautics encompasses the physical and engineering sciences including fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, vibration theory, structural mechanics, and celestial mechanics. Papers presented in these two volumes range from those of empirical experimenters who used the time-honored cut and try methods to scientists wielding theoretical principles. The work traces the coupling of the physical and engineering sciences, industrial advances, and state support that produced the awesome progress in rocketry and astronautics for the most part within living memory. The proceedings of the four symposia present in these two volumes contain information on the work of leading investigators and their associates carried out in the first two-thirds of the twentieth century.

  3. Studying Associations in Health Care Research.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Flannelly, Laura T; Jankowski, Katherine R B

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses some of the types of relationships observed in healthcare research and depicts them in graphic form. The article begins by explaining two basic associations observed in chemistry and physics (Boyles' Law and Charles' Law), and illustrates how these associations are similar to curvilinear and linear associations, respectively, found in healthcare. Graphs of curvilinear associations include morbidity curves and survival and mortality curves. Several examples of linear relationships are given and methods of testing linear relationships with interval and ratio data are introduced (i.e., correlation and ordinary least-squares regression). In addition, 2 × 2 contingency tables for testing the association between categorical (or nominal) data are described. Finally, Sir Austin Bradford Hill's eight criteria for assessing causality from research on associations between variables are presented and explained. Three appendices provide interested readers with opportunities to practice interpreting selected curvilinear and linear relationships.

  4. Common challenges for ecological modelling: synthesis of facilitated discussions held at the symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada, (October 6-9, 2009)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larocque, Guy R.; Mailly, D.; Yue, T.-X.; Anand, M.; Peng, C.; Kazanci, C.; Etterson, M.; Goethals, P.; Jorgensen, S.E.; Schramski, J.R.; McIntire, E.J.B.; Marceau, D.J.; Chen, B.; Chen, G.Q.; Yang, Z.F.; Novotna, B.; Luckai, N.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.; Liu, J.; Munson, A.; Gordon, Andrew M.; Ascough, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The eleven symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) held in Quebec City, Canada, October 6–9, 2009, included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the subjects could be classified into three broad categories: theoretical development, population dynamics and ecosystem processes. Following discussions with the symposia organizers, which indicated that they all shared similar issues and concerns, the facilitated discussions were task-oriented around four basic questions: (1) key challenges in the research area, (2) generating and sharing new ideas, (3) improving collaboration and networking, and (4) increasing visibility to decision-makers, partners and clients. Common challenges that emerged from the symposia included the need for improved communication and collaboration among different academic disciplines, further progress in both theoretical and practical modelling approaches, and accentuation of technology transfer. Regarding the generation and sharing of new ideas, the main issue that emerged was the type of positive interactions that should be encouraged among potential collaborators. The usefulness of the Internet, particularly for the sharing of open-source software and conducting discussion forums, was highlighted for improving collaboration and networking. Several communication tools are available today, and it is important for modellers to use them more intensively. Visibility can be increased by publishing professional newsletters, maintaining informal contacts with the public, organizing educational sessions in primary and secondary schools, and developing simplified analytical frameworks and pilot studies. Specific issues raised in each symposium are also discussed.

  5. Reports from the award symposia hosted by the American Chemical Society, Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry at the 245th American Chemical Society National Meeting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuefei; Vocadlo, David J

    2013-07-19

    We would like to congratulate all of the award winners for the well deserved honor. The award symposia provided a snapshot of some of the state-of-the-art research at the interface between chemistry and biology in the glycoscience field. The presentations serve as prime examples of the increasing integration of chemical and biological research in the area of glycoscience and how tools of chemistry can be applied to answer interesting, important, and fundamental biological questions. We look forward to many more years of exciting developments in the chemistry and chemical biology of glycoscience and anticipate improved tools and approaches will drive major advances while also spurring interests in the wider field.

  6. Training needs of clinical research associates.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Samyuktha; Bhatt, Arun

    2010-10-01

    Clinical research is a relatively new field in our country that has seen very rapid growth in the last few years. Availability of personnel appropriately trained to the specific requirements of the role they will perform in clinical research is critical for capacity expansion. Our study attempts to understand the specific areas of knowledge and skills that are important for the role of a clinical research associate. The survey was conducted among clinical research professionals from industry and academia who had more than five years of clinical research experience and held important decision making positions in clinical research (stakeholders). The survey questionnaire was designed as a matrix of various clinical research roles on the y-axis and six knowledge modules and eight skills on the x-axis. Respondents were asked to rate the importance of the knowledge /skills to the role of clinical research associates on a three point scale. In discussing results, a significant response was considered to be 50% or greater positive response from the total group. The significant findings were that general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules were rated as critical for the role of clinical research associate. Regulatory module was rated as important for the role. The other significant responses were that three of the sub-topics in the methodology module - framing a research proposal/protocol and experimental design, designing case report forms and EDCs and conducting PK studies - were rated as important and one sub topic in the data management and statistics module was rated as not important. All the skills except leadership skills were rated as critical for the role. The findings of our survey were in general on the lines of expectations of performance of the role. The general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules are critical knowledge areas for the role of a clinical research associate. No clear trends emerged for some of the other modules. Leadership

  7. Singapore Meeting of Education Research Associations Sets the Stage for Establishing a World Education Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a meeting of education research associations from around the world which achieved a major goal toward establishing a World Education Research Association (WERA) in Singapore on November 24-25, 2008. At the meeting, representatives reaffirmed a commitment to establish WERA and finalized several key documents for its…

  8. A dedication: Hugh A. Daubeny (1931-2015): A wonderful small fruit legacy including a critical driver of the Rubus-Ribes Symposia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Hugh Daubeny had a productive career as a strawberry and red raspberry breeder with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. As part of that career, he could be considered the “patron saint” of the Rubus-Ribes symposia as he was instrumental in the early development, hosted two symposia, attended all o...

  9. Updates from the British Association of Dermatologists 89th Annual Meeting, 7-10 July 2009, Glasgow, U.K.

    PubMed

    Alexandroff, A B; Flohr, C; Johnston, G A

    2010-07-01

    This is a synopsis of the significant research and clinical papers presented at the British Association of Dermatologists meeting held during 7-10 July 2009 in Glasgow, U.K. The conference and satellite symposia highlighted the recent biological, epidemiological and therapeutic advances in dermatology. This report is not meant as a substitute for reading the conference proceedings and related references quoted in this article.

  10. Perspectives on Discourse: Proceedings from the 1998 and 1999 Discourse Symposia at Vaxjo University. Acta Wexionesia, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, Tuija, Ed.; Maricic, Ibolya, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume brings together the majority of lectures and papers presented at the 1998 and 1999 discourse symposia at Vaxjo University. Part one, "Four Perspectives on Discourse," offers a matrix perspective on narrative, a cross cultural perspective on academic rhetoric, a cognitive perspective on informational discourse, and a construction…

  11. Life sciences and space research XXIV(1) - Gravitational biology; Proceedings of Symposia 10 and 13 of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission F (Meetings F1 and F2) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S. (Editor); Cogoli, A. (Editor); Planel, H. (Editor); Ubbels, G. A. (Editor); Sievers, A. (Editor); Oser, H. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor); Wagner, H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Topics presented include an introduction to theories and models of biological response to gravity, gravity effects on biological systems, the function of calcium in plant graviperception, developmental biology on unmanned spacecraft, and the effect of microgravity on the development of plant protoplasts flown on Biocosmos 9. Also presented are the mechanism by which an asymmetric distribution of plant growth hormone is attained, the perception of gravity by plants, an animal research facility for Space Station Freedom, the long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures, and an experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion.

  12. Research Activity and the Association with Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Baris A.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Sinha, Sidhartha; Poloniecki, Jan D.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Thompson, Matt M.; Gower, Jonathan D.; Boaz, Annette; Holt, Peter J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to describe the key features of acute NHS Trusts with different levels of research activity and to investigate associations between research activity and clinical outcomes. Methods National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Comprehensive Clinical Research Network (CCRN) funding and number of patients recruited to NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN) portfolio studies for each NHS Trusts were used as markers of research activity. Patient-level data for adult non-elective admissions were extracted from the English Hospital Episode Statistics (2005-10). Risk-adjusted mortality associations between Trust structures, research activity and, clinical outcomes were investigated. Results Low mortality Trusts received greater levels of funding and recruited more patients adjusted for size of Trust (n = 35, 2,349 £/bed [95% CI 1,855–2,843], 5.9 patients/bed [2.7–9.0]) than Trusts with expected (n = 63, 1,110 £/bed, [864–1,357] p<0.0001, 2.6 patients/bed [1.7–3.5] p<0.0169) or, high (n = 42, 930 £/bed [683–1,177] p = 0.0001, 1.8 patients/bed [1.4–2.1] p<0.0005) mortality rates. The most research active Trusts were those with more doctors, nurses, critical care beds, operating theatres and, made greater use of radiology. Multifactorial analysis demonstrated better survival in the top funding and patient recruitment tertiles (lowest vs. highest (odds ratio & 95% CI: funding 1.050 [1.033–1.068] p<0.0001, recruitment 1.069 [1.052–1.086] p<0.0001), middle vs. highest (funding 1.040 [1.024–1.055] p<0.0001, recruitment 1.085 [1.070–1.100] p<0.0001). Conclusions Research active Trusts appear to have key differences in composition than less research active Trusts. Research active Trusts had lower risk-adjusted mortality for acute admissions, which persisted after adjustment for staffing and other structural factors. PMID:25719608

  13. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS — 75 years(Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation, 6 April 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Bolotovskii, Boris M.; Kopaev, Yurii V.; Kardashev, Nikolai S.; Zatsepin, Georgii T.; Roganova, Tat'yana M.; Masalov, Anatolii V.; Gubin, Mikhail A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.

    2009-11-01

    A Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council of the Academy of Sciences and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation was convened on 6 April 2009 to mark the 75th anniversary of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN). The following papers were read to the session: (1) Mesyats G A (P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "75 years of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS which traces back its origin to the Physics Room of Peter the Great's Kunstkamera created 225 years ago"; (2) Bolotovskii B M (Division of Theoretical Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation"; (3) Kopaev Yu V (Division of Solid State Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Toroidal states in crystals"; (4) Kardashev N S (Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Science program of the Radioastron mission"; (5) Zatsepin G T (Nuclear Research Institute RAS), Roganova T M (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, D V Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute) "Cosmic ray studies"; (6) Masalov A V (Optics Division, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Spectroscopy: from atoms to cosmic objects"; (7) Gubin M A, Velichansky V L (Division of Quantum Radiophysics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Small-size optical frequency standards"; (8) Dagkesamanskii R D (Radioastronomical Observatory in Pushchino of the Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Prospects for radioastronomical research in Pushchino". Articles written on the basis of these talks are printed in this special issue of Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 179 (11) 1145 - 1256 (2009) [English version: Phys. Usp. 52 (11) (2009] journal. • P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS: past, present, and future, G A Mesyats Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1084-1097 • Vavilov

  14. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Research Associate Program. 256.2... INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities,...

  15. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities, scientific competence, and technical supervision for defined scientific or technical research by a Research Associate when such research is complementary to and compatible with scientific or technical research...

  16. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities, scientific competence, and technical supervision for defined scientific or technical research by a Research Associate when such research is complementary to and compatible with scientific or technical research...

  17. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities, scientific competence, and technical supervision for defined scientific or technical research by a Research Associate when such research is complementary to and compatible with scientific or technical research...

  18. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities, scientific competence, and technical supervision for defined scientific or technical research by a Research Associate when such research is complementary to and compatible with scientific or technical research...

  19. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen years marked the time between the discovery of the double helix in 1953 and the elucidation of the genetic code in 1966. A similar interval has now passed since the development by Cohen and Boyer of a simple procedure for the cloning of selective DNA fragments. The scientific advances made possible by the subsequent modification and elaboration of these original cloning procedures now amaze, stimulate, and increasingly often overwhelm us. Facts that until recently were virtually unobtainable now flow forth almost effortlessly. Most excitingly, the frenetic pace of these new discoveries, instead of marking the impending end of a glorious moment of learning, give every indication of opening up scientific frontiers that will take hundreds if not thousands of years to explore thoroughly. This new era of enlightenment is nowhere more apparent than in our newfound ability to study ourselves at the molecular level. This volume is the first of two collections of papers submitted by the contributors to the Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology for 1986 - molecular biology of Homo sapiens. Contained in this collection are 80 papers grouped into sessions entitled Human Gene Map, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, and Drugs Made Off Human Genes.

  20. [Sponsoring of medical conferences, workshops and symposia by pharmaceutical companies. Physicians must be wary of this!].

    PubMed

    Warntjen, M

    2009-12-01

    The longstanding conventional forms of cooperation between medical organizations and physicians on the one hand and the pharmaceutical industry and manufacturers of medical products on the other hand nowadays hold the risk of coming into conflict with the public prosecutor. Typical circumstances which are taken up by the investigating authorities are financial supports of medical conferences, workshops and symposia. To understand the problem under criminal law it is important to become acquainted with the protective aim of the statutory offences of the acceptance of benefits according to section sign 331 of the Penal Code (Strafgesetzbuch, StGB) and of corruption according to section sign 332 of the Penal Code. The "trust of the general public in the objectivity of governmental decisions" must be protected and the "evil appearance of the corruptibility of official acts" must be counteracted. A basic differentiation is made between physicians with and without office-bearing functions. By paying attention to the recommendations and basic principles of cooperation between the medical profession and the healthcare industry presented in this article (transparency principle, equivalence principle, documentation principle and separation principle) the emergence of any suspicious factors can be effectively avoided.

  1. Factors Associated with Research Wrongdoing in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Omokhoa A.; Adebamowo, Clement A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about research wrongdoing in biomedical research are growing in developing countries, where research ethics training and research regulatory systems are just emerging. In a first-time study in Africa, medical/dental researchers (N = 132) in two states in Nigeria were interviewed on a wide range of research wrongdoings and potential predictors. Using multivariate logistic regression, significant predictors of research wrongdoing were identified. Some 22.0% admitted to at least one of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism, the predictors of which were knowledge gaps in research ethics and pressure to publish enough papers for promotion. Acknowledging inadequate knowledge of research ethics was a predictor of admitting a wrongdoing. Systems that support ethical research, including skilled training and funding, are recommended. PMID:23324199

  2. Implicit Measures of Association in Psychopathology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roefs, Anne; Huijding, Jorg; Smulders, Fren T. Y.; MacLeod, Colin M.; de Jong, Peter J.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Jansen, Anita T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Validity;Measures (Individuals);Studies obtaining implicit measures of associations in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) Axis I psychopathology are organized into three categories: (a) studies comparing groups having a disorder with controls, (b) experimental…

  3. Program and abstracts of the 28th conference on Great Lakes research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the 28th Conference on Great Lakes Research and the annual meeting of the International Association for Great Lakes Research covered two symposia. The first was a comparison of Great Lakes and Baltic ecosystems, which provided an opportunity for international exchanges of information and insights. The second featured pollution problems in the Green Bay estuary environment that is of particular value to Wisconsin and Michigan. There are 41 separate abstracts selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Four of those were also selected for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), six for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA), and two for INS.

  4. Overview of magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1994-01-01

    During the funding period for NASA Grant NAG5-1480 which prior to December, 1, 1990 was known as NASA Grant NAGW-78, the group has made substantial progress on the various topics originally proposed. The research performed has resulted in two Ph.D. Theses, more than 50 refereed papers in various journals and conference proceedings, and 31 invited and 104 contributed talks at conferences and symposia throughout the world. The main results from this work are summarized in each of the sections outlined in the original proposal, followed by a complete list of the group publications associated with this grant, a list of all invited talks given during the last three years, and finally a listing of the contributed talks. Research topics include global magnetohydrodynamic simulations, structure of the dayside magnetopause, merging at the dayside magnetopause, polar wind, plasma waves in the distant magnetotail, slow shocks in the distant magnetotail, collisionless tearing instabilities in the magnetotail, and other problems.

  5. The Associability of CVC Pairs. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, William E.; Kiess, Harold O.

    To obtain an a priori estimate of natural language mediators (NLM's) 320 pairs of words with the consonant-vowel-consonant-pattern (CVC's) were broken into four series of 90 pairs and presented to 240 male and female undergraduates. Pairs were shown for 15 seconds while the subjects wrote down any associative device or NLM they could generate that…

  6. Organising Continuity and Quality of the European Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochems, Wim; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Research associations tend to be voluntary by nature and therefore unstable in character, and thus are subject to threat for their continuity. History has shown that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) is not an exception to this rule. Because EERA Council and the board members are volunteers with limited time, experience and…

  7. Ethical and legal risks associated with archival research.

    PubMed

    Taube, Daniel O; Burkhardt, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Mental health facilities and practitioners commonly permit resarchers to have direct access to patients' records for the purposes of archival research without the informed consent of patient-participants. Typically these researchers have access to all information in such records as long as they agree to maintain confidentiality and remove any identifying data from subsequent research reports. Changes in the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles (American Psychological Association, 1992) raise ethical and legal issues that require consideration by practitioners, researchers, and facility Institutional Review Boards. This article addresses these issues and provides recommendations for changes in ethical standards as well as alternative avenues for conducting research using archival mental health records.

  8. Research Administrator Salary: Association with Education, Experience, Credentials and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.; Triscari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Research Administrators Stress Perception Survey (2010 RASPerS) collected data from 1,131 research administrators on salary, years experience, educational level, Certified Research Administrator (CRA) status, and gender. Using these data, comparisons were made to show how salary levels are associated with each of these variables. Using…

  9. Student Science Research Associates (SSRA) 1996 Research Journal

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.

    1996-12-01

    The following student projects are reported: SSRA water research projects, various effects on polliwogs` growth and development, effects of Willow Park Golf Course on nitrate and phosphate levels in San Leandro Creek, water quality evaluation using color infrared photography, biochemical analysis of aquatic insects, effects of miracid/calcium chloride/liquid plant food on stringless bush beans, effects of vegetable oil on bean growth, effect of river water on lima beans, effect of storm water runoff on pH and phosphate levels of Dry Creek, acid rain in Modesto, use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to study Egeria Densa, and effect of marination on formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cooked chicken meat.

  10. Research of Geochemical Associations of Nephelin Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulf, M.; Simonov, K.; Sazonov, A.

    The instant paper concerns research of distribution petrogenic chemical members in urtit ore body of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit. Rocks of the deposit are ore for producing alum earth. Actuality of the subject based on outlooks of detection noble metal ore-bearing (Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru) in alkaline rocks of Siberia, including rocks of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit (Kuznetsk Alatau). The main purpose of analysis of distribution of members is directed to detection of a non-uniformity of distribution of substance and segments enriched with alum earth and noble members. The basic solved problems are following: o Creation regression models of ore body; o Definition of cumulative distribution functions of members in a contour of ore body; o The analysis of the obtained outcomes in geologic terms. For construction regression models the full-scale data was used, which was presented by the results of the spectral and silicate analyses of gold and petrogenic members containing 130 assays arranged in ore body. A non-linear multiparameter model of the ore body based on components of nephelin ore using neural net approach was constructed. For each member the corresponding distribution function is produced. The model is constructed on the following members: Au, Al2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, R2O ((Na2O+K2O) -1) and losses of burning. The error of model forecasting membersS concentrations was from 0.02 up to 20%. Large errors basically connected with assays located near contact of ore body and ad- jacent strata or with very high concentrations of members; also they can be connected with different genesis of rocks or superposition of other processes. The analysis of concentrations of members and normalised absolute errors of the fore- cast has shown, that all members can be sectioned into two groups: first: Al2O3, SiO2, R2O, Fe2O3 and second: Au, losses of burning, CaO, MgO, SO3. The distribution of 1 gold is tightly connected with calcium and losses of burning and spatially linked with zones

  11. Summary of Symposia on Mechanized Information Services in the University Library. Final Report on Mechanized Information Services in the University Library. Phase I - Planning. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Mary L.

    A series of symposia were conducted to provide forums for discussion of the problems arising when introducing into the single campus university library media which can be processed by computers. The first symposium "xplored the relationship between the university library and national network systems. The second concerned the relationship of…

  12. Stabilizing Indigenous Languages. Perspectives: Center for Excellence in Education Monograph Series. [Proceedings of Two Symposia (Flagstaff, Arizona, November 1994 and May 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantoni, Gina, Ed.

    In November 1994 and May 1995, two symposia on stabilizing indigenous languages were attended by U.S. and Canadian tribal educators and experts on linguistics, language renewal, and language teaching. Participants sought to lay out a blueprint of policy changes, educational reforms, and community initiatives to stabilize and revitalize American…

  13. The Creation of the European Social Work Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian J.; Sharland, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    As the social work profession matures, the need for robust knowledge becomes more pressing. Greater coordination is required to develop the research community and an infrastructure to support this nationally and internationally. This article discusses the foundation, in 2014, of the European Social Work Research Association and its roots in the…

  14. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program

    SciTech Connect

    Posey Eddy, F.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program (MURA) encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In this program, undergraduate students work with principal investigators at their universities to perform research projects on solar technology. Then, students are awarded summer internships in industry or at national laboratories, such as NREL, during the summer. Because of its success, the program has been expanded to include additional minority-serving colleges and universities and all solar energy technologies.

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

    The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry in…

  16. Children's understanding of the risks and benefits associated with research

    PubMed Central

    Burke, T; Abramovitch, R; Zlotkin, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the current study was to maximise the amount of information children and adolescents understand about the risks and benefits associated with participation in a biomedical research study. Design: Participants were presented with one of six hypothetical research protocols describing how to fix a fractured thigh using either a "standard" cast or "new" pins procedure. Risks and benefits associated with each of the treatment options were manipulated so that for each one of the six protocols there was either a correct or ambiguous choice. Participants and setting: Two hundred and fifty one children, ages 6–15 (53% boys), and 237 adults (30% men) were interviewed while waiting for a clinic appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children. Results: Using standardised procedures and questionnaires, it was determined that most participants, regardless of age group, were able to understand the basic purpose and procedures involved in the research, and most were able to choose the "correct" operation. The younger children, however, showed an overall preference for a cast operation, whereas the older participants were more likely to choose the pins. Conclusions: By creating age appropriate modules of information, children as young as six years can understand potentially difficult and complex concepts such as the risks and benefits associated with participation in biomedical research. It appears, however, that different criteria were used for treatment preference, regardless of associated risks; older participants tended to opt for mobility (the pins procedure) whereas younger participants stayed with the more familiar cast operation. PMID:16319237

  17. American Educational Research Association Paper Abstracts, 1967 Annual Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Ellis B., Ed.

    This document contains abstracts of approximately 300 papers presented at the 1967 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. A sampling of the varied subjects covered includes: dynamics of the school board role, concept learning, programed instruction, administrative behavior and organizational characteristics, correlates of…

  18. Visibility of Diversity within Association of Research Libraries Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mestre, Lori S.

    2011-01-01

    Libraries in the United States have worked towards developing more inclusive environments and programs. This inclusiveness should also extend to the online library presence. This article provides results of a web page scan of all Association of Research Libraries (ARL) in the United States to document the visibility of diversity on their pages. A…

  19. Association of Researcher Characteristics with Views on Return of Incidental Findings from Genomic Research.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Julia; Martinez, Josue; Duong, Jimmy; Zhang, Yuan; Phelan, Jo; Fyer, Abby; Klitzman, Robert; Appelbaum, Paul S; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-10-01

    Whole exome/ genome sequencing (WES/WGS) is now commonly used in research and is increasingly used in clinical care to identify the genetic basis of rare and unknown diseases. The management of incidental findings (IFs) generated through these analyses is debated within the research community. To examine how views regarding genomic research IFs are associated with researcher characteristics and experiences, we surveyed genetic professionals and assessed the effect of professional background and experience on their opinions. Researchers who did not have clinical training, provide clinical care to research participants, or have prior experience returning research results were in general more inclined to offer return of IFs than their colleagues with these characteristics. Understanding this will be important to fully appreciate the impact that policies on return of genetic IFs could have on participants, researchers, and genomic research.

  20. Association of researcher characteristics with views on return of incidental findings from genomic research

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Julia; Martinez, Josue; Duong, Jimmy; Zhang, Yuan; Phelan, Jo; Fyer, Abby; Klitzman, Robert; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) is now commonly used in research and is increasingly used in clinical care to identify the genetic basis of rare and unknown diseases. The management of incidental findings (IFs) generated through these analyses is debated within the research community. To examine how views regarding genomic research IFs are associated with researcher characteristics and experiences, we surveyed genetic professionals and assessed the effect of professional background and experience on their opinions. Researchers who did not have clinical training, provide clinical care to research participants, or have prior experience returning research results were in general more inclined to offer return of IFs than their colleagues with these characteristics. Understanding this will be important to fully appreciate the impact that policies on return of genetic IFs could have on participants, researchers, and genomic research. PMID:25592144

  1. Common Challenges for Ecological Modelling: Synthesis of Facilitated Discussions Held at the Symposia Organized for the Conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada (October 6-9, 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposia organized for the conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the subjects could be classified into three b...

  2. Research Note--Online Dissemination of Research: Are Professional Associations Making the Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borah, Elisa Vinson; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and practical means of disseminating research to social workers are needed. The authors examined how 10 social work and 10 other helping profession association websites used their sites to disseminate research to their members. A rubric was used to rate the websites in 4 domains: (1) promotion, (2) accessibility, (3) dissemination, and…

  3. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  4. Glycosaminoglycans: anticoagulant and nonanticoagulant actions: a short history of symposia held at villa vigoni.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Job; Casu, Benito; Krämer, Roland; Torri, Giangiacomo; Naggi, Annamaria; Krämer, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide belonging to the family of glycosaminoglycans, was discovered in the beginning of the 20th century and was initially identified as a procoagulant isolated from liver tissue. After the first application in patients approximately 30 years later, further purification identified the major as well as minor, but important, component units of the complex chain mixtures constituting heparin and the multiplex actions became a scientific challenge recently. A series of "Glycosaminoglycan symposium-anticoagulant and nonanticoagulant actions" developed over the past 20 years and focused on this topic has published research data in three issues of Seminars in Thrombosis & Hemostasis and in several other international scientific journals. The latest developments on the methods of analysis, the synthesis, the degradation by heparanases and the nonanticoagulant effects in tumor growth, in anti-inflammatory diseases, and in Alzheimer diseases as presented in the 21st symposium are summarized in the present overview on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the journal with special reference to the journal's founding Editor in Chief, Eberhard F. Mammen.

  5. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  6. Travel Grants to IUGGA-Associated Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, M. A.

    The procedures and policies for AGU travel grants to attend IUGG-associated symposia is presented, including information on the nomination of the reviewing committee, the selection criteria, and examples of a few of the headaches and problems encountered in the selection process. A suggested “application etiquette” is also given.

  7. The International Permafrost Association: current initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Lewkowicz, Antoni G.; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Lantuit, Hugues; Schrott, Lothar; Sergeev, Dimitry; Wei, Ma

    2015-04-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details the IPA core products, achievements and activities as well as current projects in cryospheric research. One of the most important core products is the circumpolar permafrost map. The IPA also fosters and supports the activities of the Global Terrestrial Network on Permafrost (GTN-P) sponsored by the Global Terrestrial Observing System, GTOS, and the Global Climate Observing System, GCOS, whose long-term goal is to obtain a comprehensive view of the spatial structure, trends, and variability of changes in the active layer thickness and permafrost temperature. A further important initiative of the IPA are the biannually competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Current IPA Action Groups are working on highly topical and interdisciplinary issues, such as the development of a regional Palaeo-map of Permafrost in Eurasia, the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge about the use of thermokarst and permafrost

  8. Research Update: The USDA-ARS-Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation/manuscript provide a brief summary of beef cattle feeding-related research conducted at the USDA-ARS-Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, over the past four years. It summarizes data that has been published in scientific journals, in symposia and confer...

  9. Association of a Biweekly Research Workgroup With Enhanced Resident Research Productivity.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Melissa; Reynolds, R Kevin; Uppal, Shitanshu; McLean, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Almost all residency programs require a resident research project, yet teaching and mentoring of the required skills are often lacking. We established an every-other-week gynecologic oncology research workgroup at our institution for obstetrics and gynecology faculty, fellows, and residents with the goal of increasing resident research education, involvement, and productivity. An informal, discussion-style format was adopted as a forum for brainstorming research ideas, formulating study protocols, and collaborating on institutional review board submissions. Additional aims included editorial feedback on abstracts and manuscripts as well as oral presentation preparation. The academic productivity of trainees mentored by the gynecologic oncology division was queried for 27 months before and 27 months after workgroup initiation, specifically assessing resident involvement in institutional review board submission, abstract presentation, and manuscript preparation. Institution of our workgroup was associated with a dramatic increase in resident research output, including manuscript preparation and presentations at national meetings. We describe our experience because it may benefit other residency programs wishing to improve both resident research education and productivity. PMID:27500350

  10. Chemistry without Borders: Careers, Research, and Entrepreneurship

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is based on two symposia of the American Chemical Society (ACS): 1) “The Transnational Practice of Chemistry and Allied Sciences and Engineering: Study, Research and Careers without Borders” held at the Spring National Meeting in Denver in March 2015, and 2) “International Entrepreneurship...

  11. Landfalling Tropical Cyclones: Forecast Problems and Associated Research Opportunities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, F.D.; Shay, L.K.; Barnes, G.; Black, P.; Demaria, M.; McCaul, B.; Mounari, J.; Montgomery, M.; Powell, M.; Smith, J.D.; Tuleya, B.; Tripoli, G.; Xie, Lingtian; Zehr, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Fifth Prospectus Development Team of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged to identify and delineate emerging research opportunities relevant to the prediction of local weather, flooding, and coastal ocean currents associated with landfalling U.S. hurricanes specifically, and tropical cyclones in general. Central to this theme are basic and applied research topics, including rapid intensity change, initialization of and parameterization in dynamical models, coupling of atmospheric and oceanic models, quantitative use of satellite information, and mobile observing strategies to acquire observations to evaluate and validate predictive models. To improve the necessary understanding of physical processes and provide the initial conditions for realistic predictions, a focused, comprehensive mobile observing system in a translating storm-coordinate system is required. Given the development of proven instrumentation and improvement of existing systems, three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic datasets need to be acquired whenever major hurricanes threaten the United States. The spatial context of these focused three-dimensional datasets over the storm scales is provided by satellites, aircraft, expendable probes released from aircraft, and coastal (both fixed and mobile), moored, and drifting surface platforms. To take full advantage of these new observations, techniques need to be developed to objectively analyze these observations, and initialize models aimed at improving prediction of hurricane track and intensity from global-scale to mesoscale dynamical models. Multinested models allow prediction of all scales from the global, which determine long- term hurricane motion to the convective scale, which affect intensity. Development of an integrated analysis and model forecast system optimizing the use of three-dimensional observations and providing the necessary forecast skill on all relevant spatial scales is required. Detailed diagnostic analyses of these

  12. Supporting medical education research quality: the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical Education Research Certificate program.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D; Yoder, Ernie; Frye, Ann; Perkowski, Linda C; Mavis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the medical education research (MER) reported in the literature has been frequently criticized. Numerous reasons have been provided for these shortcomings, including the level of research training and experience of many medical school faculty. The faculty development required to improve MER can take various forms. This article describes the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program, a national faculty development program that focuses exclusively on MER. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and led by a committee of established medical education researchers from across the United States, the MERC program is built on a set of 11 interactive workshops offered at various times and places across the United States. MERC participants can customize the program by selecting six workshops from this set to fulfill requirements for certification. This article describes the history, operations, current organization, and evaluation of the program. Key elements of the program's success include alignment of program content and focus with needs identified by prospective users, flexibility in program organization and logistics to fit participant schedules, an emphasis on practical application of MER principles in the context of the participants' activities and interests, consistency in program content and format to ensure standards of quality, and a sustainable financial model. The relationship between the national MERC program and local faculty development initiatives is also described. The success of the MERC program suggests that it may be a possible model for nationally disseminated faculty development programs in other domains.

  13. Determining the factors associated with health research participation.

    PubMed

    Gucciardi, Enza; Di Liao, Chen; Cameron, Jill I

    2010-01-01

    This study explores factors and attitudes that affect willingness to participate in health research in an ambulatory population of 175 individuals. Respondents reported on their sociodemographic characteristics and rated statements on a questionnaire regarding their likelihood to participate in and attitudes toward health research. Multivariate ordinal regression analysis revealed that having more positive and less negative attitudes toward health research, access to the Internet, previous participation experience, higher education, and being Canadian-born contribute to a greater willingness to participate in health research. Understanding factors that influence research participation can help identify and direct efforts to improve research volunteer recruitment. PMID:20539155

  14. Implicit measure for yoga research: Yoga implicit association test

    PubMed Central

    Ilavarasu, Judu V; Rajesh, Sasidharan K; Hankey, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Context: The implicit association test (IAT), a new tool for yoga research is presented. Implicit measures could be used in those situations where (1) The construct is difficult to self-report, (2) there is a threat of social desirability. Clinically, we can assess cognitive dissonance by evaluating incongruence between implicit and explicit measures. Explicit preferences are self-reported. Implicit preferences are what we inherently believe, often without our conscious awareness. Aims: The primary objective of this study is to provide a bird's eye view of the field, implicit cognition, with emphasis on the IAT and the secondary objective is to illustrate through an example of our study to develop an implicit tool to assess implicit preference toward yoga. Settings and Design: A total of 5 independent samples of total 69 students undergoing short and long-term yoga courses in a Yoga University were assessed for their implicit and explicit preferences towards yoga. Materials and Methods: The yoga-IAT (Y-IAT), explicit self-rating scale was administered through computers using the Inquisit program by Millisecond Software. Experimental and scoring materials are provided. Results: A moderate preference toward yoga was detected, with a lower implicit-explicit congruence, reflecting possible confound of social desirability in the self-report of preference toward yoga. Conclusions: Implicit measures may be used in the yoga field to assess constructs, which are difficult to self-report or may have social desirability threat. Y-IAT may be used to evaluate implicit preference toward yoga. PMID:25035621

  15. Book Review: The history of the Quaternary Research Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    This is a book that should be in the library of every member of the QRA as well as their institutions. This volume is a celebration of 50 years of the Quaternary Studies Field Group (1964), which was renamed the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) in 1969. What follows is a combination of a review with some further information based on the recollection of someone who was there. In examining the origins of the QSFG due credit is paid to Richard Hey and Richard West, but an inexplicable omission is the earlier discussion between Hey, Allan Straw and others during the field meeting of the Yorkshire Geological Society in September 1962 (Worsley, 2014). It is said that history is always written by the victors, or in modern parlance by those who write the minutes! But, in the writing of history there are only degrees of unsuccess. In Chapter 2 John Catt comments on the less than perfect early archival records of the QRA. So it is to his credit that 50 years of archival material has been diligently sifted and edited. In this he was assisted by memories of some named QRA members who are thanked. Wider consultation may have filled some of the gaps. At earlier meetings it was always a pleasure to greet long retired colleagues, such as Archie Lamont at the Carlops glacial drainage system when being demonstrated by Brian Sissons in 1966, or Tony Farringdon at Ballycotton Bay in 1968, or Hallam Movius in 1971 at a London discussion meeting. Similarly, who can forget the field meeting at Canterbury in 1967 when Alec Skempton demonstrated the Sevenoaks by-pass late-glacial slope failures, and John Hutchinson's use of Pomatias elegans for dating the Folkestone Warren landslips? Jan Mangerud's first QRA meeting on the Isle of Man (1971) was notable for his prescient recognition of glaciomarine deposits.

  16. Factors Associated with Research Productivity of Agricultural Education Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotrlik, Joe W.; Bartlett, James E., II; Higgins, Chadwick C.; Williams, Heather A.

    2002-01-01

    Factors influencing the research productivity of full-time agriculture professors (n=114) included the following: number of doctoral students advised to completion, self-perceptions of research confidence, and number of graduate assistant hours allocated. Not influential were percent of time on research, salary, age, gender, rank, or years in…

  17. Common challenges for ecological modelling: Synthesis of facilitated discussions held at the symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eleven symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) held in Quebec City, Canada, October 6-9, 2009, included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the s...

  18. Sea Education Association's sailing research vessels as innovative platforms for long-term research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, P.; Carruthers, E. A.; Engels, M.; Goodwin, D.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Lea, C.; Schell, J.; Siuda, A.; Witting, J.; Zettler, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sea Education Association's (SEA) two research vessels, the SSV Corwith Cramer and the SSV Robert C. Seamans are unique in the research world. Not only do these ships perform advanced research using state of the art equipment, they do so under sail with high school, undergraduate, and graduate students serving as both the science team and the crew. Because of SEA's educational mission and reliance on prevailing winds for sailing, the vessels have been studying repeated tracks for decades, providing valuable long-term data sets while educating future marine scientists. The Corwith Cramer has been collecting data in the North Atlantic between New England, the Sargasso Sea, Bermuda, and the Caribbean since 1987 while the Robert C. Seamans has been operating in the Eastern Pacific between the US West Coast, Hawaii, and French Polynesia since 2001. The ships collect continuous electronic data from hull mounted ADCP, chirp, and a clean flowing seawater system logging temperature, salinity, in-vivo chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, and beam attenuation. The ships also periodically collect data from profiling CTDs with chlorophyll and CDOM fluorometers, transmissometers, and dissolved oxygen and PAR sensors. In addition to electronic data, archived long term data sets include physical samples from net tows such as marine plastic debris and tar, and plankton including Halobates (a marine insect), leptocephali (eel larvae), and phyllosoma (spiny lobster larvae). Both vessels are 134' brigantine rig tall ships and are designated sailing school vessels (SSV) by the US Coast Guard, and both have received instrumentation grants from NSF to provide high quality, reliable data that is submitted to the NSF R2R archives. Students sailing on these ships spend time on shore at the SEA campus in Woods Hole, MA taking classes in oceanography, nautical science, maritime studies and public policy. Each student is required to write a proposal for their research before heading to sea, and

  19. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  20. The 159th national meeting of the American Association for the advancement of science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This volume is the program/abstracts for the 1993 national meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The meeting was held in Boston from 11-16 February 1993. Symposia dealt with works on the following topics; perspectives on human genetics; confronting AIDS; biology, cells bugs; medical research society; social psychology neuroscience; future chemistry, from carbon to silicon; measuring the matter energy of the universe; earth's ever-changing atmosphere; causing coping with environmental change; agricultural biotechnology, plant protection production; science corporate enterprise; examining reforming the economic system; science, ethics the law; communicating science to the public; information technology the changing face of science; mathematics, concepts computations; international cooperation human survival; science for everyone; science religion, examining both; anthropology, dynamics of human history; international science issues; improving formal science education; and science education reform in America. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this volume.

  1. Faculty Research Productivity: Some Moderators of Associated Stressors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; Bently, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    A study with 894 college faculty investigated the effects of certain stress variables on different kinds of faculty research activity; psychological and organizational variables thought to moderate stress; and the effects of stressors and moderators for gender, institution type, and discipline (humanities, social sciences, natural sciences)…

  2. Weak associations in epidemiological research: some examples and their interpretation.

    PubMed

    Florey, C D

    1988-12-01

    The study of the epidemiology of chronic non-infectious diseases grew rapidly after the Second World War. In the early 1950s strong associations were found in studies based on hypotheses derived from clinical, demographic and animal observations. The associations between smoking and lung cancer, physical exercise and myocardial infarction, and air pollution and mortality all led to more than three decades of epidemiological endeavour to refine our understanding of the initial observations. As the large effects were discovered, new associations were perforce of smaller magnitude. The benefits of milk supplements to the diet of school-age children was elegantly shown in an MRC trial in 1920s using small numbers of deprived children, whereas in the 1970s, when the population's nutrition was vastly improved, many thousands of children were needed to give an answer. The impact of passive smoking on cancer incidence, on children's health and on pregnancy is a current debate because of the vanishingly small effects. Studies of the relation between alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the outcome of pregnancy has given rise to conflicting findings so that clear cut scientifically based recommendations cannot be given to social drinkers. The demands of governments for epidemiological evidence on which to base standards for pollutants in the air, water and ground, has resulted in the need for multiple studies using different techniques to suggest whether or not an association between health and exposure exists. These examples are used to illustrate the difficulties of interpretation of epidemiological studies when the effects of suspected risk factors are small.

  3. Defining Educational Research: A Perspective of/on Presidential Addresses and the Australian Association for Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Gale, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the definition of the field of educational research and the changing and developing role of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) in representing and constituting this field. The evidence for the argument is derived from AARE Presidential Addresses across its 40-year history. The paper documents…

  4. Alternative Research Perspectives on the Effects of School Organization and Social Contexts. An American Education Research Association Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, James M.; McDill, Edward L.

    This report was prepared as part of the School Organization Program, a program focusing on authority-control structures, task structures, reward systems, and peer group processes in schools. It contains five papers delivered at an American Education Research Association Symposium. The papers examine current research on the effects of school…

  5. A Retrospective Appraisal of 15 Years' Proceedings of the Hungarian Research Student Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Tamas; Olah, Mate

    2013-01-01

    In 1996 the Hungarian Research Student Association (HRSA) was founded. Since then more than 6000 young, talented researchers have belonged to the Association. The founders set two principal aims: (1) to support the gifted and the most promising high school students and (2) to establish an active community. The movement has grown through the work…

  6. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  7. 76 FR 23537 - Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations and Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations... announces an updated computation for assessments received by importer associations under the Hass Avocado... consumption of Hass avocados in the United States. A state association receives 85 percent of the...

  8. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  9. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  10. [Proceeding and Abstracts of the 1994 National Marine Educators Association Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigsby, Michael, Ed.; Tooker, Lisa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This bulletin contains the proceedings and 54 abstracts for symposia, workshops and contributed papers of the 1994 National Marine Educators Association Conference (Knoxville, Tennessee, August 8-11, 1994). Some of the topics covered in conference abstracts include: (1) elementary physical, chemical, and biological labs and curriculum; (2)…

  11. First reported fatalities associated with the 'research chemical' 2-methoxydiphenidine.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon P; Brandt, Simon D; Wallach, Jason; Morris, Hamilton; Kavanagh, Pierce V

    2015-05-01

    2-Methoxydiphenidine, i.e. 1-[1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl]piperidine, also known as 'MXP' or '2-MeO-diphenidine' (or 2-MXP), has been available as a 'research chemical' since 2013 as a purported alternative to the 'dissociative anesthetics' methoxetamine and ketamine. Three deaths which involved the detection of 2-MXP in post-mortem blood and urine were encountered in forensic casework. The 2-, 3- and 4-methoxyphenyl positional isomers were synthesized to confirm the identity and concentration of 2-MXP. The 2-MXP femoral blood concentrations in the cases were found to be 24.0, 2.0 and 1.36 mg/L (the latter with an alternative cause of death). Some additional prescription drugs were encountered at therapeutic concentrations in all three cases. Analysis of the biofluids allowed the detection and characterization of various metabolites, including the suggested presence of hydroxy-2-MXP as the main metabolite with the hydroxyl group located on the piperidine rather than the phenyl or benzyl moiety. Additional metabolites included O-desmethyl-2-MXP and hydroxylated O-desmethyl-2-MXP. Diphenidine and hydroxy-diphenidine, also showing the presence of the hydroxyl group on the piperidine ring, were also detected. It was not possible to identify whether these arose from 2-MXP biotransformation or whether they represented the presence of diphenidine as a separate substance. These are the first published fatalities involving 2-MXP and presents analytical data to assist analytical toxicologists with future casework.

  12. Transforming Catholic Education through Research: The American Educational Research Association Catholic Education Special Interest Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Catholic schools in the United States and abroad face numerous financial, cultural, and structural challenges due to contemporary education policies and economic trends. Within this climate, research about Catholic education is often conducted and leveraged in efforts to serve schools' most immediate needs. To be certain, research aimed at…

  13. Becoming a Researcher: Forms of Capital Associated with "Research Capacity" Trajectories of Young British Social Anthropologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The paper privileges the "voices" of British social anthropologists examining their perceptions of how their research expertise was acquired. Reference is made to the case of education research in Britain, which, by comparison with social anthropology, reveals limited capacity as measured through performance audits of scientific research…

  14. Integrating Human Resources and Technology. Proceedings of the Association for Institutional Research Forum (Toronto, Canada, May 23-26, 1983). Association for Institutional Research 1983-1984 Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Daniel R., Ed.

    Abstracts and four papers from the 1983 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum on integrating human resources and technology are presented. AIR membership and organizational information are also provided. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "It Ain't All Bad" (Dean F. Berkley); "Technological Innovation and Strategies for…

  15. Proceedings: Eighteenth Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education, Washington, D.C., November 6-7, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah L., Comp.

    The Research in Medical Education (RIME) Program Planning Committee's selections for program materials for the eighteenth annual conference on Research in Medical Education are contained in this volume. The agenda consisted of poster sessions, presentation of papers, and presentation of symposia. Poster sessions examined such topics as student…

  16. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA). The conference on FDA's clinical trial requirements is... relationships among FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards...

  17. Self-Regulation of a Chiropractic Association through Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Lorraine A.; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Crowe, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) can be used in the health professions to redefine their roles. This study investigated a small health professional group, the members of The Chiropractic Association Singapore (TCAS), by using a PAR method; researchers and participants gained insights into the self-regulation of a health profession. A…

  18. Longitudinal Associations among Undergraduates' Research Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robnett, Rachael D.; Chemers, Martin M.; Zurbriggen, Eileen L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that undergraduates tend to identify more strongly with the field of science after participating in scientific research. However, mediators that might account for this association are not well understood. In the current study, we propose that science self-efficacy may serve this mediational function. Specifically, data from a…

  19. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Education Research Association.

    This document contains 14 research paper presentations and 5 "mini-tips" from the 1998 American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The first section includes three papers on international and distance education: "Determining Success of Vocational Students Enrolled in Distance Education Courses" (Michael K. Swan,…

  20. Annual Adult Education Research Conference. Proceedings (20th, Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 4-6, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    Papers from numerous research areas in the adult education field are presented. The proceedings contain thirty-five papers, five symposia, one alternate symposium, and eighteen alternate papers. Among the papers included are "A Comparison of Approaches to Measuring Outcomes in Adult Basic Education,""A Critical Analysis of Hill's 'Cognitive Style…

  1. Helping early career research scientists ascend the professional ladder.

    PubMed

    King, Laina

    2013-08-01

    The Keystone Symposia Early Career Investigator Travel Award initiative is a unique successful research mentoring program tailored for 'end of the pipeline' life and biomedical scientists from academia and industry. Using targeted educational, mentoring, and networking activities, the program benefits early career scientists in solving a specific laboratory-based research question that is limiting their evolving research and could increase their ability to obtain new grants and improve their career progression. PMID:23889774

  2. Personality Traits Are Associated with Research Misbehavior in Dutch Scientists: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Tijdink, Joeri K.; Bouter, Lex M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Wicherts, Jelte M.; Smulders, Yvo M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Personality influences decision making and ethical considerations. Its influence on the occurrence of research misbehavior has never been studied. This study aims to determine the association between personality traits and self-reported questionable research practices and research misconduct. We hypothesized that narcissistic, Machiavellianistic and psychopathic traits as well as self-esteem are associated with research misbehavior. Methods Included in this cross-sectional study design were 535 Dutch biomedical scientists (response rate 65%) from all hierarchical layers of 4 university medical centers in the Netherlands. We used validated personality questionnaires such as the Dark Triad (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism), Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, the Publication Pressure Questionnaire (PPQ), and also demographic and job-specific characteristics to investigate the association of personality traits with a composite research misbehavior severity score. Findings Machiavellianism was positively associated (beta 1.28, CI 1.06–1.53) with self-reported research misbehavior, while narcissism, psychopathy and self-esteem were not. Exploratory analysis revealed that narcissism and research misconduct were more severe among persons in higher academic ranks (i.e., professors) (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively), and self-esteem scores and publication pressure were lower (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively) as compared to postgraduate PhD fellows. Conclusions Machiavellianism may be a risk factor for research misbehaviour. Narcissism and research misbehaviour were more prevalent among biomedical scientists in higher academic positions. These results suggest that personality has an impact on research behavior and should be taken into account in fostering responsible conduct of research. PMID:27684371

  3. The Ninth Annual American Association for Cancer Research International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Wang, Sophia S.; Healey, Megan A.; Faupel-Badger, Jessica M.; Wilken, Jason A.; Battaglia, Tracy; Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2016-01-01

    The Ninth Annual AACR Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research conference was held in Philadelphia in November 7–10, 2010. Its thematic focus was “Prevention: From Basic Science to Public Health Benefit.” Telomere plasticity, the microenvironment, inflammation, transformation to the metastatic phenotype, and pathways to obesity were highlighted as important elements of carcinogenesis amenable to intervention. The integration of information from novel technologies related to physical biology, molecular and genetic profiles, and imaging along with behavioral and clinical parameters have advanced risk stratification and early detection. Cancer prevention represents a powerful testing ground for the development of individually tailored intervention and for increasing the efficiency of drug discovery. Advances in clinical trials relate to more efficient design strategies, have shown first-in-human targeting capabilities, and have developed powerful strategies to overcome accrual barriers. Tailored intervention strategies now show high efficacy on large cohorts across several cancer types. These successes are expected to increase. PMID:21464034

  4. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective manner. The program began on June 1, 1980 with funding to support several Research Associates each year. 113 awards, plus 1 from an independently supported minority component were made for the Research Associates program. The program was changed from a one year award with a possibility for renewal to a two year award. In 1999, the decision was made by NASA to discontinue the program due to development of new priorities for funding. This grant was discontinued because of the move of the Program Director to a new institution; a new grant was provided to that new institution to allow completion of the training of the remaining 2 research associates in 1999. After 1999, the program will be discontinued.

  5. Unpacking capacity to utilize research: A tale of the Burkina Faso public health association.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Nadia; Schrecker, Ted

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in addressing global health is for institutions to monitor and use research in policy-making. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), civil society organizations such as health professional associations can be key contributors to effective national health systems. However, there is little empirical data on their capacity to use research. This case study was used to gain insight into the factors that affect the knowledge translation performance of health professional associations in LMICs by describing the organizational elements and processes constituting capacity to use research, and examining the potential determinants of this capacity. Case study methodology was chosen for its flexibility to capture the multiple and often tacit processes within organizational routines. The Burkina Faso Public Health Association (ABSP) was studied, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews and key documents review. Five key dimensions that affect the association's capacity to use research to influence health policy emerged: organizational motivation; catalysts; organizational capacity to acquire and organizational capacity to transform research findings; moderating organizational factors. Also examined were the dissemination strategies used by ABSP and its abilities to enhance its capacity through networking, to advocate for more relevant research and to develop its potential role as knowledge broker, as well as limitations due to scarce resources. We conclude that a better understanding of the organizational capacity to use research of health professional associations in LMICs is needed to assess, improve and reinforce such capacity. Increased knowledge translation potential may leverage research resources and promote knowledge-sharing.

  6. Unpacking capacity to utilize research: A tale of the Burkina Faso public health association.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Nadia; Schrecker, Ted

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in addressing global health is for institutions to monitor and use research in policy-making. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), civil society organizations such as health professional associations can be key contributors to effective national health systems. However, there is little empirical data on their capacity to use research. This case study was used to gain insight into the factors that affect the knowledge translation performance of health professional associations in LMICs by describing the organizational elements and processes constituting capacity to use research, and examining the potential determinants of this capacity. Case study methodology was chosen for its flexibility to capture the multiple and often tacit processes within organizational routines. The Burkina Faso Public Health Association (ABSP) was studied, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews and key documents review. Five key dimensions that affect the association's capacity to use research to influence health policy emerged: organizational motivation; catalysts; organizational capacity to acquire and organizational capacity to transform research findings; moderating organizational factors. Also examined were the dissemination strategies used by ABSP and its abilities to enhance its capacity through networking, to advocate for more relevant research and to develop its potential role as knowledge broker, as well as limitations due to scarce resources. We conclude that a better understanding of the organizational capacity to use research of health professional associations in LMICs is needed to assess, improve and reinforce such capacity. Increased knowledge translation potential may leverage research resources and promote knowledge-sharing. PMID:21074923

  7. Misconduct in research: a descriptive survey of attitudes, perceptions and associated factors in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Misconduct in research tarnishes the reputation, credibility and integrity of research institutions. Studies on research or scientific misconduct are still novel in developing countries. In this study, we report on the attitudes, perceptions and factors related to the work environment thought to be associated with research misconduct in a group of researchers in Nigeria - a developing country. Method A survey of researchers attending a scientific conference was done using an adapted Scientific Misconduct Questionnaire-Revised (SMQ-R). Initial descriptive analysis of individual items using frequencies and proportions for all quantitative data was performed. Thereafter, Likert scale responses were transformed into dichotomous responses. Fisher exact test was performed for associations as appropriate. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was accepted as significant. Result Half of the respondents (50.4%) were aware of a colleague who had committed misconduct, defined as “non-adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms”. Over 88% of the researchers were concerned about the perceived amount of misconduct prevalent in their institution and 96.2% believed that one or more forms of scientific misconduct had occurred in their workplace. More than half (52.7%) rated the severity of penalties for scientific misconduct in their work environment as low. Furthermore¸ the majority (56.1%) were of the view that the chance of getting caught for scientific misconduct in their work environment was low. Conclusion Researchers in Nigeria perceive that scientific misconduct is commonplace in their institutions, but are however worried about the negative effects of scientific misconduct on the credibility of scientific research. We recommend that researchers be empowered with the knowledge and virtues necessary for self-regulation that advance research integrity. Research institutions should however also step into their

  8. Institutional Profile: Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P

    2012-03-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international nonprofit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several national/ethnic genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine on society in various countries. Educational activities also include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia(®), which are high-profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts.

  9. Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory as a framework for research on personality-psychopathology associations.

    PubMed

    Bijttebier, Patricia; Beck, Ilse; Claes, Laurence; Vandereycken, Walter

    2009-07-01

    Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) presupposes individual differences in the sensitivity of basic brain systems that respond to punishing and reinforcing stimuli. These differences are thought to underlie the personality dimensions of anxiety and impulsivity, and to have relevance for psychopathology. The present article aims at reviewing RST-based research on personality-psychopathology associations. First, RST and its revisions are described and the link between RST systems and personality dimensions is discussed. Second, studies investigating associations between RST systems and specific types of psychopathology are summarized. Although the available research yields a rather consistent picture with respect to constellations of BIS/BAS sensitivity that are associated with specific types of psychopathology, it also provides a clear indication that much work remains to be done. The discussion section highlights several topics that deserve future research attention.

  10. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  11. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  12. A Retrospective Analysis of the Annual Conference of the New England Educational Research Organization: 1969-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Citron, Heather B.

    The annual conference programs of the New England Educational Research Organization (NEERO) were examined from 1969 through 1988 to determine their content, the number of presenters, and their geographical locations as indicators of scholarly productivity. Two judges created categories for titles of papers and symposia. Merging the lists created…

  13. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2015 Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Joseph E; Basi, David; Peacock, Zachary; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Biennial Research Summit of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois on May 6 and 7, 2015. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the most recent clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. The proceedings of the events of that summit are presented in this report. PMID:26707430

  14. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  15. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    DOE PAGES

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  16. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective model.

  17. A Research on the Association of Pavement Surface Damages Using Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Tsung; Chang, Jia-Ray; Chen, Jian-Da; Chou, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Huang

    The association of pavement surface damages used to rely on the judgments of the experts. However, with the accumulation of data in the pavement surface maintenance database and the improvement of Data Mining, there are more and more methods available to explore the association of pavement surface damages. This research adopts Apriori algorithm to conduct association analysis on pavement surface damages. From the experience of experts, it has been believed that the association of road damages is complicated. However, through case studies, it has been found that pavement surface damages are caused among longitudinal cracking, alligator cracking and pen-holes, and they are unidirectional influence. In addition, with the help of association rules, it has been learned that, in pavement surface preventative maintenance, the top priority should be the repair of longitudinal cracking and alligator cracking, which can greatly reduce the occurrence of pen-holes and the risk of state compensations.

  18. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. Contribution of IADR This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. Conclusions IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease. PMID:26391001

  19. National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST). Annual Meeting (65th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 21-25, 1992). Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govindarajan, Girish, Ed.

    This product of an annual meeting presents abstracts of symposia, contributed papers, paper sets, discussion groups, reports, poster sessions, and panel presentations. Topics include: science teaching, gender differences, science education reform, constructivism, biological concepts, concept mapping, attitude/behavior change, conceptual…

  20. Competence for Children's Sake: Summary Report of a Research Project on the Child Development Associate Credential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettygrove, Willa Bowman

    This report summarizes a research project on the Child Development Associate (CDA) assessment and credentialing system. The issues covered in the report fall under two general categories: validity (the ability of the CDA assessment/credential system to identify competent child care staff) and career development potential (the benefits of the CDA…

  1. A Report on the Peace Education Commission Program, International Peace Research Association Conference 2010, Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Swee-Hin

    2010-01-01

    From July 6th to 10th, 2010, International Peace Research Association (IPRA) held its biennial conference at the University of Sydney in Australia. Hosted by the University's Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies and coordinated by Jake Lynch and a team of dedicated staff and volunteers, the conference featured seven plenary panels and many papers…

  2. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated with Community-Based Research in a Mexican-Origin Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.; Trejo, Laura; Miranda, Jeanne; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Quiter, Elaine S.; Mangione, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the recruitment strategies and personnel and materials costs associated with two community-based research studies in a Mexican-origin population. We also highlight the role that academic-community partnerships played in the outreach and recruitment process for our studies. We reviewed study documents using case study…

  3. AERA 2010 Web Communications Survey Report: "American Educational Research Association" January 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is intended to provide information to facilitate revision of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) website. All AERA members were invited to participate in an electronic survey to respond to questions about their assessments of the current website and their use of technology to access it. This report presents findings…

  4. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 48th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication was produced by the ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education in cooperation with the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) to provide abstracts of most of the papers presented at the 48th annual conference in Los Angeles, California, March 17-19, 1975. The…

  5. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 49th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication provides abstracts of papers presented at the 49th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) held in San Francisco, April 23-25, 1976. The entries represent a wide range of topics in the field of science education. The themes recurring most often are related to the fields of: (1)…

  6. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 47th Annual meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication was produced by the ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education in cooperation with the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) to provide abstracts of most of the papers presented at the NARST annual conference in Chicago, Illinois, on April 15-18, 1974. The…

  7. National Association for Research in Science Teaching, 45th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science Education, Columbus, OH.

    Abstracts of papers presented to the 45th Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching are arranged according to the topic for the session at which they were presented. Series of sessions were devoted to test and instrument development, evaluation, learning theory, verbal behavior, instructional methods and…

  8. National Association for Research in Science Teaching. 50th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication provides abstracts of papers presented at the 50th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching held in Cincinnati, Ohio March 22-24, 1977. The entries represent a wide range of topics in the field of science education. Topics include instruction, teacher education, learning, enrollments, concept…

  9. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 44th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science Education, Columbus, OH.

    Abstracts of papers presented to the 44th Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching are arranged according to the topic of the session at which they were presented. Separate sessions were devoted to elementary, secondary, junior high school, and college and university science teaching, with papers on evaluation,…

  10. The Dominance of Associative Theorizing in Implicit Attitude Research: Propositional and Behavioral Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Sean; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; De Houwer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In the present article we re-examine one of the most deeply entrenched assumptions in modern attitude research, namely, that implicit social cognition is a product of associations between mental representations. More precisely, we argue that the analysis of implicit social cognition in psychology is curtailed by the widespread adoption of the…

  11. 75 FR 44266 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... the Pharmacology Research Associate Program SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of... National Institutes of Health (NIH) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to... valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Application for the Pharmacology...

  12. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program FY 2005 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, F. P.

    2005-11-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates (MURA) Program encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In 2003, eight minority-serving institutions were awarded 3-year subcontracts that began in the summer/fall of FY 2004. This paper lists accomplishments made in the project's first phase.

  13. Factors Associated with Research Anxiety of University Human Resource Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chadwick C.; Kotrlik, Joe W.

    2006-01-01

    Factors associated with research anxiety of university faculty members in human resource educations fields were examined. Most of the participating faculty members were male and half were full professors. The mean age was 52 and all but one held a doctorate. Relationships between selected demographic characteristics and The Higgins-Kotrlik…

  14. High School Accreditation in Maine: Perceptions of Costs and Benefits. Penquis Superintendents' Association Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairman, Janet; Peirce, Brenda; Harris, Walter

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the findings of an exploratory study conducted by the Center for Research and Evaluation during the summer and fall of 2009, which focuses on perceptions of the costs and benefits of the accreditation process for high schools in Maine. The study was commissioned by the Penquis Superintendents' Association, a professional…

  15. Expanding the Epistemological Terrain: Increasing Equity and Diversity within the American Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s, the quest for civil rights by African Americans and other groups of color reverberated throughout the United States and the world, including within educational professional and research organizations, such as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Council of…

  16. Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Guidelines for Research Mentorship: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Chang, Catherine Y.; Hays, Danica G.; Pepperell, Jennifer; Spurgeon, Shawn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe guidelines endorsed by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision for research mentorship, including characteristics of mentors and mentees. Suggestions for implementing the guidelines at the individual, program, institution, and professional levels are focused on enhancing mentoring relationships as well as…

  17. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  18. The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Damianakis, Thecla; Kröger, Edeltraut; Wagner, Laura M; Dawson, Deirdre R; Binns, Malcolm A; Bernstein, Syrelle; Caspi, Eilon; Cook, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify lifestyle activities that reduce functional decline and dementia associated with population aging. The goals of this article are to review critically the evidence on the benefits associated with formal volunteering among older adults, propose a theoretical model of how volunteering may reduce functional limitations and dementia risk, and offer recommendations for future research. Database searches identified 113 papers on volunteering benefits in older adults, of which 73 were included. Data from descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective cohort studies, along with 1 randomized controlled trial, most consistently reveal that volunteering is associated with reduced symptoms of depression, better self-reported health, fewer functional limitations, and lower mortality. The extant evidence provides the basis for a model proposing that volunteering increases social, physical, and cognitive activity (to varying degrees depending on characteristics of the volunteer placement) which, through biological and psychological mechanisms, leads to improved functioning; we further propose that these volunteering-related functional improvements should be associated with reduced dementia risk. Recommendations for future research are that studies (a) include more objective measures of psychosocial, physical, and cognitive functioning; (b) integrate qualitative and quantitative methods in prospective study designs; (c) explore further individual differences in the benefits associated with volunteering; (d) include occupational analyses of volunteers' specific jobs in order to identify their social, physical, and cognitive complexity; (e) investigate the independent versus interactive health benefits associated with volunteering relative to engagement in other forms of activity; and (f) examine the relationship between volunteering and dementia risk.

  19. In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen B.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25

  20. Policy recommendations for addressing privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increased use of human biological material for cell-based research and clinical interventions poses risks to the privacy of patients and donors, including the possibility of re-identification of individuals from anonymized cell lines and associated genetic data. These risks will increase as technologies and databases used for re-identification become affordable and more sophisticated. Policies that require ongoing linkage of cell lines to donors’ clinical information for research and regulatory purposes, and existing practices that limit research participants’ ability to control what is done with their genetic data, amplify the privacy concerns. Discussion To date, the privacy issues associated with cell-based research and interventions have not received much attention in the academic and policymaking contexts. This paper, arising out of a multi-disciplinary workshop, aims to rectify this by outlining the issues, proposing novel governance strategies and policy recommendations, and identifying areas where further evidence is required to make sound policy decisions. The authors of this paper take the position that existing rules and norms can be reasonably extended to address privacy risks in this context without compromising emerging developments in the research environment, and that exceptions from such rules should be justified using a case-by-case approach. In developing new policies, the broader framework of regulations governing cell-based research and related areas must be taken into account, as well as the views of impacted groups, including scientists, research participants and the general public. Summary This paper outlines deliberations at a policy development workshop focusing on privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions. The paper provides an overview of these challenges, followed by a discussion of key themes and recommendations that emerged from discussions at the workshop. The paper concludes that

  1. Factors influencing clinical students' perceptions of an embedded research project and associated publication output.

    PubMed

    Weller, Renate; May, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe student perceptions of the value of a short, compulsory research project embedded in a clinical degree program, the research output in terms of publications, and the factors influencing this. It was hypothesized that student attitudes toward the project, student perceptions of how much the project contributed to their generic skills, and the number of publications submitted or prepared for submission would be associated with perceived quality of supervision, perceived difficulty of the project, career plans, and attitude before commencement of the project. We explored this using a questionnaire comprising 30 questions that included demographics, Likert scales, and categorical responses. Student attitudes toward research were found to be associated with student attitude before the start of the project, perceived difficulty of the project, perceived quality of supervision, and perceived relevance to the profession. Students thought that the research project contributed most to the skills of "information gathering" and "critical evaluation" and the least to "teamwork," "problem solving," and "oral communication." Research output was significantly linked to perceived quality of supervision and the help students received with data analysis and data collection, though not with the project report itself. In conclusion, although the success of the research project was influenced by many factors, the perceived quality of supervision influenced all three outcome measures. Therefore it is clear that optimization of this aspect offers the most scope for enhancing the student learning experience.

  2. Languages Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: A Response to the 2011 Research Centre for Languages and Cultures RCLC Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    The Research Centre for Languages and Cultures (RCLC) at the University of South Australia hosts an annual symposium on current issues related to languages and language education. The hallmark of the RCLC symposia is that they intend to raise critical, current issues in the languages field for wider debate, include presenting cutting edge research…

  3. Motivation to Work: How to Sustain a Research Career in Higher Education: A Summary of the 2011 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. James R. Austin, Professor of Music Education and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder, was the guest speaker for the 2011 Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee's Graduate Research Forum held in conjunction with the annual OMEA Professional Development Conference. During his…

  4. Overview of Innovative PMI Research on NSTX-U and Associated PMI Facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, M. Jaworski, R. Kaita, C. N. Skinner, J.P. Allain, R. Maingi, F. Scotti, V.A. Soukhanovskii, and the NSTX-U Team

    2012-09-19

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTXU, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. With ~ 15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2 . To support the PMI research, a comprehensive set of PMI diagnostic tools are being implemented. The snow-flake configuration can produce exceptionally high divertor flux expansion of up to ~ 50. Combined with the radiative divertor concept, the snow-flake configuration has reduced the divertor heat flux by an order of magnitude in NSTX. Another area of active PMI investigation is the effect of divertor lithium coating (both in solid and liquid phases). The overall NSTX lithium PFC coating results suggest exciting opportunities for future magnetic confinement research including significant electron energy confinement improvements, Hmode power threshold reduction, the control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and high heat flux handling. To support the NSTX-U/PPPL PMI research, there are also a number of associated PMI facilities implemented at PPPL/Princeton University including the Liquid Lithium R&D facility, Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Laboratories for Materials Characterization and Surface Chemistry.

  5. Historical Research: A Thematic Analysis of Convention and Conference Themes for Selected Professional Health Education Associations from 1975 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jill M.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    2009-01-01

    Many professional organizations and associations hold conventions and conferences on an annual basis. Health Education professional associations take part in this process. Using a historical research perspective, this article delineates conference themes for four prominent professional Health Education associations: the American Association for…

  6. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - A Model for Young Researcher Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2000 members from approximately 45 countries, APECS represents a body of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research activities. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. APECS can serve as a model for other groups looking to encourage the next generation of researchers. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach

  7. [Experince accumulated by RADON Industrial Research Association in treating radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, S A; Lifanov, F A; Kobelev, A P; Savkin, A E

    2006-01-01

    To reduce volume of radioactive waste for long storage, specialists in "RADON" Industrial Research Association according to qualitative contents of the waste use methods of filtration and selective sorption of radionuclides, electrolysis, monoselective purification, burning, plasmic burning and pressing. Overall volume of the waste processed by various plants exceeds 50 thousand cubic meters. The mentioned technologies could be widely used in radiochemical works and other nuclear energy plants. PMID:16568841

  8. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  9. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  10. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients.

  11. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - Developing a Continuum of Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2600 members from approximately 74 countries, APECS represents a body of students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach opportunities for young polar researchers. APECS core programs that include career development workshops and panels (including several associated

  12. The prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial and its associated research resource.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Claire S; Pinsky, Paul F; Kramer, Barnett S; Prorok, Philip C; Purdue, Mark P; Berg, Christine D; Gohagan, John K

    2013-11-20

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large-scale research effort conducted by the National Cancer Institute. PLCO offers an example of coordinated research by both the extramural and intramural communities of the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of this article is to describe the PLCO research resource and how it is managed and to assess the productivity and the costs associated with this resource. Such an in-depth analysis of a single large-scale project can shed light on questions such as how large-scale projects should be managed, what metrics should be used to assess productivity, and how costs can be compared with productivity metrics. A comprehensive publication analysis identified 335 primary research publications resulting from research using PLCO data and biospecimens from 2000 to 2012. By the end of 2012, a total of 9679 citations (excluding self-citations) have resulted from this body of research publications, with an average of 29.7 citations per article, and an h index of 45, which is comparable with other large-scale studies, such as the Nurses' Health Study. In terms of impact on public health, PLCO trial results have been used by the US Preventive Services Task Force in making recommendations concerning prostate and ovarian cancer screening. The overall cost of PLCO was $454 million over 20 years, adjusted to 2011 dollars, with approximately $37 million for the collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens, including blood samples, buccal cells, and pathology tissues.

  13. Institutional Research: New Challenges to an Evolving Role. Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (13th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 26-28, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Bayard, Comp.

    New challenges facing the institutional research profession are covered in these 1986 conference proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Paper titles and authors include: "Institutional Research at Mercer County Community College: The Changing Role in the Eighties" (F. L. Edwards); "Course Placement and Academic…

  14. Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors--A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented By Dr. Wendy Sims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatt, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee annually hosts a Graduate Research Forum in conjunction with the OMEA's Professional Development Conference. In 2009, the guest speaker was Dr. Wendy Sims, Director of Music Education at the University of Missouri--Columbia and Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. An…

  15. Developing a clinical research associate training program at Dillard University: the impact of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Charlotte; Dennis, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 Dillard University and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans collaborated to secure a five year-grant from the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health to establish a Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Center (MHHDRC) located on the campus of Dillard University. The MHHDRC is the first Federally funded Center of Excellence in the state of Louisiana. Three cores of the Center operate to achieve its mission. One core includes a clinical research associate (CRA) training program. The major goal of the program is to increase the number of minority CRAs in the state of Louisiana, especially in New Orleans and, ultimately promote greater participation and retention of minorities in clinical trials research. This article discusses the initiation of the CRA training program, its planning, community outreach, implementation, integration of multiple resources and role of collaboration in the development of the MHHDRC including accomplishments, challenges and future plans.

  16. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA): Online Research Data, Tools, and References

    PubMed Central

    Finke, Roger; Adamczyk, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) currently archives over 400 local, national, and international data files, and offers a wide range of research tools to build surveys, preview data on-line, develop customized maps and reports of U.S. church membership, and examine religion differences across nations and regions of the world. The ARDA also supports reference and teaching tools that draw on the rich data archive. This research note offers a brief introduction to the quantitative data available for exploration or download, and a few of the website features most useful for research and teaching. Supported by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, the Pennsylvania State University, and the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion, all data downloads and online services are free of charge. PMID:25484914

  17. Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology: National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association collaborative project.

    PubMed

    Refolo, Lorenzo M; Snyder, Heather; Liggins, Charlene; Ryan, Laurie; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Carrillo, Maria C

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is recognized as a public health crisis worldwide. As public and private funding agencies around the world enhance and expand their support of Alzheimer's disease research, there is an urgent need to coordinate funding strategies and leverage resources to maximize the impact on public health and avoid duplication of effort and inefficiency. Such coordination requires a comprehensive assessment of the current landscape of Alzheimer's disease research in the United States and internationally. To this end, the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Association developed the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) as a dynamic portfolio analysis tool that can be used by funding agencies worldwide for strategic planning and coordination.

  18. The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Damianakis, Thecla; Kröger, Edeltraut; Wagner, Laura M; Dawson, Deirdre R; Binns, Malcolm A; Bernstein, Syrelle; Caspi, Eilon; Cook, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify lifestyle activities that reduce functional decline and dementia associated with population aging. The goals of this article are to review critically the evidence on the benefits associated with formal volunteering among older adults, propose a theoretical model of how volunteering may reduce functional limitations and dementia risk, and offer recommendations for future research. Database searches identified 113 papers on volunteering benefits in older adults, of which 73 were included. Data from descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective cohort studies, along with 1 randomized controlled trial, most consistently reveal that volunteering is associated with reduced symptoms of depression, better self-reported health, fewer functional limitations, and lower mortality. The extant evidence provides the basis for a model proposing that volunteering increases social, physical, and cognitive activity (to varying degrees depending on characteristics of the volunteer placement) which, through biological and psychological mechanisms, leads to improved functioning; we further propose that these volunteering-related functional improvements should be associated with reduced dementia risk. Recommendations for future research are that studies (a) include more objective measures of psychosocial, physical, and cognitive functioning; (b) integrate qualitative and quantitative methods in prospective study designs; (c) explore further individual differences in the benefits associated with volunteering; (d) include occupational analyses of volunteers' specific jobs in order to identify their social, physical, and cognitive complexity; (e) investigate the independent versus interactive health benefits associated with volunteering relative to engagement in other forms of activity; and (f) examine the relationship between volunteering and dementia risk. PMID:25150681

  19. Adult Education and the Contested Terrain of Public Policy. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (21st, Toronto, Ontario May 30-31 and June 1, 2002). = L'Education des Adultes et le Domaine Controverse des Affaires Publiques. Actes Annuel de L'Association Canadienne pour L'Etude de L'Education des Adultes (21eme, Toronto, Ontario, 30-31 Mai et 1 Juin, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojab, Shahrzad, Ed.; McQueen, William, Ed.

    This document contains the texts of 57 papers, 10 roundtables, and 7 symposia from a Canadian conference on adult education and public policy. The following are among the papers included: "Childhood, Schooling Family and Community" (Margarida Aguiar); "Voices Inside" (Irene C. Baird); "Beyond Personal Agency" (Rose Barg); "Participatory Research,…

  20. Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON): A Network of Consortia for Post-Genome Wide Association (Post-GWA) Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology's (GAME-ON) overall goal is to foster an intra-disciplinary and collaborative approach to the translation of promising research leads deriving from the initial wave of cancer GWAS.

  1. Growth of a species, an association, a science: 80 years of growth and development research.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Richard J; Duren, Dana L

    2013-01-01

    Physical anthropological research was codified in the United States with the creation of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) in 1929. That same year, a study began in yellow springs, Ohio, with a goal of identifying "what makes people different." The approach used to answer that question was to study the growth and development of Homo sapiens. The resulting study, the Fels Longitudinal Study, is currently the longest continuous study of human growth and development in the world. Although the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study have existed as separate entities for more than 80 years now, it is not surprising, given the relationship between anatomical and developmental research, there has been considerable overlap between the two. As the field of physical anthropology has blossomed to include subdisciplines such as forensics, genetics, primatology, as well as sophisticated statistical methodologies, the importance of growth and development research has escalated. Although current Fels Longitudinal Study research is largely directed at biomedical questions, virtually all findings are relevant to physical anthropology, providing insights into basic biological processes and life history parameters. Some key milestones from the early years of the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study are highlighted here that address growth and development research in physical anthropology. These are still held as fundamental concepts that underscore the importance of this line of inquiry, not only across the subdisciplines of physical anthropology, but also among anthropological, biological, and biomedical inquiries.

  2. David Triggle: Research collaborations and scientific exchanges with the China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Dai, De-Zai

    2015-11-15

    Over the period 1995-2012, David Triggle was a frequent visitor to the China Pharmaceutical University in Nanjing, China making many important contributions that enhanced the activities of the Research Division of Pharmacology at the University. In addition to providing collegial advice and facilitating interactions with the international pharmacological community, Professor Triggle's international reputation as a thought leader in the field of ion channel research and drug discovery provided important insights into the potential pathophysiological and therapeutic effects of targeting ion channels. This included the L-type calcium channel and the outward delayed rectified potassium currents of rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) components in the myocardium. The Nanjing research team had been particularly interested in ion channel dysfunction in the context of cardiac arrhythmias, remodeling and drug discovery. With Professor Triggle's assistance, the relationship between an increase in ICa.L and other biological events including an enhancement of IKr and IKr currents, NADPH oxidase and endothelin receptor activation, down regulation of calcium modulating protein FKBP12.6, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPse (SERCA2A) and calsequens 2 (CASQ2), calcium leak at the diastole and endoplasmic reticulum stress, were evaluated and are discussed. Additionally, the organization of several international symposia was greatly enhanced by input from Professor Triggle as were the published research manuscripts in international pharmacology journals. During his association with the China Pharmaceutical University, Professor Triggle aided in enhancing the scientific standing of the Pharmacology department and was a highly effective ambassador for international research cooperation.

  3. Navigating the Thin Line between Education and Incarceration: An Action Research Case Study on Gang-Associated Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines data collected from an ethnographic research project conducted with 56 gang-associated Latino youths ages 15 to 21 from 2007 to 2009. The objectives of the study were to examine how poor Latino gang-associated youths perceived schooling and policing and to find out if the research process could promote educational aspirations…

  4. Federated Search and the Library Web Site: A Study of Association of Research Libraries Member Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how federated search engines are incorporated into the Web sites of libraries in the Association of Research Libraries. In 2009, information was gathered for each library in the Association of Research Libraries with a federated search engine. This included the name of the federated search service and…

  5. Images of Illness: How Causal Claims and Racial Associations Influence Public Preferences toward Diabetes Research Spending

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Lantz, Paula M.; Ubel, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the salience of health disparities in media and policy discourse, little previous research has investigated if imagery associating an illness with a certain racial group influences public perceptions. This study evaluated the influence of the media’s presentation of the causes of type 2 diabetes and its implicit racial associations on attitudes toward people with diabetes and preferences toward research spending. Survey participants who viewed an article on genetic causation or social determinants of diabetes were more likely to support increased government spending on research than those viewing an article with no causal language, while participants viewing an article on behavioral choices were more likely to attribute negative stereotypes to people with diabetes. Participants who viewed a photo of a black woman accompanying the article were less likely to endorse negative stereotypes than those viewing a photo of a white woman, but those who viewed a photo of a glucose-testing device expressed the lowest negative stereotypes. The effect of social determinants language was significantly different for blacks and whites, lowering stereotypes only among blacks. Emphasizing the behavioral causes of diabetes, as is common in media coverage, may perpetuate negative stereotypes. While drawing attention to the social determinants that shape these behaviors could mitigate stereotypes, this strategy is unlikely to influence the public uniformly. PMID:21451158

  6. Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators a statement on relationships between physicians and industry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A; Black, Henry R; Fonseca, Rafael; Garber, Jeffrey; Gonzalez-Campoy, J Michael; Kimmelstiel, Carey; Markowitz, Avi B; Nakayama, Don; Stell, Lance K; Stossel, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    Collaborations between physicians, particularly those in academic medicine, and industries that develop pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and diagnostic tests have led to substantial advances in patient care. At the same time, there is a strong awareness that these relationships, however beneficial they may be, should conform to established principles of ethical professional practice. Through a writing committee drawn from diverse disciplines across several institutions, the Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators (ACRE) has written a code of conduct to provide guidance to physicians in observing these principles. Our recommendations are not intended to be prescriptive or inflexible, but rather to be of assistance to physicians in making their own personal decisions on whether, or how, to be involved in research, education, or other collaborations with industry.

  7. Research Opportunities for Cancer Associated with Indoor Air Pollution from Solid-Fuel Combustion

    PubMed Central

    Ghazarian, Armen A.; DeMarini, David M.; Sapkota, Amir; Jack, Darby; Lan, Qing; Winn, Deborah M.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Indoor air pollution (IAP) derived largely from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating affects about 3 billion people worldwide, resulting in substantial adverse health outcomes, including cancer. Women and children from developing countries are the most exposed populations. A workshop was held in Arlington, Virginia, 9–11 May 2011, to better understand women’s and children’s potential health effects from IAP in developing countries. Workshop participants included international scientists, manufacturers, policy and regulatory officials, community leaders, and advocates who held extensive discussions to help identify future research needs. Objectives: Our objective was to identify research opportunities regarding IAP and cancer, including research questions that could be incorporated into studies of interventions to reduce IAP exposure. In this commentary, we describe the state of the science in understanding IAP and its associations with cancer and suggest research opportunities for improving our understanding of the issues. Discussion: Opportunities for research on IAP and cancer include studies of the effect of IAP on cancers other than lung cancer; studies of genetic factors that modify susceptibility; studies to determine whether the effects of IAP are mediated via germline, somatic, and/or epigenetic changes; and studies of the effects of IAP exposure via dermal and/or oral routes. Conclusions: IAP from indoor coal use increases the risk of lung cancer. Installing chimneys can reduce risk, and some genotypes, including GSTM1-null, can increase risk. Additional research is needed regarding the effects of IAP on other cancers and the effects of different types of solid fuels, oral and dermal routes of IAP exposure, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:22846419

  8. Factors associated with past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M; Williams, Mark L; Vidrine, Damon J; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, "trigger" influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified "other" as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a 'guinea pig' showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model 'age' and level of certainty regarding 'keeping yourself from being a guinea pig' showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants.

  9. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and Its Associated Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large-scale research effort conducted by the National Cancer Institute. PLCO offers an example of coordinated research by both the extramural and intramural communities of the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of this article is to describe the PLCO research resource and how it is managed and to assess the productivity and the costs associated with this resource. Such an in-depth analysis of a single large-scale project can shed light on questions such as how large-scale projects should be managed, what metrics should be used to assess productivity, and how costs can be compared with productivity metrics. A comprehensive publication analysis identified 335 primary research publications resulting from research using PLCO data and biospecimens from 2000 to 2012. By the end of 2012, a total of 9679 citations (excluding self-citations) have resulted from this body of research publications, with an average of 29.7 citations per article, and an h index of 45, which is comparable with other large-scale studies, such as the Nurses’ Health Study. In terms of impact on public health, PLCO trial results have been used by the US Preventive Services Task Force in making recommendations concerning prostate and ovarian cancer screening. The overall cost of PLCO was $454 million over 20 years, adjusted to 2011 dollars, with approximately $37 million for the collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens, including blood samples, buccal cells, and pathology tissues. PMID:24115361

  10. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  11. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Published research in English-language journals are increasingly required to carry a statement that the study has been approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board in conformance with 45 CFR 46 standards if the study was conducted in the United States. Alternative language attesting conformity with the Helsinki Declaration is often included when the research was conducted in Europe or elsewhere. The Helsinki Declaration was created by the World Medical Association in 1964 (ten years before the Belmont Report) and has been amended several times. The Helsinki Declaration differs from its American version in several respects, the most significant of which is that it was developed by and for physicians. The term "patient" appears in many places where we would expect to see "subject." It is stated in several places that physicians must either conduct or have supervisory control of the research. The dual role of the physician-researcher is acknowledged, but it is made clear that the role of healer takes precedence over that of scientist. In the United States, the federal government developed and enforces regulations on researcher; in the rest of the world, the profession, or a significant part of it, took the initiative in defining and promoting good research practice, and governments in many countries have worked to harmonize their standards along these lines. The Helsinki Declaration is based less on key philosophical principles and more on prescriptive statements. Although there is significant overlap between the Belmont and the Helsinki guidelines, the latter extends much further into research design and publication. Elements in a research protocol, use of placebos, and obligation to enroll trials in public registries (to ensure that negative findings are not buried), and requirements to share findings with the research and professional communities are included in the Helsinki Declaration. As a practical matter, these are often part of the work of American

  12. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Published research in English-language journals are increasingly required to carry a statement that the study has been approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board in conformance with 45 CFR 46 standards if the study was conducted in the United States. Alternative language attesting conformity with the Helsinki Declaration is often included when the research was conducted in Europe or elsewhere. The Helsinki Declaration was created by the World Medical Association in 1964 (ten years before the Belmont Report) and has been amended several times. The Helsinki Declaration differs from its American version in several respects, the most significant of which is that it was developed by and for physicians. The term "patient" appears in many places where we would expect to see "subject." It is stated in several places that physicians must either conduct or have supervisory control of the research. The dual role of the physician-researcher is acknowledged, but it is made clear that the role of healer takes precedence over that of scientist. In the United States, the federal government developed and enforces regulations on researcher; in the rest of the world, the profession, or a significant part of it, took the initiative in defining and promoting good research practice, and governments in many countries have worked to harmonize their standards along these lines. The Helsinki Declaration is based less on key philosophical principles and more on prescriptive statements. Although there is significant overlap between the Belmont and the Helsinki guidelines, the latter extends much further into research design and publication. Elements in a research protocol, use of placebos, and obligation to enroll trials in public registries (to ensure that negative findings are not buried), and requirements to share findings with the research and professional communities are included in the Helsinki Declaration. As a practical matter, these are often part of the work of American

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  14. Clinical-histological associations in gastroparesis: Results from the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular changes associated with diabetic (DG) and idiopathic gastroparesis (IG) have recently been described from patients enrolled in the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium. The association of these cellular changes with gastroparesis symptoms and gastric emptying is unknown. Aim Relate cellular changes to symptoms and gastric emptying in patients with gastroparesis. Methods Earlier, using full thickness gastric body biopsies from 20 DG, 20 IG and 20 matched controls, we found decreased interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and enteric nerves and an increase in immune cells in both DG and IG. Here, demographic, symptoms (gastroparesis cardinal symptom index score), and gastric emptying were related to cellular alterations using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results ICC counts inversely correlated with 4 hours gastric retention in DG but not in IG (r=−0.6, p=0.008, DG, r=0.2, p=0.4, IG). There was also a significant correlation between loss of ICC and enteric nerves in DG but not in IG (r=0.5, p=0.03 for DG, r=0.3, p=0.16, IG). IG with a myenteric immune infiltrate scored higher on the average GCSI (3.6±0.7 vs 2.7±0.9, p=0.05) and nausea score (3.8±0.9 vs 2.6±1.0, p=0.02) as compared to those without an infiltrate. Conclusions In DG, loss of ICC is associated with delayed gastric emptying. ICC or enteric nerve loss did not correlate with symptom severity. Overall clinical severity and nausea in IG is associated with a myenteric immune infiltrate. Thus, full thickness gastric biopsies can help define specific cellular abnormalities in gastroparesis, some of which are associated with physiological and clinical characteristics of gastroparesis. PMID:22339929

  15. Arts and Learning Research, 1994. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie, Ed.; Morbey, Mary Leigh, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The research papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1994 meeting of the American Educational Research Association as part of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group program. Papers collected in the volume represent an eclectic view of arts education and include music education. Following an editorial, papers are: "Arts and…

  16. Research in Science Education, Volume 1990. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (21st, Perth, Western Australia, July 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains selected refereed papers from the 21st Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association. The papers are as follows: "A Learning Model for Science Education: Developing Teaching Strategies" (Appleton); "Researching Balance between Cognition and Affect in Science Teaching" (Baird et al.); "Toward a…

  17. The Future of Institutional Research. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Orlando, Florida, October 24-26, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D., Ed.; And Others

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) are presented. The conference theme was the future of institutional research. Contents include reports of preconference workshops, speeches, panel reports, abstracts of papers, and reports pertaining to the affairs of the SAIR. Documents and authors…

  18. Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes. Proceedings of the Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum. (8th, San Francisco, California, May 6-9, 1968.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    The theme of the 8th Annual Forum on Institutional Research was "Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes" -- intended as a continuation of the 1966 Forum discussion dealing with academic inputs and the 1967 Forum on the instructional process. After an address by the Association's president in which he urged his academic colleagues to…

  19. Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (28th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 17-20, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The theme of the 2001 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research was Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. These proceedings represent the intellectual content and insights shared during the conference. The papers are: (1) The Rocky Road to Graduation: An Academic Career Flow Model for Tracking…

  20. The 1984 Research Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators. Junior and Community College Research: Texas, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Association of Junior and Community Coll. Instructional Administrators.

    Reports and abstracts of research studies conducted by members of the Research Committee of the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators are provided. Section I presents the following reports: "A Learner Analysis Experiment: Cognitive Style versus Learning Style in Undergraduate Nursing Education," by Charles…

  1. Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) Hispanic Higher Education Research Collective (H3ERC) Research Agenda: Impacting Education and Changing Lives through Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With support from the Lumina Foundation, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has launched HACU's Hispanic Higher Education Research Collective (H3ERC). The first major task of this virtual gathering of researchers and practitioners in Hispanic higher education has been to assess the state of our knowledge of the key issues…

  2. Research Libraries: Measurement, Management, Marketing. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (108th, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 1-2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    Program presentations on issues related to the use of statistics by research libraries and business meeting minutes are combined in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The full text is provided for the three papers on the program theme that were presented at the meeting: (1) "Information to Manage--The Economics of…

  3. Workshop Report from the NIH Taskforce on the Research Needs of Eosinophil-Associated Diseases (TREAD)

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Bruce S.; Book, Wendy; Busse, William W.; Butterfield, Joseph; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Klion, Amy D.; Lee, James J.; Leiferman, Kristin M.; Minnicozzi, Michael; Moqbel, Redwan; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Wechsler, Michael E.; Weller, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are blood cells that are often found in high numbers in the tissues of allergic conditions and helminthic parasite infections. The pathophysiological roles that eosinophils may serve in other human ‘eosinophil-associated’ diseases remain obscure. Objective NIH Institutes and the Office of Disease Prevention assembled an international taskforce of clinical and basic scientists with the charge to propose and prioritize unmet research needs in eosinophil-associated diseases. Methods The taskforce used an organ system approach to dissect out the different and common themes of eosinophil cell involvement in these diseases. In early 2012, a draft document was circulated for review. The document was amended and the prioritizations were set at a NIH-organized workshop in June 2012. Results The taskforce identified significant research needs. These needs cross disease entities but some are disease-specific. There are substantial shortcomings to the various preclinical animal models, as well as significant gaps in our epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic knowledge. The taskforce recognized that recent efforts by patient advocacy groups have played instrumental roles in improving the identification and characterization of these disorders. However, communication amongst the eosinophil interested communities, e.g., governmental funding and regulatory agencies, and industry and clinician scientists need to be more comprehensive. Conclusions Significant efforts are required to address our knowledge gaps in order to improve the outcomes of eosinophil-associated diseases. NIH Institutes, other federal agencies, lay organizations and the pharmaceutical industry should consider the taskforce’s recommendations in their future research activities. PMID:22935587

  4. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges.

  5. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K.; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E. Yoko; Mis, Frederick W.; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution’s admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  6. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  7. The Undergraduate-Postgraduate-Faculty Triad: Unique Functions and Tensions Associated with Undergraduate Research Experiences at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Erin L.; Johnson, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of how undergraduates' involvement in research influences postgraduates (i.e., graduate and postdoctoral researchers) and faculty. We used a qualitative approach to examine the relationships among undergraduates, postgraduates, and the faculty head in a research group. In this group, undergraduates viewed…

  8. Who Shares? Who Doesn't? Factors Associated with Openly Archiving Raw Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%–35% in 2007–2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output. PMID:21765886

  9. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Annual Research Meeting in Conjunction with the Annual Convention of the Association for Career and Technical Education. Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, December 11-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G., Ed.

    This document contains 14 research papers presented at the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The following papers are included: "Factors that Influence Students to Attend 4-Year Automotive Programs" (Gregory G. Belcher, Robert L. Frisbee); "The Training Needs of Vocational Teachers for Working with Special…

  10. The real-time learning mechanism of the Scientific Research Associates Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific research associates advanced robotic system (SRAARS) is an intelligent robotic system which has autonomous learning capability in geometric reasoning. The system is equipped with one global intelligence center (GIC) and eight local intelligence centers (LICs). It controls mainly sixteen links with fourteen active joints, which constitute two articulated arms, an extensible lower body, a vision system with two CCD cameras and a mobile base. The on-board knowledge-based system supports the learning controller with model representations of both the robot and the working environment. By consecutive verifying and planning procedures, hypothesis-and-test routines and learning-by-analogy paradigm, the system would autonomously build up its own understanding of the relationship between itself (i.e., the robot) and the focused environment for the purposes of collision avoidance, motion analysis and object manipulation. The intelligence of SRAARS presents a valuable technical advantage to implement robotic systems for space exploration and space station operations.

  11. Research papers and publications (1981-1987): Workload research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of the research reports written by participants in NASA's Workload Research Program since 1981 is presented, representing the results of theoretical and applied research conducted at Ames Research Center and at universities and industrial laboratories funded by the program. The major program elements included: 1) developing an understanding of the workload concept; 2) providing valid, reliable, and practical measures of workload; and 3) creating a computer model to predict workload. The goal is to provide workload-related design principles, measures, guidelines, and computational models. The research results are transferred to user groups by establishing close ties with manufacturers, civil and military operators of aerospace systems, and regulatory agencies; publishing scientific articles; participating in and sponsoring workshops and symposia; providing information, guidelines, and computer models; and contributing to the formulation of standards. In addition, the methods and theories developed have been applied to specific operational and design problems at the request of a number of industry and government agencies.

  12. The General Electric-Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF). An industry-academic collaboration to improve clinical research in radiology.

    PubMed

    Hillman, B J; Fryback, D G; Holden, R W; McNeil, B J; Molitor, R M; Moss, A A; Peck, P V; Putman, C E; Thompson, W M

    1993-05-01

    The association of GE Medical Systems and the AUR represents a unique collaboration between academic radiology and industry that bears important potential for elevating the quality of clinical research in radiology and developing a cadre of high-quality radiologist researchers for the future. The establishment of the GERRAF is especially timely given the new imperatives of the rapidly changing health care environment, with its emphasis on expenditure reduction. The ultimate goals of GERRAF are to develop research leaders for radiology that will provide guidance for appropriate clinical practice, better train future researchers, and secure the role of radiologists in caring for patients.

  13. Trends in health sciences library and information science research: an analysis of research publications in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1991 to 2007*

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Sally A.; Nordberg, Judith M.; Palmer, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed trends in research activity as represented in the published research in the leading peer-reviewed professional journal for health sciences librarianship. Methodology: Research articles were identified from the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association (1991–2007). Using content analysis and bibliometric techniques, data were collected for each article on the (1) subject, (2) research method, (3) analytical technique used, (4) number of authors, (5) number of citations, (6) first author affiliation, and (7) funding source. The results were compared to a previous study, covering the period 1966 to 1990, to identify changes over time. Results: Of the 930 articles examined, 474 (51%) were identified as research articles. Survey (n = 174, 37.1%) was the most common methodology employed, quantitative descriptive statistics (n = 298, 63.5%) the most used analytical technique, and applied topics (n = 332, 70%) the most common type of subject studied. The majority of first authors were associated with an academic health sciences library (n = 264, 55.7%). Only 27.4% (n = 130) of studies identified a funding source. Conclusion: This study's findings demonstrate that progress is being made in health sciences librarianship research. There is, however, room for improvement in terms of research methodologies used, proportion of applied versus theoretical research, and elimination of barriers to conducting research for practicing librarians. PMID:19626146

  14. Opportunities in multi dimensional trace metal imaging: Taking copper associated disease research to the next level

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Stefan; Ralle, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Copper plays an important role in numerous biological processes across all living systems predominantly because of its versatile redox behavior. Cellular copper homeostasis is tightly regulated and disturbances lead to severe disorders such as Wilson disease (WD) and Menkes disease. Age related changes of copper metabolism have been implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The role of copper in these diseases has been topic of mostly bioinorganic research efforts for more than a decade, metal-protein interactions have been characterized and cellular copper pathways have been described. Despite these efforts, crucial aspects of how copper is associated with AD, for example, is still only poorly understood. To take metal related disease research to the next level, emerging multi dimensional imaging techniques are now revealing the copper metallome as the basis to better understand disease mechanisms. This review will describe how recent advances in X-ray fluorescence microscopy and fluorescent copper probes have started to contribute to this field specifically WD and AD. It furthermore provides an overview of current developments and future applications in X-ray microscopic methodologies. PMID:23079951

  15. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  16. Digitization as a Method of Preservation? Final Report of a Working Group of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Association).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Hartmut; Dorr, Marianne

    The German Research Association (DFG) is actively involved in preservation of research materials; it takes the view that in preservation, the enormous potential of digitization for access should be combined with the stability of microfilm for long-term storage. A working group was convened to investigate the technical state of digitization of…

  17. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (29th, Annapolis, Maryland, November 16-19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 2002 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research, a meeting devoted to assessment in the 21st century and the challenges that face institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Putting Community College Enrollment Trends in Perspective by the Use of Census Data and Market…

  18. ARL Preservation Statistics, 1997-98: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.; Hipps, Kaylyn, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; O'Connor, Michael, Comp.

    This document presents data from 118 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1997-98 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  19. The Barriers to Achieving the Wider Goals of General Education and Their Implications for the British Educational Research Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, John

    1990-01-01

    Advocates revamping the British educational system from technical-rational content model to student-centered process programs designed to promote critical thinking, individual initiative, and communication skills. Discusses obstacles to this educational reform, emphasizing research orientation. Urges the British Educational Research Association to…

  20. ARL Preservation Statistics, 2001-02. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2003-01-01

    This document presents data from 124 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2001-2002 fiscal year. Since 1987-1988, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating…

  1. Association Reports: Council on Undergraduate Research: An Investment in Tomorrow: Undergraduate Research Students Meet Members of Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Judith A.

    1997-08-01

    This past April 10th, 58 college and university students met Members of Congress and their staffs at the first Undergraduate Research Poster Session on Capitol Hill sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR). These students represented 46 institutions of higher learning in 31 states, from as far away as California and Alaska to as near as Virginia and Maryland.

  2. The Evolving Landscape of Healthcare-Associated Infections: Recent Advances in Prevention and a Road Map for Research

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Nasia; Anderson, Deverick J.; Braun, Barbara I.; Carling, Philip; Cohen, Stuart; Donskey, Curtis; Drees, Marci; Harris, Anthony; Henderson, David K.; Huang, Susan S.; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Linkin, Darren R.; Meddings, Jennifer; Miller, Loren G.; Milstone, Aaron; Morgan, Daniel; Sengupta, Sharmila; Varman, Meera; Yokoe, Deborah; Zerr, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    This white paper identifies knowledge gaps and new challenges in healthcare epidemiology research, assesses the progress made toward addressing research priorities, provides the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Research Committee’s recommendations for high-priority research topics, and proposes a road map for making progress toward these goals. It updates the 2010 SHEA Research Committee document, “Charting the Course for the Future of Science in Healthcare Epidemiology: Results of a Survey of the Membership of SHEA,” which called for a national approach to healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and a prioritized research agenda. This paper highlights recent studies that have advanced our understanding of HAIs, the establishment of the SHEA Research Network as a collaborative infrastructure to address research questions, prevention initiatives at state and national levels, changes in reporting and payment requirements, and new patterns in antimicrobial resistance. PMID:24709716

  3. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad

  4. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. PMID:16349374

  5. Systematic Review: The Association and Impact of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Basic Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Boyle, Simone N.; Kuykendal, Adam; Fisher, Matthew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Barnato, Sara E.; Wagner, Robin L.; Goldstein, Carolyn E.; Tallman, Jacob; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Henke, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background No prior study has evaluated financial relationships of investigators with pharmaceutical manufacturers for basic science. An example of the importance and impact of such relationships is in the evaluation of erythropoietin receptors’(EpoRs) effects on cancer cell lines, since studies have reported increased mortality when cancer patients receive erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Purpose To assess the disclosed association that exist between pharmaceutical industry support and EpoRs effects on solid cancer cell lines. Data Sources MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988- July 2008) and two EpoR conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Study Selection All publications investigating EpoRs that met inclusion criteria were identified and included. Data Extraction Data were extracted on detection of EpoRs, presence of erythropoietin-induced signaling events, presence of erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function, nature of qualitative conclusions, and sources of funding for all 74 studies. Data Synthesis In comparison to studies of academic investigators with no disclosed funding support from ESA manufacturers (n=64), the studies from academic investigators with funding support from ESA manufacturers (n= 7) and the laboratories directed by investigators employed by ESA manufacturers (n=3) were both less likely to identify: EpoR presence on solid tumor cells; erythropoietin-induced signaling events; erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function; and less likely to conclude that their research had identified potentially harmful effects of erythropoietin on cancer cells. Additionally, presentations from industry-based investigator teams at NIH conferences were less likely to report EpoRs on cancer cell lines, downstream effects of erythropoietin, and cell proliferation and migration effects following EpoR administration. Conclusion Financial conflicts of interest impact the outcomes and presentation of basic science research data as

  6. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites.

  7. The role of Water Resources Users Associations in hydrological research: experiences from Lake Naivasha Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agol, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper is based on recent studies in Lake Naivasha Basin that explored the ways in which locally based institutions namely the Water Resources Users Associations (WRUAs) are contributing to hydrological knowledge for decision-making processes. Lake Naivasha is a shallow freshwater body which is situated on the floor of Kenya's Rift Valley. It covers approximately 140 Km2 and supports a rich diversity of plants and animals. The Lake Naivasha Basin faces several challenges associated with over- population, urbanization and intensive agricultural activities. For example, the large-scale floricultural and horticultural export industries around the Lake have attracted thousands of migrants from different parts of Kenya who have settled around the Lake and exert a lot of pressure on its resources. The Lake Naivasha is one of the best examples in Kenya where the WRUAs development process has shown some progress. There are 12 WRUAS across the Lake Basin representing its various sub-catchments. In recent years, the role of WRUAs in the Lake has changed rapidly as they are no longer restricted to just resolving conflicts and fostering cooperation between water users. They now have an additional responsibility of collecting hydrological data within their respective sub-catchments. The majority of WRUA officials have been trained on how to collect data such as reading rain gauges, measuring stream flows, turbidity and sediment loads. The data collected are sent to the relevant government authorities for validation and interpretation and the information derived from this process is used to formulate important strategies such as water allocation plans. Using secondary data analysis, interviews and focus group discussions the study investigated how this new role of the WRUAs is changing the water resource management landscape in the Lake Naivasha Basin. In particular it presents key challenges and opportunities associated with attempts to build capacities of lower level

  8. Tobacco and cancer: an American Association for Cancer Research policy statement.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Herbst, Roy S; Land, Stephanie R; Leischow, Scott J; Shields, Peter G

    2010-05-01

    The evidence against tobacco use is clear, incontrovertible, and convincing; so is the need for urgent and immediate action to stem the global tide of tobacco-related death and suffering and to improve public health. The American Association for Cancer Research makes an unequivocal call to all who are concerned about public health to take the following immediate steps:Increase the investment in tobacco-related research, commensurate with the enormous toll that tobacco use takes on human health, to provide the scientific evidence to drive the development of effective policies and treatments necessary to dramatically reduce tobacco use and attendant disease. Develop new evidence-based strategies to more effectively prevent the initiation of tobacco use, especially for youth and young adults. Promote the further development of evidence-based treatments for tobacco cessation, including individualized therapies, and ensure coverage of and access to evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological treatments. Develop evidence-based strategies for more effective public communication to prevent, reduce, and eliminate tobacco use and to guide health policies and clinical practice. Develop effective, evidence-based policies to reduce disparities across the tobacco continuum among social groups and developed and developing nations. Implement to the fullest extent existing evidence-based, systems-wide tobacco control programs to prevent initiation and foster cessation. Adapt and implement appropriate approaches to reduce the growing burden of tobacco use in the developing world. Enhance and coordinate surveillance efforts, both in the United States and globally, to monitor tobacco products, tobacco use, and tobacco-related disease, including tobacco use in oncology clinical trials. Establish a comprehensive, science-based regulatory framework to evaluate tobacco products and manufacturers' claims. Promote research that addresses the following: the potential harms of current and

  9. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  10. Research Perspectives on the Regulation and Physiological Functions of FGF21 and its Association with NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a metabolic hormone primarily secreted from the liver and functions in multiple tissues. Various transcription factors induce FGF21 expression in the liver, which indicates that FGF21 is a mediator of multiple environmental cues. FGF21 alters metabolism under starvation conditions, protects the body from energy depletion, and extends life span. Pharmacological administration of FGF21 alleviates dyslipidemia and induces weight loss in obese animals. In addition to the well-studied functions of FG21, several lines of recent evidence indicate a possible link between FGF21 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). High serum levels of FGF21 are associated with NAFLD and its risk factors, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress and chronic inflammation. In addition, FGF21 alleviates the major risk factors of NAFLD, including obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin insensitivity. Thus, FGF21 is a potential drug candidate for diseases, such as NAFLD, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. In this review, the research perspectives of FGF21 and therapeutic potencies of FGF21 as a modulator of NAFLD are summarized. PMID:26441837

  11. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  12. Arts and Learning Research, 1998-1999. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, Illinois, April 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Liora, Ed.; Ellis, Nancy C., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This volume highlights thought-provoking issues in visual arts, drama, and music education presented at the 1998 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Following a message from the Special Interest Group Chair, Larry Kantner, and an editorial, articles in section 1 are: "Art Beginnings" (L. A. Kantner); "Teachers' Conceptions of…

  13. Bridges to the Future: Building Linkages for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (27th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 4-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This document contains papers, summaries of panel presentations, and work share meetings from the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "The Influence of Personality Traits, Pre-College Characteristics, and Co-Curricular Experiences on College Outcomes" (Karen W. Bauer); (2) "Threading the…

  14. Factors Associated with Research Productivity among Oral Healthcare Educators in an Asian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Bernardo E., Jr.; Clerigo, Maria Eloisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Research writing confidence and organizational support toward research activities are two essential factors that may affect research productivity among higher educational institutions. This study investigated the possible relationships of these two factors to research productivity among faculty members of the College of Dentistry at Lyceum of the…

  15. Executive summary of the CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: How to make research succeed in your department.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Perry, Jeffrey; Vaillancourt, Christian; Calder, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The vision of the recently created Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section is to promote high-quality emergency patient care by conducting world-leading education and research in emergency medicine. The Academic Section plans to achieve this goal by enhancing academic emergency medicine primarily at Canadian medical schools and teaching hospitals. It seeks to foster and develop education, research, and academic leadership amongst Canadian emergency physicians, residents, and students. In this light, the Academic Section began in 2013 to hold the annual Academic Symposia to highlight best practices and recommendations for the three core domains of governance and leadership, education scholarship, and research. Each year, members of three panels are asked to review the literature, survey and interview experts, achieve consensus, and present their recommendations at the Symposium (2013, Education Scholarship; 2014, Research; and 2015, Governance and Funding). Research is essential to medical advancement. As a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine is rapidly evolving to adapt to new diagnostic tools, the challenges of crowding in emergency departments, and the growing needs of emergency patients. There is significant variability in the infrastructure, support, and productivity of emergency medicine research programs across Canada. All Canadians benefit from an investigation of the means to improve research infrastructure, training programs, and funding opportunities. Such an analysis is essential to identify areas for improvement, which will support the expansion of emergency medicine research. To this end, physician-scientist leaders were gathered from across Canada to develop pragmatic recommendations on the improvement of emergency medicine research through a comprehensive analysis of current best practices, systematic literature reviews, stakeholder surveys, and expert interviews.

  16. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Maurice J.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2003-01-01

    Includes six reports from national associations and organizations. Highlights include annual meetings; government affairs; copyright; administration; diversity; new technologies; international programs; scholarly communication; information policy; access to information; preservation; statistics and measurement; digital libraries; economics of…

  17. The International Permafrost Association: new structure and initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, I.; Lewkowicz, A. G.; Christiansen, H.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Lantuit, H.; Schrott, L.; Sergeev, D.; Wei, M.

    2012-12-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details recent and ongoing changes in the functioning of the IPA that will influence the way cryospheric research is conducted under its auspices. One of the most important is the development of competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Since the first call, four proposals have been accepted by the Executive Committee and the teams are currently working on high topical issues, such as the assessment of the deep permafrost organic carbon pools and the mapping of subsea permafrost, as well as fundamental questions such as the extent of permafrost during the Last Permafrost Maximum. The IPA also decided to put additional effort into facilitating the study of the significance of permafrost to the global climate systems, with human aspects playing a very important role. To achieve this goal, the IPA will encourage and assist the climate modeling community in improving the representation of perennially frozen ground

  18. Factors associated with biosafety level-2 research workers' laboratory exit handwashing behaviors and glove removal compliance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Merrill, Ray M; Zimmerman, Grant C; Collingwood, Scott C; Reading, James C

    2016-01-01

    Biosafety level-2 laboratories are designated for work with human-derived samples or moderate-risk microorganisms that transmit primarily by direct contact exposures. Many laboratory procedures generate unseen droplets that contaminate workers' hands, equipment, and work surfaces. Workers' strict adherence to glove removal and handwashing is required prior to laboratory exit to prevent inadvertent transmission of pathogens to self or others. However, little is known about biosafety level-2 workers' compliance with these behaviors. In this article, glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were measured by direct observation of 93 biosafety level-2 research workers from 21 university laboratories. Participants completed a 41-item survey measuring social cognitive theory-based variables related to handwashing, self-reported compliance, and demographic factors. Survey items, observed exit frequency, and laboratory characteristics were evaluated for associations with handwashing compliance. Overall, observed glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were 43.0% (Standard Error [SE] = 2.3%), and 8.2% (SE = 1.2%), respectively, while workers' self-reported glove removal and handwashing compliance were 73.7% (SE = 3.6%) and 35.5% (SE = 4.1%), respectively. The average number of observed laboratory exits per hour was 2.8 for workers with any handwashing compliance vs. 5.4 for workers with no handwashing compliance (p = 0.0013). Among the cognitive variables, behavioral modeling by supervisors and coworkers had the strongest association with workers' compliance (slope = 3.5, SE = 1.3, p = 0.0113). Workers in laboratories with a written handwashing policy had higher compliance (Mean = 14.1%, SE = 5.9%) than workers in laboratories with no written policy (Mean = 1.1%, SE = 1.0%; p = 0.0488). Multi-faceted interventions that encourage modeling of the behavior by supervisors and coworkers, implementation of written handwashing policies

  19. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  20. Invitation to the 17th international congress on photosynthesis research in 2016: photosynthesis in a changing world.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2016-02-01

    The 17th International Congress on Photosynthesis will be held from August 7 to 12, 2016 in Maastricht, The Netherlands. The congress will include an opening reception, 15 plenary lectures, 28 scientific symposia, many poster sessions, displays by scientific companies, excursions, congress dinner, social activities, and the first photosynthesis soccer world championship. See http://www.ps2016.com/ . The congress is organized as an official event of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research (see http://www.photosynthesisresearch.org/).

  1. Entertainers or Education Researchers? The Challenges Associated with Presenting While Black

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Ebony O.; Kazembe, Lasana

    2016-01-01

    How black faculty experience presenting their research in educational venues within the context of historical objectification of black people as sources of entertainment is an underexplored topic in higher education research. Presenting research has far-reaching implications for black academics' advancement, such as future employment and…

  2. The long and winding road from the research laboratory to industrial applications of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Martin Bastian; Iversen, Stig Lykke; Sørensen, Kim Ib; Johansen, Eric

    2005-08-01

    Research innovations are constantly occurring in universities, research institutions and industrial research laboratories. These are reported in the scientific literature and presented to the scientific community in various congresses and symposia as well as through direct contacts and collaborations. Conversion of these research results to industrially useful innovations is, however, considerably more complex than generally appreciated. The long and winding road from the research laboratory to industrial applications will be illustrated with two recent examples from Chr. Hansen A/S: the implementation in industrial scale of a new production technology based on respiration by Lactococcus lactis and the introduction to the market of L. lactis strains constructed using recombinant DNA technology.

  3. Future Research, Research Futures. Proceedings of the National Conference of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) (3rd, Canberra, Australia, March 23-24, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria.

    These proceedings consist of 66 conference papers on these themes: changing nature of work; emerging technologies; internationalization of vocational education and training (VET); enterprise and educational innovation; flexible delivery approaches; and research and technology and using technology in research. The papers are "Training Needs of…

  4. Environmental epigenomics and disease susceptibility. Keystone symposia on molecular and cellular biology. The Grove Park Hotel & Spa, Ashville, NC, USA, 27 March–1 April 2011.

    PubMed

    Lobanenkov, Victor; Loukinov, Dmitry; Pugacheva, Elena

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this conference was to provide solid evidence that environmental exposures during early development can affect faithful reproduction of individual parental epigenomes without changing DNA sequence in the offspring. No doubt, this important goal has been successfully achieved owing to the high quality of presented epidemiological and experimental studies and engaging discussions of many yet to be published results. Compelling data suggested a strong causal link between prenatal vulnerability of future parental epigenomes to damaging environmental factors aggravated by abnormal socio-cultural conditions (including, for instance, malnutrition and chronic stress) and the alarming risk of developing heritable complex medical conditions later in life, such as asthma, autism, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, schizophrenia and a whole range of rare neuromuscular pathologies. It was concluded that modern epigenetic research promises to markedly improve our ability to diagnose, prevent and treat these and other pathological conditions of humans. However, the complex heritability pattern of 'epigenetic syndromes' also introduces unique legal and ethical issues that were discussed at the end of this outstanding meeting.

  5. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  6. Organizational and Institutional Factors Associated with National Institutes of Health Research Grant Awards to Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Zlotnik, Joan; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and institutional factors that may be associated with the success of schools of social work (SOSWs) in securing research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and constituent agencies. Using data from the CRISP database on NIH grant funding, the Lombardi Program on Measuring University…

  7. Literacy Promises. The Thirty-Third Yearbook: A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Timothy, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    For its 54th annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers met in Omaha, Nebraska at the Hilton Omaha. This year's conference theme was "Literacy Promises", which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 33. This organization has long been the home of some of the nation's most notable literacy experts. At the…

  8. ARL Supplementary Statistics, 2001-02. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents statistics on how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries spend money on electronic resources. This report indicates that expenditures for electronic resources account for 19.6%, on average, of ARL institutions' library materials budgets. ARL libraries reported spending more than $171 million on electronic…

  9. Statement of the American Sociological Association on the Importance of Collecting Data and Doing Social Scientific Research on Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC.

    This statement describes the basis for the American Sociological Association's (ASA) position regarding scientific research on race, illustrating the importance of such data to further scientific investigation and inform public policy. Race is a complex, sensitive, and controversial topic in scientific discourse and public policy. The controversy…

  10. Research among Learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language. Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph Series. Volume IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Michael E., Ed.; Shen, Helen H., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Cutting-edge in its approach and international in its authorship, this fourth monograph in a series sponsored by the Chinese Language Teachers Association features eight research studies that explore a variety of themes, topics, and perspectives important to a variety of stakeholders in the Chinese language learning community. Employing a wide…

  11. State Library Agencies and Member Libraries of the Association of Research Libraries. Final Report of Two Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobot, Mary C.

    State Library Agencies (SLAs) and library members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) were surveyed to collect data from potential audiences for American Memory products to assist the planners for this Library of Congress (LC) project. This summary report briefly explains the purpose of the surveys; describes the survey methodology and…

  12. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)--2010 Annual Meeting. For Sight: The Future of Eye and Vision Research--part 1.

    PubMed

    Hookes, Livia

    2010-07-01

    The 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), held in Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of eye and vision research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of FOV-2304 (Fovea Pharmaceuticals SA) for the potential treatment of diabetic macular edema; PHA-666859 (Pfizer Inc) for diabetic retinopathy; GTx-878 (GTx Inc) and FCFD-4514S (Genentech Inc) for age-related macular degeneration; SYL-040012 (Sylentis Sau) for ocular hypertension associated with open-angle glaucoma; PEG-PLA-TNP-470 (Harvard Medical School) for ocular neovascularization; recombinant galectin-3 (Senju Pharmaceutical Co Ltd) for corneal injury; and CellBead Neuro (CellMed Inc) for neurological trauma and neurodegeneration.

  13. Relationships Matter: Some Benefits, Challenges and Tensions Associated with Forming a Collaborative Educational Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sandie; Murray, E.; Rivalland, C.; Monk, H.; Piazza-McFarland, L.; Daniel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Growing recognition of the complexity of children's lives has led to strong advocacy in education research literature for greater collaboration between researchers from different paradigms to address the "wicked" problems that face contemporary children and families. There is little literature, however, exploring how collaboration…

  14. Dealing with Data: Science Librarians' Participation in Data Management at Association of Research Libraries Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Jody Bales; Turner, Jaymie; Shults, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As long as empirical research has existed, researchers have been doing "data management" in one form or another. However, funding agency mandates for doing formal data management are relatively recent, and academic libraries' involvement has been concentrated mainly in the last few years. The National Science Foundation implemented a new…

  15. Directory of Human Sciences Research Organizations and Professional Associations in South Africa. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Berg, Henda, Ed.; Prinsloo, Roelf, Ed.; Pienaar, Drienie, Ed.

    This directory is intended to be a comprehensive reference source for identifying research organizations and institutions, and for promoting research cooperation and facilitating networking. This second edition provides a broad background to the development of the human sciences as well as an overview of existing and emerging science and…

  16. Current trends in research and clinical issues in the study of personality and its disorders: a survey of the presentations at the ISSPD anniversary congress.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik; Sørensen, Per; Pedersen, Liselotte

    2014-10-01

    The International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders (ISSPD) celebrated its 25th anniversary in September 2013 in Copenhagen and commemorated the First International Congress at the same site. The overall theme of the congress was "Bridging Personality and Psychopathology: The Person Behind the Illness." More than 400 abstracts were submitted, and the program included 8 keynote presentations, 18 invited symposia, a debate on current controversial issues in the classification of personality disorders (Fossati, Tyrer, Livesley, and Krueger), an ISSPD award lecture (Silk), a jubilee lecture (Simonsen), a young researchers' symposium (Hopwood, Sharp, and Kaess), and special lectures on the Danish philosopher Soeren Kierkegaard and the poet Hans Christian Andersen. In this article we will survey the presentations and highlight the important issues in order to underline the current trends in research and clinical interests in personality disorders. The keynote video presentations, invited symposia, and slide presentations are freely available at www.isspd2013.com.

  17. An Associative Memory Model for Integration of Fragmented Research Data and Identification of Treatment Correlations in Breast Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Khan, Mridul; Higgins, John; Giani, Annarita; Das, Amar K

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in advancing scientific discoveries using data-driven clinical research is the fragmentation of relevant data among multiple information systems. This fragmentation requires significant data-engineering work before correlations can be found among data attributes in multiple systems. In this paper, we focus on integrating information on breast cancer care, and present a novel computational approach to identify correlations between administered drugs captured in an electronic medical records and biological factors obtained from a tumor registry through rapid data aggregation and analysis. We use an associative memory (AM) model to encode all existing associations among the data attributes from both systems in a high-dimensional vector space. The AM model stores highly associated data items in neighboring memory locations to enable efficient querying operations. The results of applying AM to a set of integrated data on tumor markers and drug administrations discovered anomalies between clinical recommendations and derived associations.

  18. Ethical issues associated with the use of animal experimentation in behavioral neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Frauke; Meijboom, Franck

    2015-01-01

    This chapter briefly explores whether there are distinct characteristics in the field of Behavioral Neuroscience that demand specific ethical reflection. We argue that although the ethical issues in animal-based Behavioral Neuroscience are not necessarily distinct from those in other research disciplines using animal experimentation, this field of endeavor makes a number of specific, ethically relevant, questions more explicit and, as a result, may expose to discussion a series of ethical issues that have relevance beyond this field of science. We suggest that innovative research, by its very definition, demands out-of-the-box thinking. At the same time, standardization of animal models and test procedures for the sake of comparability across experiments inhibits the potential and willingness to leave well-established tracks of thinking, and leaves us wondering how open minded research is and whether it is the researcher's established perspective that drives the research rather than the research that drives the researcher's perspective. The chapter finishes by introducing subsequent chapters of this book volume on Ethical Issues in Behavioral Neuroscience.

  19. Future research needs associated with the assessment of potential human health risks from exposure to toxic ambient air pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Möller, L; Schuetzle, D; Autrup, H

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents key conclusions and future research needs from a Workshop on the Risk Assessment of Urban Air, Emissions, Exposure, Risk Identification, and Quantification, which was held in Stockholm during June 1992 by 41 participants from 13 countries. Research is recommended in the areas of identification and quantification of toxics in source emissions and ambient air, atmospheric transport and chemistry, exposure level assessment, the development of improved in vitro bioassays, biomarker development, the development of more accurate epidemiological methodologies, and risk quantification techniques. Studies are described that will be necessary to assess and reduce the level of uncertainties associated with each step of the risk assessment process. International collaborative research efforts between industry and government organizations are recommended as the most effective way to carry out this research. PMID:7529703

  20. Behavioral Outcomes of Supervisory Education in the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education: A Qualitative Research Study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Orme-Rogers, Charles; Bush, Johnny C; Stowman, Sheryl Lyndes; Seeger, Rodney W

    2016-03-01

    This study advances the work of developing a theory for educating Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Supervisors by describing the behaviors which result from the successful completion of CPE supervisory education. Twenty-eight Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) Certification Commissioners were interviewed to identify the behaviors demonstrated by Supervisory Education Students (Candidates) which influenced the decision to certify them at the level of Associate Supervisor. Specific behavioral descriptors are listed for each ACPE supervisory competency. PMID:26956745

  1. Behavioral Outcomes of Supervisory Education in the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education: A Qualitative Research Study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Orme-Rogers, Charles; Bush, Johnny C; Stowman, Sheryl Lyndes; Seeger, Rodney W

    2016-03-01

    This study advances the work of developing a theory for educating Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Supervisors by describing the behaviors which result from the successful completion of CPE supervisory education. Twenty-eight Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) Certification Commissioners were interviewed to identify the behaviors demonstrated by Supervisory Education Students (Candidates) which influenced the decision to certify them at the level of Associate Supervisor. Specific behavioral descriptors are listed for each ACPE supervisory competency.

  2. Epidemiologic Research on Malformations Associated with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Japan.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hiroshi; Iida, Koichi; Maeda, Tomoki; Takahashi, Mizuho; Fukushima, Naoki; Goshi, Terufumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate malformations associated with cleft lip and cleft palate, we conducted surveys at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and other non-NICU facilities and to determine whether there are differences among facilities. The regional survey investigated NICU facilities located in Oita Prefecture, including 92 patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) or cleft palate (CP) that occurred between 2004 and 2013, and the national survey investigated oral surgery, plastic surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology facilities located in Japan, including 16,452 patients with cleft lip (CL), CLP, or CP that occurred since 2000. The incidence per 10,000 births was 4.2, 6.2, and 2.8 for CL, CLP, and CP, respectively, according to the national survey, and 6.3 and 2.9 for CLP and CP, respectively according to the regional survey. These results indicated comparable incidences between the two surveys. In contrast, when the survey results on malformations associated with CLP and CP according to the ICD-10 classification were compared between the national survey conducted at oral surgery or plastic surgery facilities and the regional survey conducted at NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was 19.8% vs. 41.3% for any types of associated malformation, 6.8% vs. 21.7% for congenital heart disease, and 0.5% vs. 16.3% for chromosomal abnormalities. These results indicated that the incidences of all of these associated malformations were significantly greater in the survey conducted at NICU facilities and similar to the findings from international epidemiological surveys. When comparing the survey conducted at obstetrics facilities vs. NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was similar results as above. The incidence of CLP and CP was not different between surveys conducted at NICU facilities vs. non-NICU facilities; however, when conducting surveys on associated malformations, it is possible to obtain accurate epidemiological data by

  3. Epidemiologic Research on Malformations Associated with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroshi; Iida, Koichi; Maeda, Tomoki; Takahashi, Mizuho; Fukushima, Naoki; Goshi, Terufumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate malformations associated with cleft lip and cleft palate, we conducted surveys at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and other non-NICU facilities and to determine whether there are differences among facilities. The regional survey investigated NICU facilities located in Oita Prefecture, including 92 patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) or cleft palate (CP) that occurred between 2004 and 2013, and the national survey investigated oral surgery, plastic surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology facilities located in Japan, including 16,452 patients with cleft lip (CL), CLP, or CP that occurred since 2000. The incidence per 10,000 births was 4.2, 6.2, and 2.8 for CL, CLP, and CP, respectively, according to the national survey, and 6.3 and 2.9 for CLP and CP, respectively according to the regional survey. These results indicated comparable incidences between the two surveys. In contrast, when the survey results on malformations associated with CLP and CP according to the ICD-10 classification were compared between the national survey conducted at oral surgery or plastic surgery facilities and the regional survey conducted at NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was 19.8% vs. 41.3% for any types of associated malformation, 6.8% vs. 21.7% for congenital heart disease, and 0.5% vs. 16.3% for chromosomal abnormalities. These results indicated that the incidences of all of these associated malformations were significantly greater in the survey conducted at NICU facilities and similar to the findings from international epidemiological surveys. When comparing the survey conducted at obstetrics facilities vs. NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was similar results as above. The incidence of CLP and CP was not different between surveys conducted at NICU facilities vs. non-NICU facilities; however, when conducting surveys on associated malformations, it is possible to obtain accurate epidemiological data by

  4. [Pharmacogenetic research in the association between human leukocyte antigen and adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoping

    2014-07-01

    With the rapid development of pharmacogenetics, more and more studies have shown evidence in the association between polymorphisms at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci and severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). Several HLA-B alleles proved to be associated with SADRs for drugs such as carbamazepine, allopurinol, lamotrigine, and flucloxacillin. The USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has even recommended routine screening for HLA-B allele before the use of abacavir and carbamazepine. With the completion of human genome project and the Hapmap project, several new pharmacogenetics approaches such as genome-wide association study (GWAS) have emerged. These newly developed methods will undoubtedly accelerate the identification and clinical utilization of the pharmacogenetic biomakers. In addition, the immunogenetic mechanisms by which the HLA alleles cause SADRs are explored at the cellular and molecular level. This review focuses on the recent progresses in HLA alleles and ADRs regarding both the clinical translation and modern pharmacogenetic methods. PMID:25080918

  5. The dysregulated cluster in personality profiling research: Longitudinal stability and associations with bulimic behaviors and correlates

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Jennifer D.; Klump, Kelly L.; Donnellan, M. Brent; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Among cluster analytic studies of the personality profiles associated with bulimia nervosa, a group of individuals characterized by emotional lability and behavioral dysregulation (i.e., a dysregulated cluster) has emerged most consistently. However, previous studies have all been cross-sectional and mostly used clinical samples. This study aimed to replicate associations between the dysregulated personality cluster and bulimic symptoms and related characteristics using a longitudinal, population-based sample. Participants were females assessed at ages 17 and 25 from the Minnesota Twin Family Study, clustered based on their personality traits. The Dysregulated cluster was successfully identified at both time points and was more stable across time than either the Resilient or Sensation Seeking clusters. Rates of bulimic symptoms and related behaviors (e.g., alcohol use problems) were also highest in the dysregulated group. Findings suggest that the dysregulated cluster is a relatively stable and robust profile that is associated with bulimic symptoms. PMID:23398096

  6. Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, Anne D., Ed.

    This book is a collection of six papers presented at a 1974 University of Minnesota symposium on child development. The six chapters deal with language acquisition, visual perception, effects of television viewing, the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), problem-solving strategies, and Piagetian concepts related to social development. The first…

  7. Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John P., Ed.

    Ten schizophrenic and autistic children who exhibited self destructive, tantrum, echolalic, and self stimulatory behaviors were treated by reinforcement therapy. Reinforcement withdrawal, in the form of interpersonal isolation contingent upon self-destruction, and electrical shocks served to extinguish these behaviors in some children.…

  8. [Management of biofilm-associated infections: what can we expect from recent research on biofilm lifestyles?].

    PubMed

    Lebeaux, David; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated microbial communities present in all environments. Although biofilms play important ecological roles, they also lead to negative or deleterious effects in industrial and medical settings. In the latter, high levels of antibiotic tolerance of bacterial biofilms developing on medical devices and during chronic infections determine the physiopathology of many healthcare-associated infections. Original approaches have been developed to avoid bacterial adhesion or biofilm development targetting specific mechanisms or pathways. We herein review recent data about biofilm lifestyle understanding and ways to fight against related infections.

  9. Helmet-mounted display and associated research activities recently conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1994-06-01

    To enhance manned extravehicular activity (EVA) utilizing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)(i.e., a space suit and portable life support backpack), NASA has conducted research into implementing helmet mounted display (HMD) and related technology within its next generation of space suits. The NASA/Johnson Space Center has completed four feasibility development programs for the design and development of an EMU HMD, each resulting in the delivery of a binocular or biocular HMD breadboard unit utilizing conventional optical elements (i.e., glass lenses and beamsplitters) and/or holographic optics. Additional research into combining the use of voice recognition for astronaut 'hands- free' access to information via the HMD has also been conducted. Research conducted since 1983 will be summarized along with current shuttle EMU display enhancements. In addition, recommendations for the design of the next generation of displays for use within the EMU will be presented.

  10. A Scientometric Study of Research Papers Published by Visiting Associates of IUCAA, Pune, India during 2003-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, V. K.; Senger, K. P. S.; Pathak, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    The Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) is set up by the University Grants Commission (UGC) to promote the development and growth of active groups in astronomy and astrophysics at Indian universities. To highlight the IUCAA Associates program and associates' output during their tenure in the program, we decided to study the academic scientific output of IUCAA associates from 2003 to 2013. This paper is an Informetric analysis of 1009 papers published by IUCAA associates from 2003 to 2013, compiled and downloaded from the institute's website, annual reports, and the ADS. There is no doubt that collaboration is a common phenomenon in research. This paper examines the collaborative strength and patterns of authorship among IUCAA associates, covering a period of 10 years. The results of the data were analyzed based on the number of articles published per year, patterns of authorship, and the degree and strength of collaboration of authors. Further, the study investigated highly prolific authors and highly preferred journals by the IUCAA associates during the study period.

  11. An Examination of the Navy's Associate Degree Completion Program; A Research Report Submitted to the Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornsley, John T.

    The present Associate Degree Completion Program (ADCOP), which enrolls approximately 2,700 senior enlisted personnel in 14 junior colleges for full-time vocational/technical study at Navy expense, is costly and of little tangible benefit to the Navy. The ADCOP was designed in 1966 as a method of retraining career enlisted personnel and encouraging…

  12. The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Rio Hondo College: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Joseph

    During 1975-76, an evaluation of the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Rio Hondo College was undertaken which involved: (1) surveying all nursing graduates in the classes of 1973, 1974, and 1975, and all fourth semester students currently enrolled in the program; (2) surveying or interviewing all instructional staff for the ADN program;…

  13. Mechanisms Underlying Latent Disease Risk Associated with Early-Life Arsenic Exposure: Current Research Trends and Scientific Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathryn A.; Smith, Allan H.; Tokar, Erik J.; Graziano, Joseph H.; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Navasumrit, Panida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Suk, William A.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Millions of individuals worldwide, particularly those living in rural and developing areas, are exposed to harmful levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in their drinking water. Inorganic As exposure during key developmental periods is associated with a variety of adverse health effects, including those that are evident in adulthood. There is considerable interest in identifying the molecular mechanisms that relate early-life iAs exposure to the development of these latent diseases, particularly in relationship to cancer. Objectives This work summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms that underlie the increased risk of cancer development in adulthood that is associated with early-life iAs exposure. Discussion Epigenetic reprogramming that imparts functional changes in gene expression, the development of cancer stem cells, and immunomodulation are plausible underlying mechanisms by which early-life iAs exposure elicits latent carcinogenic effects. Conclusions Evidence is mounting that relates early-life iAs exposure and cancer development later in life. Future research should include animal studies that address mechanistic hypotheses and studies of human populations that integrate early-life exposure, molecular alterations, and latent disease outcomes. Citation Bailey KA, Smith AH, Tokar EJ, Graziano JH, Kim KW, Navasumrit P, Ruchirawat M, Thiantanawat A, Suk WA, Fry RC. 2016. Mechanisms underlying latent disease risk associated with early-life arsenic exposure: current research trends and scientific gaps. Environ Health Perspect 124:170–175; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409360 PMID:26115410

  14. A Report on the Activities, Publications, and Pending Research of DHS/DOD Sponsored Post-doctoral Research Associate at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Floyd E.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-04-26

    Since beginning at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February of 2012, I have been working as a DHS./DNDO Postdoctoral Research Associate under the mentorship of Lav Tandon and Khalil Spencer (NA-22 and mass spectrometry). The focus of my efforts, in addition to pursuing needed training and qualifications, has been the application of various instrumental approaches (e.g. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry; TIMS) to a range of systems of interest in materials characterization and nuclear forensics. Research to be pursued in the coming months shall include the continued use of such approaches to advance current methods for: modified total evaporation, monitoring critical minor isotope systems, and chronometry. Each of the above points will be discussed.

  15. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)--2010 Annual Meeting. For Sight: The Future of Eye and Vision Research--part 2.

    PubMed

    Hookes, Livia

    2010-07-01

    The 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), held in Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of eye and vision research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of OT-440 (Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc) for the potential treatment of glaucoma, an extended-release implant of brimonidine (pSivida Corp) for ocular hypertension, AR-12286 (Aerie Pharmaceuticals Inc) for ocular hypertension or glaucoma, AC-8 (Calmune Corp/RiboVax Biotechnologies SA) for ocular diseases following HSV infection, and fidarestat (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co Ltd) and the recombinant proteins NOV and NOVCter (INSERM/University Rene Descartes) for corneal neovascularization.

  16. Research and Teaching: Association of Summer Bridge Program Outcomes with STEM Retention of Targeted Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasko, David L.; Ridgway, Judith S.; Waller, Rocquel J.; Olesik, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major has been studied for four cohorts participating in a summer bridge program supported by the National Science Foundation. Students participated in a 6-week program prior to their first term of enrollment at a research-intensive land grant university. Comparisons…

  17. Maryland 2000. Journal of the Maryland Association for Institutional Research, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A., Ed.; Huntington, Robin B., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This volume offers nine papers on higher education research in Maryland all of which were presented at annual meetings from 1990 through 1993. The following papers are included: (1) "The Geo-Demographic Approach to Student Recruitment: The PG-TRAK90" Lifestyle Cluster System" (Karl Boughan); (2) "Evaluating College Services: A QUEST for…

  18. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... workshop regarding FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research professional... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  19. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. The Information Search Process: A Study of Elements Associated with Meaningful Research Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study at a Michigan high school that investigated elements that contributed to a meaningful library research task. Highlights include information literacy; students' feelings of satisfaction and achievement; student questionnaires and student and teacher interviews; group work; and process instruction. (LRW)

  2. The Information Search Process: A Study of Elements Associated with Meaningful Research Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated research projects at a secondary professional development school to determine successful task factors. Results show that student choice of topic, group work, topics related to course content, clear communication by teachers of goals and evaluation methods, and process instruction were related to student…

  3. Treatment Integrity in Psychotherapy Research: Analysis of the Studies and Examination of the Associated Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Treat, Teresa A.; Kazdin, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment integrity refers to the degree to which an intervention is delivered as intended. Two studies evaluated the adequacy of treatment integrity procedures (including establishing, assessing, evaluating, and reporting integrity; therapist treatment adherence; and therapist competence) implemented in psychotherapy research, as well as…

  4. Education, Science, and the Politics of Knowledge: The American Educational Research Association, 1915-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershon, Sherie; Schlossman, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, a new alliance formed between university-based scholars who dedicated themselves to the scientific study of education and public school officials. This alliance centered on the proposition that applied research could advance the professionalization of schooling and become a prestigious academic specialty in its own…

  5. American Vocational Education Research Association Proceedings (Cincinnati, Ohio, December 5-8, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmann, Donna H., Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Research and Teaching from the Web/Multimedia" (Swan); "Vocational Teachers' Attitude toward, Knowledge of, and Use of National Skill Standards" (Belcher, McCaslin); "Predicting the Leadership Effectiveness of Vocational Education Administrators" (Daughtry, Finch); "Coping Behaviors and Transitions of Managerial…

  6. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  7. Water Footprint Assessment and the Panta Rhei research initiative of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H.

    2014-12-01

    "Panta Rhei - Everything Flows" is the new scientific decade, 2013-2022, of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). It is dedicated to understanding issues linked with the interactions between hydrology and society in the context of change. The purpose of Panta Rhei is to reach an improved interpretation of the processes governing the water cycle in the Anthropocene, an improved prediction of such systems, and where possible to provide input for policy and practice, aimed at water security, human wellbeing and development. This talk discusses the research initiative, explores the possibility of research innovations offered by the research initiative and how water footprint assessment is a valuable tool to understand and assess human impacts on the water cycle in the Anthropocene.

  8. Highlights from the 2016 Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference, April 2-6, 2016.

    PubMed

    Solis, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS) Conference, held in Florence, Italy, attracted approximately 1,800 attendees from over 54 countries to the stately Firenze Fiera Conference Center from April 2-6, 2016. Providing plenary sessions, special sessions, symposia, workshops, oral presentations and poster presentations, this 5th Biennial SIRS Conference focused on "Deconstructing Schizophrenia towards Targeted Treatment." In conjunction with the Schizophrenia Research Forum, a Web project of the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and with our thanks to the SIRS organizers and staff, we bring you the following selected highlights.

  9. Highlights from the 2016 Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference, April 2-6, 2016.

    PubMed

    Solis, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS) Conference, held in Florence, Italy, attracted approximately 1,800 attendees from over 54 countries to the stately Firenze Fiera Conference Center from April 2-6, 2016. Providing plenary sessions, special sessions, symposia, workshops, oral presentations and poster presentations, this 5th Biennial SIRS Conference focused on "Deconstructing Schizophrenia towards Targeted Treatment." In conjunction with the Schizophrenia Research Forum, a Web project of the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and with our thanks to the SIRS organizers and staff, we bring you the following selected highlights. PMID:27440209

  10. Melanoma Associated with TNFα Inhibitors: a Research on Adverse Drug events And Reports (RADAR) Project

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, B.; Hammel, J.A.; Raisch, D.W.; Weaver, L.L.; Schneider, D.; West, D.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors (TNFαIs) are used for treatment of inflammatory disorders. There is evidence linking these agents with occurrence of malignancies. For four out of five TNFαIs the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label states, “melanoma has been reported in patients treated with these agents.” Objectives Determine whether a statistically-significant association exists between administration of TNFαIs and development of malignant melanoma. Methods We searched the FDA Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) database for terms related to melanoma and TNFαIs for detection of safety signals. We also searched a large urban academic electronic medical record (EMR) database for which we calculated the relative risk (RR) of melanoma in subjects exposed to TNFαIs vs. non-exposed subjects. Results There were 972 reports of melanoma associated with a TNFαIs identified in the FAERS database, with 69 reports among individuals using more than one TNFαI. A safety signal was detected for infliximab (I) golimumab (G), etanercept (E), and adalimumab (A). Cetrolizumab pegol (CP) had no detectible safety signal. For TNFαIs as a class of drugs, a safety signal was detectable in the FAERS database, and RR was significant in the EMR database. For the EMR cohort, 6,045 patients were exposed to TNFαIs and 35 cases of melanoma were detected. Significance for RR was detected for A (RR = 1.8, p = 0.02) and E (RR 2.35, p = 0.0004). Conclusions We identified a significant association between exposure to TNFαIs and malignant melanoma in two different analyses. Our findings add to existing evidence linking these agents with the occurrence of malignant melanoma. Additional investigations are required to further explore this association and the risk of melanoma with TNFαI therapy. PMID:24328939

  11. Controversies and challenges in research on urogenital schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Honeycutt, Jared; Hammam, Olfat; Fu, Chi-Ling; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Urogenital schistosomiasis, infection with Schistosoma haematobium, is linked to increased risk for the development of bladder cancer, but the importance of various mechanisms responsible for this association remains unclear, in part due to lack of sufficient and appropriate animal models. New advances in the study of this parasite, bladder regenerative processes, and human schistosomal bladder cancers may shed new light on the complex biological processes that connect S. haematobium infection to bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24913983

  12. Big data challenges in bone research: genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Nerea; Lucas, Gavin; Hysi, Pirro

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been developed as a practical method to identify genetic loci associated with disease by scanning multiple markers across the genome. Significant advances in the genetics of complex diseases have been made owing to advances in genotyping technologies, the progress of projects such as HapMap and 1000G and the emergence of genetics as a collaborative discipline. Because of its great potential to be used in parallel by multiple collaborators, it is important to adhere to strict protocols assuring data quality and analyses. Quality control analyses must be applied to each sample and each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The software package PLINK is capable of performing the whole range of necessary quality control tests. Genotype imputation has also been developed to substantially increase the power of GWAS methodology. Imputation permits the investigation of associations at genetic markers that are not directly genotyped. Results of individual GWAS reports can be combined through meta-analysis. Finally, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has gained popularity in recent years through its capacity to analyse a much greater number of markers across the genome. Although NGS platforms are capable of examining a higher number of SNPs compared with GWA studies, the results obtained by NGS require careful interpretation, as their biological correlation is incompletely understood. In this article, we will discuss the basic features of such protocols. PMID:25709812

  13. Evaluation of Strategies to Separate Root-Associated Microbial Communities: A Crucial Choice in Rhizobiome Research

    PubMed Central

    Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Eickhorst, Thilo; Knauth, Stefan; Friedrich, Michael W.; Schmidt, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Plants shape distinct, species-specific microbiomes in their rhizospheres. A main premise for evaluating microbial communities associated with root-soil compartments is their successful separation into the rhizosphere (soil-root interface), the rhizoplane (root surface), and the endosphere (inside roots). We evaluated different approaches (washing, sonication, and bleaching) regarding their efficiency to separate microbial cells associated with different root compartments of soil-grown rice using fluorescence microscopy and community fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes. Vigorous washing detached 45% of the rhizoplane population compared to untreated roots. Additional sonication reduced rhizoplane-attached microorganisms by up to 78% but caused various degrees of root tissue destruction at all sonication intensities tested. Treatment with sodium hypochlorite almost completely (98%) removed rhizoplane-associated microbial cells. Community fingerprinting revealed that microbial communities obtained from untreated, washed, and sonicated roots were not statistically distinguishable. Hypochlorite-treated roots harbored communities significantly different from all other samples, likely representing true endospheric populations. Applying these procedures to other root samples (bean and clover) revealed that treatment efficiencies were strongly affected by root morphological parameters such as root hair density and rigidity of epidermis. Our findings suggest that a careful evaluation of separation strategies prior to molecular community analysis is indispensable, especially when endophytes are the subject of interest. PMID:27252690

  14. Evaluation of Strategies to Separate Root-Associated Microbial Communities: A Crucial Choice in Rhizobiome Research.

    PubMed

    Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Eickhorst, Thilo; Knauth, Stefan; Friedrich, Michael W; Schmidt, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Plants shape distinct, species-specific microbiomes in their rhizospheres. A main premise for evaluating microbial communities associated with root-soil compartments is their successful separation into the rhizosphere (soil-root interface), the rhizoplane (root surface), and the endosphere (inside roots). We evaluated different approaches (washing, sonication, and bleaching) regarding their efficiency to separate microbial cells associated with different root compartments of soil-grown rice using fluorescence microscopy and community fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes. Vigorous washing detached 45% of the rhizoplane population compared to untreated roots. Additional sonication reduced rhizoplane-attached microorganisms by up to 78% but caused various degrees of root tissue destruction at all sonication intensities tested. Treatment with sodium hypochlorite almost completely (98%) removed rhizoplane-associated microbial cells. Community fingerprinting revealed that microbial communities obtained from untreated, washed, and sonicated roots were not statistically distinguishable. Hypochlorite-treated roots harbored communities significantly different from all other samples, likely representing true endospheric populations. Applying these procedures to other root samples (bean and clover) revealed that treatment efficiencies were strongly affected by root morphological parameters such as root hair density and rigidity of epidermis. Our findings suggest that a careful evaluation of separation strategies prior to molecular community analysis is indispensable, especially when endophytes are the subject of interest. PMID:27252690

  15. Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF)

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Brunner, Edgar; Hildenbrand, Sibylle; Loew, Thomas H.; Raupach, Tobias; Spies, Claudia; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here. Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third-party funds and the

  16. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Ten Years A-Talking! Reflecting on the Role of the EERA Council from the Perspective of National Educational Research Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Joe; Holm, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on their personal experiences, the authors reflect on the relationship between the European Educational Research Association (EERA) Council and the National Educational Research Associations (NERAs). The article will argue that while much of the work undertaken by the EERA Council is hugely valuable, at times it can be difficult to see a…

  18. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer.

  19. RESEARCH: Perceptions of Risk Associated with Use of Farm Chemicals: Implications for Conservation Initiatives

    PubMed

    Tucker; Napier

    1998-07-01

    / Data were collected from 245 farmers within the Darby Creek hydrologic unit in central Ohio to assess perceptions of risk associated with use of farm chemicals. Farmers were asked to evaluate the level of risk associated with use of agricultural chemicals for water quality, food safety, food quality, health of applicator, health of farm animals, wildlife, beneficial plants, beneficial insects, and human health. Study findings revealed that respondents perceived use of farm chemicals posed little or no threat to any of the assessed items. A composite index was formulated from the responses to the nine items and was titled Perceived Risk. Variance in the Perceived Risk index was regressed against social learning variables. The findings revealed that approximately 32% of the variance was explained by the predictive variables included in the model. It was concluded that the theoretical perspective was somewhat useful for understanding perceptions held about agricultural chemical use at the farm level. The findings are discussed in the context of future conservation and educational-information programs within the study region.KEY WORDS: Risk perception; Risk assessment; Groundwater; Pesticide contamination; Food safety; Environmental quality

  20. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  1. Changes in heart rate variability associated with acute alcohol consumption: current knowledge and implications for practice and research.

    PubMed

    Romanowicz, Magdalena; Schmidt, John E; Bostwick, John M; Mrazek, David A; Karpyak, Victor M

    2011-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a broad array of physiologic and behavioral effects including changes in heart rate. However, the physiologic mechanisms of alcohol effects and the reasons for individual differences in the cardiac response remain unknown. Measuring changes in resting heart rate (measured as beats/min) has not been found to be as sensitive to alcohol's effects as changes in heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is defined as fluctuations in interbeat interval length which reflect the heart's response to extracardiac factors that affect heart rate. HRV allows simultaneous assessment of both sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and the interplay between them. Increased HRV has been associated with exercise and aerobic fitness, while decreased HRV has been associated with aging, chronic stress, and a wide variety of medical and psychiatric disorders. Decreased HRV has predictive value for mortality in general population samples and patients with myocardial infarction and used as an indicator of altered autonomic function. A significant inverse correlation was found between HRV and both the severity of depression and the duration of the depressive episode. HRV analysis provides insights into mechanisms of autonomic regulation and is extensively used to clarify relationships between depression and cardiovascular disease. This article will review the methodology of HRV measurements and contemporary knowledge about effects of acute alcohol consumption on HRV. Potential implications of this research include HRV response to alcohol that could serve as a marker for susceptibility to alcoholism. At present however there is almost no research data supporting this hypothesis. PMID:21332532

  2. A Global Perspective on Using Implementation Research to Address Hypertension-Associated Target Organ Damage.

    PubMed

    Peprah, Emmanuel; Lopez-Class, Maria; Shero, Susan; John-Sowah, Joylene; Engelgau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, imposes a significant public health burden and challenge to address it worldwide. Scaling up delivery of proven, effective interventions for hypertension could significantly advance the goal of reducing the global burden. Although significant progress has been made in many countries, some lament that large-scale initiatives focused on reducing blood pressure in global populations have not effectively addressed this challenge. Late-stage implementation research plays a critical role in determining effective and sustainable scale-up of these initiatives. In this article, we briefly discuss some of the global initiatives that have been funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the US National Institutes of Health. Intervention delivery strategies in low resource settings must have demonstrated effectiveness and consideration for the social, cultural and physical context (eg, access, affordability, and availability of medications) in which a program is being delivered in order to be sustainable nationally and globally. Hence, the use of implementation research is central to determining sustainable delivery of evidence-based and tailored interventions focused on hypertension control. The sustained control of hypertension in global populations holds tremendous potential for reducing morbidity, premature mortality, and the adverse economic impact of cardiovascular disease in all regions. PMID:27440980

  3. Antidepressants and Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Review of the Literature and Researchers' Financial Associations with Industry

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Lisa; Shi, Ling; Creasey, David E.; Anaya-McKivergan, Maria; Myers, Jessica A.; Huybrechts, Krista F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Antidepressant (AD) use has been purported to increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, although both epidemiological and pre-clinical studies have reported mixed results [1]–[6]. Previous studies in a variety of biomedical fields have found that financial ties to drug companies are associated with favorable study conclusions [7]. Methods and Findings We searched English-language articles in MEDLINE, PsychINFO, the Science Citations Index and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (through November 2010). A total of 61 articles that assessed the relationship between breast and ovarian cancer and AD use and articles that examined the effect of ADs on cell growth were included. Multi-modal screening techniques were used to investigate researchers' financial ties with industry. A random effects meta-analysis was used to pool the findings from the epidemiological literature. Thirty-three percent (20/61) of the studies reported a positive association between ADs and cancer. Sixty-seven percent (41/61) of the studies reported no association or antiproliferative effect. The pooled odds ratio for the association between AD use and breast/ovarian cancer in the epidemiologic studies was 1.11 (95% CI, 1.03–1.20). Researchers with industry affiliations were significantly less likely than researchers without those ties to conclude that ADs increase the risk of breast or ovarian cancer. (0/15 [0%] vs 20/46 [43.5%] (Fisher's Exact test P = 0.0012). Conclusions Both the pre-clinical and clinical data are mixed in terms of showing an association between AD use and breast and ovarian cancer. The possibility that ADs may exhibit a bi-phasic effect, whereby short-term use and/or low dose antidepressants may increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, warrants further investigation. Industry affiliations were significantly associated with negative conclusions regarding cancer risk. The findings have implications in light of the 2009

  4. Research Update: Synthesis, properties, and applications of ultrathin metallic nanowires and associated heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiqing; Li, Luyao; Scofield, Megan E.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials can change considerably and unexpectedly, when their diameters attain the "ultrathin" level, i.e., below 10 nm. Herein, we have summarized recent developments associated with not only the synthesis but also more importantly, the applications of ultrathin 1D nanowires. Specifically, various classes of ultrathin metallic nanowires have been shown to be excellent, high-performing structural motifs for electrocatalysts, superconducting materials, electrical devices, and nano-sized pressure sensors. Moreover, the fabrication of ultrathin-based 0D-1D, 1D-1D, and 1D-2D composite hybrid structures may represent one of the most promising designs for novel architectures in energy storage and conversion, photovoltaic devices, photoconductivity, and photoelectrocatalysis.

  5. Treatment integrity in psychotherapy research: analysis of the studies and examination of the associated factors.

    PubMed

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Treat, Teresa A; Kazdin, Alan E

    2007-12-01

    Treatment integrity refers to the degree to which an intervention is delivered as intended. Two studies evaluated the adequacy of treatment integrity procedures (including establishing, assessing, evaluating, and reporting integrity; therapist treatment adherence; and therapist competence) implemented in psychotherapy research, as well as predictors of their implementation. Randomized controlled trials of psychosocial interventions published in 6 influential psychological and psychiatric journals were reviewed and coded for treatment integrity implementation. Results indicate that investigations that systematically addressed treatment integrity procedures are virtually absent in the literature. Treatment integrity was adequately addressed for only 3.50% of the evaluated psychosocial interventions. Journal of publication and treatment approach predicted integrity implementation. Skill-building treatments (e.g., cognitive-behavioral) as compared with non-skill-building interventions (e.g., psychodynamic, nondirective counseling) were implemented with higher attention to integrity procedures. Guidelines for implementation of treatment integrity procedures need to be reevaluated.

  6. Issues in collecting, processing and storing human tissues and associated information to support biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Grizzle, William E; Bell, Walter C; Sexton, Katherine C

    2010-01-01

    The availability of human tissues to support biomedical research is critical to advance translational research focused on identifying and characterizing approaches to individualized (personalized) medical care. Providing such tissues relies on three acceptable models - a tissue banking model, a prospective collection model and a combination of these two models. An unacceptable model is the "catch as catch can" model in which tissues are collected, processed and stored without goals or a plan or without standard operating procedures, i.e., portions of tissues are collected as available and processed and stored when time permits. In the tissue banking model, aliquots of tissues are collected according to SOPs. Usually specific sizes and types of tissues are collected and processed (e.g., 0.1 gm of breast cancer frozen in OCT). Using the banking model, tissues may be collected that may not be used and/or do not meet specific needs of investigators; however, at the time of an investigator request, tissues are readily available as is clinical information including clinical outcomes. In the model of prospective collection, tissues are collected based upon investigator requests including specific requirements of investigators. For example, the investigator may request that two 0.15 gm matching aliquots of breast cancer be minced while fresh, put in RPMI media with and without fetal calf serum, cooled to 4°C and shipped to the investigator on wet ice. Thus, the tissues collected prospectively meet investigator needs, all collected specimens are utilized and storage of specimens is minimized; however, investigators must wait until specimens are collected, and if needed, for clinical outcome. The operation of any tissue repository requires well trained and dedicated personnel. A quality assurance program is required which provides quality control information on the diagnosis of a specimen that is matched specifically to the specimen provided to an investigator instead of an

  7. Field support, data analysis and associated research for the acoustic grenade sounding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Bullard, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature and horizontal winds in the 30 to 90 km altitude range of the upper atmosphere, were determined by acoustic grenade soundings conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia and Kourou, French Guiana. Field support provided at these locations included deployment of the large area microphone system, supervision, maintenance and operation of sound ranging stations; and coordination of activities. Data analysis efforts included the analysis of field data to determine upper atmospheric meteorological parameters. Profiles for upper atmospheric temperature, wind and density are provided in plots and tables for each of the acoustic grenade soundings conducted during the contract period. Research efforts were directed toward a systematic comparison of temperature data from acoustic grenade with other meteorological sensor probes in the upper atmosphere.

  8. Tumor-Associated Glycans and Their Role in Gynecological Cancers: Accelerating Translational Research by Novel High-Throughput Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Jacob, Francis; Fedier, Andre; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2012-01-01

    Glycans are important partners in many biological processes, including carcinogenesis. The rapidly developing field of functional glycomics becomes one of the frontiers of biology and biomedicine. Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids occurs commonly during malignant transformation and leads to the expression of specific tumor-associated glycans. The appearance of aberrant glycans on carcinoma cells is typically associated with grade, invasion, metastasis and overall poor prognosis. Cancer-associated carbohydrates are mostly located on the surface of cancer cells and are therefore potential diagnostic biomarkers. Currently, there is increasing interest in cancer-associated aberrant glycosylation, with growing numbers of characteristic cancer targets being detected every day. Breast and ovarian cancer are the most common and lethal malignancies in women, respectively, and potential glycan biomarkers hold promise for early detection and targeted therapies. However, the acceleration of research and comprehensive multi-target investigation of cancer-specific glycans could only be successfully achieved with the help of a combination of novel high-throughput glycomic approaches. PMID:24957768

  9. American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection: Overview of a powerful tool for orthodontic research and teaching.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Curry, Sean

    2015-08-01

    This article reports on the current status of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection--an AAOF-supported multi-institutional project that uses the Internet and cloud computing to collect and share craniofacial images and data for orthodontic research and education. The project gives investigators and clinicians all over the world online access to longitudinal information on craniofacial development in untreated children with malocclusions of various types. It also is a unique source of control samples for testing the validity of consensually accepted beliefs about the effects of orthodontic treatment or of failure to treat. PMID:26232829

  10. American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection: Overview of a powerful tool for orthodontic research and teaching.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Curry, Sean

    2015-08-01

    This article reports on the current status of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection--an AAOF-supported multi-institutional project that uses the Internet and cloud computing to collect and share craniofacial images and data for orthodontic research and education. The project gives investigators and clinicians all over the world online access to longitudinal information on craniofacial development in untreated children with malocclusions of various types. It also is a unique source of control samples for testing the validity of consensually accepted beliefs about the effects of orthodontic treatment or of failure to treat.

  11. The Universities in a Changing World--Adaptation or Guidance? Proceedings of the European Association for Institutional Research Forum (4th, Uppsala, Sweden, August 25-27, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Charles H., Ed.

    Changes in higher education that affect teaching and research are addressed in the proceedings of the 1982 forum of the European Association for Institutional Research. In addition to six invited papers on adaptation or guidance of universities, papers on faculty, resources and cost indicators, research facilities and equipment, and institutional…

  12. Use of a modified Delphi approach to develop research priorities for the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Tiernan, J; Cook, A; Geh, I; George, B; Magill, L; Northover, J; Verjee, A; Wheeler, J; Fearnhead, N

    2014-01-01

    Aim The modified Delphi approach is an established method for reaching a consensus opinion among a group of experts in a particular field. We have used this technique to survey the entire membership of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI) to reach a consensus on prioritizing clinical research questions in colorectal disease. Method Three rounds of surveys were conducted using a web-based tool. In the first, the ACPGBI membership was invited to submit research questions. In Rounds 2 and 3 they were asked to score questions on priority. A steering group analysed the results of each round to identify those questions ranked as being of highest priority. Results Five hundred and two questions were submitted in Round 1. Following two rounds of voting and analysis, a list of 25 priority questions was produced, including 15 cancer-related and 10 noncancer-related questions. Conclusion It is anticipated that these results will: (i) set the research agenda over the next few years for the study of colorectal disease in the United Kingdom, (ii) promote development and (iii) define funding of new research and prioritize areas of unmet clinical need where the potential clinical impact is greatest. PMID:25284641

  13. Tohoku Earthquake-associated Marine Sciences: the research project for the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazato, Hiroshi; Kijima, Akihiro; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Hara, Motoyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Fujikura, Kasunori; Sonoda, Akira

    2015-04-01

    At 2:46 pm on March 11, 2011, a huge earthquake (M 9.0) occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Region, Japan. The subsequent Tsunamis hit the coasts and seriously damaged fishing villages and towns in the area. Tohoku Region faces Northwestern Pacific where is one of the most productive oceans on the Earth. Then, what happened to the marine ecosystems in the Tohoku Region? What happened to the fishery bioresources? What is the mechanism to sustain high productivity in the Region? Is the ecosystem restoring after 4 years? What is required for the recovery of fisheries in the area? In order to answer these questions, the 10 years research project, TEAMS (Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Sciences) was launched in January 2012 funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) to conduct comprehensive research on the area. Tohoku University (TU), Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, the University of Tokyo (AORIUT), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), and 25 other institutions are conducting research for this project in close association with local government and fishery people. Currently, approximately 400 people (200 scientists, 160 students and others) covering physical, chemical, biological, and geological sciences including modeling take part in the project from all over Japan. MEXT also supports TEAMS by constructing R/V Shinsei Maru in 2013 for the oceanic investigations in the region. In this report, the overview of the ecosystem before and after the disaster, major findings and challenges of TEAMS will be described.

  14. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2006-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by quality-control failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen expressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians.

  15. Additional research on instabilities in atmospheric flow systems associated with clear air turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental fluid mechanics studies were conducted to investigate instabilities in atmospheric flow systems associated with clear air turbulence. The experimental portion of the program was conducted using an open water channel which allows investigation of flows having wide ranges of shear and density stratification. The program was primarily directed toward studies of the stability of straight, stratified shear flows with particular emphasis on the effects of velocity profile on stability; on studies of three-dimensional effects on the breakdown region in shear layers; on the the interaction of shear flows with long-wave length internal waves; and on the stability of shear flows consisting of adjacent stable layers. The results of these studies were used to evaluate methods used in analyses of CAT encounters in the atmosphere involving wave-induced shear layer instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholta type. A computer program was developed for predicting shear-layer instability and CAT induced by mountain waves. This technique predicts specific altitudes and locations where CAT would be expected.

  16. Recent advances in globin research using genome-wide association studies and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-03-01

    A long-sought goal in the hemoglobin field has been an improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the switch from fetal (HbF) to adult (HbA) hemoglobin during development. With such knowledge, the hope is that strategies for directed reactivation of HbF in adults could be devised as an approach to therapy for the β-hemoglobinopathies thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to identification of three loci (BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB, and the β-globin cluster itself) in which natural genetic variation is correlated with different HbF levels in populations. Here, the central role of BCL11A in control of HbF is reviewed from the perspective of how findings may be translated to gene therapy in the not-too-distant future. This summary traces the evolution of recent studies from the initial recognition of BCL11A through GWAS to identification of critical sequences in an enhancer required for its erythroid-specific expression, thereby highlighting an Achilles heel for genome editing.

  17. Increased Perceived Stress is Associated with Blunted Hedonic Capacity: Potential Implications for Depression Research

    PubMed Central

    Pizzagalli, Diego A.; Bogdan, Ryan; Ratner, Kyle G.; Jahn, Allison L.

    2007-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that stress exerts depressogenic effects by impairing hedonic capacity; in humans, however, the precise mechanisms linking stress and depression are largely unknown. As an initial step towards better understanding the association between stress and anhedonia, the present study tested, in two independent samples, whether individuals reporting elevated stress exhibit decreased hedonic capacity. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) measured the degree to which participants appraised their daily life as unpredictable, uncontrollable, and overwhelming. Hedonic capacity was objectively assessed using a signal-detection task based on a differential reinforcement schedule. Decreased reward responsiveness (i.e., the participants' propensity to modulate behavior as a function of reward) was used as an operational measure of hedonic capacity. In both Study 1 (n = 88) and Study 2 (n = 80), participants with high PSS scores displayed blunted reward responsiveness and reported elevated anhedonic symptoms. Additionally, PSS scores predicted reduced reward responsiveness even after controlling for general distress and anxiety symptoms. These findings are consistent with preclinical data highlighting links between stress and anhedonia, and offer promising insights into potential mechanisms linking stress to depression. PMID:17854766

  18. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by qualitycontrol failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen ex-pressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians.

  19. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2006-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by quality-control failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen expressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:16910351

  20. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by qualitycontrol failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen ex-pressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:19364084

  1. Physiological Effects Associated with Quinoa Consumption and Implications for Research Involving Humans: a Review.

    PubMed

    Simnadis, Thomas George; Tapsell, Linda C; Beck, Eleanor J

    2015-09-01

    Quinoa is a pseudo-grain consumed as a dietary staple in South America. In recent years, consumer demand for quinoa in the developed world has grown steadily. Its perceived health benefits have been cited as a driving force behind this trend, but there are very few human studies investigating the impact of quinoa consumption. The aim of this review was to identify physiological effects of quinoa consumption with potential for human health. A critical evaluation of animal model studies was conducted. The quality of identified studies was assessed using a methodological quality assessment tool and summative conclusions were drawn to guide the direction of future human research. The majority of studies were of fair quality. Purported physiological effects of quinoa consumption included decreased weight gain, improved lipid profile and improved capacity to respond to oxidative stress. These physiological effects were attributed to the presence of saponins, protein and 20-hydroxyecdysone in the quinoa seed. The implications of these findings are that human studies should investigate the impact of quinoa consumption on weight gain and lipid levels. The role of quinoa as an antioxidant is still unclear and requires further elucidation in animal models.

  2. Physiological Effects Associated with Quinoa Consumption and Implications for Research Involving Humans: a Review.

    PubMed

    Simnadis, Thomas George; Tapsell, Linda C; Beck, Eleanor J

    2015-09-01

    Quinoa is a pseudo-grain consumed as a dietary staple in South America. In recent years, consumer demand for quinoa in the developed world has grown steadily. Its perceived health benefits have been cited as a driving force behind this trend, but there are very few human studies investigating the impact of quinoa consumption. The aim of this review was to identify physiological effects of quinoa consumption with potential for human health. A critical evaluation of animal model studies was conducted. The quality of identified studies was assessed using a methodological quality assessment tool and summative conclusions were drawn to guide the direction of future human research. The majority of studies were of fair quality. Purported physiological effects of quinoa consumption included decreased weight gain, improved lipid profile and improved capacity to respond to oxidative stress. These physiological effects were attributed to the presence of saponins, protein and 20-hydroxyecdysone in the quinoa seed. The implications of these findings are that human studies should investigate the impact of quinoa consumption on weight gain and lipid levels. The role of quinoa as an antioxidant is still unclear and requires further elucidation in animal models. PMID:26249220

  3. The Role of Institutional Research in Institutional Governance. Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (8th, Wrightsville, North Carolina, November 12-24, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research, which focused on the role of institutional research in institutional governance, are presented. Contents are as follows: "The Role of Institutional Research in Academic Program Evaluation: An Overview" (Dennis R. Hengstler); "The Role of Institutional…

  4. Institutional Research and Planning in the Next Decade. Proceedings from the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (10th, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 16-18, 1983). Tenth Anniversary Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1983 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research are presented. The contribution of institutional research to university decision making and the topics of student outcomes assessment, retention/attrition studies, marketing/market research, departmental studies, computer and technological applications, and…

  5. Preservation: A Research Library Priority for the 1990s. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (111th, Washington, D.C., October 21-22, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.; Merrill-Oldham, Jan, Ed.

    These minutes of the October 1987 ARL (Association of Research Libraries) membership meeting include the following papers on preservation in the research library: (1) "A Challenge for Research Libraries" (David C. Weber); (2) "The Moral Imperative of Conservation" (James H. Billington); (3) "The Role of the Library Director: Wherefore and…

  6. International Association for Promoting Geoethics (IAPG): an update on activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Bobrowsky, Peter; Kieffer, Susan; Peppoloni, Silvia; Tinti, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The International Association for Promoting Geoethics (IAPG: http://www.geoethics.org) was founded on August 2012 to unite global geoscientists to raise the awareness of the scientific community regarding the importance of the ethical, social and cultural implications of geoscience research, education, and practice. IAPG is an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussion on ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, promoting geoethical themes through scientific publications and conferences, strengthening the research base on geoethics, and focusing on case-studies as models for the development of effective and operative strategies. IAPG is legally recognized as a not-for-profit organization. It is a non-governmental, non-political, non-party institution, at all times free from racial, gender, religious or national prejudices. Its network continues to grow with more than 900 members in 103 countries, including 20 national sections. IAPG operates exclusively through donations and personal funds of its members. The results achieved since inception have been recognized by numerous international organizations. In particular, IAPG has obtained the status of affiliated organization by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), American Geosciences Institute (AGI), Geological Society of America (GSA), and the Geological Society of London (GSL). IAPG has enlarged its official relationships also through agreements on collaboration with other organizations, such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU), EuroGeoSurveys (EGS), European Federation of Geologists (EFG), Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists (AEG), International Geoscience Education Organisation (IGEO), African Association of Women in Geosciences (AAWG), and others. IAPG considers publications as an indispensable activity to strengthen geoethics from a scientific point of view, so members are active in the publication of articles and editing of books on

  7. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen

    In May of 1999, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences hosted a conference on ways to improve the scientific quality of educational research. In medicine, thanks to work 40 years ago by 2 researchers, Howard Hyatt and Frederick Mosteller, the commitment of medical professionals to base their diagnoses and prescriptions on clinical trials in…

  8. Environment-wide association study (EWAS) for type 2 diabetes in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project Biobank.

    PubMed

    Hall, Molly A; Dudek, Scott M; Goodloe, Robert; Crawford, Dana C; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Peissig, Peggy; Brilliant, Murray; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2014-01-01

    Environment-wide association studies (EWAS) provide a way to uncover the environmental mechanisms involved in complex traits in a high-throughput manner. Genome-wide association studies have led to the discovery of genetic variants associated with many common diseases but do not take into account the environmental component of complex phenotypes. This EWAS assesses the comprehensive association between environmental variables and the outcome of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project Biobank (Marshfield PMRP). We sought replication in two National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The Marshfield PMRP currently uses four tools for measuring environmental exposures and outcome traits: 1) the PhenX Toolkit includes standardized exposure and phenotypic measures across several domains, 2) the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) is a food frequency questionnaire, 3) the Measurement of a Person's Habitual Physical Activity scores the level of an individual's physical activity, and 4) electronic health records (EHR) employs validated algorithms to establish T2D case-control status. Using PLATO software, 314 environmental variables were tested for association with T2D using logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, and BMI in over 2,200 European Americans. When available, similar variables were tested with the same methods and adjustment in samples from NHANES III and NHANES 1999-2002. Twelve and 31 associations were identified in the Marshfield samples at p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively. Seven and 13 measures replicated in at least one of the NHANES at p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively, with the same direction of effect. The most significant environmental exposures associated with T2D status included decreased alcohol use as well as increased smoking exposure in childhood and adulthood. The results demonstrate the utility of the EWAS method and survey tools for identifying environmental components of complex diseases

  9. Spatial Distribution of Uranium in Groundwater and Associated Geologic Material at the NABIR Field Research Center Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. H.; Watson, D. B.

    2001-05-01

    The Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Program (NABIR) has established a Field Research Center (FRC) on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The FRC provides a site for investigators to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. This site is in the form of four buried unlined ponds where uranium and other contaminants were disposed in nitric acid for 32 years. In 1984, the ponds were neutralized with limestone, RCRA capped and paved with a parking lot. Analysis of groundwater and geologic material sampled from the site show that uranium is preferentially migrating away from the ponds and towards the nearby Bear Creek. Preferential flow appears to be associated with an ancient buried stream bed and remnant fractures in the saprolite where the uranium content of the groundwater is as high as 7 ppm. Due to the greater discharge of the contaminant source in this portion of the regolith, there is higher weathering of the shallow regolith (top 20 ft)and a greater accumulation of uranium compared to other sections of geologic material surrounding the disposal site.

  10. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  11. The evaluation of research papers in the XXI century. The Open Peer Discussion system of the World Economics Association

    PubMed Central

    Ietto-Gillies, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    The paper starts with a brief discussion of the traditional peer review (TPR) system of research evaluation, its role, and the criticisms levelled at it. An analysis of specific problems in economics leads to a full discussion of the Open Peer Review (OPR) system developed by the World Economics Association (WEA) and the principles behind it. The system is open in the following two respects: (a) disclosure of names of authors and reviewers; and (b) inclusivity of potential reviewers in terms of paradigmatic approaches, country, and community. The paper then discusses the applicability of the same system to other disciplines. In doing so, it stressed the aims of various evaluation systems and the possible pitfalls of rating systems. It also speculates on the future of journal publication. PMID:22891057

  12. Assessing tobacco use by cancer patients and facilitating cessation: an American Association for Cancer Research policy statement.

    PubMed

    Toll, Benjamin A; Brandon, Thomas H; Gritz, Ellen R; Warren, Graham W; Herbst, Roy S

    2013-04-15

    When diagnosed with cancer, patients can immediately make a meaningful positive impact on their health by stopping their tobacco use. Scientific evidence clearly shows that tobacco use in patients with cancer leads to poorer outcomes. The specific biological processes driving tobacco consumption's interference in cancer therapy are the subject of continuing research, but the evidence is clear that tobacco use in patients with cancer leads to decreased treatment efficacy and safety, decreased survival, decreased quality of life, increased treatment-related toxicity, and increased risk of cancer recurrence and second primary tumors. Data suggest that tobacco cessation can improve outcomes and survival in patients with cancer, yet full execution of evidence-based cessation interventions is infrequent in oncology settings. Therefore, both improved provision of cessation assistance to all patients with cancer who use tobacco or have recently quit and further study of the deleterious effects of tobacco use and benefits of tobacco cessation on cancer progression and treatment are needed and recommended by the American Association for Cancer Research. Progress on both fronts begins with universal assessment and documentation of tobacco use as a standard of quality cancer care regardless of treatment setting and will be further facilitated through the development of reliable, valid, and standard measures of tobacco use, incorporation of evidence-based procedures into quality and accreditation procedures, and the development of appropriate training, clinical infrastructure, and incentives for delivery of tobacco cessation interventions.

  13. A Review of Research on Health Outcomes for Workers, Home and Host Communities of Population Mobility Associated with Extractive Industries.

    PubMed

    Carney, Jason G; Gushulak, Brian D

    2016-06-01

    With a growing awareness of the association between extractive industries, the nature of work in remote locations, population mobility and health status, there is a need to advance an evidence-based approach to ensuring the health of migrant and mobile populations, and the home and host communities with whom they interact. Through a narrative synthesis of peer-reviewed and grey literature, this review examines what is known, and the nature of research activity concerning the range of health impacts determined by the social conditions inherent with population mobility alongside mining and extractive industries; and the extent to which health outcomes impact on workers, and home and host communities. While much of the literature reviewed in the study considered health in a traditional disease or illness based approach, it is clear that many risk factors for the health of mobile workers in the sector reflect broader social determinants. To support the mitigation of individual and population vulnerability to infectious disease endemics, consideration of both the etiology and the social conditions that give rise to adverse health outcomes is required, including an improvement to workers' living conditions, the expansion of diagnostic and medical services, and an approach that ensures the right to health for mobile populations. To further improve upon the rich body of research, resources are required to implement robust data collection including epidemiological surveillance, outbreak monitoring and investigation, and the long term tracking of standardized health information at both origin locations and destination communities. PMID:26902231

  14. Nurses’ research utilization two years after graduation—a national survey of associated individual, organizational, and educational factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nurses’ research utilization (RU) as part of evidence-based practice is strongly emphasized in today’s nursing education and clinical practice. The primary aim of RU is to provide high-quality nursing care to patients. Data on newly graduated nurses’ RU are scarce, but a predominance of low use has been reported in recent studies. Factors associated with nurses’ RU have previously been identified among individual and organizational/contextual factors, but there is a lack of knowledge about how these factors, including educational ones, interact with each other and with RU, particularly in nurses during the first years after graduation. The purpose of this study was therefore to identify factors that predict the probability for low RU among registered nurses two years after graduation. Methods Data were collected as part of the LANE study (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education), a Swedish national survey of nursing students and registered nurses. Data on nurses’ instrumental, conceptual, and persuasive RU were collected two years after graduation (2007, n = 845), together with data on work contextual factors. Data on individual and educational factors were collected in the first year (2002) and last term of education (2004). Guided by an analytic schedule, bivariate analyses, followed by logistic regression modeling, were applied. Results Of the variables associated with RU in the bivariate analyses, six were found to be significantly related to low RU in the final logistic regression model: work in the psychiatric setting, role ambiguity, sufficient staffing, low work challenge, being male, and low student activity. Conclusions A number of factors associated with nurses’ low extent of RU two years postgraduation were found, most of them potentially modifiable. These findings illustrate the multitude of factors related to low RU extent and take their interrelationships into account. This knowledge might serve as useful input in

  15. The Joy of Teaching Literacy. The Thirty-Fourth Yearbook: A Double Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Morrision, Timothy, Ed.; Garza-Garcia, Lizabeth, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER) Yearbook, Volume 34, includes papers presented at the annual conference, which have gone through a double peer review process. It also includes the Presidential Address and the keynote addresses given at the conference. For ALER's 55th annual meeting, the Association of Literacy…

  16. Confronting the Challenges of the Digital Era. Proceedings of the Membership Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (133rd, Washington, DC, October 14-16, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhalla, Nicole, Ed.; Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The 133rd meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on strategies for confronting critical challenges associated with the digital era and for fostering understanding from university leaders and supporters regarding the resources needed to perform successfully in this print plus digital environment. Program Session I,…

  17. Renewing the ARL Agenda. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (125th, Washington, DC, October 19-21, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jennifer, Ed.; Brennan, Patricia, Ed.

    The 125th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) reviewed the mission statement, goals, and objectives of the Association. Major themes from the review process included the effect of technology on access and preservation; the critical need to develop measures of library effectiveness and performance; and the importance of…

  18. [Current modalities and concepts on access and use of biospecimen samples and associated data for research from human biobanks].

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Roman; Semler, Sebastian Claudius

    2016-03-01

    It is accepted worldwide that biospecimen and data sharing (BDS) play an essential role for the future of medical research to improve diagnostics and prognostics, e.g. by validated biomarkers. BDS is also pivotal to the development of new therapeutic treatments and for the improvement of population health. Human biobanks can generate an added value to this need by providing biospecimens and/or associated data to researchers. An inspection of several examples of epidemiological as well as clinical/disease-oriented biobanks in Germany shows that best practice procedures (BPP) that are internationally agreed on are being installed for biospecimen and/or data access. In general, fair access is aimed at requiring a written application by the requesting scientist, which is then peer-reviewed for scientific and ethical validity by the Biobank. Applied BPP take into account (i) patient education/agreement according to the informed consent model, (ii) privacy protection, (iii) intellectual property rights, the (iv) notification obligation of health-related findings (including incidental findings), the (v) use of material (MTA) and data transfer agreements (DTA) for mutual legal security, the avoidance of conflicts of interests, as well as for cost recovery/fee for service as a basis for sustainability of the biobank. BPP are rooted in the self-regulation efforts of life sciences and are supported by parent ethics committees in Germany. Central biobank registries displaying aggregated information on biospecimens stored and the research foci constitute an important tool to make biobanks that are scattered across the country visible to each other, and, can thus promote access to hitherto unknown biospecimen and data resources. PMID:26809822

  19. National Libraries' Leadership Roles and Responsibilities. Minutes of the Semiannual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (115th, Bethesda, Maryland, October 18-20, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Diane, Ed.

    This membership meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) opened with an overview of the challenges facing research libraries and the relationships between the three U.S. national libraries and the members of ARL by Sidney Verba of Harvard University. The directors of the national libraries then spoke on their current programs and…

  20. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (53rd, Boston, Massachusetts, April 11-13, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur L., Ed.

    This publication contains abstracts of papers presented at the 53rd annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), held in Boston, Massachusetts, April 11-13, 1980. Papers relate to research techniques, learning, cognitive development, instruction, science curriculum, teacher education (preservice, inservice)…

  1. National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Annual Meeting (66th, Atlanta, Georgia, April 15-19, 1993). Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallard, Alejandro Jose, Ed.; De Albuquerque, Haroldo Guerreiro, Ed.

    This book provides titles, author information, and abstracts of presented papers at the 1993 National Association of Research in Science Teaching Conference. The abstracts are divided into the following sections: (1) Alternative Assessment; (2) Approaches to Research; (3) Conceptual Change; (4) Gender and Equity; (5) History, Philosophy, and…

  2. IFLA General Conference, 1985. International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) Round-Table on Access to Information in International Legal Research. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on international access to information pertaining to legal research, which were presented at the 1985 conference of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) include: (1) "Materials of European Intergovernmental Organizations and Their Accessibility through Available Research Tools" (Irene Berkey, Northwestern University…

  3. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (31st, Orlando, FL, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    For the thirty-first year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. This year's Proceedings has two sections--Section 1 includes research and development papers and…

  4. From Joint Experimentation to Laissez-Faire: Transdisciplinary Innovation Research for the Institutional Strengthening of a Water Users Association in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djanibekov, Nodir; Hornidge, Anna-Katharina; Ul-Hassan, Mehmood

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article assesses a participatory action and innovation research experience, in which project researchers, farmers and staff members of a local water users association (WUA) came together to: (a) jointly test and adapt a social mobilization and institutional strengthening approach according to the local context, and by doing so, to…

  5. Redefining Higher Education. Proceedings of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (129th, Washington, DC, October 16-18, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The 129th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on anticipating the future of higher education in North America and identifying responses from research libraries that will contribute to emerging agendas for change. An opening session (convened by Nancy Cline, ARL Presiding President) began the meeting. The first session,…

  6. ARL Statistics, 1999-2000: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-Two Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Young, Mark, Comp.

    This is the latest in a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 122 member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Of these, 112 are universities libraries; the remaining 10 are public, governmental, and private research libraries. ARL member libraries are…

  7. Arts and Learning SIG Proceedings: American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 23-27, 1984). Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroscik, Judith S., Ed.; Barrett, Terry, Ed.

    Sixteen conference papers representing diverse topics concerning research in the arts and presented as part of the 1984 Arts and Learning Special Interest Group (SIG) program of the American Educational Research Association are presented in the second of two volumes. Papers presented include: "First Graders' Conversations about Art Making: Social…

  8. 1991 AAIR Forum. Refereed Proceedings of the Conference of the Australasian Association for Institutional Research (AAIR) (2nd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, October 1-3, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinburne Inst. of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria (Australia).

    The Australasian Association for Institutional Research (AAIR) conference provided a comprehensive coverage of issues, concepts, and techniques in the areas of planning, data analysis and research, and related aspects of management support in tertiary education. Refereed papers from the conference include: (1) "Changes in Student Approaches to…

  9. ARL Statistics 2002-03: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-Three Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Young, Mark, Comp.

    2004-01-01

    This document is the latest in a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 123 members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Of these, 113 are university libraries, the remaining 10 are public, governmental, and nonprofit research libraries. Data reported by member…

  10. Energies for Transition. Proceedings of the National Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries (4th, Baltimore, Maryland, April 9-12, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitecki, Danuta A., Ed.

    This proceedings of the 1986 conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries contains 60 papers--44 position papers, 7 research reports, and 9 idea briefs--dealing with the issue of transitions facing librarians and ways to respond to these transitions through both formal and informal means. Papers are organized under eight broad…

  11. International Federation of Library Associations Annual Conference Papers. General Research Libraries Division: Parliamentary Libraries and National Libraries Sections (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August 17-22, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gude, Gilbert; And Others

    This set of papers presented to the General Research Libraries Division of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) during its 47th annual conference (1981) includes: "The Effect of the Introduction of Computers on Library and Research Staff," by Gilbert Gude; "Libraries as Information Service Agencies (IVS)," by Franz Georg…

  12. Arts and Learning Research, 1996-1997. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (New York, New York, April 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M., Ed.; Klein, Sheri R., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1996 meeting of the American Educational Research Association, mostly at programs of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group. Papers in the volume focus on research in the arts in the areas of profiles of learning and assessment (section 1), community-based art education (section 2),…

  13. Research in Science Education, 1994. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (25th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, July 10-13, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains 41 papers, 10 abstracts/research notes, and an after-dinner speech "The Book of Genesis and the Chronicles of the People of ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association). Paper titles include: "Improving students' understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in first-year Biochemistry at tertiary level"; "Students'…

  14. Sailing into the New Millennium: Charting the Course for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (26th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 13-16, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 1999 annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "A Marketing Research Program for Commuter Colleges" (Michelle S. Appel and Craig A. Clagett); (2) "Where Do I Start? Determining Institutional Information Needs beyond Mandated Reporting" (Michelle S.…

  15. Doing Institutional Research: A Focus on Professional Development. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (9th, Durham, New Hampshire, October 17-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Diana M., Ed.

    Institutional research that focuses on professional development is addressed in 35 papers from the 1982 meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Titles and authors include the following: "Modeling College Student Adjustment and Retention for the Individual Institution" (Norman D. Aitken); "The Development Saga of an…

  16. Consensus Recommendations to NCCIH from Research Faculty in a Transdisciplinary Academic Consortium for Complementary and Integrative Health and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, John; Anderson, Belinda; Meeker, William; Calabrese, Carlo; O'Bryon, David; Cramer, Greg D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This commentary presents the most impactful, shared priorities for research investment across the licensed complementary and integrative health (CIH) disciplines according to the Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care (ACCAHC). These are (1) research on whole disciplines; (2) costs; and (3) building capacity within the disciplines' universities, colleges, and programs. The issue of research capacity is emphasized. Discussion: ACCAHC urges expansion of investment in the development of researchers who are graduates of CIH programs, particularly those with a continued association with accredited CIH schools. To increase capacity of CIH discipline researchers, we recommend National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) to (1) continue and expand R25 grants for education in evidence-based healthcare and evidence-informed practice at CIH schools; (2) work to limit researcher attrition from CIH institutions by supporting career development grants for clinicians from licensed CIH fields who are affiliated with and dedicated to continuing to work in accredited CIH schools; (3) fund additional stand-alone grants to CIH institutions that already have a strong research foundation, and collaborate with appropriate National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and centers to create infrastructure in these institutions; (4) stimulate higher percentages of grants to conventional centers to require or strongly encourage partnership with CIH institutions or CIH researchers based at CIH institutions, or give priority to those that do; (5) fund research conferences, workshops, and symposia developed through accredited CIH schools, including those that explore best methods for studying the impact of whole disciplines; and (6) following the present NIH policy of giving priority to new researchers, we urge NCCIH to give a marginal benefit to grant applications from CIH clinician-researchers at CIH academic/research

  17. Handbook of Research for Educational Communications and Technology. A Project of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H., Ed.

    This handbook provides an overview of research in the field of educational communications and technology. The handbook may be used to familiarize students and researchers with a domain of research in this field prior to their own research, or may be used as a guide for selecting research topics or methodologies. The book consists of 42 papers by…

  18. Child Well-Being in Same-Sex Parent Families: Review of Research Prepared for American Sociological Association Amicus Brief.

    PubMed

    Manning, Wendy D; Fettro, Marshal Neal; Lamidi, Esther

    2014-08-01

    Recent legal cases before the Supreme Court of the United States were challenging federal definitions of marriage created by the Defense of Marriage Act and California's voter approved Proposition 8 which limited marriage to different-sex couples only. Social science literature regarding child well-being was being used within these cases, and the American Sociological Association sought to provide a concise evaluation of the literature through an amicus curiae brief. The authors were tasked in the assistance of this legal brief by reviewing literature regarding the well-being of children raised within same-sex parent families. This article includes our assessment of the literature, focusing on those studies, reviews and books published within the past decade. We conclude that there is a clear consensus in the social science literature indicating that American children living within same-sex parent households fare just, as well as those children residing within different-sex parent households over a wide array of well-being measures: academic performance, cognitive development, social development, psychological health, early sexual activity, and substance abuse. Our assessment of the literature is based on credible and methodologically sound studies that compare well-being outcomes of children residing within same-sex and different-sex parent families. Differences that exist in child well-being are largely due to socioeconomic circumstances and family stability. We discuss challenges and opportunities for new research on the well-being of children in same-sex parent families. PMID:25018575

  19. Child Well-Being in Same-Sex Parent Families: Review of Research Prepared for American Sociological Association Amicus Brief.

    PubMed

    Manning, Wendy D; Fettro, Marshal Neal; Lamidi, Esther

    2014-08-01

    Recent legal cases before the Supreme Court of the United States were challenging federal definitions of marriage created by the Defense of Marriage Act and California's voter approved Proposition 8 which limited marriage to different-sex couples only. Social science literature regarding child well-being was being used within these cases, and the American Sociological Association sought to provide a concise evaluation of the literature through an amicus curiae brief. The authors were tasked in the assistance of this legal brief by reviewing literature regarding the well-being of children raised within same-sex parent families. This article includes our assessment of the literature, focusing on those studies, reviews and books published within the past decade. We conclude that there is a clear consensus in the social science literature indicating that American children living within same-sex parent households fare just, as well as those children residing within different-sex parent households over a wide array of well-being measures: academic performance, cognitive development, social development, psychological health, early sexual activity, and substance abuse. Our assessment of the literature is based on credible and methodologically sound studies that compare well-being outcomes of children residing within same-sex and different-sex parent families. Differences that exist in child well-being are largely due to socioeconomic circumstances and family stability. We discuss challenges and opportunities for new research on the well-being of children in same-sex parent families.

  20. Child Well-Being in Same-Sex Parent Families: Review of Research Prepared for American Sociological Association Amicus Brief

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.; Fettro, Marshal Neal; Lamidi, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Recent legal cases before the Supreme Court of the United States were challenging federal definitions of marriage created by the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s voter approved Proposition 8 which limited marriage to different-sex couples only. Social science literature regarding child well-being was being used within these cases, and the American Sociological Association sought to provide a concise evaluation of the literature through an amicus curiae brief. The authors were tasked in the assistance of this legal brief by reviewing literature regarding the well-being of children raised within same-sex parent families. This article includes our assessment of the literature, focusing on those studies, reviews and books published within the past decade. We conclude that there is a clear consensus in the social science literature indicating that American children living within same-sex parent households fare just, as well as those children residing within different-sex parent households over a wide array of well-being measures: academic performance, cognitive development, social development, psychological health, early sexual activity, and substance abuse. Our assessment of the literature is based on credible and methodologically sound studies that compare well-being outcomes of children residing within same-sex and different-sex parent families. Differences that exist in child well-being are largely due to socioeconomic circumstances and family stability. We discuss challenges and opportunities for new research on the well-being of children in same-sex parent families. PMID:25018575

  1. Junior and Community College Research, Texas, 1980-81. The 1981 Research Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Association of Junior and Community Coll. Instructional Administrators.

    Reports and abstracts are presented for research conducted during 1981 on community college education in Texas. Four institutional research reports are provided first: an evaluation of the effectiveness of the developmental studies program at North Harris County College; a study of retention patterns at Amarillo College by Stanley Adelman and Kay…

  2. Navigating the Literacy Waters: Research, Praxis, and Advocacy. The Twenty-Ninth Yearbook: A Peer Reviewed Publication of the College Reading Association. [Papers from the College Reading Association Conference, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Martha M., Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Falk-Ross, Francine, Ed.; Sampson, Mary Beth, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a selection of the research and papers presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the College Reading Association in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in October, 2006. This Yearbook begins with Karen Bromley's presidential address, which explored the future of writing by discussing four predictions: the notion that pens and pencils will be…

  3. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Janis; Jardine, Cynthia G.; Guebert, Jenilee; Bubela, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Background Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK). Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. Objective This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Design Review. Results Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Conclusions Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements. PMID:23986896

  4. Effects of Different Analysis Strategies on Paired Associative Stimulation. A Pooled Data Analysis from Three Research Labs.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Jacob; Paßmann, Sven; List, Jonathan; Vach, Werner; Flöel, Agnes; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a widely used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm to non-invasively induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain in vivo. Altered PAS-induced plasticity has been demonstrated for several diseases. However, researchers are faced with a high inter- and intra-subject variability of the PAS response. Here, we pooled original data from nine PAS studies from three centers and analyzed the combined dataset of 190 healthy subjects with regard to age dependency, the role of stimulation parameters and the effect of different statistical methods. We observed no main effect of the PAS intervention over all studies (F(2;362) = 0.44; p = 0.644). The rate of subjects showing the expected increase of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes was 53%. The PAS effect differed significantly between studies as shown by a significant interaction effect (F(16;362) = 1.77; p = 0.034) but post-hoc testing did not reveal significant effects after correction for multiple tests. There was a trend toward increased variability of the PAS effect in older subjects. Acquisition parameters differed across studies but without systematically influencing changes in MEP-size. The use of post/baseline quotients systematically indicated stronger PAS effects than post/baseline difference or the logarithm of the post/baseline quotient. The non-significant PAS effects across studies and a wide range of responder rates between studies indicate a high variability of this method. We were thus not able to replicate findings from a previous meta-analysis showing robust effects of PAS. No pattern emerged regarding acquisition parameters that at this point could guide future studies to reduce variability and help increase response rate. For future studies, we propose to report the responder rate and recommend the use of the logarithmized post/baseline quotient for further analyses to better address the possibility that results are driven by few extreme cases

  5. Effects of Different Analysis Strategies on Paired Associative Stimulation. A Pooled Data Analysis from Three Research Labs

    PubMed Central

    List, Jonathan; Vach, Werner; Flöel, Agnes; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a widely used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm to non-invasively induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain in vivo. Altered PAS-induced plasticity has been demonstrated for several diseases. However, researchers are faced with a high inter- and intra-subject variability of the PAS response. Here, we pooled original data from nine PAS studies from three centers and analyzed the combined dataset of 190 healthy subjects with regard to age dependency, the role of stimulation parameters and the effect of different statistical methods. We observed no main effect of the PAS intervention over all studies (F(2;362) = 0.44; p = 0.644). The rate of subjects showing the expected increase of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes was 53%. The PAS effect differed significantly between studies as shown by a significant interaction effect (F(16;362) = 1.77; p = 0.034) but post-hoc testing did not reveal significant effects after correction for multiple tests. There was a trend toward increased variability of the PAS effect in older subjects. Acquisition parameters differed across studies but without systematically influencing changes in MEP-size. The use of post/baseline quotients systematically indicated stronger PAS effects than post/baseline difference or the logarithm of the post/baseline quotient. The non-significant PAS effects across studies and a wide range of responder rates between studies indicate a high variability of this method. We were thus not able to replicate findings from a previous meta-analysis showing robust effects of PAS. No pattern emerged regarding acquisition parameters that at this point could guide future studies to reduce variability and help increase response rate. For future studies, we propose to report the responder rate and recommend the use of the logarithmized post/baseline quotient for further analyses to better address the possibility that results are driven by few extreme cases

  6. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  7. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  8. Building Literacy Communities. The Thirty-Second Yearbook: A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Morrison, Timothy, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Raine, I. LaVerne, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    For its 53rd annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers met in Charlotte, North Carolina at the Marriott Charlotte City Center. This year's conference theme was "Building Literacy Communities", which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 32. This organization has long been the home of some of the nation's…

  9. Technology and the Future of Scholarly Exchange. Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (114th, Providence, Rhode Island, May 10-12, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Diane, Ed.

    This membership meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on the impact of the new information technologies on scholarly exchange. The program was organized into two sessions comprising 11 papers in all. In the first session, three influential leaders presented papers exploring different aspects of the conference topic. In the…

  10. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 51st Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, March 31 - April 2, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur L., Ed.

    This publication provides abstracts of papers presented at the 51st annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) held in Toronto, Canada from March 31 to April 2, 1978. Entries represent a wide range of topics in science education including: cognitive development, teacher education, student behaviors,…

  11. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 52nd Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (Atlanta, Georgia, March 21-23, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur L., Ed.

    This publication contains abstracts of papers presented at the 52nd annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), Atlanta, Georgia, March 21-23, 1979. Papers relate to science teacher education (preservice and inservice), cognitive development, learning, instruction, teacher and student behaviors, research…

  12. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (55th, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, April 5-8, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur L., Ed.; Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.

    Abstracts of most of the papers presented at the 55th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), held at the Abbey, Lake Geneva, WI, April 5-8, 1982 have been collected in this publication. Papers relate to such topics as teacher education: preservice and inservice, cognitive development, research…

  13. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (27th, Chicago, Illinois, 2004). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    For the twenty-seventh year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Chicago, Illinois. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  14. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  15. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  16. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (25th, Dallas, Texas, 2002). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    For the twenty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Dallas, TX. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two volumes.…

  17. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (26th, Anaheim, California, 2003). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    For the twenty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Anaheim, CA. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two volumes.…

  18. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (26th, Anaheim, California, 2003). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    For the twenty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. This is Volume 2 of the 26th Annual Proceedings of Selected Papers On the Practice of Educational Communications and Technology presented at the National AECT…

  19. AIR 1981-82. Forum 1981 Proceedings: Toward 2001: The IR Perspective (Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 17-20). The Association for Institutional Research Directory, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1981 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum and the 1981-82 AIR Directory are presented in a single volume. General session addresses and authors from the forum are as follows: "Some Possible Revolutions by 2001" (Michael Marien); "Information, the Non-Depletive Resource" (John W. Lacey); "What's Higher about Higher…

  20. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  1. Gateway to the Pacific Rim: Information Resources for the 21st Century. Association of Research Libraries, Minutes of the Meeting (122nd, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    High economic growth and growing movements toward democratic political systems are reshaping the Pacific countries, and these movements will have profound implications for libraries. The program of the meeting of the Association of Research Libraries was devoted to the cultures, societies, and libraries of the Pacific Rim. Program Session I,…

  2. Exploring the World of Literacy. The Thirty-Sixth Yearbook: A Doubled Peer-Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.; Vasinda, Sheri, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    For their 57th annual conference, the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER) met in Dallas, Texas at Addison Marriott Quorum by the Galleria. This year's conference theme was Exploring the World of Literacy, which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 36. Included are double-peer reviewed papers,…

  3. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (35th, Louisville, Kentucky, 2012). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    For the thirty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in…

  4. International Conference of the Australasian Association of Institutional Research (3rd, Auckland, New Zealand, November 25-27, 1992). Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Gan Che, Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Eight papers presented at the Third International Conference of the Australasian Association of Institutional Research (AAIR) are published in this journal issue. They represent the diversity and richness of the field of Planning in the Public Sector" (Jack Smith); (2) "Futures Planning for Tertiary Education: Curricula for the 21st Century: The…

  5. Promoting Quality through Leadership. General Session Presentations at the Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research (28th, Phoenix, Arizona, May 15-18, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Institutional Research.

    Information from the 1988 annual forum of the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) is presented. The focus is on interests, roles, and responsibilities of AIR members. Speakers focus on the theme of promoting quality through leadership, looking at the important role of managerial leadership in the development, implementation, and…

  6. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (36th, Anaheim, California, 2013). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For the thirty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  7. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (36th, Anaheim, California, 2013). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For the thirty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  8. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (35th, Louisville, Kentucky, 2012). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    For the thirty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in…

  9. International Federation of Library Associations Annual Conference Papers. General Research Libraries Division: University Libraries Section (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August 17-22, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveday, Anthony J.; And Others

    This set of papers presented to the General Research Libraries Division, University Libraries Section, of the International Federation of Library Associations during its 47th annual conference (1981) includes: "SCONUL (Standing Conference of National and University Libraries) and British University Library Standards: Some Observations on the Role…

  10. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (37th, Jacksonville, Florida, 2014). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh year, the Research and Theory Division and the Division of Instructional Design of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Jacksonville, Florida. This year's Proceedings…

  11. Planning for Quality. Papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (8th, Princeton, New Jersey, November 5-7, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The proceedings of the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research, whose theme was "Planning for Quality," are presented. The 26 papers were divided into the following topics: admissions, assessment, enrollment, faculty and staff, outcomes, planning, programs and retention, the environment, and the field of…

  12. Preservation of Digital Information. Proceedings of the Membership Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (131st, Washington, DC, October 15-17, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The 131st meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on preservation of digital information. The ARL Preservation Committee convened three panels of experts to highlight major issues raised by the archiving of digital resources, and to encourage discussion about options for operating models and criteria for digital archives.…

  13. Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting (25th, Toronto, December 28-29, 1972). Industrial Relations Research Association Series. Index of IRRA Publications 1966-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Gerald G., Ed.

    Papers presented at the 25th meeting of the Industrial Relations Research Association (IRAA) covered issues that are central to industrial relations in North America. Papers and discussions dealt with these major issues: (1) Prices and Income Policy: Comparative Aspects, (2) Dispute Settlement in the Public Sector, (3) Manpower Policies in Canada…

  14. National Perspectives for ARL Libraries. Minutes of the Semi-Annual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (86th, Houston, Texas, May 8-9, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    The focus of this Association of Research Libraries meeting was the process of scholarly communication--its costs, complexity and justification. Three speakers made first day presentations. Edward Booher reported on a study of the production and dissemination of scholarly work. He advocated the collaborative efforts of libraries and publishers.…

  15. Assessment: Fad or Fact of Life? Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (14th, Rochester, New York, October 25-27, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Assessment in higher education is addressed in these proceedings of the 1987 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Papers and authors include: "Assessing the Status of Assessment" (Peter T. Ewell); "Has the Middle Class Been Pressured the Most? Multivariate Analysis of Parental Contributions to Higher Education"…

  16. The University as an Open System. Proceedings of the Annual Forum of European Association for Institutional Research (5th, Maastricht, The Netherlands, August 17-19, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Charles H., Ed.

    The university as an open system is addressed in 13 papers and 12 abstracts of papers from the 1983 forum of the European Association for Institutional Research. Topics are as follows: program review, analysis of faculty outcomes and characteristics, manpower planning in Dutch universities, adult education in the United Kingdom, outside funding,…

  17. Consortial Leadership: Cooperation in a Competitive Environment. Proceedings of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (130th, Albuquerque, NM, May 14-16, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The program of the 130th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) explored the leadership challenges posed by the juxtapositions of cooperation and competing priorities in a consortial environment. Following an opening and welcome (Gloria Werner, ARL Presiding President), and a Keynote Address, "Defining Successful Leadership" (David…

  18. Leading the Agile Organization. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (128th, Vancouver, BC, May 15-17, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Rounds, Laura, Ed.; Sabnis, Shona, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The program of the 128th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is designed around the notion of examining rapid changes taking place in individual institutions and becoming agile enough to adapt, to manage change, and to learn how to effectively lead libraries through these turbulent periods. The program is divided into three main…

  19. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  20. ARL Statistics, 1998-99: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-One Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; O'Connor, Michael, Comp.

    "ARL Statistics 1998-99" is the latest in a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 121 member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The first section of the report includes several illustrative charts and discusses service trends; the decline of ownership,…

  1. ARL Statistics, 1997-98: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-Two Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Green, Jonathan, Comp.; Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.

    "ARL Statistics 1997-98" is part of a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 122 member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The first section of the report includes several illustrative charts and discusses service trends (1991-1998); the decline of…

  2. The Leadership Role in Library Fund Raising. Minutes of the Membership Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (120th, Charleston, South Carolina, May 13-15, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    The "Leadership Role in Library Fund Raising" was selected as the program theme for the 120th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) to call attention to the changing scene of fund raising in higher education. Session 1 set the stage with an overview of the leadership role of library fund raising in the context of the institution…

  3. Literacy Is Transformative. The Thirty-Fifth Yearbook A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.; Garza-Garcia, Lizabeth, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For their 56th annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers (ALER) met in Grand Rapids, Michigan at the Amway Grand Hotel. This year's conference theme was Literacy Is Transformative, which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 35. Included are double-peer reviewed papers, the presidential address,…

  4. 1980: Prologue to the Future. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (96th, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 15-16, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    This report on the proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) contains the following papers: "On the Need for a New Energy Consciousness," by James L. Clayton; "Video: Information Technology of the 80's," by Kenneth Winslow; "Linking Bibliographic Utilities," by Donald A. Smalley; "Preservation," by Pamela W.…

  5. The Presidential Address to the Association for Career and Technical Education Research: Using Standards to Reform Teacher Preparation in Career and Technical Education--A Successful Reformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, M. Susie

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the presidential address at the annual conference of the Association for Career and Technical Education Research by M. Susie Whittington, ACTER President 2005. The purpose of the presidential address is to examine a current issue facing the profession, and pose challenges to the membership in the context of that issue. In her…

  6. The Response of the Institution to External Forces: Proactive or Reactive? Conference Proceedings of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Virginia Beach, Virginia, October 30-November 1, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orahood, Mary Alyce, Ed.

    The proceedings of the 1985 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) is presented. The focus was preparing colleges to anticipate and respond to the demand of accrediting bodies, federal agencies, and state legislatures. Contents include: a conference agenda; a keynote address, summaries of pre-conference workshops,…

  7. Toward Self Sufficiency: Social Issues in the Nineties. Proceedings of the National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (33rd, Scottsdale, Arizona, August 7-11, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics, Olympia, WA.

    The presentations compiled in these proceedings on welfare and self-sufficiency reflect much of the current research in areas of housing, health, employment and training, welfare and reform, nutrition, child support, child care, and youth. The first section provides information on the conference and on the National Association for Welfare Research…

  8. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (27th, Chicago, Illinois, 2004). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    For the twenty-seventh year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Chicago, Illinois. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  9. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (30th, Anaheim, California, 2007). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    For the thirtieth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  10. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (32nd, Louisville, KY, 2009). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    For the thirty-second year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  11. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (33rd, Anaheim, California, 2010). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    For the thirty-third year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  12. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (30th, Anaheim, California, 2007). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    For the thirtieth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  13. COPD exacerbations associated with the modified Medical Research Council scale and COPD assessment test among Humana Medicare members

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Margaret K; Xu, Yihua; Baker, Christine L; Zou, Kelly H; Teeter, John G; Renda, Andrew M; Davis, Cralen C; Lee, Theodore C; Bobula, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines recommend assessment of COPD severity, which includes symptomatology using the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) or COPD assessment test (CAT) score in addition to the degree of airflow obstruction and exacerbation history. While there is great interest in incorporating symptomatology, little is known about how patient reported symptoms are associated with future exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs. Methods The mMRC and CAT were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 4,000 Medicare members aged >40 years, diagnosed with COPD (≥2 encounters with International Classification of Dis eases-9th Edition Clinical Modification: 491.xx, 492.xx, 496.xx, ≥30 days apart). The exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs were collected from claims data during 365-day post-survey after exclusion of members lost to follow-up or with cancer, organ transplant, or pregnancy. A logistic regression model estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbations during follow-up, and a generalized linear model with log link and gamma distribution estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbation-related costs. Results Among a total of 1,159 members who returned the survey, a 66% (765) completion rate was observed. Mean (standard deviation) age among survey completers was 72.0 (8.3), 53.7% female and 91.2% white. Odds ratios for having post-index exacerbations were 3.06, 4.55, and 16.28 times for members with 1, 2, and ≥3 pre-index exacerbations, respectively, relative to members with 0 pre-index exacerbations (P<0.001 for all). The odds ratio for high vs low symptoms using CAT was 2.51 (P<0.001). Similarly, exacerbation-related costs were 73% higher with each incremental pre-index exacerbation, and over four fold higher for high-vs low-symptom patients using CAT (each P<0.001). The symptoms using mMRC were not

  14. Research in Science Education, Volume 5. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (6th, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, May 19-21, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, A. M., Ed.; Power, Colin, N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the sixth Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (ASERA) held at Flinders University in May, 1975. Paper topics include: pupil learning and classroom climate, teacher structuring behavior, the Australian Science Education Project (ASEP), cognitive preference and…

  15. Proceedings of Selected Research Paper Presentations at the 1980 Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology and Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (Denver, CO, April 21-24, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael R., Ed.; Rohner, Daniel, Ed.

    The 31 papers in this collection represent approximately 35 percent of the manuscripts which were submitted for consideration to the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) for presentation at the 1980 AECT convention. All papers were subjected to a blind reviewing process and the ones…

  16. Institutional Research and Strategies for Higher Education Issues in the 1980's and Research Exchange Forum. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (7th, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 1979) and the Drive-In Conference (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Ussery, Robert M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the 1980 Research Search Exchange Drive-In Conference Program, which address the skills needed by institutional researchers to deal with the issues in higher education in the 1980s, are presented. Highlights of the North Carolina association…

  17. Twelve Years of Acoustical Research. American School Band Directors' Association, Research Committee Reports for the 17th Annual Convention, Hot Springs, Arkansas, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Band Directors Association, Newark, OH.

    The guide, one in a series of committee reports relating to school band performance, organization, and equipment needs, discusses acoustical problems inherent to the clarinet. The report is presented in five sections. Section I summarizes findings of an American School Band Directors' Association (ASBDA) clarinet testing committee. A major finding…

  18. Annual Research Review: Functional Somatic Symptoms and Associated Anxiety and Depression--Developmental Psychopathology in Pediatric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medically unexplained physical symptoms, commonly referred to as functional somatic symptoms (FSS), are common in pediatric medical settings and associated with suffering, impairment, and medical help seeking. The association of pediatric FSS with anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders across the life span is reviewed.Method:…

  19. Ethical Principles Associated with the Publication of Research in ASHA's Scholarly Journals: Importance and Adequacy of Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, Janis C.; Minifie, Fred D.; Horner, Jennifer; Robey, Randall R.; Lansing, Charissa; McCartney, James H.; Slater, Sarah C.; Moss, Sharon E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this 2-part study was to determine the importance of specific topics relating to publication ethics and adequacy of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) policies regarding these topics. Method: A 56-item Web-based survey was sent to (a) ASHA journal editors, associate editors, and members of the…

  20. 78 FR 79498 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Open-IX Association

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Association Notice is hereby given that, on December 3, 2013, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National... Association (``Open-IX'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the... and principal place of business of the standards development organization is: Open-IX...

  1. Institutional Research in a Changing Society. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (18th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 16-19, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains formal papers, keynote speeches and selected panel presentations delivered at a conference that addressed the issues, responsibilities and challenges faced by institutional researchers now and in the future. Papers are as follows: "Attrition and C.I.R.P. Correlates of a Measure of Self-Confidence Regarding Transition into…

  2. Accountability and Institutional Research: Measuring Results. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (24th, Hartford, Connecticut, November 1-4, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings document is comprised of the 12 papers, panel presentations, and work shares presented at a 1997 conference on institutional research. The papers are: (1) "What Does Accountability in Higher Education Mean to You?" (William R. Dyson, Andrew G. De Rocco, John R. Doyle, and Merle W. Harris); (2) "The University of Delaware…

  3. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  4. Institutional Research: Coming of Age. General Session Presentations [at the] Annual Forum [of the] Association for Institutional Research (30th, Louisville, Kentucky, May 13-16, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Jean J., Ed.

    Synopses of six conference presentations are provided in this pamphlet, dealing with the theme of leadership and professional standards in university settings and the influence of social and technological challenges. In "Leadership and Team Building: Key Ingredients to the Institutional Research Role of the Future," Robert L. Taylor challenges…

  5. The International Social Organisation of Educational Research in Europe: Reviewing the European Educational Research Association as an Example--Facts and Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gretler, Armin

    2007-01-01

    Armin Gretler passed away on 6 October 2005. Armin was a founder member of the EERA and served on its Council, representing Switzerland. He was a sociologist and founding director of the Swiss Coordination Centre for Research in Education in 1971. He remained Director until retiring in 1999. Prior to that he had been working as a consultant for…

  6. Propensity Score Techniques and the Assessment of Measured Covariate Balance to Test Causal Associations in Psychological Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Valerie S.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Anthony, James C.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using propensity score (PS) statistical techniques to address questions of causal inference in psychological research. Many PS techniques exist, yet few guidelines are available to aid applied researchers in their understanding, use, and evaluation. In this study, the authors give an overview of available…

  7. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  8. Size and characteristics of the biomedical research workforce associated with U.S. National Institutes of Health extramural grants.

    PubMed

    Pool, Lindsay R; Wagner, Robin M; Scott, Lindsey L; RoyChowdhury, Deepshikha; Berhane, Rediet; Wu, Charles; Pearson, Katrina; Sutton, Jennifer A; Schaffer, Walter T

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) annually invests approximately $22 billion in biomedical research through its extramural grant programs. Since fiscal year (FY) 2010, all persons involved in research during the previous project year have been required to be listed on the annual grant progress report. These new data have enabled the production of the first-ever census of the NIH-funded extramural research workforce. Data were extracted from All Personnel Reports submitted for NIH grants funded in FY 2009, including position title, months of effort, academic degrees obtained, and personal identifiers. Data were de-duplicated to determine a unique person count. Person-years of effort (PYE) on NIH grants were computed. In FY 2009, NIH funded 50,885 grant projects, which created 313,049 full- and part-time positions spanning all job functions involved in biomedical research. These positions were staffed by 247,457 people at 2,604 institutions. These persons devoted 121,465 PYE to NIH grant-supported research. Research project grants each supported 6 full- or part-time positions, on average. Over 20% of positions were occupied by postdoctoral researchers and graduate and undergraduate students. These baseline data were used to project workforce estimates for FYs 2010-2014 and will serve as a foundation for future research.

  9. Size and characteristics of the biomedical research workforce associated with U.S. National Institutes of Health extramural grants.

    PubMed

    Pool, Lindsay R; Wagner, Robin M; Scott, Lindsey L; RoyChowdhury, Deepshikha; Berhane, Rediet; Wu, Charles; Pearson, Katrina; Sutton, Jennifer A; Schaffer, Walter T

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) annually invests approximately $22 billion in biomedical research through its extramural grant programs. Since fiscal year (FY) 2010, all persons involved in research during the previous project year have been required to be listed on the annual grant progress report. These new data have enabled the production of the first-ever census of the NIH-funded extramural research workforce. Data were extracted from All Personnel Reports submitted for NIH grants funded in FY 2009, including position title, months of effort, academic degrees obtained, and personal identifiers. Data were de-duplicated to determine a unique person count. Person-years of effort (PYE) on NIH grants were computed. In FY 2009, NIH funded 50,885 grant projects, which created 313,049 full- and part-time positions spanning all job functions involved in biomedical research. These positions were staffed by 247,457 people at 2,604 institutions. These persons devoted 121,465 PYE to NIH grant-supported research. Research project grants each supported 6 full- or part-time positions, on average. Over 20% of positions were occupied by postdoctoral researchers and graduate and undergraduate students. These baseline data were used to project workforce estimates for FYs 2010-2014 and will serve as a foundation for future research. PMID:26625903

  10. Does Research on Evaluation Matter? Findings from a Survey of American Evaluation Association Members and Prominent Evaluation Theorists and Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coryn, Chris L. S.; Ozeki, Satoshi; Wilson, Lyssa N.; Greenman, Gregory D., II; Schröter, Daniela C.; Hobson, Kristin A.; Azzam, Tarek; Vo, Anne T.

    2016-01-01

    Research on evaluation theories, methods, and practices has increased considerably in the past decade. Even so, little is known about whether published findings from research on evaluation are read by evaluators and whether such findings influence evaluators' thinking about evaluation or their evaluation practice. To address these questions, and…

  11. Developing a Successful High School Science Research Program via Teacher Training, Student Internships, and Community Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danch, J. M.; Darytichen, F.

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of the Science Research Program is to allow students to perform authentic scientific research in disciplines of their choosing over a period of 3 years. The success of the program has allowed for expansion including community involvement, student mentorship, and a series of professional development programs. Through state and national competition and community symposia, student research is evaluated, showcased, and subsequently supported both idealistically and financially by local government and industrial partnerships. Student internships and university/industrial mentorship programs allow students to pursue research topics and utilize equipment exceeding the scope of the secondary science classroom. Involved teachers have developed and delivered professional development workshops to foster the successful implementation of scientific research programs at additional high schools throughout the state.

  12. Processes and Outcomes from a Medical Student Research Training Program in Integrative, Complementary, and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dicianno, Brad E; Glick, Ronald M; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Boninger, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    In response to the growing need to train a new generation of clinician scientists, a research program was developed to train medical students in integrative, complementary, and alternative medicine (ICAM) research early in their careers. A total of 25 students (100%) successfully completed a 10-week program. Students reported significantly increased levels of knowledge in all 7 integrative, complementary, and alternative medicine topics at the conclusion of the program. All students presented their work at one or more local research symposia. In addition, the average number of quality research outputs, which included manuscripts, awards, and abstracts presented at national and international meetings, was 1.5 per student, which exceeded benchmarks based on prior program outcomes. Results from this program may be useful when planning larger or longer-term projects aimed at attracting physicians who will become our next generation of academicians, researchers, and healers.

  13. Program of Research in Structures and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Structures and Dynamics Program was first initiated in 1972 with the following two major objectives: to provide a basic understanding and working knowledge of some key areas pertinent to structures, solid mechanics, and dynamics technology including computer aided design; and to provide a comprehensive educational and research program at the NASA Langley Research Center leading to advanced degrees in the structures and dynamics areas. During the operation of the program the research work was done in support of the activities of both the Structures and Dynamics Division and the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division. During the period of 1972 to 1986 the Program provided support for two full-time faculty members, one part-time faculty member, three postdoctoral fellows, one research engineer, eight programmers, and 28 graduate research assistants. The faculty and staff of the program have published 144 papers and reports, and made 70 presentations at national and international meetings, describing their research findings. In addition, they organized and helped in the organization of 10 workshops and national symposia in the structures and dynamics areas. The graduate research assistants and the students enrolled in the program have written 20 masters theses and 2 doctoral dissertations. The overall progress is summarized.

  14. Association between co-authorship network and scientific productivity and impact indicators in academic medical research centers: A case study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza; Akbari-Kamrani, Marjan; Hanneman, Robert A; Etemadi, Arash

    2008-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine the co-authorship networks in three successful Iranian academic research centers, in order to find the association between the scientific productivity and impact indicators with network features in a case study. Methods We searched for English articles of the three research centers. We drew co-authorship maps of each center and calculated social network measures. Results The collaboration networks in centers shared many structural features, including a "star-like" pattern of relations. Centers with more successful scientific profile showed denser and more cooperative networks. Key figures in each center were interviewed for their understandings of the reasons for the emergence of these patterns. Conclusion Star shape network structure and dependency on a single big member is a common feature observed in our case study. Scientific output measures correlate with the network structure of research centers. Network analysis seems a useful method to explore the subtle scientific contexts in research organizations. PMID:18796149

  15. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology - Canadian Institutes of Health Research - pharmaceutical partner postdoctoral operating fellowship programme: an outstanding success that continues to excel!

    PubMed

    McKay, Derek M; Daniels, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) postdoctoral fellowship programme was initiated in 1992 with the goal of promoting excellence in Canadian gastroenterological research. With backing from multiple pharmaceutical partners and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, 87 fellows were funded over the next ten years for a total investment of $8,730,101. Between 1992 and 2000, fellows authored 247 articles; 176 being original research articles, 31 (17.5%) of which appeared in journals with impact factors of greater than 10. As testament to the program's success in developing young scientists, 31 former fellows (36%) have progressed to faculty positions. The fellowship programme continues to be an outstanding success and the flagship of CAG research activities.

  16. A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Teichert, Martina; Chasman, Daniel I; Heit, John A; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Li, Guo; Pankratz, Nathan; Leebeek, Frank W; Paré, Guillaume; de Andrade, Mariza; Tzourio, Christophe; Psaty, Bruce M; Basu, Saonli; Ruiter, Rikje; Rose, Lynda; Armasu, Sebastian M; Lumley, Thomas; Heckbert, Susan R; Uitterlinden, André G; Lathrop, Mark; Rice, Kenneth M; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Glazer, Nicole L; Pankow, James S; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Amouyel, Philippe; Bis, Joshua C; Bovill, Edwin G; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Tracy, Russell P; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rotter, Jerome I; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Loth, Daan W; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Ridker, Paul M; Folsom, Aaron R; Smith, Nicholas L

    2013-07-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to approximately 2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (P ≤ 0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG; P < 5.0 × 10(-13) for both). The associations at the FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (P < 5.0 × 10(-6) ) and constitute new candidate genes. In conclusion, this large GWAS replicated key genetic associations in F5 and ABO, and confirmed the importance of F11 and FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations.

  17. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Seventy years of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Troitsk, Moscow region) was held in the conference hall of IZMIRAN on 25 November 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Moscow) "The role of cosmic rays and runaway electron breakdown in atmospheric lightning discharges"; (2) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research"; (3) Dorman L I (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region, CR & SWC, Israel) "Cosmic ray variations and space weather"; (4) Mareev E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects"; (5) Tereshchenko E D, Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Research Center, RAS, Murmansk) "Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects"; (6) Gulyaev Yu V, Armand N A, Efimov A I, Matyugov S S, Pavelyev A G, Savich N A, Samoznaev L N, Smirnov V V, Yakovlev O I (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region) "Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods"; (7) Kunitsyn V E (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Satellite radio probing and the radio tomography of the ionosphere"; (8) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space Research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences." Papers based on reports 2-8 are published below. The main contents of report 1 are reproduced in A V Gurevich's review, "Nonlinear effects in the ionosphere" [Phys. Usp. 50

  18. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5–7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their association with static magnetic field exposure. Methods We performed an observational study among 361 employees of 14 clinical and research MRI facilities in The Netherlands. Each participant completed a diary during one or more work shifts inside and/or outside the MRI facility, reporting work activities and symptoms (from a list of potentially MRI-related symptoms, complemented with unrelated symptoms) experienced during a working day. We analysed 633 diaries. Exposure categories were defined by strength and type of MRI scanner, using non-MRI shifts as the reference category for statistical analysis. Non-MRI shifts originated from MRI staff who also participated on MRI days, as well as CT radiographers who never worked with MRI. Results Varying per exposure category, symptoms were reported during 16–39% of the MRI work shifts. We observed a positive association between scanner strength and reported symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with closed-bore MRI scanners of 1.5 Tesla (T) and higher (1.5 T OR=1.88; 3.0 T OR=2.14; 7.0 T OR=4.17). This finding was mainly driven by reporting of vertigo and metallic taste. Conclusions The results suggest an exposure-response association between exposure to strong static magnetic fields (and associated motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields) and reporting of transient symptoms on the same day of exposure. Trial registration number 11-032/C PMID:24714654

  19. An Interview with the President-Elect of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The AACC has a number of key goals as it moves into 2011 including: developing ways to continue working with industry within the new AdvaMed guidelines; developing ways in which the AACC can collaborate more with other professional medical associations; increasing the recognition of translational science at our annual meeting; and continuing our global outreach

  20. [Papers Presented at the American Medical Association's Air Pollution Medical Research Conference (New Orleans, Louisiana, October 5-7, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    This is a collection of twenty speeches presented at the American Medical Association's Air Pollution Medical Conference, October 5-7, 1970. Speeches included: Air Pollution Control: The Physician's Role; Air Pollution Problems in Nuclear Power Development; Airway Resistance and Collateral Ventilation; Asbestos Air Pollution in Urban Areas;…

  1. Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007...

  2. Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication: Results of an Investigation Conducted by Ithaka for the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Nancy L.; Smith, K. Kirby

    2008-01-01

    As electronic resources for scholarship proliferate, more and more scholars turn to their computers rather than to print sources to conduct their research. The decentralized distribution of these new model works can make it difficult to fully appreciate their scope and number, even for university librarians tasked with knowing about valuable…

  3. Finances top challenge charts for association members. Exclusive findings from annual Medical Practice Today: what members have to say research.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Heather

    2012-07-01

    Learn which issues--out of a list of 52--are most applicable and intense foryou and your colleagues in this year's "Medical Practice Today: What members have to say" research. To help you find solutions for those issues, we have paired the top 10 challenges (identified by our applicability-weighted index) with MGMA-ACMPE resources on pages 52 and 53.

  4. Trade and Industrial Education Research Committee. Proceedings of the Carrousel Session, American Vocational Association (Dallas, Texas, December 8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the texts of five research reports that were presented at a conference dealing with trade and industrial education. The following papers are included: "A Survey of Teacher Attitudes and Beliefs Related to the Use of Microcomputers in Vocational Education," by Steve Chi-Yin Yuen; "Retraining for Robotics and Other Forms of…

  5. The Associations between Language Aptitude and Second Language Grammar Acquisition: A Meta-Analytic Review of Five Decades of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a meta-analysis that synthesizes the empirical research on the role of language aptitude in second language grammar acquisition. A total of 33 study reports were identified including 17 predictive studies that investigated the correlations between aptitude and ultimate L2 attainment and 16 interactional studies that examined the…

  6. Risky Assessments: Participant Suicidality and Distress Associated with Research Assessments in a Treatment Study of Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sarah K.; Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Murray, Angela; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of self-reported suicidality and distress during research assessments in a sample of 63 women meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder and current and chronic suicidality. The risk management protocol we used during the two-year study period (University of Washington Risk Assessment…

  7. Associations between Personal Exposures to VOCs and Alterations in Cardiovascular Physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007 (5 seas...

  8. PERSONAL, RESIDENTIAL AND CENTRAL SITE PM MASS CONCENTRATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY ( DEARS )

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DEARS is a three year field monitoring study being performed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory in the Detroit, Michigan area. Two years of monitoring have been completed and data from the first year of the study is currently being analyzed. This report ...

  9. Is Dyslexia Necessarily Associated with Negative Feelings of Self-Worth? A Review and Implications for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burden, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of research in the past 20 years into the relationship between dyslexia and various aspects of self-perception, including self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy and locus of control. Problems are identified relating to the measurement of some of the most widely used constructs, as is the need for more precise…

  10. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Nuclear physics, lasers, and medicine(Scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 14 December 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    The scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the Conference Hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 14 December 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Kotov Yu D (National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute' (MEPhI), Institute of Astrophysics, Moscow) "High-energy solar flare processes and their investigation onboard Russian satellite missions CORONAS"; (2) Pakhlov P N (Russian Federation State Scientific Center 'Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,' Moscow) "Exotic charmonium"; (3) Shcherbakov I A (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Laser and plasma technologies in medicine"; (4) Balakin V E (Center for Physics and Technology, Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Protvino, Moscow region) "New-generation equipment and technologies for the ray therapy of oncological diseases using a proton beam"; (5) Kravchuk L V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Development of nuclear physics medicine at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS." Papers based on reports 1, 3, and 5 are published below. The expanded content of the report by Pakhlov is presented in review form in Physics-Uspekhi 53 219 (2010). • High-energy solar flare processes and their investigation onboard Russian satellite missions CORONAS, Yu D Kotov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 619-631 • Laser physics in medicine, I A Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 631-635 • Development of nuclear physics medicine at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, L V Kravchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 635-639

  11. The utility of web mining for epidemiological research: studying the association between parity and cancer risk [Web Mining for Epidemiological Research. Assessing its Utility in Exploring the Association Between Parity and Cancer Risk

    DOE PAGES

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua; Han, Xuesong

    2015-11-27

    Background: The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful data source for epidemiological studies related to infectious disease surveillance. However, its potential for cancer-related epidemiological discoveries is largely unexplored. Methods: Using advanced web crawling and tailored information extraction procedures we automatically collected and analyzed the text content of 79,394 online obituary articles published between 1998 and 2014. The collected data included 51,911 cancer (27,330 breast; 9,470 lung; 6,496 pancreatic; 6,342 ovarian; 2,273 colon) and 27,483 non-cancer cases. With the derived information, we replicated a case-control study design to investigate the association between parity and cancer risk. Age-adjusted odds ratiosmore » (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each cancer type and compared to those reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. Results: Parity was found to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.82), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.72 to 0.83), colon cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74), and ovarian cancer (OR=0.58, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.62). Marginal association was found for lung cancer prevalence (OR=0.87, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.92). The linear trend between multi-parity and reduced cancer risk was dramatically more pronounced for breast and ovarian cancer than the other cancers included in the analysis. Conclusion: This large web-mining study on parity and cancer risk produced findings very similar to those reported with traditional observational studies. It may be used as a promising strategy to generate study hypotheses for guiding and prioritizing future epidemiological studies.« less

  12. The utility of web mining for epidemiological research: studying the association between parity and cancer risk [Web Mining for Epidemiological Research. Assessing its Utility in Exploring the Association Between Parity and Cancer Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua; Han, Xuesong

    2015-11-27

    Background: The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful data source for epidemiological studies related to infectious disease surveillance. However, its potential for cancer-related epidemiological discoveries is largely unexplored. Methods: Using advanced web crawling and tailored information extraction procedures we automatically collected and analyzed the text content of 79,394 online obituary articles published between 1998 and 2014. The collected data included 51,911 cancer (27,330 breast; 9,470 lung; 6,496 pancreatic; 6,342 ovarian; 2,273 colon) and 27,483 non-cancer cases. With the derived information, we replicated a case-control study design to investigate the association between parity and cancer risk. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each cancer type and compared to those reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. Results: Parity was found to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.82), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.72 to 0.83), colon cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74), and ovarian cancer (OR=0.58, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.62). Marginal association was found for lung cancer prevalence (OR=0.87, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.92). The linear trend between multi-parity and reduced cancer risk was dramatically more pronounced for breast and ovarian cancer than the other cancers included in the analysis. Conclusion: This large web-mining study on parity and cancer risk produced findings very similar to those reported with traditional observational studies. It may be used as a promising strategy to generate study hypotheses for guiding and prioritizing future epidemiological studies.

  13. A Curriculum for a Three Year High School Science Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darytichen, F.; Danch, J.

    2003-12-01

    A three-year high school science research program has been taught in Woodbridge Township School District - Woodbridge, New Jersey, since 1987. The program's focus is to foster originial science research projects for high school students that have shown an aptitude and an interest in science. Students are instructed in basic research skills, including developing and conducting original research projects, statistical analysis, scientific writing, and presentation of research at local and national symposia, and science fairs. Upon completion of the third year all students are required to submit a paper, suitable for journal publication, detailing their research. Participating students have gone on to win awards with Westinghouse, Intel, The National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, the International Science and Engineering Fair, New Jersey Academy of Sciences, and local and regional science fairs and symposia. Participating teachers have been recoginized by the Sigma Xi Research Society of Rutgers University for excellence in science teaching. New Jersey awarded the curriulum a Best Practice Award for 2003. Goals and strategies of the curriculum are detailed in a guide written for the courses. Professional development for the courses and resources for mentoring programs are the responsibility of the District Science Supervisor, and have been fostered over the years with the assistance of local colleges and universities including Rutgers Univesity, Monmouth University, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Liberty Science Center of New Jersey's Partners in Science Program, as well as local industries including Hatco Corporation, Merck Corporation, Englehard Corporation, and Lucent Technologies. Science Research teachers have conducted developmental workshops for school districts interested in implementing similar curricula.

  14. Tectonic evolution of greenstone-Gneiss association in Dharwar Craton, South India: Problems and perspectives for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Y. J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The two fold stratigraphic subdivision of the Archean-Proterozoic greenstone-gneiss association of Dharwar craton into an older Sargur group (older than 2.9 Ga.) and a younger Dharwar Supergroup serves as an a priori stratigraphic model. The concordant greenstone (schist)-gneiss (Peninsular gneiss) relationships, ambiguities in stratigraphic correlations of the schist belts assigned to Sargur group and difficulties in deciphering the older gneiss units can be best appreciated if the Sargur group be regarded as a trimodal association of: (1) ultrabasic-mafic metavolcanics (including komatiites), (2) clastic and nonclastic metasediments and paragneisses and (3) mainly tonalite/trondhemite gneisses and migmatites of diverse ages which could be as old as c. 3.4 ga. or even older. The extensive occurrence of this greenstone-gneiss complex is evident from recent mapping in many areas of central and southern Karnataka State.

  15. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  16. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  17. Active Learning in Research Methods Classes Is Associated with Higher Knowledge and Confidence, Though not Evaluations or Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter J; Baughman, Frank D

    2016-01-01

    Research methods and statistics are regarded as difficult subjects to teach, fueling investigations into techniques that increase student engagement. Students enjoy active learning opportunities like hands-on demonstrations, authentic research participation, and working with real data. However, enhanced enjoyment does not always correspond with enhanced learning and performance. In this study, we developed a workshop activity in which students participated in a computer-based experiment and used class-generated data to run a range of statistical procedures. To enable evaluation, we developed a parallel, didactic/canned workshop, which was identical to the activity-based version, except that students were told about the experiment and used a pre-existing/canned dataset to perform their analyses. Tutorial groups were randomized to one of the two workshop versions, and 39 students completed a post-workshop evaluation questionnaire. A series of generalized linear mixed models suggested that, compared to the students in the didactic/canned condition, students exposed to the activity-based workshop displayed significantly greater knowledge of the methodological and statistical issues addressed in class, and were more confident about their ability to use this knowledge in the future. However, overall evaluations and satisfaction between the two groups were not reliably different. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:26973575

  18. Active Learning in Research Methods Classes Is Associated with Higher Knowledge and Confidence, Though not Evaluations or Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter J.; Baughman, Frank D.

    2016-01-01

    Research methods and statistics are regarded as difficult subjects to teach, fueling investigations into techniques that increase student engagement. Students enjoy active learning opportunities like hands-on demonstrations, authentic research participation, and working with real data. However, enhanced enjoyment does not always correspond with enhanced learning and performance. In this study, we developed a workshop activity in which students participated in a computer-based experiment and used class-generated data to run a range of statistical procedures. To enable evaluation, we developed a parallel, didactic/canned workshop, which was identical to the activity-based version, except that students were told about the experiment and used a pre-existing/canned dataset to perform their analyses. Tutorial groups were randomized to one of the two workshop versions, and 39 students completed a post-workshop evaluation questionnaire. A series of generalized linear mixed models suggested that, compared to the students in the didactic/canned condition, students exposed to the activity-based workshop displayed significantly greater knowledge of the methodological and statistical issues addressed in class, and were more confident about their ability to use this knowledge in the future. However, overall evaluations and satisfaction between the two groups were not reliably different. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:26973575

  19. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Commemoration of the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 May 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), was held on 26 May 2010 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The session was devoted to the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii. The program announced on the web page of the RAS Physical Sciences Division (www.gpad.ac.ru) contained the following reports: (1) Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Current sheets and reconnection in the geomagnetic tail"; (2) Frank A G (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Dynamics of current sheets as the cause of flare events in magnetized plasmas"; (3) Kuznetsov V D (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space research on the Sun"; (4) Somov B V (Shternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Strong shock waves and extreme plasma states"; (5) Zybin K P (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Structure functions for developed turbulence"; (6) Ptuskin V S (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The origin of cosmic rays." Papers based on reports 1-4 and 6 are published in what follows. • Metastability of current sheets, L M Zelenyi, A V Artemyev, Kh V Malova, A A Petrukovich, R Nakamura Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 933-941 • Dynamics of current sheets underlying flare-type events in magnetized plasmas, A G Frank Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 941-947 • Space research of the Sun, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 947-954 • Magnetic reconnection in solar flares, B V Somov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 954-958 • The origin of cosmic rays, V S Ptuskin Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 958-961

  20. Emerging ethical, legal and social issues associated with stem cell research & and the current role of the moral status of the embryo.

    PubMed

    Zarzeczny, Amy; Caulfield, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Since its early days, stem cell research, particularly human embryonic stem cell research, has been the focus of intense social debate, and the question of the moral status of the embryo has been a central issue in the controversy. Despite this friction, and while it has yet to obtain widespread success in clinical applications, stem cell research remains a great hope for future advances in healthcare. In this paper, we will discuss the results of our systematic literature review in which we examined recent social science, legal and biomedical discourse, as well as Canadian print media discourse, associated with stem cell research in order to assess the role the question of the moral status of the embryo currently plays in these forums, and to identify what other issues are emerging and receiving attention. This analysis will assist with recognizing the issues which are likely to inform future policy and will facilitate forecasting the probable direction of the continually developing social discourse surrounding stem cell research.

  1. Technologies development for environmental restoration and waste management: International university and research institution and industry partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Herndon, R.C.; Moerlins, J.E.; Kuperberg, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The Institute for Central and Eastern European Cooperative Environmental Research (ICEECER) at Florida State University was formed in 1990 soon after the end of the Cold War. ICEECER consists of a number of joint centers which link FSU, and US as well as international funding agencies, to academic and research institutions in Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Russia, and the other countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States. Areas of interest include risk assessment, toxicology, contaminated site remediation/characterization, waste management, emergency response, environmental technology development/demonstration/transfer, and some specialized areas of research (e.g., advanced chemical separations). Through ICEECER, numerous international conferences, symposia, training courses, and workshops have also been conducted on a variety of environmental topics. This paper summarizes the mission, structure, and administration of ICEECER and provides information on the projects conducted through this program at FSU.

  2. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Techniques: Implications and Opportunities for Fluid Dynamics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    1999-01-01

    A challenge for the fluid dynamics community is to adapt to and exploit the trend towards greater multidisciplinary focus in research and technology. The past decade has witnessed substantial growth in the research field of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). MDO is a methodology for the design of complex engineering systems and subsystems that coherently exploits the synergism of mutually interacting phenomena. As evidenced by the papers, which appear in the biannual AIAA/USAF/NASA/ISSMO Symposia on Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, the MDO technical community focuses on vehicle and system design issues. This paper provides an overview of the MDO technology field from a fluid dynamics perspective, giving emphasis to suggestions of specific applications of recent MDO technologies that can enhance fluid dynamics research itself across the spectrum, from basic flow physics to full configuration aerodynamics.

  3. Adeno-Associated Virus at 50: A Golden Anniversary of Discovery, Research, and Gene Therapy Success—A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fifty years after the discovery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and more than 30 years after the first gene transfer experiment was conducted, dozens of gene therapy clinical trials are in progress, one vector is approved for use in Europe, and breakthroughs in virus modification and disease modeling are paving the way for a revolution in the treatment of rare diseases, cancer, as well as HIV. This review will provide a historical perspective on the progression of AAV for gene therapy from discovery to the clinic, focusing on contributions from the Samulski lab regarding basic science and cloning of AAV, optimized large-scale production of vectors, preclinical large animal studies and safety data, vector modifications for improved efficacy, and successful clinical applications. PMID:25807962

  4. Adeno-associated virus at 50: a golden anniversary of discovery, research, and gene therapy success--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Eric; Samulski, R Jude

    2015-05-01

    Fifty years after the discovery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and more than 30 years after the first gene transfer experiment was conducted, dozens of gene therapy clinical trials are in progress, one vector is approved for use in Europe, and breakthroughs in virus modification and disease modeling are paving the way for a revolution in the treatment of rare diseases, cancer, as well as HIV. This review will provide a historical perspective on the progression of AAV for gene therapy from discovery to the clinic, focusing on contributions from the Samulski lab regarding basic science and cloning of AAV, optimized large-scale production of vectors, preclinical large animal studies and safety data, vector modifications for improved efficacy, and successful clinical applications.

  5. Research on reverse association mechanism of the thermal control performance of conducting optical solar reflector and its antistatic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tianhai; Wu, Shuling; Xing, Zheng; Wei, Xiaoqun

    2014-12-01

    As we know, optical solar reflector (OSR) is used as the thermal control element for communications satellites and other spacecraft. The solar absorption, infrared emissivity and their ratio of OSR, are considered as the main standard of its thermal control performance. OSR is divided into conducting OSR and non-conducting OSR. When using the indium tin oxide (ITO) film coated on the surface of conducting OSR's glass substrate, ITO film will improve OSR's solar absorption rate and reduce the infrared emissivity. That means the thermal control performance will be declined. The paper is aimed to revealing the reverse association mechanism between the thermal control performance of conducting OSR used for spacecraft and the antistatic properties of ITO film. First, we combined the Drude theory with the Thermal radiation theorem to analyze how the antistatic parameters of ITO film impact the solar absorption and the infrared emissivity of OSR. Then,based on the theoretic analysis of main antistatic parameters of ITO, including the surface square resistance, secondary electron emission characteristic, solar absorption rate, infrared emissivity and other optical and electrical parameters. It illustrated that those factors have a strong reverse connection with the thermal control parameters of OSR, and influenced the solar absorption, infrared emissivity and their ratio of OSR. Comparison of the predicted and experimental results demonstrate that when reducing the surface square resistance of the ITO film, the antistatic properties was declined, and increased the value of the OSR solar absorption. On the contrary, reducing the infrared emissivity, It would result in the degradation of OSR's thermal control performance. The study has performed that the reverse association mechanism of conducting OSR can't be ignored. And apparently it shows that if we want to keep its application in the spacecraft thermal control environment and antistatic properties long-term stable, the

  6. Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

    2010-07-01

    Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses <100 mSv in a single exposure appear to be too small to allow epidermiological detection of statistically significant excess cancers in the presence of naturally occurring cancers; that low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

  7. SLCO1B1 genetic variant associated with statin-induced myopathy: a proof-of-concept study using the clinical practice research datalink.

    PubMed

    Carr, D F; O'Meara, H; Jorgensen, A L; Campbell, J; Hobbs, M; McCann, G; van Staa, T; Pirmohamed, M

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether patients with statin-induced myopathy could be identified using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink, whether DNA could be obtained, and whether previously reported associations of statin myopathy with the SLCO1B1 c.521T>C and COQ2 rs4693075 polymorphisms could be replicated. Seventy-seven statin-induced myopathy patients (serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) > 4× upper limit of normal (ULN)) and 372 statin-tolerant controls were identified and recruited. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the SLCO1B1 c.521T>C single-nucleotide polymorphism to be a significant risk factor (P = 0.009), with an odds ratio (OR) per variant allele of 2.06 (1.32-3.15) for all myopathy and 4.09 (2.06-8.16) for severe myopathy (CPK > 10× ULN, and/or rhabdomyolysis; n = 23). COQ2 rs4693075 was not associated with myopathy. Meta-analysis showed an association between c.521C>T and simvastatin-induced myopathy, although power for other statins was limited. Our data replicate the association of SLCO1B1 variants with statin-induced myopathy. Furthermore, we demonstrate how electronic medical records provide a time- and cost-efficient means of recruiting patients with severe adverse drug reactions for pharmacogenetic studies.

  8. National Medical Association/National Institutes of Health Workshop on Violence and the Conduct of Research. Workgroup Proceedings, June 1-2, 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, R. A.; Pointer, A.; Vereen, D.; Marks, S. F.

    1995-01-01

    The physical, economic, and mental toll caused by violence in the United States has put tremendous pressure on American medical, political, religious, and social institutions. The impact in urban neighborhoods has been especially harrowing, forcing African-American organizations to address this domestic problem with ideas and suggestions unique to their philosophies and collective talents. This article contains general perspectives and commentary from physicians and social science experts who participated in a workshop sponsored by the National Medical Association, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, and the National Institute of Mental Health to discuss topics on violence, its health consequences, and the conduct of research in the African-American community. PMID:8907813

  9. SuperQuads: a day in the life; research reviews: color-number association, finger-length ratios, twinning diets, athletic pairs.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2006-08-01

    The nature and frequency of quadruplet births are reviewed, followed by a close-up look at the 6-year-old monozygotic Mathias quadruplets. This essay is followed by reviews of new twin research on color-number association, male-female twins' finger-length ratios, and links between twinning and dietary practices. The article finishes by focusing on unusual twin athletes in football, basketball and golf, and on twin co-authors of a new book on the 1972 silver medal victory by the United States hockey team.

  10. Rodent model choice has major impact on variability of standard preclinical readouts associated with diabetes and obesity research

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Victoria S; Porsgaard, Trine; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Hvid, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rodents are available as either genetically defined inbred strains or genetically undefined outbred stocks. As outbred rodents are generally thought to display a higher level of phenotypic variation compared to inbred strains, it has been argued that experimental studies should preferentially be performed by using inbred rodents. However, very few studies with adequate sample sizes have in fact compared phenotypic variation between inbred strains and outbred stocks of rodents and moreover, these studies have not reached consistent conclusions. The aim of the present study was to compare the phenotypic variation in commonly used experimental readouts within obesity and diabetes research, for four of the most frequently used mouse strains: inbred C57BL/6 and BALB/c and outbred NMRI and CD-1 mice. The variation for all readouts was examined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), i.e., the relative variation, including a 95% confidence interval for the CV. We observed that for the majority of the selected readouts, inbred and outbred mice showed comparable phenotypic variation. The observed variation appeared highly influenced by strain choice and type of readout, which suggests that these collectively would serve as more predictive of the phenotypic variation than the more general classification of mice as inbred or outbred based on genetic heterogeneity.

  11. Rodent model choice has major impact on variability of standard preclinical readouts associated with diabetes and obesity research.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Victoria S; Porsgaard, Trine; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Hvid, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rodents are available as either genetically defined inbred strains or genetically undefined outbred stocks. As outbred rodents are generally thought to display a higher level of phenotypic variation compared to inbred strains, it has been argued that experimental studies should preferentially be performed by using inbred rodents. However, very few studies with adequate sample sizes have in fact compared phenotypic variation between inbred strains and outbred stocks of rodents and moreover, these studies have not reached consistent conclusions. The aim of the present study was to compare the phenotypic variation in commonly used experimental readouts within obesity and diabetes research, for four of the most frequently used mouse strains: inbred C57BL/6 and BALB/c and outbred NMRI and CD-1 mice. The variation for all readouts was examined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), i.e., the relative variation, including a 95% confidence interval for the CV. We observed that for the majority of the selected readouts, inbred and outbred mice showed comparable phenotypic variation. The observed variation appeared highly influenced by strain choice and type of readout, which suggests that these collectively would serve as more predictive of the phenotypic variation than the more general classification of mice as inbred or outbred based on genetic heterogeneity. PMID:27648148

  12. Rodent model choice has major impact on variability of standard preclinical readouts associated with diabetes and obesity research

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Victoria S; Porsgaard, Trine; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Hvid, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rodents are available as either genetically defined inbred strains or genetically undefined outbred stocks. As outbred rodents are generally thought to display a higher level of phenotypic variation compared to inbred strains, it has been argued that experimental studies should preferentially be performed by using inbred rodents. However, very few studies with adequate sample sizes have in fact compared phenotypic variation between inbred strains and outbred stocks of rodents and moreover, these studies have not reached consistent conclusions. The aim of the present study was to compare the phenotypic variation in commonly used experimental readouts within obesity and diabetes research, for four of the most frequently used mouse strains: inbred C57BL/6 and BALB/c and outbred NMRI and CD-1 mice. The variation for all readouts was examined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), i.e., the relative variation, including a 95% confidence interval for the CV. We observed that for the majority of the selected readouts, inbred and outbred mice showed comparable phenotypic variation. The observed variation appeared highly influenced by strain choice and type of readout, which suggests that these collectively would serve as more predictive of the phenotypic variation than the more general classification of mice as inbred or outbred based on genetic heterogeneity. PMID:27648148

  13. Values, Inquiry, and Education. CSE Monograph Series in Evaluation, 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gideonse, Hendrik, Ed.; And Others

    This edited volume contains 16 social science-related educational research articles based on papers presented at the 1979 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). The articles and associated commentary are organized according to six symposia held at the meeting--anthropology, evaluation, history, political science,…

  14. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Scientific Session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the centenary of L D Landau's birth (22-23 January 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. F.; Kagan, Yu M.; Pitaevskii, L. P.; Khalatnikov, I. M.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu; Ioffe, B. L.; Okun, L. B.; Lipatov, L. N.

    2008-06-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the centenary of L D Landau's birth was held in the Conference Hall of the Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, on 22 and 23 January 2008. An Opening Address by A F Andreev and the following reports were presented at the session: (1) Andreev A F (Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences) "Supersolidity of quantum glasses" (2) Kagan Yu M (Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Moscow) "Formation kinetics of the Bose condensate and long-range order"; (3) Pitaevskii L P (Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences; Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and BDC Center, Trento, Italy) "Superfluid Fermi liquid in a unitary regime"; (4) Lebedev V V (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region) "Kolmogorov, Landau, and the modern theory of turbulence"; (5) Khalatnikov I M (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow), Kamenshchik A Yu (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna, Italy) "Lev Landau and the problem of singularities in cosmology"; (6) Ioffe B L (Russian State Scientific Center Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow) "Axial anomaly in quantum electro- and chromodynamics and the structure of the vacuum in quantum chromodynamics"; (7) Okun L B (Russian State Scientific Center Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow) "The theory of relativity and the Pythagorean theorem"; (8) Lipatov L N (St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg) "Bjorken and Regge asymptotics of scattering amplitudes in QCD and in supersymmetric gauge models." A brief presentation of the Opening Address by A F Andreev and reports 2

  15. Better Instruction through Better Evaluation. Proceedings of the Annual State Conference on Educational Research (25th, Los Angeles, November 29-30, 1973). Research Resume No. 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Teachers Association, Burlingame.

    This report contains each of the general addresses and symposia of the annual California conference on educational evaluation. The three general sessions described are concerned with the evaluation of instruction and instructors, and some procedural problems of evaluation. The symposia included: (1) Divergent Perceptions of Instructional…

  16. Research to Reality: Putting VET Research To Work. Proceedings of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) Conference (4th, Adelaide, Australia, March 28-30, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria.

    This document contains 95 papers and summaries of 5 poster sessions from an Australian conference on putting vocational education and training (VET) research to work. The following are among the areas covered in the papers: factors affecting VET graduates' employability over time; technical and further education (TAFE) institutes as models of…

  17. China-Japan enhance joint research cooperation for drug discoveries and development: News from CJMWDDT 2007 in Jinan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Y; Qu, X J; Tang, W

    2007-08-01

    Viral hepatitis is currently a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. In some Asian countries like China and Japan, Hepatitis B and C in particular are the most common extremely infectious diseases and are likely to develop into liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, statistics indicate that patients with liver cirrhosis resulting from hepatitis B and C have an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Scientists have worked tirelessly to find curative therapeutic strategies to control chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, accompanied by improvements in public health and living conditions. China's Shandong University and the University of Tokyo in Japan previously established a longterm cooperative relationship. Cooperative programs include co-training of postgraduates, exchanges of visiting scholars, academic symposia, and a bilateral international joint research program. Some substantive progress has been made as a result of bilateral endeavors. For instance, the Shandong University China-Japan Cooperation Center for Drug Discovery & Screening (SDU-DDSC) has enhanced to serve as an important platform for further close cooperation. At the same time, the International Advancement Center for Medicine & Health Research (IACMHR) - "Drug Discoveries and Therapeutics" and International Research and Cooperation Association for Bio & Socio-Sciences Advancement (IRCA-BSSA) - "BioScience Trends" were established (Visit http://www.ddtjournal.com and http://www.biosciencetrends.com ). The first China-Japan conference on new drug discoveries and therapeutics (CJMWDDT 2007) was recently held in Jinan, China May 27-29, 2007, which provided opportunities for further communication and cooperation and increased knowledge of new drug research and clinical cures for hepatitis. Financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), the conference covered a wide range of topics in

  18. Association between mental demands at work and cognitive functioning in the general population – results of the health study of the Leipzig research center for civilization diseases (LIFE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The level of mental demands in the workplace is rising. The present study investigated whether and how mental demands at work are associated with cognitive functioning in the general population. Methods The analysis is based on data of the Health Study of the Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Disease (LIFE). 2,725 participants aged 40–80 years underwent cognitive testing (Trail-Making Test, Verbal Fluency Test) and provided information on their occupational situation. Participants over the age of 65 years additionally completed the Mini-Mental State Examination. Mental demands at work were rated by a standardized classification system (O*NET). The association between mental demands and cognitive functioning was analyzed using Generalized Linear Modeling (GENLIN) adjusted for age, gender, self-regulation, working hour status, education, and health-related factors. Results Univariate as well as multivariate analyses demonstrated significant and highly consistent effects of higher mental demands on better performance in cognitive testing. The results also indicated that the effects are independent of education and intelligence. Moreover, analyses of retired individuals implied a significant association between high mental demands at work of the job they once held and a better cognitive functioning in old age. Conclusions In sum, our findings suggest a significant association between high mental demands at work and better cognitive functioning. In this sense, higher levels of mental demands – as brought about by technological changes in the working environment – may also have beneficial effects for the society as they could increase cognitive capacity levels and might even delay cognitive decline in old age. PMID:24914403

  19. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  20. Board on Research Data and Information

    SciTech Connect

    Sztein, A. Ester; Boright, John

    2015-08-14

    The Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI) has planned and undertaken numerous activities regarding data citation, attribution, management, policy, publishing, centers, access, curation, sharing, and infrastructure; and international collaboration and cooperation. Some of these activities resulted in National Research Council reports (For Attribution: Developing Data Attribution and Citation Practices and Standards (2012), The Case for International Scientific Data Sharing: A Focus on Developing Countries (2012), and The Future of Scientific Knowledge Discovery in Open Networked Environments (2012); and a peer-reviewed paper (Out of Cite, Out of Mind: The Current State of Practice, Policy, and Technology for the Citation of Data, 2013). BRDI held symposia, workshops and sessions in the U.S. and abroad on diverse topics such as global scientific data infrastructures, discovery of data online, privacy in a big data world, and data citation principles, among other timely data-related subjects. In addition, BRDI effects the representation of the United States before the International Council for Science’s International Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA).

  1. Template for preparation of papers for IEEE sponsored conferences & symposia.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, L; Dagliati, A; Tibollo, V; Leporati, P; De Cata, P; Cerra, C; Chiovato, L; Bellazzi, R

    2015-01-01

    To improve the access to medical information is necessary to design and implement integrated informatics techniques aimed to gather data from different and heterogeneous sources. This paper describes the technologies used to integrate data coming from the electronic medical record of the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri (FSM) hospital of Pavia, Italy, and combines them with administrative, pharmacy drugs purchase coming from the local healthcare agency (ASL) of the Pavia area and environmental open data of the same region. The integration process is focused on data coming from a cohort of one thousand patients diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Data analysis and temporal data mining techniques have been integrated to enhance the initial dataset allowing the possibility to stratify patients using further information coming from the mined data like behavioral patterns of prescription-related drug purchases and other frequent clinical temporal patterns, through the use of an intuitive dashboard controlled system.

  2. Report from the Symposia on Antennas and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, S.

    1985-12-01

    Communications including shortwave; mobile radio; radiolink; satellite networks; and array, microstrip, adaptive, and reflector type antennas; surface and underground antennas; and waves were treated. Rain attenuation was discussed. Multipath propagation on radiolinks, and the interference between terrestrial links and satellite links were considered.

  3. Template for preparation of papers for IEEE sponsored conferences & symposia.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, L; Dagliati, A; Tibollo, V; Leporati, P; De Cata, P; Cerra, C; Chiovato, L; Bellazzi, R

    2015-08-01

    To improve the access to medical information is necessary to design and implement integrated informatics techniques aimed to gather data from different and heterogeneous sources. This paper describes the technologies used to integrate data coming from the electronic medical record of the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri (FSM) hospital of Pavia, Italy, and combines them with administrative, pharmacy drugs purchase coming from the local healthcare agency (ASL) of the Pavia area and environmental open data of the same region. The integration process is focused on data coming from a cohort of one thousand patients diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Data analysis and temporal data mining techniques have been integrated to enhance the initial dataset allowing the possibility to stratify patients using further information coming from the mined data like behavioral patterns of prescription-related drug purchases and other frequent clinical temporal patterns, through the use of an intuitive dashboard controlled system. PMID:26736708

  4. Reports of the AAAI 2009 Spring Symposia: Technosocial Predictive Analytics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2009-10-01

    The Technosocial Predictive Analytics AAAI symposium was held at Stanford University, Stanford, CA, March 23-25, 2009. The goal of this symposium was to explore new methods for anticipatory analytical thinking that provide decision advantage through the integration of human and physical models. Special attention was also placed on how to leverage supporting disciplines to (a) facilitate the achievement of knowledge inputs, (b) improve the user experience, and (c) foster social intelligence through collaborative/competitive work.

  5. Queer Inroads: Two Queer Higher Education Symposia Reviews Written Otherwise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burford, James; Henderson, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is a review approached by the authors as a writing experiment of two recent gatherings where queer theory and Higher Education (HE) Studies met: "The Queerly Theorising Higher Education and Academia: Interdisciplinary Conversations" symposium held at the University College London (UCL), Institute of Education (IOE), (London,…

  6. Medication Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: 2015 Position Statement of the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Rhee, Yumie; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Kwon, Tae-Geon; Lee, Jeong Keun

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis, and are also used in malignant bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and Paget's disease, and provide therapeutic efficacy on those diseases. However, it was reported that occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) could be related with bisphosphonate exposures, and there have been many cases regarding this issue. Therefore, a clearer definition and treatment guidelines were needed for this disease. The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) and American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) reported statements on bisphosphonate-related ONJ (BRONJ), and a revised version was recently presented. In the revised edition, the diagnosis BRONJ was changed to medication-related ONJ (MRONJ), which reflects a consideration of the fact that ONJ also occurs for denosumab, a bone resorption inhibitor of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) antibody family, and bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis inhibitor. In 2009, a statement on ONJ was also reported locally by a relevant organization, which has served as basis for clinical treatment in Korea. In addition to the new official stance of the AAOMS and ASBMR, with an increasing pool of ONJ clinical experience, a revised version of the 2009 local statement is needed. As such, the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research (KSBMR) and the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (KAOMS) have collectively formed a committee for the preparation of an official statement on MRONJ, and have reviewed recent local and international data to propose guidelines customized for the local Korean situation. PMID:26713306

  7. The Geropathology Research Network: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Integrating Pathology Into Research on Aging.

    PubMed

    Ladiges, Warren; Ikeno, Yuji; Niedernhofer, Laura; McIndoe, Richard A; Ciol, Marcia A; Ritchey, Jerry; Liggitt, Denny

    2016-04-01

    Geropathology is the study of aging and age-related lesions and diseases in the form of whole necropsies/autopsies, surgical biopsies, histology, and molecular biomarkers. It encompasses multiple subspecialties of geriatrics, anatomic pathology, molecular pathology, clinical pathology, and gerontology. In order to increase the consistency and scope of communication in the histologic and molecular pathology assessment of tissues from preclinical and clinical aging studies, a Geropathology Research Network has been established consisting of pathologists and scientists with expertise in the comparative pathology of aging, the design of aging research studies, biostatistical methods for analysis of aging data, and bioinformatics for compiling and annotating large sets of data generated from aging studies. The network provides an environment to promote learning and exchange of scientific information and ideas for the aging research community through a series of symposia, the development of uniform ways of integrating pathology into aging studies, and the statistical analysis of pathology data. The efforts of the network are ultimately expected to lead to a refined set of sentinel biomarkers of molecular and anatomic pathology that could be incorporated into preclinical and clinical aging intervention studies to increase the relevance and productivity of these types of investigations.

  8. Is the Physical Functioning of Older Adults with Diabetes Associated with the Processes and Outcomes of Care? Evidence from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pearl G.; McEwen, Laura N.; Waitzfelder, Beth; Subramanian, Usha; Karter, Andrew J.; Mangione, Carol M.; Herman, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the relationship between physical function limitations and diabetes self-management, processes of care, and intermediate outcomes in adults ≥65 years of age with type 2 diabetes. Methods We studied 1,796 participants 65 years of age and older in managed care health plans enrolled in Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD). Physical functioning was assessed at baseline with the Physical Component Summary of the Short Form-12 (SF-12) Health Survey. Diabetes self-management was assessed with follow-up surveys, and processes of care (eye exams, urine microalbumin testing, foot exams, etc.) and intermediate health outcomes (HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-c) were assessed with medical chart reviews. Multivariate regression models were constructed to examine the associations between physical function limitations and outcomes. Results Frequency of eye exams (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49 - 0.99) was the only process of care that was worse for participants with physical function limitations (n=573) compared to those without limitations (n=618). Neither self-management nor intermediate outcomes differed by whether patients had or did not have physical function limitations. Conclusion Limitations in physical functioning as assessed by the SF-12 were not associated with substantial difference in diabetes care in adults ≥65 years of age enrolled in managed care health plans. PMID:22268866

  9. [The Association of Urological Oncology (AOU) German Cancer Society e.V. The competent counterpart for research in Uro-oncology].

    PubMed

    Rexer, H

    2005-04-01

    With more than 85,000 newly diagnosed cancers per year, uro-oncology alone represents a significant part in the field of oncology in Germany. Therefore, the Task Group for Uro-Oncology (The Association of Urogenital Oncology, AUO) of the German Cancer Association (DKG) was founded in 1989 to enforce high quality in research on urological cancer. The main aim has been to improve the quality of clinical cancer studies. The board of the AUO reviews, certifies and gives accreditation to study protocols with respect to GCP standards, likelihood of realisation and scientific impact of the study objectives. To support enrolment of patients, the AUO initiated a study group of more than 85 clinical centers of excellence and publishes timely details on the different studies in the appropriate media. Moreover, the members of the AUO board organize seminars, scientific meetings and pharmaceutical hearings. In this article, the organisation's structure is described in detail. Various aspects of AUO work, carried out over the years, are highlighted, and data presented on the outcome of studies.

  10. Quantitative genetic research on sleep: a review of normal sleep, sleep disturbances and associated emotional, behavioural, and health-related difficulties.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Nicola L; Gregory, Alice M

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 50 years, well over 100 twin studies have focussed on understanding factors contributing to variability in normal sleep-wake characteristics and sleep disturbances. Whilst we have gained a great deal from these studies, there is still much to be learnt. Twin studies can be used in multiple ways to answer questions beyond simply estimating heritability. This paper provides a comprehensive review of some of the most important findings from twin studies relating to sleep to date, with a focus on studies investigating genetic and environmental influences contributing to i) objective and subjective measures of normal sleep characteristics (e.g., sleep stage organisation, sleep quality); as well as sleep disturbances and disorders such as dyssomnias (e.g., insomnia, narcolepsy) and parasomnias (e.g., sleepwalking, bruxism); ii) the persistence of sleep problems from childhood to adulthood, and the possibility that the aetiological influences on sleep change with age; iii) the associations between sleep disturbances, emotional, behavioural and health-related problems; and iv) processes of gene-environment correlation and interaction. We highlight avenues for further research, emphasising the need to further consider the aetiology of longitudinal associations between sleep disturbances and psychopathology; the genetic and environmental overlap between sleep and numerous phenotypes; and processes of gene-environment interplay and epigenetics. PMID:22560641

  11. Childhood onset arthritis is associated with an increased risk of fracture: a population based study using the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, J M; Shults, J; Weinstein, R; Lewis, J D; Leonard, M B

    2006-01-01

    Background Childhood onset arthritis is associated with low bone mass and strength. Objective To determine whether childhood onset arthritis is associated with greater fracture risk. Methods In a retrospective cohort study all subjects with onset of arthritis between 1 and 19 years of age in the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database were identified. As controls, all sex and age matched subjects from a practice that included a subject with arthritis were included. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for first fracture were generated using Mantel‐Haenszel methods and Poisson regression. Results 1939 subjects with arthritis (51% female) and 207 072 controls (53% female) were identified. The median age at arthritis diagnosis was 10.9 years. A total of 129 (6.7%) first fractures were noted in subjects with arthritis compared with 6910 (3.3%) in controls over a median follow up of 3.90 and 3.95 years in the subjects with arthritis and controls, respectively. The IRR (95% confidence interval) for first fracture among subjects with arthritis, compared with controls, according to the age at the start of follow up were 1.49 (0.91 to 2.31) for age <10 years, 3.13 (2.21 to 4.33) at 10–15 years, 1.75 (1.18 to 2.51) at 15–20 years, 1.40 (0.91 to 2.08) at 20–45 years, and 3.97 (2.23 to 6.59) at >45 years. Conclusions Childhood onset arthritis is associated with a clinically significant increased risk of fracture in children, adolescents and, possibly, adults. Studies are urgently needed to characterise the determinants of structural bone abnormalities in childhood arthritis and devise prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:16627541

  12. Diagnostic Intervals and Its Association with Breast, Prostate, Lung and Colorectal Cancer Survival in England: Historical Cohort Study Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Redaniel, Maria Theresa; Martin, Richard M.; Ridd, Matthew J.; Wade, Julia; Jeffreys, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic pathways for cancer have been implemented, but evidence whether shorter diagnostic intervals (time from primary care presentation to diagnosis) improves survival is lacking. Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we identified patients diagnosed with female breast (8,639), colorectal (5,912), lung (5,737) and prostate (1,763) cancers between 1998 and 2009, and aged >15 years. Presenting symptoms were classified as alert or non-alert, according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance. We used relative survival and excess risk modeling to determine associations between diagnostic intervals and five-year survival. The survival of patients with colorectal, lung and prostate cancer was greater in those with alert, compared with non-alert, symptoms, but findings were opposite for breast cancer. Longer diagnostic intervals were associated with lower mortality for colorectal and lung cancer patients with non-alert symptoms, (colorectal cancer: Excess Hazards Ratio, EHR >6 months vs <1 month: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72-1.00; Lung cancer: EHR 3-6 months vs <1 month: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80-0.95; EHR >6 months vs <1 month: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.74-0.89). Prostate cancer mortality was lower in patients with longer diagnostic intervals, regardless of type of presenting symptom. The association between diagnostic intervals and cancer survival is complex, and should take into account cancer site, tumour biology and clinical practice. Nevertheless, unnecessary delay causes patient anxiety and general practitioners should continue to refer patients with alert symptoms via the cancer pathways, and actively follow-up patients with non-alert symptoms in the community. PMID:25933397

  13. Preventing and Lessening Exacerbations of Asthma in School-aged children Associated with a New Term (PLEASANT): Recruiting Primary Care Research Sites–the PLEASANT experience

    PubMed Central

    Horspool, Michelle J; Julious, Steven A; Mooney, Cara; May, Robin; Sully, Ben; Smithson, W Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recruitment of general practices and their patients into research studies is frequently reported as a challenge. The Preventing and Lessening Exacerbations of Asthma in School-aged children Associated with a New Term (PLEASANT) trial recruited 142 general practices, across England and Wales and delivered the study intervention to time and target. Aims: To describe the process of recruitment used within the cluster randomised PLEASANT trial and present results on factors that influenced recruitment. Methods: Data were collected on the number of and types of contact used to gain expression of interest and subsequent randomisation into the PLEASANT trial. Practice size and previous research experience were also collected. Results: The mean number of contacts required to gain expression of interest were m=3.01 (s.d. 1.6) and total number of contacts from initial invitation to randomisation m=6.8 (s.d. 3.5). Previous randomised controlled trial involvement (hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (confidence interval (CI) 95%, 1.55–2.11) P<0.001) and number of studies a practice had previously engaged in (odds ratio (OR) 1.91 (CI 95%, (1.52–2.42)) P<0.001), significantly influenced whether a practice would participate in PLEASANT. Practice size was not a significant deciding factor (OR=1.04 (95% CI 0.99–1.08) P=0.137). Conclusions: Recruitment to time and target can be achieved in general practice. The amount of resource required for site recruitment should not, however, be underestimated and multiple strategies for contacting practices should be considered. General practitioners with more research experience are more likely to participate in studies. PMID:26562491

  14. Association between funding source, methodological quality and research outcomes in randomized controlled trials of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics added to infant formula: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little or no information available on the impact of funding by the food industry on trial outcomes and methodological quality of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics research in infants. The objective of this study was to compare the methodological quality, outcomes of food industry sponsored trials versus non industry sponsored trials, with regards to supplementation of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics in infant formula. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted to identify published and unpublished randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Cochrane methodology was used to assess the risk of bias of included RCTs in the following domains: 1) sequence generation; 2) allocation concealment; 3) blinding; 4) incomplete outcome data; 5) selective outcome reporting; and 6) other bias. Clinical outcomes and authors’ conclusions were reported in frequencies and percentages. The association between source of funding, risk of bias, clinical outcomes and conclusions were assessed using Pearson’s Chi-square test and the Fisher’s exact test. A p-value < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results Sixty seven completed and 3 on-going RCTs were included. Forty (59.7%) were funded by food industry, 11 (16.4%) by non-industry entities and 16 (23.9%) did not specify source of funding. Several risk of bias domains, especially sequence generation, allocation concealment and blinding, were not adequately reported. There was no significant association between the source of funding and sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding and selective reporting, majority of reported clinical outcomes or authors’ conclusions. On the other hand, source of funding was significantly associated with the domains of incomplete outcome data, free of other bias domains as well as reported antibiotic use and conclusions on weight gain. Conclusion In RCTs on infants fed infant formula containing probiotics, prebiotics or synbiotics, the source of funding did not

  15. Youth in Transition: The Challenges of Generational Change in Asia. Proceedings of the Biennial General Conference of the Association of Asian Social Science Research Councils (15th, Canberra, Australia, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Fay, Ed.; Fahey, Stephanie, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book originates from a conference of the Association of Asian Social Science Research Councils and contains writings and research reports on Youth in Transition in the Asia and Pacific region. The definition of "youth" varies from country to country and ranges between the ages of 10 to 35. The publication summarizes issues in the region,…

  16. Research Visibility: Research and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, George, L., Ed.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this research review was to demonstrate the relationship between the research and evaluation activities and the operational programs of the American Vocational Association (AVA) as it was presented to the 1970 annual convention. The 18 research reports are reviewed under these categories: (1) Awareness, Maturity, and Performance,…

  17. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01

    expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

  18. Burn therapist contributions to the American Burn Association and the Journal of Burn Care and Research: a 45th anniversary review.

    PubMed

    Richard, Reginald

    2014-01-01

    The year 2013 marked the 45th anniversary of American Burn Association (ABA) annual meetings. At this significant juncture, a review of contributions of its members is appropriate to celebrate this milestone. Since the first ABA annual meeting and the initiation of the Journal of Burn Care and Research (JBCR), burn therapists, including both occupational and physical therapists, have grown to become integral members of the ABA, and their contributions among all members are highlighted. A systematic manual review of both ABA annual meeting proceedings and the JBCR was performed. The contributions of burn therapists to the ABA as a whole were classified, cataloged, and hand counted. Areas included: 1) quantifying ABA abstract and JBCR articles on authorship and subject matter, 2) representation on ABA committees; 3) participation in special activities; and 4) other recognitions. Burn therapists comprise 9.7% of ABA members overall. During the course of the first 44 ABA meetings, 8381 abstracts have been presented. Of this number, 634 (7.6%) have been delivered by burn therapists as lead authors. Through the end of 2011, no less than 3207 publications by all disciplines have appeared in JBCR. The vast majority of articles have been written by physicians, followed by doctorate-trained professionals. One hundred-forty therapists have 249 publications (7.8%) to their credit. For both abstracts and articles, the top three subject matter topics have been: scarring, splints and casts, and outcomes. Numerous burn therapists have served as faculty and moderators at ABA annual meetings and on ABA committees including JBCR. Burn therapists have made significant contributions to the JBCR and in support of the ABA and its annual meetings over the past 45 years from the clinical, scientific, and Association perspectives.

  19. Burn therapist contributions to the American Burn Association and the Journal of Burn Care and Research: a 45th anniversary review.

    PubMed

    Richard, Reginald

    2014-01-01

    The year 2013 marked the 45th anniversary of American Burn Association (ABA) annual meetings. At this significant juncture, a review of contributions of its members is appropriate to celebrate this milestone. Since the first ABA annual meeting and the initiation of the Journal of Burn Care and Research (JBCR), burn therapists, including both occupational and physical therapists, have grown to become integral members of the ABA, and their contributions among all members are highlighted. A systematic manual review of both ABA annual meeting proceedings and the JBCR was performed. The contributions of burn therapists to the ABA as a whole were classified, cataloged, and hand counted. Areas included: 1) quantifying ABA abstract and JBCR articles on authorship and subject matter, 2) representation on ABA committees; 3) participation in special activities; and 4) other recognitions. Burn therapists comprise 9.7% of ABA members overall. During the course of the first 44 ABA meetings, 8381 abstracts have been presented. Of this number, 634 (7.6%) have been delivered by burn therapists as lead authors. Through the end of 2011, no less than 3207 publications by all disciplines have appeared in JBCR. The vast majority of articles have been written by physicians, followed by doctorate-trained professionals. One hundred-forty therapists have 249 publications (7.8%) to their credit. For both abstracts and articles, the top three subject matter topics have been: scarring, splints and casts, and outcomes. Numerous burn therapists have served as faculty and moderators at ABA annual meetings and on ABA committees including JBCR. Burn therapists have made significant contributions to the JBCR and in support of the ABA and its annual meetings over the past 45 years from the clinical, scientific, and Association perspectives. PMID:24823340

  20. Organization of research team for nano-associated safety assessment in effort to study nanotoxicology of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Park, Sung Ha; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Ja Hei; Meang, Eun-Ho; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Lim, Seok Tae; Oh, Jae-Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Meyoung-Kon

    2014-01-01

    Currently, products made with nanomaterials are used widely, especially in biology, bio-technologies, and medical areas. However, limited investigations on potential toxicities of nanomaterials are available. Hence, diverse and systemic toxicological data with new methods for nanomaterials are needed. In order to investigate the nanotoxicology of nanoparticles (NPs), the Research Team for Nano-Associated Safety Assessment (RT-NASA) was organized in three parts and launched. Each part focused on different contents of research directions: investigators in part I were responsible for the efficient management and international cooperation on nano-safety studies; investigators in part II performed the toxicity evaluations on target organs such as assessment of genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, or skin penetration; and investigators in part III evaluated the toxicokinetics of NPs with newly developed techniques for toxicokinetic analyses and methods for estimating nanotoxicity. The RT-NASA study was carried out in six steps: need assessment, physicochemical property, toxicity evaluation, toxicokinetics, peer review, and risk communication. During the need assessment step, consumer responses were analyzed based on sex, age, education level, and household income. Different sizes of zinc oxide and silica NPs were purchased and coated with citrate, L-serine, and L-arginine in order to modify surface charges (eight different NPs), and each of the NPs were characterized by various techniques, for example, zeta potentials, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of the "no observed adverse effect level" and systemic toxicities of all NPs were performed by thorough evaluation steps and the toxicokinetics step, which included in vivo studies with zinc oxide and silica NPs. A peer review committee was organized to evaluate and verify the reliability of toxicity tests, and the risk communication step was also needed to convey the current findings