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Sample records for research catchment north

  1. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  2. Hydro-climatic control of stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) across northern catchments within the North-Watch program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudon, Hjalmar; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Seibert, Jan; Soulsby, Chris; Carey, Sean; Buttle, Jim; McDonnell, Jeff; McGuire, Kevin; Caissie, Daniel; Shanley, Jamie

    2010-05-01

    There has been an increasing interest in understanding the regulating mechanisms of surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) the last decade. A majority of this recent work has been based on individual well characterized research catchments or on regional synoptic datasets combined with readily available landscape and climatic variables. However, as the production and transport of DOC primarily is a function of hydro-climatic conditions a better description of catchment hydrological functioning across large geographic regions would be favorable for moving the mechanistic understanding forward. To do this we report from a first assessment of catchment DOC within the international inter-catchment comparison program North-Watch (http://www.abdn.ac.uk/northwatch/). North-Watch includes long-term research catchments ranging from northern temperate regions to the boreal and sub-arctic biomes with the aim to better understand the variable hydrological and biogeochemical responses in Northern catchments to climate change. The North-Watch catchments are located in Sweden (Krycklan), Scotland (Mharcaidh, Girnock and Strontian), the US (Sleepers River and HJ Andrews) and Canada (Catamaran, Dorset and Wolf Creek). The annual average DOC concentration in the nine catchments investigated were directly linked to hydro-climatic influences (e.g. temperature, water storage) and landscape configuration. In general, the DOC concentration followed a parabolic shape with temperature, where the highest concentrations were found in the boreal and near boreal sites and with the lowest concentrations in the temperate and sub-arctic catchments. The between catchment variability in DOC concentration could also be explained by catchment water storage and amount of wetlands in the catchment. Whereas there is a mechanistic link between long-term climatic conditions and the areal coverage of wetlands, the total catchment storage of water is more strongly linked to topography, parent material

  3. Sediment budget for Rediu reservoir catchment, North-Eastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todosi, Cristian; Niculita, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    Sediment budgets are a useful tool for geomorphologic analysis, catchment management and environmental assessment, despite the uncertainties related to their assessment. We present the sediment budget construction and validation for a small catchment of 9.5319 kmp (953.19 ha) situated in the North-Eastern part of Romania. The Rediu reservoir was built between 1986 and 1988, on Rediu valley, a left tributary of Bahlui river, north-west from Iasi city. The catchment of the reservoir has 6.5 km in length and 2.5 km in maximum width, the altitudes decreasing from 170 m in the northern part, to 52 m in the southern part. The valley is symmetric, the altitude of the hillslopes going between 200 m to 75 m in one km length, in the transversal section with the maximum width. The floodplain is narrow having between 20 m to 210 m (in the area of confluence with Breazu tributary). The mean slope of the catchment is 6.4 degree, the maximum slope being 24.6 degrees. The length of channels which show banks of up to 2 m is 19.98 km. The land is used predominantly as crops (58.1 %), 16.7 % being covered by pastures (from which over half are eroded), 11.5 % percent of the catchment being covered by planted forests, 9.2 % by rural constructions and roads, 2.9 % by hayfields, 1.5 % by lakes and 0.1 % by orchards. Beside the Rediu reservoir, there are three ponds (15 771, 1761 and 751 sqm) in the catchment. We considered the trap efficiency for the reservoir and the ponds to be 95%. Aerial images from 1963, 1978 , 1984, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2014 were used to assess the state of geomorphological processes before and after the reservoir construction. After 1970 a gully system situated in Breazu tributary sub-catchment and several active landslides along the main valley left side were forested. Beside these processes, soil erosion and human impact by constructions are the main processes generating sediment in the study area. The sediment yields were quantified by estimating the

  4. Surface Water - Groundwater Interaction Research in Chalk Catchments: UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, D.; Wheater, H.; Howden, N.; Gallagher, A.; Bloomfield, J.

    2004-12-01

    The focus of new European legislation on integrated management and, in particular, on ecological quality, raises major scientific and technical questions. These require improved understanding of catchment systems and hydro-ecological interactions that can only be obtained from integrated and multi-disciplinary experimental research. The main water supply aquifers in the United Kingdom, namely the Cretaceous Chalk and Permo-Triassic Sherwood Sandstone, are situated, for the most part, in lowland England, particularly in the Midlands, South and South East. These aquifers have a major, often dominant influence on the river systems that they underlie. These lowland permeable catchments present a particular set of challenges; management pressures are great, the scientific understanding of the major UK aquifers is poor, and tools for the integrated modelling of surface water-groundwater interactions and associated hydro-ecological processes are limited. In response to these factors, the LOwland CAtchment Research programme (LOCAR) was conceived. The programme also provides intrumented catchments to address some of these scientific issues. This paper describes the programme and early results of research into the influence of lithostratigraphy and karst features on surface water/groundwater interaction in the two Chalk LOCAR catchments.

  5. Comparative analysis of threshold rainfall-runoff response of small catchments in North Carolina's Piedmont region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A. L.; Kuntukova, K.; Fu, C.; Dreps, C.; Sun, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent catchment hydrologic studies have focused on examination of a threshold rainfall-runoff response of hillslopes and small catchments. This threshold response, where runoff generated by a catchment shows a strong nonlinear change as a function of a combined metric of antecedent storage and storm size is of particular interest as it has been proposed as a common or shared behavior. In this study, we analyzed rainfall-runoff data and a series of antecedent storage metrics from five catchments (10-30 ha in size) in North Carolina's Piedmont region for evidence of threshold response. Although located within five miles of each other, the five catchments represent two groupings of catchments with strongly contrasting terrain characteristics, defined here by differences in soils, topography and drainage density. Despite these differences, results showed that each catchment exhibits a clear threshold rainfall-runoff response. Using these experimental results, we have begun to examine whether distributed hydrologic models can capture this shared behavior across sites. The threshold response quantified here and by similar studies offers an interesting summary of catchment response under changing combinations of storm size and antecedent moisture conditions, both variables possibly affected by climate change. In the case of the Triangle area of the Piedmont region of North Carolina, a region that is undergoing increasingly rapid urbanization, these catchments also represent landscape critical to the long term sustainable development of the Falls Lake reservoir, the drinking water source for over half a million people.

  6. The impact of agricultural Best Management Practices on water quality in a North German lowland catchment.

    PubMed

    Lam, Q D; Schmalz, B; Fohrer, N

    2011-12-01

    Research on water quality degradation caused by point and diffuse source pollution plays an important role in protecting the environment sustainably. Implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs) is a conventional approach for controlling and mitigating pollution from diffuse sources. The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term impact of point and diffuse source pollution on sediment and nutrient load in a lowland catchment using the ecohydrological model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of BMPs for water quality improvement in the entire catchment. The study area, Kielstau catchment, is located in the North German lowlands. The water quality is not only influenced by the predominating agricultural land use in the catchment as cropland and pasture, but also by six municipal wastewater treatment plants. Diffuse entries as well as punctual entries from the wastewater treatment plants are implemented in the model set-up. Results from model simulations indicated that the SWAT model performed satisfactorily in simulating flow, sediment, and nutrient load in a daily time step. Two approaches to structural and nonstructural BMPs have been recommended in relation to cost and effectiveness of BMPs in this study. These BMPs include extensive land use management, grazing management practice, field buffer strip, and nutrient management plan. The results showed that BMPs would reduce fairly the average annual load for nitrate and total nitrogen by 8.6% to 20.5%. However, the implementation of BMPs does not have much impact on reduction in the average annual load of sediment and total phosphorus at the main catchment outlet. The results obtained by implementing those BMPs ranged from 0.8% to 4.9% and from 1.1% to 5.3% for sediment and total phosphorus load reduction, respectively. This study also reveals that reduction only in one type of BMP did not achieve the target value for water quality according to the

  7. Characterising Groundwater-dominated Lowland Catchments - the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports on a major 10million UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. We focus here on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. We give an overview of the experimental approach and highlight some current research findings. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and Karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture is emerging of localised subsurface inflows, linked to structural geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel. Hyporheic zone research has shown significant areas of methanogenesis and denitrification - the catchment-scale significance of this remains to be determined. Similarly, analysis of nutrient transformations in riparian wetlands is being linked to analysis of groundwater flowpaths to

  8. Characterising groundwater-dominated lowland catchments: the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a major UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. The scope and objectives of this national programme are introduced and focus on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. An overview of the research programme is provided together with highlights of some current research findings concerning the hydrological functioning of these catchments. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture of localised subsurface inflows, linked to geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel is emerging. Management implications are discussed. Strategies to control surface application of nutrients are expected to have little effect on groundwater quality for several

  9. [Comparison of nitrogen loss via surface runoff from two agricultural catchments in semi-arid North China].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hai-Ming; Yin, Cheng-Qing; Wang, Xia-Hui; Zou, Ying

    2008-10-01

    Nitrogen loss characteristics via surface runoff from two typical agricultural catchments into Yuqiao Reservoir--the important drinking water source area for Tianjin city in semi-arid North China were investigated through two-year in-situ monitoring and indoor chemical analysis. The results showed that annual nitrogen export mainly concentrated in the rainy period between June to September. About 41% of the annual water output and 52% of the annual total nitrogen output took place in two rainfall events with rainfall> 60 mm in Taohuasi catchment (T catchment), while the distribution of water and nitrogen export among various rainfalls in Caogezhuang catchment (C catchment) was smooth. The rainfall thresholds for the appearance of water and nitrogen export from the outlet of T catchment and C catchment were 20 mm and 10 mm. The mean annual runoff coefficients of C and T catchments were 0.013 2 and 0.001 6, respectively. The mean annual total nitrogen exports from C catchment and T catchment were 1.048 kg x (hm2 x a)(-1) and 0.158 kg x (hm2 x a)(-1) respectively. The difference of micro-topography, landscape pattern and hydrological pathway between two catchments could explain the nitrogen export gap. Micro-topographical features created by long-term anthropological disturbance decrease the runoff generation ability. The distance between nitrogen source area and the outlet in T catchment was around 1 500 m, while such distance in C catchment was just around 200 m. The short distance added the nitrogen export risk via surface runoff. Road-type hydrological pathway in C catchment could transfer nitrogen into the receiving water via surface runoff directly, while nitrogen could be detained within the pathway by many sink structures such as small stones, vegetated buffer strip and dry ponds in T catchment.

  10. Participatory planning in river catchments, an innovative toolkit tested in Southern Africa and North West England.

    PubMed

    Tippett, J

    2005-01-01

    The European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD) offers an unparalleled opportunity for improving river basin management. Active participation is essential for its delivery. "End-of-pipe" solutions will not deliver the improvements needed to achieve its ambitious goals. This research tested DesignWays, a toolkit for participatory planning, as a mechanism for maximizing the long-term social and environmental benefits of such stakeholder and community participation. It examined the emerging role of "planning for sustainability" in the context of river catchments. Sustainable management of water requires integration, and recognition of interconnections between systems at different levels of scale. This is an endeavour in which systems thinking provides useful tools. The development of DesignWays was a conscious attempt to embed 'new paradigm' living systems metaphors into a practical planning tool. This paper begins with a description of DesignWays and its development in Southern Africa. An outline of the context of the action research in North-West England is followed by a description of the stages of the process, with highlights of the outcomes. This research had two major outcomes: a contribution to theory through an in-depth exploration of the theoretical basis of participatory, ecologically informed design; and a contribution to practice through investigating DesignWays' potential to meet key challenges of the WFD. This research points to the importance of understanding participatory planning as a societal process, aiming to make the process engaging and meaningful. It has pointed to the need to see participatory planning and education for sustainability as an integrated process. It demonstrated the benefits of an iterative process in which planning at the landscape level of scale informs, and is informed by, work at the site level. It has shown that an approach consistent with a living systems paradigm can contribute to the development of more integrated

  11. Vegetation and water fluxes under Mediterranean mountain conditions. The Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, P.; Poyatos, R.; Muzylo, A.; Rubio, C. M.; Latron, J.; Delgado, J.; Gallart, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Vallcebre research catchments are located in a Mediterranean mountain area of the Pyrenean ranges (North Eastern Spain). These catchments were originally covered by Quercus pubescens but were deforested for agricultural use in the past. Nowadays they are covered by mesophyle grasses with spontaneous afforestation by Pinus sylvestris, covering 64% of the catchment area. In this context, different investigations studying water fluxes in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum have been performed. The main objective of these studies is the analysis of the role of vegetation cover on the catchment water balance in a framework of climate and land use changes. The dynamics of transpiration and rainfall interception by Pinus sylvestris and Quercus pubescens, are investigated in terms of their dependence on meteorological conditions, on soil moisture and water table depth. Furthermore, the role of vegetation on catchment water balance is analysed. The results underline: (a) The importance of rainfall interception losses, representing about 24% of the bulk rainfall by the Scots pine and between 6 and 24%, by the Pubescent oak (depending on phenology), and the high temporal variability of this flux. (b) The effect of forest covers on soil moisture, which was apparent when comparing neighbouring soil moisture profiles under forest and meadows. (c) The differences in transpiration between species. Transpiration by Scots pines represented twice the value found in the nearby Pubescent oak stand. Scots pines showed a strong reduction of transpiration during dry summer periods, even in the studied area where the annual rainfall slightly exceeds the reference evapotranspiration. On the contrary, Pubescent oak was less affected by soil moisture deficits. Rainfall interception as well as trees transpiration processes have been modelled (Gash and Jarvis-type models respectively) at the plot scale with a twofold objective: the comprehension of each studied process and the analysis

  12. Seamless hydrological predictions for a monsoon driven catchment in North-East India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, Lisei; Bürger, Gerd; Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Improving hydrological forecasting systems on different time scales is interesting and challenging with regards to humanitarian as well as scientific aspects. In meteorological research, short-, medium-, and long-term forecasts are now being merged to form a system of seamless weather and climate predictions. Coupling of these meteorological forecasts with a hydrological model leads to seamless predictions of streamflow, ranging from one day to a season. While there are big efforts made to analyse the uncertainties of probabilistic streamflow forecasts, knowledge of the single uncertainty contributions from meteorological and hydrological modeling is still limited. The overarching goal of this project is to gain knowledge in this subject by decomposing and quantifying the overall predictive uncertainty into its single factors for the entire seamless forecast horizon. Our study area is the Mahanadi River Basin in North-East India, which is prone to severe floods and droughts. Improved streamflow forecasts on different time scales would contribute to early flood warning as well as better water management operations in the agricultural sector. Because of strong inter-annual monsoon variations in this region, which are, unlike the mid-latitudes, partly predictable from long-term atmospheric-oceanic oscillations, the Mahanadi catchment represents an ideal study site. Regionalized precipitation forecasts are obtained by applying the method of expanded downscaling to the ensemble prediction systems of ECMWF and NCEP. The semi-distributed hydrological model HYPSO-RR, which was developed in the Eco-Hydrological Simulation Environment ECHSE, is set up for several sub-catchments of the Mahanadi River Basin. The model is calibrated automatically using the Dynamically Dimensioned Search algorithm, with a modified Nash-Sutcliff efficiency as objective function. Meteorological uncertainty is estimated from the existing ensemble simulations, while the hydrological uncertainty is

  13. A comparative study of nutrient transfer via surface runoff from two small agricultural catchments in north China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiming; Yin, Chengqing; Wang, Weidong; Shan, Baoqing

    2007-08-01

    A field study was conducted to determine the effect of landscape spatial pattern and micro-topography on nutrient transfer via runoff from two catchments into Yuqiao Reservoir in north China. The surface runoff discharge was measured during rainfall events and water samples were analyzed in 2004 and 2005. The mean annual total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) exports per unit area from Caogezhuang catchment (C catchment) were 1.048 and 0.561 kg ha-1 year-1, respectively, while the TN and TP exports from Taohuasi catchment (T catchment) were 0.158 and 0.027 kg ha-1 year-1. In both catchments, village and vineyard shared the highest nutrient export ability due to the accumulated animal waste and heavy application of fertilizer and manure. In T catchment, the distance of village and vineyard was about 1,500 m away from the receiving water and in between were woodland and cropland. In the hydrological pathway, there were sink landscape structures of small stone dams, roadside swale, vegetated filter strip and dry ponds, which could detain water and nutrients. In C catchment, the distance between the village and the receiving water was about 200 m, and the hydrological pathway was compacted roads and ditches with no sink structures. It is suggested that the distance between the pollution source area and the receiving water and the micro-topographical features were the main factors to control the great difference in nutrient export rates.

  14. Decadal changes in the frequency of major floods in near-natural catchments across North America and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Hannaford, Jamie; Whitfield, Paul H.; Burn, Donald H.; Fleig, Anne; Stahl, Kerstin; Renard, Benjamin; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-04-01

    Recent major floods in North America and Europe have received much press, with some concluding that these floods are more frequent in recent years as a result of anthropogenic warming. There has therefore been considerable scientific effort invested in establishing whether observed flood records show evidence of trends or variability in flood frequency, and to determine whether these patterns can be linked to climatic changes. However, the river catchments used in many published studies are influenced by direct human alteration such as reservoir regulation and urbanisation, which can confound the interpretation of climate-driven variability. Furthermore, a majority of previous studies have analysed changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at a national scale. Few studies are known that have analysed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year floods) on a continental scale. To fill this research gap, the current study is analysing flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges across a large study domain embracing North America and much of Europe. RHNs comprise gauging stations with minimally disturbed catchment conditions, which have a near-natural flow regime and provide good quality data; RHN analyses thus allow hydro-climatic variability to be distinguished from direct artificial disturbances or data inhomogeneities. One of the key innovations in this study is the definition of an RHN-like network on a continental scale. The network incorporates existing, well-established RHNs in Canada, the US, the UK, Ireland and Norway, alongside RHN-like catchments from Europe (France, Switzerland, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland), which have been incorporated in the network following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status of candidate gauges through consultation with local experts. As the aim of the study is to examine long-term variability in the number of major floods, annual exceedances of 25-, 50-, and 100-year

  15. Hydrologic responses of a tropical catchment in Thailand and two temperate/cold catchments in north America to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, T.Y.; Ahmad, Z.

    1997-12-31

    The hydrologic impact or sensitivities of three medium-sized catchments to global warming, one of tropical climate in Northern Thailand and two of temperate climate in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins of California, were investigated.

  16. Nutrient loss and water quality under extensive grazing in the upper Burdekin river catchment, North Queensland.

    PubMed

    O'Reagain, P J; Brodie, J; Fraser, G; Bushell, J J; Holloway, C H; Faithful, J W; Haynes, D

    2005-01-01

    of ground cover are maintained. In contrast, sediment and nutrient loss under grazing on more erodable land types is cause for serious concern. Long-term empirical research and monitoring will be essential to quantify the impacts of changed land management on water quality in the spatially and temporally variable Burdekin River catchment.

  17. US Forest Service Experimental Forests and Ranges Network: a continental research platform for catchment-scale research

    Treesearch

    Daniel Neary; Deborah Hayes; Lindsey Rustad; James Vose; Gerald Gottfried; Stephen Sebesteyn; Sherri Johnson; Fred Swanson; Mary Adams

    2012-01-01

    The US Forest Service initiated its catchment research program in 1909 with the first paired catchment study at Wagon Wheel Gap, Colorado, USA. It has since developed the Experimental Forests and Ranges Network, with over 80 long-term research study sites located across the contiguous USA, Alaska, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. This network provides a unique, powerful...

  18. Review of acid-deposition-catchment interaction and comments on future research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Edward C.

    1991-11-01

    This review of acid-deposition-catchment interaction follows from the Journal of Hydrology's Special Issue of August, 1990 (Volume 116). For some years acid deposition research has laboured under the constraint of a |Dspolitically correct|DS paradigm. Nevertheless, this review documents appreciable advances in the state of the science. These advances have led to the point where a paradigm shift is possible. Atmospheric acid deposition contributes to the acidity of catchments. It necessarily interacts with all catchment materials: organic, biological, and mineral. However, acid-deposition-catchment interactions need to be critically revisited and put into perspective with the fundamental knowledge of catchment biogeochemistry, geography and the effects of disturbance history possessed by other disciplines. Each natural acid-neutralizing and acid-producing mechanism ignored by popular acidification theory contributes to a cumulative overestimate of the importance of acidic deposition in catchment acidity. Previous research on catchment sulphur sources has been deficient to the degree it has accepted the paradigm that such catchments have negligible natural sources of sulphur. This cannot be so given the need ecosystems have for sulphur as an essential macronutrient, their adaptation to excessive amounts of it (i.e. ecosystems are leaky in respect to sulphur), the sulphur content of bedrock, and weatherability of sulphur-bearing minerals. Research needs to be initiated on all aspects of catchment retention of atmospherically deposited sulphur, especially enhanced retention by imperfectly drained terrestrial soils. Deficiencies in catchment sulphur cycle research are not random; they err cumulatively on the side of overestimating the importance of atmospheric sulphur deposition.

  19. Linking the runoff response at micro-plot and catchment scale following wildfire and terracing, north-central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Martinho A. S.; Rial-Rivas, María E.; Machado, Ana I.; Serpa, Dalila; Prats, Sergio A.; Faria, Sílvia R.; Varela, María E. T.; González-Pelayo, Óscar; Keizer, J. Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires are known as one of the principal natural hazards affecting the Mediterranean region. This includes Portugal, where wildfires have affected some 100.000 ha of rural lands each year. The effects of wildfires on runoff generation and/or the associated soil (fertility) losses have been studied in Portugal for more than two decades. Some of these studies have reported strong and sometimes extreme hydrological responses in recently burnt areas. Forestry operations in such areas have increasingly come to include bench terracing in preparation of new eucalypt plantations. The hydrological impacts of bench terracing, however, have received little research attention so far and the few existing publications are limited to small spatial scales. The construction of terraces is commonly considered an effective practice for soil conservation on steep slopes, having been applied by mankind since early history. Nonetheless, the present authors have measured high rates of splash as well as inter-rill erosion on recently constructed terraces, and have regularly observed rill formation, including on forest tracks which typically constitute an extensive network in such bench terraced plantations. The present study was carried out in a 29-ha forest catchment in north-central Portugal that was burnt by a wildfire during the summer of 2010, logged during early winter 2010/11, and then bench terraced with bulldozers during late winter 2011, some 6 months after the wildfire. The catchment outlet was instrumented immediately after the fire with an automatic hydrometric station comprising two subsequent flumes with maximum discharge capacities of 120 and 1700 l sec-1. Within the catchment, rainfall was measured using several automatic and storage gauges and overland flow was monitored on two contrasting slopes using 3 micro-plots of approximately 0.25m2 on each slope.Overland flow was measured at 1- to 2-weekly intervals during the hydrological years of 2010/11 and 2011/12, i

  20. Integrating within-catchment and interbasin connectivity in riverine and nonriverine freshwater conservation planning in the North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowen; Shi, Jianbin; Song, Xiaolong; Ma, Tiantian; Man, Ying; Cui, Baoshan

    2017-08-25

    Freshwater ecosystems encompass all inland water bodies, in which riverine and nonriverine freshwaters are linked through hydrological connectivity within a catchment. However, riverine and nonriverine freshwaters have often been assessed separately and their interdependence and connection has not been considered appropriately in prevailing freshwater conservation planning. To address the representation and persistence of freshwater ecosystems in conservation assessment, we integrated riverine and nonriverine freshwater wetlands as broad-scale conservation surrogates and incorporated longitudinal, lateral and vertical connectivity rules in a conservation planning for the freshwater wetlands in the North China Plain (NCP). We also considered interbasin connectivity by incorporating conservation features of key transferring nodes of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWD) in the NCP to safeguard their unique ecosystem services of regulating interbasin freshwater. Three scenarios (i.e., 2D, 3D and interbasin scenario) were developed by incorporating different multiple conservation targets, and their spatial priorities and cost-efficiency in freshwater conservation were compared. We applied systematic conservation framework and modified Marxan to accommodate these multidirectional and interbasin connectivity targets in our freshwater conservation assessment. The results indicated that the existing conservation system covered approximately 20% of the freshwater wetlands in the NCP, and there were still considerable conservation gaps that need to be filled. The optimal scenarios could substantially improve the representation, complementarity and persistence for the conservation of freshwater ecosystems, but would not significantly increased overall costs. The framework developed by our research has the potential to facilitate further application of systematic methods in freshwater conservation and rehabilitation planning at multiple scales. Copyright © 2017

  1. Differences in Sulfate Behavior along a North-South Gradient of Unglaciated Eastern U.S. Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, K. C.; Cosby, B. J.; Deviney, F. A.; Webb, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    During the 1990’s, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) concluded that stream recovery from acidification would vary with the ability of the receiving catchment soils to store sulfur by sulfate (SO42-) adsorption. In the unglaciated portion of the eastern U.S., soils are likely to retain SO42- because they are old, thick, and have high clay contents. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and 1995 have caused reduced sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions and subsequent reduced atmospheric deposition of SO42-. The DDRP indicated that streams in the Mid Appalachian Region range from being at steady state (input = output) with respect to SO42- to having greater than 90% net sulfur retention. Long-term monitoring in ten forested catchments in the eastern U.S. reveals that effects of the decreased SO2 emissions in stream waters have been mixed. There are decreases in SO42- concentrations in some streams but little change at others, indicating varying degrees of retention. We tested the DDRP hypothesis by examining sulfate behavior along a north-south gradient of unglaciated catchments in the eastern U.S. We analyzed the cumulative net flux (input - output) of SO42- at the catchment scale with the longest-term data available to determine if the catchment is: 1) at steady state; 2) exporting SO42- (desorbing from soil sorption sites or weathering products from an internal source of SO42-); or 3) retaining SO42- (more SO42- being deposited by atmospheric deposition than is exported by stream water) and examined why neighboring catchments respond differently. For example, at Catoctin Mountain, Maryland, we observed four catchments, three of which demonstrated the three different SO42- dynamics described. Likewise, at Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, we observed a range of SO42- behavior among the six catchments monitored. We offer ideas that may help explain differences in SO42- behavior across the large spatial gradient. We

  2. The Population Burden of Cancer: Research Driven by the Catchment Area of a Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Tai, Caroline G; Hiatt, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Cancer centers, particularly those supported by the National Cancer Institute, are charged with reducing the cancer burden in their catchment area. However, methods to define both the catchment area and the cancer burden are diverse and range in complexity often based on data availability, staff resources, or confusion about what is required. This article presents a review of the current literature identifying 4 studies that have defined various aspects of the cancer burden in a defined geographical area and highlights examples of how some cancer centers and other health institutions have defined their catchment area and characterized the cancer burden within it. We then present a detailed case study of an approach applied by the University of California, San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center to define its catchment area and its population cancer burden. We cite examples of how the Cancer Center research portfolio addresses the defined cancer burden. Our case study outlines a systematic approach to using publicly available data, such as cancer registry data, that are accessible by all cancer centers. By identifying gaps and formulating future research directions based on the needs of the population within the catchment area, epidemiologic studies and other types of cancer research can be directed to the population served. This review can help guide cancer centers in developing an approach to defining their own catchment area as mandated and applying research findings to this defined population. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Assessing the Age of Particulate Organic Matter Exported from a Temperate Rainforest Catchment of the North American Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; Ingalls, A. E.; Santos, G.; Keil, R. G.; Wefferling, L.; Jones, A.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Although temperate rainforests of the North American Pacific Coast contain a small proportion of the world's forests, they contain some of the highest densities of biomass of any terrestrial system, and they store large quantities of carbon in soil. Understanding the residence time of organic carbon in these watersheds is of ecological significance. Given that rivers can mobilize sediment (and associated carbon) from across the catchment, carefully deciphering the organic signatures found within riverine particles can be a powerful tool to inform our understanding of carbon cycling catchment-wide. Here we examine the lignin phenol content (lignin is a biomarker unique to vascular plants) and the radiocarbon age (Δ14C) of fine particulate organic carbon (FPOC) exported by the Queets River of Washington State's Olympic Peninsula over the course of one year, targeting winter storm events. This mountainous catchment is one of the largest and most pristine found on the Olympic Peninsula. The Δ14C of FPOC was quantified for each of the twelve sampling events, whereas the Δ14C of the individual lignin phenols was determined during a late-winter storm event. Sediments were enriched in lignin phenols at the end of the summer dry season and into the first storm of the fall, suggesting that surface soils were transported early on. The Δ14C of individual lignin phenols ranged from -161 to 26‰, with biomarkers for non-woody vegetation being most depleted. These results suggest that particulate lignin exported from temperate catchments is considerably aged, especially relative to the tropics. These findings are consistent with cool temperatures and abundant moisture limiting microbial decomposition, increasing the residence time of plant-derived organic carbon in temperate rainforests. We will compare the Δ14C content of lignin phenols to that of bulk organic matter to partition riverine FPOC amongst possible organic matter sources.

  4. Prediction of soil water erosion risk within GIS-case study of Beni Amrane Dam catchment (North of Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touahir, S.; Khenter, K.; Remini, B.; Saad, H.

    2017-08-01

    Isser River is one of North Algeria’s major resources. It is vulnerable to water soil erosion because of favourable conjunctions of different geomorphological, hydro-climatic and lithologic factors. This case study has been carried out on the Beni Amrane dam Catchment, which is located in the bottom of Isser River, in North Algeria. The study involves a mapping of main factors of water erosion: rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, slope and land use. Essentially a data mapping specification analysis shows, on each factor, how to identify the areas that are prone to water erosion. 04 classes of multifactorial vulnerability to water erosion have been identified: areas with low vulnerability (10 per cent); area with middle vulnerability (49 per cent); areas with high and very high vulnerability (38 per cent and 3 per cent). This could be a first guidance document for a rational use of land in the region and better secure the Beni Amrane dam against reservoir siltation.

  5. Historical changes in the annual number of large floods in near-natural catchments across North America and Europe, 1931-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Glenn; Whitfield, Paul; Hannaford, Jamie; Burn, Donald; Renard, Benjamin; Stahl, Kerstin; Fleig, Anne; Madsen, Henrik; Mediero, Luis; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna

    2014-05-01

    Previous investigations have analyzed historical changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at regional or national scales. These investigations often use catchments where streamflows have been influenced by human alterations such as reservoir regulation or urbanization. No known studies have analyzed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year return period floods) at a continental scale for near-natural catchments. To fill this research gap, this study analyzed flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges in North America (United States and Canada) and Europe (United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland). RHNs are formally defined networks in several countries that comprise gauges with a natural or near-natural flow regime and that provide good quality data. Selected RHN-like gauges were included following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status through consultation with local experts. Some 1206 study gauges met near-natural and completeness criteria for 1961-2010 and 322 gauges met criteria for 1931-2010. Peak flows with recurrence intervals of 25, 50, and 100 years were estimated using the generalized extreme-value distribution and L-moments, and peak flows at each gauge that exceeded these flood thresholds in each year were compiled. Continental and regional trends over time in the annual number of large floods, including groups differentiated by catchment size and major Köppen-Geiger climate group, are being computed and will be presented at EGU. Plots will also show the decadal variability in the annual number of large floods. The unique dataset used for this study is an example of successful international collaboration on hydro-climatic data exchange, which is potentially a step towards establishing RHN or RHN-like networks and analyzing near-natural streamflows on a global scale.

  6. Producing landslide susceptibility maps by utilizing machine learning methods. The case of Finikas catchment basin, North Peloponnese, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsangaratos, Paraskevas; Ilia, Ioanna; Loupasakis, Constantinos; Papadakis, Michalis; Karimalis, Antonios

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of the present study was to apply two machine learning methods for the production of a landslide susceptibility map in the Finikas catchment basin, located in North Peloponnese, Greece and to compare their results. Specifically, Logistic Regression and Random Forest were utilized, based on a database of 40 sites classified into two categories, non-landslide and landslide areas that were separated into a training dataset (70% of the total data) and a validation dataset (remaining 30%). The identification of the areas was established by analyzing airborne imagery, extensive field investigation and the examination of previous research studies. Six landslide related variables were analyzed, namely: lithology, elevation, slope, aspect, distance to rivers and distance to faults. Within the Finikas catchment basin most of the reported landslides were located along the road network and within the residential complexes, classified as rotational and translational slides, and rockfalls, mainly caused due to the physical conditions and the general geotechnical behavior of the geological formation that cover the area. Each landslide susceptibility map was reclassified by applying the Geometric Interval classification technique into five classes, namely: very low susceptibility, low susceptibility, moderate susceptibility, high susceptibility, and very high susceptibility. The comparison and validation of the outcomes of each model were achieved using statistical evaluation measures, the receiving operating characteristic and the area under the success and predictive rate curves. The computation process was carried out using RStudio an integrated development environment for R language and ArcGIS 10.1 for compiling the data and producing the landslide susceptibility maps. From the outcomes of the Logistic Regression analysis it was induced that the highest b coefficient is allocated to lithology and slope, which was 2.8423 and 1.5841, respectively. From the

  7. Snow Accumulation and Spring Melt Rates of Bogs and Fens in the North Granny Creek Catchment Basin, Hudson Bay Lowlands, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, C. F.; Price, J. S.

    2009-05-01

    The Hudson Bay Lowlands contain one of the most extensive, contiguous peatland complexes in the world. Interlinked patterned peatlands developed in this region because of the cool climate, low-gradient topography and an underlying layer of low conductivity marine sediments. There is currently little research regarding the mechanisms that control runoff and surface water connectivity in this region, especially the functions of different peatland types on runoff production and flow pathways. Runoff generation in these systems is dependent on several factors such as soil and pool storage capacity, snow accumulation and melt rates, and peatland morphometry. Snowmelt accounts for a major portion of total annual runoff in this region and the timing of the melt will determine effective runoff production from a peatland catchment. One of the objectives of this project is to identify the processes and mechanisms that generate spring snowmelt runoff in different peatland types (i.e. bogs and fens) and quantify the relative contribution of each type in a peatland-dominated catchment basin. This research is being conducted in a 30 km2 catchment basin located near the DeBeers Victor diamond mine, located 90 km west of Attawapiskat, Ontario. The North Granny Creek basin is located approximately 3 km from the mine pit and is comprised of several peatland types and forms. The surface hydrology of this area is expected to be affected by groundwater depressurization due to dewatering of the mine pit by deep groundwater pumping wells. Effects of this activity on surface hydrology could possibly include increased soil storage capacity due to drier conditions and decreased melt rates due to reduced inputs of warm groundwater. Surface water connectivity is usually at a maximum in the spring because of a relatively impermeable frost table and low soil storage capacity which reduces infiltration. These effects of melt will not be observed uniformly over the entire catchment because of the

  8. On the interpolation of volumetric water content in research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Phesheya; Chaplot, Vincent

    Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) is widely used in the environmental sciences because of its accuracy and efficiency in producing soil maps compared to the traditional soil mapping. Numerous studies have investigated how the sampling density and the interpolation process of data points affect the prediction quality. While, the interpolation process is straight forward for primary attributes such as soil gravimetric water content (θg) and soil bulk density (ρb), the DSM of volumetric water content (θv), the product of θg by ρb, may either involve direct interpolations of θv (approach 1) or independent interpolation of ρb and θg data points and subsequent multiplication of ρb and θg maps (approach 2). The main objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of these two mapping approaches for θv. A 23 ha grassland catchment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was selected for this study. A total of 317 data points were randomly selected and sampled during the dry season in the topsoil (0-0.05 m) for θg by ρb estimation. Data points were interpolated following approaches 1 and 2, and using inverse distance weighting with 3 or 12 neighboring points (IDW3; IDW12), regular spline with tension (RST) and ordinary kriging (OK). Based on an independent validation set of 70 data points, OK was the best interpolator for ρb (mean absolute error, MAE of 0.081 g cm-3), while θg was best estimated using IDW12 (MAE = 1.697%) and θv by IDW3 (MAE = 1.814%). It was found that approach 1 underestimated θv. Approach 2 tended to overestimate θv, but reduced the prediction bias by an average of 37% and only improved the prediction accuracy by 1.3% compared to approach 1. Such a great benefit of approach 2 (i.e., the subsequent multiplication of interpolated maps of primary variables) was unexpected considering that a higher sampling density (∼14 data point ha-1 in the present study) tends to minimize the differences between interpolations techniques and approaches. In the

  9. Diffuse nutrient losses and the impact factors determining their regional differences in four catchments from North to South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Zhou, Yujian; Shao, Quanxi; Liu, Hongbin; Lei, Qiuliang; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xuelei

    2016-12-01

    Diffuse nutrient loss mechanism is complicated and shows remarkably regional differences due to spatial heterogeneities of underlying surface conditions, climate and agricultural practices. Moreover, current available observations are still hard to support the identification of impact factors due to different time or space steps. In this study, an integrated water system model (HEQM) was adopted to obtain the simulated loads of diffuse components (carriers: runoff and sediment; nutrient: total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP)) with synchronous scales. Multivariable statistical analysis approaches (Analysis of Similarity and redundancy analysis) were used to assess the regional differences, and to identify impact factors as well as their contributions. Four catchments were selected as our study areas, i.e., Xiahui and Zhangjiafen Catchments of Miyun Basin in North China, Yuliang and Tunxi Catchments of Xin'anjiang Basin in South China. Results showed that the model performances of monthly processes were very good for runoff and good for sediment, TN and TP. The annual average coefficients of all the diffuse components in Xin'anjiang Basin were much greater than those in Miyun Basin, and showed significantly regional differences. All the selected impact factors interpreted 72.87-82.16% of the regional differences of carriers, and 62.72-71.62% of those of nutrient coefficients, respectively. For individual impact factor categories, the critical category was geography, followed by land-use/cover, carriers, climate, as well as soil and agricultural practices in Miyun Basin, or agricultural practices and soil in Xin'anjiang Basin. For individual factors, the critical factors were locations for the carrier regional differences, and carriers or chemical fertilizer for the nutrient regional differences. This study is expected to promote further applications of integrated water system model and multivariable statistical analysis in the diffuse nutrient studies, and

  10. Response of sap flow to environmental factors in the headwater catchment of Miyun Reservoir in subhumid North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Qiang; Hu, Hongchang; Tian, Fuqiang; Liu, Yaping; Xu, Ran

    2015-04-01

    Since the headwater catchment of Miyun Reservoir is the main drinking water conservation area of Beijing, its water cycle is of importance for the regional water resource. Transpiration is an important component of water cycle, which can be estimated by sap flow. In this study, the dynamics of sap flow and its response to environmental factors and relationship with leaf area index (LAI) were analyzed. The field study was conducted in the Xitaizi Experimental Catchment, located in the headwater catchment of Miyun Reservoir in subhumid North China. The Aspen (Populus davidiana) and Epinette (Larix gmelinii) are the two dominant tree species. Sap flow in 15 Aspen (Populus davidiana) trees was monitored using thermal dissipation probes (TDP) during the growing season of 2013 and 2014, and sap flow in another 3 Epinette (Larix gmelinii) trees was also monitored during September and October in 2014 for comparative analysis. Physiological and biometric parameters of the selected trees and the environmental factors, including meteorological variables, soil moisture content and groundwater table depth were measured. Vapor pressure deficit (VPD), variable of transpiration (VT) and reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) were calculated using the measured environmental factors. The LAI, which is used to characterize phenophase, was calculated using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI product (MCD15A3). Correlation analysis for daily sap flow and air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed, solar radiation, VPD, VT and ET0 under different soil moisture and groundwater table depth conditions was performed. Diurnal course and hysteresis of sap flow were analyzed as a function of air temperature, solar radiation, VPD and VT on the typical sunny, cloudy and rainy days under different soil moisture conditions. Correlation analysis between daily sap flow and LAI showed that LAI and phenophase significantly influence sap flow and restrict

  11. Overview of North American stored product research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Major locations for stored product research in North America are in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Recent personnel changes and research areas are reviewed. One of the pressing research areas in the U.S. is reducing the need for fumigations in flour mills and evaluating alte...

  12. Mechanisms to improve integrative research at the science-policy interface for sustainable catchment manageme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J. A.; Blackstock, K. L.; Haygarth, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    There is a need for greater levels of integration between researchers and policy makers to provide an evidence base that is transparent, integrated, and adaptive to support the complexities of sustainable catchment management. Opening up and closing down mechanisms are equally important in creating and establishing such an evidence base. We provide examples of both types based on our recent research and knowledge transfer activities at the science-policy interface. Through our coordination role for the UK government we provide opening up forums for researchers and government science and policy staff to learn about and assess the gaps and uncertainties of the evidence base. Closing down mechanisms are also vital to policy making on sustainable catchment management, in that they distil what is known and what is unknown. The diffuse pollution user manual provides a valuable tool for policy and catchment management staff to assess the potential effectiveness of different combinations of remedial diffuse pollution mitigation methods. We argue that it is important that opening up and closing down mechanisms are iteratively linked given the complexity and uncertainty of the science and policy cycles. Advances in integrative research at the science-policy interface are vital if there is to be a move to more deliberative policy making.

  13. Nitrogen deposition and leaching from two forested catchments in Southwest China--preliminary data and research needs.

    PubMed

    Larssen, T; Mulder, J; Wang, Y; Chen, X; Xiao, J; Zhao, D

    2001-11-15

    Increased nitrogen deposition has resulted in increased nitrogen pools and nitrogen leaching in European and North American forest soils. The development in Asia in general, and China in particular, suggests increased deposition of reduced nitrogen from changes in agricultural practices and of oxidized nitrogen from rapid growth of the transportation sector. Decreased nitrogen retention in forested areas in the future may cause increased NO3- leaching and, thus, acidification and eutrophication in surface waters. The differences in climate, ecosystems, land use, and deposition history make direct application of knowledge from studies in Europe and North America difficult. In Southwest China the potential for nitrogen mobilization from forest soils may be high because of the warm and humid climate, resulting in high decomposition rates of soil organic matter. However, there are very few data available for quantifying the suspected potential for increased nitrogen leaching in forest ecosystems. Here we present data from two forested catchments, dominated by Masson pine (Pinus massoniana), near Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively, in Southwest China. The present nitrogen deposition is moderate, estimated in the range from 10 to 40 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). The C/N ratios of the soils are generally below 15. Nitrate concentrations in soil water are rather variable in space, with highest values of several hundred microequivalents per liter. The turnover rate of nitrogen in the forest ecosystem is quite high compared to the atmospheric deposition rate. At present, nitrate runoff from the catchments is low and intermediate in Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively. More research is needed to improve our ability to predict future nitrogen leaching from subtropical Asian coniferous forests.

  14. Testing fine sediment connectivity hypotheses using fallout radionuclide tracers in a small catchment with badlands. Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Vuolo, Diego; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Ferrer, Laura; Estrany, Joan

    2016-04-01

    In the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain), results obtained during over 20 years showed that badlands are the primary sources of sediments to the drainage network. Parent lutitic rocks are weathered during winter producing regoliths, which are eroded from badland surfaces mainly during summer intense rainstorms. Even if the produced sediments are mainly fine, due to the ephemeral nature of summer runoff events most of them are deposited on the stream beds, where they may remain during some time (months to years). Within the MEDhyCON project, a fallout radionuclides (FRNs) tracing experiment (i.e., excess lead 210 (Pbx-210) and beryllium 7 (Be-7)) is being carried out in order to investigate sediment connectivity. A simplified Pbx-210 balance model on badland surfaces suggested a seasonal sawtooth-like activity pattern: FRN being accumulated in regoliths from October to June and depleted in summer. Early summer erosion events would produce the sediments with the highest activity whereas late summer events would produce sediments with the lowest activity coming from the deeper regolith horizons. These findings lead us to launch two sediment transfer connectivity hypotheses analysing respectively the temporal and spatial variability of the Pb-210 activities within the fine sediments at the small catchment scale: (1) The temporal variability of suspended sediment activities at the gauging stations is a measure of sediment transfer immediacy, ergo connectivity. Hence, a high variability in suspended sediment activities, mimicking regolith activity temporal pattern would indicate high connectivity, whereas a low variability, meaning that sediments are mostly pooled in a large and slowly moving stock, would indicate low connectivity. (2) In a drainage system where fine sediments temporarily remain on the dry stream bed, the ratio between fine sediment activities at the sources and fine in-stream sediment activities downstream is a measure of sediment connectivity

  15. The artificial catchment `Chicken Creek' (`Huehnerwasser') as a new research tool for hydrological and ecological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwin, W.; Schaaf, W.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    The most important framework of many ecological studies are watersheds as landscape units for water and element budgets. However, internal structures of natural catchments are often not well known due to natural heterogeneity and difficult boundary conditions. Important information has to be extrapolated from point measurements or indirect exploration methods. In contrast, artificial watersheds have the advantage of better defined boundaries and internal structures. Both local boundary conditions, e.g. the accordance of the surface and the groundwater catchment or hydrologic parameters like drainage patterns, discharge points and stratification can be designed and precisely documented during site construction. A recently launched German-Swiss Collaborative Research Centre is investigating the 'Chicken Creek' watershed which can be seen as one of the largest artificially created catchments for scientific purposes worldwide. The main hypothesis of the Collaborative Research Centre is that initial structures define and shape the development of an ecosystem as well as its later stages. Against this background the artificial catchment was designed to offer manifold opportunities for hydrological oriented as well as ecological studies of an initial ecosystem. As internal structures are well known and the surface and subsurface boundaries are well defined compared to natural catchments the site offers high potentials for improving hydrological and ecological models. The catchment ‘Chicken Creek' in Lusatia (Germany; 150 km SE from Berlin) has an area of 6 ha. It was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. No further measures of restoration like planting, amelioration or fertilization were carried out to allow natural succession and undisturbed development. At the bottom of the catchment a small lake with a diameter of 70 m and a

  16. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangen, B.; Finocchiaro, R. G.; Gleason, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been suggested as policy goal with multiple environmental benefits including enhancement of atmospheric carbon sequestration. However, there are concerns that increased CH4 emissions associated with restoration may outweigh the potential sequestration benefits. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is characterized by millions of depressional wetlands and spans climate and land-use gradients that have potential to affect biotic and abiotic factors associated with the overall greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of pothole wetland ecosystems. Thus, we conducted a comprehensive, 4-year study of 119 wetland catchments distributed throughout the U.S. portion of the PPR to assess the effects of land use and restoration practices on CH4 and N2O fluxes and soil properties.Results showed that the effects of land use on GHG fluxes and abiotic soil properties differed with respect to catchment zone (upland, wetland), wetland classification, geographic location, and year. CH4 fluxes were greater than previously reported for pothole wetlands, while N2O fluxes were comparable to previously reported values. Moreover, maximum cumulative CH4 fluxes were nearly 3 times as high as previously reported in North America.Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, but sequestration rates associated with restoration are variable. Further, when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline; conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of restoration when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability discovered by this study underscores the difficulty in quantifying the GHG balance of wetlands.

  17. Land use change impacts on floods at the catchment scale: Challenges and opportunities for future research

    PubMed Central

    Agnoletti, M.; Alaoui, A.; Bathurst, J. C.; Bodner, G.; Borga, M.; Chaplot, V.; Gallart, F.; Glatzel, G.; Hall, J.; Holden, J.; Holko, L.; Horn, R.; Kiss, A.; Kohnová, S.; Leitinger, G.; Lennartz, B.; Parajka, J.; Perdigão, R.; Peth, S.; Plavcová, L.; Quinton, J. N.; Robinson, M.; Salinas, J. L.; Santoro, A.; Szolgay, J.; Tron, S.; van den Akker, J. J. H.; Viglione, A.; Blöschl, G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Research gaps in understanding flood changes at the catchment scale caused by changes in forest management, agricultural practices, artificial drainage, and terracing are identified. Potential strategies in addressing these gaps are proposed, such as complex systems approaches to link processes across time scales, long‐term experiments on physical‐chemical‐biological process interactions, and a focus on connectivity and patterns across spatial scales. It is suggested that these strategies will stimulate new research that coherently addresses the issues across hydrology, soil and agricultural sciences, forest engineering, forest ecology, and geomorphology. PMID:28919651

  18. Ecohydrological separation in a Mediterranean mountain environment (Vallcebre research catchments, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Cayuela, Carles; Sánchez-Costa, Elisenda; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Until very recently, a general paradigm in hydrology was that water is well mixed in the soil, and therefore groundwater, stream water and plant transpiration are all sourced by this well mixed pool. However, recent works (Brooks et al., 2010; Goldsmith et al., 2012) have shown the existence of different water pools in the soil, where tightly bound water, potentially used by plants, does not mix with mobile water that potentially contributes to groundwater and streamflow. This new "two water worlds hypothesis" of ecohydrological separation of water between streams and trees should however be verified in areas with different climates and land covers (McDonnell, 2014). With this objective, we examine this hypothesis in the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E) using the dual isotope-based approach combined with meteorological and hydrometric monitoring. Since May 2015, stable water-isotopes have been monitored in rainfall (2 locations), in throughfall and stemflow below Scots pines as well as in stream water at the Can Vila (0.56 km2) catchment outlet. Moreover, three spatially distributed sampling campaigns in different antecedent soil moisture conditions have been performed (May, August and November 2015) within the catchment. During the sampling campaigns soil samples (10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 cm) and xylem samples (3 Scots pines) were collected at 8 locations, with different topographic indices. Water in soil and xylem samples was extracted by cryogenic vacuum distillation. This information was complemented with mobile soil water sampled in 3 lysimetric profiles (20, 50 and 100 cm) and in 13 piezometers (150-300 cm deep) distributed within the catchment. These campaigns were combined with a similar regular sampling, every 15 days (From May to December 2015) at one of the 8 locations. All the isotopic information, obtained by infrared spectroscopy, has been combined with continuous measurement of meteorological, soil moisture and potential

  19. Sediment connectivity in a small catchment with badlands: Testing connectivity indices using fallout radionuclide tracers at the Vallcebre Research Catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Vuolo, Diego; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Estrany, Joan; Ferrer, Laura

    2015-04-01

    At the Vallcebre Research Catchments (South Eastern Pyrenees), results obtained during over 20 years showed that badlands are the primary sources of sediments to the drainage network. Parent lutitic rocks are weathered during winter producing regoliths, which are eroded from badland surfaces mainly during summer intense rainstorms. Even if the produced sediments are mainly fine, due to the ephemeral nature of summer runoff events most of them are deposited on the stream beds, where may remain during some time (months to years). Within the MEDhyCON project, a fallout radionuclides (FRNs) tracing experiment (i.e., excess lead 210 (Pbx-210) and beryllium 7 (Be-7)) is being carried out in order to investigate sediment connectivity. A simplified Pbx-210 balance model on badland surfaces suggested a seasonal sawtooth-like activity pattern: FRN would be accumulated in regoliths from October to June and depleted in summer. Early summer erosion events would produce the sediments with the highest activity whereas late summer events would produce sediments with the least activity coming from the deeper regolith horizons. These findings lead us to intend two sediment connectivity indices analysing respectively the temporal and spatial variability of the Pb-210 activities within the fine sediments: (1) The temporal variability of activities in suspended sediments at the gauging stations, being a measure of sediment transfer, ergo connectivity; a high variability mimicking regolith activity temporal pattern would represent high connectivity, whereas a low variability would involve that the sediments were pooled in a large and slowly moving stock. (2) The ratio between fine sediment activities at the sources and fine stream sediment activities downstream; fine stream sediment activities higher than those at their sources and increasing downstream (ratio lower than the unity) may indicate long-term permanence (low connectivity) of sediments in the stream beds, because once

  20. Hydrochemical responses among nested catchments of the Sleepers River Research Watershed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Boyer, E. W.; Shanley, J. B.; Kendall, C.

    2005-12-01

    We are probing chemical and isotopic tracers of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrate over both space and time to determine how stream nutrient dynamics change with increasing basin size and differ with flow conditions. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA, 20 to 30 nested sub-basins that ranged in size from 3 to 11,000 ha were sampled repeatedly under baseflow conditions. These synoptic surveys showed a pattern of heterogeneity in headwaters that converged to a consistent response at larger basin sizes and is consistent with findings of other studies. In addition to characterizing spatial patterns under baseflow, we sampled rainfall and snowmelt events over a gradient of basin sizes to investigate scaling responses under different flow conditions. During high flow events, DOC and nitrate flushing responses varied among different basins where high-frequency event samples were collected. While the DOC and nitrate concentration patterns were similar at four headwater basins, the concentration responses of larger basins were markedly different in that the concentration patterns, flushing duration, and maximum concentrations were attenuated from headwaters to the largest basin. We are using these data to explore how flow paths and solute mixing aggregate. Overall, these results highlight the complexities of understanding spatial scaling issues in catchments and underscore the need to consider event responses of hydrology and chemistry among catchments.

  1. Geophysical investigation of differences in weathering depths between the north and south facing slopes of a small catchment in the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, T.; Bradford, J. H.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical and soil investigations of the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (RCCZO) have revealed that the depth to unweathered bedrock is deeper on north facing than on south facing slopes. This asymmetry has been posited to be a function of greater soil moisture in the north facing aspects. The increased moisture input leads to higher rates of weathering and thus to deeper unweathered bedrock. However, how this asymmetry changes from the higher elevations to the lower elevations has not been examined in the RCCZO. To examine the catchment wide weathering trends, seismic refraction tomography (SRT) surveys will be conducted in Johnston Draw along the lines shown in Figure 1. Johnston Draw is a 1.5 km2 east-west trending granitic catchment that ranges from 1400 m to 1900 m in elevation in the semi-arid Owyhee Range of southwest Idaho. The site has been instrumented with meteorological instruments on its north and south slopes. Because of its uniform lithology, easterly drainage direction, range of elevations, and instrumentation, it is a unique site for exploring aspect controlled weathering asymmetry. SRT provides a 2D profile of P-wave velocity from which the depth to unweathered bedrock can be inferred by the depth to the velocity of fresh bedrock which is about 4km/s at this site. Observations of snow accumulations and plant communities in Johnston Draw suggest that at the top of the draw the difference in the soil moisture between the south and north facing slopes is greater than at its bottom. Thus it is hypothesized that the difference between the rate of weathering of the north and south facing aspects will be greater at the top of the draw and this will be reflected in a greater asymmetry in weathering depths. This is diagramed in Figure 2 in which the blue arrows depict qualitatively the hydraulic flux and the vegetation the changes in ground cover through the catchment. A previous SRT survey conducted near the top of Johnston Draw by the Wy

  2. Risk estimation and annual fluxes of emerging contaminants from a Scottish priority catchment to the estuary and North Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zulin; Lebleu, Melanie; Osprey, Mark; Kerr, Christine; Courtot, Estelle

    2017-06-28

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) attracted global concern during the last decades due to their potential adverse effects on humans and ecosystems. This work is the first study to assess the spatiotemporal changes, annual fluxes and ecological risk of ECs (4 EDCs and 6 PPCPs) by different monitoring strategies (spot and passive sampling) over 12 months in a Scottish priority catchment (River Ugie, Scotland, 335 km(2)). Overall, the total concentration in water ranged from North Sea were estimated to be 409 and 294 g based on the spot and passive sampling data, respectively, while they were 4636 and 4517 g for 6 PPCPs by spot and passive sampling, respectively. The spatiotemporal trend suggested that human activities and medication usages were the primary source of the contaminants. The overall comparison of the two sampling strategies supported the hypothesis that passive sampling tends to integrate the contaminants over a period of exposure and allows quantification of contamination at low concentration. The ecological risk assessment showed that bisphenol A posed the highest risks with 21.5% of the spot samples, resulting in a risk quotient >1. This suggests that mitigation measures might need to be taken to reduce the input of emerging contaminants into the river and its adjacent estuary and sea.

  3. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Brian A; Finocchiaro, Raymond G; Gleason, Robert A

    2015-11-15

    Wetland restoration has been suggested as policy goal with multiple environmental benefits including enhancement of atmospheric carbon sequestration. However, there are concerns that increased methane (CH4) emissions associated with restoration may outweigh potential benefits. A comprehensive, 4-year study of 119 wetland catchments was conducted in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central U.S. to assess the effects of land use on greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and soil properties. Results showed that the effects of land use on GHG fluxes and abiotic soil properties differed with respect to catchment zone (upland, wetland), wetland classification, geographic location, and year. Mean CH4 fluxes from the uplands were predictably low (<0.02 g CH4 m(-2) day(-1)), while wetland zone CH4 fluxes were much greater (<0.001-3.9 g CH4 m(-2) day(-1)). Mean cumulative seasonal CH4 fluxes ranged from roughly 0-650 g CH4 m(-2), with an overall mean of approximately 160 g CH4 m(-2). These maximum cumulative CH4 fluxes were nearly 3 times as high as previously reported in North America. The overall magnitude and variability of N2O fluxes from this study (<0.0001-0.0023 g N2O m(-2) day(-1)) were comparable to previously reported values. Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, and that when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline. Conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of wetland restoration (drained, non-drained) when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability demonstrated by this study was consistent with findings of other wetland investigations and underscores the difficulty in quantifying the

  4. An Open Source Framework for Coupled Hydro-Hydrogeo-Chemical Systems in Catchment Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfs, J.; Sachse, A.; Gayler, S.; Grathwohl, P.; He, W.; Jang, E.; Kalbacher, T.; Klein, C.; Kolditz, O.; Maier, U.; Priesack, E.; Rink, K.; Selle, B.; Shao, H.; Singh, A. K.; Streck, T.; Sun, Y.; Wang, W.; Walther, M.

    2013-12-01

    This poster presents an open-source framework designed to assist water scientists in the study of catchment hydraulic functions with associated chemical processes, e.g. contaminant degradation, plant nutrient turnover. The model successfully calculates the feedbacks between surface water, subsurface water and air in standard benchmarks. In specific model applications to heterogeneous catchments, subsurface water is driven by density variations and runs through double porous media. Software codes of water science are tightly coupled by iteration, namely the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) for urban runoff, Expert-N for simulating water fluxes and nutrient turnover in agricultural and forested soils, and OpenGeoSys (OGS) for groundwater. The coupled model calculates flow of hydrostatic shallow water over the land surface with finite volume and difference methods. The flow equations for water in the porous subsurface are discretized in space with finite elements. Chemical components are transferred through 1D, 2D or 3D watershed representations with advection-dispersion solvers or, as an alternative, random walk particle tracking. A transport solver can be in sequence with a chemical solver, e.g. PHREEQ-C, BRNS, additionally. Besides coupled partial differential equations, the concept of hydrological response units is employed in simulations at regional scale with scarce data availability. In this case, a conceptual hydrological model, specifically the Jena Adaptable Modeling System (JAMS), passes groundwater recharge through a software interface into OGS, which solves the partial differential equations of groundwater flow. Most components of the modeling framework are open source and can be modified for individual purposes. Applications range from temperate climate regions in Germany (Ammer catchment and Hessian Ried) to arid regions in the Middle East (Oman and Dead See). Some of the presented examples originate from intensively monitored research sites of the

  5. 12. View north of Tropic Chamber. Natick Research & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View north of Tropic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  6. 2. View southwest of north facade elevation. Natick Research ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View southwest of north facade elevation. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  7. A review on the establishment and research in hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas in China and abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai; Wang, Chuanhai; Hua, Wenjuan

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviewed some specific conceptions of hydrological experimental areas (catchments) while found that the traditional definition of 'catchment' may be difficult to meet in plain areas. According to the review of development history and current situation of hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas in China, 4 stages were shown besides the recent 10 years, i.e., 'golden stage(1952-1966)', 'backward stage(1966-1986)', 'short recovery stage(1986-1989)' and 'stagnant stage(1986-2006)'. It gets new impetus since 2006 with some investigation work promoted by the government. Furthermore, some historic problems during establishing experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas were revealed based on the document literature and a few meaningful lessons were drawn from the past. It was also the first time to collect and classify the details of both 11 representative experimental areas in China and abroad, after that a brief comparison about the measurement level and research directions was made between two regions. Additionally, we took the experimental research work in the plain of Taihu Lake Basin as example and introduced the particular research goals and the corresponding establishing process, including how to design the experimental area, eg, size, location, land use type, arranging the measurement instruments et al. We hope such case can provide a reference for newly-building, recovering and extending hydrological experimental areasin plain areas in the future. Finally, this paper prospected the future development in establishment and research in hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas. It may be more common to see the cooperation between model scientists and field experts. Because of the comprehensive goals in water problems, researchers from various fields would work together in the future experimental research work. Scale study and modelling in plain areas will be a promising branch after some typical experimental areas

  8. Using object-based geomorphometry for hydro-geomorphological analysis in a Mediterranean research catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Domenico; Cuomo, Albina; Palmieri, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the paper is to apply an object-based geomorphometric procedure to define the runoff contribution areas and support a hydro-geomorphological analysis of a 3 km2 Mediterranean research catchment (southern Italy). Daily and sub-hourly discharge and electrical conductivity data were collected and recorded during a 3-year monitoring activity. Hydro-chemograph analyses carried out on these data revealed a strong seasonal hydrological response in the catchment that differed from the stormflow events that occur in the wet periods and in dry periods. This analysis enabled us to define the hydro-chemograph signatures related to increasing flood magnitude, which progressively involves various runoff components (baseflow, subsurface flow and surficial flow) and an increasing contributing area to discharge. Field surveys and water table/discharge measurements carried out during a selected storm event enabled us to identify and map specific runoff source areas with homogeneous geomorphological units previously defined as hydro-geomorphotypes (spring points, diffuse seepage along the main channel, seepage along the riparian corridors, diffuse outflow from hillslope taluses and concentrate sapping from colluvial hollows). Following the procedures previously proposed and used by authors for object-based geomorphological mapping, a hydro-geomorphologically oriented segmentation and classification was performed with the eCognition (Trimble, Inc.) package. The best agreement with the expert-based geomorphological mapping was obtained with weighted plan curvature at different-sized windows. By combining the hydro-chemical analysis and object-based hydro-geomorphotype map, the variability of the contribution areas was graphically modeled for the selected event, which occurred during the wet season, by using the log values of flow accumulation that better fit the contribution areas. The results allow us to identify the runoff component on hydro-chemographs for each time step

  9. Hydrology of the North Klondike River: carbon export, water balance and inter-annual climate influences within a sub-alpine permafrost catchment.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Anthony; Clark, Ian; Macumber, Andrew; Patterson, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Arctic and sub-arctic watersheds are undergoing significant changes due to recent climate warming and degrading permafrost, engendering enhanced monitoring of arctic rivers. Smaller catchments provide understanding of discharge, solute flux and groundwater recharge at the process level that contributes to an understanding of how larger arctic watersheds are responding to climate change. The North Klondike River, located in west central Yukon, is a sub-alpine permafrost catchment, which maintains an active hydrological monitoring station with a record of >40 years. In addition to being able to monitor intra-annual variability, this data set allows for more complex analysis of streamflow records. Streamflow data, geochemistry and stable isotope data for 2014 show a groundwater-dominated system, predominantly recharged during periods of snowmelt. Radiocarbon is shown to be a valuable tracer of soil zone recharge processes and carbon sources. Winter groundwater baseflow contributes 20 % of total annual discharge, and accounts for up to 50 % of total river discharge during the spring and summer months. Although total stream discharge remains unchanged, mean annual groundwater baseflow has increased over the 40-year monitoring period. Wavelet analysis reveals a catchment that responds to El Niño and longer solar cycles, as well as climatic shifts such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Dedicated to Professor Peter Fritz on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  10. Presence-only approach to assess landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility. A test for the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Hochschild, Volker; Rotigliano, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at comparing the performances of a presence only approach, namely Maximum Entropy, in assessing landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility within the Mili catchment, located in the north-eastern Sicily, Italy. This catchment has been recently exposed to three main meteorological extreme events, resulting in the activation of multiple fast landslides, which occurred on the 1st October 2009, 10th March 2010 and 1st March 2011. Differently from the 2009 event, which only marginally hit the catchment, the 2010 and 2011 storms fully involved the area of the Mili catchment. Detailed field data was collected to associate the thickness of mobilised materials at the triggering zone to each mass movement within the catchment. This information has been used to model the landslide susceptibility for two classes of processes clustered into shallow failures for maximum depths of 0.5m and deep ones in case of values equal or greater than 0.5m. As the authors believed that the peculiar geomorphometry of this narrow and steep catchment played a fundamental role in generating two distinct patterns of landslide thicknesses during the initiation phase, a HRDEM was used to extract topographic attributes to express near-triggering geomorphological conditions. On the other hand, medium resolution vegetation indexes derived from ASTER scenes were used as explanatory variables pertaining to a wider spatial neighbourhood, whilst a revised geological map, the land use from CORINE and a tectonic map were used to convey an even wider area connected to the slope instability. The choice of a presence-only approach allowed to effectively discriminate between the two types of landslide thicknesses at the triggering zone, producing outstanding prediction skills associated with relatively low variances across a set of 20 randomly generated replicates. The validation phase produced indeed average AUC values of 0.91 with a standard deviation of 0.03 for both the modelled landslide

  11. Fluvial responses to volcanism: resedimentation of the 1800a Taupo ignimbrite eruption in the Rangitaiki River catchment, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manville, Vern; Newton, Erin H.; White, James D. L.

    2005-02-01

    The potential for the generation of dangerous and damaging lahars and floods in response to the eruption of voluminous pyroclastic debris has become increasingly appreciated in recent years. The style and tempo of this response varies both between eruptions and between individual catchments impacted by a single eruption, so that an understanding of the factors controlling this variation is necessary for precise hazard assessment. The 1800a Taupo eruption from the Taupo Volcanic Centre in the central North Island of New Zealand devastated an area of 20,000 km 2 during eruption of a climactic ignimbrite, impacting the headwaters of all major rivers draining radially from this region. The Rangitaiki River, the subject of this paper, differs from other catchments in that the Taupo ignimbrite buried an essentially flat land surface inherited from a suite of welded ignimbrite sheets erupted between 320-340 and 230 ka. The middle reaches of the catchment are characterised by narrow, steep gorges alternating with low-gradient basins developed in tectonic half-grabens. Initially, remobilisation of pyroclastic material in the headwaters was dominated by hyperconcentrated sheet flows resulting in shallow reworking. In higher gradient areas, reintegration of drainage networks was achieved by incision of deep channels and gullies, assisted by breakouts from ephemeral lakelets developed in ignimbrite-dammed depressions. Braided, and later meandering, streams superseded this pattern as rill and gully systems stabilised and sediment yields fell leading to a decline in drainage density. Gorge reaches acted as efficient conduits for remobilised material while the basins acted as local depocentres for the temporary storage of volcaniclastic sediments, mediating the transfer of pyroclastic debris to the Bay of Plenty coast >100 km to the north. Reworking and resedimentation of pyroclastic debris began immediately after the eruption, peaking early and then rapidly declining so that

  12. Application of The Hydrology Lab Research Modeling System (hl-rms) For Large Headwater Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, V.; Smith, M.; Reed, S.; Zhang, Z.

    The Hydrology Lab (HL) of the National Weather Service Office of Hydrologic De- velopment is actively engaged in research and development into catchment modeling approaches to improve the ability to forecast river flows. Traditionally, conceptual lumped models have been used to produce operational river forecasts, and they of- ten produce reasonable results provided their parameters were calibrated properly. A common hypothesis in the scientific community attributes this success primarily to a model parameter calibration without regard a model structure. It is also commonly assumed that distributed models will provide better results just because they account for the spatial variability of input data and parameters. However, experience suggests that there are advantages and disadvantages of lumped and distributed models due to the combined effects of model structure and parameter estimation procedures. Neither physically poor models with advanced parameter estimation procedures, nor physi- cally advanced models with poor parameter estimation procedures can provide reason- able results. While most conceptual lumped models do not use explicitly the classical mass and momentum conservation equations, they incorporate strong physical con- cepts supported by field experiments. Their parameters represent integrated effects of basin properties on an outlet hydrograph, and as a result, they are identifiable from hydrograph analysis. On the other hand, most distributed models are based on point process equations, and distributed parameters are less identifiable from hydrograph analysis because they represent local properties. The authors believe that more com- prehensive analyses of lumped and distributed models on large-scale basins is needed to fully benefit from existing lumped modeling experience. As a Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP) initiative, HL has developed a grid-based Research Modeling System (HL-RMS) that combines lumped and distributed model

  13. The Children's Oncology Group Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN): case catchment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Jessica R B; Spector, Logan G; Krailo, Mark D; Reaman, Gregory H; Linabery, Amy M; Poynter, Jenny N; Stork, Susan K; Adamson, Peter C; Ross, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    The Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) was established within the Children's Oncology Group (COG) in July 2008 to provide a centralized pediatric cancer research registry for investigators conducting approved etiologic and survivorship studies. The authors conducted an ecological analysis to characterize CCRN catchment at >200 COG institutions by demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and geographic location to determine whether the CCRN can serve as a population-based registry for childhood cancer. During 2009 to 2011, 18,580 US children newly diagnosed with cancer were registered in the CCRN. These observed cases were compared with age-specific, sex-specific, and race/ethnicity-specific expected numbers calculated from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer incidence rates and 2010 US Census data. Overall, 42% of children (18,580 observed/44,267 expected) who were diagnosed with cancer at age <20 years were registered in the CCRN, including 45%, 57%, 51%, 44%, and 24% of those diagnosed at birth, ages 1 to 4 years, ages 5 to 9 years, ages 10 to 14 years, and ages 15 to 19 years, respectively. Some malignancies were better represented in the CCRN (leukemia, 59%; renal tumors, 67%) than others (retinoblastoma, 34%). There was little evidence of differences by sex or race/ethnicity, although rates in nonwhites were somewhat lower than rates in whites. Given the low observed-to-expected ratio, it will be important to identify challenges and barriers to registration to improve case ascertainment, especially for rarer diagnoses and older age groups; however, it is encouraging that some diagnoses in younger children are fairly representative of the population. Overall, the CCRN is providing centralized, real-time access to cases for research and could be used as a model for other national cooperative groups. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  14. A cross-site comparison of factors controlling streamwater carbon flux in western North American catchments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, P. D.; Biederman, J. A.; Condon, K.; Chorover, J.; McIntosh, J. C.; Meixner, T.; Perdrial, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing variability in climate is expected to alter the amount and form of terrestrial carbon in stream water both directly, through changes in the magnitude and timing of discharge, and indirectly through changes in land cover following disturbance (e.g. drought, fire, or insect driven mortality). Predicting how these changes will impact individual stream-catchment ecosystems however, is hampered by a lack of concurrent observations on both dissolved and particulate carbon flux across a range of spatial, temporal, and discharge scales. Because carbon is strongly coupled to most biogeochemical reactions within both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, this represents a critical unknown in predicting the response of catchment-ecosystems to concurrent changes in climate and land cover. This presentation will address this issue using a meta-analysis of dissolved organic, dissolved inorganic, and particulate organic carbon fluxes from multiple locations, including undisturbed sites along a climate gradient from desert rivers to seasonally snow-covered, forested mountain catchments, and sites disturbed by both fire and extensive, insect driven mortality. Initial analyses suggest that dissolved (organic and inorganic) and particulate fluxes respond differently to various types of disturbance and depend on interactions between changes in size of mobile carbon pools and changes in hydrologic routing of carbon to streamwater. Anomalously large fluxes of both dissolved and particulate organic matter are associated with episodic changes in hydrologic routing (e.g. storm floods; snowmelt) that connect normally hydrologically isolated carbon pools (e.g. surficial hillslope soils) with surface water. These events are often of short duration as the supply of mobile carbon is exhausted in short term flushing response. In contrast, disturbances that increase the size of the mobile carbon pool (e.g. widespread vegetation mortality) result smaller proportional increases in

  15. Teacher Salary Bonuses in North Carolina. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Salary Bonuses in North Carolina"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Jacob Vigdor of Duke University reviews a teacher salary bonus program operating in North Carolina. Known officially as the ABC's of Public Education, the program awards teachers…

  16. The necessity of field research in prescription of Environmental Flows - A case of the hydropower dominated Middle Zambezi Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwelwa, Elenestina; Crosato, Alessandra; Wright, Nigel; Beevers, Lindsay

    2013-04-01

    The research work in the Middle Zambezi sub-catchment has the key objective to investigate the state of the river and its flood plain in terms of flow variation, river and flood plain morphological variation for both the pre and post hydropower schemes. From the rich biodiversity that this area supports, both Zambia and Zimbabwe has established National Parks with Mana Pools National Park, Sapi and Chewore safari areas being designated as UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984. The habitat sustenance depend on the river channels and the associated morphological features with the flood and recession interaction whose modification can lead to negative environmental consequences. The research findings on the state of the sub-catchment flows and morphology will be outlined. Highlights will be given on the following findings: dominance of hydropower regulation in the water balance of the river reach, historical map analysis and related rates of river channel morphology changes associated to dam operating events and, bed load sediment characterisation and distribution. With the use of SOBEK-Rural (1D/2D) model, analysis of future state of the sub-catchment will be outlined, taking into account the following scenarios: no dam state of the river reach; continue with current water regulation and operations; modification in water regulation to take into account favorable changes and; climate related variation of droughts. The research deductions and implications for maintaining the current dam operation practices will be outline as relates to the sustainability of the hydro-morphology and ecosystem of the catchment which support a rich wildlife habitat. The research observed critical water needs form the basis for environmental flows prescription and recommendation. Whereas the restoration of regular flooding has been identified to be important, the most critical need however is the timing of flood gate regulation which has been observed as a trigger to loss of islands and bars

  17. Past and future impact of North Atlantic teleconnection patterns on the hydroclimate of the Caspian catchment area in CESM1.2.2 and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandini, Sri

    2017-04-01

    The Caspian Sea level has undergone dramatic variations of more than 3 m during the past century with important implications for the life of coastal people, economy and the ecosystem. The origin of these variations as well as future changes in the Caspian water budget are still a matter of debate. In this study, we examine the influence of the major seasonal North Atlantic teleconnection patterns, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic pattern (EA), the Scandinavian pattern (SCA), and the North Sea Caspian Pattern (NCP), on Caspian hydroclimate variability from 1850-2000 CE. Numerical experiments at different atmospheric grid resolutions (2° and 1°) are carried out with the coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2.2). We test model skills under different resolutions through validation against observational data by various statistical methods (Empirical Orthogonal Functions, Taylor diagrams, linear regressions and Spearman rank correlation). Results reveal the strongest simulated signal in winter (DJF) with high explained variances for 1° CESM1.2.2 NAO (39%) and EA (15.7%), similar to observational data. The model is unable to reproduce the SCA pattern in the third EOF, which is found in the observations. The modelled NAO has a strong influence on winter temperature and rainfall over the Caspian catchment area. A strong winter NCP induces above-average 2-meter temperatures over north Caspian region and lower-than-normal precipitation over the eastern Caspian sea. Our study suggests that the 1° version of CESM1.2.2 (with CAM5 atmosphere physics) shows adequate performance with respect to teleconnection maps during the historical period. Lastly, 1° model climate projections (2005-2100 CE) are performed with different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) to examine potential changes in the teleconnection patterns and their influence on the Caspian region.

  18. Setting Priorities for Research in the North of Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Challenges to formulating research priorities in the Canadian North include: the large number of agencies setting research agendas; poor communication among agencies; low federal commitment to research supporting international protocols and agreements; no political will to promote Canadian leadership in Northern research; inadequate funding for…

  19. Setting Priorities for Research in the North of Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Challenges to formulating research priorities in the Canadian North include: the large number of agencies setting research agendas; poor communication among agencies; low federal commitment to research supporting international protocols and agreements; no political will to promote Canadian leadership in Northern research; inadequate funding for…

  20. Overview on health research ethics in Egypt and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Diaa; Abd El Aal, Wafaa; Saleh, Azza; Sleem, Hany; Khyatti, Meriem; Mazini, Loubna; Hemminki, Kari; Anwar, Wagida A

    2014-08-01

    Developing countries, including Egypt and North African countries, need to improve their quality of research by enhancing international cooperation and exchanges of scientific information, as well as competing for obtaining international funds to support research activities. Research must comply with laws and other requirements for research that involves human subjects. The purpose of this article is to overview the status of health research ethics in Egypt and North African countries, with reference to other Middle Eastern countries. The EU and North African Migrants: Health and Health Systems project (EUNAM) has supported the revision of the status of health research ethics in Egypt and North African countries, by holding meetings and discussions to collect information about research ethics committees in Egypt, and revising the structure and guidelines of the committees, as well as reviewing the literature concerning ethics activities in the concerned countries. This overview has revealed that noticeable efforts have been made to regulate research ethics in certain countries in the Middle East. This can be seen in the new regulations, which contain the majority of protections mentioned in the international guidelines related to research ethics. For most of the internationally registered research ethics committees in North African countries, the composition and functionality reflect the international guidelines. There is growing awareness of research ethics in these countries, which extends to teaching efforts to undergraduate and postgraduate medical students. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Olive Mounds, Roman cisterns, erosion pins - potential to characterize erosion in a Mediterranean catchment in north Jordan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, Sabine; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of a three years' time period of a PhD thesis it is luck to catch the "right" rain events for good general erosion approximations. Methods that (i) cover longer time periods, (ii) are not confined to constructed boundaries, and finally (iii) include all possible erosion processes are crucial for good average estimates of sediment yields from different landscapes. The aim of the study was to get a first understanding of erosion processes and sediment yields in a Mediterranean to semi-arid catchment in NW Jordan, wherefore different measurement methods were tested in the predominant landscape units: olive orchards (27%), fields (14%) and natural shrubs on steep slopes (~30%). One of the applied methods was the measurement of topographic olive mounds within 7 orchards with an average size of 800 m2 in synergy with tree-coring and age estimation of the orchards. Furthermore the OSL dating of deposited sediments in two roman cisterns adjacent to fields was conducted and the 9 erosion pin fields, each about 200m2 large, were installed on steep slopes with natural vegetation. The methods cover different time scales from 560 years for the fields, an average of 32 years for the olive orchards and up to two rainy seasons for the erosion pin fields. Results show that olive orchards on steep slopes (>10%) have the highest erosion potential in the region with 95±8 t ha-1year-1 followed by natural vegetated slopes with 37±4 t ha-1year-1 of dislocated material and fields with 1.22±0.06 t ha-1year-1 sediment yield. These spatially constrained outcomes are supported by geochemical sediment fingerprint results of lake sediments from the catchment and will be discussed in regard to the basic assumption that underlie the principle of measurement and the limitations of the methods.

  2. The Krycklan Catchment Study—A flagship infrastructure for hydrology, biogeochemistry, and climate research in the boreal landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudon, Hjalmar; Taberman, Ida; Å; gren, Anneli; Futter, Martyn; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Bishop, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    The Krycklan Catchment Study (KCS) provides a unique field infrastructure for hillslope to landscape-scale research on short- and long-term ecosystem dynamics in boreal landscapes. The site is designed for process-based research assessing the role of external drivers including forest management, climate change, and long-range pollutant transport on forests, mires, soils, streams, lakes, and groundwater. The overarching objectives of KCS are to (1) provide a state-of-the-art infrastructure for experimental and hypothesis-driven research, (2) maintain a collection of high-quality, long-term climatic, biogeochemical, hydrological, and environmental data, and (3) support the development of models and guidelines for research, policy, and management.

  3. Chemical Denudation and Cation Depletion in a Semi-Arid Catchment of the Long-Term Agroecological Research Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaljian, M.; Keller, C. K.; Jones, K. B.; Brooks, E. S.; Huggins, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network of the USDA is a nationwide observatory and decadal-timescale field-experimental study of sustainable food production. The LTAR thus supports investigation of hydroecological and biogeochemical processes that could affect agricultural sustainability over the course of the 21st century. Mineral-derived nutrient cations are essential to fertility, and acidification of soils due to chemical fertilization may result in unsustainable chemical denudation of the soil exchange pool. Mineral weathering also contributes to base cation denudation. This study investigated base cation losses for one year in drainage from a semi-arid, rain-fed catchment at the Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF) LTAR site in southeastern Washington. We measured flows, analyzed drainage samples and estimated hydrologic effluxes of base cations from the catchment. The total dissolved base cation denudation rate at CAF-LTAR is about 40 kg ha-1 yr-1, which is comparable to other catchments on silicate terranes. The 2.1keq ha-1 yr-1 of denuded cationic charge is dominated by Ca2+ (61%) and Mg2+ (35%). Principal counter-ions are HCO3- (43%), NO3- (38%) and SO42- (16%), suggesting that both H2CO3 and HNO3 are important acids. Comparing 2008 soil pH and base saturation at CAF-LTAR to a nearby native prairie site, we preliminarily estimate a loss of 120 keq ha-1 of base cations from the upper 1.5m of the soil exchangeable cation pool. Dividing this depletion by the estimated denudation flux returns 60 years, which is approximately the interval of chemically intensive agriculture here. This may suggest that the source of exported base cations in drainage is primarily cation exchange rather than mineral weathering. The LTAR observatory will support ongoing monitoring and experimentation necessary to better understand base cation depletion and how it interacts with agroecological changes over the next several decades.

  4. The artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, W.; Gerwin, W.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Zeyer, J.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    The artificial catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is the main research site of the Transregional Collaborative Research Center SFB/TRR 38. Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the SFB/TRR 38 has gathered more than 50 scientists from BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich to study the patterns and processes - and their interaction - of the initial phase of ecosystem development in an artificial catchment. The catchment was constructed in 2003 to 2005 in the Lusatian lignite-mining area close to Cottbus, Germany. It has an area of 6 ha including a small lake and is mainly composed of a 2-4 m layer of sandy to loamy Quaternary overburden sediments above a 1-2 m clay layer that seals the total catchment area at the bottom. No restoration, planting or other reclamation measures were carried out. Main research objectives are: Which abiotic and biotic patterns and processes are regulating the initial phase of ecosystem development? How do processes interact with abiotic and biotic patterns? Which patterns and processes can be used to define development stages? Which parameters are suitable for generalization and application to other initial ecosystems? The presentation will present the research concept of the SFB/TRR 38, the construction process of the catchment and first results.

  5. The evolution of wilderness wildlife research in North America

    Treesearch

    R. Gerald Wright; Lisa K. Garrett

    2000-01-01

    Most wildlife research in North America has focused on a standard suite of questions, asked of a limited assemblage of economically important species and studied using a relatively limited set of techniques, study site characteristics and narrow time-frames. We describe why these factors are not necessarily conducive to conducting wildlife research in wilderness...

  6. A critical re-evaluation of controls on spatial and seasonal variations in nitrate concentrations in river waters throughout the River Derwent catchment in North Yorkshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shaheen; Adnan, Muhammad; McClean, Colin J; Cresser, Malcolm S

    2016-05-01

    Since mean nitrate concentration along single river channels increases significantly with percent arable land use upstream of sampling points and autumn/early winter flushes in nitrate concentration are widespread, it is generally concluded that farmers contribute most of the nitrate. For the River Derwent in North Yorkshire, the correlation between nitrate concentration and percent arable land use is much poorer when tributary data are included in the equation, because of greater variations in dilution by water draining upland areas and in other N input sources. For the whole river system therefore, percent upland moorland/rough grazing land cover is an appreciably better predictor than percent arable land use for nitrate concentration. Upland land use encompasses the higher precipitation and runoff in such areas, and the subsequent greater dilution downstream of both arable land runoff and effluent from treatment works, as well as an inverse correlation to percent arable land use. This is strongly supported by the observation that, for the Derwent, Meteorological Office rainfall data alone proved even better than percent moorland rough grazing for predicting nitrate concentration. The dilution effect is therefore substantial but highly seasonal; lower runoff and dilution in summer offset the lower leaching losses from arable land, and higher dilution and runoff in winter offset greater nitrate leaching losses from arable soils. Because of this, coupled to improved efficiency of nitrogen fertilizer use, seasonality trends in nitrate concentrations that were pronounced a decade ago now have all but disappeared in the catchment.

  7. Comparison of drought occurrence in selected Slovak and Czech catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendekova, Miriam; Fendek, Marian; Porubska, Diana; Hanel, Martin; Horacek, Stanislav; Martinkova, Marta; Vizina, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The presented study is focused on the analysis and comparison of hydrological drought occurrence, development and duration in six small to middle sized catchments in the Czech Republic (CZ) and Slovakia. The main questions to be answered are: (1) are there correlations between the physical conditions in the catchments and drought occurrence, and (2) does the spatial trend of drought occurrence exist. The Žitava catchment is located in the central western part of Slovakia having runoff dominated by rainfall with the contribution of snow melting during the spring period. The Belá River catchment is located on the contact of Západné and Vysoké Tatry Mts. in the north of Slovakia. The runoff is snow to snow-rain combined type. The Ľupčianka catchment is located on the northern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mts. in the northern part of the central Slovakia. The runoff regime is snow-rain combined in the upper part of the catchment, and of rain-snow type in the rest of catchment. The Rakovnický potok brook (CZ) has its spring in Rakovnická pahorkatina hilly land. Runoff is dominated by rainfall, quite heavily influenced by water uptakes in the catchment. The Teplá River (CZ) originates in peat meadows in the western part of the Czech Republic. Runoff is dominated by rainfall. The Metuje catchment (CZ) is formed by Adršsbach-Teplické stěny Upland. The headwater part is typical by deeply incest valleys, table mountains and pseudokarst caves. The discharge is fed dominantly by groundwater. The streamflow drought was characterized using discharge data, the groundwater drought using the base flow values. The local minimum method was used for base flow separation. The threshold level method (Q80, BF80) and the sequent peak algorithm were used for calculation of drought duration in discharge and base flow time series. The data of the same three decades of the common period (1971 - 1980, 1981 - 1990 and 1991 - 2000) were used. The resulting base flow values along with

  8. The North: New Challenges for Creative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimsson, Olafur Ragnar

    2000-01-01

    A Northern research forum of scholars from universities in Arctic countries will study issues raised by the end of the Cold War, including new political institutions and relationships instituted in Northern regions, the relationship between environmental protection and sustainable economic growth, the relevance of traditional international…

  9. Black raspberry phytochemical research in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our research group has focused on developing black raspberries with improved disease resistance and phytochemical traits over the last seven years. Recent interest in the rich color of black raspberries, and their historical use as an effective dye, derive from their anthocyanin composition and cont...

  10. The status of osprey research in western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The status of research on the Osprey tn western North America is reviewed. For discussion purposes the geographical populations are conveniently subdivided into Canada and Alaska, the Pacific Northwest of the United States, the western interior of the United States, and Mexico. Suggestions are made for further research on the populations in each region. In addition, possible research and management activities related to the extirpated or nearly extirpated California population on the Channel Islands and along the southern coast are presented.

  11. A new approach to health research in Canada's North.

    PubMed

    Chatwood, Susan; Young, Kue

    2010-01-01

    Over the past four years, despite low resource allocations to the North, northern residents and community organizations have taken significant initiatives towards the development of health research. In this commentary, we present a model for the development of northern health research based on our experiences in establishing the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research (ICHR) in the Northwest Territories. It is hoped that the lessons we have learned will inform decision-makers and encourage them to make strategic investments to support further health research capacity and institutional development within the North. Factors that have enabled the development of a health research institute in the North include leadership, a vision for health research, and the engagement of key partners and stakeholders. Challenges arise in the development of appropriate governance and policy for health research. There is an urgency to target resources to support the development of policies and governance for health research in northern jurisdictions. Both academic and community-based research need to be strengthened.

  12. Research of Houjiayao Unit in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    "Houjiayao Group" is the standard stratigraphic unit of late Pleistocene in northern China, which was created by Jia Lanpo and Wei Qi during their research on Houjiayao site. Based on the mammal, ancient human fossils and Paleolithic features, "Houjiayao Group" was thought as late Pleistocene sediments. "Houjiayao Group" was defined as late Pleistocene stratigraphic units. However, the problems of the age of "Houjiayao Group", stratigraphic division and other issues, have not yet been well resolved. These issues include: the differences of age-dating results, the unclear comparison between stratigraphic units and regional contrast, the uncertain relationship between "Houjiayao Group" and "Nihewan Layer ", and so on. Houjiayao site which located in the southeast of Houjiayao village in Dongjingji town Yangyuan County, Hebei province of China, is a very important paleolithic site. But some researches show that Houjiayao site is located at the 3th terrace of Liyigou valley and there are many opinions about the age of Houjiayao site, which varies from 20-500 thousand years. Combined with former research results and many research methods, our study was mainly focused on the key problems existing in the study of "Houjiayao Group". Through the use of sequence stratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and other theoretical methods, stratigraphic section was studied in the late Pleistocene stratigraphy and sedimentary environment. Through environmental indicators and the age-dating tests, the evolution of ancient geography and environment were identified elementarily. After analyzing informations of this area, geomorphologic investigation and stratum comparation in and around Houjiayao site were done. Houjiayao site is located on the west bank of Liyigou river, which has a tributary named Black Stone River. Two or three layers of volcanic materials were found in this area, those sediments are from a buried paleovolcano in upstream of Black Stone River. The volcanic

  13. Instrumenting an upland research catchment in Canterbury, New Zealand to study controls on variability of soil moisture, shallow groundwater and streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Srinivasan, Ms

    2015-04-01

    Hydrologists recognise the importance of vertical drainage and deep flow paths in runoff generation, even in headwater catchments. Both soil and groundwater stores are highly variable over multiple scales, and the distribution of water has a strong control on flow rates and timing. In this study, we instrumented an upland headwater catchment in New Zealand to measure the temporal and spatial variation in unsaturated and saturated-zone responses. In NZ, upland catchments are the source of much of the water used in lowland agriculture, but the hydrology of such catchments and their role in water partitioning, storage and transport is poorly understood. The study area is the Langs Gully catchment in the North Branch of the Waipara River, Canterbury: this catchment was chosen to be representative of the foothills environment, with lightly managed dryland pasture and native Matagouri shrub vegetation cover. Over a period of 16 months we measured continuous soil moisture at 32 locations and near-surface water table (< 2 m) at 14 locations, as well as measuring flow at 3 stream gauges. The distributed measurement sites were located to allow comparisons between North and South facing locations, near-stream versus hillslope locations, and convergent versus divergent hillslopes. We found that temporal variability is strongly controlled by the climatic seasonal cycle, for both soil moisture and water table, and for both the mean and extremes of their distributions. Groundwater is a larger water storage component than soil moisture, and the difference increases with catchment wetness. The spatial standard deviation of both soil moisture and groundwater is larger in winter than in summer. It peaks during rainfall events due to partial saturation of the catchment, and also rises in spring as different locations dry out at different rates. The most important controls on spatial variability are aspect and distance from stream. South-facing and near-stream locations have higher

  14. Programs for invasive research in North American zoos and aquariums.

    PubMed

    Goodrowe, Karen L

    2003-01-01

    Zoo-based research in North America is an emerging field, which has progressed from an ad hoc approach in a small number of zoos to a coordinated, integrated network of scientists with recognized research programs in approximately one half of the accredited institutions in North America. The disciplines most active in these programs--veterinary medicine and pathology, nutrition, reproductive biology, contraception, and behavior--are now becoming coordinated in zoos through Scientific Advisory Groups. Zoos with research programs generally establish either an institutional animal care and use committee or another committee to evaluate research proposals. In addition to scientific merit and experimental design, zoos evaluate proposals based on factors such as priority by conservation program/identified need; direct effect on species conservation, species type, and appropriateness; availability and location of animals; operational requirements/logistics; communication between institutions; and available funding. Euthanasia is considered only in rare circumstances. Zoo-based research has evolved into an integral component in animal management and conservation programs by providing practical information that is used to improve animal care, well-being, health, and reproduction. However, the degree to which zoos participate in invasive research varies considerably among institutions, due not only to resource limitations but also to how the term "invasive" is defined and accepted at each institution. A more standardized approach among zoological institutions for examining and approving research projects that are supported by zoo-based conservation programs would greatly facilitate the wildlife research efforts of North American zoos.

  15. Research and application of biochar in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biochar production and application in soil are proposed as a good strategy for carbon sequestration, providing simultaneous benefits for improving soil quality and increasing agronomic productivity. In this chapter, we summarized historic and current researches and application of biochar in North Am...

  16. One Health training, research, and outreach in North America

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Cheryl; Kaplan, Bruce; Logan, Jenae E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The One Health (OH) concept, formerly referred to as ‘One Medicine’ in the later part of the 20th century, has gained exceptional popularity in the early 21st century, and numerous academic and non-academic institutions have developed One Health programs. Objectives To summarize One Health training, research, and outreach activities originating in North America. Methods We used data from extensive electronic records maintained by the One Health Commission (OHC) (www.onehealthcommission.org/) and the One Health Initiative (www.onehealthinitiative.com/) and from web-based searches, combined with the corporate knowledge of the authors and their professional contacts. Finally, a call was released to members of the OHC's Global One Health Community listserv, asking that they populate a Google document with information on One Health training, research, and outreach activities in North American academic and non-academic institutions. Results A current snapshot of North American One Health training, research, and outreach activities as of August 2016 has evolved. Conclusions It is clear that the One Health concept has gained considerable recognition during the first decade of the 21st century, with numerous current training and research activities carried out among North American academic, non-academic, government, corporate, and non-profit entities. PMID:27906120

  17. North Fork Silver Creek Research Natural Area: guidebook supplement 47

    Treesearch

    Reid Schuller; Rachel Showalter; Tom Kaye; Beth Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    This guidebook describes major biological and physical attributes of the 243-ha (600-ac) North Fork Silver Creek Research Natural Area (RNA), Josephine County, Oregon. Chosen to represent the diversity of shrub species that occur in the western Siskiyou Mountains on non-serpentine metamorphic bedrock, the RNA supports manzanita (Arctostaphylos spp...

  18. An Overview of CLT Research and Implementation in North America

    Treesearch

    Shiling Pei; Douglas Rammer; Marjan Popovski; Tom Williamson; Philip Line; John W. van de Lindt

    2016-01-01

    Although not yet seen as common practice, building with cross laminated timber (CLT) is gaining momentum in North America. Behind the scenes of the widely publicized project initiatives such as the Wood Innovation Design Centre Building in Canada and the recent U.S. Tall Wood Building Competition, substantial research, engineering, and development has been completed or...

  19. A new approach to modeling the sediment retention service (InVEST 3.0): Case study of the Cape Fear catchment, North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Perrine; Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Sim, Sarah; Mueller, Carina

    2015-08-15

    There is a growing call for ecosystem services models that are both simple and scientifically credible, in order to serve public and private sector decision-making processes. Sediment retention receives particular interest given the impact of this service on water quality. We developed a new version of the sediment retention model for the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs) tool to address previous limitations and facilitate model uncertainty assessment. We tested the model in the Cape Fear basin, North Carolina (NC), performing sensitivity analyses and assessing its ability to detect the spatial variability in sediment retention service for eight subcatchments. The main advantages of the revised model include the use of spatially-explicit, globally available input data, and the explicit consideration of hydrological connectivity in the landscape. The sensitivity analyses in the study catchment identified the erosivity and erodibility factors, together with the cover factor for agricultural land as the most influential parameter for sediment export. Relative predictions, representing the spatial variability in sediment exports, were correctly represented by the model. Absolute sediment exports were also highly correlated with observations, although their interpretation for socio-economic assessments is more uncertain without local knowledge of the dominant erosion processes. This work confirms that the sediment connectivity approach used in the revised InVEST model has great potential to quantify the sediment retention service. Although resources to conduct model calibration and testing are typically scarce, these practices should be encouraged to improve model interpretation and for confident application in different decision-making contexts. Without calibration, the InVEST sediment model still provides relevant information for ecosystem services assessments, especially in decision contexts that involve ranking of sediment export

  20. Environmental care in agricultural catchments: Toward the communicative catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter

    1991-11-01

    Substantial land degradation of agricultural catchments in Australia has resulted from the importation of European farming methods and the large-scale clearing of land. Rural communities are now being encouraged by government to take responsibility for environmental care. The importance of community involvement is supported by the view that environmental problems are a function of interactions between people and their environment. It is suggested that the commonly held view that community groups cannot care for their resources is due to inappropriate social institutions rather that any inherent disability in people. The communicative catchment is developed as a vision for environmental care into the future. This concept emerges from a critique of resource management through the catchment metaphors of the reduced, mechanical, and the complex, evolving catchment, which reflect the development of systemic and people-centered approaches to environmental care. The communicative catchment is one where both community and resource managers participate collaboratively in environmental care. A methodology based on action research and systemic thinking (systemic action research) is proposed as a way of moving towards the communicative catchment of the future. Action research is a way of taking action in organizations and communities that is participative and informed by theory, while systemic thinking takes into account the interconnections and relationships between social and natural worlds. The proposed vision, methodology, and practical operating principles stem from involvement in an action research project looking at extension strategies for the implementation of total catchment management in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales.

  1. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Gleason, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, and that when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline. Conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of wetland restoration (drained, non-drained) when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability demonstrated by this study was consistent with findings of other wetland investigations and underscores the difficulty in quantifying the GHG balance of wetland systems.

  2. Cleanup of the Western Research Institute North Site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this project is to clean up the Western Research Institute`s North Site in an environmentally sound and cost-effective manner. Work is broken down into the following phases: Phase 1, definition of waste streams; Phase 2, disposal of hazardous wastes; Phase 3, disposal of nonhazardous materials; Phase 4, soil sampling and disposal of buried wastes; Phase 5, decontamination and disposal of equipment; Phase 5a, groundwater monitoring; and Phase 6, preparation of material inventory database.

  3. Water quality in sugar catchments of Queensland.

    PubMed

    Rayment, G E

    2003-01-01

    Water quality condition and trend are important indicators of the impact of land use on the environment, as degraded water quality causes unwelcome changes to ecosystem composition and health. These concerns extend to the sea, where discharges of nutrients, sediments and toxicants above natural levels are unwelcome, particularly when they drain to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area and other coastal waters of Queensland. Sugarcane is grown in 26 major river catchments in Queensland, most in environmentally sensitive areas. This puts pressure on the Queensland Sugar Industry to manage the land in ways that have minimum adverse off-site impacts. Sugar researchers including CRC Sugar have been associated with water quality studies in North Queensland. These include investigations and reviews to assess the role of groundwater as a pathway for nitrate loss from canelands in the Herbert Catchment, to find causes of oxygen depletion in water (including irrigation runoff) from Ingham to Mackay, to use residues of superseded pesticides as indicators of sediment loss to the sea, and to assemble information on water quality pressure and status in sugar catchments. Key findings, plus information on input pressures are described in this paper, and areas of concern and opportunities discussed.

  4. Research, management, and status of the osprey in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Chancellor, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Osprey populations were studied throughout North America during the last decade as a result of dramatic declines reported along the North Atlantic Coast in the1950s and early 1960s. Researchers used banding, localized studies, aerial surveys, and pesticide analyses to identify factors influencing regional populations. Declining populations showed extremely poor production, contamination by environmental pollutants (including DDT and its metabolites, dieldrin, and polychlorinated biphenyls) and thin-shelled eggs. Following the reduced use and eventual ban of DDT and dieldrin, productivity began to improve. Improvement in affected populations, mainly those along the Atlantic Coast and in the Great Lakes region, began in the late 1960s and is continuing in the 1970s. Most populations in the South Atlantic region, in Western North America, and in Florida and the Gulf of California appeared to be producing at normal or near-normal rates in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Although some of the most severely affected populations are still not producing at normal rates, the pattern of improvement and an increase in management activities, including provision of nesting platforms and establishment of Osprey management zones, allow cautious optimism about the future of the species in North America. With its low recruitment potential, however, recovery will be slow.

  5. Landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility, a simple proxy for landslide hazard? A test in the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Mai, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This study implements a landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility approach in order to investigate the landslide scenario in the catchment of Mili, this being located in the north-easternmost sector of Sicily (Italy). From a detailed geomorphological campaign, thicknesses of mobilised materials at the triggering zone of each mass movement were collected and subsequently used as a dependent variable to be analysed in the framework of spatial predictive models. The adopted modelling methodology consisted of a presence-only learning algorithm which differently from classic presence-absence methods does not rely on stable conditions in order to derive functional relationships between dependent and independent variables. The dependent was pre-processed by reclassifying the crown thickness spectrum into a binary condition expressing thick (values equal or greater than 1m) and thin (values less than 1m) landslide crown classes. The explanatory variables were selected to express triggering-thickness dependency at different scales, these being in close proximity to the triggering point through primary and secondary attributes from a 2m-cell side Lidar HRDEM, at a medium scale through vegetation indexes from multispectral satellite images (ASTER) and a coarser scale through a geological, land use and tectonic maps. The choice of a presence-only approach allowed to effectively discriminate between the two types of landslide thicknesses at the triggering zone, producing excellent prediction skills associated with relatively low variances across a set of 50 randomly generated replicates. In addition, the role of each predictor was assessed for the two considered classes as relevant differences arose in terms of their contribution to the final models. In this regard, predictor importance, Jack-knife tests and response curves were used to assess the reliability of the models together with their geomorphological reasonability. This work attempts to capitalize on fieldwork data

  6. Automotive Mg Research and Development in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Joseph A.; Jackman, Jennifer; Li, Naiyi; Osborne, Richard J.; Powell, Bob R.; Sklad, Philip S

    2006-01-01

    Expanding world economic prosperity and probable peaking of conventional petroleum production in the coming decades require efforts to increase the efficiency of, and the development of alternatives to, petroleum-based fuels used in automotive transportation. North America has been aggressively pursuing both approaches for over ten years. Mainly as a result of lower prices due to global sourcing, magnesium has recently emerged as a serious candidate for lightweighting, and thus increasing the fuel efficiency of, automotive transportation. Automotive vehicles produced in North America currently use more Mg than vehicles produced elsewhere in the world, but the amounts per vehicle are very small in comparison to other materials such as steel, aluminum and plastics. The reasons, besides price, are primarily a less-developed state of technology for Mg in automotive transportation applications and lack of familiarity by the vehicle manufacturers with the material. This paper reviews some publicly-known, recent, present and future North American research and development activities in Mg for automotive applications.

  7. USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory: History and current research on western North American rangelands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poisonous plants on western North American rangelands have historically been troublesome to livestock producers. Research on toxic plants was initiated by U.S. Department of Agriculture in the late 1890’s to solve problems for the livestock industry. The USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laborator...

  8. An application of excess lead-210 analysis for the study of fine sediment connectivity in a Mediterranean mountain basin with badlands, the Vallcebre research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Ferrer, Laura; Estrany, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of sediment dynamics in Mediterranean environments is fundamental to basin management, particularly for mountain catchments with badlands, which affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems. Connectivity has emerged in Environmental and Earth Sciences as an evolution of the sediment delivery concept, providing a useful framework for understanding how sediments are transferred between geomorphic zones of the catchment. This study explores the feasibility of excess lead-210 (210Pbex) to analyse sediment connectivity in a 4-km2 Mediterranean mountain basin with badlands (the Vallcebre research catchments, Eastern Pyrenees) by applying simple 210Pbex mass-balance models for hypothesis generation and experimental testing in the field. Badland surfaces in the basin are weathered by freezing during the winter and are further eroded in summer by the effect of high-intensity storms. The eroded sediments may remain deposited within the catchment streams from months to years. Application of 210Pbex balance models in our basin proposes: (i) a saw-tooth seasonal pattern of badland surface 210Pbex activities (increasing from October to May, and depleted in summer) and (ii) a downstream increase in sediment activity due to fallout lead-210 accumulation in streambed sediment deposits. Both deposited and suspended sediments collected at the Vallcebre catchments showed, in general, low sediment 210Pbex concentrations, illustrating their fresh-rock origin at the badland sites, but also hampering the understanding of sediment 210Pbex patterns due to high measurement uncertainty (particularly for sediments with d50>20µm) and to strong dependence on sediment sampling methodology. Suspended sediment 210Pbex activity reproduced the simulated seasonal activity patterns for the badland surfaces. Contrary to the in-stream transit increases of sediment 210Pbex activity that were predicted by our model simulations, fallout lead-210 concentrations in the suspended sediments decreased

  9. Assessing catchment connectivity using hysteretic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jason; Masselink, Rens; Goni, Mikel; Gimenez, Rafael; Casali, Javier; Seeger, Manuel; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    Storm events mobilize large proportions of sediments in catchment systems. Therefore understanding catchment sediment dynamics throughout the continuity of storms and how initial catchment states act as controls on the transport of sediment to catchment outlets is important for effective catchment management. Sediment connectivity is a concept which can explain the origin, pathways and sinks of sediments within catchments (Baartman et al., 2013; Parsons et al., 2015; Masselink et al., 2016a,b; Mekonnen et al., 2016). However, sediment connectivity alone does not provide a practicable mechanism by which the catchment's initial state - and thus the location of entrained sediment in the sediment transport cascade - can be characterized. Studying the dynamic relationship between water discharge (Q) and suspended sediment (SS) at the catchment outlet can provide a valuable research tool to infer the likely source areas and flow pathways contributing to sediment transport because the relationship can be characterized by predictable hysteresis patterns. Hysteresis is observed when the sediment concentration associated with a certain flow rate is different depending on the direction in which the analysis is performed - towards the increase or towards the diminution of the flow. However, the complexity of the phenomena and factors which determine the hysteresis make its interpretation ambiguous. Previous work has described various types of hysteretic loops as well as the cause for the shape of the loop, mainly pointing to the origin of the sediments. The data set for this study comes from four experimental watersheds in Navarre (Spain), owned and maintained by the Government of Navarre. These experimental watersheds have been monitored and studied since 1996 (La Tejería and Latxaga) and 2001 (Oskotz principal and Oskotz woodland). La Tejería and Latxaga watersheds are similar to each other regarding size (approximately 200 ha), geology (marls and sandstones), soils (fine

  10. Participatory Research in North America; A Perspective on Participatory Research in Latin America; Participatory Research in Southern Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaventa, John; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The authors present perspectives on the employment of participatory research techniques in three areas: (1) North America (Gaventa); (2) Latin America (de Souza); and (3) Southern Europe (Orefice). Discussion focuses on participatory research strategies for popular groups, purposes and considerations regarding participatory research, and the role…

  11. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, S.D.; Hauk, T.F.; Leach, R.

    1997-07-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) CTBT R{ampersand}D program has made significant progress assembling a comprehensive seismic database (DB) for events and derived parameters in the Middle East and North Africa (ME/NA). The LLNL research DB provides not only a coherent framework in which store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment. The DB is designed to be flexible and extensible in order to accommodate the large volumes of data in diverse formats from many sources in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. Researchers can make use of the relational nature of the DB and interactive analysis tools to quickly and efficiently process large volumes of data. Seismic waveforms have been systematically collected form a wide range of local and regional networks using numerous earthquake bulletins and converted a common format based on CSS3.O while undergoing quality control and corrections of errors. By combining traveltime observations, event characterization studies, and regional wave-propagation studies of the LLNL CTBT team, we are assembling a library of ground truth information and event location correction surfaces required to support the ME/NA regionalization program. Corrections and parameters distilled from the LLNL research DB will provide needed contributions to the DOE knowledge base for the ME/NA region and enable the USNDC and IDC to effectively verify CTBT compliance.

  12. Understanding of research, genetics and genetic research in a rapid ethical assessment in north west Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Millard, James D.; Nji, Theobald M.; Tantoh, William F.; Nyoh, Doris N.; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Enyong, Peter A.; Newport, Melanie J.; Davey, Gail; Wanji, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background There is limited assessment of whether research participants in low-income settings are afforded a full understanding of the meaning of medical research. There may also be particular issues with the understanding of genetic research. We used a rapid ethical assessment methodology to explore perceptions surrounding the meaning of research, genetics and genetic research in north west Cameroon. Methods Eleven focus group discussions (including 107 adults) and 72 in-depth interviews were conducted with various stakeholders in two health districts in north west Cameroon between February and April 2012. Results Most participants appreciated the role of research in generating knowledge and identified a difference between research and healthcare but gave varied explanations as to this difference. Most participants' understanding of genetics was limited to concepts of hereditary, with potential benefits limited to the level of the individual or family. Explanations based on supernatural beliefs were identified as a special issue but participants tended not to identify any other special risks with genetic research. Conclusion We demonstrated a variable level of understanding of research, genetics and genetic research, with implications for those carrying out genetic research in this and other low resource settings. Our study highlights the utility of rapid ethical assessment prior to complex or sensitive research. PMID:25969503

  13. Understanding of research, genetics and genetic research in a rapid ethical assessment in north west Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A; Millard, James D; Nji, Theobald M; Tantoh, William F; Nyoh, Doris N; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Enyong, Peter A; Newport, Melanie J; Davey, Gail; Wanji, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    There is limited assessment of whether research participants in low-income settings are afforded a full understanding of the meaning of medical research. There may also be particular issues with the understanding of genetic research. We used a rapid ethical assessment methodology to explore perceptions surrounding the meaning of research, genetics and genetic research in north west Cameroon. Eleven focus group discussions (including 107 adults) and 72 in-depth interviews were conducted with various stakeholders in two health districts in north west Cameroon between February and April 2012. Most participants appreciated the role of research in generating knowledge and identified a difference between research and healthcare but gave varied explanations as to this difference. Most participants' understanding of genetics was limited to concepts of hereditary, with potential benefits limited to the level of the individual or family. Explanations based on supernatural beliefs were identified as a special issue but participants tended not to identify any other special risks with genetic research. We demonstrated a variable level of understanding of research, genetics and genetic research, with implications for those carrying out genetic research in this and other low resource settings. Our study highlights the utility of rapid ethical assessment prior to complex or sensitive research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Experimental program to stimulate competitive energy research in North Dakota: Summary and significance of DOE Trainee research

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjouk, Philip

    1999-07-01

    The general goals of the North Dakota DOE/EPSCoR Program are to enhance the capabilities of North Dakota's researchers to conduct nationally competitive energy-related research and to develop science and engineering human resources to meet current and future needs in energy-related areas. Doctoral students were trained and energy research was conducted.

  15. Studies in Teaching: 2002 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2002)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the of an annual educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 11, 2002. A table of contents and 27 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: Effects of the Earth/Environmental Science Requirement on High School Science Enrollment in North…

  16. Quantitative catchment profiling to apportion faecal indicator organism budgets for the Ribble system, the UK's sentinel drainage basin for Water Framework Directive research.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, C M; Wyer, M D; Crowther, J; McDonald, A T; Kay, D; Greaves, J; Wither, A; Watkins, J; Francis, C; Humphrey, N; Bradford, M

    2008-06-01

    Under the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) 20/60/EC and the US Federal Water Pollution Control Act 2002 management of water quality within river drainage basins has shifted from traditional point-source control to a holistic approach whereby the overall contribution of point and diffuse sources of pollutants has to be considered. Consequently, there is a requirement to undertake source-apportionment studies of pollutant fluxes within catchments. The inclusion of the Bathing Water Directive (BWD), under the list of 'protected areas' in the WFD places a requirement to control sources of faecal indicator organisms within catchments in order to achieve the objectives of both the BWD (and its revision - 2006/7/EC) and the WFD. This study was therefore initiated to quantify catchment-derived fluxes of faecal indicator compliance parameters originating from both point and diffuse sources. The Ribble drainage basin is the single UK sentinel WFD research catchment and discharges to the south of the Fylde coast, which includes a number of high profile, historically non-compliant, bathing waters. Faecal indicator concentrations (faecal coliform concentrations are reported herein) were measured at 41 riverine locations, the 15 largest wastewater treatment works (WwTWs) and 15 combined sewer overflows (CSOs) across the Ribble basin over a 44-day period during the 2002 bathing season. The sampling programme included targeting rainfall-induced high flow events and sample results were categorised as either base flow or high flow. At the riverine sites, geometric mean faecal coliform concentrations showed statistically significant elevation at high flow compared to base flow. The resultant faecal coliform flux estimates revealed that over 90% of the total organism load to the Ribble Estuary was discharged by sewage related sources during high flow events. These sewage sources were largely related to the urban areas to the south and east of the Ribble basin, with over half the

  17. The North Wyke Farm Platform, a UK national capability for research into sustainability of temperate agricultural grassland management: progress and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul; Dungait, Jennifer; Griffith, Bruce; Shepherd, Anita; Sint, Hadewij; Blackwell, Martin; Cardenas, Laura; Collins, Adrian; Goulding, Keith; Lee, Michael; Orr, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The North Wyke Farm Platform (NWFP) at Rothamsted Research in the South-West of England, is a large, farm-scale experiment for collaborative research, training and knowledge exchange in agro-environmental sciences; with the aim of addressing agricultural productivity and ecosystem responses to different management practices. The 63 ha NWFP site, captures the spatial and/or temporal data necessary to develop a better understanding of the dynamic processes and underlying mechanisms that can be used to model how agricultural grassland systems respond to different management inputs. Here, via beef and sheep production, the underlying principle is to manage each of three farmlets (each consisting of five man-made, hydrologically-isolated sub-catchments) in three contrasting ways: (i) improvement through use of mineral fertilizers; (ii) improvement through use of legumes; and (iii) improvement through innovation. The connectivity between the timing and intensity of the different management operations, together with the transport of nutrients and potential pollutants from the NWFP is evaluated using various data collection and data modelling exercises. The primary data collection strategy involves the use of a ground-based, wireless sensor network, where in each of the fifteen sub-catchments, water characteristics such as flow, turbidity and chemistry are measured at a flume laboratory that captures the sub-catchment's water drainage (via a system of directed French drains). This sensor network also captures: precipitation, soil moisture and soil temperature data for each sub-catchment; greenhouse gas data across key subsets of the fifteen sub-catchments; and meteorological data (other than precipitation) at a single site only (representative of the NWFP site, as a whole). Such high temporal resolution data sets (but with limited spatial resolution) are coupled with a secondary data collection strategy, for high spatial resolution data sets (but with limited temporal

  18. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, D; Hauk, T; Moore, R M; O'Boyle, J; Ruppert, S

    1999-07-23

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Research and Development (CTBT R and D) program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive seismic research database (RDB) for seismic events and derived research products in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our original ME/NA study region has enlarged and is now defined as an area including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, the Former Soviet Union and the Scandinavian/Arctic region. The LLNL RDB will facilitate calibration of all International Monitoring System (IMS) stations (primary and auxiliary) or their surrogates (if not yet installed) as well as a variety of gamma stations. The RDB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction sur faces and capabilities. In order to accommodate large volumes of data from many sources with diverse formats the RDB is designed to be flexible and extensible in addition to maintaining detailed quality control information and associated metadata. Station parameters, instrument responses, phase pick information, and event bulletins were compiled and made available through the RDB. For seismic events in the MENA region occurring between 1976 and 1999, we have systematically assembled, quality checked and organized event waveforms; continuous seismic data from 1990 to present are archived for many stations. Currently, over 11,400 seismic events and 1.2 million waveforms are maintained in the RDB and made readily available to researchers. In addition to open sources of seismic data, we have established collaborative relationships with several ME/NA countries that have yielded additional ground truth and broadband waveform data essential for regional calibration and capability

  19. A new, catchment-scale model for simulating methyl and total mercury in soils and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futter, M. N.; Poste, A. E.; Whitehead, P. G.; Dillon, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent and persistent neurotoxin. It is subject to long-range atmospheric transport, accumulates in catchment soils, and can pose health risks to humans and animals both at the point of use as well as in remote locations. Elevated concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg) in fish are related to atmospheric Hg deposition and have resulted in fish consumption advisories in many parts of North America and Fennoscandia. After more than 150 years of elevated Hg deposition in Europe and North America, there remains a large inventory of Hg in the terrestrial catchments of lakes, which continues to be exported to receiving waters despite decreasing atmospheric inputs. While a substantial Hg pool exists in boreal catchment soils, fluxes of Hg from catchments via stream runoff tend to be much lower than atmospheric Hg inputs. Terrestrial catchments receiving similar atmospheric Hg inputs can have markedly different patterns of Hg output in stream water. Considering the importance of catchment processes in determining Hg flux to lakes and subsequent MeHg concentrations in fish, there is a need to characterize Hg cycling and transport in boreal and temperate forest-covered catchments. We present a new, catchment-scale, process-based dynamic model for simulating Hg in soils and surface waters. The Integrated Catchments Model for Mercury (INCA-Hg) simulates transport of gaseous, dissolved and solid Hg and transformations between elemental (Hg0), ionic (Hg(II)) and MeHg in natural and semi-natural landscapes. The mathematical description represents the model as a series of linked, first-order differential equations describing chemical and hydrological processes in catchment soils and waters which control surface water Hg dynamics and subsequent fluxes to lakes and other receiving waters. The model simulates daily time series between one and one hundred years long and can be applied to catchments ranging in size from <1 to ~10000 km2. Here we present applications

  20. Middle East, North Africa and Western Eurasia Seismic Research Database

    SciTech Connect

    O'Boyle, J L; Ruppert, S D; Hauk, T F; Dodge, D A; Ganzberger, M D; Ryall, F

    2003-07-14

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (GNEM R&E) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant progress populating a comprehensive Seismic Research Database (SRDB) used for deriving seismic calibration parameters for the Middle East, North Africa and Western Eurasia (ME/NA/WE) regions. In addition to an overview of select individual information products, we present an overview of our visualization, integration, validation, and organizational processes. Development of these processes and the LLNL SRDB was necessitated by both the very large amount of data and information involved (over 15 terabytes) and the varied data and research result formats utilized. The LLNL SRDB allows for the collection of raw and contextual seismic data used in research, provides an interface for researchers to access data, provides a framework to store research results and integrate datasets, and supports assembly, integration and dissemination of datasets to the NNSA Knowledge Base (KB). The LLNL SRDB is a flexible and extensible framework consisting of a relational database (RDB), Geographical Information System (GIS), and associated product/data visualization and data management tools. This framework is designed to accommodate large volumes of data in diverse formats from many sources (both in-house-derived research and integrated contractor products), in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. In order to efficiently organize information within the LLNL SRDB, it was necessary to automate procedures needed to create and update database tables, but a large effort is still required by technicians and scientists to load special datasets, review results of automated processing and resolve quality issues. The LLNL SRDB currently has 3 million reconciled event origins and arrivals from several global, regional and local seismic bulletins and 30 million

  1. Recent Trends in Soil Science and Agronomy Research in the Northern Great Plains of North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The book “Recent Trends in Soil Science and Agronomy Research in the Northern Great Plains of North America” summarizes published research in soil science and agronomy from various field experiments conducted in the soil-climatic/agro-ecological regions of the Northern Great Plains of North America....

  2. Analysing the role of abandoned agricultural terraces on flood generation in a set of small Mediterranean mountain research catchments (Vallcebre, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Llorens, Pilar; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Latron, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    The Vallcebre research catchments are located in NE Spain, in a middle mountain area with a Mediterranean sub-humid climate. Most of the bedrock consists of continental red lutites that are easily weathered into loamy soils. This area was intensely used for agriculture in the past when most of the sunny gentle hillslopes were terraced. The land was progressively abandoned since the mid-20th Century and most of the fields were converted to meadows or were spontaneously forested. Early studies carried out in the terraced Cal Parisa catchment demonstrated the occurrence of two types of frequently saturated areas, ones situated in downslope locations with high topographic index values, and the others located in the inner parts of many terraces, where the shallow water table usually outcrops due to the topographical modifications linked to terrace construction. Both the increased extent of saturated areas and the role of a man-made elementary drainage system designed for depleting water from the terraces suggested that terraced areas would induce an enhanced hydrological response during rainfall events when compared with non-terraced hillslopes. The response of 3 sub-catchments, of increasing area and decreasing percentage of terraced area, during a set of major events collected during over 15 years has been analysed. The results show that storm runoff depths were roughly proportional to precipitations above 30 mm although the smallest catchment (Cal Parisa), with the highest percentage of terraces, was able to completely buffer rainfall events of 60 mm in one hour without any runoff when antecedent conditions were dry. Runoff coefficients depended on antecedent conditions and peak discharges were weakly linked to rainfall intensities. Peak lag times, peak runoff rates and recession coefficients were similar in the 3 catchments; the first variable values were in the range between Hortonian and saturation overland flow and the two last ones were in the range of

  3. Comparison of threshold hydrologic response across northern catchments

    Treesearch

    Genevieve Ali; Doerthe Tetzlaff; Jeffrey J. McDonnell; Chris Soulsby; Sean Carey; Hjalmar Laudon; Kevin McGuire; Jim Buttle; Jan Seibert; Jamie. Shanley

    2015-01-01

    Nine mid-latitude to high-latitude headwater catchments – part of the Northern Watershed Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (North-Watch) programme – were used to analyze threshold response to rainfall and snowmelt-driven events and link the different responses to the catchment characteristics of the nine sites. The North-Watch data include daily time-series of...

  4. Human impacts on river water quality- comparative research in the catchment areas of the Tone River and the Mur River-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, K.

    2013-12-01

    Human activities in river basin affect river water quality as water discharges into river with pollutant after we use it. By detecting pollutants source, pathway, and influential factor of human activities, it will be possible to consider proper river basin management. In this study, material flow analysis was done first and then nutrient emission modeling by MONERIS was conducted. So as to clarify land use contribution and climate condition, comparison of Japanese and European river basin area has been made. The model MONERIS (MOdelling Nutrient Emissions in RIver Systems; Behrendt et al., 2000) was applied to estimate the nutrient emissions in the Danube river basin by point sources and various diffuse pathways. Work for the Mur River Basin in Austria was already carried out by the Institute of Water Quality, Resources and Waste Management at the Vienna University of Technology. This study treats data collection, modelling for the Tone River in Japan, and comparative analysis for these two river basins. The estimation of the nutrient emissions was carried out for 11 different sub catchment areas covering the Tone River Basin for the time period 2000 to 2006. TN emissions into the Tone river basin were 51 kt/y. 67% was via ground water and dominant for all sub catchments. Urban area was also important emission pathway. Human effect is observed in urban structure and agricultural activity. Water supply and sewer system make urban water cycle with pipeline structure. Excess evapotranspiration in arable land is also influential in water cycle. As share of arable land is 37% and there provides agricultural products, it is thought that N emission from agricultural activity is main pollution source. Assumption case of 10% N surplus was simulated and the result was 99% identical to the actual. Even though N surplus reduction does not show drastic impact on N emission, it is of importance to reduce excess of fertilization and to encourage effective agricultural activity

  5. Issues/Higher Education/Institutional Research. NCAIR Proceedings. Fifth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Asheville, North Carolina, November 2-3, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings from the fifth annual meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) focus on issues affecting higher education and the relationship of these issues to the institutional research function. Included are general session addresses by Charles A. Lyons and Dick Robinson that discuss the implications of Judge…

  6. Issues/Higher Education/Institutional Research. NCAIR Proceedings. Fifth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Asheville, North Carolina, November 2-3, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings from the fifth annual meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) focus on issues affecting higher education and the relationship of these issues to the institutional research function. Included are general session addresses by Charles A. Lyons and Dick Robinson that discuss the implications of Judge…

  7. Evaluating the Impacts of Unexpected Forest Disturbances on Paired Catchment Calibrations of Sediment Yield and Turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlein, K.; Silins, U.; Williams, C.; Wagner, M. J.; Martens, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The paired catchment approach of studying the impacts of disturbance on catchment hydrology remains as perhaps the most powerful approach for direct verification of catchment scale impacts from disturbance. However, paired catchment studies are also dependent on the stability of the relationships between treated and reference catchments during calibration and evaluation periods. A long-term paired catchment study of forest harvest impacts on sediment yield and turbidity in the Rocky Mountains of southwestern Alberta, Canada has a robust 11-year pre-treatment data record. The study intends to evaluate three alternative logging practices: clear-cutting, strip-shelterwood, and partial cutting. 3 sub-catchments in Star Creek (1035 ha) underwent harvest treatments while North York Creek (865 Ha) serves as the reference. The objective of this particular study was to explore the potential effects of unplanned and unanticipated watershed changes in two watersheds during an 11-year calibration. Sediment yield (kg ha-1 d-1) and turbidity (NTU) were monitored throughout the calibration period (2004-2014) prior to the 2015 harvest in Star Creek. Two unanticipated disturbances including backcountry trail rehabilitation in North York (2010) followed by a >100 year storm event in both watersheds in June 2013 may have affected the sediment yield and turbidity calibration relationships. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to evaluate the effects of this trail rehabilitation and flooding by comparing the calibration relationships before and after these disturbances. Despite qualitative field observations of periodically affected sediment regimes, no impact on pre- or post- calibration relationships was observed. Backcountry trail rehabilitation in North York (p=0.904 and 0.416 for sediment yield and turbidity, respectively) or flooding in both watersheds (p=0.364 and 0.204 for sediment yield and turbidity, respectively) did not produce significant changes to the calibrations

  8. Time-variant Catchment Transit Time Distribution and StorAge Selection Functions in Neighbouring Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, J.; Rodriguez, N. B.; McGuire, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of the catchment functions of storage, mixing, and release is a major research challenge as their behavior is fundamental for understanding water quality and flow quantity and timing. Generally, the complexity of the flow paths and associated mixing processes is still a major hindrance to a thorough understanding of catchment functions. Catchment transit time distributions can be used as an integrative descriptor of catchment functions. Here we aim to understand these fundamental catchment functions in four neighboring catchments of the HJA Experimental Forest in Oregon, USA. The areas of the four catchments (WS2, WS3, WS9, WS10) range from 0.085 to 1.011 km2. The catchments are fully forested with Douglas fir, western hemlock, and western redcedar dominating the lower elevations, and noble fir, Pacific silver fir, Douglas fir dominating higher elevations. Geology is dominated by volcaniclastics, covering 68% to 99% of the catchments. We employed a two storage conceptual model in each catchment for stream flow and transport modeling. We used solutions of the Master Equation to determine transit time distributions. We assumed randomly sampled/fully mixed conditions in each storage to model 18Oxygen in stream flow over a two year period. For example, modeling results for WS10 yielded a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.84 for stream flow of and a NSE of 0.7 for the (volume weighted) 18O in stream flow. Furthermore, we derived the master transit time distribution (mttd) for the catchments. Eventually we investigated the landscape controls (topography, geology, morphology) on mttd and the dynamics of storage selection functions of each catchment.

  9. 2011 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The North Plains Water Conservation District started a water conservation project in 2010 on corn irrigation aimed at using just 12 inches of irrigation and producing 200 bu/ac of corn. This report is for 2011, the second year of the study, conducted at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) in Ett...

  10. Exploring research priorities for the North American hardwood industry

    Treesearch

    David Brinberg; Earl Kline; Delton Alderman; Philip Araman; Ed Cesa; Steve Milauskas; Tom Walthousen; Jan Wiedenbeck

    2008-01-01

    With the increase of globalization, the North American hardwood industry is facing many challenges to remain competitive and sustainable, facing drastic changes in the areas of labor, land, manufacturing, markets and marketing, and supply chain. The hardwood industry is especially vulnerable, with the influx of foreign manufacturers and suppliers with greater natural...

  11. History of black walnut genetics research in North America

    Treesearch

    Erin Victory; Keith Woeste; Olin E., Jr. Rhodes

    2004-01-01

    Eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) is an economically and ecologically important hardwood species that has been used throughout the history of settlement in North America. It was a resource that helped Native Americans in their everyday life, it helped European settlers carve a living out of the wilderness, and it has helped rural farmers and...

  12. Displaced Homemakers in North Dakota. Research Series No. 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhardt, Dale; Elhardt, LaDonna

    Three hundred and forty-one North Dakota women, classified as displaced homemakers, were interviewed to gather information on their backgrounds, experienced problems, and perceived needs. Data analysis showed that displaced women tend to be poor and tend to move to the job market upon their change in marital status. Job market involvement is most…

  13. Geologic controls on bedrock channel width in large, slowly-eroding catchments: Case study of the New River in eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotila, James A.; Moskey, Kristyn A.; Prince, Philip S.

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the geologic controls on hydraulic geometry of bedrock rivers using a single large catchment, the New River, from a stable tectonic setting with variable, resistant lithology but spatially stable climate. Our survey of channel width at 0.5 km spacing along 572 km of the river shows major variation that only roughly fits the expected scaling relationships between width, drainage area, and slope. Considerable variations in width, including steps in trends and large spikes, relate to physiogeologic boundaries that the river passes through. A large fraction (15%) of the river's length classifies as bedrock reach, showing that it behaves more like a bedrock river than an alluvial river. Unlike established trends, the channel is wider in bedrock than in alluvium. Field observations show that aspect ratio (width to depth) is not constant, but fluctuates systematically with width from wide, shallow reaches to narrower, deeper reaches. Our observations of bedrock properties suggest that susceptibility to fluvial plucking versus abrasion may control this anomalous channel morphology. One end member form with aspect ratio as high as 500, which we term the incision plain, is associated with very closely spaced discontinuities (~ 10 cm) in otherwise hard rock. We propose that the closely spaced discontinuities enable efficient plucking that leads to widening by lateral erosion. This morphology locally occurs in other passive margin rivers and may be a fundamental fluvial form that is similar to, but the inverse of, slot canyons. The other end member, which we term channel neck, is narrower and deeper with complex flow paths through blocky bedrock. This form occurs where discontinuity spacing is longer (> 0.5 m) and erosion is abrasion dominated. These results imply that changes in channel width do not necessarily reflect variations in uplift rate, but instead may result from complex response to bedrock properties.

  14. Collaborative Research with Chinese, Indian, Filipino and North European Research Organizations on Infectious Disease Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we present a short review of applications of time series analysis, which consists of spectral analysis based on the maximum entropy method in the frequency domain and the least squares method in the time domain, to the incidence data of infectious diseases. This report consists of three parts. First, we present our results obtained by collaborative research on infectious disease epidemics with Chinese, Indian, Filipino and North European research organizations. Second, we present the results obtained with the Japanese infectious disease surveillance data and the time series numerically generated from a mathematical model, called the susceptible/exposed/infectious/recovered (SEIR) model. Third, we present an application of the time series analysis to pathologic tissues to examine the usefulness of time series analysis for investigating the spatial pattern of pathologic tissue. It is anticipated that time series analysis will become a useful tool for investigating not only infectious disease surveillance data but also immunological and genetic tests.

  15. An approach for aggregating upstream catchment information to support research and management of fluvial systems across large landscapes.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Yin-Phan; Wieferich, Daniel; Fung, Kuolin; Infante, Dana M; Cooper, Arthur R

    2014-01-01

    The growing quality and availability of spatial map layers (e.g., climate, geology, and land use) allow stream studies, which historically have occurred over small areas like a single watershed or stream reach, to increasingly explore questions from a landscape perspective. This large-scale perspective for fluvial studies depends on the ability to characterize influences on streams resulting from throughout entire upstream networks or catchments. While acquiring upstream information for a single reach is relatively straight-forward, this process becomes demanding when attempting to obtain summaries for all streams throughout a stream network and across large basins. Additionally, the complex nature of stream networks, including braided streams, adds to the challenge of accurately generating upstream summaries. This paper outlines an approach to solve these challenges by building a database and applying an algorithm to gather upstream landscape information for digitized stream networks. This approach avoids the need to directly use spatial data files in computation, and efficiently and accurately acquires various types of upstream summaries of landscape information across large regions using tabular processing. In particular, this approach is not limited to the use of any specific database software or programming language, and its flexibility allows it to be adapted to any digitized stream network as long as it meets a few minimum requirements. This efficient approach facilitates the growing demand of acquiring upstream summaries at large geographic scales and helps to support the use of landscape information in assisting management and decision-making across large regions.

  16. Integration for sustainable catchment management.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Christopher J A; Scholefield, David; Haygarth, Philip M

    2007-02-15

    Sustainable catchment management requires increased levels of integration between groups of natural and social scientists, land and water users, land and water managers, planners and policy makers across spatial scales. Multiple policy drivers, covering urban and rural communities and their relationships with land and water use, have resulted in the need for an integrated decision making framework that operates from the strategic national scale to the local catchment scale. Large gaps in integration between policies are resulting in uncertain outcomes of conflicting and competing policy measures. The need for further integration is illustrated by little or no reductions in nitrate and phosphate levels in surface and ground waters in England and Wales. There is a requirement for natural scientists to consider the socio-economic setting and implications of their research. Moreover, catchment system level science requires natural and social scientists to work more closely, to provide robust analysis of the state of the environment that fully considers the bio-physical, social, political and economic settings. The combined use of spatial technologies, scenarios, indicators and multicriteria analysis are increasingly being used to enable improved integration for sustainable catchment management.

  17. An isotopic study of dissolved inorganic carbon in the catchment of the Waimakariri River and deep ground water of the North Canterbury Plains, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. B.; Fox, V. J.

    1996-11-01

    Processes of evolution of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) and its isotopic composition have been followed by modelling and measurement in the catchment of the Waimakariri River and the ground water of the section of the Canterbury Plains recharged by infiltration from that river. Although the TDIC concentrations are low (maximum 1.2 mmol kg -1 water in this study), clear chemical—isotopic relationships emerge, which are consistent with the modelling approach. Total 14C concentrations in rivers and shallow ground water are linearly related to TDIC, with slope similar to the 14C concentration of atmospheric CO 2 during the sampling period. 13C concentrations of Waimakariri River and its tributaries reflect attainment of equilibrium between exchange with atmospheric CO 2 and direct addition of CO 2 to the water by decay of organic material. As river water infiltrates to the aquifers (fluvioglacial deposits of age several hundred thousand years, mainly greywacke), further TDIC accrues by residual decay of organic material of recent 14C concentration. Subsequent changes as the water moves to and through the deeper aquifers appear to be limited only to broadening of the age spectrum by natural flow processes, accompanied by radioactive decay of 14C. This allows age assessment of the tritium-free, artesian ground water presently drawn from the deep aquifer in near-coastal areas in and close to Christchurch. Based on the 14C evidence alone, mean residence times range from about 800 years just outside the confined zone to 2000-3000 years in the confined area. A separate age determination uses the 13C data to evaluate the contributions to TDIC of each deep water sample by the river and biogenic components at the time of recharge; agreement with the 14C residence times is achieved when reasonable pre-industrial 14C concentrations are assigned to these two components. The ages appear to be in conflict with positive tritium indications during the early 1970s and with

  18. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Catchment Hydrology: A Modified Model Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), typically defined as depressional wetlands surrounded by uplands, support an array of hydrological and ecological processes. However, key research questions concerning the hydrological connectivity of GIWs and their impacts on downgradient surface waters remain unanswered. This is particularly important for regulation and management of these systems. For example, in the past decade United States Supreme Court decisions suggest that GIWs can be afforded protection if significant connectivity exists between these waters and traditional navigable waters. Here we developed a simulation procedure to quantify the effects of various spatial distributions of GIWs across the landscape on the downgradient hydrograph using a refined version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a catchment-scale hydrological simulation model. We modified the SWAT FORTRAN source code and employed an alternative hydrologic response unit (HRU) definition to facilitate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes and connectivity relationships to other surface waters, and to quantify their downgradient hydrological effects. We applied the modified SWAT model to an ~ 202 km2 catchment in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA, exhibiting a substantial population of mapped GIWs. Results from our series of GIW distribution scenarios suggest that: (1) Our representation of GIWs within SWAT conforms to field-based characterizations of regional GIWs in most respects; (2) GIWs exhibit substantial seasonally-dependent effects upon downgradient base flow; (3) GIWs mitigate peak flows, particularly following high rainfall events; and (4) The presence of GIWs on the landscape impacts the catchment water balance (e.g., by increasing groundwater outflows). Our outcomes support the hypothesis that GIWs have an important catchment-scale effect on downgradient streamflow.

  19. "The way the country has been carved up by researchers": ethics and power in north-south public health research.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Aisling; Brugha, Ruairi; Byrne, Elaine

    2016-12-12

    Despite the recognition of power as being central to health research collaborations between high income countries and low and middle income countries, there has been insufficient detailed analysis of power within these partnerships. The politics of research in the global south is often considered outside of the remit of research ethics. This article reports on an analysis of power in north-south public health research, using Zambia as a case study. Primary data were collected in 2011/2012, through 53 in-depth interviews with: Zambian researchers (n = 20), Zambian national stakeholders (n = 8) and northern researchers who had been involved in public health research collaborations involving Zambia and the global north (n = 25). Thematic analysis, utilising a situated ethics perspective, was undertaken using Nvivo 10. Most interviewees perceived roles and relationships to be inequitable with power remaining with the north. Concepts from Bourdieu's theory of Power and Practice highlight new aspects of research ethics: Northern and southern researchers perceive that different habituses exist, north and south - habituses of domination (northern) and subordination (Zambian) in relation to researcher relationships. Bourdieu's hysteresis effect provides a possible explanation for why power differentials continue to exist. In some cases, new opportunities have arisen for Zambian researchers; however, they may not immediately recognise and grasp them. Bourdieu's concept of Capitals offers an explanation of how diverse resources are used to explain these power imbalances, where northern researchers are often in possession of more economic, symbolic and social capital; while Zambian researchers possess more cultural capital. Inequities and power imbalances need to be recognised and addressed in research partnerships. A situated ethics approach is central in understanding this relationship in north-south public health research.

  20. NARVAL North - Remote Sensing of Postfrontal Convective Clouds and Precipitation over the North Atlantic with the Research Aircraft HALO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepp, Christian; Ament, Felix; Bakan, Stephan; Crewell, Susanne; Hagen, Martin; Hirsch, Lutz; Jansen, Friedhelm; Konow, Heike; Mech, Mario; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Schäfler, Andreas; Stevens, Bjorn

    2014-05-01

    The new German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) became recently available for measurement flights in atmospheric research. It's capacity of measuring from a high altitude vertical profiles of all components of atmospheric water - like vapor, liquid and ice, in both cloud and precipitation forms, as well as the aerosol particles upon which cloud droplets form - makes it a unique research platform. The aircraft, equipped with advanced radiometers, radar and lidar technology, the HALO Microwave Package (HAMP), is an initiative by German climate and environmental research institutions and is operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). One of the first major missions to exploit the capabilities of HALO was conducted for the NARVAL project (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies) during January 2014. After studying subtropical clouds one month before in the first NARVAL phase, the interest of NARVAL North focused on the study of cold air convection and precipitation in the form of rain and snow. Based at Keflavik airport (Iceland), several flights were conducted to examine the specific small-scale precipitation structures behind the backsides of cold fronts over the North Atlantic. This should help to narrow the gap in the understanding of substantial differences between satellite observations and model calculations in such situations. First data analysis of these measurements indicate promising results. The poster will describe the HALO instrument packages as well as the collected observations during the campaign and will present preliminary scientific findings.

  1. Inferring the effect of catchment complexity on mesoscale hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FröHlich, Holger L.; Breuer, Lutz; Vaché, Kellie B.; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2008-09-01

    The effect of catchment complexity on hydrologic and hydrochemical catchment response was characterized in the mesoscale Dill catchment (692 km2), Germany. This analysis was developed using multivariate daily stream concentration and discharge data at the basin outlet, in connection with less frequently sampled catchment-wide end-member chemistries. The link between catchment-wide runoff sources and basin output was observed through a combination of concentration-discharge (C-Q) analysis and multivariate end-member projection. Subsurface stormflow, various groundwater and wastewater sources, as well as urban surface runoff emerged in catchment output chemistry. Despite the identification of multiple sources, several runoff sources observed within the catchment failed to display consistent links with the output chemistry. This failure to associate known source chemistry with outlet chemistry may have resulted from a lack of hydraulic connectivity between sources and basin outlet, from different arrival times of subbasin-scale runoff contributions, and also from an overlap of source chemistries that subsumed discrete runoff sources in catchment output. This combination of catchment heterogeneity and complexity simply suggests that the internal spatial organization of the catchment impeded the application of lumped mixing calculations at the 692 km2 outlet. Given these challenges, we suggest that in mesoscale catchment research, the potential effects of spatial organization should be included in any interpretation of highly integrated response signals, or when using those signals to evaluate numerical rainfall-runoff models.

  2. A new perspective on catchment storage gained from a nested catchment experiment in Luxembourg (Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe; François Iffly, Jean; Gourdol, Laurent; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2014-05-01

    Recent hydrological process research focussed on how much water a catchment can store and how these catchments store and release water. Storage can be a valuable metric for catchment description, inter-comparison, and classification. Further storage controls catchment mixing, non-linearities in rainfall-runoff transformation and eco-hydrological processes. Various methods exist to determine catchment storage (e.g. natural tracer, soil moisture and groundwater data, hydrological models). Today it remains unclear what parts of the catchment storage are measured with the different models. Here we present a new hydrometric approach to answer the question how much water a catchment can store. We tested our approach in a dense hydro-climatological monitoring network that encompasses 16 recording streamgauges and 21 pluviographs in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). Catchment scales are ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2 and they have clean- and mixed combinations of distinct geologies ranging from schists to marls, sandstone, dolomite and limestone. Previous investigations in the area of interest have shown that geology largely controls winter runoff coefficients. Here, we focus at how catchment geology is ultimately affecting catchment storage. We used the approach of Sayama et al. (2011) to compute catchment dynamic storage changes for each winter season over the period 2002-2012 (based on precipitation as input; discharge and evapotranspiration as output). We determined dynamic storage changes for each winter semester (October to March) in all 16 catchments over the period 2002-2012. At the beginning of each hydrological winter season, all catchments showed similar trends in storage change. A few weeks into the winter season, catchments with lowest permeability (e.g. marls) started to plateau. The highest storage values were reached several months later in the season in catchments dominated by permeable substrate (e.g. sandstone). For most catchments, we found

  3. Merging perspectives in the catchment sciences: the US-Japan Joint Seminar on catchment hydrology and forest biogeochemistry

    Treesearch

    Kevin J. McGuire; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Nobuhito Ohte; Emily M. Elliott; Takashi Gomi; Mark B. Green; Brian L. McGlynn; Naoko. Tokuchi

    2014-01-01

    Japan has strong research programmes in the catchment sciences that overlap with interests in the US catchment science community, particularly in experimental and field-based research. Historically, however, there has been limited interaction between these two hydrologic science communities because of differences in language, culture, and research approaches. These...

  4. Catchment Transit Times - Does Scale Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Soulsby, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Speed, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mean transit times (MTT) can give useful insights into the internal processes of hydrological systems. However, our understanding of how they vary and scale remains unclear. The objective of this study was therefore to compare MTT at different scales and to thereby identify possible changes in dominant flow pathways and mixing processes over several orders of magnitude from small headwaters to large scale catchments. Furthermore, the study aimed at finding a new way to determine MTT, suitable for application in ungauged catchments. MTTs were estimated using an input weighed convolution integral approach with a Gamma distribution as transit time distribution and weekly δ18O data from 20, mostly nested, contrasting catchments in North-East Scotland ranging from 1 to 1800 km2. The estimated MTTs ranged between 270 and 1172 days and were used to test a previously developed multiple linear regression (MLR) model for MTT prediction based on metrics of soil cover, landscape organization and climate. We show that the controls on MTT identified by the MLR model hold with the independent data from these 20 sites and that the MLR can be used to predict MTT in ungauged montane catchments within a mean relative error of 25 % without the need for independent tracer information. Furthermore, it was found that the dominant controls on MTT not only remain unchanged in regions other than those used for the original calibration of the MLR but also over 3 more orders of magnitude of catchment size, suggesting no major change of dominant flow paths and mixing processes at larger scales. This is consistent with the fact that only the variance of MTT, rather than MTT, showed a scaling relationship above a potential threshold of ~ 50 km2. However, MTT itself appeared to converge with increasing catchment scale, apparently due to the integration of heterogeneous headwater responses in larger downstream catchments.

  5. Studies in Teaching. 1995 Research Digest. Papers Presented at the Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    This is a collection of papers reporting student research projects at the Annual Research Forum, Department of Education, Wake Forest University (North Carolina). They include: "Student Interest in Studying World History in Relation to Current Events" (Conan Arthur); "Perceptions of High School Student Athletes and Athletics"…

  6. Comparison of the new intermediate complex atmospheric research (ICAR) model with the WRF model in a mesoscale catchment in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härer, Stefan; Bernhardt, Matthias; Gutmann, Ethan; Bauer, Hans-Stefan; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    Until recently, a large gap existed in the atmospheric downscaling strategies. On the one hand, computationally efficient statistical approaches are widely used, on the other hand, dynamic but CPU-intensive numeric atmospheric models like the weather research and forecast (WRF) model exist. The intermediate complex atmospheric research (ICAR) model developed at NCAR (Boulder, Colorado, USA) addresses this gap by combining the strengths of both approaches: the process-based structure of a dynamic model and its applicability in a changing climate as well as the speed of a parsimonious modelling approach which facilitates the modelling of ensembles and a straightforward way to test new parametrization schemes as well as various input data sources. However, the ICAR model has not been tested in Europe and on slightly undulated terrain yet. This study now evaluates for the first time the ICAR model to WRF model runs in Central Europe comparing a complete year of model results in the mesoscale Attert catchment (Luxembourg). In addition to these modelling results, we also describe the first implementation of ICAR on an Intel Phi architecture and consequently perform speed tests between the Vienna cluster, a standard workstation and the use of an Intel Phi coprocessor. Finally, the study gives an outlook on sensitivity studies using slightly different input data sources.

  7. NASA/FAA North Texas Research Station Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    NTX Research Staion: NASA research assets embedded in an interesting operational air transport environment. Seven personnel (2 civil servants, 5 contractors). ARTCC, TRACON, Towers, 3 air carrier AOCs(American, Eagle and Southwest), and 2 major airports all within 12 miles. Supports NASA Airspace Systems Program with research products at all levels (fundamental to system level). NTX Laboratory: 5000 sq ft purpose-built, dedicated, air traffic management research facility. Established data links to ARTCC, TRACON, Towers, air carriers, airport and NASA facilities. Re-configurable computer labs, dedicated radio tower, state-of-the-art equipment.

  8. An approach to predict water quality in data-sparse catchments using hydrological catchment similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Glendell, Miriam; Stutter, Marc I.; Helliwell, Rachel C.

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of catchment response to climate and land use change at a regional scale is necessary for the assessment of mitigation and adaptation options addressing diffuse nutrient pollution. It is well documented that the physicochemical properties of a river ecosystem respond to change in a non-linear fashion. This is particularly important when threshold water concentrations, relevant to national and EU legislation, are exceeded. Large scale (regional) model assessments required for regulatory purposes must represent the key processes and mechanisms that are more readily understood in catchments with water quantity and water quality data monitored at high spatial and temporal resolution. While daily discharge data are available for most catchments in Scotland, nitrate and phosphorus are mostly available on a monthly basis only, as typified by regulatory monitoring. However, high resolution (hourly to daily) water quantity and water quality data exist for a limited number of research catchments. To successfully implement adaptation measures across Scotland, an upscaling from data-rich to data-sparse catchments is required. In addition, the widespread availability of spatial datasets affecting hydrological and biogeochemical responses (e.g. soils, topography/geomorphology, land use, vegetation etc.) provide an opportunity to transfer predictions between data-rich and data-sparse areas by linking processes and responses to catchment attributes. Here, we develop a framework of catchment typologies as a prerequisite for transferring information from data-rich to data-sparse catchments by focusing on how hydrological catchment similarity can be used as an indicator of grouped behaviours in water quality response. As indicators of hydrological catchment similarity we use flow indices derived from observed discharge data across Scotland as well as hydrological model parameters. For the latter, we calibrated the lumped rainfall-runoff model TUWModel using multiple

  9. North American long-term soil productivity research program

    Treesearch

    Allan E. Tiarks; Marilyn A. Buford; Robert F. Powers; Jerry F. Ragus; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Felix Ponder; Douglas M. Stone

    1997-01-01

    The National Long-term Soil Productivity research program was chartered to address National Forest Management Act concerns over possible losses n soil productivity on national forest lands. The program supports validation of soil quality monitoring standards and process-level productivity research. Summarized results are supplied to forests as collected. National...

  10. North American long-term soil productivity research program

    Treesearch

    Allan E. Tiarks; Marilyn A. Buford; Robert F. Powers; Jerry F. Ragus; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Felix, Jr. Ponder; Douglas M. Stone

    1997-01-01

    The National Long-term Soil Productivity research program was chartered to address National Forest Management Act concerns over possible losses in soil productivity on National Forest lands. The program supports validation of soil quality monitoring standards and process-level productivity research. Summarized results are supplied to Forests as collected. National...

  11. Research without external funding in North American psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Silberman, E K; Snyderman, D A

    1997-08-01

    The authors investigated the extent and characteristics of published psychiatric research from U.S. and Canadian medical schools that was carried out without external funding. They reviewed reports of unfunded research in 14 psychiatric journals, tabulating methodological factors and topics of study. They surveyed first authors about their academic duties and resources used in the studies. Unfunded studies represented 26% of research reports, were usually prospective, most commonly dealt with phenomenology/epidemiology or psychopharmacology, used low levels of technology, and were accomplished on a modest budget of time and money. Unfunded studies make a substantial and economically efficient contribution to psychiatric research. Future investigations should detail the institutional conditions necessary to sustain this type of research productivity.

  12. The Development of Research Capability at Private Colleges in North and South Dakota. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, E. Robert

    This final report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of a 3-year cooperative project (Dakota ACCORD) designed to stimulate and support educational research in three private liberal arts colleges located in North and South Dakota. Specific project objectives were: (1) to develop an awareness of research opportunities and skills among the…

  13. 2012 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    2012 represented the third sequential year of research regarding the limited irrigation 12-200 corn production assessment study at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) with the yield results being improved from that of the 2011 season but less than of the 2010 season. The study's purpose was to ev...

  14. A Research Report of the North Carolina Advancement School: Spring Semester 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Advancement School, Winston-Salem.

    This research report of the North Carolina Advancement School includes a description of the selection of students and the instructional program; a statistical analysis of the students; an evaluation of the counseling and instructional programs; a discussion of research in progress; and recommendations. The School's purpose is to carry on…

  15. On Radar Rainfall, Catchment Runoff and the Response Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, E.; Goodrich, D. C.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2001-12-01

    The general research hypothesis is that: "a rainfall event, extreme at a specific scale, has the potential to generate an extreme runoff event in a catchment, which characterized by this response scale". In the presented study, which is a first step in testing this hypothesis, we examine if catchments have a stable response scale in the above context. For that purpose, we compare maximum storm rainfall intensities at different time and space scales with runoff peak discharges in order to determine at what scale these two variables are best related to each other. Three types of rainfall variable are tested: 1) gage rainfall intensity, 2) radar rainfall intensity, and 3) radar reflectivity. Initial results are available for the Walnut Gulch Experimental Catchment, a 150-km2 semi-arid catchment, located in southern Arizona. The catchment is well equipped with dense networks of rainfall and runoff gages. Radar data are also available for the catchment from the Tucson NEXRAD system. Preliminary results indicate a response scale in the order of 6-km and 2-hours for the 150-km2 catchment and for the 126- and 94-km2 sub-catchments. The response scale of a 25-km2 sub-catchment is reduced to 1-km and 20-minutes. The three types of rainfall variable tested point to the same response scale. As mentioned, the above results are initial and based on a limited number of events. We are investigating this hypothesis on a larger number of events as well as additional catchments.

  16. Topic: Catchment system dynamics: Processes and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    In this meeting we can talk about my main expertise: the focus of my research ocus revolves around understanding catchment system dynamics in a holistic way by incorporating both processes on hillslopes as well as in the river channel. Process knowledge enables explanation of the impact of natural and human drivers on the catchment systems and which consequences these drivers have for water and sediment connectivity. Improved understanding of the catchment sediment and water dynamics will empower sustainable land and river management and mitigate soil threats like erosion and off-side water and sediment accumulation with the help of nature's forces. To be able to understand the system dynamics of a catchment, you need to study the catchment system in a holistic way. In many studies only the hillslopes or even plots are studied; or only the channel. However, these systems are connected and should be evaluated together. When studying a catchment system any intervention to the system will create both on- as well as off sites effects, which should especially be taken into account when transferring science into policy regulations or management decisions.

  17. Catchment Classification: Connecting Climate, Structure and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicz, K. A.; Wagener, T.; Sivapalan, M.; Troch, P. A.; Carrillo, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrology does not yet possess a generally accepted catchment classification framework. Such a classification framework needs to: [1] give names to things, i.e. the main classification step, [2] permit transfer of information, i.e. regionalization of information, [3] permit development of generalizations, i.e. to develop new theory, and [4] provide a first order environmental change impact assessment, i.e., the hydrologic implications of climate, land use and land cover change. One strategy is to create a catchment classification framework based on the notion of catchment functions (partitioning, storage, and release). Results of an empirical study presented here connects climate and structure to catchment function (in the form of select hydrologic signatures), based on analyzing over 300 US catchments. Initial results indicate a wide assortment of signature relationships with properties of climate, geology, and vegetation. The uncertainty in the different regionalized signatures varies widely, and therefore there is variability in the robustness of classifying ungauged basins. This research provides insight into the controls of hydrologic behavior of a catchment, and enables a classification framework applicable to gauged and ungauged across the study domain. This study sheds light on what we can expect to achieve in mapping climate, structure and function in a top-down manner. Results of this study complement work done using a bottom-up physically-based modeling framework to generalize this approach (Carrillo et al., this session).

  18. A North Adriatic centenarian: The marine research station at Rovinj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodnik, D.

    1995-03-01

    The institute in Rovinj was founded in 1891 as the field station of the Berlin Aquarium. It soon gained in scientific importance. From 1911, it was governed by various scientific bodies, such as the ‘Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften’, the ‘Reale Comitato Talassografico Italiano’, and the ‘Jugoslavenska Akademija znanosti i umjetnosti’. At present, it is a department of the ‘Ruđer Bo\\vsković’ Institute, called the ‘Center for Marine Research Rovinj’. In the past hundred years, the Rovinj station experienced several ascents and declines in its development: both in the First and Second World Wars the station's scientific equipment, research vessels, library and reference collections were dispersed, and from 1945 1948 the station was closed. But in “happier” periods, rich support by the state and international bodies favoured the increase in research facilities and promoted interest among visiting scientists. The station has always been involved in studies of the Adriatic Sea, especially in its northern part. It contributed much to general knowledge of oceanography, of the physics and chemistry of the sea, but its paramount contribution is to various disciplines of marine biological sciences. Applied research, however, was most oriented to fisheries biology, especially shellfish culture, to resource studies, and, recently, to toxicology, bacteriology, eutrophication and pollution monitoring. The international approach in science and applied research was always favoured. At present, the Center is well equipped for complex coastal and offshore field- and laboratory research, and maintains facilities for graduate and postgraduate teaching. Scientific dissemination is also promoted by the public aquarium and professional meetings.

  19. 2013 North Dakota Transgenic Barley Research and FHB Nursery Report

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research continues to develop and test new transgenic plants using genes provided by collaborators. As lines are developed in Golden Promise, they are crossed to Conlon for field testing. Transgenic lines developed in Conlon are being crossed to resistant lines developed by the breeding programs. ...

  20. Phosphorus and dissolved organic carbon export during peak flow periods in three small homogenous catchments in eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benning, R.; Schwärzel, K.; Feger, K. H.

    2012-04-01

    Regional climate change scenarios for Central Europe predict both an overall increase in temperature and alterations in annual precipitation regimes. For large parts of Central Europe, climate change is expected to result in an increase in winter precipitation and a decrease in summer precipitation. In addition, an increase in extreme conditions, such as heat waves, prolonged drought periods, and heavy rainfall events are predicted. This research examines the potential impacts of increased heavy rainfall events on matter export from small catchment areas, and how different vegetation cover and land management options effects these exports. In order to evaluate the export of matter from different land-use types in the Eastern Ore Mountains (Saxony, NE Germany, 50° 48'18.06" North, 13° 36'24.54" East), study sites were established in three small catchments with homogeneous land-use. These study areas are each sub-catchments of the Ammelsdorf catchment, which provides inflow to the Lehnmühle reservoir (a major water supply for the city of Dresden). Each sub catchment represents one of the three main land-use types in the catchment area of the reservoir: crops (winter oilseed rape, winter wheat), grasslands, and forests (primarily spruce). Since November 2009 the discharge from these sub catchments has been continuously measured and water quality was analyzed on a weekly basis. During peak flow events, discharge was collected using automatic water samplers, which allowed for high temporal resolution analysis of matter export during these periods to be made. During the 2010 and 2011 hydrological years, several heavy rainfall events occurred which have been evaluated. During a 110-hour long precipitation event (P = 170 mm) between 37 and 81 water samples per sub catchment were collected and analyzed. The resulting export of dissolved phosphorus (ortho-PO4-) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the sub catchments during this event is provided in the results. In

  1. Research on water shortage risks and countermeasures in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxiang; Fang, Wenxuan; Wu, Ziqin

    2017-05-01

    In the paper, a grey forecasting model and a population growth model are established for forecasting water resources supply and demand situation in the region, and evaluating the scarcity of water resources thereof in order to solve the problem of water shortage in North China. A concrete plan for alleviating water resources pressure is proposed with AHP as basis, thereby discussing the feasibility of the plan. Firstly, water resources supply and demand in the future 15 years are predicted. There are four sources for the demand of water resources mainly: industry, agriculture, ecology and resident living. Main supply sources include surface water and underground water resources. A grey forecasting method is adopted for predicting in the paper aiming at water resources demands since industrial, agricultural and ecological water consumption data have excessive decision factors and the correlation is relatively fuzzy. Since residents' water consumption is determined by per capita water consumption and local population, a logistic growth model is adopted to forecast the population. The grey forecasting method is used for predicting per capita water consumption, and total water demand can be obtained finally. International calculation standards are adopted as reference aiming at water supply. The grey forecasting method is adopted for forecasting surface water quantity and underground water quantity, and water resources supply is obtained finally. Per capita water availability in the region is calculated by comparing the water resources supply and demand. Results show that per capita water availability in the region is only 283 cubic meters this year, people live in serious water shortage region, who will suffer from water shortage state for long time. Then, sensitivity analysis is applied for model test. The test result is excellent, and the prediction results are more accurate. In the paper, the following measures are proposed for improving water resources condition

  2. Generality of Fractal 1/f Scaling in Catchment Tracer Time Series: Implications for Catchment Travel Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Palucis, M. C.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    The mean travel time - the time that it takes a parcel of rainwater to reach the stream - is a basic parameter used to characterize catchments. More generally, a catchment is characterized by its travel-time distribution, which is described not only by its mean but also its shape. The travel time distribution of water in a catchment is typically inferred from passive tracer time series (typically water isotopes or chloride concentrations) in rainfall and streamflow. The catchment mixes precipitation inputs (and thus passive tracers) falling at different points in time; as a result, tracer fluctuations in streamflow are usually strongly damped relative to precipitation. Mathematically, this mixing of waters of different ages is represented by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation inputs to generate the stream outputs. Previous analyses of both rainfall and streamflow tracer time series from several catchments in Wales have demonstrated that rainfall chemistry spectra resemble white noise, whereas these same catchments exhibit fractal 1/f scaling in stream tracer chemistry over three orders of magnitude. These observations imply that these catchments have an approximate power-law distribution of travel times, and thus they retain a long memory of past inputs. The observed fractal scaling places strong constraints on possible models of catchment behavior: commonly-used exponential or advection-dispersion travel time distribution models do not exhibit fractal scaling. Here we test the generality of the observed fractal scaling of streamflow chemistry, by analyzing long-term tracer time series from 17 other catchments in North America and Europe. Special care is taken to account for the effects of spectral aliasing. We demonstrate that 1/f fractal scaling of stream chemistry is a common feature of these catchments and discuss the implications of this observation to catchment-scale hydrologic modeling. We then present the best-fit travel

  3. Report of the review into the research framework in North Staffordshire.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    This review began because of complaints about the conduct of research studies in the paediatric department of the North Staffordshire Hospital in Stroke-on-Trent. As it progressed other issues were also examined such as diagnosing Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy by the use of covert video surveillance. The following extracts concentrate on research issues, and include the whole of the framework for research governance outlined in the report.

  4. The Practice of Institutional Research. Proceedings of a Joint Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Charlotte, North Carolina, October 29-30, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary P., Ed.; Staman, E. Michael, Ed.

    Proceedings of a 1981 joint conference sponsored by the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research are presented. The conference theme was the practice of institutional research. Contents include preconference workshop reports, speeches, abstracts of papers, and reports of…

  5. The Practice of Institutional Research. Proceedings of a Joint Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Charlotte, North Carolina, October 29-30, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary P., Ed.; Staman, E. Michael, Ed.

    Proceedings of a 1981 joint conference sponsored by the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research are presented. The conference theme was the practice of institutional research. Contents include preconference workshop reports, speeches, abstracts of papers, and reports of…

  6. Transit time estimation using tritium and stable isotopes in a Mediterranean mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig-Planasdemunt, Maria; Stewart, Mike; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Water resources of Mediterranean regions mainly depend on runoff generated in mountain areas. Therefore, study of the time water spends travelling through Mediterranean mountains is important for water resources management as it reflects the ability of catchments to retain and release water. Natural isotopes (tritium and stable isotopes) have been used in different environments to quantify the ages of water within catchments. However, there are relatively few studies of water transit times in Mediterranean mountain regions. Additionally, tritium dating is more common in Southern Hemisphere streams because they were less affected by tritium produced mainly in the North Hemisphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s. With the aim of improving knowledge of the hydrological catchment functioning of Mediterranean mountain areas, this work estimates water transit times in spring water, groundwater and stream water using tritium and stable isotope (δ18O and δ2H) measurements in the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). Tritium measurements from a previous study carried out in 1996-1998 (Herrmann et al., 1999) were supplemented by new samples collected on 3 November 2013. Difficulties with the age interpretation of the tritium measurements arise from the determination of the tritium input function, the different accuracies of the tritium measurements and the ambiguous ages resulting from past input of tritium from nuclear testing to the atmosphere. Water stable isotope samples were collected in rainfall, spring water, groundwater and streamwater at baseflow conditions every 15 days over a 27 month period. Detailed distributed hydrometric measurements (precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, discharge and water table level) were obtained during the same period. Preliminary results using δ18O, δ2H and tritium show that mean transit times in the Cal Rodó catchment (4.2 km2) ranged between 1.3 and 11.6 years. The lowest mean

  7. North American/European Health Systems research Conference,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-16

    California ~~ ENGLAND D D C 1 F ~~iEr~ nr~~~~~ FEB 14 19T8~~ H UNITED ETATEB OF AMERICA APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE ; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED...increases in the costs of operating the Military Health Services System (MEsS) of the United States have exhibited striking parallels to that of the private...contacts with health systems management and research personnel in Britain and France during the trip to and from the meetings offered the opportunity to

  8. What makes catchment management groups "tick"?

    PubMed

    Oliver, P

    2001-01-01

    The work of catchment management groups throughout Australia represents a significant economic and social investment in natural resource management. Institutional structures and policies, the role of on-ground coordinators, facilitation processes, citizen participation and social capital are critical factors influencing the success of catchment management groups. From a participant-researcher viewpoint, this paper signposts research directions and themes that are being pursued from the participant/coordinator, catchment group, and lead government/non-government agency perspective on the influence of these factors on the success of a catchment management group in the Pumicestone Region of Southeast Queensland, Australia. Research directions, themes and discussion/reflection points for practitioners include--the importance of understanding milieu; motivation; success; having fun; "networking networks"; involvement of "nontraditional" stakeholders; development of stakeholder/participant partnerships; learning from other practitioners; methods of stakeholder/participant representation; evaluation; the need for guiding principles or philosophy; the equivalence of planning, implementation, evaluation, and resourcing; catchments as fundamental units of Nature; continuity of support for groups; recognising a new role for government; working with existing networks; and the need for an eclectic approach to natural resource management.

  9. Stormflow generation: A meta-analysis of field evidence from small, forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthold, Frauke K.; Woods, Ross A.

    2015-05-01

    Combinations of runoff characteristics are commonly used to represent distinct conceptual models of stormflow generation. In this study, three runoff characteristics: hydrograph response, time source of runoff water, and flow path are used to classify catchments. Published data from the scientific literature are used to provide evidence from small, forested catchments. Each catchment was assigned to one of the eight conceptual models, depending on the combination of quick/slow response, old/new water, and overland/subsurface flow. A standard procedure was developed to objectively diagnose the predominant conceptual model of stormflow generation for each catchment and assess its temporal and spatial support. The literature survey yielded 42 catchments, of which 30 catchments provide a complete set of qualitative runoff characteristics resulting in one of the eight conceptual models. The majority of these catchments classify as subsurface flow path dominated. No catchments were found for conceptual models representing combinations of quick response-new water-subsurface flow (SSF), slow-new-SSF, slow-old-overland flow (OF) nor new-slow-OF. Of the 30 qualitatively classified catchments, 24 provide a complete set of quantitative measures. In summary, the field support is strong for 19 subsurface-dominated catchments and is weak for 5 surface flow path dominated catchments (six catchments had insufficient quantitative data). Two alternative explanations exist for the imbalance of field support between the two flow path classes: (1) the selection of research catchments in past field studies was mainly to explain quick hydrograph response in subsurface dominated catchments; (2) catchments with prevailing subsurface flow paths are more common in nature. We conclude that the selection of research catchments needs to cover a wider variety of environmental conditions which should lead to a broader, and more widely applicable, spectrum of resulting conceptual models and process

  10. Institutional Research and Strategies for Higher Education Issues in the 1980's and Research Exchange Forum. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (7th, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 1979) and the Drive-In Conference (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Ussery, Robert M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the 1980 Research Search Exchange Drive-In Conference Program, which address the skills needed by institutional researchers to deal with the issues in higher education in the 1980s, are presented. Highlights of the North Carolina association…

  11. Institutional Research and Strategies for Higher Education Issues in the 1980's and Research Exchange Forum. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (7th, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 1979) and the Drive-In Conference (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Ussery, Robert M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the 1980 Research Search Exchange Drive-In Conference Program, which address the skills needed by institutional researchers to deal with the issues in higher education in the 1980s, are presented. Highlights of the North Carolina association…

  12. Labor Market Returns to Community College: Evidence from North Carolina. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive; Liu, Yuen Ting; Trimble, Madeline Joy

    2014-01-01

    In this brief, we summarize our research on the wage returns to community college pathways in North Carolina. We use detailed individual and college transcript information on approximately 830,000 students who attended community college during the 2000s. This transcript data is matched with earnings data from Unemployment Insurance records. We…

  13. Water, water everywhere... integrated riparian research in the North Central Region

    Treesearch

    Lynne M. Westphal

    2003-01-01

    Riparian areas are important for many reasons including timber, residential areas, biodiversity, recreation, and industry. Because of the intricate land/water interface, these lands require special care. Determining what this care should be requires more knowledge than we currently have. Hence, the North Central Research Station (NCRS) has initiated the Sustaining...

  14. The Effect of Terrain Aspect on Interannual Variability of Hydrologic Response in Mountainous Catchments in New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, X.; Troch, P. A.; McIntosh, J. C.; Broxton, P. D.; Brooks, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    The aspect of the land surface in mid and high latitudes control hydrological response through differences in energy fluxes, prevailing winds, snow processes, evaporation and transpiration. In the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) in northern New Mexico, recent research has shown that north facing terrains accumulate thicker snow packs, the snow cover duration is longer, the soil moisture content is higher and hillslopes have longer water transit times. These findings suggest that catchments with a predominant north facing aspect are expected to have more water available and consequently a different hydrological response than catchments characterized by a different land orientation. This poster presents four years (2008-2011) of hydrological data in the VCNP and shows the hydrological response to interannual climate variability in mountainous catchments draining along different aspects. This investigation focuses on three perennial catchments draining Redondo Peak (3435m): La Jara (LJ; 3.67 km2), History Grove (HG; 2.42 km2) and Upper Jaramillo (UJ; 3.06 km2). The three catchments range in elevation between 2680 m and 3429 m. They share similar topographic characteristics, climate, vegetation and a complex geology. The most predominant north facing catchment is UJ; HG and LJ have both a predominant east facing aspect. This study is based on empirical observations of basin response and it has been carried out by way of monitoring physical amount, intensity and timing of water entering and leaving the catchments using the available meteorological data in the region and the instrumented network installed by the Jemez River Basin and Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (http://www.czo.arizona.edu/). The climate in the region is semi-arid, continental and highly variable. For the water years (WY) 2008 and 2011 annual precipitation was 86% and 71% below the mean (P=711.5mm), and during WY 2009 and 2010, annual precipitation was 4% and 1% above the

  15. Estimating gully erosion contribution to large catchment sediment yield rate in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndomba, Preksedis Marco; Mtalo, Felix; Killingtveit, Aanund

    The objective of this paper is to report on the issues and proposed approaches in estimating the contribution of gully erosion to sediment yield at large catchment. The case study is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB) located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. Little has been done by other researchers to study and/or extrapolate gully erosion results from plot or field scale to large catchment. In this study multi-temporal aerial photos at selected sampling sites were used to estimate gully size and morphology changes over time. The laboratory aerial photo interpretation results were groundtruthed. A data mining tool, Cubist, was used to develop predictive gully density stepwise regression models using aerial photos and environment variables. The delivery ratio was applied to estimate the sediment yield rate. The spatial variations of gully density were mapped under Arc View GIS Environment. Gully erosion sediment yield contribution was estimated as a ratio between gully erosion sediment yield and total sediment yield at the catchment outlet. The general observation is that gullies are localized features and not continuous spatially and mostly located on some mountains’ foot slopes. The estimated sediment yield rate from gullies erosion is 6800 t/year, which is about 1.6% of the long-term total catchment sediment yield rate. The result is comparable to other study findings in the same catchment. In order to improve the result larger scale aerial photos and high resolution spatial data on soil-textural class and saturated hydraulic conductivity - are recommended.

  16. School Catchments and Pupil Movements: A Case Study in Parental Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Eddie; Chalkley, Brian; Jones, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the extent to which English parents send their children to out-of-catchment schools and the patterns of students across catchment boundaries. Uses a form of geographic information system as the principal research tool. Reveals that over one third of year seven students attend schools other than their catchment comprehensive. (CMK)

  17. Catchment virtual observatory for sharing flow and transport models outputs: using residence time distribution to compare contrasting catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Zahra; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; Kolbe, Tamara; Abbott, Ben; Marcais, Jean; Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven; Bishop, Kevin; Le Henaff, Geneviève; Squividant, Hervé; Pichelin, Pascal; Pinay, Gilles; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2017-04-01

    The distribution of groundwater residence time in a catchment provides synoptic information about catchment functioning (e.g. nutrient retention and removal, hydrograph flashiness). In contrast with interpreted model results, which are often not directly comparable between studies, residence time distribution is a general output that could be used to compare catchment behaviors and test hypotheses about landscape controls on catchment functioning. In this goal, we created a virtual observatory platform called Catchment Virtual Observatory for Sharing Flow and Transport Model Outputs (COnSOrT). The main goal of COnSOrT is to collect outputs from calibrated groundwater models from a wide range of environments. By comparing a wide variety of catchments from different climatic, topographic and hydrogeological contexts, we expect to enhance understanding of catchment connectivity, resilience to anthropogenic disturbance, and overall functioning. The web-based observatory will also provide software tools to analyze model outputs. The observatory will enable modelers to test their models in a wide range of catchment environments to evaluate the generality of their findings and robustness of their post-processing methods. Researchers with calibrated numerical models can benefit from observatory by using the post-processing methods to implement a new approach to analyzing their data. Field scientists interested in contributing data could invite modelers associated with the observatory to test their models against observed catchment behavior. COnSOrT will allow meta-analyses with community contributions to generate new understanding and identify promising pathways forward to moving beyond single catchment ecohydrology. Keywords: Residence time distribution, Models outputs, Catchment hydrology, Inter-catchment comparison

  18. Land degradation trends in upper catchments and morphological developments of braided rivers in drylands: the case of a marginal graben of the Ethiopian Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Biadgilgn; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Braided rivers have received relatively little attention in research and development activities in drylands. However, they strongly impact agroecology and agricultural activities and thereby local livelihoods. The Raya Graben (3750 km² including the escarpment) is a marginal graben of the Ethiopian Rift Valley located in North Ethiopia. In order to study the dynamics of braided rivers and the relationship with biophysical controls, 20 representative catchments were selected, ranging between 15 and 311 km². First, the 2005 morphology (length, area) of the braided rivers was related to biophysical controls (vegetation cover, catchment area and slope gradient in the steep upper catchments and gradient in the graben bottom). Second, the changes in length of the braided rivers were related to vegetation cover changes in the upper catchments since 1972. Landsat imagery was used to calculate the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and to map vegetation cover and the total length of the braided rivers. Spot CNES imagery available from Google Earth was used to identify the total area of the braided rivers in 2005. A linear regression analysis revealed that the length of braided rivers was positively related to the catchment area (R²=0.32, p<0.01), but insignificantly related to vegetation cover in the upper catchments. However, there is an indication that it is an important factor in the relationship calculated for 2005 (R²=0.2, p=0.064). Similarly, the area occupied by the braided rivers was related to NDVI (R²=0.24, p<0.05) and upper catchment area (R²=0.447, p<0.01). Slope gradient is not an important explanatory factor. This is related to the fact that slope gradients are steep (average of 38.1%) in all upper and gentle (average of 3.4%) in graben bottom catchments. The vegetation cover in the upper catchments shows a statistically insignificant increasing trend (R²=0.73, p=0.067) over the last 40 years, whereas length of rivers in the graben bottom

  19. Studies in Teaching: 2015 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 25, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 20th Annual Research Forum held June 25, 2015, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included are the following 21 action research papers: (1) History Lives! The Use of Simulations in a High School Social Studies Classroom (Lydia Adkins); (2) Using Francophone Music in the High…

  20. Studies in Teaching: 2003 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 10, 2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of an annual educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 10, 2003. A table of contents and 31 research studies of high school teaching are included. The following studies are included: (1) No, Seriously: Humor Use by High School Social Studies Teachers…

  1. Studies in Teaching: 2011 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 15, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of 16th Annual Research Forum held June 15, 2011, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included herein are the following 25 action research papers: (1) The Effects of Prompted Math Journaling on Algebra 1 Students' Achievement and Attitudes (Heidi I. Arnold); (2) Group Work and Attitude…

  2. Studies in Teaching: 2007 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 12, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    These Proceedings document an educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 12, 2007. Table of contents and 23 research studies of high school teaching are included. Each paper contains a literature review, methodology, results, conclusions, and references. Studies include: (1) Cultural…

  3. Studies in Teaching: 2006 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 6, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    These Proceedings document an educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 6, 2006. Table of contents and 27 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: (1) A Study of Teachers' Perceptions of High School Mathematics Instructional Methods (Caroline Adkisson); (2)…

  4. Studies in Teaching: 2005 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 7, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    These Proceedings document an educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 7, 2005. Table of contents and 26 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: (1) Mathematical Reasoning in Multiple Representations: Connections and Confidence (Justin Allman); (2) The…

  5. Studies in Teaching: 2016 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Jun 30, 2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 21st Annual Research Forum held June 30, 2016, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included are the following 11 action research papers: The Use of Mexican Folk Art to Develop Oral and Written Language Ability and Cultural Awareness in the Secondary Spanish Classroom (Antonio…

  6. Studies in Teaching: 2012 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 29, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 17th Annual Research Forum held June 29, 2012, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included herein are the following 25 action research papers: (1) "Reading and Writing": A Study Comparing the Strengths of Peer Review and Visible Author Writing Strategies (Elizabeth Behar); (2)…

  7. Studies in Teaching: 2013 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 26, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 18th Annual Research Forum held June 26, 2013, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included are the following 13 action research papers: (1) Developing Oral Language Ability in the Secondary Spanish Classroom Using the Interpersonal and Presentational Modes of Communication…

  8. An innovative methodology for the prioritization of sub-catchments for flood control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughani, Mohammad; Ghafouri, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Mahmoodreza

    2007-02-01

    Iran is dominated by arid and semi-arid climate with sporadic rainfall which creates seasonal floods and causes considerable damages and occasionally loss of life. The current research with the aim of flood damage reduction presents an innovative applied methodology for spatial optimization of flood control measures based on sub-catchments location. The presented methodology determines the contribution of each sub-catchment to the main catchment outlet flood peak and prioritizes sub-catchments for implementation of flood control measures. For this purpose catchment flood hydrographs are simulated by calibration and evaluation of a hydrologic model. The isochrones of the catchment have been computed and drawn and sub-catchment spatial distribution is investigated in relation to isochronal areas. Considering both spatial distribution and flooding potential of sub-catchments and their combined effects on the flood peak, their contribution to flood peak was modified by implementing flood control measure. Testing of this methodology on an experimental catchment indicated that sub-catchments located near the centroid of the catchment with an area of 64.6 km 2 have the greatest effects on flood peak for the overall catchment with an area of 284.6 km 2. It was concluded that flood control measures should be concentrated in these sub-catchments as the first priority.

  9. IPY to Mark Expansion of Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, B. D.; Eicken, H.; Sheehan, G. W.; Glenn, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Barrow Global Climate Change Research Facility will open to researchers on the North Slope of Alaska during the 2007-08 anniversary of the first IPY. Between 1949 and 1980, arctic researchers were very active on the North Slope and in nearby waters largely because of the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) at Barrow. NARL provided easy access, laboratories and logistical support. NARL was closed in 1981, but particularly during this past decade, Barrow-based arctic research projects have been back on the upswing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) Barrow station was founded during the 1970s, and continues as part of NOAA's five station global network for monitoring atmospheric composition. The North Slope Borough's Department of Wildlife Management (DWM) has for the past 20 years conducted its own research. The DWM also served as logistical provider for growing numbers of arctic researchers without other logistical support. In the late 1990s, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM: DOE's principal climate change research effort) created a Cloud and Radiation Testbed on the North Slope with atmospheric instrumentation at Barrow and Atqasuk. It is now part of the ARM Climate Research Facility, a National User Facility. In response to growing researcher needs, the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium (BASC) was formed in the late 1990s as a non-profit logistical support and community coordinating organization, and received the endorsement of Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation (UIC), NSB and the local community college. BASC provides logistical support to National Science Foundation (NSF) researchers through a cooperative agreement, and to others on a fee for service basis. UIC also dedicated 11 square miles of its land as the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), and charged BASC with management of the BEO. This land that has been used for research for more

  10. Critical uncertainties and research needs for the restoration and conservation of native lampreys in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the literature, queried selected researchers, and drew upon our own experience to describe some critical uncertainties and research needs for the conservation and restoration of native lampreys in North America. We parsed the uncertainties and research needs into five general categories: (1) population status; (2) systematics; (3) passage at dams, screens, and other structures; (4) species identification in the field; and (5) geneal biology and ecology. For each topic, we describe why the subject is important for lampreys, briefly smmarize our current state of knowledge, and discuss the key data or information gaps.

  11. Magnitudes and Sources of Catchment Sediment: When A + B Doesn't Equal C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The export of land-based sediments to receiving waters can cause degradation of water quality and habitat, loss of reservoir capacity and damage to reef ecosystems. Predictions of sources and magnitudes generally come from simulations using catchment models that focus on overland flow processes at the expense of gully and channel processes. This is not appropriate for many catchments where recent research has shown that the dominant erosion sources have shifted from the uplands and fields following European Settlement, to the alluvial valleys today. Still, catchment models which fail to adequately address channel and bank processes are still the overwhelming choice by resource agencies to help manage sediment export. These models often utilize measured values of sediment load at the river mouth to "calibrate" the magnitude of loads emanating from uplands and fields. The difference between the sediment load at the mouth and the simulated upland loading is then proportioned to channel sources.Bank erosion from the Burnett River (a "Reef Catchment" in eastern Queensland) was quantified by comparisons of bank-top locations and by numerical modeling using BSTEM. Results show that bank-derived sediment contributes between 44 and 73% of the sediment load being exported to the Coral Sea. In comparison reported results from a catchment model showed bank contributions of 8%. In absolute terms, this is an increase in the reported average, annual rate of bank erosion from 0.175 Mt/y to 2.0 Mt/y.In the Hoteo River, New Zealand, a rural North Island catchment characterized by resistant cohesive sediments, bank erosion was found to contribute at least 48% of the total specific yield of sediment. Combining the bank-derived, fine-grained loads from some of the major tributaries gives a total, average annual loading rate for fine material of about 10,900 t/y for the studied reaches in the Hoteo River System. If the study was extended to include the lower reaches of the main stem

  12. Building International Research Partnerships in the North Atlantic-Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benway, Heather M.; Hofmann, Eileen; St. John, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The North Atlantic-Arctic region, which is critical to the health and socioeconomic well being of North America and Europe, is susceptible to climate-driven changes in circulation, biogeochemistry, and marine ecosystems. The need for strong investment in the study of biogeochemical and ecosystem processes and interactions with physical processes over a range of time and space scales in this region was clearly stated in the 2013 Galway Declaration, an intergovernmental statement on Atlantic Ocean cooperation (http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-13-459_en.htm). Subsequently, a workshop was held to bring together researchers from the United States, Canada, and Europe with expertise across multiple disciplines to discuss an international research initiative focused on key features, processes, and ecosystem services (e.g., Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, spring bloom dynamics, fisheries, etc.) and associated sensitivities to climate changes.

  13. Constitution of a catchment virtual observatory for sharing flow and transport models outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Zahra; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; Kolbe, Tamara; Abbott, Benjamin W.; Marçais, Jean; Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven; Bishop, Kevin; Pichelin, Pascal; Pinay, Gilles; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2016-12-01

    Predicting hydrological catchment behavior based on measurable (and preferably widely available) catchment characteristics has been one of the main goals of hydrological modelling. Residence time distributions provide synoptic information about catchment functioning and can be useful metrics to predict their behaviors. Moreover, residence time distributions highlight a wide range of characteristic scales (spatial and temporal) and mixing processes. However, catchment-specific heterogeneity means that the link between residence time distributions and catchment characteristics is complex. Investigating this link for a wide range of catchments could reveal the role of topography, geology, land-use, climate and other factors in controlling catchment hydrology. Meaningful comparison is often challenging given the diversity of data and model structures and formats. To address this need, we are introducing a new virtual platform called Catchment virtual Observatory for Sharing flow and transport models outputs (COnSOrT). The goal of COnSOrT is to promote catchment intercomparison by sharing calibrated model outputs. Compiling commensurable results in COnSOrT will help evaluate model performance, quantify inter-catchment controls on hydrology, and identify research gaps and priorities in catchment science. Researchers interested in sharing or using calibrated model results are invited to participate in the virtual observatory. Participants may test post-processing methods on a wide range of catchment environments to evaluate the generality of their findings.

  14. Resilience of catchment sediment yield to climate perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Wiel, Marco; Lipkowski, Emily

    2015-04-01

    It is commonly thought that catchment sediment yield is largely governed by allogenic controls acting on the catchment. Under this paradigm, variations in climatic, tectonic or anthropogenic forcing are directly transmitted to the catchment sediment yield. The sediment yield thus represents a temporal signature of the governing external forces. This paradigm, however, has been challenged by recent research, which has shown that autogenic controls from within the catchment can significantly affect and, in some cases, overwrite the allogenic signal in the sediment yield signal. In these cases the catchment sediment yield can be considered to be resilient to external perturbation. On the other hand, it also has been shown that, in some other cases, the allogenic signal can indeed be transmitted efficiently through the catchment, without too much distortion by the autogenic controls. In these latter cases, the sediment yield signal, and hence the downstream sediment deposits, can be a reliable archive of past environmental forcing. This study uses computer simulation to investigate the autogenic resilience of catchment sediment yields. Specifically, it investigates allogenic signal preservation in catchment sediment yield in the context of climate signals. It is hypothesized that 1) the resilience of the catchment sediment yield signal is largely determined by the catchment's spatial heterogeneity (of topography, vegetation, soil properties, ...) and the external signal's temporal heterogeneity and amplitude; and 2) catchment resilience is inversely correlated with spatial heterogeneity and positively correlated with the temporal heterogeneity and amplitude of the allogenic signal. This hypothesis is tested using a set of similar catchments, but with different relief ranges, different levels of topographic smoothness, different sediment distributions, and different artificial vegetation covers. These catchments are subjected to a range of rainfall scenarios over a 300

  15. North American deep underground laboratories: Soudan Underground Laboratory, SNOLab, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past several decades, fundamental physics experiments have required access to deep underground laboratories to satisfy the increasingly strict requirements for ultra-low background environments and shielding from cosmic rays. In this presentation, I summarize the existing and anticipated physics programs and laboratory facilities of North America's deep facilities: The Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, SNOLab in Ontario, Canada, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

  16. How old is upland catchment water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Harald; Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water supply catchments is an essential part of water management. Upland catchments provide a continuous, reliable source of high quality water not only for some of the world's biggest cities, but also for agriculture and industry. Headwater streams control river flow in lowland agricultural basins as the majority of river discharge emerges from upland catchments. Many rivers are perennial and flow throughout the year, even during droughts. However, it is still unclear how reliable and continuous upland catchment water resources really are. Despite many efforts in upland catchment research, there is still little known about where the water is stored and how long it takes to travel through upper catchments. Resolving these questions is crucial to ensure that this resource is protected from changing land use and to estimate potential impacts from a changing climate. Previous research in this important area has been limited by existing measurement techniques. Knowledge to date has relied heavily on the use of variation in stable isotope signals to estimate the age and origin of water from upland catchments. The problem with relying on these measures is that as the water residence time increases, the variation in the stable isotope signal decreases. After a maximum period of four years, no variation can be detected This means that to date, the residence time in upland catchments is likely to have been vastly underestimated. Consequently, the proportion of water flow out of upland river catchments to the total river flow is also underestimated. Tritium (3H) combines directly with water molecules and enters the flow paths with the infiltrating water. Its half-life (12.32 years) makes it ideal to describe residence times in upper catchment reservoirs as it can theoretically measure water up to about 150 years old. The bomb pulse peak in the southern hemisphere was several orders of magnitude lower than in the northern hemisphere. Hence the

  17. Action research to strengthen women weavers' self-care in North-East Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nilvarangkul, Kessarawan; Srithongchai, Niramol; Saensom, Donwiwat; Smith, John F; Supornpan, Ausa; Tumnong, Chuanpit

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this research was to improve self-care and work safety practices among women weavers in North-East Thailand. Action research was used with a sample of 107 weavers and 15 community and local government stakeholders from six rural villages. Formative and summative evaluation was carried out over 10 months following initial implementation of five action plans, and after 5 years. Qualitative data were collected via focus groups, formal and informal interviews and research field notes. Women's self-care issues and safety problems, and weaving-related environmental pollution emerged from the content analyses. Five action plans were created. Results showed that through action research the women were empowered to identify personal and work-related health issues, environmental contamination concerns, and lack of social and community support systems. Over time they developed capacity for working collectively to address these. Five year follow-up revealed many of the changes made were ongoing, and well-integrated into community life. The study reaffirmed the potential for public health or community nurses and other health personnel for enhancing community health status via action research with vulnerable populations; in this case, rural village women weavers in North-East Thailand. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ecological research priorities for energy crops in the north central states

    SciTech Connect

    Ugoretz, S.M.; Rineer, K.C.

    1996-12-31

    Stakeholders and experts in the fields of biomass energy, agriculture, and ecology have identified ecological research priorities to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically-sound, sustainable manner. It has been recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied to biomass development in phases that would incorporate increasingly larger biomass plantations. Each phase of development could answer questions about landscape-scale change to improve the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture have been recommended for biomass plantations to maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy while minimizing adverse impacts to soils, water quality, and wildlife. At this time, it is early enough in the deployment of biomass technologies in the North Central states to apply the principles of sustainable agriculture and landscape ecological planning as an important part of the process. Many questions about ecological impacts need to be answered, but there is no need to wait until the component elements have been researched one by one. Applying an adaptive research management framework can allow research to proceed along with technology implementation by establishing feedback loops between research, policy, and development.

  19. Thirty years of North American wind energy acceptance research: What have we learned?

    DOE PAGES

    Rand, Joseph; Hoen, Ben

    2017-05-25

    Thirty years of North American research on public acceptance of wind energy has produced important insights, yet knowledge gaps remain. This review synthesizes the literature, revealing the following lessons learned. (1) North American support for wind has been consistently high. (2) The NIMBY explanation for resistance to wind development is invalid. (3) Socioeconomic impacts of wind development are strongly tied to acceptance. (4) Sound and visual impacts of wind facilities are strongly tied to annoyance and opposition, and ignoring these concerns can exacerbate conflict. (5) Environmental concerns matter, though less than other factors, and these concerns can both help andmore » hinder wind development. (6) Issues of fairness, participation, and trust during the development process influence acceptance. (7) Distance from turbines affects other explanatory variables, but alone its influence is unclear. (8) Viewing opposition as something to be overcome prevents meaningful understandings and implementation of best practices. (9) Implementation of research findings into practice has been limited. The paper also identifies areas for future research on wind acceptance. With continued research efforts and a commitment toward implementing research findings into developer and policymaker practice, conflict and perceived injustices around proposed and existing wind energy facilities might be significantly lessened.« less

  20. Tracer-based assessment of flow paths, storage and runoff generation in northern catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Buttle, Jim; Carey, Sean K.; McGuire, Kevin; Laudon, Hjalmar; Soulsby, Chris

    2015-04-01

    We examine how tracer studies have enhanced our understanding of flow paths, residence times and sources of stream flow in northern catchments. We define northern catchments as non-glacial sites in the temperate conifer/boreal/permafrost zone, focussing mainly on sites in North America and Europe. Improved empirical and theoretical understanding of hydrological functioning has advanced the analytical tools available for tracer-based hydrograph separations, derivation of transit time distributions and tracer-aided rainfall-runoff models that are better able to link hydrological response to storage changes. However, the lack of comprehensive tracer data sets still hinders development of a generalized understanding of how northern catchments will respond to change. This paucity of empirical data leads to many outstanding research needs, particularly in rapidly changing areas that are already responding to climatic warming and economic development. To continually improve our understanding of hydrological processes in these regions our knowledge needs to be advanced using a range of techniques and approaches. Recent technological developments for improved monitoring, distributed hydrological sensor systems, more economic analysis of large sample numbers in conjunction with novel, tracer-aided modelling approaches and the use of remote sensing have the potential to help understanding of northern hydrological systems as well as inform policy at a time of rapid environmental change.

  1. Nesting doctoral students in collaborative North-South partnerships for health systems research.

    PubMed

    Loukanova, Svetla; Prytherch, Helen; Blank, Antje; Duysburgh, Els; Tomson, Göran; Gustafsson, Lars L; Sié, Ali; Williams, John; Leshabari, Melkizedeck; Haefeli, Walter E; Sauerborn, Rainer; Fonn, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    Background The European Union (EU) supports North-South Partnerships and collaborative research projects through its Framework Programmes and Horizon 2020. There is limited research on how such projects can be harnessed to provide a structured platform for doctoral level studies as a way of strengthening health system research capacity in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Objective The aim of this study was to explore the challenges of, and facilitating factors for, 'nesting' doctoral students in North-South collaborative research projects. The term nesting refers to the embedding of the processes of recruiting, supervising, and coordinating doctoral students in the overall research plan and processes. Design This cross-sectional qualitative study was undertaken by the EU-funded QUALMAT Project. A questionnaire was implemented with doctoral students, supervisors, and country principal investigators (PIs), and content analysis was undertaken. Results Completed questionnaires were received from nine doctoral students, six supervisors, and three country PIs (86% responses rate). The doctoral students from SSA described high expectations about the input they would receive (administrative support, equipment, training, supervision). This contrasted with the expectations of the supervisors for proactivity and self-management on the part of the students. The rationale for candidate selection, and understandings of the purpose of the doctoral students in the project were areas of considerable divergence. There were some challenges associated with the use of the country PIs as co-supervisors. Doctoral student progress was at times impeded by delays in the release of funding instalments from the EU. The paper provides a checklist of essential requirements and a set of recommendations for effective nesting of doctoral students in joint North-South projects. Conclusion There are considerable challenges to the effective nesting of doctoral students within major collaborative research

  2. Nesting doctoral students in collaborative North-South partnerships for health systems research.

    PubMed

    Loukanova, Svetla; Prytherch, Helen; Blank, Antje; Duysburgh, Els; Tomson, Göran; Gustafsson, Lars L; Sié, Ali; Williams, John; Leshabari, Melkizedeck; Haefeli, Walter E; Sauerborn, Rainer; Fonn, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The European Union (EU) supports North-South Partnerships and collaborative research projects through its Framework Programmes and Horizon 2020. There is limited research on how such projects can be harnessed to provide a structured platform for doctoral level studies as a way of strengthening health system research capacity in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The aim of this study was to explore the challenges of, and facilitating factors for, 'nesting' doctoral students in North-South collaborative research projects. The term nesting refers to the embedding of the processes of recruiting, supervising, and coordinating doctoral students in the overall research plan and processes. This cross-sectional qualitative study was undertaken by the EU-funded QUALMAT Project. A questionnaire was implemented with doctoral students, supervisors, and country principal investigators (PIs), and content analysis was undertaken. Completed questionnaires were received from nine doctoral students, six supervisors, and three country PIs (86% responses rate). The doctoral students from SSA described high expectations about the input they would receive (administrative support, equipment, training, supervision). This contrasted with the expectations of the supervisors for proactivity and self-management on the part of the students. The rationale for candidate selection, and understandings of the purpose of the doctoral students in the project were areas of considerable divergence. There were some challenges associated with the use of the country PIs as co-supervisors. Doctoral student progress was at times impeded by delays in the release of funding instalments from the EU. The paper provides a checklist of essential requirements and a set of recommendations for effective nesting of doctoral students in joint North-South projects. There are considerable challenges to the effective nesting of doctoral students within major collaborative research projects. However, ways can be found to overcome

  3. Picturing and modelling catchments by representative hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle; Jackisch, Conrad; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling studies often start with a qualitative sketch of the hydrological processes of a catchment. These so-called perceptual models are often pictured as hillslopes and are generalizations displaying only the dominant and relevant processes of a catchment or hillslope. The problem with these models is that they are prone to become too much predetermined by the designer's background and experience. Moreover it is difficult to know if that picture is correct and contains enough complexity to represent the system under study. Nevertheless, because of their qualitative form, perceptual models are easy to understand and can be an excellent tool for multidisciplinary exchange between researchers with different backgrounds, helping to identify the dominant structures and processes in a catchment. In our study we explore whether a perceptual model built upon an intensive field campaign may serve as a blueprint for setting up representative hillslopes in a hydrological model to reproduce the functioning of two distinctly different catchments. We use a physically-based 2D hillslope model which has proven capable to be driven by measured soil-hydrological parameters. A key asset of our approach is that the model structure itself remains a picture of the perceptual model, which is benchmarked against a) geo-physical images of the subsurface and b) observed dynamics of discharge, distributed state variables and fluxes (soil moisture, matric potential and sap flow). Within this approach we are able to set up two behavioral model structures which allow the simulation of the most important hydrological fluxes and state variables in good accordance with available observations within the 19.4 km2 large Colpach catchment and the 4.5 km2 large Wollefsbach catchment in Luxembourg without the necessity of calibration. This corroborates, contrary to the widespread opinion, that a) lower mesoscale catchments may be modelled by representative hillslopes and b) physically

  4. Geoscience Research Drilling Office Operations I: the North INYO Drilling Program, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, P.

    1986-05-01

    The North Inyo Drilling Program was part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program/Thermal Regimes and it was put forth by the Department of Energy/Office of Basic Energy Sciences to explore roots of a 600 year old volcanic system which is found in the north-west corner of Long Valley Caldera, California. The responsibility of the Geoscience Research Drilling Office was to provide logistical support to the scientific drilling team. This support consisted of obtaining the necessary permits, obtaining a drilling contract and providing field services involving logging and core handling/laboratory facilities. The first portion of this program was successful when hole RDO-2b traversed the conduit which fed Obsidian Dome; the second portion succeeded when RDO-3a traversed the dike underlying the Inyo Chain of volcanoes.

  5. Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin information status and research planning meeting.

    SciTech Connect

    LaGory, K. E.; Krummel, J. R.; Hayse, J. W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Stull, E. A.; Gorenflo, L.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-26

    gathering of relevant literature; (2) synthesis and summary of the literature; and (3) identification and prioritization of information needs. To assist in gathering this information, MMS convened the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting, held in Anchorage, Alaska, from November 28 through December 1, 2006; this report presents a summary of that meeting. The meeting was the primary method used to gather input from stakeholders and identify information needs and priorities for future inventory, monitoring, and research related to potential leasing and oil and gas developments in the North Aleutian Basin.

  6. Catchment Systems Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. F.; Wilkinson, M. E.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.

    2012-04-01

    within a catchment to take responsibility for the water quantity and quality that arises from the catchment. Further, any holistic solution requires a bottom up, problem solving agenda which is facilitated by policy makers and is underpinned by scientific knowledge. http:\\research.ncl.ac.ukproactive

  7. Energy versus Water balance in a small agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Martine; Hogan, Patrick; Foken, Thomas; Blöschl, Günter

    2013-04-01

    research on spatial analysis of evaporation on the catchment scale.

  8. Quantitative reconstruction of past soil erosion in the Kirschgraben catchment (Spessart mountains, Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Annegret; Bork, Hans-Rudolf; Nelle, Oliver; Müller, Ulrich; Fuchs, Markus; Fuelling, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    An important problem in Holocene landscape reconstruction is quantifying the relative roles of climatic change and human impact. This project aims to quantify and mass-balance sediment flux in high temporal and spatial resolution, therefore a relatively small gully catchment (Kirschgraben) in the low mountain range Spessart (Germany, Lower Franconia) was chosen as a research area. The catchment is 42 ha in size and total relief is ~200 m. Bedrock is composed of Bunter Sandstone, large areas of which are loess mantled. In the intersection between Kirschgraben fan and the alluvial plain of the Elsava River a moated archaeological site was recently excavated. On the basis of process-based stratigraphy and preliminary chronology, a detailed sequence of landscape changes can be interpreted. Gully incision into Pleistocene sand and gravel sediments during early Holocene resulted in rapid fan development. Non-deposition on the fan surface and minor infilling of the gully system suggests relative catchment stability persisted during prehistoric times, at least until the early iron ages, when human occupation of the fan surface is first recorded. The first evidence of human impact, although minor, is represented by thin colluvial layers on the lower slopes during late Neolithic period. Subsequently, almost the entire catchment has been under agricultural use from the early medieval periods on, and well preserved within field terraces along ancient tenure borders. These features demonstrate widespread and intensive soil loss from the slopes, and eroded material is also preserved in various sediment traps within the catchment. Charcoal production in the catchment probably began at the same time as the widespread soil loss, and lasted until ca. 1900 AD. Anthracological investigations provide the opportunity to reconstruct the vegetation composition on a local scale, and is combined with paleobotanical macro remains and pollen analysis. Initial results indicate a rotating wood

  9. Using scenarios of North Slope energy and resource development to assess research and monitoring needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Significant Arctic environmental and socio-economic change has been observed on the North Slope of Alaska, presenting challenges for resident communities and management agencies that need to adapt to future changes that are difficult to model or predict. Continued climate change coupled with new or modified energy development could substantially alter the landscape and ecosystem in the future. The North Slope Science Initiative (NSSI) recognized the value of using a participatory scenarios process to consider plausible future energy and resource development scenarios through the year 2040 to help identify and prioritize research and monitoring needs on the North Slope. The scenarios process engaged diverse stakeholders, including subject matter experts and local knowledge holders. Through identification and ranking of key drivers and uncertainties relevant to the focus of the study, a series of spatially explicit scenarios was developed, analyzed in terms of low, medium and high development activities. Climate change and economic factors were key drivers affecting plausible energy development scenarios. The implications from each of the scenarios were then used to identify important research and monitoring activities and their relevant spatial scales. The scenarios project identified over 40 research and monitoring needs. The top five research needs addressed data gaps and key concerns related to how the scenarios could affect: hunting and trapping on land, health and community well-being, permafrost and hydrology, marine mammal subsistence and potential marine oil spills. The use of a participatory scenarios process was essential for identifying a range of plausible energy and resource development scenarios using a framework that involved a systematic assessment of complex interacting drivers of change, consideration of key uncertainties, and transparency throughout the project.

  10. Introduction to the North Pacific Research Board Gulf of Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Research Program (GOAIERP): Volume I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Danielle M. S.; Baker, Matthew R.

    2016-10-01

    The North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) supports research to address pressing fishery management and ecosystem information needs in the marine waters of Alaska. Understanding dynamics at the scale of ecosystems requires integrated approaches that explore underlying mechanistic processes and interactions. It also requires analytic approaches that investigate the influence, cause, effect, and relative importance of various phenomena and drivers in determining ecosystem structure, processes and biophysical interactions. To address ecosystem-level hypotheses and questions at this scale, NPRB developed the Integrated Ecosystem Research Program (IERP). These programs employ multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional approaches to investigating ecosystem processes. The aim is to provide a basis for understanding core processes and to provide information and products that have targeted application to management priorities.

  11. The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Hemond, H.F.; Charles, D.F.; Norton, S.A.

    1993-03-05

    A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

  12. The Role of Institutional Research in Institutional Governance. Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (8th, Wrightsville, North Carolina, November 12-24, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research, which focused on the role of institutional research in institutional governance, are presented. Contents are as follows: "The Role of Institutional Research in Academic Program Evaluation: An Overview" (Dennis R. Hengstler); "The Role of Institutional…

  13. The Role of Institutional Research in Institutional Governance. Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (8th, Wrightsville, North Carolina, November 12-24, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research, which focused on the role of institutional research in institutional governance, are presented. Contents are as follows: "The Role of Institutional Research in Academic Program Evaluation: An Overview" (Dennis R. Hengstler); "The Role of Institutional…

  14. Thresholds in Subsurface Flow Generation: An Intercomparison of Three Different Headwater Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjerdt, K. N.; McGlynn, B.; Tromp-van Meerveld, I.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hooper, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    Dynamic thresholds in catchment response and subsurface stormflow initiation are poorly understood. This remains a problem for the generalization and transferability of hydrologic models, as well as for the simulation of catchment response under variable antecedent and input conditions. Threshold processes appear to operate both spatially and temporally within a catchment and introduce non-linearity to the system response function. We present a catchment intercomparison to illustrate the common features of threshold dynamics at the hillslope and catchment scales. While our overall goal is to generalize a model structure to work in humid areas where storm response is dominated by subsurface flow, cross-comparing internal catchment dynamics is a necessary prerequisite in order to define first order controls on the generation of subsurface stormflow across different landscape types. We analyzed physical data series collected from three catchments with extremely diverse climatic and physical characteristics: (1) Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA; (2) Panola Mountain Research Watershed in central Georgia, USA; and (3) Maimai Watershed on the South Island of New Zeeland. The physical data series included continuous runoff, soil moisture probes, wells, piezometers and, for some catchments, tensiometers and hillslope trench flow. We calculated indices that characterized the timing, magnitude and duration of subsurface response in relation to stream discharge for a large number of events within each catchment. Analysis of these indices across space and time revealed distinguishable patterns of threshold behavior in the different catchments and our presentation will demonstrate the value of catchment intercomparision in this regard.

  15. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  16. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  17. Catchments of general practice in different countries– a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area. This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  18. Runoff Variability in Field-scale Catchments and the Implications for Rainffall-Runoff Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shuster, W.

    2004-12-01

    In this study long-term rainfall runoff records for two agricultural catchments (ca. 0.5 ha) in the USDA - Agricultural Research Service North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (Coshocton, OH) network were used to address the inter-event and inter-catchment variability of field-scale runoff processes. Through analyses of flood frequency and flow duration, the adjacent fallowed watersheds (WS106 and WS121) were found to be similar in terms of annual flood peaks, but less so in terms of the distribution of their discharge rates. Further investigation was focused on event-scale variations of runoff response and whether these variations can be effectively captured by rainfall-runoff models, which included: a) TR-20 (a lumped model); b) EPA-SWMM (a semi-distributed model); and c) GSSHA (a grid-based, fully distributed model). Each model was used to simulate 41 selected runoff episodes recorded in each of the two catchments, and subsequently calibrated to yield parameter values that maximize the correlation between the simulated and observed runoff peaks. Our results indicate that, despite calibration, the hydrographs derived from all models deviated considerably from actual observations, and on the basis of inter-event fluctuations, which furthermore lacked a conspicuous dependence on the magnitude of runoff peaks. Our findings suggest that, in the absence of information on rainfall distribution and soil moisture, distributed models may not be superior to lumped ones in forecasting runoff responses of field scale catchments; and the correspondence between runoff mechanisms and model representations needs to be better understood and accounted for in order to limit the uncertainties of model predictions.

  19. Quantifying catchment water balances and their uncertainties by expert elicitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebok, Eva; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Warmink, Jord J.; Stisen, Simon; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    The increasing demand on water resources necessitates a more responsible and sustainable water management requiring a thorough understanding of hydrological processes both on small scale and on catchment scale. On catchment scale, the characterization of hydrological processes is often carried out by calculating a water balance based on the principle of mass conservation in hydrological fluxes. Assuming a perfect water balance closure and estimating one of these fluxes as a residual of the water balance is a common practice although this estimate will contain uncertainties related to uncertainties in the other components. Water balance closure on the catchment scale is also an issue in Denmark, thus, it was one of the research objectives of the HOBE hydrological observatory, that has been collecting data in the Skjern river catchment since 2008. Water balance components in the 1050 km2 Ahlergaarde catchment and the nested 120 km2 Holtum catchment, located in the glacial outwash plan of the Skjern catchment, were estimated using a multitude of methods. As the collected data enables the complex assessment of uncertainty of both the individual water balance components and catchment-scale water balances, the expert elicitation approach was chosen to integrate the results of the hydrological observatory. This approach relies on the subjective opinion of experts whose available knowledge and experience about the subject allows to integrate complex information from multiple sources. In this study 35 experts were involved in a multi-step elicitation process with the aim of (1) eliciting average annual values of water balance components for two nested catchments and quantifying the contribution of different sources of uncertainties to the total uncertainty in these average annual estimates; (2) calculating water balances for two catchments by reaching consensus among experts interacting in form of group discussions. To address the complex problem of water balance closure

  20. Water Catchment and Storage Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenig, Michael; Dunbabin, Matt; Moore, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and Sensor Networks technologies provide the means for comprehensive understanding of natural processes in the environment by radically increasing the availability of empirical data about the natural world. This step change is achieved through a dramatic reduction in the cost of data acquisition and many orders of magnitude increase in the spatial and temporal granularity of measurements. Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is undertaking a strategic research program developing wireless sensor network technology for environmental monitoring. As part of this research initiative, we are engaging with government agencies to densely monitor water catchments and storages, thereby enhancing understanding of the environmental processes that affect water quality. In the Gold Coast hinterland in Queensland, Australia, we are building sensor networks to monitor restoration of rainforest within the catchment, and to monitor methane flux release and water quality in the water storages. This poster will present our ongoing work in this region of eastern Australia. The Springbrook plateau in the Gold Coast hinterland lies within a World Heritage listed area, has uniquely high rainfall, hosts a wide range of environmental gradients, and forms part of the catchment for Gold Coast's water storages. Parts of the plateau are being restored from agricultural grassland to native rainforest vegetation. Since April 2008, we have had a 10-node, multi-hop sensor network deployed there to monitor microclimate variables. This network will be expanded to 50-nodes in February 2010, and to around 200-nodes and 1000 sensors by mid-2011, spread over an area of approximately 0.8 square kilometers. The extremely dense microclimate sensing will enhance knowledge of the environmental factors that enhance or inhibit the regeneration of native rainforest. The final network will also include nodes with acoustic and image sensing capability for

  1. Incidental Computer Tomography Radiologic Findings through Research Participation in the North Texas Healthy Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Anna; Malone, Kendra; Balyakina, Elizabeth; Fulda, Kimberly G.; Cardarelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Although variation exists in the classification and practice of managing clinical findings in research, emerging views suggest that researchers bear some responsibility in the management of incidental findings. This study contributes to the documentation of the population characteristics and prevalence of medical findings incidental to research participation, specifically findings related to coronary calcium scores and computed tomography (CT) scans that investigated cardiovascular disparities in an asymptomatic population. Methods A total of 571 asymptomatic adult participants were recruited in the North Texas Healthy Heart Study. Participants completed a 16-slice CT scan of the heart and abdomen. Findings of radiology reports and 3 years of follow-up documentation were reviewed. Results A total of 246 clinically apparent findings were identified in 169 asymptomatic participants (32.9% of participants who completed a CT scan). Another 245 participants (48%) had findings of unknown significance, a total of 307 findings. At least 4 cases in this study led to a clinically significant intervention. Conclusion Although CT scans were completed for research purposes, study procedures resulted in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals who were previously asymptomatic. Potential clinical benefits in imaging research are moderated by considerations regarding possible harm and costs resulting from uncertain findings and the use of CT scans for nonclinical purposes. The continued development of protocols for the handling of incidental findings in research and the establishment of guidelines are needed to ensure that research procedures mirror the best interests of participants. PMID:24808109

  2. Hydrological Catchment Similarity Assessment in Geum River Catchments, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ara; Park, Kisoon; Lee, Hyosang

    2013-04-01

    Similarity measure of catchments is essential for regionalization studies, which provide in depth analysis in hydrological response and flood estimations at ungauged catchments. However, this similarity measure is often biased to the selected catchments and is notclearly explained in hydrological sense. This study applied a type of hydrological similarity distance measure-Flood Estimation Handbook to 25 Geum river catchments, Korea. Three Catchment Characteristics, Area (A)-Annual precipitation (SAAR)-SCS Curve Number (CN), are used in Euclidian distance measures. Furthermore, six index of Flow Duration Curve (ILow:Q275/Q185, IDrought:Q355/Q185, IFlood:Qmax/Q185, IAbundant:Q95/Q185, IFloodDuration:Q10/Q355 and IRiverRegime:Qmax/Qmin) are applied to clustering analysis of SPSS. The catchments' grouping of hydrological similarity measures suggests three groups: H1 (Cheongseong, Gidae, Bukil, Oksan, Seockhwa, Habgang and Sangyeogyo), H2 (Cheongju, Guryong, Ugon, Boksu, Useong and Seokdong) and H3 (Muju, Yangganggyo and YongdamDam). The four catchments (Cheoncheon, Donghyang, DaecheongDam and Indong) are not grouped in this study. The clustering analysis of FDC provides four Groups; CFDC1 (Muju, YongdamDam, Yangganggyo, DaecheongDam, Cheongseong, Gidae, Seokhwa, Bukil, Habgang, Cheongju, Oksan, Yuseong and Guryong), CFDC2 (Cheoncheon, Donghyang, Boksu, Indong, Nonsan, Seokdong, Ugon, Simcheon, Useong and Sangyeogyo), CFDC3 (Songcheon) and CFDC4 (Tanbu). The six catchments (out of seven) of H1 are grouped in CFDC1, while Sangyeogyo is grouped in CFDC2. The four catchments (out of six) of H2 are also grouped in CFDC2, while Cheongju and Guryong are grouped in CFDC1. The catchments of H3 are categorized in CFDC1. The authors examine the results (H1, H2 and H3) of similarity measure based on catchment physical descriptors with results (CFDC1 and CFDC2) of clustering based on catchment hydrological response. The results of hydrological similarity measures are supported by

  3. Downward approach at the catchment scale or at the catchment set scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, C.; Andréassian, V.; Le Moine, N.

    2009-04-01

    examples drawn from our past and current research activities based on large data sets. Surprisingly, the level of model complexity that could be achieved following this approach is quite low, which may indicate that the current understanding of the main features of hydrological catchment behaviour is not as good as many models may suggest (Michel et al., 2006). We hope that this communication will stimulate discussion on this issue and encourage more hydrologists to work on large sets of catchments (Andréassian et al., 2006). References: Andréassian, V., Hall, A., Chahinian, N., Schaake, J. (2006). Introduction and synthesis: Why should hydrologists work on a large number of basin data sets? IAHS Publication n° 307, 1-5. Klemes, V. (1983). Conceptualisation and scale in hydrology. Journal of Hydrology, 65, 1-23. Michel, C., Perrin, C., Andréassian, V. Oudin, L. and Mathevet, T. (2006). Has basin scale modelling advanced far beyond empiricism, IAHS Publication n° 307, 108-116. Sivakumar, B. (2008). Dominant processes concept, model simplification and classification framework in catchment hydrology, Stoch. Envrion. Res. Risk. Assess., 22, 737-748. Sivapalan, M., Blöschl, G., Zhang, L. and Vertessy, R. (2003). Downward approach to hydrological prediction. Hydrological Processes, 17, 2101-2111.

  4. Protected areas in the North Sea: An absolute need for future marine research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeboom, H. J.

    1995-03-01

    There are many signals that different human activities affect the marine ecosystem on local and sometimes regional scales. There is evidence that in the Dutch sector of the North Sea at least 25 species have decreased tremendously in numbers or have totally disappeared. But what has caused their disappearance: fisheries, pollution, eutrophication, climatic changes, or a combination of causes? On the Dutch Continental Shelf, the fisheries are now so intensive that every square metre is trawled, on an average, once to twice a year. Furthermore, it has been shown that trawling causes direct damage to the marine ecosystem. This indicates that the “natural” North Sea ecosystem we are studying is already a heavily influenced system. And what is the value of data on the diversity and production of benthic animals, if the research area has been raked by beamtrawl gear an unknown amount of times before sampling? To be able to study the natural trends in the marine ecosystem, or to answer the question which human activity has most influenced the ecosystem, there is an absolute and immediate need for protected areas to be established. The size of the protected areas must be determined by the behaviour of that species characteristic for the area. In such areas, where fisheries and local pollution would be forbidden or very limited, scientific research into the species composition and age distribution of different populations should be carried out and trends should be established.

  5. Institutional Research: New Challenges to an Evolving Role. Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (13th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 26-28, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Bayard, Comp.

    New challenges facing the institutional research profession are covered in these 1986 conference proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Paper titles and authors include: "Institutional Research at Mercer County Community College: The Changing Role in the Eighties" (F. L. Edwards); "Course Placement and Academic…

  6. Variability of Snow Ablation: Consequences for Runoff Generation at the Process Scale and Lessons for Large Cold Regions Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Carey, S. K.; Granger, R. J.; Hedstrom, N. R.; Janowicz, R.; Pietroniro, A.; Quinton, W. L.

    2002-12-01

    The supply of water to large northern catchments such as the Mackenzie and Yukon Rivers is dominated by snowmelt runoff from first order mountain catchments. In order to understand the timing, peak and duration of the snowmelt freshet at larger scale it is important to appreciate the spatial and temporal variability of snowmelt and runoff processes at the source. For this reason a comprehensive hydrology study of a Yukon River headwaters catchment, Wolf Creek Research Basin, near Whitehorse, has focussed on the spatial variability of snow ablation and snowmelt runoff generation and the consequences for the water balance in a mountain tundra zone. In northern mountain tundra, surface energetics vary with receipt of solar radiation, shrub vegetation cover and initial snow accumulation. Therefore the timing of snowmelt is controlled by aspect, in that south facing slopes become snow-free 4-5 weeks before the north facing. Runoff generation differs widely between the slopes; there is normally no spring runoff generated from the south facing slope as all meltwater evaporates or infiltrates. On the north facing slope, snowmelt provides substantial runoff to hillside macropores which rapidly route water to the stream channel. Macropore distribution is associated with organic terrain and discontinuous permafrost, which in turn result from the summer surface energetics. Therefore the influence of small-scale snow redistribution and energetics as controlled by topography must be accounted for when calculating contributing areas to larger scale catchments, and estimating the effectiveness of snowfall in generating streamflow. This concept is quite distinct from the drainage controlled contributing area that has been found useful in temperate-zone hydrology.

  7. Controls on suspended sediment, particulate and dissolved organic carbon export from two adjacent catchments with contrasting land-uses, Exmoor UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendell, M.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    The fluvial export of total organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) plays an important role in the transportation of organic carbon from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems, with implications for the understanding of the global carbon cycle and calculations of regional carbon budgets. The terrestrial biosphere contains large amounts of stored carbon in the soil and vegetation, thus a small change in the terrestrial carbon pool may have significant implications for atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Since the onset of agriculture, human activities have accelerated soil erosion rates 10- to 100- fold above all estimated natural background levels, especially in the uplands and at lower latitudes, whilst increasing DOC concentrations over the past decades have been reported in rivers across Western Europe and North America, raising concerns about potential destabilisation of the terrestrial soil carbon pool. The increased input of fine sediment and organic carbon into aquatic environments is also an important factor in stream water quality, being responsible for direct ecological effects as well as transport of a range of contaminants. Many factors, such as topography, hydrological regime and vegetation are known to influence the fluvial export of carbon from catchments. However, most work to date has focused on DOC losses from either forested or peaty catchments, with only limited studies examining the controls and rates of TOC (dissolved and particulate) fluxes from agricultural catchments, particularly during flood events. This research aims to: • Quantify the fluxes of total suspended sediment, total dissolved and total particulate carbon in two adjacent catchments with contrasting land-uses and • Examine the controlling factors of total fluvial carbon fluxes in a semi-natural and agricultural catchment in order to assess the impact of agricultural land-use on fluvial carbon export. The two contrasting study catchments (the Aller and Horner), in south

  8. The "Teflon basin" myth: Snow-soil interactions in mountain catchments in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. W.; Cowie, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In much of western North America, snow and snowmelt provide the primary means for storage of winter precipitation, effectively transferring water from the relatively wet winter season to the typically dry summers. A common assumption is that high-elevation catchments in the western United States behave like "Teflon basins" and that water released from seasonal storage in snow packs flows directly into streams with little or no interaction with underlying soils. Here I present information from a variety of catchments in the Colorado Front Range on snowmelt/soil interactions using isotopic, geochemical, nutrient and hydrometric data in 2- and 3- component hydrograph separations, along with end-member mixing analysis (EMMA). For most catchments we measured these parameters in weekly precipitation, the seasonal snowpack, snowmelt before contact with the ground, discharge, springs, soil solution, and groundwater. We ran EMMA at the catchment scale for catchments that represent the rain-snow transition zone in the montane forest, the seasonally snow covered sub-alpine to alpine transition zone, and a high-elevation alpine zone near the continental divide. In all catchments three end-members were the source waters for about 95% of discharge. Two end-members were the same in all catchments, snow and groundwater. For the alpine catchment talus springs was the third water source, while rain was the third water source in the two lower-elevation catchments. For all three catchments, soil solution plotted with stream waters along or near a line connecting the snow and groundwater end-members. Thus, for seasonally snow-covered catchments from montane to alpine ecosystems, snowmelt infiltrates underlying soils before snowmelt recharges groundwater reservoirs and contributes to surface flows. Seasonally snow-covered catchments are not Teflon basins. Rather, snowmelt infiltrates soils where solute concentrations are changed by biological and geochemical processes.

  9. The topographic wetness index as a predictor for hot spots of DOC export from catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Oosterwoud, Marieke; Tittel, Jörg; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the discharge of many catchments in Europe and North America are rising. This increase is of concern for the drinking water supply from reservoirs since high DOC concentrations cause additional costs in water treatment and potentially the formation of harmful disinfection by-products. A prerequisite for understanding this increase is the knowledge on the spatial distribution of dominant soil DOC sources within catchments and on mobilization as well as transfer processes to the surface water. A number of studies identified wetland soils as the dominant source with fast mobilization and short transit times to the receiving surface water. However, most studies have either focussed on smaller, hillslope and single catchment or on larger scale multi-catchment assessments. Moreover, information on the distribution of soil types in catchments is not always readily available. This study brings together both types of assessment in a data-driven top-down approach: (i) a detailed survey on DOC concentration and loads over the course of one year within two paired data-rich catchments discharging into a large drinking water reservoir in central Germany and (ii) a database of hydrochemistry and physio-geographic characteristics of 113 catchments draining into 58 reservoirs across Germany over the course of 16 years. The objective is to define hot spots of DOC export within the catchments for both types of assessments (i, ii) and to test the suitability of the topographic wetness index (TWI) as a proxy for well-connected wetland soils at various spatial scales. In the sub-catchments of assessment (i) the spatial variability of concentrations and loads was much smaller than expected. None of the studied sub-catchments was a predominant producer of the total DOC loads exported from the catchments. We found the mean concentrations and loads to be positively correlated with the share of groundwater-dominated soils in the sub-catchments

  10. Institutional Context of Carbon Cycle Science Research in the U.S. and North America - A SOCCR perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Ste-Marie, C.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon cycle science has been a research priority in the U.S. for decades. Interagency coordination interests and research needs in U.S. carbon cycle science led to the establishment of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, the North American Carbon Program (NACP), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program (OCB) and other intergovernmental collaboration platforms such as CarboNA, involving the U.S., Mexico and Canada. This presentation highlights some of these activities, and the historical context, the institutional frameworks and the operational mechanisms that have helped to facilitate and advance large scale collaborative research in carbon cycle in the U.S. and North America.

  11. Research On The Methodology of Seismic Density and Seismic Characteristics In North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian

    We aim at researching on seismic characteristics of small and moderate earthquakes recorded by instruments, its relationship with strong earthquakes in order to determine the strong earthquake risk sites demanded by long-medium term earthquake prediction and seismic hazard analysis. In North China, since 1970 abundant data of moderate and small earthquakes have been recorded. In the same spatial-temporal interval there were several strong earthquakes. These data are very good to research on seismic characteristics of small earthquakes and its relationship with strong earthquakes. Owing to phenomeno-logic and intrinsic limitation in seismic research, firstly we introduce a quantitative method to deal with seismic patterns in North China. With the quantitative seismic patterns we can compare variation of seismicity in different regions and time periods systematically. For certain magnitude bin and time period, characteristics of epicenter distribution might be denseness or sparseness. To reflect the characteristics reasonably it should embody number and convergence of earthquakes simultaneously. We have defined the seismic density at a grid node of epicenter distribution in each magnitude bin Vj,m,t. Calculation of density at a grid node is : in the region we delineate grids with distant? ; put the jth node of the grid as the center, rm is radius; and within the spatial-temporal and magnitude interval, number of earthquakes is n, the density at the jth node Vj,m,t should be: n Vj = 1 ,m,t Ln i=1 (Di ) e=Di =rm (1) In the formula Ln( ) is Napierian logarithm, Di expresses the distance from ith epicenter to jth node. The mean of formula (1) is that density at jth node is summation of reciprocals of the distances from epicenters to jth node for each earthquake in the region. The density is direct to number of earthquakes and inverse to the distance. Ln(D) reduces affection of the distance owing to accuracy of epicenter. For the region, with given temporal interval

  12. A Research Study on the Projected Impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on Texas Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Albert; And Others

    This report estimates the number of recent immigrant students that would enroll in Texas public schools as a result of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and recommends educational strategies to address the unique needs of recent immigrants. Research approaches included a review of existing research on immigration trends and…

  13. Multiple-method approaches for quantifying fine sediment dynamics in river catchments over contemporary timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the patterns and processes of contemporary fine sediment dynamics in river catchments constitutes a key research challenge for catchment scientists. Such knowledge has considerable value for the targeting of management resources to reduce excess fine sediment supply and its impacts on water resources and aquatic ecosystems. Many past studies tended to focus on a single compartment of the fine sediment cascade and utilised a limited range of research methods. For more holistic understanding, the use of multiple-method approaches is required to provide data on the sources, transfer, storage, and transit times of fine sediment in river catchments. Such approaches would allow scientists to better conceptualise catchment processes controlling the movement of fine sediment across a range of spatial scales. It may also enhance the scientific quality of catchment-scale studies through the acquisition of multiple lines of evidence concerning a particular research problem. The specific combination of fine sediment tracing and fingerprinting procedures with catchment sediment flux measurements and sediment budget modelling has considerable potential to enhance our knowledge of contemporary sediment dynamics. This combination of techniques offers complementary information and the opportunity to compare datasets, such as estimates of catchment sediment source contributions obtained using sediment tracers with direct measurements of sediment fluxes or catchment model outputs. This contribution explores the potential for such combinations of methods to yield distinctive insights not otherwise available from the use of only one of these techniques. It draws on published examples of multiple-method studies by the author from small agricultural and wildfire-affected forest catchments (1-2 km2) in south-east Australia and from larger agricultural river catchments (38-920 km2) in south-west England. It will also identify possible directions for catchment research based

  14. A tentative of Holocene sediment budget for the Seulles catchment (western France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Vincent; Lespez, Laurent; Delahaye, Daniel; Le Gouee, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Geomorphological and paleoenvironmental researches on Holocene sedimentation in the valleys of Normandy provide evidence for fluvial system changes related to climate and human activities in the Paris basin. Alluvial and colluvial deposits are important as archives of past environments changes. They can be used to construct the temporal frameworks for historical erosion and to give an indication of the past erosion processes. Few studies attempts to make long-term soil erosion and sediment storage in the valley bottom in North-western France. This work put into forward results of a research on Holocene sediment budget. This study focuses in the Seulles catchment (430 km²), located in Normandy at the junction between the Armorican massif (upstream part) and the sedimentary Paris Basin (downstream part). In order to reconstruct the Holocene sediment budget, different approaches were used to quantify sediment deposit within the floodplain, soil erosion rates and colluvial deposition. To characterize and quantify the sediment storage into the valley bottoms, 32 partial or complete cross-sections, regularly placed along the valley bottom, were established. These field investigations allow to evaluate the global bulk of fluvial sediment storage into the catchment. In a second step, the assessment of dry bulk densities permits to convert volumetric data into weight. To establish the chronology of the alluvial filling, 6 drilling cores were realized on selected cross-sections to sample organic material content for AMS radiocarbon dating. In total, 38 dates were obtained at the catchment scale and numerous are in process. In the same way, we evaluated Holocene slope erosion and sediment storage using soils profiles descriptions determined from auger coring transects of two small catchments (15 Km²). Results demonstrate the existence until 2500 BP of two morpho-sedimentary units (a model related to sediments dynamics into the catchment and a second one related to the

  15. Assessing the role of urban developments on storm runoff response through multi-scale catchment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Owen, Gareth; Geris, Josie; Soulsby, Chris; Quinn, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Many communities across the world face the increasing challenge of balancing water quantity and quality issues with accommodating new growth and urban development. Urbanisation is typically associated with detrimental changes in water quality, sediment delivery, and effects on water storage and flow pathways (e.g. increases in flooding). In particular for mixed rural and urban catchments where the spatio-temporal variability of hydrological responses is high, there remains a key research challenge in evaluating the timing and magnitude of storage and flow pathways at multiple scales. This is of crucial importance for appropriate catchment management, for example to aid the design of Green Infrastructure (GI) to mitigate the risk of flooding, among other multiple benefits. The aim of this work was to (i) explore spatio-temporal storm runoff generation characteristics in multi-scale catchment experiments that contain rural and urban land use zones, and (ii) assess the (preliminary) impact of Sustainable Drainage (SuDs) as GI on high flow and flood characteristics. Our key research catchment, the Ouseburn in Northern England (55km2), has rural headwaters (15%) and an urban zone (45%) concentrated in the lower catchment area. There is an intermediate and increasingly expanding peri-urban zone (currently 40%), which is defined here as areas where rural and urban features coexist, alongside GIs. Such a structure is typical for most catchments with urban developments. We monitored spatial precipitation and multiscale nested (five gauges) runoff response, in addition to the storage dynamics in GIs for a period of 6 years (2007-2013). For a range of events, we examined the multiscale nested runoff characteristics (lag time and magnitude) of the rural and urban flow components, assessed how these integrated with changing land use and increasing scale, and discussed the implications for flood management in the catchment. The analyses indicated three distinctly different

  16. Making Organisms Model Human Behavior: Situated Models in North-American Alcohol Research, 1950-onwards

    PubMed Central

    Leonelli, Sabina; Ankeny, Rachel A.; Nelson, Nicole C.; Ramsden, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Argument We examine the criteria used to validate the use of nonhuman organisms in North-American alcohol addiction research from the 1950s to the present day. We argue that this field, where the similarities between behaviors in humans and non-humans are particularly difficult to assess, has addressed questions of model validity by transforming the situatedness of non-human organisms into an experimental tool. We demonstrate that model validity does not hinge on the standardization of one type of organism in isolation, as often the case with genetic model organisms. Rather, organisms are viewed as necessarily situated: they cannot be understood as a model for human behavior in isolation from their environmental conditions. Hence the environment itself is standardized as part of the modeling process; and model validity is assessed with reference to the environmental conditions under which organisms are studied. PMID:25233743

  17. Making organisms model human behavior: situated models in North-American alcohol research, since 1950.

    PubMed

    Ankeny, Rachel A; Leonelli, Sabina; Nelson, Nicole C; Ramsden, Edmund

    2014-09-01

    We examine the criteria used to validate the use of nonhuman organisms in North-American alcohol addiction research from the 1950s to the present day. We argue that this field, where the similarities between behaviors in humans and non-humans are particularly difficult to assess, has addressed questions of model validity by transforming the situatedness of non-human organisms into an experimental tool. We demonstrate that model validity does not hinge on the standardization of one type of organism in isolation, as often the case with genetic model organisms. Rather, organisms are viewed as necessarily situated: they cannot be understood as a model for human behavior in isolation from their environmental conditions. Hence the environment itself is standardized as part of the modeling process; and model validity is assessed with reference to the environmental conditions under which organisms are studied.

  18. Research on Dynamic Stress Triggering at Chinese North-South Seismic Belt in Recent Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic stress triggering refers to the influence induced by one earthquake to the nearby and remote seismic activity, including static stress triggering and dynamic stress triggering. Scientists have studied static stress triggering for a long time and have got lots of achievement. However, the researches of dynamic stress triggering were scarce. The time we actually researched on seismic dynamic stress triggering was after the Landers earthquake in 1992, USA. Due to the superiority of dynamic stress triggering in explaining remote triggering, it has been developing rapidly in recent years. China locates between the Pacific Ocean seismic zone and the Asia-Europe seismic zone, so Chinese mainland and its periphery has more strong shocks. Although Chinese seismologists study seismic dynamic stress triggering later, it is necessary to study seismic dynamic stress triggering in China. In order to explore Chinese seismic dynamic stress triggering, we take Chinese North-South seismic belt as an example in this article. With the method of calculating seismic dynamic stress, we researched the triggered situation of some strong earthquakes in Chinese North-South seismic belt: calculate stress tensor and coulomb stress in triggered area, including M8.0 earthquake of 2000 in Sumatra triggered M5.8 earthquake of Jingtai in Gansu and M6.5 earthquake of Burma, M7.9 earthquake of 2003 in border of China, Russia and Mongolia triggered M6.1 earthquake of Minle-Shandan and M5.2 earthquake of Minxian in Gansu, M8.7 earthquake of 2004 in Sumatra triggered M5.1 earthquake of Shuangbai and M5.1 earthquake of Simao in Yunnan. The results show that the dynamic stress peak value on triggered fault produced by several strong shocks all exceeds to triggering threshold value. All in all, the earthquake activity is triggered easily in the North-South seismic belt, but the earthquakes in different area have different triggering effect in the North-South seismic belt, probably influenced by the

  19. Steps to overcome the North-South divide in research relevant to climate change policy and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Malgorzata; Smithers, Richard J.; Kuchler, Magdalena; Agrawal, Ganesh K.; Gutiérrez, José M.; Hassanali, Ahmed; Huq, Saleemul; Koller, Silvia H.; Marjit, Sugata; Mshinda, Hassan M.; Masjuki, Hj Hassan; Solomons, Noel W.; Staden, Johannes Van; Mikusiński, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    A global North-South divide in research, and its negative consequences, has been highlighted in various scientific disciplines. Northern domination of science relevant to climate change policy and practice, and limited research led by Southern researchers in Southern countries, may hinder further development and implementation of global climate change agreements and nationally appropriate actions. Despite efforts to address the North-South divide, progress has been slow. In this Perspective, we illustrate the extent of the divide, review underlying issues and analyse their consequences for climate change policy development and implementation. We propose a set of practical steps in both Northern and Southern countries that a wide range of actors should take at global, regional and national scales to span the North-South divide, with examples of some actions already being implemented.

  20. Evolving the linkages between North American Monsoon Experiment research and services in the binational monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. J.

    2007-05-01

    Multi-year drought, high interannual precipitation variability, and rapid population growth present major challenges to water resources and land managers in the U.S. Southwest and binational monsoon region. The NAME strategy to improve warm season precipitation forecasts is paying off in the understanding of the system and its potential predictability, illustrated by a special issue of the Journal of Climate with about 25 articles and numerous other published papers (e.g. Higgins and Gochis et al. 2006; Gutzler et al. 2004, Higgins et al. 2003). NOAA now has set a goal to NAME and other initiatives also have the potential to provide key insights, such as historic information regarding onset and overall strength of the monsoon as it affects stakeholder interests in flooding, soil moisture, vegetation health, and summer water demand. However, the usual avenues for scientific output, such as peer-reviewed publications and web sites designed for use by climate and weather experts, do not adequately support the flow of knowledge to operational decisionmakers. A recent workshop on Monsoon Region climate Applications in Guaymas, Sonora identified several areas in which monsoon science might contribute to reducing societal vulnerability, as well as some research findings that are suited to transition into model development and operations at service providers including NOAA and SMN. They recommended that products are needed that interpret climate forecasts for water resource management applications, and developing new regionally-tailored climate information products. This presentation will discuss how to enhance the flow of monsoon information and predictions to stakeholders by linking user-oriented perspectives with research results from NAME and other programs, including a new effort for a North American Monsoon Forecast Forum which plans to develop periodic consolidated North American Monsoon outlooks.

  1. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  2. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  3. Institutional Research and Creative Change. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (6th, Cooperstown, New York, October 14-16, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Papers from the 1979 annual meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research are presented. The theme of the conference was institutional research and creative change. Part One, Budget/Cost Analysis, contains papers on academic income-cost models for institutional planning, a budget incentive factor within declining enrollments,…

  4. Studies in Teaching 1999 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    This publication presents a collection of research projects presented at the Annual Research Forum at Wake Forest University: "The Use of Group Work as an Effective Teaching Technique in Lower Level Spanish Classes" (James Blackburn); "What Are the Real Factors behind Student Motivation?" (Matthew Grey Burdick); "Can…

  5. The catchment based approach using catchment system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Quinn, Paul; Barber, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The catchment based approach (CaBa) has been championed as a potential mechanism for delivery of environmental directives such as the Water Framework Directive in the UK. However, since its launch in 2013, there has been only limited progress towards achieving sustainable, holistic management, with only a few of examples of good practice ( e.g. from the Tyne Rivers trust). Common issues with developing catchment plans over a national scale include limited data and resources to identify issues and source of those issues, how to systematically identify suitable locations for measures or suites of measures that will have the biggest downstream impact and how to overcome barriers for implementing solutions. Catchment System Engineering (CSE) is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of hydrological flow pathways throughout the catchment. A significant component of the runoff generation can be managed by targeting hydrological flow pathways at source, such as overland flow, field drain and ditch function, greatly reducing erosive soil losses. Coupled with management of farm nutrients at source, many runoff attenuation features or measures can be co-located to achieve benefits for water quality and biodiversity. A catchment, community-led mitigation measures plan using the CSE approach will be presented from a catchment in Northumberland, Northern England that demonstrate a generic framework for identification of multi-purpose features that slow, store and filter runoff at strategic locations in the landscape. Measures include within-field barriers, edge of field traps and within-ditch measures. Progress on the implementation of measures will be reported alongside potential impacts on the runoff regime at both local and catchment scale and costs.

  6. Integrating the UAS in Undergraduate Teaching and Research - Opportunities and Challenges at University of North Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J. B.; Hulsey, D.

    2014-11-01

    The University of North Georgia (UNG) has begun to evaluate both fixed and rotary UAS platforms across the departments to evaluate their potential for furthering both student learning experiences and undergraduate research. A research project of the Institute for Spatial Analysis (IESA) at UNG has acquired the fixed wing eBee UAS and is currently piloting its integration into the undergraduate geospatial science curriculum. Limited very low altitude, line of sight calibration runs within areas of our campus have help us understand the capabilities that this technology brings to learning and research opportunities at UNG. In our pilot area of study on the UNG Gainesville Campus, we will collect overlapping imagery and generate 3-D models. These models will be compared with models based on LiDAR data. Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) methods are essential to the analysis of voluminous high resolution UAS data and the associated computational and regulatory issues are discussed. Several future interdisciplinary projects are envisaged with the eBee UAS and this project helps establish their viability.

  7. Lessons learned for applying a paired-catchment approach in drought analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Loon, Anne; Rangecroft, Sally; Coxon, Gemma; Agustín Breña Naranjo, José; Van Ogtrop, Floris; Croghan, Danny; Van Lanen, Henny

    2017-04-01

    Ongoing research is looking to quantify the human impact on hydrological drought using observed data. One potentially suitable method is the paired-catchment approach. Paired catchments have been successfully used for quantifying the impact of human actions (e.g. forest treatment and wildfires) on various components of a catchment's water balance. However, it is unclear whether this method could successfully be applied to drought. In this study, we used a paired-catchment approach to quantify the effects of reservoirs, groundwater abstraction and urbanisation on hydrological drought in the UK, Mexico, and Australia. Following recommendations in literature, we undertook a thorough catchment selection and identified catchments of similar size, climate, geology, and topography. One catchment of the pair was affected by either reservoirs, groundwater abstraction or urbanisation. For the selected catchment pairs, we standardised streamflow time series to catchment area, calculated a drought threshold from the natural catchment and applied it to the human-influenced catchment. The underlying assumption being that the differences in drought severity between catchments can then be attributed to the anthropogenic activity. In some catchments we had local knowledge about human influences, and therefore we could compare our paired-catchment results with hydrological model scenarios. However, we experienced that detailed data on human influences usually are not well recorded. The results showed us that it is important to account for variation in average annual precipitation between the paired catchments to be able to transfer the drought threshold of the natural catchment to the human-influenced catchment. This can be achieved by scaling the discharge by the difference in annual average precipitation. We also found that the temporal distribution of precipitation is important, because if meteorological droughts differ between the paired catchments, this may mask changes caused

  8. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  9. Comparison of three statistical downscaling methods for precipitation in the Hérault and Ebro catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Sylvain; Vrac, Mathieu; Ruelland, Denis; Dezetter, Alain

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the GICC project "REMedHE" (http://www.remedhe.org) is to evaluate and compare the evolution of water supply capacity under climatic and anthropogenic changes by 2050 on two Mediterranean catchments: the Hérault (South of France) and the Ebro (North East of Spain) catchments. Indeed, the Mediterranean region has been identified as a "hot spot" of climate change, especially for precipitation which is expected to globally decrease while water needs should continue to increase. To perform such a study, it is then necessary to simulate future water flows with hydrological models fed by high-resolution precipitation data representative of the future climate. To generate high-resolution climate simulations, three different statistical downscaling approaches have been applied. The first one consists in a deterministic transfer function based on a Generalized Additive Model (GAM). The second method involves a Stochastic Weather Generator (SWG), simulating local values from probability density functions conditioned by large-scale predictors. The third approach belongs to the "Model Output Statistics" (MOS) family, in bias correcting the large-scale distributions with respect to the local-scale ones, through the Cumulative Distribution Function transform CDFt approach. These statistical downscaling models were calibrated and cross-validated using the SAFRAN dataset (for Hérault catchment), a dataset compiled by HydroSciences Montpellier (for Ebro catchment) as local-scale reference and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis outputs as predictors, over two time periods 1959-1984 and 1985-2010. Cross-validation analysis shows that the inter-annual variability of the yearly sum of precipitation from GAM is close to that from SAFRAN. However, daily variability and occurrence frequency are badly represented by GAM. On the opposite, SWG and one version of CDFt allow both the inter-annual and

  10. Study on Catchment Runoff Variations and Possible Responds to Climate Change and Human Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, J.; Chen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Under the influence of global climate change and human activities,the spatial-temporal distribution of precipitation has changed significantly which drives catchment hydrological processes changes.To better understand the characteristic and causes of runoff variations at different periods which would impacts catchment flood disaster risk, the Utaphao catchment is studied whichis a typical catchment in southern Thailand.Based on daily hydrological data from 1971 to 2014,selecting representative raingauges and stream gauging stations from the catchment as research stations. Using the methods of Mann-Kendall test and serial cluster analysis, this paper studied the characteristics and laws of historical hydrological process in Utaphao catchment, detects the impact of changing environment to watershed hydrological processes,the results show that the runoff and precipitation havesome kinds of changes.

  11. Research Spotlight: Using satellite data to estimate the North Atlantic Ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-03-01

    By redistributing heat and freshwater around the planet, ocean currents play a crucial role in regulating Earth's climate. Accurate knowledge of the subtle regional variations in Earth's gravity field is fundamental to the measurement of ocean currents, but the challenge of mapping Earth's gravity in sufficient detail has previously limited scientists' ability to reliably determine the ocean's time-mean circulation. To address this problem, in October 2009 the European Space Agency launched the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite with the aim of mapping Earth's gravity field with unprecedented spatial resolution. Bingham et al. present an initial assessment of the performance of GOCE by using the first data from the satellite to estimate the time-mean circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. This basin is particularly interesting because it contains the Gulf Stream, the world's strongest current and a key component of the global overturning circulation, which carries heat from the equator to high northerly latitudes. The scientists show that with just 2 months of observations, the GOCE estimate of the North Atlantic circulation is superior to that obtained from 8 years of data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite. In many places, the current speeds estimated from the GOCE data compare well with those obtained from in situ observations, providing strong validation of the GOCE mission design. Accumulation of data as the mission progresses could lead to a more accurate and detailed map of the ocean's currents. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045633, 2011)

  12. Priorities for ecological research of energy crops in the North Central states

    SciTech Connect

    Ugoretz, S.M.; Rineer, K.C.; Downing, M.

    1995-11-01

    Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March, 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecological sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

  13. Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states

    SciTech Connect

    Ugoretz, S.M.; Rineer, K.C.; Downing, M.

    1995-07-26

    Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

  14. Studies in Teaching 2001 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.

    This collection of research projects includes: "What Types of Questions Do Mathematics Teachers Ask?" (Cynthia L. Adams); "Will Alternate Assessment Formats Create a Difference in Student Motivation to Study?" (Robyn J. Allen); "Factors Affecting the Motivation of Students" (Dejon J. Banks); "The Dynamics of…

  15. Studies in Teaching 2001 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.

    This collection of research projects includes: "What Types of Questions Do Mathematics Teachers Ask?" (Cynthia L. Adams); "Will Alternate Assessment Formats Create a Difference in Student Motivation to Study?" (Robyn J. Allen); "Factors Affecting the Motivation of Students" (Dejon J. Banks); "The Dynamics of…

  16. Progress in the identification of catchments with co-existent multiple steady states and finite resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, T. J.; Western, A. W.; Thyer, M. A.; Frost, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrology has implicitly assumed that catchments are infinitely resilient to droughts and floods. No matter the magnitude of the climatic disturbance, almost all hydrological models simulate full recovery and hence assume infinite resilience. Recent research shows that catchments can undergo fundamental change during major droughts and this change in behavior is not captured by rainfall-runoff models. To date, the field of hydrological resilience has relied on theoretical deterministic models or vague resilience concepts, with the identification of catchments with multiple steady states (henceforth, attractors) remaining elusive. This is primarily due to the challenges stochastic forcing introduces into quantifying disturbance and recovery, and because resilience theory does not adequately address stochastic forcing. Drawing from recent hydrological resilience theory on catchment disturbance and recovery, a data-driven hidden Markov model is proposed for identifying recovery to a different hydrological state following major climatic disturbances. Application to selected unregulated catchments within Victoria, Australia, shows that after the Millennium Drought (~1995-2010) some catchments are yet to recover and have persisted within a functionally different hydrological state compared to that prior to the drought. Conversely, some catchments fully recovered at the cessation of the drought. This provides the first known field evidence that some catchments may have multiple attractors. Additionally, catchments are shown to differ in their resistance to the drought, with some catchments switching to a drought state at the commencement of the meteorological drought while other catchments taking ~10 years to switch to a hydrological drought state. In addition to separating hydrological droughts from meteorological droughts, this research provides a pathway for quantifying catchment resilience and resistance to climatic disturbances.

  17. Human-Landscape interaction in cultivated lowland catchments (Louroux catchment, Loire Valley, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdan, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Gay, Aurore; Salvador Blanes, Sébastien; Evrard, Olivier; Desmet, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Change of land use or agricultural practices are known to have high impacts on sediment transfer in catchments and rivers. Numerous studies have particularly illustrated these effects in sloping land in tropical areas undergoing deforestation. Much less attention has been paid to lowland humid areas, where permanent land uses have been plowed more recently. However recent studies reported significant erosion rates in these environments despite the gentle topography and the temperate climate. In order to quantify these changing fluxes of sediment, several instrumentation and historical database analyses were carried out in various catchments of the Loire Valley, France. More particularly, a multiparameter analysis was conducted on sedimentary deposits of a pond created in the 11th century in a catchment representative of cultivated and drained lowland environments where an intensification of agricultural practices has occurred during the last 60 years. The results showed that the initial land consolidation period (1954-1960) was characterized by a dominance of allochtonous material input to the pond. This input represents an erosion of 1900 to 2300 t.km-².yr-1 originating from the catchment. Then, between 1970-1990, terrigenous material flow decreased progressively and tended to stabilize, whereas eutrophication and associated primary production increased in the pond. In addition to these temporal changes, material input across the pond during the last 10 years corresponds to a loss of material in the catchment ranging between 90 and 102 t.km-2.yr-1. While a strong decrease is observed, it still represents a 60-fold increase of the sediment fluxes to the pond compared to the preintensification period. Subsequent research monitoring studies permitted to differentiate between the different sources of sediment and highlight the importance of surface erosion during flood events and of bank erosion during low flows. The increased export of the sediment is primarily due

  18. Modeller's attitude in catchment modelling: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Ten modellers have been invited to predict, independently from each other, the discharge of the artificial Chicken Creek catchment in North-East Germany for simulation period of three years, providing them only soil texture, terrain and meteorological data. No data concerning the discharge or other sources of state variables and fluxes within the catchment have been provided. Modellers had however the opportunity to visit the experimental catchment and inspect areal photos of the catchments since its initial development stage. This study has been a unique comparative study focussing on how different modellers deal with the key issues in predicting the discharge in ungauged catchments: 1) choice of the model structure; 2) identification of model parameters; 3) identification of model initial and boundary conditions. The first general lesson learned during this study was that the modeller is just part of the entire modelling process and has a major bearing on the model results, particularly in ungauged catchments where there are more degrees of freedom in making modelling decisions. Modellers' attitudes during the stages of the model implementation and parameterisation have been deeply influenced by their own experience from previous modelling studies. A common outcome was that modellers have been mainly oriented to apply process-based models able to exploit the available data concerning the physical properties of the catchment and therefore could be more suitable to cope with the lack of data concerning state variables or fluxes. The second general lesson learned during this study was the role of dominant processes. We believed that the modelling task would have been much easier in an artificial catchment, where heterogeneity were expected to be negligible and processes simpler, than in catchments that have evolved over a longer time period. The results of the models were expected to converge, and this would have been a good starting point to proceed for a model

  19. Gender Gaps in North American Research Productivity: Examining Faculty Publication Rates in Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Gonzalez, Laura; Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Galaz-Fontes, Jesus F.; Fisher, Donald; Snee, Iain

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses gender gaps in North American research productivity, which may be influenced by personal and family variables, as well as professional and work-related variables. The study was conducted as part of the "Changing Academic Profession (CAP) International Survey", conducted in 2007-08. Using articles as indicator…

  20. Gender Gaps in North American Research Productivity: Examining Faculty Publication Rates in Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Gonzalez, Laura; Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Galaz-Fontes, Jesus F.; Fisher, Donald; Snee, Iain

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses gender gaps in North American research productivity, which may be influenced by personal and family variables, as well as professional and work-related variables. The study was conducted as part of the "Changing Academic Profession (CAP) International Survey", conducted in 2007-08. Using articles as indicator…

  1. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #12: U.S.-- CANADA SYMPOSIUM ON NORTH AMERICAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND WEATHER EXTREMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This edition reports on a U.S.-Canada Symposium onNorth American Climate Change and Weather Extremes that was held in Atlanta in October. This symposium was conducted by EPA's Global Change Research Program in partnership with Environment Canada and the U.S. National Weather Se...

  2. School Catchment Area Evasion: The Case of Berlin, Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noreisch, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to examine the ways in which school segregation plays out in a pure catchment area system and to what extent residential composition is directly mirrored in schools. The research examines the data for the districts in Berlin and, more specifically at the school level, for the district of Tempelhof-Schoneberg. The research is based…

  3. School Catchment Area Evasion: The Case of Berlin, Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noreisch, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to examine the ways in which school segregation plays out in a pure catchment area system and to what extent residential composition is directly mirrored in schools. The research examines the data for the districts in Berlin and, more specifically at the school level, for the district of Tempelhof-Schoneberg. The research is based…

  4. Inter-comparison of hydro-climatic regimes across northern catchments: Synchronicity, resistance and resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, S.K.; Tetzlaff, D.; Seibert, J.; Soulsby, C.; Buttle, J.; Laudon, H.; McDonnell, J.; McGuire, K.; Caissie, D.; Shanley, J.; Kennedy, M.; Devito, K.; Pomeroy, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The higher mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are particularly sensitive to climate change as small differences in temperature determine frozen ground status, precipitation phase, and the magnitude and timing of snow accumulation and melt. An international inter-catchment comparison program, North-Watch, seeks to improve our understanding of the sensitivity of northern catchments to climate change by examining their hydrological and biogeochemical responses. The catchments are located in Sweden (Krycklan), Scotland (Mharcaidh, Girnock and Strontian), the United States (Sleepers River, Hubbard Brook and HJ Andrews) and Canada (Catamaran, Dorset and Wolf Creek). This briefing presents the initial stage of the North-Watch program, which focuses on how these catchments collect, store and release water and identify 'types' of hydro-climatic catchment response. At most sites, a 10-year data of daily precipitation, discharge and temperature were compiled and evaporation and storage were calculated. Inter-annual and seasonal patterns of hydrological processes were assessed via normalized fluxes and standard flow metrics. At the annual-scale, relations between temperature, precipitation and discharge were compared, highlighting the role of seasonality, wetness and snow/frozen ground. The seasonal pattern and synchronicity of fluxes at the monthly scale provided insight into system memory and the role of storage. We identified types of catchments that rapidly translate precipitation into runoff and others that more readily store water for delayed release. Synchronicity and variance of rainfall-runoff patterns were characterized by the coefficient of variation (cv) of monthly fluxes and correlation coefficients. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed clustering among like catchments in terms of functioning, largely controlled by two components that (i) reflect temperature and precipitation gradients and the correlation of monthly precipitation and discharge and (ii

  5. Understanding catchment dynamics through a Space-Society-Water trialectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Catherine; Jewitt, Graham; Risko, Susan; Hay, Ducan; Stuart-Hill, Sabine; Browne, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Can healthy catchments be utilized to secure water for the benefit of society? This is a complex question as it requires an understanding of the connections and relations between biophysical, social, political, economic and governance dimensions over space and time in the catchment and must interrogate whether there is 'value' in investing in the catchment natural or ecological infrastructure (EI), how this should be done, where the most valuable EI is located, and whether an investment in EI will generate co-benefits socially, environmentally and economically. Here, we adopt a social ecological relations rather than systems approach to explore these interactions through development of a space-society-water trialectic. Trialectic thinking is challenging as it requires new epistemologies and it challenges conventional modes of thought. It is not ordered or fixed, but rather is constantly evolving, revealing the dynamic relations between the elements under exploration. The construction of knowledge, through detailed scientific research and social learning, which contributes to the understanding and achievement of sustainable water supply, water related resilient economic growth, greater social equity and justice in relation to water and the reduction of environmental risk is illustrated through research in the uMngeni Catchment, South Africa. Using four case studies as a basis, we construct the catchment level society-water-space trialectic as a way of connecting, assembling and comparing the understanding and knowledge that has been produced. The relations in the three elements of the trialectic are constructed through identifying, understanding and analysing the actors, discourses, knowledge, biophysical materialities, issues and spatial connections in the case studies. Together these relations, or multiple trajectories, are assembled to form the society-water-space trialectic, which illuminates the dominant relations in the catchment and hence reveal the leverage

  6. Drought propagation and its relation with catchment biophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C. D.; Lara, A.; Garreaud, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Droughts propagate in the hydrological cycle from meteorological to soil moisture to hydrological droughts. To understand the drivers of this process is of paramount importance since the economic and societal impacts in water resources are directly related with hydrological droughts (and not with meteorological droughts, which have been most studied). This research analyses drought characteristics over a large region and identify its main exogenous (climate forcing) and endogenous (biophysical characteristics such as land cover type and topography) explanatory factors. The study region is Chile, which covers seven major climatic subtypes according to Köppen system, it has unique geographic characteristics, very sharp topography and a wide range of landscapes and vegetation conditions. Meteorological and hydrological droughts (deficit in precipitation and streamflow, respectively) are characterized by their durations and standardized deficit volumes using a variable threshold method, over 300 representative catchments (located between 27°S and 50°S). To quantify the propagation from meteorological to hydrological drought, we propose a novel drought attenuation index (DAI), calculated as the ratio between the meteorological drought severity slope and the hydrological drought severity slope. DAI varies from zero (catchment that attenuates completely a meteorological drought) to one (the meteorological drought is fully propagated through the hydrological cycle). This novel index provides key (and comparable) information about drought propagation over a wide range of different catchments, which has been highlighted as a major research gap. Similar drought indicators across the wide range of catchments are then linked with catchment biophysical characteristics. A thorough compilation of land cover information (including the percentage of native forests, grass land, urban and industrial areas, glaciers, water bodies and no vegetated areas), catchment physical

  7. Air-Quality Data from NARSTO (North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone)

    DOE Data Explorer

    NARSTO is a public/private partnership dedicated to improving management of air quality in North America. It was established on February 13, 1995 when representatives of Canada, the United States, and Mexico signed the NARSTO Charter in a ceremony at the White House. The Department of Energy is one of the charter members providing funding. The central programmatic goal of NARSTO is to provide data and information for use in the determination of workable, efficient, and effective strategies for local and regional ozone and fine particle management. Since its founding, NARSTO has completed three major scientific Assessments of critical air quality management issues. NARSTO maintains the Quality Systems Science Center and the NARSTO Data Archive for storing data from NARSTO Affiliated Research Activities and making these data available to the scientific community. NARSTO also facilitates activities, such as the Reactivity Research Working Group, which provide critical reviews of the state of the science in areas of interest to air quality policy makers. In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Sciences Division announced their sponsorship of the NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center (QSSC). The QSSC is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory within the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Quality Assurance and Data Management assistance and guidelines are provided by the QSCC, along with access to data files. The permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Center at the Langley Research Center. The archived data can be reached by a link from the QSSC.(Specialized Interface) See also the NARSTO web site at http://www.narsto.org/

  8. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes

  9. Red Oak Research and Demonstration Area in Phelps Township, North Bay, Ontario-2004 to 2005

    Treesearch

    Dave Deugo; Andrée Morneault; Dianne Othmer; Megan Smith; Al Stinson; Murray Woods; Ian Kovacs; Ian Aho; Bill Parker; Rob Baker; Marinus Verwey; Guylaine Thauvette; Don Willis; Jeff Dech

    2006-01-01

    In July 2004, a large stand of red oak (Quercus rubra) was harvested in Phelps Township, North Bay District, North Bay, Ontario using the uniform shelterwood system. Most of the stand was harvested to retain 40 percent crown closure, while a very small portion was harvested to retain 70 percent crown closure. During tree marking, an active Northern...

  10. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2003-04. Research Report 1-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiaoyun

    2004-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the thirty-sixth annual Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina. This report covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  11. The Research and Evaluation of Drug-Use Habits of People in North Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gürman, Mustafa; Demirdamar, Rümeysa; Basgut, Bilgen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the drug-use habits in North Cyprus and to prepare a demographic study of drug wastage. A total of 450 questionnaires containing 36 questions were handed out in 5 major cities of North Cyprus. Participants' pharmaceutical consumption habits and basic knowledge on rational use were compared with respect to…

  12. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2008-09. Research Report 01-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Daphne

    2009-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the forty-first annual "Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina." This abstract covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student…

  13. The Research and Evaluation of Drug-Use Habits of People in North Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gürman, Mustafa; Demirdamar, Rümeysa; Basgut, Bilgen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the drug-use habits in North Cyprus and to prepare a demographic study of drug wastage. A total of 450 questionnaires containing 36 questions were handed out in 5 major cities of North Cyprus. Participants' pharmaceutical consumption habits and basic knowledge on rational use were compared with respect to…

  14. Using Isotopes to Assess Transit Times and Pollution Risk in Mesoscale Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. J.; Tetzlaff, D.; Essery, R.; Soulsby, C.

    2011-12-01

    The use of environmental tracers to discern dominant runoff sources has become an increasingly popular approach in the field of hydrology. Developing an understanding of both geographical water sources and the timing of water passage through a catchment provides an avenue to characterise both the spatial and temporal dynamics of water fluxes in rainfall-runoff transformation. Understanding these dynamics can provide invaluable insight into the the nature of pollution risk and longevity of natural clean-up times in different catchment landscapes. Here, we present results from a study investigating catchment behaviour across eight heterogeneous mesoscale (104-488 km2) catchments in the north east of Scotland. Weekly samples were taken of both streamwater and precipitation for stable isotopes (2H and 18O) to facilitate Mean Transit Time (MTT) estimates at the catchment scale. Streamwater samples were also analysed for alkalinity which was used as a hydrochemical tracer to determine runoff sources. Estimates of MTT were conducted using a gamma distribution convolution integral model and controlling catchment characteristics were identified using multiple regression using a GIS of landscape properties. A range of MTTs were estimated for the study catchments. In more upland catchments these were in the order of 2 years as waters were mainly derived from near surface soil horizons, but in more lowland catchments the transit times increased to over 4 years as groundwater became a more significant contributor to flow. In such lowland catchments, a legacy of fertilizer applications has contaminated groundwater sources which impacts on macronutrient levels in stream waters. Clean up times are likely to be decadal, and meantime short residence time, clean upland waters provide a critical ecosystem service in diluting downstream sources and maintaining stream water quality.

  15. The North Alabama Severe Thunderstorm Observations, Research, and Monitoring Network (STORMnet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Boccippio, D.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; Bateman, M.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The Severe Thunderstorm Observations, Research, and Monitoring network (STORMnet) became operational in 2001 as a test bed to infuse new science and technologies into the severe and hazardous weather forecasting and warning process. STORMnet is collaboration among NASA scientists, National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters, emergency managers and other partners. STORMnet integrates total lightning observations from a ten-station 3-D VHF regional lightning mapping array, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), real-time regional NEXRAD Doppler radar, satellite visible and infrared imagers, and a mobile atmospheric profiling system to characterize storms and their evolution. The storm characteristics and life-cycle trending are accomplished in real-time through the second generation Lightning Imaging Sensor Demonstration and Display (LISDAD II), a distributed processing system with a JAVA-based display application that allows anyone, anywhere to track individual storm histories within the Tennessee Valley region of north Alabama and Tennessee, a region of the southeastern U.S. well known for abundant severe weather.

  16. Hydraulic Tomography at North Campus Research Site: Let Data Tell the Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, C. H. M.; Yeh, T. C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a sequential cross-hole hydraulic test followed by inversion of the data to map the spatial distribution of aquifer hydraulic properties (Yeh and Liu, 2000). We provide a focused, qualitative discussion on the hydraulic tomography data reported in Berg and Illman (2011). At the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) of the University of Waterloo, 8 pumping tests are conducted sequentially at different locations of the well field while drawdown is monitored at 44 ports distributed at 8 other wells. Without conducting inverse modeling, we discuss the behavior of the drawdown curves and the temporal evolution head field in response to pumping location, heterogeneity in aquifer parameters (i.e. hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss)), flow regimes, and boundary conditions. We emphasize the importance and direct benefits for conducting hydraulic tomography surveys relies primarily on the collection of non-redundant data, not on the inverse models. This paper attempts to use an intuitive/logical approach to qualitative hydraulic tomography analysis. Our interpretation on the aquifer heterogeneity largely agrees with the intensive core sampling (i.e. local K measurements) and inverse modeling results. We conclude some of the inspection procedures can be beneficial before the inversion of data, while the quantitative and unifying estimation of hydraulic parameter fields can only be done using an inverse model.

  17. The Annual North American Dendroecological Fieldweek: A workweek in applied tree-ring research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.M.; Krusic, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Trees record many events or processes that influence annual growth patterns. Dendrochronology is concerned with how environment and physiology affect tree growth as recorded within tree rings. The most basic principle of dendrochronology is that of crossdating, in which calendrical years are assigned to individual rings within a tree. Once crossdated, each ring is then a reflection of the climate or other environmental conditions that influenced that tree for that year. The Annual North American Dendroecological Fieldweek is a workweek in applied tree-ring research, designed to give both beginners to the discipline an introduction to its basic methodology and applications and more experienced users a change to work with and learn from others in the field in an informal group setting. The Fieldweek has had an outstanding history to date, with almost 250 participants in the five Fieldweeks from 1990 to 1994. The 6th Fieldweek is scheduled for 30 June to 8 July, 1995, at the Kananaskis Field Station in the Canadian Rockies near Calgary, Alberta.

  18. Bridges to the Future: Building Linkages for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (27th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 4-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This document contains papers, summaries of panel presentations, and work share meetings from the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "The Influence of Personality Traits, Pre-College Characteristics, and Co-Curricular Experiences on College Outcomes" (Karen W. Bauer); (2)…

  19. North-South Partnership in Training and Education in Space Research and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, E.

    tackled by capturing the interest of young people in science, by appealing to space science. This is an area of cooperation in which complementarities of experience, stemming from different cultural origins can yield positive results. Researches into the utilization of space-based observation to monitor and control environmental resources (forests, oceans, atmosphere etc.) and climate change, are other examples of areas in which North-South Space Research and Application partnership can be established and sustained. Another area of partnership is in the development of space-based experiments, especially in the area of Communication Satellites, Earth threatening Asteroids and Co mets, Global Navigation Satellites Systems, and the promotion of public awareness in space science and technology applications. Such activities will encourage mutual exchange of ideas and intellectual input by both partners in the progress, as opposed to a unilateral transfer of ideas from one partner to the other. Collaborative projects between partners from the North and South should involve university systems, the polytechnics, elementary and secondary school systems, colleges of education, research centers and organizations, corporate enterprise training, the Internet, and all those institutions whose responsibilities are to manage education and training in the developing world. Partnership in space science and technology, if nurtured in these institutions, can in the long run become one of mutual interaction, and can be sustained for a very long time.

  20. North-South Partnership in Training and Education in Space Research and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, E.

    tackled by capturing the interest of young people in science, by appealing to space science. This is an area of cooperation in which complementarities of experience, stemming from different cultural origins can yield positive results. Researches into the utilization of space-based observation to monitor and control environmental resources (forests, oceans, atmosphere etc.) and climate change, are other examples of areas in which North-South Space Research and Application partnership can be established and sustained. Another area of partnership is in the development of space-based experiments, especially in the area of Communication Satellites, Earth threatening Asteroids and Comets, Global Navigation Satellites Systems, and the promotion of public awareness in space science and technology applications. Such activities will encourage mutual exchange of ideas and intellectual input by both partners in the progress, as opposed to a unilateral transfer of ideas from one partner to the other. Collaborative projects between partners from the North and South should involve university systems, the polytechnics, elementary and secondary school systems, colleges of education, research centers and organizations, corporate enterprise training, the Internet, and all those institutions whose responsibilities are to manage education and training in the developing world. Partnership in space science and technology, if nurtured in these institutions, can in the long run become one of mutual interaction, and can be sustained for a very long time.

  1. Detecting non-stationary hydrologic model parameters in a paired catchment system using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathiraja, S.; Marshall, L.; Sharma, A.; Moradkhani, H.

    2016-08-01

    Non-stationarity represents one of the major challenges facing hydrologists. There exists a need to develop modelling systems that are capable of accounting for potential catchment changes, in order to provide useful predictions for the future. Such changes may be due to climatic temporal variations or human induced changes to land cover. Extensive research has been undertaken on the impacts of land-use change on hydrologic behaviour, however, few studies have examined this issue in a predictive modelling context. In this paper, we investigate whether a time varying model parameter estimation framework that uses the principles of Data Assimilation can improve prediction for two pairs of experimental catchments in Western Australia. All catchments were initially forested, but after three years one catchment was fully cleared whilst another had only 50% of its area cleared. Their adjacent catchments remained unchanged as a control. Temporal variations in parameters were detected for both treated catchments, with no comparable variations for the control catchments. Improved streamflow prediction and representation of soil moisture dynamics were also seen for the time varying parameter case, compared to when a time invariant parameter set from the calibration period was used. While we use the above mentioned catchments to illustrate the usefulness of the approach, the methods are generic and equally applicable in other settings. This study serves as an important validation step to demonstrate the potential for time varying model structures to improve both predictions and modelling of changing catchments.

  2. Perceptions of cancer clinical research among African American men in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Trantham, Laurel C.; Carpenter, William R; DiMartino, Lisa D.; White, Brandolyn; Green, Melissa; Teal, Randall; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Godley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The problem of cancer health disparities is substantial. Clinical trials are widely advocated as a means of reducing disparities and bringing state-of-the-art care to the broader community, where most cancer care is delivered. This study sought to develop a better understanding of why disproportionately few African American men enroll in clinical trials given their substantial cancer burden. Design This study applied community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods to design and conduct four focus groups of African American male cancer survivors and their caregivers in North Carolina. Results Among major themes, participants expressed confusion about the relationship between clinical trials, treatment, and research, signifying patient confusion and misinterpretation of common clinical trial terminology. Social norms including gender barriers and generational differences remain problematic; participants often reported that men do not talk about health issues, are unwilling to go to the doctor, and exhibit misapprehension and distrust regarding trials. Participants perceived this as detrimental to community health and expressed the need for more clarity in clinical trials information and a more fundamental social openness and communication about cancer detection and treatment. Conclusion Findings indicate the importance of clinical trials education in both traditional provider referral to trials and also in general patient navigation. To dispel pervasive misapprehension regarding placebos, clinical trials information should emphasize the role of standard care in modern cancer treatment trials. Many participants described willingness to participate in a trial upon physician recommendation, suggesting merit in improving patient-physician communication through culturally competent terminology and trial referral systems. PMID:26113749

  3. Tidal fluxes of dissolved oxygen at the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. R.; Kjerfve, B.; Petrecca, D. M.

    2006-04-01

    Advective, dispersive and total dissolved oxygen (DO) fluxes from 1297 complete tidal cycles were analyzed to test the "outwelling" hypothesis as it pertains to DO. A 910 day time series of meteorological and water quality data (approximately 35,000 half-hourly observations) was used to assess DO fluxes and dynamics at Crab Haul Creek, a small (1.1 km 2) tidal salt marsh basin at North Inlet, South Carolina, within the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. A basin storage curve, derived from water velocity measurements made across a permanent transect in the tidal creek every half hour for eight semidiurnal tidal cycles, enabled water discharges to be estimated from tide height readings in the 910 day time series. The discharges along with DO concentration measurements were used to calculate DO fluxes for each tidal cycle in the series. The long-term mean dispersive and advective DO fluxes were -0.281 g O 2 s -1 and -0.375 g O 2 s -1, respectively. Based on " t" tests both means are significantly less than zero ( p < 0.02), indicating exports. Furthermore a significant correlation was found between the dispersive DO export and the tidal mean solar radiation, indicating that photosynthesis is the principal process driving the dispersive export of DO. On the other hand no significant correlations were found between the advective export of DO and solar radiation or between the dispersive fluxes of DO and salt. The absence of such correlations indicates that the advective export of DO is simply an artifact of a slight ebb sampling bias in our computation of the tidal mean discharge. On a unit area basis the average annual dispersive export of DO is 8.9 g m -2 yr -1 or 0.28 mol DO m -2 yr -1. This is a small fraction of the oxygen produced in the basin by phytoplankton (18 mol DO m -2 yr -1) and its contribution to the DO resources of the receiving waters is far exceeded by the oxygen demand associated with the concurrent export of dissolved

  4. Atmospheric Research and Public Outreach Activities at Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, B.; Pope, J.; Kelly, G.; Sherman, J. P.; Taubman, B.

    2012-12-01

    Promoting scientific and public understanding of mountain meteorological processes, particularly in the context of climate variability and change, remains a formidable challenge. Mountain environments present considerable difficulties in the collection of surface and atmospheric observations due to complex topography and resulting high spatial and temporal variability of the atmospheric processes. A collaborative partnership between Appalachian State University (ASU) and the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation (GMSF) in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina has provided an outstanding opportunity to integrate atmospheric research and outreach activities. The NASA-funded Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach (CAN-DOO) project directly supports the research and education activities and places them in the context of climate variability and change. This paper introduces the manual observations and citizen science activities, automated meteorological measurements, and public outreach initiatives on Grandfather Mountain and presents preliminary findings. In support of project objectives, GMSF staff makes daily measurements of precipitation, snow water equivalent, snow depth, and aerosol optical depth, while also encouraging citizen scientists to participate in the daily meteorological measurements. Team members have developed real-time displays of meteorological conditions for the two main visitor's centers and website, and have also created interactive climate science public displays. ASU scientists and GMSF staff have worked together to install and operate two research-quality meteorological stations at 1609 m asl that measure temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, pressure, precipitation, and present weather. Preliminary results of research activities suggest that extreme wind gusts >50 m s -1 and severe icing due to riming and freezing rain are a frequent occurrence on Grandfather Mountain

  5. Isotope tracers in catchment hydrology: How far can we go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The use of stable isotopes as tracers of water has fundamentally changed the way that we view catchment hydrology. Tracer-based mass balance mixing studies in the past decades have revealed that most of the water comprising the storm hydrograph (in humid areas) is dominated by pre-event water. Furthermore, using the convolution integral approach to long term isotopic time series, studies have revealed a wide range of streamwater residence times (focused mostly on baseflow), from months to decades, but with most on the order of 1-3 years. These findings have now matured to the point where such information is informing rainfall- runoff model testing. As a result, stable isotope tracers offer new and orthogonal data measures for rejecting model structures. Similarly, scaling relations detected in streamwater residence time data offer hope for a new pathway to understand and quantify multi-scale catchment response patterns. So how far can we go with stable isotope tracers in catchment hydrology? Here I offer some suggestions on new research avenues that capitalize on the use of laser spectrometers and how the resulting increased sample frequencies in time and space (with laser specs in the lab and in the field) may offer new hydrological insights. Examples are given that apply to ecohydrological studies in catchments to resolve how vegetation and streams appear to return different pools of water to the hydrosphere; virtual experiments with catchment models to assess the fundamental controls on catchment residence time distribution; multi-tracer approaches to streamwater residence time to reconcile the striking differences in residence time estimates between oxygen-18 and tritium; and labeled isotope additions at the plot, hillslope and catchment scale under controlled input conditions for resolving the age, origin and pathway of flow.

  6. USGS research on geohazards of the North Pacific: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, M. K.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The disastrous earthquakes and tsunamis of Sumatra in 2004 and Tohoku in 2011 have driven re-examination of where and how such events occur. Particular focus is on the North Pacific. Of the top 30 earthquakes recorded instrumentally worldwide, 50% occurred along the line of subduction from the Kuril Islands to the southern Alaska mainland. This region has seen monstrous volcanic eruptions (Katmai-Novarupta, 1912), destructive tsunamis (Severo-Kurilsk, 1952), and one of Earth's largest instrumentally-recorded earthquakes (M9.2 Alaska, 1964). Only the modest populations in these frontier towns half a century ago kept losses to a minimum. Impact of any natural disaster to population, vital infrastructure, and sea and air transportation would be magnified today. While USGS had a presence in Alaska for more than a century, the great Alaska earthquake of 1964 ushered in the first understanding of the area's risks. This was the first mega-thrust earthquake properly interpreted as such, and led to re-examination of the 1960 Chilean event. All modern conceptions of mega-thrust earthquakes and tsunamis derive some heritage from USGS research following the 1964 event. The discovery of oil in the Alaska Arctic prompted building a pipeline from the north slope of Alaska to the ice-free port of Valdez. The USGS identified risks from crossing permafrost and active faults. Accurate characterization of these hazards informed innovative designs that kept the pipeline from rupturing due to ground instability or during the M7.9 Denali earthquake of 2002. As a large state with few roads, air travel is common in Alaska. The frequent ash eruptions of volcanoes in the populous Cook Inlet basin became a serious issue, highlighted by the near-crash of a large passenger jet in 1989. In response, the USGS and its partners developed and deployed efficient seismic networks on remote volcanoes and initiated regular satellite surveillance for early warning of ash eruptions. Close collaboration

  7. Transdisciplinarity Within the North American Climate Change Mitigation Research Community, Specifically the Carbon Dioxide Capture, Transportation, Utilization and Storage Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Steven Michael

    This research investigates the existence of and potential challenges to the development of a transdisciplinary approach to the climate change mitigation technology research focusing on carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in North America. The unprecedented challenge of global climate change is one that invites a transdisciplinary approach. The challenge of climate change mitigation requires an understanding of multiple disciplines, as well as the role that complexity, post-normal or post-modern science, and uncertainty play in combining these various disciplines. This research followed the general discourse of transdisciplinarity as described by Klein (2014) and Augsburg (2016) which describe it as using transcendence, problem solving, and transgression to address wicked, complex societal problems, and as taught by California School of Transdisciplinarity, where the research focuses on sustainability in the age of post-normal science (Funtowicz & Ravetz, 1993). Through the use of electronic surveys and semi-structured interviews, members of the North American climate change mitigation research community shared their views and understanding of transdisciplinarity (Kvale & Brinkmann, 2009). The data indicate that much of the research currently being conducted by members of the North American CCUS research community is in fact transdisciplinary. What is most intriguing is the manner in which researchers arrived at their current understanding of transdisciplinarity, which is in many cases without any foreknowledge or use of the term transdisciplinary. The data reveals that in many cases the researchers now understand that this transdisciplinary approach is borne out of personal beliefs or emotion, social or societal aspects, their educational process, the way in which they communicate, and in most cases, the CCUS research itself, that require this transdisciplinary approach, but had never thought about giving it a name or understanding its origin or

  8. Changes in stream nitrate concentrations due to land management practices, ecological succession, and climate: Developing a system approach to integrated catchment response

    Treesearch

    F. Worrall; Wayne T. Swank; T. P. Burt

    2003-01-01

    This study uses time series analysis to examine long-term stream water nitrate concentration records from a pair of forested catchments at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina, USA. Monthly average concentrations were available from 1970 through 1997 for two forested catchments, one of which was clear-felled in 1977 and the other maintained as a control....

  9. Characterizing Runoff and Water Yield from Headwater Catchments in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate where much of the annual precipitation falls during winter, the snow-capped Sierra Nevada serves as the primary source of dry season runoff that supports agriculture, industries, urban, and other ecosystems. Increased warming has led to significant reductions in mountain snowpack accumulation and earlier snowmelt throughout the western United States where most of the snow accumulates at temperatures near the freezing point. As a result, declines in dry season runoff magnitude, earlier runoff timing, and altered flood risk have been reported across the region. An important question in this context is, how to best manage forested catchments for water and other ecosystem services? We depict the differences in hydrologic response of ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds (KREW) research project using continuous precipitation, snow, and runoff data during 2004-2014. The size of these catchments ranges from 50 to 475 ha, and they span a 600-m elevation range in the rain snow transitional zone. In terms of soil, Shaver and Gerle-Cagwin dominate the lower elevation Providence catchments, and Cagwin soils dominate the higher elevation Bull catchments. The majority of these catchments have southwest aspect, moderate average slope (i.e. <25%), and a well-developed drainage network with drainage density ranging from 4.6 to 10.1 km/km2. Bull catchments, on average, have higher runoff than the Providence catchments across all hydrologic signatures extracted from daily hydrographs. Mean annual runoff ranges between 281 to 408 mm in Providence and 436 to 656 mm in Bull catchments despite no significant difference in precipitation among KREW's four meteorological stations. However, high elevation Bull catchments receive significantly more precipitation as snow than the low elevation Providence catchments. The average runoff ratio ranges from 18% to as high as 43% among different catchments, indicating that the catchment

  10. Characteristics of Adults in the Hepatitis B Research Network in North America Reflect Their Country of Origin and HBV Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ghany, Marc; Perrillo, Robert; Li, Ruosha; Belle, Steven H.; Janssen, Harry L.A.; Terrault, Norah A.; Shuhart, Margaret C.; Lau, Daryl T-Y; Kim, W. Ray; Fried, Michael W.; Sterling, Richard K.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Han, Steven-Huy B.; Ganova-Raeva, Lilia Milkova; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Suk-Fong Lok, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an important cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide; populations that migrate to the US and Canada might be disproportionately affected. The Hepatitis B Research Network (HBRN) is a cooperative network of investigators from the United States and Canada, created to facilitate clinical, therapeutic, and translational research in adults and children with hepatitis B. We describe the structure of the network and baseline characteristics of adults with hepatitis B enrolled in the network. Methods The HBRN collected data on clinical characteristics of 1625 adults with chronic HBV infection who are not receiving antiviral therapy from 21 clinical centers in North America. Results Half of the subjects in the HBRN are male, and the mean age is 42 years; 72% are Asian, 15% are Black, and 11% are White, with 82% born outside of North America. The most common HBV genotype was B (39%); 745 of subjects were negative for the hepatitis B e antigen. The median serum level of HBV DNA when the study began was 3.6 log10 IU/mL; 68% of male subjects and 67% of female subjects had levels of alanine aminotransferase above the normal range. Conclusions The HBRN cohort will be used to address important clinical and therapeutic questions for North Americans infected with chronic HBV and to guide health policies on HBV prevention and management in North America. PMID:25010003

  11. Switching the poles in sexual and reproductive health research: implementing a research capacity-strengthening network in West and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Jean-Paul; Assarag, Bouchra; Delamou, Alexandre; Van der Veken, Karen; Belaid, Loubna; Ouédraogo, Moctar; Khalfallah, Sonia; Aouras, Hayet; Diadhiou, Mohamed; Fassassi, Raïmi; Delvaux, Thérèse

    2016-08-08

    Health research capacities have been improved in Africa but still remain weak as compared to other regions of the World. To strengthen these research capacities, international collaboration and networking for knowledge and capacity transfer are needed. In this commentary, we present the Network for Scientific Support in the field of Sexual and Reproductive Health in West and North Africa, its priority research topics and discuss its implementation process. Established in January 2014, the Network aims at generating human rights and gender-based research fully carried out and driven by South based institutions. It is composed of 12 institutions including the Institute of Tropical Medicine of Antwerp (Belgium) and 11 institutions from eight Francophone West and North African countries. The key areas of interest of this network are health policies analysis and health system research in family planning, HIV prevention among vulnerable groups, quality of care and breast cancers. Since it started, seventeen research proposals based on locally relevant research questions have been developed. Among the seventeen proposals, eleven have been implemented. Several research institutions enhanced linkages with local representations of international partners such as UNFPA. The network is committed to strengthening methodological research capacities and soft skills such as fundraising, advocacy and leadership. Such competencies are strongly needed for developing an effective South-based leadership in Sexual and Reproductive Health research, and for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

  12. A short narrative - Challenges and opportunities in expanding research in the Middle East, North Afr

    Cancer.gov

    CGH CRTA, Hedieh Mehrtash interviews CGH's Dr. Marie Ricciardone who works with a network of partners in the Middle East and North Africa region, on experiences, challenges, and opportunities in the region.

  13. On using TRMM data and rainfall forecasts from meteorological models in data-scarce transboundary catchments - an example of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Tohidul Islam, Md.

    2014-05-01

    This research focuses on the flood risk of the Haor region in the north-eastern part of Bangladesh. The prediction of the hydrological variables at different spatial and temporal scales in the Haor region is dependent on the influence of several upstream rivers in the Meghalaya catchment in India. Limitation in hydro-meteorological data collection and data sharing issues between the two countries dominate the feasibility of hydrological studies, particularly for near-realtime predictions. One of the possible solutions seems to be in making use of the variety of satellite based and meteorological model products for rainfall. The abundance of a variety of rainfall products provides a good basis of hydrological modelling of a part of the Ganges and Brahmaputra basin. In this research the TRMM data and rainfall forecasts from ECMWF have been compared with the scarce rain gauge data from the upstream Meghalaya catchment. Subsequently, the TRMM data and rainfall forecasts from ECMWF have been used as the meteorological input to a rainfall-runoff model of the Meghalaya catchment. The rainfall-runoff model of Meghalaya has been developed using the DEM data from SRTM. The generated runoff at the outlet of Meghalaya has been used as the upstream boundary condition in the existing rainfall-runoff model of the Haor region. The simulation results have been compared with the existing results based on simulations without any information of the rainfall-runoff in the upstream Meghalaya catchment. The comparison showed that the forecasting lead time has been substantially increased. As per the existing results the forecasting lead time at a number of locations in the catchment was about 6 to 8 hours. With the new results the forecasting lead time has gone up, with different levels of accuracy, to about 24 hours. This additional lead time will be highly beneficial in managing flood risk of the Haor region of Bangladesh. The research shows that satellite based rainfall products and

  14. Streamflow generation in the Pang and Lambourn catchments, Berkshire, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Binley, A.; Crook, N.; Nutter, J.; Young, A.; Fletcher, S.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryThis paper presents findings from a comprehensive field campaign of stream flow measurement in two Chalk catchments in Berkshire (UK). The measurements were taken in order to characterise the spatial and temporal dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction within the area, and facilitate a better understanding of underlying processes with the aid of supporting groundwater and water-chemistry data. Long-term streamflow data are used to approximate the baseflow component at three sites within each catchment. Spot-measured streamflow data are then used to describe the seasonal variability in streamflow, at a number of locations within each catchment, in order to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics of areas of groundwater-surface interaction. This study was completed as part of the lowland catchment research programme (LOCAR) and as such aimed to improve monitoring techniques for use within water resource management. In particular, the methods employed provide a useful template for characterisation of similar type catchments and which may be used to ensure effective implementation of Water Framework Directive related environmental assessments.

  15. Towards Estimating the Nutrient Balance of the Hydrologic Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) Catchment, Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner-Kittridge, Michael; Zessner, Matthias; Broer, Martine; Eder, Alexander; Strauss, Peter; Blöschl, Günter

    2010-05-01

    The fate of nutrients introduced by human activities have significant impacts on both nature and our civilization. Excessive nutrients can contaminate our drinking water as well as promote algae blooms that deplete the surrounding waters of oxygen for aquatic life. It is estimated that agriculture in Austria contributes approximately 60% to the total discharge of nitrogen and 40% to the total discharge of phosphorus. Understanding the specific pathways and sources of nitrogen and phosphorus from agriculture land could greatly improve our ability to mitigate for excessive discharges if the problems can be targeted more precisely. The objective of our research is to determine the complete nitrogen and phosphorous balance within a 66.7 hectare catchment in Lower Austria. The Hydrologic Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) catchment is located in Lower Austria approximately 100 km west of Vienna. The HOAL catchment was established in 2009 through funding by the Austrian Science Foundation to be used for multidisciplinary hydrologic research for understanding water flow and transport processes in catchments. The catchment land cover is characterized as 90% agriculture, 5% impermeable surface, and 3% forest. The predominant soil type is a clayey silt loam and a section of the catchment contain a subsurface tile drainage network that extend approximately 5.5 km. Nitrogen and phosphorus are the two primary nutrients assessed in this study. To accomplish the nutrient balance, the research is divided into three different scales: Field Scale, Subcatchment Scale, and Catchment Scale. The Catchment scale encompasses the entirety of the catchment, the subcatchment scale encompasses a 6.4 hectare area within the catchment that is completely underlain by the tile drainage network, and the field scale studies are performed on several square meter plots within the subcatchment. Each scale attempts to determine different parts of the total nutrient budget. The initial phase of the research

  16. Using hydrochemical tracers to conceptualise hydrological function in a larger scale catchment draining contrasting geologic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, R.; Tetzlaff, D.; Malcolm, I. A.; Hartley, A. J.; Soulsby, C.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryA year-long multivariate tracer study in the 749 km 2 catchment of the North-Esk in north east Scotland was carried out to infer the dominant runoff generation processes in two markedly different geologic provinces. The upper 60% of the catchment has montane headwaters dominated by impermeable metamorphic rocks, steep topography, peaty soils and a sub-arctic climate with over 1400 mm of precipitation. The lowlands of the catchment are underlain by a major sandstone aquifer, and mainly have freely draining, fertile soils that support intensive arable farming under a drier climate with around 800 mm of precipitation. Storm runoff in the uplands is dominated by near-surface processes in soils and sedimentary layers which generate around 60% of annual stream flows with water of low alkalinity and ionic strength. In contrast, tributaries in the lower parts of the catchment are dominated by groundwater-fed base flows which account for 75% of annual runoff and are characterised by alkaline waters with high concentrations of base cations and high levels of nitrate. Multivariate statistical methods were used to derive a generic typology of catchment source waters, their spatial and temporal dynamics and particularly, how they integrate together at the larger catchment scale. The uplands dominate the winter high flow response of the whole catchment. The influence of lowland groundwater from major aquifers becomes more apparent under low flows. However, groundwater from small upland aquifers plays a critical role for ecosystem service in dry periods providing baseflows which dilute pollutant inputs from lowland areas at the large catchment scale.

  17. Hydrology and landscape structure control subalpine catchment carbon export

    Treesearch

    Vincent Jerald Pacific

    2009-01-01

    Carbon export from high elevation ecosystems is a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Ecosystems in northern latitudes have become the focus of much research due to their potential as large sinks of carbon in the atmosphere. However, there exists limited understanding of the controls of carbon export from complex mountain catchments due to strong spatial and...

  18. Identifying fine sediment sources to alleviate flood risk caused by fine sediments through catchment connectivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohig, Sarah; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2017-04-01

    Fine sediment poses a significant threat to UK river systems in terms of vegetation, aquatic habitats and morphology. Deposition of fine sediment onto the river bed reduces channel capacity resulting in decreased volume to contain high flow events. Once the in channel problem has been identified managers are under pressure to sustainably mitigate flood risk. With climate change and land use adaptations increasing future pressures on river catchments it is important to consider the connectivity of fine sediment throughout the river catchment and its influence on channel capacity, particularly in systems experiencing long term aggradation. Fine sediment erosion is a continuing concern in the River Eye, Leicestershire. The predominately rural catchment has a history of flooding within the town of Melton Mowbray. Fine sediment from agricultural fields has been identified as a major contributor of sediment delivery into the channel. Current mitigation measures are not sustainable or successful in preventing the continuum of sediment throughout the catchment. Identifying the potential sources and connections of fine sediment would provide insight into targeted catchment management. 'Sensitive Catchment Integrated Modelling Analysis Platforms' (SCIMAP) is a tool often used by UK catchment managers to identify potential sources and routes of sediment within a catchment. SCIMAP is a risk based model that combines hydrological (rainfall) and geomorphic controls (slope, land cover) to identify the risk of fine sediment being transported from source into the channel. A desktop version of SCIMAP was run for the River Eye at a catchment scale using 5m terrain, rainfall and land cover data. A series of SCIMAP model runs were conducted changing individual parameters to determine the sensitivity of the model. Climate Change prediction data for the catchment was used to identify potential areas of future connectivity and erosion risk for catchment managers. The results have been

  19. Is catchment productivity a useful predictor of taxa richness in lake plankton communities?

    PubMed

    Soininen, Janne; Luoto, Miska

    2012-03-01

    The influence of catchment variables on lake organisms is understudied. The terrestrial zone in the vicinity of lakes is, however, probably highly important for biota due to the effects on water chemistry and to various processes operating across ecosystem boundaries. We examined the relative importance of lake and catchment variables, as well as large-scale geographical factors, on the taxa richness of phyto- and zooplankton in 100 small lakes in Finland. In variation partitioning, the variability of phytoplankton richness was most strongly related to the effects of lake variables, the joint effects of lake and catchment variables, and the joint effects of all three groups of variables. Zooplankton richness, in turn, was most strongly related to the effects of lake and catchment variables and the joint effect of lake and catchment variables. The exact results of the variation partitioning depended on the catchment sizes considered in the regression models. Among lake variables, planktonic richness was strongly related to variables indicating productivity. Among catchment variables, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), indicating catchment productivity, showed a relatively strong association with planktonic richness. These results provide evidence that catchment variables such as the NDVI may be efficient predictors of planktonic richness in small lakes. It is possible that individual lakes embedded in a highly productive landscape have higher taxa richness than solitary, potentially productive lakes because of the high influx of dispersing propagules from the regional pool. We also suggest that catchment variables may respond to environmental changes at different scales than the lake variables, and explicit consideration of catchment productivity would therefore be useful when planning research and monitoring programs for freshwater organisms.

  20. Evaluation of TOPLATS on three Mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2016-08-01

    Physically based hydrological models are complex tools that provide a complete description of the different processes occurring on a catchment. The TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (TOPLATS) simulates water and energy balances at different time steps, in both lumped and distributed modes. In order to gain insight on the behavior of TOPLATS and its applicability in different conditions a detailed evaluation needs to be carried out. This study aimed to develop a complete evaluation of TOPLATS including: (1) a detailed review of previous research works using this model; (2) a sensitivity analysis (SA) of the model with two contrasted methods (Morris and Sobol) of different complexity; (3) a 4-step calibration strategy based on a multi-start Powell optimization algorithm; and (4) an analysis of the influence of simulation time step (hourly vs. daily). The model was applied on three catchments of varying size (La Tejeria, Cidacos and Arga), located in Navarre (Northern Spain), and characterized by different levels of Mediterranean climate influence. Both Morris and Sobol methods showed very similar results that identified Brooks-Corey Pore Size distribution Index (B), Bubbling pressure (ψc) and Hydraulic conductivity decay (f) as the three overall most influential parameters in TOPLATS. After calibration and validation, adequate streamflow simulations were obtained in the two wettest catchments, but the driest (Cidacos) gave poor results in validation, due to the large climatic variability between calibration and validation periods. To overcome this issue, an alternative random and discontinuous method of cal/val period selection was implemented, improving model results.

  1. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  2. A detrital record of the Nile River and its catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Laura; Najman, Yani; Millar, Ian; Butterworth, Peter; Ando, Sergio; Padoan, Marta; Barfod, Dan; Kneller, Ben

    2017-04-01

    This research uses analyses from Nile catchment rivers, wadis, dunes and bedrocks to constrain the geological history of NE Africa and document influences on the composition of sediment reaching the Nile delta. Methods used include single grain analyses (U-Pb and Hf analyses of zircon, U-Pb dating of rutile, Ar-Ar dating of white mica and plagioclase), and bulk analyses (petrography, Sr, Nd and Hf isotopic analyses, and trace element concentrations). Our data show evolution of the North African crust, highlighting phases in the development of the Arabian-Nubian Shield and amalgamation of Gondwana in Neoproterozoic times. The Saharan Metacraton and Congo Craton in Uganda have a common history of crustal growth, with new crust formation at 3.0 - 3.5 Ga, and crustal melting at c. 2.7 Ga. The Hammamat Formation of the Arabian-Nubian Shield is locally derived and has a maximum depositional age of 635 Ma. By contrast, Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks are derived from more distant sources. In the modern Nile drainage, there is considerable evolution downstream, controlled predominantly by changes in local geology and geomorphology. The provenance signature of the White Nile is dramatically different upstream and downstream of the Sudd marshes as a result of sediment trapping. South of the Sudd, White Nile sediments are craton-derived. North of the Sudd, at Kosti, the signature of the White Nile is dominated by material derived from Phanerozoic sandstones supplied via alluvial fans to the west of the river. Further north, south of Khartoum, White Nile sediment composition is affected by its proximity to the Pleistocene Blue Nile sourced Gezira Fan. The Blue Nile's and Atbara's signatures are influenced predominantly by input from the Ethiopian flood basalts in terms of their bulk-rock signature, and by proximity to the Arabian-Nubian Shield in terms of zircon characteristics. A further shift in sediment signature in terms of zircon characteristics is seen by the time the Nile

  3. Influence of teleconnection on water quality in agricultural river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellander, Per-Erik; Jordan, Phil; Shore, Mairead; McDonald, Noeleen; Shortle, Ger

    2015-04-01

    Influences such as weather, flow controls and lag time play an important role in the processes influencing the water quality of agricultural catchments. In particular weather signals need to be clearly considered when interpreting the effectiveness of current measures for reducing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural sources to water bodies. In north-western Europe weather patterns and trends are influenced by large-scale systems such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the position of the Gulf Stream, the latter expressed as the Gulf Stream North Wall index (GSNW index). Here we present five years of monthly data of nitrate-N concentration in stream water and groundwater (aggregated from sub-hourly monitoring in the stream outlet and monthly sampling in multilevel monitoring wells) from four agricultural catchments (ca. 10 km2) together with monitored weather parameters, long-term weather data and the GSNW index. The catchments are situated in Ireland on the Atlantic seaboard and are susceptible to sudden and seasonal shifts in oceanic climate patterns. Rain anomalies and soil moisture deficit dynamics were similar to the dynamics of the GSNW index. There were monitored changes in nitrate-N concentration in both groundwater and surface water with no apparent connection to agricultural management; instead such changes also appeared to follow the GSNW index. For example, in catchments with poorly drained soils and a 'flashy hydrology' there were seasonal dynamics in nitrate-N concentration that correlated with the seasonal dynamics of the GSNW index. In a groundwater driven catchment there was a consistent increase in nitrate-N concentration over the monitored period which may be the result of increasingly more recharge in summer and autumn (as indicated by more flux in the GSNW index). The results highlight that the position of the Gulf Stream may influence the nitrate-N concentration in groundwater and stream water and there is a risk

  4. A Fresh Start for Flood Estimation in Ungauged UK Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giani, Giulia; Woods, Ross

    2017-04-01

    The standard regression-based method for estimating the median annual flood in ungauged UK catchments has a high standard error (95% confidence interval is +/- a factor of 2). This is also the dominant source of uncertainty in statistical estimates of the 100-year flood. Similarly large uncertainties have been reported elsewhere. These large uncertainties make it difficult to do reliable flood design estimates for ungauged catchments. If the uncertainty could be reduced, flood protection schemes could be made significantly more cost-effective. Here we report on attempts to develop a new practical method for flood estimation in ungauged UK catchments, by making more use of knowledge about rainfall-runoff processes. Building on recent research on the seasonality of flooding, we first classify more than 1000 UK catchments into groups according to the seasonality of extreme rainfall and floods, and infer possible causal mechanisms for floods (e.g. Berghuijs et al, Geophysical Research Letters, 2016). For each group we are developing simplified rainfall-runoff-routing relationships (e.g. Viglione et al, Journal of Hydrology, 2010) which can account for spatial and temporal variability in rainfall and flood processes, as well as channel network routing effects. An initial investigation by Viglione et al suggested that the relationship between rainfall amount and flood peak could be summarised through a dimensionless response number that represents the product of the event runoff coefficient and a measure of hydrograph peakedness. Our hypothesis is that this approach is widely applicable, and can be used as the basis for flood estimation. Using subdaily and daily rainfall-runoff data for more than 1000 catchments, we identify a subset of catchments in the west of the UK where floods are generated predominantly in winter through the coincidence of heavy rain and low soil moisture deficits. Floods in these catchments can reliably be simulated with simple rainfall

  5. Coevolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takeo; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment coevolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.225 to 82.2 Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density and slope-area relationship) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseflow index, and flow-duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found a significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. The intra-annual flow variability was also significantly related to catchments age. Younger catchments tended to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibited more flashy runoff. The decrease in baseflow with catchment age is consistent with the existing hypothesis that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways change over time from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in a set of similar, but younger volcanic catchments in the Oregon Cascades, in which drainage density increased with age. In that case, older catchments were thought to show more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths. Our results suggests two competing hypotheses on the evolution of drainage density in mature catchments. One is that as catchments continue to age, the hydrologically active channels retreat

  6. Inter-comparison of hydro-climatic regimes across northern catchments: snychronicity, resistance and resilience

    Treesearch

    Sean K. Carey; Doerthe Tetzlaff; Jan Seibert; Chris Soulsby; Jim Buttle; Hjalmar Laudon; Jeff McDonnell; Kevin McGuire; Daniel Caissie; Jamie Shanley; Mike Kennedy; Kevin Devito; John W. Pomeroy

    2010-01-01

    The higher mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are particularly sensitive to climate change as small differences in temperature determine frozen ground status, precipitation phase, and the magnitude and timing of snow accumulation and melt. An international inter-catchment comparison program, North-Watch, seeks to improve our understanding of the sensitivity of...

  7. Disaster Down East: Using Participatory Action Research to Explore Intimate Partner Violence in Eastern North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Pamela York; Belton, Leigh; Hooten, Elizabeth; Campbell, Marci Kramish; DeVellis, Brenda; Benedict, Salli; Carrillo, Carla; Gonzalez, Pam; Kelsey, Kristine; Meier, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd in 1999, a Community Advisory Committee requested assistance from its university partners (University of North Carolina) to address stress and increased risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Collected from 12 study work sites, baseline data indicated that IPV rates were higher among blue-collar women in…

  8. Emerald ash borer in North America: a research and regulatory challenge

    Treesearch

    David Cappaert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Nathan W. Siegert

    2005-01-01

    The saga of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmare (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in North America began on 25 June 2002, when five entomologists representing Michigan State University (MSU), the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS)...

  9. Management of North American Culicoides biting midges: Current knowledge and research needs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of two important viruses infecting North American ruminants: bluetongue (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHDV). While these viruses have been identified for over 60 years, we still lack an adequate understanding of t...

  10. Model Store Curriculum. A Developmental Model for North Dakota Schools. Final Report. Research Series No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goschen, Todd; Warcup, Dennis

    The final report evaluates the activities of the first nine weeks of a project designed to develop a curriculum guide for a school-model store at a North Dakota high school. The program combines the favorable aspects of both the school store and the model store, providing "live" experiences as well as simulated ones. The Distributive…

  11. Diseases of intensively cultured hybrid poplars: a summary of recent research in the north central region

    Treesearch

    M. E. Ostry; H. S. McNabb

    1983-01-01

    Several potentially damaging diseases of hybrid poplars hue been identified in the north-central United States. Among the most serious are leaf and stem diseases caused by Melampsora, Marssonina, and Septoria. Short-term chemical controls are of limited usefulness. The most practical control strategy appears to be the use of resistant clones obtained through local...

  12. North Carolina Community College System Operating Program, 1975-1980. Research Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Stephen A.; Jolley, Hazel R.

    Using the systemwide enrollment information from the 1975-85 strategic plan for the North Carolina Community College System, this five year (1975-80) operating program plan presents enrollment projections for major program areas by multi-county planning regions and individual institutions. Projections are consistent with past experience,…

  13. Growing pressures on Circumpolar North wilderness: A case for coordinated research and education

    Treesearch

    Lilian Alessa; Alan Watson

    2002-01-01

    Pressures are growing on undeveloped (wild) places in the Circumpolar North. Among them are economic development, oil and gas exploration and extraction, development of geothermal energy resources, development of heavy industry close to energy sources, and lack of appreciation for “other” orientations toward wilderness resources. An international seminar in Anchorage,...

  14. Phonological Issues in North Alaskan Inupiaq. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Lawrence D.

    The monograph on the North Alaskan dialect of Inupiaq, an Eskimo language, makes a phonological comparison of the two sub-dialects, Barrow and Kobuk. An introductory section outlines basic word structure and standard orthography, and gives an overview of the dialects' phonology. Subsequent sections give an extensive phonological analysis of these…

  15. Factors Associated with Expectations: North Dakota High School Seniors. Educational Research Series No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabick, Lawrence W.

    Questionnaires were completed on a single day (spring 1973) by high school seniors from 18 large and small, rural and urban, schools located throughout North Dakota in an effort to establish correlation between desired and expected occupations and expressed educational expectations. Tabular data supported previous studies which established…

  16. North American Higher Education Cooperation: Findings from Recent Research in Mexico, Canada, and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliva, Maricela

    This case study examined the North American Higher Education Cooperation (NAHEC) initiative from its launch in 1992 by educators and the governments of Canada, Mexico, and the United States through 1996, focusing on organizational, process, and actor preference "zones of influence" in international collaboration. Interviews were…

  17. The Flora North America Generalized System for Describing the Morphology of Organisms. Research Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetler, Stanwyn G.

    The file organization for the computerized Flora North America (FNA) data bank is described. A four level character hierarchy allows subdivision of any flora description into as many as four levels in order to specify plant character precisely. Terms at any one level will not necessarily be parallel in status. Both PLANTS and LEAVES serve as…

  18. Farm Crisis Response: Extension and Research Activities in the North Central Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Paul, Comp.; And Others

    The 12 states comprising the North Central Region have been affected in similar ways by the farm crisis of the 1980s. Statewide surveys show sizeable proportions of farm operations that are experiencing moderately high levels of financial stress. The problems caused by chronic stress on family structure and functioning, the loss of mainstreet…

  19. Disaster Down East: Using Participatory Action Research to Explore Intimate Partner Violence in Eastern North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Pamela York; Belton, Leigh; Hooten, Elizabeth; Campbell, Marci Kramish; DeVellis, Brenda; Benedict, Salli; Carrillo, Carla; Gonzalez, Pam; Kelsey, Kristine; Meier, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd in 1999, a Community Advisory Committee requested assistance from its university partners (University of North Carolina) to address stress and increased risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Collected from 12 study work sites, baseline data indicated that IPV rates were higher among blue-collar women in…

  20. A Review and Summary of Research on Adult Mathematics Education in North America (1980-2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford-Ramus, Katherine

    The content, scope, and methodology of dissertations on adult mathematics education in North American were examined. The study database consisted of the abstracts of 113 dissertations written between 1980 and 2000. The topics covered in the individual dissertations were as follows: assessment/frameworks/standards (14); contexts (3); instructional…

  1. Understanding fine sediment and phosphorous delivery in upland catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, M. T.; Reaney, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    The uplands of UK are heavily impacted by land management including; farming and forestry operations, moorland burning, peat extraction, metal mining, artificial drainage and channelisation. It has been demonstrated that such land management activity may modify hillslope processes, resulting in enhanced runoff generation and changing the spatial distribution and magnitude of erosion. Resultantly, few upland river systems of the UK are operating in a natural state, with land management activity often resulting in increased fluxes of suspended sediment (< 2 mm) and associated pollutants (such as phosphorous). Most recent Environment Agency (EA) data reveals that 60% of monitored water bodies within upland areas of the UK are currently at risk of failing the Water Framework Directive (WFD) due to poor ecological status. In order to prevent the continual degradation of many upland catchments, riverine systems and their diverse ecosystems, a range of measures to control diffuse pollution will need to be implemented. Future mitigation options and measures in the UK may be tested and targeted through the EA's catchment pilot scheme; DEFRA's Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) programmes and through the catchment restoration fund. However, restoring the physical and biological processes of past conditions in inherently sensitive upland environments is extremely challenging requiring the development of a solid evidence base to determine the effectiveness of resource allocation and to enable reliable and transparent decisions to be made about future catchment operations. Such evidence is rarely collected, with post-implementation assessments often neglected. This paper presents research conducted in the Morland sub-catchment of the River Eden within Cumbria; UK. 80% of this headwater catchment is in upland areas and is dominated by improved grassland and rough grazing. The catchment is heavily instrumented with a range of hydro-meteorological equipment. A high-tech monitoring

  2. Formulations of transport in catchment-scale conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vos, Lotte; Hrachowitz, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Standard conceptual hydrological models can rarely accommodate stream tracer dynamics at the catchment scale. They rely on the generation of runoff through the propagation of a pressure wave and do not account for the actual advective movement of particles. Over the last years different model frameworks have been developed to account for this shortcoming. The difference between the frameworks lies in whether they are based on mixing coefficients or storage age selection functions. Both methods have shown their ability to capture the stream chemistry response. It is however not clear how these distinct approaches compare to each other and to reality. The object of this research is to provide clarification in this matter. To achieve this, the hydrological and stream water chemistry response for a set of contrasting research catchments is modelled, using both the mixing coefficient and the storage age selection approach. The results are analysed using the concept of transit times, where information on the fluxes and states in all model components is used to generate distributions that describe the age structure of water. By comparing the distributions generated by both methods and by evaluating the overall model performances, more insight is gained on how mixing occurs at the catchment scale. This contributes to the understanding of the integrated system dynamics of catchments, which is relevant for the development of good water quality models that accurately describe the integrated response of a hydrological system.

  3. Phosphorus fluxes in headwater streams draining non-research poultry-pasture operations in north-central Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeis, J. J.; Jackson, C. R.; Radcliffe, D. E.; Risse, M. L.; Bryant, J.

    2007-12-01

    Poultry production is the largest agricultural commodity in Georgia, USA. Due to inefficient utilization of the phosphorus (P) in poultry feed, the manure contains high concentrations of P. When used as fertilizer for crops and pasture, poultry manure may be washed from the soil surface and increase eutrophication risks to downstream lakes and reservoirs. Long term application of poultry manure may result in P saturation of the soils. In the upper Etowah River basin in north-central Georgia, a long history of poultry farming has resulted in high P levels in soils receiving regular poultry manure applications. Few studies to date have been performed on the estimation of P fluxes from operational commercial poultry farms in Georgia. In Fall 2006, a 20-month surface water quality monitoring program was completed that was aimed at estimating P and suspended sediment fluxes in nine headwater streams draining poultry-pasture operations in the upper Etowah River basin. The nine catchments differed in terms of land use history, soil P levels, best management practices and other factors. An additional three streams draining U.S. National Forest were also monitored to provide reference concentrations and loads. Monitoring data included continuous (5-minute) streamflow, rainfall, and water quality samples. Water quality samples included biweekly grab samples plus storm samples collected using conventional autosamplers. Storm sampling using autosamplers included collection of discrete samples and composite samples. In particular instances, the two types of storm sample were collected simultaneously. Discrete storm sampling methods enabled collection of both rising and falling hydrograph limb samples to identify potential hysteretic water quality effects. Water samples were analyzed for total P, filterable reactive P, and total suspended solids. We are using this data to compare different flux estimation methods with emphasis on regression models that utilize laboratory results

  4. Impacts of climate and land use changes on regional nutrient export in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Climate and land use changes modify the physical functioning of river catchments and, in particular, influence the transport of nutrients from land to water. In large-scale catchments, where a variety of climates, topographies, soil types and land uses co-exist to form a highly heterogeneous environment, a more complex nutrient dynamic is imposed by climate and land use changes. This is the case of the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) that, along with the North Saskatchewan River, forms the largest river system in western Canada. In the past years changes in the land use and new industrial developments in the SSR area have heightened serious concerns about the future of water quality in the catchment and downstream waters. Agricultural activities have increased the supply of manure and fertilizer for cropping. Oil and gas exploitation has also increased the risk of surface water and groundwater contamination. The rapid population growth not only leads to increments in water consumption and wastewater, but in the construction of roads, railways and the expansion of new urban developments that impose hydraulic controls on the catchment hydrology and therefore the sediment and nutrient transport. Consequences of the actual anthropogenic changes have been notorious in reservoirs where algal blooms and signs of eutrophication have become common during certain times of the year. Although environmental agencies are constantly improving the mechanisms to reduce nutrient export into the river and ensure safe water quality standards, further research is needed in order to identify major nutrient sources and quantify nutrient export and also, to assess how nutrients are going to vary as a result of future climate and land use change scenarios. The SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) model is therefore implemented to assess water quality regionally, in order to describe spatial and temporal patterns to identify those factors and processes that affect water

  5. Impacts of climate and land use changes on regional nutrient export in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Climate and land use changes modify the physical functioning of river catchments and, in particular, influence the transport of nutrients from land to water. In large-scale catchments, where a variety of climates, topographies, soil types and land uses co-exist to form a highly heterogeneous environment, a more complex nutrient dynamic is imposed by climate and land use changes. This is the case of the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) that, along with the North Saskatchewan River, forms the largest river system in western Canada. In the past years changes in the land use and new industrial developments in the SSR area have heightened serious concerns about the future of water quality in the catchment and downstream waters. Agricultural activities have increased the supply of manure and fertilizer for cropping. Oil and gas exploitation has also increased the risk of surface water and groundwater contamination. The rapid population growth not only leads to increments in water consumption and wastewater, but in the construction of roads, railways and the expansion of new urban developments that impose hydraulic controls on the catchment hydrology and therefore the sediment and nutrient transport. Consequences of the actual anthropogenic changes have been notorious in reservoirs where algal blooms and signs of eutrophication have become common during certain times of the year. Although environmental agencies are constantly improving the mechanisms to reduce nutrient export into the river and ensure safe water quality standards, further research is needed in order to identify major nutrient sources and quantify nutrient export and also, to assess how nutrients are going to vary as a result of future climate and land use change scenarios. The SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) model is therefore implemented to assess water quality regionally, in order to describe spatial and temporal patterns to identify those factors and processes that affect water

  6. Participant characteristics that influence consent for genetic research in a population-based survey: the Baltimore epidemiologic catchment area follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mezuk, Briana; Eaton, William W; Zandi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the sociodemographic and health characteristics associated with the willingness to donate a DNA sample, and consent to testing and long-term storage of that sample, among participants in a longitudinal community-based survey. Eighty-three percent of the 1,071 participants interviewed in 2004/5 agreed to donate a biological specimen (blood or buccal). Age was consistently inversely associated with the willingness to allow genetic testing (OR 0.97; p < 0.05), but was unrelated to the willingness to donate or allow storage. There was no association between race and the consent to donate a specimen, but Blacks were less likely to consent to DNA storage for future research as compared with members of other racial groups (OR 0.50; p < 0.01). Four conditions were listed on the consent form as relevant to the genes targeted for assay. Participants with a family history of 1 or more of these conditions were more likely to donate than those without (OR 1.68; p < 0.01). Participants with a personal history of 1 of the 4 conditions listed were not more or less likely to donate, allow testing or allow storage than respondents without such a history. Sociodemographic characteristics were unrelated to the willingness to donate a biological sample. Age, but not race, sex or education, was related to consent to genetic testing. Race, but not age, sex or education, was related to consent to storage. A family history of health conditions listed as relevant to the assays being requested was related to the willingness to donate. Factors that affect the willingness to donate a biological sample in an epidemiologic study are not the same as those associated with the willingness to allow genetic testing or storage of that sample for unspecified future research. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Research of water resources allocation of South-to-North Water Diversion East Route Project in Jiangsu Province ,Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optimized allocation of water resources is the important means of solving regional water shortage and can improve the utilization of water resources. Water resources allocation in the large-scale water diversion project area is the current research focus. This research takes the east route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project in Jiangsu province as the research area, based on the hydrological model, agricultural irrigation quota model, and water project scheduling model, a water resources allocation model was constructed. The research carried on generalized regional water supply network, simulated the water supply, water demand and water deficit in agriculture, industry, life, ecology and lock under the status quo and planning engineering conditions. According to the results, the east route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project is helpful to improve regional water shortage situation. The results showed that pump output increase by 2.8 billion cubic meters of water. On the conditions of P = 95%, 75% and 50%, compared with the benchmark year, water demand increases slightly due to the need of social and economic development in planning years, and water supply increased significantly because of new diversion ability. Water deficit are greatly reduced by 74.9% especially in the commonly drought condition because of the new project operation and optimized allocation of water resources.

  8. Remote assessment of instantaneous changes in water chemistry after liming in a Nova Scotia catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Remote assessment of instantaneous changes in water chemistry after liming in a Nova Scotia catchment ANGELIDIS, C.1, STERLING, S.1, BREEN, A.2, BIAGI, K.1., and CLAIR, T.A.1 1Dalhousie University, christine.angelidis@dal.ca, 2Bluenose Coastal Action Foundation, andrew@coastalaction.org Southwestern Nova Scotia has some of the most acidic freshwaters in North America due to its location downwind of the major emission sources in eastern Canada and the US and due to a resistant geology which offers little acid buffering capacity (Clair et al. 2007). Because of the poor buffering and regionally high runoff values, hydrological events such as snowmelt and rain storms are frequent and can cause sudden changes in water chemistry which can have devastating effects on freshwater biota due to increases in acidity and metals (Dennis and Clair in press). Clair et al. (2001) have estimated the potential frequency of acidic episodes in this region based on a number of hydrological factors, though the technology available at the time to monitor short-term changes was not dependable. Recent advances in equipment have made the assessment of the frequency and severity of acidic episodes easier and more accurate, allowing better interpretation and prediction of hydrogeochemical changes with variations in weather and deposition patterns. Here we take advantage of these recent advances to monitor water chemistry in an experimental catchment, and explore the response to catchment liming. Catchment liming is one way of mitigating the effects of acid deposition in sensitive areas. We limed a 50 ha catchment at a rate of 5 t/ha in the Gold River watershed of southwest Nova Scotia to examine the interactions between application of lime with the geological and climatological conditions of this region and acid episode frequency. In order to assess changes of episode frequency caused by liming, we established two mobile environmental monitoring platforms in the catchment: a control site

  9. Collaborative Research: Climate Sensitivity of Thaw Lake Systems on the Alaska North Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Tingjun; Jeffries, Martin O.

    2001-01-01

    There are thousands of thaw (thermokarst) lakes on the North Slope of Alaska, where they cover as much as 40% of the land area. Their very name recognizes the fact that they owe their origin to the impact they have on the ground thermal regime, but there have been few quantitative studies of the impact of the lakes on atmosphere-land interactions in this tundra region.

  10. Cultural Resources, Studies, Eastern North Carolina Above Cape Lookout, Literature Review and Preliminary Research Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    England in preparation of its purchase of North and South Carolina in 1729, an acquisi- tion which transformed the provinces into royal colonies. The...proprietors in England . For their part, the proprietors minimized the whole affair and the incident passed without retribution to the supposed rebels. The...liberated. According to Governor Johnston, when writing to the Board of Trade in England , "It is only in these two Precincts that the people have dared to

  11. Nitrogen Concentrations and Exports in Baseflow and Stormflow from Three Small Urban Catchments in Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Hochmuth, G.; Clark, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Export of nitrogen from different watersheds across the United States is receiving increasing attention due to the impairment of water quality in receiving water bodies. Researchers have indicated that different land uses exerted a substantial influence on the water quality. Nitrogen loadings on the watershed scale are being studied in many large ecosystems, such as the Baltimore Ecosystem and Arizona Ecosystem, but only a few focuses in a smaller scale such as catchment scale. Characterization of the land use in catchment scale can better explain the observed environmental phenomena under the watershed scale and enrich the related watershed studies. Nitrogen fluxes have been studied at Lake Alice watershed in Gainesville, Florida with a focus on the rarely studied catchments such as sports fields with intensive fertilization management (SFC), urban area with reclaimed water irrigation (RWC) and urban area without irrigation (CC). The entire study started from May 2013. Discharge was monitored in the three catchments by transducers every 5 minutes. Regular biweekly grab samples in the three catchments were used to estimate the baseflow N loads, composite samples in 13 storms were collected to estimate the stormflow N loads. The results showed that in the baseflow, the average NO3-N concentration in SFC was 12.19 mg/l, which was significantly different from the urban catchments. Also there was a significant difference between the NO3-N concentrations in RWC (1.17 mg/l on average) and CC (0.60 mg/l on average). A separate log-log relationship was developed between discharge and N loads to estimate the baseflow N loads and stormflow N loads. It showed that baseflow contributed more N loads than stormflow in the three catchments in the annual N load. In conclusion, the recreational catchment received the greatest N load compared to the other catchments, so it should be the priority catchment when it comes to adopting nutrient management practices in the Lake Alice

  12. Scale effects on headwater catchment runoff timing, flow sources, and groundwater-streamflow relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlynn, B.L.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Seibert, J.; Kendall, C.

    2004-01-01

    [1] The effects of catchment size and landscape organization on runoff generation are poorly understood. Little research has integrated hillslope and riparian runoff investigation across catchments of different sizes to decipher first-order controls on runoff generation. We investigated the role of catchment sizes on riparian and hillslope dynamics, based on hydrometric and tracer data observed at five scales ranging from trenched hillslope sections (55-285 m 2) to a 280-ha catchment at Maimai on the west coast of the South Island, New Zealand. The highly organized landscape is comprised of similar headwater catchments, regular geology, steep highly dissected topography, relatively consistent soil depths, and topographically controlled shallow through flow. We found a strong correlation between riparian zone groundwater levels and runoff for the headwaters, whereas the water tables in the valley bottom of the larger catchments were uncorrelated to runoff for 14 months of record. While there was no clear relationship between catchment size and new water contribution to runoff in the two storms analyzed in detail, lag times of tracer responses increased systematically with catchment size. The combination of hydrometric and tracer data allowed assessment of the runoff contributions from different parts of the landscape. Runoff was generated consistently in headwater riparian zones. This agreed also with the observed variations of tracer (18O and silica) responses for the different catchments. During wetter antecedent conditions or during larger events (>30 mm under dry antecedent conditions) hillslope and valley bottom floodplains did contribute to event runoff directly. We propose that analysis of landscape-scale organization and the distribution of dominant landscape features provide a structure for investigation of runoff production and solute transport, especially as catchment-scale increases from headwaters to the mesoscale.

  13. Identifying Barriers and Practical Solutions to Conducting Site-Based Research in North America: Exploring Acute Heart Failure Trials As a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ambrosy, Andrew P; Mentz, Robert J; Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greene, Stephen J; Severance, Harry W

    2015-10-01

    Although the prognosis of ambulatory heart failure (HF) has improved dramatically there have been few advances in the management of acute HF (AHF). Despite regional differences in patient characteristics, background therapy, and event rates, AHF clinical trial enrollment has transitioned from North America and Western Europe to Eastern Europe, South America, and Asia-Pacific where regulatory burden and cost of conducting research may be less prohibitive. It is unclear if the results of clinical trials conducted outside of North America are generalizable to US patient populations. This article uses AHF as a paradigm and identifies barriers and practical solutions to successfully conducting site-based research in North America.

  14. Modeling the behavior of an ungauged catchment using alternative datasets: a case study of the Caribou catchment in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, Geneviève; Boucher, Marie-Amélie; Chesnaux, Romain

    2017-04-01

    The modelling of ungauged catchments is a long standing problem in hydrology and there is still no general consensus regarding the best practices to adopt in a variety of situations. In addition to flood and drought forecasting, there are other interests of modelling the hydrological behaviour of a catchment, whether it is gauged or not. For instance, estimation of groundwater recharge can be performed through an integrated modeling of the catchment. In this study, the WaSim model is used to model the hydrology of the Caribou River catchment located in the province of Quebec, in Canada. Since this catchment includes an important aquifer that is used both for drinking water, industrial and potential agricultural purposes, an accurate recharge assessment is important and is the long-term objective of the project. The WaSim model was chosen due to its very versatile soil sub-model features which allow to simulate subsurface flows and calculate the groundwater recharge as an output variable. Since the Caribou River is ungauged, alternative means of calibrating the free parameters of WaSim had to be implemented. The implementation of a calibration protocol that can get the most out of the few available data is a secondary objective and is the subject of this presentation. First, a « twin » gauged catchment is selected for its physiographic and hydro-climatic similarities with the Caribou River catchment. Streamflow series from this « twin » catchment are then transferred and used jointly with the dynamically dimensioned search (DDS) algorithm (Tolson and Shoemaker 2007) to obtain a raw calibration of the WaSim model parameters. This initial calibration can be further refined using two available datasets: (1) snow water equivalent data interpolated on a 10 km by 10 km grid and (2) a short and discontinuous time series of streamflow obtained using the land-surface scheme of the environmental multiscale atmospheric model (GEM) at Environment and Climate Change Canada

  15. Understanding drought propagation in the UK in the context of climatology and catchment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Lucy; Hannaford, Jamie; Bloomfield, John; Marchant, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Droughts are a complex natural phenomena that are challenging to plan and prepare for. The propagation of droughts through the hydrological cycle is one of many factors which contribute to this complexity, and a thorough understanding of drought propagation is crucial for informed drought management, particularly in terms of water resources management in both the short and long term. Previous studies have found that both climatological and catchment factors cause lags in drought propagation from meteorological to hydrological and hydrogeological droughts. There are strong gradients in both climatology and catchment properties across the UK. Catchments in the north and west of the UK are relatively impermeable, upland catchments with thin soils and receive the highest annual precipitation with relatively low mean annual temperatures. Conversely, in the south and east of the UK, characterised by higher mean temperatures and lower annual precipitation, catchments are underlain by a number of major aquifers (e.g. Chalk, limestone) and are typically associated with high baseflow rivers. Here we explore the effects of these gradients in climatology and catchments on the propagation of droughts. Using standardised drought indices (the Standardised Precipitation Index; the Standardised Streamflow Index; and the Standardised Groundwater Index) we analyse drought propagation characteristics for selected catchment-borehole pairs across the UK using reconstructed time series back to the 19th century. We investigate how the timing, nature and predictability of drought propagation changes across the UK, given gradients in climatology and catchment characteristics. We use probability of detection methods, usually used for forecast verification, to investigate how well precipitation and streamflow deficits predict deficits in streamflow and groundwater levels and how this varies across the UK.

  16. Geographic variations in heart failure hospitalizations among medicare beneficiaries in the Tennessee catchment area.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Modele O; Holt, James B; Croft, Janet B; Nwaise, Isaac A; Okafor, Henry E; Sawyer, Douglas B; Giles, Wayne H; Mensah, George A

    2012-01-01

    Although differences in heart failure (HF) hospitalization rates by race and sex are well documented, little is known about geographic variations in hospitalizations for HF, the most common discharge diagnosis for Medicare beneficiaries. Using exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, the authors examined hospitalization rates for HF as the first-listed discharge diagnosis among Medicare beneficiaries in a 10-state Tennessee catchment area, based on the resident states reported by Tennessee hospitals from 2000 to 2004. The age-adjusted HF hospitalization rate (per 1000) among Medicare beneficiaries was 23.3 [95% confidence interval (CI), 23.3-23.4] for the Tennessee catchment area, 21.4 (95% CI, 21.4-21.5) outside the catchment area and 21.9 (95% CI, 21.9-22.0) for the overall United States. The age-adjusted HF hospitalization rates were also significantly higher in the catchment area than outside the catchment area and overall, among men, women and whites, whereas rates among the blacks were higher outside the catchment area. Beneficiaries in the catchment area also had higher age-specific HF hospitalization rates. Among states in the catchment area, the highest mean county-level rates were in Mississippi (30.6 ± 7.6) and Kentucky (29.2 ± 11.5), and the lowest were in North Carolina (21.7 ± 5.7) and Virginia (21.8 ± 6.6). Knowledge of these geographic differences in HF hospitalization rates can be useful in identifying needs of healthcare providers, allocating resources, developing comprehensive HF outreach programs and formulating policies to reduce these differences.

  17. Assessment of surface water resources availability using catchment modeling and the results of tracer studies in the meso-scale Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Mukubwa, A.; Maskey, S.; Wenninger, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the last couple of years, different hydrological research projects were undertaken in the Migina catchment (243.2 km2), a tributary of the Kagera river in Southern Rwanda. These projects were aimed to understand hydrological processes of the catchment using analytical and experimental approaches and to build a pilot case whose experience can be extended to other catchments in Rwanda. In the present study, we developed a hydrological model of the catchment, which can be used to inform water resources planning and decision making. The semi-distributed hydrological model HEC-HMS (version 3.5) was used with its soil moisture accounting, unit hydrograph, liner reservoir (for base flow) and Muskingum-Cunge (river routing) methods. We used rainfall data from 12 stations and streamflow data from 5 stations, which were collected as part of this study over a period of two years (May 2009 and June 2011). The catchment was divided into five sub-catchments each represented by one of the five observed streamflow gauges. The model parameters were calibrated separately for each sub-catchment using the observed streamflow data. Calibration results obtained were found acceptable at four stations with a Nash-Sutcliffe Model Efficiency of 0.65 on daily runoff at the catchment outlet. Due to the lack of sufficient and reliable data for longer periods, a model validation (split sample test) was not undertaken. However, we used results from tracer based hydrograph separation from a previous study to compare our model results in terms of the runoff components. It was shown that the model performed well in simulating the total flow volume, peak flow and timing as well as the portion of direct runoff and base flow. We observed considerable disparities in the parameters (e.g. groundwater storage) and runoff components across the five sub-catchments, that provided insights into the different hydrological processes at sub-catchment scale. We conclude that such disparities justify the need

  18. How tritium illuminates catchment structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M.; Morgenstern, U.; McDonnell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Streams contain water which has taken widely-varying times to pass through catchments, and the distribution of ages is likely to change with the flow. Part of the water has 'runoff' straight to the stream with little delay, other parts are more delayed and some has taken years (in some cases decades) to traverse the deeper regolith or bedrock of the catchment. This work aims to establish the significance of the last component, which is important because it can cause catchments to have long memories of contaminant inputs (e.g. nitrate). Results of tritium studies on streams world-wide were accessed from the scientific literature. Most of the studies assumed that there were just two age-components present in the streams (i.e. young and old). The mean ages and proportions of the components were found by fitting simulations to tritium data. It was found that the old component in streams was substantial (average was 50% of the annual runoff) and had considerable age (average mean age was 10 years) (Stewart et al., 2010). Use of oxygen-18 or chloride variations to estimate streamflow mean age usually does not reveal the age or size of this old component, because these methods cannot detect water older than about four years. Consequently, the use of tritium has shown that substantial parts of streamflow in headwater catchments are older than expected, and that deep groundwater plays an active and sometimes even a dominant role in runoff generation. Difficulties with interpretation of tritium in streams in recent years due to interference from tritium due to nuclear weapons testing are becoming less serious, because very accurate tritium measurements can be made and there is now little bomb-tritium remaining in the atmosphere. Mean ages can often be estimated from single tritium measurements in the Southern Hemisphere, because there was much less bomb-tritium in the atmosphere. This may also be possible for some locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Age determination on

  19. North-South Partnership in Water Resource Education and Research - Lessons learnt from U.S.-Ethiopia Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, M.

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, Ethiopian and U.S. universities formed partnership to train critical mass of Ethiopians in modern water resources tools, techniques, skills and knowledge, and to strengthen the institutional capacity of Ethiopian universities to establish graduate-level programs in Ethiopia. The partnership established Ethiopia's first water resource research institute, two graduate-level programs (water resource engineering and management, water and health) that are currently training about 100 students at M.S. and Ph.D. levels, summer undergraduate outreach program that provided community-based research experience in water resource for undergraduate students, and short-term trainings to practitioners and policy makers. The design, implementation and impact of these programs have had limitations and successes. In this presentation, I will provide lessons learnt from this partnership, and suggestions of elements required for successful North-South partnership in higher education and research.

  20. Visitor’s Guide to Oliktok Point Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Desilets, Darin; Helsel, Fred M.; Bendure, Al O.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Dexheimer, Danielle N.

    2016-04-01

    The importance of Oliktok Point, Alaska, as a focal point for climate research in the Arctic continues to grow with the addition of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) and the expansion of infrastructure to support airborne measurements. The site hosts a suite of instruments for making multi-year, high-fidelity atmospheric measurements; serves as a base of operations for field campaigns; and contains the only Restricted Airspace and Warning Area in the U.S. Arctic, which enables the use of unmanned aircraft systems. The use of this site by climate researchers involves several considerations, including its remoteness, harsh climate, and location amid the North Slope oilfields. This guide is intended to help visitors to Oliktok Point navigate this unique physical and administrative environment, and thereby facilitate safe and productive operations.

  1. [Medico-geographical analysis of the territory: the experience of research in the European North of Russia].

    PubMed

    Dushkova, D O

    2013-01-01

    Detailed analysis of medical-geographical peculiarities in the regions of the European North of Russia is presented Medico-geographical characteristics were revealed to impose certain restrictions on the economic development of the region and serve as prerequisites for the occurrence regional pathologies. The importance of such research to identify spatial patterns in changes in health indices in connection with the regional features and landscape-epidemiological situation has been shown. The main factors contributing to the occurrence and development of natural focal diseases caused by feral herd infections in the investigated area have been described

  2. Hydrologic regime alteration of a Mediterranean catchment under climate change projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Haykel; Benabdallah, Sihem; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Herrmann, Frank; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2014-05-01

    Most of the climate models projections for the Mediterranean basin have showed that the region will likely to experience a general tendency towards drier climate conditions with decreases in total precipitation, increases in temperature, alterations in the rainfall extreme events and droughts frequency (IPCC, 2007; Giorgi and Lionello, 2008; López-Moreno et al., 2011). The region is already suffering from water resources scarcity and vulnerability which are expected to amplify in the next century (Ludwig et al., 2011; Schneider et al., 2013). Therefore, assessing the impact of climate change on the hydrologic regime of Mediterranean catchments is with a major concern not only to scientist but also to water resources policy makers and general public. However, most of the climate change impact studies focus on the flow regime on global or regional scale rather than on the catchment scale which is more useful and more appropriate to guide practical mitigation and adaptation policy. This is because hydro-climate modeling at the local scale is confronted to the variability in climate, topography, geology, lack of observations and anthropogenic activities within the catchment. Furthermore, it is well recognized that hydrological and climate models forecasts are always affected with uncertainty making the assessment of climate change impact on Mediterranean catchment hydrology more challenging. This work aims to assess the impact of climate change on a Mediterranean catchment located in North Africa (the Chiba catchment in northeast Tunisia) through a conjunctive use of physically based hydrological model (SWAT) driven with four climate models*. Quantification of the impact of climate change has been conducted by means of the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (Richter et al., 1996) which are also ecologically meaningful. By comparing changes in these indicators in the reference period (1971-2000) to the projected ones in the future (2041-2070), it was possible to draw

  3. River nutrient loads and catchment size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.V.; Swaney, D.P.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Scarsbrook, M.R.; Weatherhead, M.A.; Humborg, Christoph; Eriksson, H.; Hannerz, F.

    2005-01-01

    We have used a total of 496 sample sites to calibrate a simple regression model for calculating dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes via runoff to the ocean. The regression uses the logarithms of runoff and human population as the independent variables and estimates the logarithms of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus loading with R 2 values near 0.8. This predictive capability is about the same as has been derived for total nutrient loading with process-based models requiring more detailed information on independent variables. We conclude that population and runoff are robust proxies for the more detailed application, landscape modification, and in-stream processing estimated by more process-based models. The regression model has then been applied to a demonstration data set of 1353 river catchments draining to the sea from the North American continent south of the Canadian border. The geographic extents of these basins were extracted from a 1-km digital elevation model for North America, and both runoff and population were estimated for each basin. Most of the basins (72% of the total) are smaller than 103 km2, and both runoff and population density are higher and more variable among small basins than among larger ones.While total load to the ocean can probably be adequately estimated from large systems only, analysis of the geographic distribution of nutrient loading requires consideration of the small basins, which can exhibit significant hydrologic and demographic heterogeneity between systems over their range even within the same geographic region. High-resolution regional and local analysis is necessary for environmental assessment and management. ?? Springer 2005.

  4. Integrated monitoring of nitrogen dynamics in contrasting catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, M.; Fleischer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The research institute WESS (Water & Earth System Science) is monitoring three adjacent meso-scale catchments (72 - 140 km2) in southwest Germany with respect to water quantity and quality. Due to their spatial proximity, the studied catchments are similar regarding climatic conditions and water balance. Geology is characterized by sedimentary rocks which are partly karstified. The catchments contrast strongly in land use and show a range from predominantly agriculture to almost exclusively forestry. In this context, a special focus of our research is the distinction of matter coming from the catchment area versus substances stemming from urban point sources. One important compound representing inputs from the catchment area is nitrogen. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient governing plant growth. If available in excess it leads to eutrophication and is therefore one of the globally most widespread contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Transport of human-derived nitrogen through landscapes including urban areas to the oceans predominantly occurs via river network systems. Hence, monitoring of nitrogen fluxes in streams and rivers reveals mechanisms and dynamics of its transport and gives also insight into hydrologic processes which influence the mobilization of nitrogen. Presently, the catchments are equipped with online probes enabling high resolution monitoring of nitrate concentrations and other parameters. We found that average nitrate concentrations in stream water perfectly reflect the portion of fertilized arable land. The dynamics of N transport, however, largely depends on the hydrologic system and is driven by the dominating runoff generation processes. The interplay between different hydrological storages, which eventually also act as N pools, turns out to be decisive for the temporal variability of N concentrations in stream discharge. Inversely, the study of N transport dynamics can be used to infer the hydrologic mechanisms responsible for N mobilization

  5. A Catchment-Based Land Surface Model for GCMs and the Framework for its Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducharen, A.; Koster, R. D.; Suarez, M. J.; Kumar, P.

    1998-01-01

    A new GCM-scale land surface modeling strategy that explicitly accounts for subgrid soil moisture variability and its effects on evaporation and runoff is now being explored. In a break from traditional modeling strategies, the continental surface is disaggregated into a mosaic of hydrological catchments, with boundaries that are not dictated by a regular grid but by topography. Within each catchment, the variability of soil moisture is deduced from TOP-MODEL equations with a special treatment of the unsaturated zone. This paper gives an overview of this new approach and presents the general framework for its off-line evaluation over North-America.

  6. Fate of organic contaminants in a boreal forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergknut, Magnus; Meijer, Sandra; Halsall, Crispin; Ågren, Anneli; Laudon, Hjalmar; Köhler, Stephan; Jones, Kevin; Tysklind, Mats; Wiberg, Karin

    2010-05-01

    organic carbon and soil-water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. Significant differences in export of POPs were apparent between the forested and mire areas, and this could be linked to observed differences in hydrology, biogeochemistry and flux of DOC. Levels of POPs in surface water along the water path from the studied catchment to the Baltic Sea (the Gulf of Bothnia subbasin) were measured and the results showed that for this water system, atmospherically derived diffuse pollution has impact on the surface water quality in addition to downstream point sources. In conclusion, it is evident that a full understanding of the baseline contribution and the soil-to-water processes controlling the transport of priority substances at catchment scale is a prerequisite for assessing the variation of priority substances in water streams and river basins on a seasonal and regional scale. It is also clear that mobilization of headwater atmospherically derived diffuse pollution may have an impact on stream water quality in addition to downstream point sources. The above findings are applicable to a wide variety of north European catchments systems and provide an integrated and process-based understanding of base-line contamination of major catchments. The presented data highlight the findings from the PERSPEC project, which was possible under the umbrella of the European Commission's 6th Framework Programme project SNOWMAN (contract no ERAC-CT-2003-003219).

  7. Monitoring of initial patterns and structures in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Biemelt, Detlef; Fischer, Anton

    2010-05-01

    To combine process-oriented research on initial development of ecosystems with interactions and co-development of spatial patterns and structures the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR) 38 (www.tu-cottbus.de/sfb_trr) was established as an initiative of three universities (BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich). The objective of the SFB/TRR 38 is to enhance our understanding of structure genesis in ecosystems and of process dynamics as well as their interactions during the initial development phase. The aim is to integrate these feedback mechanisms in the analysis of water and element budgets at the catchment scale and to implement them into models. To allow the clear definition of starting conditions at ´point zeró and to be able to integrate spatially distributed processes and patterns to larger units, an artificial catchment was constructed in the mining area of Lusatia/Germany as the main research site (Gerwin et al. 2009a). With an area of about 6 ha, this catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is to our knowledge the largest artificial catchment worldwide. It was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. No further measures of restoration like planting, amelioration or fertilization were carried out to allow natural succession and undisturbed development. Due to the artificial construction, boundary conditions of this site are clearly defined including well documented inner structures as compared to natural catchments. It is assumed that the interaction of patterns and processes during initial development will proceed from simpler to more complex states of the systems and that different stages along this phase can be identified at the catchment level. Changes within the catchment are intensively monitored since 2005, when construction finished (Gerwin et al. 2009b), including intensive on-site measurements and micro

  8. Spatial relationships in a dendritic network: the herpetofaunal metacommunity of the Mattole River catchment of northwest California.

    Treesearch

    Hartwell Welsh; Garth Hodgson

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the aquatic and riparian herpetofauna in a 789 km² river catchment in northwest California to examine competing theories of biotic community structuring in catchment stream networks. Research in fluvial geomorphology has resulted in multi-scale models of dynamic processes that cyclically create, maintain, and destroy environments in stream...

  9. Population dynamics of the major north American needle-eating budworms. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    The report includes data from six western States provided 1,251 life tables representing western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis. These data provided projection capabilities for defoliation and successive budworm densities, as well as a basis for comparing survival rates among the three principal North American needle-eating budworms (western and eastern spruce budworms, and the jack pine budworm). Several modifications are suggested in current methods for managing budworm susceptible forests, and suggestions are provided for further studies on the budworm life systems.

  10. Digital catchment observatories: A platform for engagement and knowledge exchange between catchment scientists, policy makers, and local communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, E. B.; Wilkinson, M. E.; Macleod, C. J. A.; Beven, K.; Percy, B. J.; Macklin, M. G.; Quinn, P. F.; Stutter, M.; Haygarth, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    Increasing pressures on the hydrological cycle from our changing planet have led to calls for a refocus of research in the sciences of hydrology and water resources. Opportunities for new and innovative research into these areas are being facilitated by advances in the use of cyberinfrastructure, such as the development of digital catchment observatories. This is enabling research into hydrological issues such as flooding to be approached differently. The ability to combine different sources of data, knowledge, and modeling capabilities from different groups such as scientists, policy makers, and the general public has the potential to provide novel insights into the way individual catchments respond at different temporal and spatial scales. While the potential benefits of the digital catchment observatory are large, this new way of carrying out research into hydrological sciences is likely to prove challenging on many levels. Along with the obvious technical and infrastructural challenges to this work, an important area for consideration is how to enable a digital observatory to work for a range of potential end-users, paving the way for new areas of research through developing a platform effective for engagement and knowledge exchange. Using examples from the recent local-scale hydrological exemplar in the Environmental Virtual Observatory pilot project (http://www.evo-uk.org), this commentary considers a number of issues around the communication between and engagement of different users, the use of local knowledge and uncertainty with cloud-based models, and the potential for decision support and directions for future research.

  11. Hydro-Biogeochemical Approaches to Understanding of Water Cycling in the Gwangneung Coniferous Catchment, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Choi, H.; Lim, J.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial and temporal sources of headwater catchment runoff are important factors in our understanding of the dominant controls on catchment runoff. The information on flowpath, storage, residence time, and interactions of water and materials transport in a catchment is the prerequisite to the understanding and predicting of water cycling in the mountainous landscapes. In this presentation, along with some up-to-date results of hydro-biogeochemical researches, we present the principal methods that are currently used in Forest Water Resources Laboratory, Korea Forest Research Institute to obtain such information. Various catchment hydrological processes have been examined on the basis of the water table fluctuations, the end-member mixing model, the cross correlation analysis, and stable isotope. The stream discharge from the surface and shallow soil layer momentarily dominated at peak flow, and then its relative contribution decreased as precipitation intensity declined. Such a pattern (though with a greater magnitude) is consistent with those reported in many mixing-model studies of forested catchments. Overall surface discharge, on the other hand, steadily increased with subsequent storm events throughout the season. The previous study suggested that maintained precipitation expands saturation zone and increases macropore flow in the forested catchment. Such a macropore flow delivers new water in which dissolved ion concentrations are low because of short contact time with soil and bedrock. In the Gwangneung coniferous forest catchment, the contribution of surface discharge was relatively large, and the changes in the amount, intensity and patterns of precipitation affected both the flowpath and the mean residence time of water. Particularly during the summer monsoon, changes in precipitation patterns and hydrological processes in the catchment influenced the carbon cycle such that the persistent precipitation increased the discharge of dissolved organic

  12. Catchments of general practice in different countries--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Allan, Donald P

    2014-08-29

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area.This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  13. Directions and Dilemmas in Massage Therapy Research: A Workshop Report from the 2009 North American Research Conference on Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Christopher A.; Dryden, Trish; Shipwright, Stacey

    2009-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy (MT) is widely used and expanding rapidly, but systematic research on its mechanisms and effects has, in contrast with many other therapeutic fields, a short history. Purpose: To take stock of the current state of MT research and to explore approaches, directions, and strategies with the potential to make the next two decades of MT research optimally productive. Setting: The 2009 North American Research Conference on Complementary and Integrative Medicine held in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Method: Using a modified Delphi method, the study authors led an interactive workshop that aimed to identify established MT research findings, needed MT research, weaknesses and limitations in currently available MT research, and directions to pursue in the next two decades of MT research. Participants: The thirty-seven conference attendees—including MT researchers, educators, and practitioners, and other health care practitioners who already work interprofessionally with MT—actively participated in the workshop and ensured that a diversity of perspectives were represented. Results: The MT field has made rapid and laudable progress in its short history, but at the same time this short history is probably the main reason for most of the current shortcomings in MT research. Drawing on a diversity of backgrounds, workshop participants identified many opportunities and strategies for future research. Conclusion: Though lost time can never be recovered, the field’s late start in research should not be allowed to be a demoralizing handicap to progress. Modern scientific methods and technologies, applied to the range of directions and dilemmas highlighted in this report, can lead to impressive progress in the next twenty years of MT research. PMID:21589729

  14. Interactive Effects of Storms, Drought, and Weekly Land Cover Changes on Water Quality Patterns in an Agricultural-dominated Subtropical Catchment in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, J.; Owsley, B.; de Beurs, K.; Hughes, A.

    2013-12-01

    Rivers are the funnels of landscapes, with the quality of water at the catchment outlet reflecting interactions among geomorphic processes, vegetation characteristics, weather patterns, and anthropogenic land uses. The impacts of changing climate and land cover on water quality are not straightforward; but instead, are set by the interaction of numerous landscape components at multiple spatiotemporal scales. In agricultural-dominated subtropical landscapes such as the Hoteo River Catchment in northern North Island of New Zealand, the land surface can be very dynamic, responding quickly to storms, drought, forest clearings, and grazing practices. In order to capture these short-term fluctuations, we created an 8-day land disturbance index for the catchment using MODIS Nadir BRDF-adjusted reflectance (NBAR) data (500 meter resolution) from 2000 to 2013. We also fused this time-series with Landsat TM/ETM surface reflectance data (30 meter resolution) to more precisely capture the location and extent of these land disturbances. This high-resolution land disturbance time-series was then compared to daily rainfall, daily river discharge, and monthly water samples to assess the effects of changing weather and land cover on a suite of water quality variables including water clarity, turbidity, ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), total nitrogen (TN), dissolved reactive phosphate (DRP), total phosphorus (TP), and fecal coliforms. Forest clearings in the early part of our study period created the most intense land disturbances, which led to elevated turbidity and DRP during subsequent storms. Pasture areas during drought were also characterized by high disturbance indices, particularly in 2013 - the worst drought on record for northern New Zealand. Seasonal effects on land disturbance and water quality were also detected, especially for water clarity and turbidity. From 2011 to 2013, river discharge and turbidity from three sub-catchments were measured at 5-minute intervals to

  15. Carbon Dioxide Flooding Technology Research and Field Test in Liuzan North Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanshi; Luo, Pingya; Sun, Lei; Fu, Zhijun

    2014-12-01

    The fault roots of Liuzan north block in Jidong oilfield of China have been long-term explored by solution gas drive. Recently, oil production declined rapidly because of shortage of formation energy and needing high water injection pressure. Carbon dioxide injection pressure is found to be generally low, and CO2 has good solubility in crude oil to supply formation energy and achieve high oil recovery efficiency. In this work, a pilot program of CO2 EOR technology was carried out. The slim tube test results showed that the minimal miscible pressure of Liuzan north block was 28.28 MPa. The injection parameters were optimized by numerical simulation method: the injection method was continuous, the slug size was 0.2 HCPV and the EOR efficiency was 7.23%. After two months of gas injection field test, the formation pressure of two gas injectors just increased by 14.02 MPa and 2.98 MPa, respectively, indicating that carbon dioxide could supply the formation energy effectively. 16 months after gas injection, the CO2 injection amount was 14640 t, and the oil increment was 16424 t. The present work demonstrates the potential applicability of CO2 flooding technology from high water injection reservoirs.

  16. Identifying hydrological responses of micro-catchments under contrasting land use in the Brazilian Cerrado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, R. L. B.; Guzha, A. C.; Torres, G. N.; Kovacs, K.; Lamparter, G.; Amorim, R. S. S.; Couto, E.; Gerold, G.

    2015-09-01

    topographic characteristics, and low-till farming techniques in the cropland catchment, additionally to the buffering effect of the gallery forests in these catchments. Although the results of this study provide a useful assessment of catchment rainfall-runoff controls in the Brazilian Cerrado landscape, further research is required to include quantification of the influence of the gallery forests on both hydrological and hydrochemical fluxes, which are important for watershed management and ecosystem services provisioning.

  17. Observation of hydrological processes and structures in the artificial Chicken Creek catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, K.; Schoenheinz, D.; Biemelt, D.; Schaaf, W.; Grünewald, U.

    Hydrological catchments are the essential observation spaces for hydrological and ecological studies on a landscape scale. Generally, natural catchments are characterised by high complexity and heterogeneity with uncertainties in boundaries, interior structures and properties. Artificially created, spatially and structurally well-defined hydrological catchments might be a suitable tool for enabling progress in hydrological research. “Chicken Creek”, one of the largest artificial catchments, with clearly defined boundary conditions and extended monitoring facilities, was set up on a dump site associated with opencast mining activities in East Germany. This catchment, left to undisturbed succession, has enabled the observation of ecosystem development from its very beginnings. A sophisticated measurement concept covering hydrological, meteorological and soil physical parameters was designed. It aimed at the detection and description of the hydrological processes that form structures and are controlled by structures at the catchment scale. In mature natural catchments that have already achieved a stage of dynamic equilibrium with evolved runoff structures and land cover, hot spots of hydrological interest are normally known or easily identifiable prior to the establishment of any monitoring concept. For a newly created artificial catchment, there is no recorded experience regarding hydrological development and behaviour. Under the premise of looking at a defined, initially unstructured, homogenous, isotropic, “virgin” area, a primarily grid-based observation concept was chosen as the initial approach. As components of the progressive development of the ecosystem, new soil and runoff structures have been formed, and vegetation has spread on the initially uncovered surface. As a function of the changed hydrological properties and the improved system knowledge, the initial observation programme was iteratively extended and adjusted by the addition of more

  18. SWAT-CS: Revision and testing of SWAT for Canadian Shield catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; James, April L.; Yao, Huaxia

    2014-04-01

    Canadian Shield catchments are under increasing pressure from various types of development (e.g., mining and increased cottagers) and changing climate. Within the southern part of the Canadian Shield, catchments are generally characterized by shallow forested soils with high infiltration rates and low bedrock infiltration, generating little overland flow, and macropore and subsurface flow are important streamflow generation processes. Large numbers of wetlands and lakes are also key physiographic features, and snow-processes are critical to catchment modeling in this climate. We have revised the existing, publicly available SWAT (version 2009.10.1 Beta 3) to create SWAT-CS, a version representing hydrological processes dominating Canadian Shield catchments, where forest extends over Precambrian Shield bedrock. Prior to this study, very few studies applying SWAT to Canadian Shield catchments exist (we have found three). We tested SWAT-CS using the Harp Lake catchment dataset, an Ontario Ministry of Environment research station located in south-central Ontario. Simulations were evaluated against 30 years of observational data, including streamflow from six headwater sub-catchments (0.1-1.9 km2), outflow from Harp Lake (5.4 km2) and five years of weekly snow water equivalent (SWE). The best Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) results for daily streamflow calibration, daily streamflow validation, and SWE were 0.60, 0.65, and 0.87, respectively, for sub-catchment HP4 (with detailed land use and soil data). For this range of catchment scales, land cover and soil properties were found to be transferable across sub-catchments with similar physiographic features, namely streamflow from the remaining five sub-catchments could be modeled well using sub-catchment HP4 parameterization. The Harp Lake outflow was well modeled using the existing reservoir-based target release method, generating NSEs of 0.72 and 0.67 for calibration and verification periods respectively. With

  19. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. The North American Fetal Therapy Network (NAFTNet): a new approach to collaborative research in fetal diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark Paul

    2010-02-01

    In August 2004, the National Institutes of Health organized a 'Workshop on Fetal Therapy' to develop a plan for the maternal-fetal, surgical, and neonatal evaluation and treatment of pregnancies that might benefit from in-utero therapy. At the completion of the workshop several recommendations were made, foremost of which was the 'formation of a cooperative group of clinical investigators to help set a national agenda for research and clinical progress in the field of fetal therapy'. Somewhat by coincidence, a multidisciplinary 'Fetal Therapy Working Group' that had been formed earlier in the year was well-positioned to accept this national mandate and proposed development of a North American Fetal Therapy Network (NAFTNet) to foster collaborative research between active fetal diagnosis and treatment centers in both the USA and Canada, develop a peer review mechanism for study proposals, explore ways to centralize data collection and study development, and establish an educational agenda for medical professionals and the public as well as training of future leaders in the field. NAFTNet represents a new paradigm and approach to international collaborative research. Early success has resulted in the recognition of the power of collaborative research efforts in studying rare congenital anomalies and intervention strategies to improve outcomes and survivals in such limited populations. By abandoning 'competitive research' for a cooperative, collaborative environment of research partnership, NAFTNet strives to be more responsible and effective in using limited resources and improving care for pregnancies and children born with congenital anomalies.

  1. Statistical analysis of hydrological response in urbanising catchments based on adaptive sampling using inter-amount times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Schleiss, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Urban catchments are typically characterised by a more flashy nature of the hydrological response compared to natural catchments. Predicting flow changes associated with urbanisation is not straightforward, as they are influenced by interactions between impervious cover, basin size, drainage connectivity and stormwater management infrastructure. In this study, we present an alternative approach to statistical analysis of hydrological response variability and basin flashiness, based on the distribution of inter-amount times. We analyse inter-amount time distributions of high-resolution streamflow time series for 17 (semi-)urbanised basins in North Carolina, USA, ranging from 13 to 238 km2 in size. We show that in the inter-amount-time framework, sampling frequency is tuned to the local variability of the flow pattern, resulting in a different representation and weighting of high and low flow periods in the statistical distribution. This leads to important differences in the way the distribution quantiles, mean, coefficient of variation and skewness vary across scales and results in lower mean intermittency and improved scaling. Moreover, we show that inter-amount-time distributions can be used to detect regulation effects on flow patterns, identify critical sampling scales and characterise flashiness of hydrological response. The possibility to use both the classical approach and the inter-amount-time framework to identify minimum observable scales and analyse flow data opens up interesting areas for future research.

  2. Catchment classification by means of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebrand, Hugo; Ley, Rita; Casper, Markus

    2013-04-01

    An important hydrological objective is catchment classification that will serve as a basis for the regionalisation of discharge parameters or model parameters. The main task of this study is the development and assessment of two classification approaches with respect to their efficiency in catchment classification. The study area in western Germany comprises about 80 catchments that range in size from 8 km2 up to 1500 km2, covering a wide range of geological substrata, soils, landscapes and mean annual precipitation. In a first approach Self Organising Maps (SOMs) use discharge characteristics or catchment characteristics to classify the catchments of the study area. Next, a reference hydrological model calibrates the catchments of the study area and tests the possibilities of parameter transfer. Compared to the transfer of parameters outside a class, for most catchments the model performance improves when parameters within a class are transferred. Thus, it should be possible to distinguish catchment classes by means of a hydrological model. The classification results of the SOM are compared to the classification results of the reference hydrological model in order to determine the latter validity. The second approach builds on the first approach in such a way that it uses the Superflex Modelling Framework instead of only one reference model. Within this framework multiple conceptual model structures can be calibrated and adapted. Input data for each calibration of a catchment are hourly time series of runoff, precipitation and evaporation for at least eight years. The calibration of multiple models for each catchment and their comparison allows for the assessment of the influence of different model structures on model performance. Learning loops analyse model performance and adapt model structures accordingly with a view to performance improvement. The result of the modelling exercise is a best performing model structure for each catchment that serves as a basis

  3. Hydrological response of the Mediterranean catchments- A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merheb, Mohammad; Moussa, Roger; Abdallah, Chadi; Colin, François; Perrin, Charles; Baghdadi, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is a water stressed environment with increasing climatic and anthropogenic pressures. This work presents a review of 120 hydrological studies carried out in the Mediterranean region. It contributes to the ongoing hydrological research initiative on "Hydrology in a changing world" launched by the IAHS in 2014. It aims to understand the characteristics of hydrological response under Mediterranean conditions, taking into account changes driven by anthropogenic and climatic factors; and to compare modeling and regionalization approaches in use. The study region is divided into three sub-regions: Northwestern Mediterranean (NWM), Eastern (EM) and Southern Mediterranean (SM). Information on catchments responses and modeling approaches at different time scales (annual, dry season and event) were extracted from published studies, and analyzed. Results indicate regional discrepancies (between NWM, EM and SM sub-regions) in the distribution of climatic and hydrological response characteristics at the annual and the event scale. The NWM catchments are the wettest, and the SM catchments are the driest, while the EM catchments are intermediate and exhibit the largest variability. The NWM sub-region shows the most extreme rainfall regime in the Mediterranean, particularly, in an arc that extends from Northeastern Spain to Northeastern Italy. Observations indicate decreasing tendency in water resources due to both anthropogenic and climatic impacts, and a more extreme rainfall regime. Moreover, Mediterranean catchments show very heterogeneous responses in time and space which make the modeling of their hydrological functioning very complicated and data demanding, with increasing model limitations and uncertainties. Nevertheless, the models in use are classical ones; very few were developed to address these regional specificities. Regionalization studies in the Mediterranean are scarce even in term of low flows and FDCs which is surprising in a water

  4. Timber resource statistics for the north interior resource area of California. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the North Interior Resource Area of California, which includes Lassen, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of the Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Six Rivers, Plumas, Shasta-Trinity, Rogue River, and Toiyabe National Forests. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality , and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  5. RESEARCH NOTE: On the roughness of Mesozoic oceanic crust in the western North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minshull, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from Mesozoic oceanic crust around the Blake Spur Fracture Zone (BSFZ) in the western North Atlantic have been widely used in constraining tectonic models of slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges. These profiles have anomalously low basement relief compared to crust formed more recently at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at the same spreading rate. Profiles from other regions of Mesozoic oceanic crust also have greater relief. The anomalous basement relief and slightly increased crustal thickness in the BSFZ survey area may be due to the presence of a mantle thermal anomaly close to the ridge axis at the time of crustal formation. If so, the intracrustal structures observed may be representative of an atypical tectonic regime.

  6. Recent research on the hydrodynamics of the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta and north San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burau, J.R.; Monismith, S.G.; Stacey, M.T.; Oltmann, R.N.; Lacy, J.R.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents an overview of recent findings from hydrodynamic research on circulation and mixing in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) (Figure 1) and North San Francisco Bay (North Bay) (Figure 2). For the purposes of this article, North Bay includes San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, and Suisun Bay. The findings presented are those gained from field studies carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), and Stanford University beginning about 1993. The premise behind these studies was that a basic understanding of circulation and mixing patterns in the Bay and Delta is an essential part of understanding how biota and water quality are affected by natural hydrologic variability, water appropriation, and development activities. Data collected for the field studies described in this article have significantly improved our understanding of Bay and Delta hydrodynamics. Measured flows ,in the Delta have provided valuable information on how water moves through the Delta's network of channels and how export pumping affects flows. Studies of the shallows and shallow-channel exchange processes conducted in Honker Bay have shown that the water residence time in Honker Bay is much shorter than previously reported (on the order of hours to several tidal cycles instead ofweeks). Suisun Bay studies have provided data on hydrodynamic transport and accumulation mechanisms that operate primarily in the channels. The Suisun Bay studies have caused us to revise our understanding of residual circulation in the channels of North Bay and of "entrapment" mechanisms in the low salinity zone. Finally, detailed tidal and residual (tidally averaged) time-scale studies of the mechanisms that control gravitational circulation in the estuary show that density-driven transport in the channels is governed by turbulence time-scale (seconds) interactions between the mean flow and stratification. The hydrodynamic research

  7. Research on lithospheric density distributions beneath North China Craton and its destruction mechanism by gravity and seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Fang, J.; Hsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    North China Craton (NCC) has been a research hotspot for geoscientists all over the world. Partial North China Craton (NCC) has lost its lithospheric keel since Mesozoic. Researchers have reached a consensus on destruction of NCC' lithosphere, however, the destruction mechanism and dynamic processes still remain controversy. In this study, a three-dimensional density distribution of lithosphere beneath NCC is determined using gravity datum combined with P-wave travel times by sequential inversion method. After the analyses and discussions on our density results referred to other geophysical and geochemical researches and then gave our viewpoint about destruction mechanisms of NCC lithosphere from the standpoint of density distribution. A linear velocity-density relationship is used to achieve mutual transformations and constraints between density and velocity. As we know, the gravity anomalies measured on the ground surface are the integrated reflection of the interface undulations and underground density inhomogeneous. In order to invert the lithospheric density structures, we firstly separated the gravity effects of lithospheric density inhomogeneous by removing the effects of other contributions to the gravity field from the observed integrated gravity filed before density inversion. The method of Zhao et al.,(1994) is used for seismic tomography, while Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) is applied in density inversion, which highly improved the calculation velocity compared to common least squares method. The inversion results indicate that, the lithospheric density beneath NCC is extremely inhomogeneous and its distributions are coherent with surface regional tectonics; Low density anomalies exist in lower crust beneath rift basins around Ordos block. High poisson' ratios are found in these regions (about 3.0), which may indicate partial melting occurred. Receive function studies prevailed thinned (<100km) lithosphere beneath Hetao graben. We consider

  8. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M. P. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hunink, J. E.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-06-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed to explore the potential of developing classification systems for catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. This principle also applies to catchments. However, to be useful, soil classifications have to be based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time. When defining permanent catchment characteristics, discharge data would therefore appear to be less suitable. But permanent soil characteristics do not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards the required functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for three recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous soils with varying soil structures during the year and about spatial and temporal variability. The suggestion is made therefore to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, possibly incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a catchment classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we suggest to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates. Such characteristics may well be derived from societal issues being studied, as is illustrated for the Green Water Credits program.

  9. Storage as a Metric of Catchment Comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, J.P.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bishop, K.; Soulsby, C.; Seyfried, M.; Peters, N.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Hooper, R.

    2011-01-01

    The volume of water stored within a catchment, and its partitioning among groundwater, soil moisture, snowpack, vegetation, and surface water are the variables that ultimately characterize the state of the hydrologic system. Accordingly, storage may provide useful metrics for catchment comparison. Unfortunately, measuring and predicting the amount of water present in a catchment is seldom done; tracking the dynamics of these stores is even rarer. Storage moderates fluxes and exerts critical controls on a wide range of hydrologic and biologic functions of a catchment. While understanding runoff generation and other processes by which catchments release water will always be central to hydrologic science, it is equally essential to understand how catchments retain water. We have initiated a catchment comparison exercise to begin assessing the value of viewing catchments from the storage perspective. The exercise is based on existing data from five watersheds, no common experimental design, and no integrated modelling efforts. Rather, storage was estimated independently for each site. This briefing presents some initial results of the exercise, poses questions about the definitions and importance of storage and the storage perspective, and suggests future directions for ongoing activities. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Seasonal isotope hydrology of Appalachian forest catchments

    Treesearch

    D. R. DeWalle; P. J. Edwards; B. R. Swistock; R. J. Drimmie; R. Aravena

    1995-01-01

    Seasonal hydrologic behavior of small forested catchments in the Appalachians was studied using oxygen-18 as a tracer. Oxygen-18 in samples of precipitation and streamflow were used to determine seasonal variations of subsurface water recharge and movement within two 30-40 ha forest catchments (Watershed 3 and 4) at the Fernow Experimental Forest in northcentral West...

  11. Hydrological observation of the artificial catchment `Chicken Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, K.; Biemelt, D.; Schoenheinz, D.; Grünewald, U.

    2009-04-01

    In Lusatia, eastern Germany, an artificial catchment called 'Chicken Creek' was developed. The catchment with an area of 6 ha was designed as hillside on the top of a refilled open mining pit. The bottom boundary was created by a 1 to 2 m thick clay layer acting as aquiclude. The catchment body consists of a 2 to 4 m mighty layer of sandy to loamy sediments acting as aquifer. The catchment 'Chicken Creek' is the central investigation site of the German-Swiss Collaborative Research Centre SFB/TRR 38. The aim of the research is to characterise various ecosystem development phases with respect to the occurring relevant structures and processes. Therefore, structures and processes as well as interactions being dominant within the initial ecosystem development phase are investigated and will be compared to those occurring in the later stages of ecosystem development. In this context, one important part of the investigations is the detailed observation of hydrological processes and the determination of the water balance components. To achieve these objectives, a comprehensive monitoring programme was planned considering the following questions: Which parameters/data are required? Which parameters/data can be measured? Which spatial and temporal resolution of observations is required? The catchment was accordingly equipped with weirs, flumes, observation wells, probes and meteorological observation stations. First results were obtained and will be presented. The gathered data provide parameters and boundary conditions for the ensuing hydro(geo)logical modeling. Conclusions e.g. from groundwater flow simulations shall allow to improve theses about the dynamic in the saturated zone and support the quantification of the groundwater discharge as component of the water balance. First research results show that precipitation related surface runoff proves to be much more dominant in the hydrological system than initially expected. Therefore, the monitoring concept had to be

  12. The HUMEX Project: Experimental acidification of a catchment and its humic lake

    SciTech Connect

    Gjessing, E.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Acid rain research during the late 1970s and the early 1980s concluded that acid precipitation seriously affected the environment. It was, however, realized that humic substances (HS) in the water have an effect on the response of acid rain, and that HS acts as a modifier on both the chemical composition and on the biological activity. The HUMEX Project is studing the impact of HS on the acidification and the effect acidification has on the biological properties of HS. This is done by artificial acidification of a whole catchment. In the fall of 1988 a dystrophic lake was divided in two halves by a plastic curtain from the middle of the natural outlet to the opposite side. During the following two years, through September 1990, the water chemistry of the two lake halves was monitored. A number of scientists from Europe and North America have been studying the organic matter and the biota in the water and in the catchment area prior to the artificial acidification, which started in October 1990. The results, after 18 months of treatment, with a combination of sulphuric acid and ammonium nitrate, show a change in the water chemistry. In the experimental lake, there is a small increase in the concentration of S and organic N and a small decrease in color and pH. A reduction of the anion deficit in the treated basin is suggested to be due to a protonization of the HS. There are also significant biological changes in the treated lake half. 22 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Hydrogeochemical responses of forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins Church, M.; Hornberger, George; Driscoll, Charles; Sklash, Michael; Hemond, Harold

    The AGU Chapman Conference on Hydrogeochemical Responses of Forested Catchments was held September 18-21, 1989, in Bar Harbor, Maine, and brought together geochemists with interests in determining the effects of different geochemical processes on resulting surface water chemistry and hydrologists with interests in explaining flow generation in catchments with the aim of fostering better communication between the two groups on the topic of geochemical and hydrological interactions in intermediate-size watersheds. An important point of consideration was the emphasis on intermediate-size watersheds, which we defined operationally as watersheds of sufficient size to yield flow and habitat suitable for supporting at least a marginal recreational fishery, for example, on the order of at least a few square kilometers in the northeast United States. This emphasis is important because it is the potential effects of pollutants, as modified by watershed geochemical and hydrological processes, in watersheds of this scale that drive much of the concern of the nation's regulatory agencies with regard to adverse environmental effects and required water quality legislation. A good example of this is the current concern over potential adverse effects of acidic deposition on surface water quality, especially in streams that support upland sport fisheries.

  14. Qualitative Research, Semiotics, North Beach, South of Markey, Jack London, and the Grateful Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Looks at educational research from a macro perspective, advocating semiotics as the foundation for qualitative research in education. Presents myths and disputations and an open-ended conclusion via the kaleidoscopic interpretations of Jack London, Phil Dick, Jack Kerouac, the Grateful Dead, and an assortment of street characters. (Author/VWL)

  15. Qualitative Research, Semiotics, North Beach, South of Markey, Jack London, and the Grateful Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Looks at educational research from a macro perspective, advocating semiotics as the foundation for qualitative research in education. Presents myths and disputations and an open-ended conclusion via the kaleidoscopic interpretations of Jack London, Phil Dick, Jack Kerouac, the Grateful Dead, and an assortment of street characters. (Author/VWL)

  16. Research clinics’: online journal clubs between south and north for student mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Salla; Varshney, Dinansha; Meragia, Elnta; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Diwan, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Background Capacity development in health research is high on the agenda of many low- and middle-income countries. Objective The ARCADE projects, funded by the EU, have been working in Africa and Asia since 2011 in order to build postgraduate students’ health research capacity. In this short communication, we describe one initiative in these projects, that of research clinics – online journal clubs connecting southern and northern students and experts. Design We describe the implementation of these research clinics together with student and participant experiences. Results From 2012 to 2015, a total of seven journal clubs were presented by students and junior researchers on topics related to global health. Sessions were connected through web conferencing, connecting experts and students from different countries. Conclusions The research clinics succeeded in engaging young researchers across the globe and connecting them with global experts. The contacts and suggestions made were appreciated by students. This format has potential to contribute toward research capacity building in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:27725079

  17. An Investigation of Distance Education in North American Research Literature Using Co-Word Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Stewart, Michelle; Smith, Patryce; Barron, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    The field of distance education is composed of a multiplicity of topics leading to a vast array of research literature. However, the research does not provide a chronological picture of the topics it addresses, making it difficult to develop an overview of the evolution and trends in the literature. To address this issue, a co-word analysis was…

  18. Opinions of fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers towards recreational fishing issues: an exploratory analysis for North America

    SciTech Connect

    Hasler, Caleb T.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Rapp, Tobias; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Bellehumeur, Karyne; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-02

    There is a need to better understand the perspectives of various recreational fishing stakeholder groups regarding key issues related to fisheries sustainability. To provide a first snapshot and to inform future human dimension studies in this area, we distributed a Web-based open-access survey to fisheries researchers, fisheries managers, and anglers in North America. Attitudes of these respondents towards issues such as overharvest, impacts of catch and release, recreational fisheries management, and research priorities for the future were assessed. We found similar opinions and perspectives by the responding recreational anglers, managers,and researchers on a number of issues, such as the perceived impact of commercial fishing contributing to fish stock declines, the perceived importance of using and promoting gear that minimizes stress and injury to individual fish when fish are to be released, and the belief that conflicts among stakeholders is growing as is the global anti-fishing movement based on animal rights thinking. Differences among responding groups included that researchers tended to be more concerned than anglers and managers with the potential of recreational angling contributing to fish stock declines. Responding anglers were also less content with their involvement in the fisheries management process than were responding managers and researchers, and these anglers also indicated a greater desire for more human dimensions research on understanding angler attitudes and behavior than was evident for responding managers and researchers. This preliminary survey revealed some variation in attitudes among recreational fisheries stakeholders. However, due to lack of random sampling, the study results cannot be extrapolated to the population level. We nevertheless conclude that improved communication and better understanding about the different perspectives among fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers and intrasectorally among different angling

  19. Process type identification in torrential catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, Micha; Scheidl, Christian; Eisl, Julia; Spangl, Bernhard; Hübl, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The classification of torrential processes takes place according to factors like sediment concentration and flow behavior and ranges from fluvial process types, including water floods and fluvial sediment transport processes, to fluvial mass movements such as debris flows. This study hypothises a context between basic geomorphological disposition parameters and potential dominant flow process types in steep headwater catchments. Thus, examined catchments were selected based on a historical event documentation of torrential events in the Austrian Alps. In total, 84 catchments could be analysed, and 11 different morphometric parameters were considered. To predict the dominant torrential process type within a catchment, a naive Bayes classifier, a decision tree model, and a multinomial regression model was trained against the compiled geomorphological disposition parameters. All models as well as their combination were compared, based on bootstrapping and complexity. The presented classification model with the lowest prediction error for our data might help to identify the most likely torrential process within a considered catchment.

  20. Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting at the Raleigh Hydrogeologic Research Station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2009-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station, located in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from May 2005 through September 2007 are presented in this report. Three well clusters and four piezometers were installed at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station along an assumed flow path from recharge to discharge areas. Each well cluster includes four wells to monitor the regolith, transition zone, and shallow and deep bedrock. Borehole, surface, and waterborne geophysics were conducted to examine the lithology and physical properties of the bedrock and to determine the aerial extent of near vertical diabase dikes. Slug tests were conducted in the wells at each cluster to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the formation tapped by each well. Periodic water-level altitudes were measured in all wells and in four piezometers. Continuous hourly water levels were measured in wells for variable periods of time during the study, and a surface-water gage collected 15-minute stage data from April to June 2006. In October 2005 and April 2006, water-quality samples were collected from a tributary and in all wells at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station. Continuous water-quality data were collected hourly in three wells from December 2005 through January 2007 and every 15 minutes in the tributary from May to June 2006. In August 2006, streambed temperatures and drive-point ground-water samples were collected across lines of section spanning the Neuse River.

  1. Regional lead isotope study of a polluted river catchment: River Wear, Northern England, UK.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Thomas J; Chenery, Simon R N; Pashley, Vanessa; Lord, Richard A; Ander, Louise E; Breward, Neil; Hobbs, Susan F; Horstwood, Matthew; Klinck, Benjamin A; Worrall, Fred

    2009-08-15

    High precision, lead isotope analyses of archived stream sediments from the River Wear catchment, northeast England (1986-88), provide evidence for three main sources of anthropogenic lead pollution; lead mining, industrial lead emissions and leaded petrol. In the upper catchment, pollution is totally controlled and dominated by large lead discharges from historic mining centres in the North Pennine Orefield ((208)Pb/(206)Pb, (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios range from 2.0744-2.0954 and 0.8413-0.8554 respectively). In the lower catchment, co-extensive with the Durham Coalfield and areas of high population density, pollution levels are lower and regionally more uniform. Isotope ratios are systematically higher than in the upper catchment ((208)Pb/(206)Pb, (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios range from 2.0856-2.1397 and 0.8554-0.8896 respectively) and far exceed values determined for the geogenic regional background. Here, the pollution is characterised by the atmospheric deposition of industrial lead and petrol lead. Lead derived from the combustion of coal, although present, is masked by the other two sources. Recent sediments from the main channel of the River Wear are isotopically indistinguishable from older, low order stream sediments of the North Pennine Orefield, indicating that contamination of the river by lead mining waste (up to several 1000 mg/kg Pb at some locations) continues to pose an environmental problem; a pattern that can be traced all the way to the tidal reach. Using within-catchment isotope variation and sediment lead concentrations, estimates can be made of the discharges from discrete mines or groups of mines to the overall level of lead pollution in the River Wear. As well as providing information pertinent to source apportionment and on-going catchment remediation measures, the database is a valuable resource for epidemiologists concerned with the health risks posed by environmental lead.

  2. The Evaluation of Educational Programmes: Methods, Uses and Benefits. Part A, Volume 24. Report of the Educational Research Workshop (North Berwick, Scotland, November 22-25, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Council for Research in Education.

    An introductory report, six commissioned papers, and four selected background reports presented at the North Berwick Workshop, one of a series of educational research meetings sponsored by the Council of Europe, are provided. The Workshop brought together research workers and educational administrators from different countries to: review…

  3. Report on Action Research: An Analysis of the Effects of Selected Instructional Strategies on Student Achievement at Terre Haute North Vigo High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haystead, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the findings of an analysis of a series of action research projects conducted by Vigo County School Corporation at Terre Haute North Vigo High School. During the 2009-2010 school year, 17 teachers participated in independent action research studies regarding the extent to which selected instructional strategies enhanced the…

  4. Proceedings of the symposium on research and management of annosus root disease (Heterobasidion annosum) in western North America; April 18-21, 1989; Monterey, CA.

    Treesearch

    William J. Otrosina; Robert F. Scharpf

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings is a collection of papers presented at the Symposium on Research and Management of Annosus Root Disease (Heterobasidion annosum) in Western North America held in Monterey, California, April 18-21, 1989. As the first symposium dealing with this subject in the western United States, the papers presented address current research and...

  5. Enhancement of Health Research Capacity in Nigeria through North-South and In-Country Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Olaleye, David O.; Odaibo, Georgina N.; Carney, Paula; Agbaji, Oche; Sagay, Atiene S.; Muktar, Haruna; Akinyinka, Olusegun O.; Omigbodun, Akinyinka O.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Gashau, Wadzani; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Ogunsola, Folasade; Chukwuka, Chinwe; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Meloni, Seema T.; Adewole, Isaac; Kanki, Phyllis J.; Murphy, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa has the potential to affect teaching, student quality, faculty career development, and translational country-relevant research as it has in developed countries. Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, with an academic infrastructure that includes 129 universities and 45 medical schools; however, despite the size, the country has unacceptably poor health status indicators. To further develop the research infrastructure in Nigeria, faculty and research career development topics were identified within the six Nigerian universities of the nine institutions of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Nigeria (MEPIN) consortium. The consortium identified a training model that incorporated multi-institutional “train the trainers” programs at the University of Ibadan, followed by replication at the other MEPIN universities. More than 140 in-country trainers subsequently presented nine courses to more than 1,600 faculty, graduate students, and resident doctors throughout the consortium during the program’s first three years (2011–2013). This model has fostered a new era of collaboration among the major Nigerian research universities, which now have increased capacity for collaborative research initiatives and improved research output. These changes, in turn, have the potential to improve the nation’s health outcomes. PMID:25072590

  6. Enhancement of health research capacity in Nigeria through north-south and in-country partnerships.

    PubMed

    Olaleye, David O; Odaibo, Georgina N; Carney, Paula; Agbaji, Oche; Sagay, Atiene S; Muktar, Haruna; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Omigbodun, Akinyinka O; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Gashau, Wadzani; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Ogunsola, Folasade; Chukwuka, Chinwe; Okonkwo, Prosper I; Meloni, Seema T; Adewole, Isaac; Kanki, Phyllis J; Murphy, Robert L

    2014-08-01

    Research productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa has the potential to affect teaching, student quality, faculty career development, and translational country-relevant research as it has in developed countries. Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, with an academic infrastructure that includes 129 universities and 45 medical schools; however, despite the size, the country has unacceptably poor health status indicators. To further develop the research infrastructure in Nigeria, faculty and research career development topics were identified within the six Nigerian universities of the nine institutions of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Nigeria (MEPIN) consortium. The consortium identified a training model that incorporated multi-institutional "train-the-trainers" programs at the University of Ibadan, followed by replication at the other MEPIN universities. More than 140 in-country trainers subsequently presented nine courses to more than 1,600 faculty, graduate students, and resident doctors throughout the consortium during the program's first three years (2011-2013). This model has fostered a new era of collaboration among the major Nigerian research universities, which now have increased capacity for collaborative research initiatives and improved research output. These changes, in turn, have the potential to improve the nation's health outcomes.

  7. Frito-Lay North America/NREL CRADA: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-176

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.

    2013-06-01

    Frito Lay North America (FLNA) requires technical assistance for the evaluation and implementation of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in production facilities and distribution centers across North America. Services provided by NREL do not compete with those available in the private sector, but rather provide FLNA with expertise to create opportunities for the private sector renewable/efficiency industries and to inform FLNA decision making regarding cost-effective projects. Services include: identifying the most cost-effective project locations based on renewable energy resource data, utility data, incentives and other parameters affecting projects; assistance with feasibility studies; procurement specifications; design reviews; and other services to support FNLA in improving resource efficiency at facilities. This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) establishes the terms and conditions under which FLNA may access capabilities unique to the laboratory and required by FLNA. Each subsequent task issued under this umbrella agreement would include a scope-of-work, budget, schedule, and provisions for intellectual property specific to that task.

  8. Research into the functional components and antioxidant activities of North China rice wine (Ji Mo Lao Jiu)

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuai; Mao, Xiangzhao; Liu, Pei; Lin, Hong; Du, Zuyuan; Lv, Ning; Han, Jichen; Qiu, Cuifang

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, considerable experimental evidence has supported the view that grape wine and South China rice wine are rich in diverse nutrients and have powerful antioxidant activity. However, little research has been carried out for North China rice wine, of which Ji Mo Lao Jiu (JMLJ) is the outstanding representative. In this study, the functional components and antioxidant activity of JMLJ were investigated. Twenty-eight free amino acids were found in JMLJ, much more than that previously reported in other Chinese rice wines (16–21). Functional oligosaccharides (5290.222 mg/L), total phenols (722.431 ± 10.970 mg/L), and mineral elements (9) were rich in JMLJ. When compared with synthetic antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), JMLJ showed effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and reducing capacity. The results of this study lay the foundation for promoting the utilization of JMLJ and the development of North China rice wine in the food industry. PMID:24804035

  9. The missing flux in a 35S budget for the soils of a small polluted catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novak, M.; Michel, R.L.; Prechova, E.; Stepanova, M.

    2004-01-01

    A combination of cosmogenic and artificial 35S was used to assess the movement of sulfur in a steep Central European catchment affected by spruce die-back. The Jezer??i?? catchment, Krus??ne?? Hory Mts. (Czech Republic) is characterized by a large disproportion between atmospheric S input and S output via stream discharge, with S output currently exceeding S input three times. A relatively high natural concentration of cosmogenic 35S (42 mBq L-1) was found in atmospheric deposition into the catchment in winter and spring of 2000. In contrast, stream discharge contained only 2 mBq L-1. Consequently, more than 95% of the deposited S is cycled or retained within the catchment for more than several months, while older S is exported via surface water. In spring, when the soil temperature is above 0 ??C, practically no S from instantaneous rainfall is exported, despite the steepness of the slopes and the relatively short mean residence time of water in the catchment (6.5 months). Sulfur cycling in the soil includes not just adsorption of inorganic sulfate and biological uptake, but also volatilization of S compounds back into the atmosphere. Laboratory incubations of an Orthic Podzol from Jezer??i?? spiked with h 720 kBq of artificial 35S showed a 20% loss of the spike within 18 weeks under summer conditions. Under winter conditions, the 35S loss was insignificant (< 5%). This missing S flux was interpreted as volatilized hydrogen sulfide resulting from intermittent dissimilatory bacterial sulfate reduction. The missing S flux is comparable to the estimated uncertainty in many catchment S mass balances (??10%), or even larger, and should be considered in constructing these mass balances. In severely polluted forest catchments, such as Jezer??i??, sulfur loss to volatilization may exceed 13 kg ha-1 a-1, which is more than the current total atmospheric S input in large parts of North America and Europe. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  10. Using chemical and isotopic tracers to conceptualise hydrological function in a larger scale catchment draining contrasting geomorphic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, R.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; Hartley, A. J.; Malcolm, I. A.

    2010-12-01

    A multivariate tracer study in the 749 km2 catchment of the North-Esk in north east Scotland was carried out to infer the dominant hydrological processes in two markedly different geomorphic provinces. The upper 60% of the catchment has montane headwaters dominated by impermeable metamorphic rocks, steep topography, peaty soils and a sub-arctic climate with over 1400mm of precipitation. The lowlands of the catchment are underlain by a major sandstone aquifer, and mainly have freely draining, fertile soils that support intensive arable farming under a drier climate with around 800mm of precipitation. Runoff in the uplands is dominated by near-surface processes with water of low alkalinity and low ionic strength. In contrast, tributaries in the lower parts of the catchment are characterised by alkaline waters with high concentrations of base cations and high levels of nitrate. Stable water isotope dynamics in precipitation and stream water were used to estimate mean transit times (MTT), indicating shorter MTTs in uplands with short turnover times especially in winter, while lowland stream MTTs are largely influenced by sandstone aquifer water and exceed several years. Multivariate statistical methods were used to derive a generic typology of catchment source waters, their spatial and temporal dynamics and particularly, how they integrate together at the larger catchment scale. The uplands dominate the winter high flow response of the whole catchment. The influence of lowland groundwater from major aquifers becomes more apparent under low flows. However, groundwater from small upland aquifers plays a critical ecosystem service in providing base flows which dilute pollutant inputs from lowland areas at the large catchment scale.

  11. Modeling of matters removal from swampy catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inishev, N. G.; Inisheva, L. I.

    2010-05-01

    the estimations were made taking into account layering unevenness of snow cover in deferent landscapes. Stored water distribution in the limits of every landscape was approximated by the curve of gamma distribution with parameters which are the results of snow survey. Everyday basin water yield was determined as difference between excesses of water coming above usage for filling of its water retaining tank. The size of the water retaining tank before start of snow melting depends on the basin wetting in the previous autumn. Autumn river flow is taken as a degree of water retaining tank filling before the snow melt. It is supposed that there is a process of water accumulation at slopes. Between theses water supplies and overland runoffs there is a nonlinear link. Temporary melt water detention, which comes from mire in swamp forest, is considered. Estimations are made individually for field, forest and swamp parts of the basin of the river Kljuch. Estimation of HA removal from the surface of catchment of the river Kljuch is taken as an example of model application. The results reveal possibilities of the given approach to modeling of dissolved matters removal from the swampy area. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by RFFR (No.No. 09-05-00235, 09-05-99007), Minister of education and science (No. 02.740.11.0325).

  12. Water-quality trends for streams and reservoirs in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, 1983-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.; Bathala, Neeti

    1997-01-01

    Water-quality and streamflow monitoring data, collected from 1983 to 1995, were analyzed for 34 stream and reservoir sites in a seven- county region within the upper Neuse and upper Cape Fear River Basins. Early data (1983-88) were compiled from U.S. Geological Survey water- quality studies and from the ambient water-quality monitoring network of the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources. Analyses of major ions, nutrients, metals, trace elements, and synthetic organic compounds were compiled from samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1988 to 1995 as part of a continuing project to monitor the water quality of surface-water supplies in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, and from the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources ambient water-quality monitoring network. This report presents the results of analysis of consistently increasing or decreasing trends in concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus species, suspended sediment, suspended solids, sodium, chloride, iron, manganese, zinc, and chlorophyll a from seasonal Kendall trend analysis on flow-adjusted concentrations for streams and concentrations in lakes. Total phosphorus concentrations also were tested for a step decrease in concentration (step trend) associated with the North Carolina phosphate-detergent ban of 1988. For some other constituents, insufficient data or values below laboratory detection limits precluded trend analysis. A regionwide decrease in total phosphorus, ranging from 25 to 81 percent was observed that coincided with increased phosphorus removal efforts at municipal wastewater-treatment facilities in the region and the statewide phosphate-detergent ban. Most sites had stable or decreasing trends in nitrogen concentrations; however, increasing trends occurred in the Neuse River near Clayton and at Smithfield, both of which are downstream from the developing Raleigh-Durham area. Chlorophyll a

  13. NorthEast Under/graduate Research Organization for Neuroscience (NEURON): Our Third New York City Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Goyette, Sharon Ramos; Edinger, Kassandra L.; Luine, Vicki; Young, Jason; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-01

    The NorthEast Under/graduate Research Organization for Neuroscience (N.E.U.R.O.N.) promotes preparation, education, and undergraduate research in Neuroscience. The N.E.U.R.O.N. Conference was initially held at undergraduate institutions primarily in New England. Then, for the previous two years, to broaden its impact and increase diversity, the meeting moved to Hunter College, CUNY, New York. This year represents the first year in which two N.E.U.R.O.N. meetings were held, one in Boston and one in New York City. The following is a report of the New York City meeting which was held at Hunter College on April 28, 2007. Eminent Neuroscientist, Dr. Carol Sue Carter, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, delivered the keynote address. The meeting also included the second bestowal of the Suzannah Bliss Tieman Research Awards for outstanding poster presentations and a workshop aimed at increasing minority participation in Neuroscience research. These highlights and future plans for N.E.U.R.O.N. are discussed. PMID:23495318

  14. Paired Catchment Analysis of the Impact of Human Activities on Hydrological Drought around the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangecroft, S.; Van Loon, A.; Van Lanen, H.; Brena-Naranjo, J. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.; Coxon, G.; Pelikan, J.; Verbist, K. M. J.; Maureira, H.; Coomans, W.

    2016-12-01

    Drought is an important natural hazard with a projected increase in frequency and severity worldwide. The intertwined hydrological and social processes related to drought have only recently started to be studied. Hydrological droughts do not only have natural causes; anthropogenic activities can also alleviate, enhance or cause droughts. Therefore we need to develop the tools to analyse, quantify and understand the human impact on droughts worldwide and help improve water management approaches. Here, we apply a paired-catchment method to quantify human impact on streamflow drought and compare with scenario modelling. Taken from flood research, the paired catchment approach compares undisturbed and disturbed catchments or sub-catchments (e.g. upstream-downstream comparison). Scenario modelling is used to check the method and validate results. This work has been done on a number of different catchments and human activities across the world. An upstream-downstream approach has been taken for an arid basin in Chile, quantifying the impact of a dam. Results showed that the dam helps to alleviate against small drought events, however it cannot help against large multi-year drought events. The comparison of droughts in a scenario with dam and a naturalised scenario gives similar results. Paired catchment analysis of the effect of groundwater (GW) abstraction in the UK showed fewer, but longer and more severe hydrological droughts in the disturbed catchment; in many cases to twice that of the natural catchment. Again, scenario modelling confirmed this difference. Paired catchment analysis of the effect of GW abstraction in Australia showed more variable results than in the UK, but during the Millennium Drought the disturbed catchment had years of near zero flow, whereas the undisturbed catchment continued flowing. Further case studies in the UK showed the impact of land-use change (urbanization) on drought, but not to the same magnitude as that of GW abstraction. We

  15. Mean water residence times in the pre-alpine Rietholzbach catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, I.; Bernasconi, S.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2009-04-01

    The Rietholzbach catchment is a small, hilly pre-alpine basin in the north-eastern part of Switzerland. Its area is 3.31 km2 and it covers an altitude range between 682 and 950 m. The area is only sparsely populated and primarily used as pasture land (67 %), on steep slopes the land use is forest (25 %). A hydrological peculiarity is the congruence of surface and sub-surface catchment area. In 1975 measurements were initiated to determine and understand the water balance and its processes. Isotope measurements of all components of the water cycle started in 1994. The water samples of precipitation, soil water (discharge of a lysimeter), ground water, and river water are taken approximately bi-weekly. All samples are prepared by the CO2 gas equilibration technique and are analysed in terms of the oxygen isotopes by mass spectrometry. The samples are taken either at the gauge at the outflow of the catchment or next to the main measurement site in the upper third of the catchment where an other gauge, three groundwater wells, the lysimeter and the meteorological sensors are installed in close vicinity. Based on these data series this contribution will present estimates of the mean water residence times in the different components of the catchment.

  16. Institutional Research and Planning in the Next Decade. Proceedings from the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (10th, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 16-18, 1983). Tenth Anniversary Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1983 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research are presented. The contribution of institutional research to university decision making and the topics of student outcomes assessment, retention/attrition studies, marketing/market research, departmental studies, computer and technological applications, and…

  17. Monitoring of Soil-Plant-Atmosphere patterns and processes in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, W.; Gerwin, W.; Biemelt, D.; Veste, M.; Fischer, A.

    2009-04-01

    The artificial catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is the main research site of the Transregional Collaborative Research Center (SFB/TRR 38). Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the SFB/TRR 38 has gathered more than 50 scientists from BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich to study the patterns and processes - and their interaction - of the initial phase of ecosystem development in an artificial catchment. The catchment was constructed in 2003 to 2005 in the Lusatian lignite-mining area close to Cottbus, Germany. It has an area of 6 ha including a small lake and is mainly composed of a 2-4 m layer of sandy to loamy Quaternary overburden sediments above a 1-2 m clay layer that seals the total catchment area at the bottom. No restoration, planting or other reclamation measures were carried out. To support the scientific objectives of the whole project an intensive monitoring program is carried out in the catchment since the end of the construction works including grid soil sampling, meteorological stations, weirs, groundwater wells, vegetation and soil fauna monitoring, precipitation and soil solution sampling, and aerial photo documentation. The presentation will present the the construction process of the catchment, monitoring installations and first results of the monitoring program.

  18. A small Internet controllable observatory for research and education at the University of North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardersen, P. S.; de Silva, S.; Reddy, V.; Cui, P.; Kumar, S.; Gaffey, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    One of the challenges in astronomy education today is to introduce college students to the real-world practice and science of observational astronomy. Along with a good theoretical background, college students can gain an earlier, deeper understanding of the astronomy profession through direct observational and data reduction experience. However, building and managing a modest observatory is still too costly for many colleges and universities. Fortunately, advances in commercial astronomical hardware and software now allow universities to build and operate small Internet controllable observatories for a modest investment. The advantages of an Internet observatory include: 1) remote operation from a comfortable location, 2) immediate data access, 3) telescope control via a web browser, and 4) allowing both on-campus and distance education students the ability to conduct a variety of observing projects. Internet capabilities vastly expand the number of students who will be able to use the observatory, thus exposing them to astronomy as a science and as a potential career. In September 2005, the University of North Dakota (UND) Department of Space Studies began operating a small, recently renovated Internet controllable observatory. Housed within a roll-off roof 10 miles west of UND, the observatory includes a Meade 16-inch, f/10 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, an SBIG STL-6303e CCD with broadband filters, ACP observatory control software, focuser, and associated equipment. The observatory cost \\25,000 to build in 1996; 2005 renovation costs total \\28,000. An observatory operator prepares the telescope for use each night. Through remote operation, the roof is opened and the telescope/CCD power is turned on. The telescope is then aligned and focused before allowing students to access the observatory. Students communicate with the observatory operator via an online chat room and via telephone, if necessary, to answer questions and resolve any problems. Additional

  19. Atmospheric Electric Field measurements at Eastern North Atlantic ARM Climate Research Facility: Global Electric Circuit Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Francisco; Silva, Hugo; Nitschke, Kim; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility of the ARM programme (established an supported by the U.S. Department of Energy with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores), is located at Graciosa Island of the Azores Archipelago (39° N; 28° W). It constitutes a strategic observatory for Atmospheric Electricity since it is located in the Atlantic Ocean basin exposed to clean marine aerosol conditions which reduces the well known spectral signature of atmospheric pollution and enables the study of the so called Global Electrical Circuit (GEC). First evidences of the existence of a GEC affecting the Earth's Electric Environment has retrieved by the Carnegie cruise expedition, in what became known as the Carnegie Curve. Those measurements were made in the Ocean in several campaigns and the present studies aims at reconsidering measurements in similar conditions but in a long-term basis, at least 5 years. This will contribute to the understanding of the long-term evolution of the Ionospheric Potential (IP). In literature there is theoretical evidence that it is decreasing IP in strength, but that conjecture is still lacking valid experimental evidence. Moreover, to clearly identify the GEC signal two effects must be taken into account: the effect of surface radon gas variation, because the Azores Archipelago is a seismic active region the possible influence of Earthquakes cannot be discarded easily; the effect of short-term solar activity on the Atmospheric Electricity modulation, solar flares emitting solar particles (e.g., solar energetic protons) need to be considered in this study.

  20. New directions in migration research: perspectives from some North American regional science disciplines.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M J; Mueser, P R; Plane, D A; Schlottmann, A M

    1991-01-01

    "This paper takes several surveys of the literature concerning migration research as its starting point and directs the reader toward a number of potentially fruitful lines for future research. Major sections include one on modeling migrant choice in which the pros and cons of using gross versus net migration measures are discussed. A second introduces and discusses the concept of a 'spatial' choice set, which has the potential to be implemented with laboratory experimental techniques. The third involves a wide-ranging discussion of new directions in modeling the interrelationships between employment and migration." The primary geographical focus is on the United States. excerpt

  1. UK catchment nutrient loads 1993-2003, a new approach using harmonised monitoring scheme data: temporal changes, geographical distribution, limiting nutrients and loads to coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Earl, Timothy J; Upton, Graham J G; Nedwell, David B

    2014-07-01

    The work provides robust estimates of nutrient loads (nitrate and phosphate) from all UK catchments: as required by the Water Framework Directive to monitor catchments' health, and to inform management of these environments. To calculate nutrient loads, data for nutrient concentrations and water flow are combined. In the UK, flow data are typically available at hourly intervals at more than 1300 gauging stations but concentration data are collected less frequently (roughly weekly) and at fewer locations (about 280). The sparseness of the concentration data limits the occasions for which load can be calculated, so a mathematical model was derived which was used to interpolate the concentrations between measurements. The model's parameters provide useful information about the annual nutrient concentration cycles within any catchment, and permitted improved estimates of both the annual loads of N and P, and of the N : P ratios, from mainland UK catchments. Data from 1993-2003 showed nitrate loads from UK catchments were generally constant, while orthophosphate loads generally declined. N : P ratios suggested that most catchments in the north and west of the UK were potentially P-limited although a few were potentially N-limited, while many in central and eastern UK oscillated seasonally between N and P limitation. Knowledge of the nutrient which is potentially limiting to biological productivity is a key factor for management of a catchment's nutrient loads. Calculations of nutrient export loads to coastal regions showed that UK catchments contributed only about 16.5% of total fluvial loads of nitrate to the North Sea, or about 3% of the total N loads when inputs from the Atlantic were included. Orthophosphate loads from the UK catchments into the North Sea were only 1.7% of the total P inputs from rivers and the Atlantic but did not include riverine inputs of P adsorbed to particles.

  2. Land degradation and erosion control within the Moldavian Plateau of eastern Romania: a case study from Racova catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niacsu, Lilian; Ionita, Ion; Samoila, Claudia; Grigoraş, Georgel

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation has been recognized as the major environmental threat in the Moldavian Plateau of eastern Romania. The Racova catchment, located in the central part of this area and extending on 32,908 ha, is significantly subjected to moderate-high rates of soil erosion, gullying, landslides and reservoir siltation. Several methods have been used to estimate land degradation indicators, such as classical research methods (field surveys and mapping, mathematical-statistical processing), present-day methods based on the GIS software, the Cs-137 technique etc. For example, the landslide inventory resulted from data collected during field surveys, interpretation of the 2005 and 2009 aerial orthophotos, exploiting very-high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) based on the topographical plans at 1:5,000 scale, and the visual analysis of products obtained from 2012 LiDAR DEM (slope map and shaded relief images). The results obtained showed that landslides, in any shape or age, are the most typical degradation processes in the Racova catchment, particularly extending on steep slopes representing north or west looking cuesta fronts, usually. At present, they cover half of the study area and most are inactive. The gullied systems amounting 4% of the catchment area consist of both types of gullies, discontinuous and continuous along valley-bottoms, respectively. In addition, the major role of gully erosion in triggering landslides and high reservoir siltation rate has been considered. Extensive conservation practices have been deployed over the 70's and 80's, namely: contour farming on arable land (under strip-cropping, buffer strip-cropping and bench terraces), reforestation over 2,000 ha (especially with black-locust on the active landslides), check dams to control gully erosion etc. Since 1990, two land reforms have been implemented (the Act No. 18/1991 and the Act No.1/2000) and their impact was very marked on soil conservation and crop yields. The major effect of

  3. The observed evapotranspiration combining the energy and water balance for different land use under semiarid Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna Chebbi, Rim; Mekki, Insaf; Jacob, Frédéric; Masmoudi, Moncef; Prévot, Laurent; Ben Mechlia, Netij; Voltz, Marc; Albergel, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean semiarid cultivated catchments are affected by global and climate change and are characterized by very complex hydrological systems. The improvement of their management requires a best understanding of the hydrological processes and developing reliable means for characterizing the temporal dynamics of soil water balance in a spatially distributed manner. The main objective of this study is: i) to analyze the observed evapotranspiration in relation to natural drivers (i.e. rainfall and soil properties) and anthropogenic forcing (i.e. land use and crop successions), and ) ii to assess the differences in both energy and water balances. We focus on a hilly semiarid Mediterranean catchment devoted to rainfed agriculture, so-called the Kamech catchment, which is located in the Cap Bon Peninsula, north-eastern Tunisia. The site belongs to the OMERE observatory for environmental research and it is monitored for the different hydrological cycle components under influence of anthropogenic forcing. The analysis is based on in-situ data measured under the common cereals/legumes/pasture cropping systems within the Kamech catchment. Energy and water balance components and vegetation parameters were collected in different fields and during various crop growth cycles. The results showed the highly variable response of energy and water balances depending on soil types, land use, and climatic conditions. The annual rainfall is mainly converted into evapotranspiration during the growing cycle for different land uses. The runoff amounts, for most of the sites, correspond to less than 10% of the rainfall amount. The evapotransipration ratios differed significantly across site and season in relation to soil properties and cumulated rainfall. We observe large differences in soil water dynamics among the legumes (fababean and chickpea) and cereals (wheat, oat, and triticale). Soil water is larger for legume crops, despite substantial plant growth during winter

  4. Signature Concepts of Key Researchers in North American Higher Education Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandlbinder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Universities in the English-speaking world share a common ancestry that extends back to medieval times. From these beginnings universities quickly developed distinctive qualities as they became integrated within different social and cultural systems of their home societies. A number of comparisons of higher education research have shown major…

  5. Reflective Practice and Motion Sickness: Thoughts on the First North American Action Research Study Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Lonnie; Inoue, Noriyuki; Getz, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the experience of an action research "Study Day" to investigate development of a culture of reflective practice among educators. Shared recognition of the importance of reflective practice in education is now a well-established part of both pre-service preparation and in-service work experience for educators. Osterman…

  6. Reflective Practice and Motion Sickness: Thoughts on the First North American Action Research Study Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Lonnie; Inoue, Noriyuki; Getz, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the experience of an action research "Study Day" to investigate development of a culture of reflective practice among educators. Shared recognition of the importance of reflective practice in education is now a well-established part of both pre-service preparation and in-service work experience for educators. Osterman…

  7. Signature Concepts of Key Researchers in North American Higher Education Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandlbinder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Universities in the English-speaking world share a common ancestry that extends back to medieval times. From these beginnings universities quickly developed distinctive qualities as they became integrated within different social and cultural systems of their home societies. A number of comparisons of higher education research have shown major…

  8. NORTH ATLANTIC REGIONAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS (ITHACA, NOVEMBER 5-7, 1963).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. Agricultural Education Div. at Cornell Univ.

    THIS PUBLICATION REPORTS ON SIGNIFICANT SPEECHES, CURRENT RESEARCH, AND COMMITTEE WORK DURING THE 3-DAY CONFERENCE FOR TEACHER EDUCATORS, SUPERVISORY STAFF MEMBERS, TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURE, AND GRADUATE STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. DIGESTS OF THE FOLLOWING SPEECHES ARE GIVEN--(1) "PROGRESS REPORT OF STATE STUDIES IN NON-FARM…

  9. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  10. North-South Partnership in Space Research and Application: Space Research Center at Minufiyia University, Egypt, as Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, M.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Minufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1.Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2.Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3.Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4.Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2003 and 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the worl d, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5.Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  11. Analysis of land use changes over the last 200 years in the catchment of Lake Czechowskie (Pomerania, northern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Kaczmarek, Halina

    2014-05-01

    Changes in land cover in the catchment area are, beside climate change, some of the major factors affecting sedimentation processes in lakes. With increasing human impact, changes in land cover no longer depend primarily on climate. In relation to research on sediments of Lake Czechowskie in Pomeranian Province in North Poland, land use changes over the last 200 years were analysed, with particular reference to deforestation or afforestation. The study area was the lake catchment, which covers nearly 20 km2. The analysis was based on archival and contemporary cartographic and photogrammetric materials, georeferenced and rectified using ArcGIS software. The following materials were used: Schrötter-Engelhart, Karte von Ost-Preussen nebst Preussisch Litthauen und West-Preussen nebst dem Netzdistrict, 1:50 000, section 92, 93, 1796-1802; Map Messtishchblatt, 1:25000, sheet Czarnen, (mapping conducted in 1874), 1932; Map WIG (Military Geographical Institute - Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny), 1:25000, sheet Osowo, (mapping conducted in 1929-31), 1933; aerial photos 1:13000, 1964, 1969; 1:25000, 1987; 1:26000, 1997; aerial ortophotomap , 1:5000, 2010. Today, over 60% of the catchment of Lake Czechowskie is covered with forests, dominated by planted Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), while the remaining areas are used for agricultural purposes or are built up. The first cartographic materials indicate that in the late 18th c., forest covered almost 50% of the catchment surface. By the year 1870, there was a significant reduction in the forested area, as its contribution fell to 40%. Deforestation took place mainly between the main villages. In the 1920s the forest cover increased to 44%. Today, almost the entire lake is surrounded by forest and a wetland belt (at least 0.5 km wide). Deforestation in the catchment should not be attributed solely to logging because the area of Tuchola Forests (Bory Tucholskie) was repeatedly affected by natural disasters. In the 19th c. these

  12. Variable catchment sizes for the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Whippo, Tara

    2012-07-01

    Government efforts designed to help improve healthcare access rely on accurate measures of accessibility so that resources can be allocated to truly needy areas. In order to capture the interaction between physicians and populations, various access measures have been utilized, including the popular two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. However, despite the many advantages of 2SFCA, the problems associated with using fixed catchment sizes have not been satisfactorily addressed. We propose a new method to dynamically determine physician and population catchment sizes by incrementally increasing the catchment until a base population and a physician-to-population ratio are met. Preliminary application to the ten-county region in northern Illinois has demonstrated that the new method is effective in determining the appropriate catchment sizes across the urban to suburban/rural continuum and has revealed greater detail in spatial variation of accessibility compared to results using fixed catchment sizes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 2011 Photosynthesis Gordon Research Conference & Seminar (June 11-17, 2011, Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina)

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Krishna Niyogi

    2011-06-17

    Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy into chemical energy. Elucidation of the mechanisms of photosynthetic energy conversion at a molecular level is fundamentally important for understanding the biology of photosynthetic organisms, for optimizing biological solar fuels production, and for developing biologically inspired approaches to solar energy conversion. The 2011 Gordon Conference on Photosynthesis will present cutting-edge research focusing on the biochemical aspects of photosynthesis, including: (1) structure, assembly, and function of photosynthetic complexes; (2) the mechanism of water splitting by PSII; (3) light harvesting and quenching; (4) alternative electron transport pathways; (5) biosynthesis of pigments and cofactors; and (6) improvement of photosynthesis for bioenergy and food production. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of photosynthesis research, a diverse group of invited speakers will represent a variety of scientific approaches to investigate photosynthesis, such as biochemistry, molecular genetics, structural biology, systems biology, and spectroscopy. Highly interactive poster sessions provide opportunities for graduate students and postdocs to present their work and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. One of the highlights of the Conference is a session featuring short talks by junior investigators selected from the poster presentations. The collegial atmosphere of the Photosynthesis GRC, with programmed discussion sessions as well as informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, enables participants to brainstorm, exchange ideas, and forge new collaborations. For the second time, this Conference will be immediately preceded by a Gordon Research Seminar on Photosynthesis (June 11-12, 2011, at the same location), with a focus on 'Photosynthesis, Bioenergy, and the Environment.' The GRS provides an additional opportunity for graduate students and postdocs to present their research, and it

  14. A biogeochemical comparison of two well-buffered catchments with contrasting histories of acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kram, P.; Hruska, J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the biogeochemical cycling research in catchments in the past 25 years has been driven by acid deposition research funding. This research has focused on vulnerable base-poor systems; catchments on alkaline lithologies have received little attention. In regions of high acid loadings, however, even well-buffered catchments are susceptible to forest decline and episodes of low alkalinity in streamwater. As part of a collaboration between the Czech and U.S. Geological Surveys, we compared biogeochemical patterns in two well-studied, well-buffered catchments: Pluhuv Bor in the western Czech Republic, which has received high loading of atmospheric acidity, and Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, U.S.A., where acid loading has been considerably less. Despite differences in lithology, wetness, forest type, and glacial history, the catchments displayed similar patterns of solute concentrations and flow. At both catchments, base cation and alkalinity diluted with increasing flow, whereas nitrate and dissolved organic carbon increased with increasing flow. Sulfate diluted with increasing flow at Sleepers River, while at Pluhuv Bor the sulfate-flow relation shifted from positive to negative as atmospheric sulfur (S) loadings decreased and soil S pools were depleted during the 1990s. At high flow, alkalinity decreased to near 100 ??eq L-1 at Pluhuv Bor compared to 400 ??eq L-1 at Sleepers River. Despite the large amounts of S flushed from Pluhuv Bor soils, these alkalinity declines were caused solely by dilution, which was greater at Pluhuv Bor relative to Sleepers River due to greater contributions from shallow flow paths at high flow. Although the historical high S loading at Pluhuv Bor has caused soil acidification and possible forest damage, it has had little effect on the acid/base status of streamwater in this well-buffered catchment. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  15. Shale to Regolith Evolution: The Controls on Catchment Solute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Pamela; Goddéris, Yves; Shi, Yuning; Singha, Kamini; Clarke, Brian; Schott, Jacques; Duff, Chritopher; Brantley, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that control the formation of regolith and the evolution of pore space within regolith as it is moves upward to the surface is of global importance. Unfortunately, both access and high costs have been prohibitive in gathering information about the bedrock-regolith boundary. Recognizing the need for data at depth, the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) network initiated the "Drill the Ridge" project. The goal of this project is to investigate fresh bedrock at each CZO and then to perform an array of downhole geophysical survey and geochemical analyses to understand regolith formation. In response to this call, several ridgetop boreholes were drilled at the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO in 2012 and 2013. Here we present the optical televiewer and gamma logs of these boreholes, along with downcore bulk geochemical analysis to shed light on the geochemical and lithological controls on the evolution of the watershed. Observations of catchment hydrology are also being used with estimates of hydrologic parameters to quantify near-surface geologic evolution and geochemical fluxes associated with weathering at depth. To quantify the contribution of weathering fluxes from the mobile regolith, we then link the meteorological forcing from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2), the fully-coupled land-surface Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (Flux-PIHM), and the geochemical box model WITCH. With this cascade of models, solute fluxes for the CZO are being simulated. At depth, the bulk geochemical analysis of ridgetop sediments indicates that pyrite had the deepest depletion front, which was concurrent with the regional water table position. Hydrologic data together with detailed borehole and bulk soil/rock geochemical analysis elucidated an eastern to western progression in lithology across the SSHCZO catchment controls fracture distribution and thus groundwater flow. Where shale and mudstone underlie the eastern portion of

  16. Evaluation of a distributed catchment scale water balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troch, Peter A.; Mancini, Marco; Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The validity of some of the simplifying assumptions in a conceptual water balance model is investigated by comparing simulation results from the conceptual model with simulation results from a three-dimensional physically based numerical model and with field observations. We examine, in particular, assumptions and simplifications related to water table dynamics, vertical soil moisture and pressure head distributions, and subsurface flow contributions to stream discharge. The conceptual model relies on a topographic index to predict saturation excess runoff and on Philip's infiltration equation to predict infiltration excess runoff. The numerical model solves the three-dimensional Richards equation describing flow in variably saturated porous media, and handles seepage face boundaries, infiltration excess and saturation excess runoff production, and soil driven and atmosphere driven surface fluxes. The study catchments (a 7.2 sq km catchment and a 0.64 sq km subcatchment) are located in the North Appalachian ridge and valley region of eastern Pennsylvania. Hydrologic data collected during the MACHYDRO 90 field experiment are used to calibrate the models and to evaluate simulation results. It is found that water table dynamics as predicted by the conceptual model are close to the observations in a shallow water well and therefore, that a linear relationship between a topographic index and the local water table depth is found to be a reasonable assumption for catchment scale modeling. However, the hydraulic equilibrium assumption is not valid for the upper 100 cm layer of the unsaturated zone and a conceptual model that incorporates a root zone is suggested. Furthermore, theoretical subsurface flow characteristics from the conceptual model are found to be different from field observations, numerical simulation results, and theoretical baseflow recession characteristics based on Boussinesq's groundwater equation.

  17. Ecology and biology of paddlefish in North America: historical perspectives, management approaches, and research priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Cecil A.; Zigler, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Polyodontidae) are large, mostly-riverine fish that once were abundant in medium- to large-sized river systems throughout much of the central United States. Concern for paddlefish populations has grown from a regional fisheries issue to one of national importance for the United States. In 1989, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) was petitioned to list paddlefish as a federally threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The petition was not granted, primarily because of a lack of empirical data on paddlefish population size, age structure, growth, or harvest rates across the present 22-state range. Nonetheless, concern for paddlefish populations prompted the USFWS to recommend that paddlefish be protected through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The addition of paddlefish to Appendix II of CITES, which was approved in March 1992, provides a mechanism to curtail illegal trade in paddlefish and their parts and supports a variety of conservation plans. Paddlefish populations have been negatively affected by overharvest, river modifications, and pollution, but the paddlefish still occupies much of its historic range and most extant populations seem to be stable. Although many facets of paddlefish biology and ecology are well understood, the lack of information on larval and juvenile ecology, mechanisms that determine recruitment, population size and vital rates, interjurisdictional movements, and the effects of anthropogenic activities present significant obstacles for managing paddlefish populations. Questions about the size and structure of local populations, and how such populations are affected by navigation traffic, dams, and pollution are regarded as medium priority areas for future research. The availability of suitable spawning habitat and overall reproductive success in impounded rivers are unknown and represent critical areas for future research

  18. Nitrogen loadings and environmental impacts in rice agriculture catchments in subtropical central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The severe deterioration of water quality in rice agriculture catchments challenges ecologists and hydrologists in exploring how rice agriculture affects nutrient loadings and water quality. This research observed the nitrogen (N) concentrations in stream water and groundwater in one forest and five rice agriculture catchments in subtropical central China to quantify the relationships between rice agriculture intensification, water quality of water bodies, and catchment N loadings. Our results indicate that intensive rice agriculture deteriorated stream water quality. A non-linear fitting analysis using a Boltzmann sigmoid function suggests that the concentrations and mass fluxes of ammonium-N (NH4+-N), nitrate-N (NO3--N), and total N (TN) in stream water increase with the areal proportion of rice agriculture in the catchments; however, these increases can only be detected when the areal proportions of rice agriculture in the catchments are greater than 13-30%, highlighting the importance of reasonable land use planning for managing stream water quality as well as N loadings from catchments. The factorial correspondence analysis (FCA) also suggests that rice agriculture has a potential to impose groundwater NH4+-N pollution, particularly in the soil exhausting season of July - October. And, the great N fertilizer application rates for rice cropping can increase the groundwater NO3-N and TN concentrations due to large quantities of N leaching into groundwater system beneath the paddy fields. The high N concentrations in groundwater result in strong N loadings via the base flow process. The NO3--N loadings via the base flow reaches 0.12-0.27 kg N ha-1 month-1 in the rice agriculture catchments, contributing 27.3%-36.5% of the total NO3--N loadings by the stream discharge. Therefore, the best management practices for N reduction and the smart land use planning should be applied in the rice agriculture catchments to improve water quality and mitigate N loadings.

  19. Catchment coevolution: A useful framework for improving predictions of hydrological change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, Peter A.

    2017-04-01

    The notion that landscape features have co-evolved over time is well known in the Earth sciences. Hydrologists have recently called for a more rigorous connection between emerging spatial patterns of landscape features and the hydrological response of catchments, and have termed this concept catchment coevolution. In this presentation we present a general framework of catchment coevolution that could improve predictions of hydrologic change. We first present empirical evidence of the interaction and feedback of landscape evolution and changes in hydrological response. From this review it is clear that the independent drivers of catchment coevolution are climate, geology, and tectonics. We identify common currency that allows comparing the levels of activity of these independent drivers, such that, at least conceptually, we can quantify the rate of evolution or aging. Knowing the hydrologic age of a catchment by itself is not very meaningful without linking age to hydrologic response. Two avenues of investigation have been used to understand the relationship between (differences in) age and hydrological response: (i) one that is based on relating present landscape features to runoff processes that are hypothesized to be responsible for the current fingerprints in the landscape; and (ii) one that takes advantage of an experimental design known as space-for-time substitution. Both methods have yielded significant insights in the hydrologic response of landscapes with different histories. If we want to make accurate predictions of hydrologic change, we will also need to be able to predict how the catchment will further coevolve in association with changes in the activity levels of the drivers (e.g., climate). There is ample evidence in the literature that suggests that whole-system prediction of catchment coevolution is, at least in principle, plausible. With this imperative we outline a research agenda that implements the concepts of catchment coevolution for building

  20. Nitrate Removal Along a Colorado Montane Headwater Stream: the Role of Bidirectional Hydrologic Exchange at Reach to Catchment Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smull, E. M.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Bidirectional hydrologic exchanges between streams and aquifers can influence nutrient concentrations (physical influx/efflux via gaining/losing water), and/or can facilitate biogeochemical cycling (physical and biological processes). Such exchanges therefore act to influence nutrient fate and transport, and have not yet been captured and incorporated into our understanding of stream nutrient retention and export. Along Colorado's Front Range, research in alpine and subalpine catchments has documented consistent increases in nitrate export, likely due to increased nitrogen deposition from industrialization and fertilization in eastern Colorado. The state of montane zone catchments with respect to their ability to cycle nitrate is not as well understood, however, and such ecosystems have complex hydrologic regimes relative to alpine areas. We applied a fully informed hydrologic mass balance model and nitrate mass balance model that include gross gains and gross losses (bidirectional exchanges) along a 1000 m study reach, to better understand physical and biological nitrate removal for a Colorado montane zone catchment, Lower Gordon Gulch. We collected data during five synoptic stream tracer and sampling campaigns along our study reach during the 2014-2015 water year, and installed wells along the north-facing and south-facing riparian corridor to capture changing water tables. Four distinct hydrologic regimes are captured in our results, including two experiments during baseflow, one experiment following snowmelt, one experiment following late-spring rainfall, and one experiment during the start of the seasonal hydrograph recession in mid-summer. Results show a transition from hydrologic sources of nitrate following snowmelt, to biological sources during rainfall, to biological removal during summer, and finally to hydrologic removal during baseflow. Our findings also corroborate earlier work in montane zone streams that shows preferential flow on south

  1. Hydrological characterisation of pesticide loads using hydrograph separation at different scales in a German catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Deurer, M.; Hartmann, H.; Bach, M.; Spiteller, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2003-03-01

    pesticide was found not to be an appropriate scaling factor. Research is required to develop adequate methods to scale detailed measurements of pesticide loads from small scales up to catchments with complex drainage systems.

  2. The North-South information highway: case studies of publication access among health researchers in resource-poor countries

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Joanna; Fottrell, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Background Less than 2% of scientific publications originate in low-income countries. Transfer of information from South to North and from South to South is grossly limited and hinders understanding of global health, while Northern-generated information fails to adequately address the needs of a Southern readership. Methods A survey of a new generation of health researchers from nine low-income countries was conducted using a combination of email questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. Data were gathered on personal experiences, use and aspirations regarding access and contribution to published research. Results A total of 23 individuals from 9 countries responded. Preference for journal use over textbooks was apparent, however a preference for print over online formats was described among African respondents compared to respondents from other areas. Almost all respondents (96%) described ambition to publish in international journals, but cited English language as a significant barrier. Conclusion The desire to contribute to and utilise contemporary scientific debate appears to be strong among study respondents. However, longstanding barriers remain in place and innovative thinking and new publishing models are required to overcome them. PMID:20027241

  3. The Nazi ethnographic research of Georg Leibbrandt and Karl Stumpp in Ukraine, and its North American legacy.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, E J; Sinner, S D

    2000-01-01

    Scholars have recently debated the topic of German academics who directly or indirectly served the Nazi machinery of death and who then went on to successful professional careers after the war. This article examines the activities of two prominent émigré scholars, Drs. Georg Leibbrandt (1899-1982) and Karl Stumpp (1896-1982). These Ukrainian Germans emigrated to Germany after World War 1. In America, most members of the Russian-German ethnic community never knew that Leibbrandt had represented Alfred Rosenberg's Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories, or that under his supervision Stumpp led a Sonderkommando in Ukraine. This unit classified hundreds of villages, indirectly documenting the annihilation of Jews and others. The authors conclude that one consequence of Leibbrandt's and Stumpp's "return to normalcy" after the war was the growing fascination with genealogical research that affected the Russian-German ethnic community in North America-research partly based on 1930s and 1940s Nazi racial record-keeping.

  4. Effects of climate and irrigation changes on the water balance of a Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gunten, Diane; Wöhling, Thomas; Haslauer, Claus; Cirpka, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Climate change will strongly impact the water cycle of Mediterranean catchments as a result of the changes in precipitation patterns and increased temperature. However, effects of climate change are difficult to predict with precision and are often influenced by land-use or water management choices. In agricultural catchments, irrigation is of particular interest because of its importance for cultivation in semi-arid climate and because of its strong impacts on hydrological processes. Interactions between irrigation and climate change impacts are likely to be important and should be considered when studying the future of a catchment. However, they are still difficult to quantify. A better understanding of the differences in climate-change sensitivity between irrigated and non-irrigated catchments would allow a finer description of local climate change effects. In this study, we compared the impacts of climate change in various irrigation scenarios, including a scenario without irrigation. Our case study was a relatively small catchment (about 7.5km2) in north-east Spain, called the Lerma catchment. This catchment was not irrigated prior to 2006, but 54% of its surface is now used for irrigated agriculture. This transition to irrigated agriculture was closely monitored and data on hydraulic heads, discharge and daily irrigation volume are available. Based on these measurements, a coupled surface-subsurface model of the catchment was developed using the pde-based model HydroGeoSphere. The model performs well for both irrigated and non-irrigated periods. Future climate was predicted using four regional climate models from the ENSEMBLE project (P.van der Linden and J.Mitchell, ENSEMBLES: Climate Change and its Impacts [...], Met Office Hadley Center, 2009) and two downscaling methods, including one based on a weather generator. Four irrigation scenarios, based on projected potential evapotranspiration changes, were compared. Our results show a shift in the climate

  5. Climate-driven trends in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Whitfield, Paul H.; Burn, Donald H.; Hannaford, Jamie; Renard, Benjamin; Stahl, Kerstin; Fleig, Anne K.; Madsen, Henrik; Mediero, Luis; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna

    2016-04-01

    Every year river floods cause enormous damage around the world. Recent major floods in North America and Europe, for example, have received much press, with some concluding that these floods are more frequent in recent years as a result of anthropogenic warming. There has been considerable scientific effort invested in establishing whether observed flood records show evidence of trends or variability in flood frequency, and to determine whether these patterns can be linked to climatic changes. However, the river catchments used in many published studies are influenced by direct human alteration such as reservoir regulation and urbanisation, which can confound the interpretation of climate-driven variability. Furthermore, a majority of previous studies have analysed changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at a national scale. Few studies are known that have analysed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year floods) on a continental scale. To fill this research gap, we present a study analysing flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges across a large study domain embracing North America and much of Europe. RHNs comprise gauging stations with minimally disturbed catchment conditions, which have a near-natural flow regime and provide good quality data; RHN analyses thus allow hydro-climatic variability to be distinguished from direct artificial disturbances or data inhomogeneities. One of the key innovations in this study is the definition of an RHN-like network consisting of 1204 catchments on a continental scale. The network incorporates existing, well-established RHNs in Canada, the US, the UK, Ireland and Norway, alongside RHN-like catchments from Europe (France, Switzerland, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Spain), which have been incorporated in the network following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status of candidate gauges through consultation with local experts. As the aim of the study is to examine

  6. The ethics of animal research: a survey of the public and scientists in North America.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Ari R; Bara, Meredith; Anton, Natalie; Nobis, Nathan

    2016-03-29

    To determine whether the public and scientists consider common arguments (and counterarguments) in support (or not) of animal research (AR) convincing. After validation, the survey was sent to samples of public (Sampling Survey International (SSI; Canadian), Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT; US), a Canadian city festival and children's hospital), medical students (two second-year classes), and scientists (corresponding authors, and academic pediatricians). We presented questions about common arguments (with their counterarguments) to justify the moral permissibility (or not) of AR. Responses were compared using Chi-square with Bonferonni correction. There were 1220 public [SSI, n = 586; AMT, n = 439; Festival, n = 195; Hospital n = 107], 194/331 (59%) medical student, and 19/319 (6%) scientist [too few to report] responses. Most public respondents were <45 years (65%), had some College/University education (83%), and had never done AR (92%). Most public and medical student respondents considered 'benefits arguments' sufficient to justify AR; however, most acknowledged that counterarguments suggesting alternative research methods may be available, or that it is unclear why the same 'benefits arguments' do not apply to using humans in research, significantly weakened 'benefits arguments'. Almost all were not convinced of the moral permissibility of AR by 'characteristics of non-human-animals arguments', including that non-human-animals are not sentient, or are property. Most were not convinced of the moral permissibility of AR by 'human exceptionalism' arguments, including that humans have more advanced mental abilities, are of a special 'kind', can enter social contracts, or face a 'lifeboat situation'. Counterarguments explained much of this, including that not all humans have these more advanced abilities ['argument from species overlap'], and that the notion of 'kind' is arbitrary [e.g., why are we not of the 'kind' 'sentient-animal' or 'subject

  7. Research Spotlight: North and south components of Saturn's radio emissions reversed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-02-01

    Saturn is known to emit intense radio emissions at kilometer wavelengths from its auroral regions. Observations in recent years found that the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) emission from the northern auroral region has a clocklike modulation with a period of about 10.6 hours, while the SKR emission from the southern auroral region has a period of about 10.8 hours. Analyzing more recent observations from the Cassini spacecraft, Gurnett et al. have now found that the rotational modulation rates of the southern and northern components reversed shortly after Saturn’s equinox on 11 August 2009, so that the southern hemisphere SKR now has the shorter rotation period. They also analyzed data from the Ulysses spacecraft to show that a similar reversal occurred during the previous equinox, in November 1995. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045796, 2010)

  8. Enhancing community participation in intervention research: farmworkers and agricultural chemicals in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Arcury, T A; Austin, C K; Quandt, S A; Saavedra, R

    1999-08-01

    The participation of affected communities in the development of public health intervention research improves project sustainability and effectiveness by making projects more relevant and acceptable to the communities. This article presents a multimode, multidomain model approach for community participation in different project components, which ensures the benefits of participation without requiring the same level of participation in every activity or by every community sector. A case study is used to illustrate the model, describing procedures for establishing and maintaining farmworker participation in developing an intervention to reduce exposure to chemicals. Farmworkers are a poor and underserved population for which the empowering and culturally appropriate benefits of community participation are especially needed. However, this population presents challenges for participatory health projects: geographic dispersion, ethnic diversity, lack of organization, sense of powerlessness, and communication and transportation difficulties. The lessons learned in this case extend the method and theory of community participation.

  9. The research progress of antitumorous effectiveness of Stichopus japonicus acid mucopolysaccharide in north of China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2009-03-01

    The sea cucumbers growing in the estuary of the Pohai of northern China are called Stichopus japonicus and are the orthodox holothurians in traditional Chinese medicine. There are multiple biological active ingredients in S. japonicus, and S. japonicus acid mucopolysaccharide (SJAMP) is one of the important ingredients. SJAMP has multiple pharmacologic actions, such as antitumor, immunologic regulation, anticoagulated blood, and antivirus. The research on antitumor has been carried out by way of animal experiments aiming at studying internal tumor-inhibiting effect of SJAMP, and the route of administration is usually peritoneal or intragastric. Additionally, sea cucumbers have been widely recognized and applied as medicated food or therapeutic prescriptions during and after the treatment of some tumors.

  10. Nitrogen budgets on Appalachian forest catchments

    Treesearch

    David R. DeWalle

    1997-01-01

    Variations in nitrogen losses in streamflow on catchments in the Appalachians suggests that the level of nitrogen retention in hardwood forests varies widely. Stream losses of dissolved nitrate-N on several small experimental forested catchments range from about 0.2 to 8.5 kg ha-1 y-1. This wide range of losses is equivalent to less than 10% to nearly 100% of measured...

  11. A perspective on stream-catchment connections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological study of the hyporheic zone is leading to recognition of a need for additional hydrologic understanding. Some of this understanding can be obtained by viewing the hyporheic zone as a succession of isolated boxes adjacent to the stream. Further understanding, particularly relevant to catchment-scale ecology, may come from studies focussed on the fluid mechanics of the flow-path connections between streams and their catchments.

  12. Improved baseflow characterization in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoelzle, Michael; Stahl, Kerstin; Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Seibert, Jan; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the baseflow regime is crucial for managing river ecosystems during low flow periods. Then aquatic conditions, water supply or streamflow forecast highly depend on the sustainability, magnitude, timing or rate of change of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, especially in areas of water shortage or with high water demand. This study aims to improve the understanding of the interplay between quick- and baseflow components by revising a widely used baseflow separation method (WMO or IH-UK method). Baseflow Index (BFI) and quickflow-baseflow-regimes were analyzed for 50 meso-scale catchments in southwestern Germany and Switzerland along a pronounced altitudinal gradient from 200 to 3200 m asl. Since the graphical separation of the baseflow signal depends on the chosen method, we evaluated the separation procedure by analyzing the relation between the seasonal variability of the stable water isotope signal in streamflow and the contribution of the quickflow component. We found that the snowmelt signal in high-elevation catchments is mostly accounted as baseflow suggesting that the used method is only valid for catchment with pluvial regimes. The large variability of BFI values found between the low-elevation, rainfall-driven catchments indicates that here catchment controls such as hydrogeological characteristics determine the baseflow contribution to streamflow. Relationships between several physiographic characteristics and the BFI values differed systematically for rainfall- and snowmelt-driven catchments suggesting that besides quick- and baseflow another delayed storage contributes to streamflow in mountainous catchments. By adjusting the separation procedure (variation of filter parameters) we were able to separate more delayed contributions of snowmelt from the faster groundwater signal. Thus, variable filter parameters are helpful to identify delayed streamflow contributions from different sources (e.g. snow and groundwater). The study

  13. Restoring Landform Geodiversity in Modified Rivers and Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ben; Clifford, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Extensive human modification and exploitation has created degraded and simplified systems lacking many of the landforms which would characterise healthy, geodiverse rivers. As awareness of geodiversity grows we must look to ways not only to conserve geodiversity but to also restore or create landforms which contribute to geodiverse environments. River restoration, with lessons learned over the last 30 years and across multiple continents, has much to offer as an exemplar of how to understand, restore or create geodiversity. Although not mentioned explicitly, there is an implicit emphasis in the Water Framework Directive on the importance of landforms and geodiversity, with landform units and assemblages at the reach scale assumed to provide the physical template for a healthy aquatic ecosystem. The focus on hydromorphology has increased the importance of geomorphology within river restoration programmes. The dominant paradigm is to restore landforms in order to increase habitat heterogeneity and improve biodiversity within rivers. However, the process of landform restoration is also a goal in its own right in the context of geodiversity, and extensive compilations of restoration experiences allow an inventory and pattern of landform (re-) creation to be assembled, and an assessment of landform function as well as landform presence/absence to be made. Accordingly, this paper outlines three principal research questions: Which landforms are commonly reinstated in river restoration activities? How do these landforms function compared to natural equivalents and thus contribute to 'functional' geodiversity as compared to the 'aesthetic' geodiversity? How does landform diversity scale from reach to catchment and contribute to larger-scale geodiversity? Data from the UK National River Restoration Inventory and the RHS are combined to assess the frequency and spatial distribution of commonly created landforms in relation to catchment type and more local context. Analysis is

  14. Sailing into the New Millennium: Charting the Course for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (26th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 13-16, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 1999 annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "A Marketing Research Program for Commuter Colleges" (Michelle S. Appel and Craig A. Clagett); (2) "Where Do I Start? Determining Institutional Information Needs beyond Mandated Reporting" (Michelle S.…

  15. Doing Institutional Research: A Focus on Professional Development. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (9th, Durham, New Hampshire, October 17-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Diana M., Ed.

    Institutional research that focuses on professional development is addressed in 35 papers from the 1982 meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Titles and authors include the following: "Modeling College Student Adjustment and Retention for the Individual Institution" (Norman D. Aitken); "The Development Saga of an…

  16. Understanding Pesticide Behaviour At The Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Pendlington, D.; Groves, S.

    Pesticides in stream flow at the outlet of a 142ha catchment in Eastern England (Col- worth, Bedfordshire), have been monitored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. The data from this catchment are being used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT contaminant transport pack- age at the catchment scale. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available with a useful set of pesticide application and detection data. Following calibration and validation of the hydrology of the catchment, pesticide modelling was carried out for tebuconazole, terbutryn, and terbuthylazine. This paper reports on the results of a sen- sitivity analysis of the model, and the final calibrated pesticide component. Analysis of the results obtained show that the timing and decay of predicted pesticide concen- trations are correct. It is therefore recommended that SWAT can be used as a tool to understand pesticide behaviour at the catchment scale.

  17. Institutional Research in Emerging Countries of Southern Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa: Global Frameworks and Local Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis; Saavedra, F. Mauricio; Romano, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a synthesis of the conceptualization and practice of institutional research (IR) in higher education (HE) in emerging countries across Southern Africa, Latin America and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions. The chapter contextualizes the growing need for IR in these regions, identifies problems and challenges…

  18. Assessment: Fad or Fact of Life? Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (14th, Rochester, New York, October 25-27, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Assessment in higher education is addressed in these proceedings of the 1987 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Papers and authors include: "Assessing the Status of Assessment" (Peter T. Ewell); "Has the Middle Class Been Pressured the Most? Multivariate Analysis of Parental Contributions to Higher…

  19. Planning for Quality. Papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (8th, Princeton, New Jersey, November 5-7, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The proceedings of the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research, whose theme was "Planning for Quality," are presented. The 26 papers were divided into the following topics: admissions, assessment, enrollment, faculty and staff, outcomes, planning, programs and retention, the environment, and the field of…

  20. Institutional Research in Emerging Countries of Southern Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa: Global Frameworks and Local Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis; Saavedra, F. Mauricio; Romano, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a synthesis of the conceptualization and practice of institutional research (IR) in higher education (HE) in emerging countries across Southern Africa, Latin America and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions. The chapter contextualizes the growing need for IR in these regions, identifies problems and challenges…

  1. Investigation of comparative effectiveness research in Asia, Europe, and North America.

    PubMed

    Patel, Isha; Rarus, Rachel; Tan, Xi; Lee, E K; Guy, Jason; Ahmad, Akram; Chang, Jongwha

    2015-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is an important branch of pharmacoeconomics that systematically studies and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. CER plays instrumental roles in guiding government public health policy programs and insurance. Countries throughout the world use different methods of CER to help make medical decisions based on providing optimal therapy at a reduced cost. Expenses to the healthcare system continue to rise, and CER is one-way in which expenses could be curbed in the future by applying cost-effectiveness evidence to clinical decisions. China, India, South Korea, and the United Kingdom are of essential focus because these country's economies and health care expenses continue to expand. The structures and use of CER are diverse throughout these countries, and each is of prime importance. By conducting this thorough comparison of CER in different nations, strategies and organizational setups from different countries can be applied to help guide public health and medical decision-making in order to continue to expand the establishment and role of CER programs. The patient-centered medical home has been created to help reduce costs in the primary care sector and to help improve the effectiveness of therapy. Barriers to CER are also important as many stakeholders need to be able to work together to provide the best CER evidence. The advancement of CER in multiple countries throughout the world provides a possible way of reducing costs to the healthcare system in an age of expanding expenses.

  2. Investigation of comparative effectiveness research in Asia, Europe, and North America

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha; Rarus, Rachel; Tan, Xi; Lee, EK; Guy, Jason; Ahmad, Akram; Chang, Jongwha

    2015-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is an important branch of pharmacoeconomics that systematically studies and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. CER plays instrumental roles in guiding government public health policy programs and insurance. Countries throughout the world use different methods of CER to help make medical decisions based on providing optimal therapy at a reduced cost. Expenses to the healthcare system continue to rise, and CER is one-way in which expenses could be curbed in the future by applying cost-effectiveness evidence to clinical decisions. China, India, South Korea, and the United Kingdom are of essential focus because these country's economies and health care expenses continue to expand. The structures and use of CER are diverse throughout these countries, and each is of prime importance. By conducting this thorough comparison of CER in different nations, strategies and organizational setups from different countries can be applied to help guide public health and medical decision-making in order to continue to expand the establishment and role of CER programs. The patient-centered medical home has been created to help reduce costs in the primary care sector and to help improve the effectiveness of therapy. Barriers to CER are also important as many stakeholders need to be able to work together to provide the best CER evidence. The advancement of CER in multiple countries throughout the world provides a possible way of reducing costs to the healthcare system in an age of expanding expenses. PMID:26729947

  3. Special issue on mercury in Canada's North: summary and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Chételat, John; Braune, Birgit; Stow, Jason; Tomlinson, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Important scientific advances have been made over the last decade in identifying the environmental fate of mercury and the processes that control its cycling in the Canadian Arctic. This special issue includes a series of six detailed reviews that summarize the main findings of a scientific assessment undertaken by the Government of Canada's Northern Contaminants Program. It was the first assessment to focus exclusively on mercury pollution in the Canadian Arctic. Key findings, as detailed in the reviews, relate to sources and long-range transport of mercury to the Canadian Arctic, its cycling within marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments, and its bioaccumulation in, and effects on, the biota that live there. While these accomplishments are significant, the complex nature of the mercury cycle continues to provide challenges in characterizing and quantifying the relationships of mercury sources and transport processes with mercury levels in biota and biological effects of mercury exposure. Of particular concern are large uncertainties in our understanding of the processes that are contributing to increasing mercury concentrations in some Arctic fish and wildlife. Specific recommendations are provided for future research and monitoring of the environmental impacts of anthropogenic mercury emissions, influences of climate change, and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies for mercury in the Canadian Arctic.

  4. Building Partnerships and Research Collaborations to Address the Impacts of Arctic Change: The North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, J.; North, L. A.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Arctic warming influence the various atmospheric and oceanic patterns that drive Caribbean and mid-latitude climate events, including extreme events like drought, tornadoes, and flooding in Kentucky and the surrounding region. Recently, the establishment of the North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3) project at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in partnership with the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland Arctic Cooperation Network (IACN), and Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) provides a foundation from which to engage students in applied research from the local to global levels and more clearly understand the many tenets of climate change impacts in the Arctic within both a global and local community context. The NAC3 project encompasses many facets, including joint international courses, student internships, economic development, service learning, and applied research. In its first phase, the project has generated myriad outcomes and opportunities for bridging STEM disciplines with other fields to holistically and collaboratively address specific human-environmental issues falling under the broad umbrella of climate change. WKU and UNAK students desire interaction and exposure to other cultures and regions that are threatened by climate change and Iceland presents a unique opportunity to study influences such as oceanic processes, island economies, sustainable harvest of fisheries, and Arctic influences on climate change. The project aims to develop a model to bring partners together to conduct applied research on the complex subject of global environmental change, particularly in the Arctic, while simultaneously focusing on changing how we learn, develop community, and engage internationally to understand the impacts and find solutions.

  5. Contrasting Patterns of Fine Fluvial Sediment Delivery in Two Adjacent Upland Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, M.; Bracken, L.; Warburton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying patterns of fine suspended sediment transfer in UK upland rivers is of vital importance in combating the damaging effects of elevated fluxes of suspended sediment, and sediment associated transport of contaminants, on in-stream biota. In many catchments of the UK there is still a lack of catchment-wide understanding of both the spatial patterns and temporal variation in fine sediment delivery. This poster describes the spatial and temporal distribution of in-stream fine sediment delivery from a network of 44 time-integrated mass flux samplers (TIMs) in two adjacent upland catchments. The two catchments are the Esk (210 km2) and Upper Derwent (236 km2) which drain the North York Moors National Park. Annual suspended sediment loads in the Upper Derwent are 1273 t, whereas in the Esk catchment they are greater at 1778 t. Maximum yields of 22 t km-2 yr -1 were measured in the headwater tributaries of the Rye River (Derwent), whereas peak yields in the Esk are four times greater (98 t km-2 yr-1) on the Butter Beck subcatchment. Analysis of the within-storm sediment dynamics, indicates that the sediment sources within the Upper Derwent catchment are from distal locations possibly mobilised by hillslope runoff processes, whereas in the Esk, sediment sources are more proximal to the channel e.g. within channel stores or bank failures. These estimates of suspended sediment flux are compared with the diffuse pollution potential generated by a risk-based model of sediment transfer (SCIMAP) in order to assess the similarity between the model predictions and observed fluxes.

  6. Building learning catchments for integrated catchment managing: designing learning systems based on experiences in the UK and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kevin; Colvin, John; Ison, Ray

    2009-01-01

    We examine challenges and opportunities for developing 'learning systems' for integrated catchment managing (ICMg) drawing on our experiences in two contexts: UK and South Africa (SA). Our research question is: what is it that we would have to experience to claim that a catchment was a learning catchment? We suggest that any valid answer to this question will arise in social relations in context-determined ways. From this perspective ICMg is an emergent 'performance' of stakeholders engaged in mutual action, or social learning (SL), in which understandings and practices are transformed in situation improving ways. These questions are relevant given recent reviews suggesting that implementation of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is not nurturing adaptive management. Our European and SA experiences demonstrate that it is possible to invest in social learning as a governance mechanism for water managing, but key constraints exist. Our SA work based on (i) appreciating the situation, especially the history, and (ii) contextual appreciation and design of learning systems (as a result of (i)) is described in response to these constraints. We conclude that more attention on developing an effective praxis for ICMg is required.

  7. Numerical Research of Steam and Gas Plant Efficiency of Triple Cycle for Extreme North Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskii, Svjatoslav; Matveev, Aleksandr; Masjuk, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The present work shows that temperature decrease of heat rejection in a cycle is necessary for energy efficiency of steam turbine plants. Minimum temperature of heat rejection at steam turbine plant work on water steam is 15°C. Steam turbine plant of triple cycle where lower cycle of steam turbine plant is organic Rankine cycle on low-boiling substance with heat rejection in air condenser, which safely allows rejecting heat at condensation temperatures below 0°C, has been offered. Mathematical model of steam and gas plant of triple cycle, which allows conducting complex researches with change of working body appearance and parameters defining thermodynamic efficiency of cycles, has been developed. On the basis of the model a program of parameters and index cycles design of steam and gas plants has been developed in a package of electron tables Excel. Numerical studies of models showed that energy efficiency of steam turbine plants of triple cycle strongly depend on low-boiling substance type in a lower cycle. Energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net 60% higher can be received for steam and gas plants on the basis of gas turbine plant NK-36ST on pentane and its condensation temperature below 0°C. It was stated that energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net linearly depends on condensation temperature of low-boiling substance type and temperature of gases leaving reco very boiler. Energy efficiency increases by 1% at 10% decrease of condensation temperature of pentane, and it increases by 0.88% at 15°C temperature decrease of gases leaving recovery boiler.

  8. Using Spatial Analysis to Investigate Geographic Variations in Heart Failure Hospitalizations among Medicare Beneficiaries in the Tennessee Catchment Area

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Modele O.; Holt, James B.; Croft, Janet B.; Nwaise, Isaac A.; Okafor, Henry E.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Giles, Wayne H.; Mensah, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although differences in heart failure hospitalization rates by race and sex are well documented, little is known about geographic variations in hospitalization rates for heart failure among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods Using exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, we examined hospitalization rates for heart failure as the first-listed discharge diagnosis among Medicare beneficiaries in a 10-state Tennessee catchment area, based on the resident states reported by Tennessee hospitals from 2000 to 2004. Results The age-adjusted heart failure hospitalization rate (per 1,000) among Medicare beneficiaries was 23.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3–23.4) for the Tennessee catchment area, 21.4 (95% CI, 21.4 -21.5) for the non-catchment US area and 21.9 (95% CI, 21.9–22.0) for the overall US. The age-adjusted HF hospitalization rates were also significantly higher in the catchment area than the non catchment US area and the overall US, among men, women, and whites, whereas rates among the blacks were higher outside the catchment area. Beneficiaries in the catchment area also had higher age-specific HF hospitalization rates. Among states in the catchment area, the highest mean county-level rates were in Mississippi (30.6±7.6) and Kentucky (29.2±11.5), and the lowest were in North Carolina (21.7±5.7), closely and Virginia (21.8±6.6). Conclusions Knowledge of geographic differences in rates of hospitalization for heart failure can be useful in identifying needs of health care providers, allocating resources, developing comprehensive heart failure outreach programs, and formulating policies designed to reduce these differences. PMID:21804374

  9. Catchment scale molecular composition of hydrologically mobilized dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeke, Julia; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Bornmann, Katrin; Tittel, Jörg; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in rivers of temperate catchments in Europe and North Amerika impose new technical challenges for drinking water production. The driving factors for this decadal increase in DOM concentration are not conclusive and changes in annual temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric deposition are intensely discussed. It is known that the majority of DOM is released by few but large hydrologic events, mobilizing DOM from riparian wetlands for export by rivers and streams. The mechanisms of this mobilization and the resulting molecular composition of the released DOM may be used to infer long-term changes in the biogeochemistry of the respective catchment. Event-based samples collected over two years from streams in three temperate catchments in the German mid-range mountains were analyzed after solid-phase extraction of DOM for their molecular composition by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Hydrologic conditions, land use and water chemistry parameters were used to complement the molecular analysis. The molecular composition of the riverine DOM was strongly dependent on the magnitude of the hydrologic events, with unsaturated, oxygen-enriched compounds being preferentially mobilized by large events. This pattern is consistent with an increase in dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations. In contrast, the relative proportions of nitrogen and sulfur bearing compounds increased with an increased agricultural land use but were less affected by the mobilization events. Co-precipitation experiments with colloidal aluminum showed that unsaturated and oxygen-rich compounds are preferentially removed from the dissolved phase. The precipitated compounds thus had similar chemical characteristics as compared to the mobilized DOM from heavy rain events. Radiocarbon analyses also indicated that this precipitated fraction of DOM was of comparably young radiocarbon age. DOM radiocarbon from field samples

  10. Mapping past salt marsh dieback in South Carolina's North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. J.; Morris, J. T.; Wang, C.

    2016-12-01

    : Brown marsh, or marsh dieback, occurs when portions of salt marsh either thin in vegetation, or completely die. The exact extent and locations of marsh dieback are often unknown due to the difficulty accessing salt marshes for in-field observations. Remote sensing provides a synoptic view of Earth surfaces and can help highlight vegetation thinning or loss in large spatial extents. In 2002-2003 there was a marsh dieback event that affected South Carolina. While most research centered on causes of the event, its extent has not been mapped yet. Using satellite data to extract the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for years 1999 and 2003, this study calculated the change in vegetation greenness within a salt marsh in North Inlet, Georgetown, South Carolina. Results showed where the marsh increased in vegetation and where vegetation was lost/thinned. The northern section of the marsh experienced the most dieback, with the southern end of the mash experienced a gain in vegetation. Though the causes of this dieback event are unknown, there are a few potential causes. The regions of greatest lost often occur with lower marsh elevations and, South Carolina experienced a prolonged extreme drought during 2001. The regions of vegetation loss may be due to the marsh not keeping up with sea level rise, stress from the drought, or a combination of the two.

  11. A critical review of labor and birth care. Obstetrical Interest Group of the North American Primary Care Research Group.

    PubMed

    Smith, M A; Acheson, L S; Byrd, J E; Curtis, P; Day, T W; Frank, S H; Franks, P; Graham, A V; LeFevre, M; Resnick, J

    1991-09-01

    A critical review of the literature regarding important aspects of labor and delivery was conducted by members of the Obstetrical Interest Group of the North American Primary Care Research Group using computerized searches, personal communication, and literature exchange between group members. Each written topic summary was carefully reviewed by a second group member, and a consensus was reached regarding conclusions and recommendations by the group. The topics include family involvement, comfort measures, fetal heart rate monitoring, labor augmentation, birth positions, and episiotomies. Each topic summary is preceded by conclusions and recommendations given in the order of least invasive to most invasive of the woman in labor. The strength of these conclusions and recommendations is based on the amount and type of supportive data in the literature and is indicated by one to three stars preceding that statement. One-star conclusions are not well supported in the literature but reflect a family practice style and were reached through consensus from the group. Three-star conclusions are supported by data from clinical trials.

  12. Launch, Low-Speed, and Landing Characteristics Determined from the First Flight of the North American X-15 Research Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finch, Thomas W.; Matranga, Gene J.

    1959-01-01

    The first flight of the North American X-15 research airplane was made on June 8, 1959. This was accomplished after completion of a series of captive flights with the X-15 attached to the B-52 carrier airplane to demonstrate the aerodynamic and systems compatibility of the X-15//B-52 combination and the X-15 subsystem operation. This flight was planned as a glide flight so that the pilot need not be concerned with the propulsion system. Discussions of the launch, low-speed maneuvering, and landing characteristics are presented, and the results are compared with predictions from preflight studies. The launch characteristics were generally satisfactory, and the X-15 vertical tail adequately cleared the B-52 wing cutout. The actual landing pattern and landing characteristics compared favorably with predictions, and the recommended landing technique of lowering the flaps and landing gear at a low altitude appears to be a satisfactory method of landing the X-15 airplane. There was a quantitative correlation between flight-measured and predicted lift-drag-ratio characteristics in the clean configuration and a qualitative correlation in the landing configuration. A longitudinal-controllability problem, which became severe in the landing configuration, was evident throughout the flight and, apparently, was aggravated by the sensitivity of the side-located control stick. In the low-to-moderate angle-of-attack range covered, the longitudinal and directional stability were indicated to be adequate.

  13. Data Analysis in North Campus Research Site: How the Properties of The Aquifer Can be Characterized Best

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Yeh, T. C. J.; Zha, Y.; Tso, C. H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Head data from pumping tests are often used to estimate the properties of the aquifers such as hydraulic conductivity. In this study, data from 15 pumping tests in the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) in Waterloo are analyzed through hydraulic tomography (HT). A mathematical tool, Successive Linear Estimator [SLE, see Yeh et al. 1996] is used, which can effectively interpret the data collected from HT, and has been validated many times [Berg and Illman, 2011, 2013, 2014]. During the analysis, different subsets of 15 pumping tests are used to estimate the parameters (hydraulic conductivity and specific storage), ranging from 15 single tests respectively to total number of 15 tests. By interpreting and comparing the results of inversions (L2, big difference of head, head scatter, hydraulic conductivity and specific storage, etc.), we will be able to determine the importance of the number and the locations of pumping tests that are used to both characterize the aquifers well and avoid redundancy. In addition, hydrographs will also be drawn to validate the head data from pumping tests.

  14. Comparing Hydrologic Response Times Between a Forested and Mountaintop Mined Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. J.; Zegre, N.

    2012-12-01

    Mountaintop removal mining (MTR) represents the largest land cover/landuse change in the Central Appalachian region. By 2012, the U.S. EPA estimates that MTR will have impacted approximately 6.8% of the predominately forested Appalachian Coalfield region of West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia with nearly 4,000 miles of headwater streams buried under valley fills. In spite of the scale and extent of MTR, its hydrologic impacts are poorly understood. While MTR has a well-established pattern of downstream water quality degradation, its effect on the quantity and timing of catchment runoff is less clear. Several devastating floods in the region have been attributed to MTR, but there is little evidence to either confirm or refute this belief. Existing research has focused on statistical analysis of catchment outlet responses, but results from these studies only offer evidence of differences in hydrologic behavior, not process understanding of how the system is changing. This study begins to address that research gap by exploring differences in hydrologic response times, a fundamental hydraulic parameter that controls the conversion of rainfall to runoff. A simple rainfall-runoff model was used to quantify differences in response times for storm events in a mined and predominantly forested catchment. Results showed that the mountaintop mined catchment responded more quickly to storm events than the forested catchment. The mined catchment also showed more variability in response time than the forested catchment. These patterns repeated using multiple model structures. The more rapid response of the mined catchment is likely attributed to increased impervious surface, preferential flow paths within valley fills that rapidly route water to the stream, or rapid displacement of water stored in valley fills upon the onset of rain. However, further research using tools such as isotope tracers is needed to offer insight about the processes responsible for streamflow

  15. Compilation of Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting for the Allison Woods Research Station in Iredell County, North Carolina, 2005-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Brad A.; Abraham, Joju

    2010-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Allison Woods research station near Statesville, North Carolina, in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from April 2005 through September 2008 are presented in this report. Data presented include well-construction characteristics and periodic groundwater-level measurements for 29 wells, borehole geophysical logs for 8 wells, hourly groundwater-level measurements for 5 wells, continuous water-quality measurements for 3 wells, periodic water-quality samples for 12 wells and 1 surface-water station, slug-test results for 11 wells, and shallow groundwater-flow maps. In addition, the geology and hydrogeology at the site are summarized.

  16. Regional health workforce planning through action research: lessons for commissioning health services from a case study in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Annette June; Murray, Richard; Stewart, Ruth; Mills, Jane; Beaton, Neil; Larkins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Creating a stable and sustainable health workforce in regional, rural and remote Australia has long been a challenge to health workforce planners, policy makers and researchers alike. Traditional health workforce planning is often reactive and assumes continuation of current patterns of healthcare utilisation. This demonstration project in Far North Queensland exemplifies how participatory regional health workforce planning processes can accurately model current and projected local workforce requirements. The recent establishment of Primary Health Networks (PHNs) with the intent to commission health services tailored to individual healthcare needs underlines the relevance of such an approach. This study used action research methodology informed by World Health Organization (WHO) systems thinking. Four cyclical stages of health workforce planning were followed: needs assessment; health service model redesign; skills-set assessment and workforce redesign; and development of a workforce and training plan. This study demonstrated that needs-based loco-regional health workforce planning can be achieved successfully through participatory processes with stakeholders. Stronger health systems and workforce training solutions were delivered by facilitating linkages and planning processes based on community need involving healthcare professionals across all disciplines and sectors. By focusing upon extending competencies and skills sets, local health professionals form a stable and sustainable local workforce. Concrete examples of initiatives generated from this process include developing a chronic disease inter-professional teaching clinic in a rural town and renal dialysis being delivered locally to an Aboriginal community. The growing trend of policy makers decentralising health funding, planning and accountability and rising health system costs increase the future utility of this approach. This type of planning can also assist the new PHNs to commission health services

  17. Groundwater as an emergency source for drought mitigation in the Crocodile River catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussá, F. E. F.; Zhou, Y.; Maskey, S.; Masih, I.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2015-02-01

    Global climate change has received much attention worldwide in the scientific as well as in the political community, indicating that changes in precipitation, extreme droughts and floods may increasingly threaten many regions. Drought is a natural phenomenon that causes social, economical and environmental damage to society. In this study, we assess the drought intensity and severity and the groundwater potential to be used as a supplementary source of water to mitigate drought impacts in the Crocodile River catchment, a water-stressed sub-catchment of the Incomati River catchment in South Africa. The research methodology consists of three parts. First, the spatial and temporal variation of the meteorological and hydrological drought severity and intensity over the catchment were evaluated. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was used to analyse the meteorological drought and the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) was used for the hydrological drought. Second, the water deficit in the catchment during the drought period was computed using a simple water balance method. Finally, a groundwater model was constructed in order to assess the feasibility of using groundwater as an emergency source for drought impact mitigation. Results show that the low-rainfall areas are more vulnerable to severe meteorological droughts (lower and upper crocodile). Moreover, the most water stressed sub-catchments with high level of water uses but limited storage, such as the Kaap located in the middle catchment and the Lower Crocodile sub-catchments, are more vulnerable to severe hydrological droughts. The analysis of the potential groundwater use during droughts showed that a deficit of 97 Mm3 yr-1 could be supplied from groundwater without considerable adverse impacts on the river base flow and groundwater storage. Abstraction simulations for different scenarios of extremely severe droughts reveal that it is possible to use groundwater to cope with the droughts in the catchment

  18. Groundwater as an emergency source for drought mitigation in the Crocodile River catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussá, F. E. F.; Zhou, Y.; Maskey, S.; Masih, I.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2014-03-01

    Global climate change has received much attention worldwide in the scientific as well as in the political community, indicating that changes in precipitation, extreme droughts and floods may threaten increasingly many regions. Drought is a natural phenomenon that may cause social, economical and environmental damages to the society. In this study, we assess the drought intensity and severity and the groundwater potential to be used as a supplement source of water to mitigate drought impacts in the Crocodile River catchment, a water-stressed sub-catchment of the Incomati River catchment in South Africa. The research methodology consists mainly of three parts. First, the spatial and temporal variation of the meteorological and hydrological drought severity and intensity over the catchment were evaluated. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was used to analyse the meteorological drought and the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) was used for the hydrological drought. Second, the water deficit in the catchment during the drought period was computed using a simple water balance method. Finally, a groundwater model was constructed in order to assess the feasibility of using groundwater as an emergency source for drought impact mitigation. Results show that the meteorological drought severity varies accordingly with the precipitation; the low rainfall areas are more vulnerable to severe meteorological droughts (lower and upper crocodile). Moreover, the most water stressed sub-catchments with high level of water uses but limited storage, such as the Kaap located in the middle catchment and the Lower Crocodile sub-catchments are those which are more vulnerable to severe hydrological droughts. The analysis of the potential groundwater use during droughts showed that a deficit of 97 Mm3 yr-1 could be supplied from groundwater without considerable adverse impacts on the river base flow and groundwater storage. Abstraction simulations for different scenarios of extremely

  19. Landscape dynamics in the Otterbach catchment (Bavarian Forest, Southern Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Daniel; Scheck, Sebastian; Scholz, Emanuel; Waltl, Peter; Völkel, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    As part of the TUM-CZO (TU-Munich Critical Zone Observatory), the Otterbach Valley has been focus of numerous research approaches, focusing on soil carbon dynamics, hydrological processes as well as landscape dynamics. Aim of this contribution is the reconstruction of the landscape evolution of the Otterbach catchment in context with anthropogenic land use and natural process dynamics. Therefore, studies focus on alluvial and colluvial sediments which are usually regarded as correlated with anthropogenically induced erosion. Located in the western Bavarian Forest the Otterbach is a creek of 2nd stream order and runs directly into the Danube River. Geologically, most parts of the catchment are composed of granitic rocks, mylonites and saprolites. While agricultural land use is dominant in the upper and lower reaches of the Otterbach, the steep middle reaches are forested, floodplains are used as grasslands. Settlement history points out that the forest of the so-called "Thiergarten", covering large parts of the catchment, has been used invariably for forestry, makes this study site valuable for the reconstruction of anthropogenic impact on landscape evolution. Characterization of the shallow subsurface is based on the analysis of soil pits (up to 2 m depth), core samples (up to 18 m depth) and geophysical measurements (electrical resistivity tomography, seismic refraction tomography). Temporal contextualization of sediments is achieved using radiocarbon dating. As a result of illuvial processes, clay curtains are observed almost continuously up to 18 m depth within the slope sediments, suggesting a genesis during Pleistocene warm stages. Radiocarbon dating in the alluvial floodplain point to pronounced sedimentary relocation processes between around 2.400 and 1.000 BP. This emphasizes the importance of naturally caused process dynamics as population density in the surroundings of the Otterbach catchment was low during this period and the area was mostly forested

  20. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  1. Re-making the global economy of knowledge: do new fields of research change the structure of North-South relations?

    PubMed

    Connell, Raewyn; Pearse, Rebecca; Collyer, Fran; Maia, João; Morrell, Robert

    2017-08-17

    How is global-North predominance in the making of organized knowledge affected by the rise of new domains of research? This question is examined empirically in three interdisciplinary areas - climate change, HIV-AIDS, and gender studies - through interviews with 70 researchers in Southern-tier countries Brazil, South Africa and Australia. The study found that the centrality of the North was reinstituted as these domains came into existence, through resource inequalities, workforce mechanisms, and intellectual framing. Yet there are tensions in the global economy of knowledge, around workforce formation, hierarchies of disciplines, neoliberal management strategies, and mismatches with social need. Intellectual workers in the Southern tier have built significant research centres, workforces and some distinctive knowledge projects. These create wider possibilities of change in the global structure of organized knowledge production. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  2. Experimental Enrichment and Solute Release in Low-Relief Coastal Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding catchment storage and release of water and solutes is a critical challenge in hydrology, and an urgent need for effective landscape management. An emerging tool to gain new insights is the deployment of sensors capable of measurements at time scales commensurate with hydrologic and solar forcing. In two low-relief forested coastal plain watersheds in north Florida, we deployed sensor packages capable of hourly measurements of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, salts, dissolved gases, pH, and flow in an effort to understand catchment responses to experimental nutrient enrichment. This 5 year study has enabled investigations of how these catchments store and release water, how solutes are controlled by hydroclimatic and diel forcings, how (and when) these solutes are coupled to each other, and how they respond to human manipulation. Here we explore evidence of landscape nutrient losses from changes in concentration-discharge relationships, the storm event and diel controls on C, N and P solute releases, and the phenology of stream metabolism. Our results are immediately relevant to the management of coastal plain watersheds, with implications for the fate of applied fertilizers in plantation forests, and also of theoretical value because high resolution measurements allow novel inferences about the provenance of solutes from within catchments, the multi-scale drivers of solute export variation, and the attendant controls on stream ecosystem responses.

  3. Distribution and diversity of fungi in freshwater sediments on a river catchment scale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Jianan; Gao, Guanghai; Bartlam, Mark G.; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities perform essential functions in biogeochemical cycles. However, knowledge of fungal community structural changes in river ecosystems is still very limited. In the present study, we combined culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to investigate fungal distribution and diversity in sediment on a regional scale in the Songhua River catchment, located in North-East Asia. A total of 147 samples over the whole river catchment were analyzed. The results showed that compared to the mainstream, the tributaries have a higher fungal community organization and culturable fungal concentration, but possess lower community dynamics as assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of DGGE bands showed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were the predominant community in the Songhua River catchment. Redundancy analysis revealed that longitude was the primary factor determining the variation of fungal community structure, and fungal biomass was mainly related to the total nutrient content. Our findings provide new insights into the characteristics of fungal community distribution in a temperate zone river at a regional scale, and demonstrate that fungal dispersal is restricted by geographical barriers in a whole river catchment. PMID:25954259

  4. Correlating Global Precipitation Measurement satellite data with karst spring hydrographs for rapid catchment delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longenecker, Jake; Bechtel, Timothy; Chen, Zhao; Goldscheider, Nico; Liesch, Tanja; Walter, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To protect karst spring water resources, catchments must be known. We have developed a method for correlating spring hydrographs with newly available, high-resolution, satellite-based Global Precipitation Measurement data to rapidly and remotely locate recharge areas. We verify the method using a synthetic comparison of ground-based rain gage data with the satellite precipitation data set. Application to karst springs is proven by correlating satellite data with hydrographs from well-known springs with published catchments in Europe and North America. Application to an unknown-catchment spring in Pennsylvania suggests distant recharge, requiring a flow path that crosses topographic divides, as well as multiple lithologies, physiographic provinces, and tectonic boundaries. Although surprising, this latter result is consistent with published geologic/geophysical, monitoring well, and stream gage data. We conclude that the method has considerable potential to improve the speed and accuracy of catchment identification and hydrodynamic characterization, with applications to water resource protection and groundwater exploration, among others.

  5. Distribution and diversity of fungi in freshwater sediments on a river catchment scale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Jianan; Gao, Guanghai; Bartlam, Mark G; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities perform essential functions in biogeochemical cycles. However, knowledge of fungal community structural changes in river ecosystems is still very limited. In the present study, we combined culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to investigate fungal distribution and diversity in sediment on a regional scale in the Songhua River catchment, located in North-East Asia. A total of 147 samples over the whole river catchment were analyzed. The results showed that compared to the mainstream, the tributaries have a higher fungal community organization and culturable fungal concentration, but possess lower community dynamics as assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of DGGE bands showed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were the predominant community in the Songhua River catchment. Redundancy analysis revealed that longitude was the primary factor determining the variation of fungal community structure, and fungal biomass was mainly related to the total nutrient content. Our findings provide new insights into the characteristics of fungal community distribution in a temperate zone river at a regional scale, and demonstrate that fungal dispersal is restricted by geographical barriers in a whole river catchment.

  6. Dissolved organic carbon and sulfur in southwestern Quebec lakes: Relationships with catchment and lake properties

    SciTech Connect

    Houle, D.; Carignan, R.; Lachance, M.

    1995-06-01

    In 59 southwestern Quebec lakes, dissolved organic S (DOS) concentration averages 185{+-}92 {mu}g liter{sup -1} (9.2% of total S) and ranges from undetectable to 437 {mu}g liter{sup -1} (22% of total S). DOS can be predicted from dissolved organic C (DOC) concentrations: DOS ({mu}g liter{sup -1}) = 2.20 log{sub 10}(DOC) + 7, r{sup 2} = 0.55. When applied to 1,238 lakes from five Quebec regions, this relationship indicates that DOS can account for 8.5% (Ottawa) to 22.2% (North Shore) of total S. These results stress the importance of evaluating DOS concentrations in studies of catchment S budgets. Multiple regression models using lake and catchment properties as independent variables respectively explain 75, 43, 49, and 69% of the variance in DOC, DOS, DOC: DOS, and color. The regressions found for DOC, color, and DOS include a flowpath index, accounting for dissolved organic matter (DOM) leaching from the catchment, and a term for in-lake losses. The DOC:DOS regression includes the flowpath index, lake perimeter, and altitude and suggests that DOM supply and composition also depend on catchment properties. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Stakeholder discourse and water management in a catchment in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo Stanghellini, P. S.; Collentine, D.

    2007-06-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD; directive 2000/60/EC) was created to ensure the sustainable use of water resources in the European Union. A central guideline included throughout the directive is a call for the participation of stakeholders in the management of these resources. Involving stakeholders is an important step to ensure that catchment management plans take into consideration local experience in the development of these plans and the impact of the plans on local interests. This paper describes and analyses the results of a series of workshops to facilitate implementation of the WFD at a catchment level based on the stakeholder participation model, CATCH. To test the usefulness of the stakeholder participation model CATCH for water management in a catchment area, a sub-catchment in an alpine valley in the north-east of Italy, the Alta Valsugana in the Province of Trento, was chosen as the setting for a series of workshops. In this valley water is fundamental for activities associated with agriculture, domestic use, energy production, sports and recreation. In the recent past the valley has had serious problems related to water quality and quantity. Implementation of water management plans under the WFD may lead to conflicts within the catchment between different stakeholder interest groups. Including stakeholders in the development of management plans not only follows the guidelines of the WFD but also could result in a more locally adapted and acceptable plan for the catchment. A new stakeholder analysis methodology was developed and implemented in order to identify the relevant stakeholders of the area and then two sets of workshops involving the key stakeholders identified were conducted in Spring 2006. The CATCH meetings were a new experience for the participants, who had to deal with both the principles of the WFD in general and the participation requirement in particular. During the meetings, the CATCH model played a very important role in

  8. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M. P. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hunink, J. E.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-02-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed in relation to the functioning and characterisation of catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. However, such classifications are based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time and this does not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous field soils with varying soil structures during the year and the suggestion is made to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we advise to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates.

  9. Catchment biophysical drivers of streamflow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trancoso, R.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of streamflow reflect the co-evolution of climate, soils, topography and vegetation of catchments. Hydrological metrics or signatures can represent the long-term behaviour and integrate the influence of all the streamflow drivers. Although this sort of relationship has been developed in regional studies exploring prediction of Flow Duration Curves and other streamflow metrics, little is known about the controls of other key streamflow characteristics especially in continent scale. This study aims to understand how catchment biophysical variables control key hydrological metrics such as baseflow index, elasticity of streamflow to rainfall variability and intermittency in continent scale and regionally. We used a set of catchment biophysical variables to model key streamflow signatures using multivariate power-law and beta regressions in 355 catchments located along the eastern Australian seaboard. Streamflow signatures were derived from daily streamflow time series data from 1980 to 2013. We tested 52 catchment biophysical characteristics related to climate, soil, topography, geography, geomorphology, vegetation and land-cover as predictors of the streamflow signatures. The prediction R-squared ranged from 63 to 72% when relationships are built in continent scale, but can be greater than 80% when regressions are regionalised. The interpretation of the modelled relationships offers new insights regarding the controls of flow characteristics.

  10. Simulating Catchment Scale Afforestation for Mitigating Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, M. S.; Bathurst, J. C.; Quinn, P. F.; Birkinshaw, S.

    2016-12-01

    After the 2013-14, and the more recent 2015-16, winter floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management practice remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. This project aims to improve the understanding of the impacts of upland afforestation on flood risk at the sub-catchment and full catchment scales. This will be achieved through an integrated fieldwork and modelling approach, with the use of a series of process based hydrological models to scale up and examine the effects forestry can have on flooding. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, catchment system engineering and the installation of runoff attenuation features (RAFs), such as engineered log jams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. Additionally, the proportion of a catchment or riparian reach that would need to be forested in order to achieve a significant impact on reducing downstream flooding will be defined. The consequential impacts of a corresponding reduction in agriculturally productive farmland and the potential decline of water resource availability will also be considered in order to safeguard the UK's food security and satisfy the global demand on water resources.

  11. Hydrologic connectivity between landscapes and streams: Transferring reach- and plot-scale understanding to the catchment scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jencso, K.G.; McGlynn, B.L.; Gooseff, M.N.; Wondzell, S.M.; Bencala, K.E.; Marshall, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between catchment structure and runoff characteristics is poorly understood. In steep headwater catchments with shallow soils the accumulation of hillslope area (upslope accumulated area (UAA)) is a hypothesized first-order control on the distribution of soil water and groundwater. Hillslope-riparian water table connectivity represents the linkage between the dominant catchment landscape elements (hillslopes and riparian zones) and the channel network. Hydrologic connectivity between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) landscape elements is heterogeneous in space and often temporally transient. We sought to test the relationship between UAA and the existence and longevity of HRS shallow groundwater connectivity. We quantified water table connectivity based on 84 recording wells distributed across 24 HRS transects within the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (U.S. Forest Service), northern Rocky Mountains, Montana. Correlations were observed between the longevity of HRS water table connectivity and the size of each transect's UAA (r2 = 0.91). We applied this relationship to the entire stream network to quantify landscape-scale connectivity through time and ascertain its relationship to catchment-scale runoff dynamics. We found that the shape of the estimated annual landscape connectivity duration curve was highly related to the catchment flow duration curve (r2 = 0.95). This research suggests internal catchment landscape structure (topography and topology) as a first-order control on runoff source area and whole catchment response characteristics. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. In Lieu of the Paired-Catchment Approach - Hydrologic Model Change Detection at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegre, N. P.

    2009-05-01

    Knowledge of the effects of forest management on hydrology primarily comes from paired-catchment studies conducted world-wide. While this approach has been useful for discerning changes in small experimental catchments and has contributed fundamental knowledge of the effects of forest and natural resources management on hydrology, results from experimental catchment studies exhibit temporal variability, have limited spatial inference, and lack insight into internal catchment processes. To address these limitations, traditional field experiments can be supplemented with numerical models to isolate the effects of disturbance on catchment behavior. Outlined in this study is an alternative method of change detection for daily time-series streamflow that integrates hydrologic modeling and statistical change detection methods used to discern the effects of contemporary forest management on the hydrology of western Oregon Cascades headwater catchments. In this study, a simple rainfall-runoff model was used to generate virtual reference catchments using attributes that reflect streamflow conditions absent of forest disturbance. Streamflow was simulated under three levels of model uncertainty using GLUE and were used to construct generalized least squares regression models to discern changes in hydrologic behavior. By considering processes within a single experimental catchment rather than the two spatially explicit catchments used in traditional paired experiments, it was possible to reduce unexplained variation and increase the likelihood of correctly detecting hydrologic effects following forest harvesting. In order to evaluate the stability of the hydrologic and statistical models and catchment behavior over time, the change detection method was applied to a contemporary reference catchment. By applying the change detection model to reference catchments, it was possible to eliminate unexpected variation as a cause for detected changes in observed hydrology. Further, it

  13. Use of GIS Technology in Surface Water Monitoring fro Targeted Policy Intervention in a Mountainous Catchment in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giali, Gabriela; Schneider, Petra

    2015-04-01

    USE OF GIS TECHNOLOGY IN SURFACE WATER MONITORING FOR TARGETED POLICY INTERVENTION IN A MOUNTAINOUS CATCHMENT IN ROMANIA The collection of information on surface water quality is a specific activity that takes place systematically and regularly at regional and national scale, and it is important for the assessment of the water quality as well as for water management policy-making. A data base information management using a Geographical Information System (GIS) forms an important aspect of environmental management, which provides the frame for processing and visualisation of water monitoring data and information as well as for the optimisation of monitoring concepts. This paper presents an architecture performed by a GIS which provides a grafic database and attributes the nesessary measurements of the water quality to different sections of the mountainous catchment of the Suceava river in the north of Romania. With this approach the location of the water sampling points can be optimised in terms of the selection and setting of the river sections. To facilitate the setting of the sampling locations in the various sections of water sampling in the river, the presented GIS system provides to the user different information layers with combined or isolated data according to the objectives. In the frame of the research were created 5 layers of information in the basin under study, underlying the determination of a new information layer, namely the "Hydrografic Network Graded to Hydrographic Sections". Practically, in the studied basin were established 8 sections for water sampling locations, and the water quality characterization was done by the consideration of 15 quality indicators. The GIS system presented in this research is a valuable, useful and adaptable to land use changes data base that can be exploited by any number of combinations, its capabilities justify it's role as "tool to support decision making." With this characteristics it supports the policy-making of

  14. Scaling ET from different data sources gives insight in catchment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, Willem; Henry, Joseph; Gharun, Mana; Adams, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Depending on the available funding and equipment, environmental data are often available at one scale, while predictions or forecasts are needed at a larger or smaller scale. The scientific literature is therefore full of comments and papers about scaling, upscaling and downscaling. Brought back to its basics, all scaling problems are essentially model prediction problems. Thus seeking a universal scaling law is unlikely to deliver results. Our interest has been in scaling evapotranspiration. A literature review revealed that most of the work in estimating evapotranspiration in Australia has occurred at short time scales at the local tree level, scaling to the stand or hillslope level. There has been limited work at scaling to larger scales, such as the catchment, although there has been work at the much larger continental scales (reference), scaling from a limited number of EC towers. However, from a hydrological prediction point of view, estimates of evapotranspiration at the catchment scale or distributed across the catchment scale are crucial to improve water balance estimates for water resource management. Here we compare several different approaches to scale local ET estimates to catchment scale ET and highlight how they all produce different results due to limitations with each of the methods. However, each of the scaling exercises reveals other aspects of the overall catchment system behaviour that cannot be identified at an individual scale. In this research we used collected field site in a model (WAVES) to predict local scale ET using different approaches and scaled this to catchment level ET, derived from the water balance and derived from the satellite MODIS ET estimates. The model was calibrated to sapflow measurements scaled to stand, introducing another opportunity for uncertainty. We discuss how at each of this scales lack of knowledge influences the estimates, but that the combined analysis reveals more about the temporal and spatial variation in

  15. Identifying critical source areas for phosphorus loss in Ireland using field and catchment scale ranking schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, K. J.; Magette, W. L.; Kurz, I.

    2005-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) in agricultural runoff is a major pollutant in many of Ireland's surface waters. Identification of areas that are at a high risk for P loss to surface waters is a critical component of river basin management. Two P ranking schemes (PRS's) were developed for Ireland, based on multi-criteria analysis approaches proposed in both the US and Europe, to predict the relative likelihood of P loss at both the field and catchment scales. The Field PRS was evaluated by comparing predicted rankings of potential P loss and transport against measured edge-of-field Dissolved Reactive P (DRP) loss for three fields with varying soil P levels. Qualitatively, results indicated that the Field PRS rankings corresponded to the magnitudes of measured P loss for the field sites, as well as to a reasoned evaluation of the relative likelihood that the fields would lose P that would subsequently make its way to surface water. The Catchment PRS was evaluated on a total of 31 catchments and sub-catchments by comparing predicted rankings of potential P loss and transport against measured in-stream median Molybdate Reactive P (MRP). Rankings of the relative likelihood of P loss and transport predicted by the Catchment PRS were positively correlated with median in-stream MRP ( r=0.51, P<0.05). Although the data available for these evaluations were limited, especially at field scale, and further research may identify the opportunity for modifications, both field and catchment scale P ranking schemes demonstrated a potential for identifying critical P source areas within catchments dominated by grass-based agricultural production systems, such as those in Ireland.

  16. Establishing an Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) program in East Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Booth, C A; Warianti, A; Wrigley, T

    2001-01-01

    The Brantas is one of Indonesia's most important catchments. It is the "rice bowl" of Java and nationally important for its industrial activity. Surabaya, Indonesia's second largest city, is located at the mouth of the Brantas River which is pivotal to the city's water supply. The challenges associated with the institutional framework for natural resource management in East Java parallels that of many states and provinces around the globe. It is multi-layered and complex. Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) may be defined as "the co-ordinated and sustainable management of land, water, soil vegetation, fauna and other natural resources on a water catchment basis". Over a period of six months, an ICM Strategy was researched and facilitated for the Brantas River Catchment in East Java via a short term advisor attachment. The aim of the Strategy is to improve coordination, co-operation, communication and consistency of government and community efforts towards sustaining the catchment's environmental, economic and social values. The attachment was part of the Pollution Control Implementation (PCI) Project funded by AusAid and the Indonesian Government. The ICM Strategy developed was broad based and addressed the priority natural resource management issues facing the Brantas Catchment. It was co-ordinated by BAPEDALDA, the Provincial Environmental Protection Agency, and developed by all agencies involved in natural resource management in the catchment. Various Universities and Non Government Organisations (NGOs) were also involved in the ICM process which developed the Strategy. At the conclusion of the attachment, a draft ICM Strategy and a proposed institutional framework had been developed. A working group of key agencies was also established to further enhance local "ownership", finalise timescales and implementation responsibilities within the Strategy and bring the institutional arrangements into being through a Governor's Decree.

  17. A methodology to determine pesticides pollution sources in water catchments: study case (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Limbourg, Q; Noel, S; Huyghebaert, B; Capette, L; Hallet, V

    2009-01-01

    In the Walloon Region (Belgium), a Committee of Investigation was created in 2007 to investigate and determine the potential pesticides pollution sources in drinkable water catchments. This Committee, constituted by a multidisciplinary team of experts i.e agronomists, soil scientists, phyto-chemists, hydrogeologists, is coordinated by the Walloon Agricultural Research Centre (CRA-W) and funded by the Société Publique de Gestion des Eaux (SPGE). The diagnosis method is inspired of the AQUAPLAINE method (Arvalis, France), and is composed of four steps: 1/preparing the diagnosis using existing data, 2/diagnosis using data bank completed by field observations, 3/meeting and discussion with the pesticide users, 4/final diagnosis and remediation proposal. In a rural district of Walloon Region, a water producer who possesses two catchments ("Les marroniers" (P1) and "Puits N2" (P2)) has problems with pesticides. The pollution started in 1998 with atrazine and bromacile detected in the two catchments. In 2004, 2,6-dichlorobenzamide, metabolite of dichlobenil, was also detected in the catchments. At present, all these pesticides are still found in the catchment P1 and only the 2,6 dichlorobenzamide is found in the other catchment. These active ingredients are not used in agriculture expect atrazine. Indeed, the main user of these products is the public sector. An investigation was realised to locate the main sites which are treated with these pesticides in this commune. The conclusion of this study is that the local authority used dichlobenil, bromacile and atrazine to weed the public areas. In more, the filling and the cleaning areas of sprayer, used for the treatment, are located near the catchments.

  18. The future of cardiov