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Sample records for research catchment north

  1. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  2. Sediment budget for Rediu reservoir catchment, North-Eastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todosi, Cristian; Niculita, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    Sediment budgets are a useful tool for geomorphologic analysis, catchment management and environmental assessment, despite the uncertainties related to their assessment. We present the sediment budget construction and validation for a small catchment of 9.5319 kmp (953.19 ha) situated in the North-Eastern part of Romania. The Rediu reservoir was built between 1986 and 1988, on Rediu valley, a left tributary of Bahlui river, north-west from Iasi city. The catchment of the reservoir has 6.5 km in length and 2.5 km in maximum width, the altitudes decreasing from 170 m in the northern part, to 52 m in the southern part. The valley is symmetric, the altitude of the hillslopes going between 200 m to 75 m in one km length, in the transversal section with the maximum width. The floodplain is narrow having between 20 m to 210 m (in the area of confluence with Breazu tributary). The mean slope of the catchment is 6.4 degree, the maximum slope being 24.6 degrees. The length of channels which show banks of up to 2 m is 19.98 km. The land is used predominantly as crops (58.1 %), 16.7 % being covered by pastures (from which over half are eroded), 11.5 % percent of the catchment being covered by planted forests, 9.2 % by rural constructions and roads, 2.9 % by hayfields, 1.5 % by lakes and 0.1 % by orchards. Beside the Rediu reservoir, there are three ponds (15 771, 1761 and 751 sqm) in the catchment. We considered the trap efficiency for the reservoir and the ponds to be 95%. Aerial images from 1963, 1978 , 1984, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2014 were used to assess the state of geomorphological processes before and after the reservoir construction. After 1970 a gully system situated in Breazu tributary sub-catchment and several active landslides along the main valley left side were forested. Beside these processes, soil erosion and human impact by constructions are the main processes generating sediment in the study area. The sediment yields were quantified by estimating the

  3. Surface Water - Groundwater Interaction Research in Chalk Catchments: UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, D.; Wheater, H.; Howden, N.; Gallagher, A.; Bloomfield, J.

    2004-12-01

    The focus of new European legislation on integrated management and, in particular, on ecological quality, raises major scientific and technical questions. These require improved understanding of catchment systems and hydro-ecological interactions that can only be obtained from integrated and multi-disciplinary experimental research. The main water supply aquifers in the United Kingdom, namely the Cretaceous Chalk and Permo-Triassic Sherwood Sandstone, are situated, for the most part, in lowland England, particularly in the Midlands, South and South East. These aquifers have a major, often dominant influence on the river systems that they underlie. These lowland permeable catchments present a particular set of challenges; management pressures are great, the scientific understanding of the major UK aquifers is poor, and tools for the integrated modelling of surface water-groundwater interactions and associated hydro-ecological processes are limited. In response to these factors, the LOwland CAtchment Research programme (LOCAR) was conceived. The programme also provides intrumented catchments to address some of these scientific issues. This paper describes the programme and early results of research into the influence of lithostratigraphy and karst features on surface water/groundwater interaction in the two Chalk LOCAR catchments.

  4. Seamless hydrological predictions for a monsoon driven catchment in North-East India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, Lisei; Bürger, Gerd; Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Improving hydrological forecasting systems on different time scales is interesting and challenging with regards to humanitarian as well as scientific aspects. In meteorological research, short-, medium-, and long-term forecasts are now being merged to form a system of seamless weather and climate predictions. Coupling of these meteorological forecasts with a hydrological model leads to seamless predictions of streamflow, ranging from one day to a season. While there are big efforts made to analyse the uncertainties of probabilistic streamflow forecasts, knowledge of the single uncertainty contributions from meteorological and hydrological modeling is still limited. The overarching goal of this project is to gain knowledge in this subject by decomposing and quantifying the overall predictive uncertainty into its single factors for the entire seamless forecast horizon. Our study area is the Mahanadi River Basin in North-East India, which is prone to severe floods and droughts. Improved streamflow forecasts on different time scales would contribute to early flood warning as well as better water management operations in the agricultural sector. Because of strong inter-annual monsoon variations in this region, which are, unlike the mid-latitudes, partly predictable from long-term atmospheric-oceanic oscillations, the Mahanadi catchment represents an ideal study site. Regionalized precipitation forecasts are obtained by applying the method of expanded downscaling to the ensemble prediction systems of ECMWF and NCEP. The semi-distributed hydrological model HYPSO-RR, which was developed in the Eco-Hydrological Simulation Environment ECHSE, is set up for several sub-catchments of the Mahanadi River Basin. The model is calibrated automatically using the Dynamically Dimensioned Search algorithm, with a modified Nash-Sutcliff efficiency as objective function. Meteorological uncertainty is estimated from the existing ensemble simulations, while the hydrological uncertainty is

  5. Decadal changes in the frequency of major floods in near-natural catchments across North America and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Hannaford, Jamie; Whitfield, Paul H.; Burn, Donald H.; Fleig, Anne; Stahl, Kerstin; Renard, Benjamin; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-04-01

    Recent major floods in North America and Europe have received much press, with some concluding that these floods are more frequent in recent years as a result of anthropogenic warming. There has therefore been considerable scientific effort invested in establishing whether observed flood records show evidence of trends or variability in flood frequency, and to determine whether these patterns can be linked to climatic changes. However, the river catchments used in many published studies are influenced by direct human alteration such as reservoir regulation and urbanisation, which can confound the interpretation of climate-driven variability. Furthermore, a majority of previous studies have analysed changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at a national scale. Few studies are known that have analysed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year floods) on a continental scale. To fill this research gap, the current study is analysing flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges across a large study domain embracing North America and much of Europe. RHNs comprise gauging stations with minimally disturbed catchment conditions, which have a near-natural flow regime and provide good quality data; RHN analyses thus allow hydro-climatic variability to be distinguished from direct artificial disturbances or data inhomogeneities. One of the key innovations in this study is the definition of an RHN-like network on a continental scale. The network incorporates existing, well-established RHNs in Canada, the US, the UK, Ireland and Norway, alongside RHN-like catchments from Europe (France, Switzerland, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland), which have been incorporated in the network following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status of candidate gauges through consultation with local experts. As the aim of the study is to examine long-term variability in the number of major floods, annual exceedances of 25-, 50-, and 100-year

  6. Hydrologic responses of a tropical catchment in Thailand and two temperate/cold catchments in north America to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, T.Y.; Ahmad, Z.

    1997-12-31

    The hydrologic impact or sensitivities of three medium-sized catchments to global warming, one of tropical climate in Northern Thailand and two of temperate climate in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins of California, were investigated.

  7. Bedload exports in a forest catchment following wildfire and terracing, north-central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Martinho A. S.; Machado, Ana I.; Serpa, Dalila; Prats, Sergio A.; Faria, Sílvia R.; Varela, María E. T.; González-Pelayo, Óscar; Keizer, J. Jacob

    2014-05-01

    In Portugal, the occurrences of wildfires are frequently, on average, affects some 100.000 ha of rural lands each year, but in extreme years such as 2003 and 2005 the burnt areas can go over 300.000 ha. Studies in various parts of the world, including Portugal, have well-documented a strong and sometimes extreme response in overland flow generation and associated soil losses following wildfire. Over the last two decades, the construction of terraces in preparation of a new eucalypt plantation has become increasingly common in the mountain areas of north-central Portugal, including in recently burnt areas. Terraces are traditionally viewed as a soil conservation technique, however, the present authors have measured high splash and inter-rill erosion on recent terraces and have frequently observed gully formation connecting the terraces over the full hill slope length, as well as within the adjacent unsealed roads. The present study was carried out in a forest catchment in the north-central Portugal that was burnt by a wildfire during the summer of 2010 and logged and then terraced with a bulldozer during the winter 2010. The burnt catchment of roughly 25 ha was instrumented with two subsequent flumes with maximum discharge capacities of 120 and 1700 l sec-1. The bed load that deposited in the smallest flume was removed and weighted in the field at regular intervals during the subsequent three years. The records are being now analyzed, nonetheless preliminary results suggested that, besides the wildfire effects, also post-fire land management played an important role on bedload exports.

  8. Nutrient loss and water quality under extensive grazing in the upper Burdekin river catchment, North Queensland.

    PubMed

    O'Reagain, P J; Brodie, J; Fraser, G; Bushell, J J; Holloway, C H; Faithful, J W; Haynes, D

    2005-01-01

    of ground cover are maintained. In contrast, sediment and nutrient loss under grazing on more erodable land types is cause for serious concern. Long-term empirical research and monitoring will be essential to quantify the impacts of changed land management on water quality in the spatially and temporally variable Burdekin River catchment. PMID:15757706

  9. Nutrient loss and water quality under extensive grazing in the upper Burdekin river catchment, North Queensland.

    PubMed

    O'Reagain, P J; Brodie, J; Fraser, G; Bushell, J J; Holloway, C H; Faithful, J W; Haynes, D

    2005-01-01

    of ground cover are maintained. In contrast, sediment and nutrient loss under grazing on more erodable land types is cause for serious concern. Long-term empirical research and monitoring will be essential to quantify the impacts of changed land management on water quality in the spatially and temporally variable Burdekin River catchment.

  10. Linking the runoff response at micro-plot and catchment scale following wildfire and terracing, north-central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Martinho A. S.; Rial-Rivas, María E.; Machado, Ana I.; Serpa, Dalila; Prats, Sergio A.; Faria, Sílvia R.; Varela, María E. T.; González-Pelayo, Óscar; Keizer, J. Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires are known as one of the principal natural hazards affecting the Mediterranean region. This includes Portugal, where wildfires have affected some 100.000 ha of rural lands each year. The effects of wildfires on runoff generation and/or the associated soil (fertility) losses have been studied in Portugal for more than two decades. Some of these studies have reported strong and sometimes extreme hydrological responses in recently burnt areas. Forestry operations in such areas have increasingly come to include bench terracing in preparation of new eucalypt plantations. The hydrological impacts of bench terracing, however, have received little research attention so far and the few existing publications are limited to small spatial scales. The construction of terraces is commonly considered an effective practice for soil conservation on steep slopes, having been applied by mankind since early history. Nonetheless, the present authors have measured high rates of splash as well as inter-rill erosion on recently constructed terraces, and have regularly observed rill formation, including on forest tracks which typically constitute an extensive network in such bench terraced plantations. The present study was carried out in a 29-ha forest catchment in north-central Portugal that was burnt by a wildfire during the summer of 2010, logged during early winter 2010/11, and then bench terraced with bulldozers during late winter 2011, some 6 months after the wildfire. The catchment outlet was instrumented immediately after the fire with an automatic hydrometric station comprising two subsequent flumes with maximum discharge capacities of 120 and 1700 l sec-1. Within the catchment, rainfall was measured using several automatic and storage gauges and overland flow was monitored on two contrasting slopes using 3 micro-plots of approximately 0.25m2 on each slope.Overland flow was measured at 1- to 2-weekly intervals during the hydrological years of 2010/11 and 2011/12, i

  11. Stormflow generation: a meta-analysis of field studies and research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthold, Frauke; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Runoff characteristics are expressions of runoff generation mechanisms. In this study, we want to test the hypothesis if storm hydrographs of catchments with prevailing near-surface flow paths are dominated by new water. We aim to test this hypothesis using published data from the scientific literature. We developed a classification system based on three runoff characteristics: (1) hydrograph response (HR: slowly or quickly), (2) the temporal source of water that dominates the hydrograph (TS: pre-event vs. event water) and (3) the flow paths that the water takes until it is released to the stream (FP: subsurface vs. surface flow paths). We then performed a literature survey to collect information on these runoff characteristics for small, forested headwater catchments that served as study areas in runoff generation studies and assigned each study catchment to one of the 8 classes. For this purpose, we designed a procedure to objectively diagnose the predominant conceptual model of storm flow generation in each catchment and assess its temporal and spatial relevance for the catchment. Finally, we performed an explorative analysis of the classified research catchments and summarized field evidence. Our literature survey yielded a sample of 22 research catchments that fell within our defined criteria (small, naturally forested catchments which served as study areas in stormflow generation studies). We applied our classification procedure to all of these catchments. Among them were 14 catchments for which our meta-analysis yielded a complete set of stormflow characteristics resulting in one of the 8 model concepts and were assigned into our classification scheme. Of the 14 classified research catchments, 10 were dominated by subsurface flow paths while 4 were dominated by overland flow. The data also indicate that the spatial and temporal relevance is high for catchments with subsurface flow paths while often weak for surface flow paths dominated catchments. The

  12. Northern Watershed Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (North-Watch) - Towards a comparative ecohydrology of northern catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; Buttle, J.; Carey, S.; Laudon, H.; McDonnell, J.; McGuire, K.; Seibert, J.; Shanley, J.

    2012-04-01

    In few places will the changes and challenges associated with climatic change be greater than in the circumpolar mid-high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Slight temperature differences determine whether precipitation falls as rain or snow, and the degree to which winter snow packs accumulate and the rate at which they subsequently melt. This has implications for stream flow regimes, water quality and in-stream hydroecology. The Northern Watershed Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (North-Watch) programme is an international interdisciplinary inter-site comparison project spanning a transect of hydro-climatic zones in Scotland, the USA, Canada and Scandinavia. The overall aim is to better understand the integrated consequences of climate change on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of water resources across northern regions. Here, we present initial findings from these analyses. The way in which hydroclimatic drivers interact with catchment characteristics are examined to show how the synchroneity, resistance and resilience of input-output responses varies spatially and temporally across sites. The dominant influence is the nature of the snowmelt period and how strongly this influences the hydrological regime. Linked to this is the variable nature of the threshold response of input - streamflow dynamics and how this changes for rainfall and snowmelt events. The ways in which these hydrological controls regulate Carbon fluxes from different catchments are also explored, and the implications for in-stream ecosystem response assessed. As the hydroclimatic drivers influencing the catchments are changing in a warming climate, vegetation and soil are also likely to change. This in turn will affect patterns of partitioning, storage and release of water with associated changes in streamflow dynamics. Budyko Curves are used to examine the current differences between the North-Watch catchments in terms of water and energy limitations, and likely

  13. Assessing the Age of Particulate Organic Matter Exported from a Temperate Rainforest Catchment of the North American Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; Ingalls, A. E.; Santos, G.; Keil, R. G.; Wefferling, L.; Jones, A.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Although temperate rainforests of the North American Pacific Coast contain a small proportion of the world's forests, they contain some of the highest densities of biomass of any terrestrial system, and they store large quantities of carbon in soil. Understanding the residence time of organic carbon in these watersheds is of ecological significance. Given that rivers can mobilize sediment (and associated carbon) from across the catchment, carefully deciphering the organic signatures found within riverine particles can be a powerful tool to inform our understanding of carbon cycling catchment-wide. Here we examine the lignin phenol content (lignin is a biomarker unique to vascular plants) and the radiocarbon age (Δ14C) of fine particulate organic carbon (FPOC) exported by the Queets River of Washington State's Olympic Peninsula over the course of one year, targeting winter storm events. This mountainous catchment is one of the largest and most pristine found on the Olympic Peninsula. The Δ14C of FPOC was quantified for each of the twelve sampling events, whereas the Δ14C of the individual lignin phenols was determined during a late-winter storm event. Sediments were enriched in lignin phenols at the end of the summer dry season and into the first storm of the fall, suggesting that surface soils were transported early on. The Δ14C of individual lignin phenols ranged from -161 to 26‰, with biomarkers for non-woody vegetation being most depleted. These results suggest that particulate lignin exported from temperate catchments is considerably aged, especially relative to the tropics. These findings are consistent with cool temperatures and abundant moisture limiting microbial decomposition, increasing the residence time of plant-derived organic carbon in temperate rainforests. We will compare the Δ14C content of lignin phenols to that of bulk organic matter to partition riverine FPOC amongst possible organic matter sources.

  14. [Research progress on unsaturated and saturated soil water movement in forest catchments].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Pei, Tiefan

    2005-09-01

    This paper reviewed the studies on the movement ways, i. e., infiltration, phreatic evaporation, ground water recharge and interflow, of unsaturated and saturated soil water in forest catchments, and introduced the present advances in soil hydraulic parameters, including soil water characteristic curve, and unsaturated and saturated soil hydraulic conductivity. Research directions in the future were also proposed.

  15. Predicting nutrient responses to mitigation at catchment to national scale: the UK research platform (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnes, P.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient enrichment of waters from land-based and atmospheric sources presents a significant management challenge, requiring effective stakeholder engagement and policy development, properly underpinned by robust scientific evidence. The challenge is complex, raising significant questions about the specific sources, apportionment and pathways that determine nutrient enrichment and the key priorities for effective management and policy intervention. This paper presents outputs from 4 major UK research programmes: the Defra Demonstration Test Catchments programme (DTC), the Environment Agency's Catchment Sensitive Farming monitoring and evaluation programme (CSF), Natural Resources Wales Welsh Catchment Initiative (WCI) and the NERC Environmental Virtual Observatory programme (EVOp). Funded to meet this challenge, they are delivering new understanding of the rates and sources of pollutant fluxes from land to water, their impacts on ecosystem goods and services, and likely trends under future climate and land use change from field to national scale. DTC, a 12m investment by the UK Government, has set up long-term, high resolution research platforms equipped with novel telemetered sensor networks to monitor stream ecosystem responses to on-farm mitigation measures at a representative scale for catchment management. Ecosystem structural and functional responses and bulk hydrochemistry are also being monitored using standard protocols. CSF has set up long-term, enhanced monitoring in 8 priority catchments, with monthly monitoring in a further 72 English catchments and 6 Welsh priority catchments, to identify shifts in pollutant flux to waters resulting from mitigation measures in priority areas and farming sectors. CSF and WCI have contributed to >50 million of targeted farm improvements to date, representing a significant shift in farming practice. Each programme has generated detailed evidence on stream ecosystem responses to targeted mitigation. However, to provide

  16. On the interpolation of volumetric water content in research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Phesheya; Chaplot, Vincent

    Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) is widely used in the environmental sciences because of its accuracy and efficiency in producing soil maps compared to the traditional soil mapping. Numerous studies have investigated how the sampling density and the interpolation process of data points affect the prediction quality. While, the interpolation process is straight forward for primary attributes such as soil gravimetric water content (θg) and soil bulk density (ρb), the DSM of volumetric water content (θv), the product of θg by ρb, may either involve direct interpolations of θv (approach 1) or independent interpolation of ρb and θg data points and subsequent multiplication of ρb and θg maps (approach 2). The main objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of these two mapping approaches for θv. A 23 ha grassland catchment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was selected for this study. A total of 317 data points were randomly selected and sampled during the dry season in the topsoil (0-0.05 m) for θg by ρb estimation. Data points were interpolated following approaches 1 and 2, and using inverse distance weighting with 3 or 12 neighboring points (IDW3; IDW12), regular spline with tension (RST) and ordinary kriging (OK). Based on an independent validation set of 70 data points, OK was the best interpolator for ρb (mean absolute error, MAE of 0.081 g cm-3), while θg was best estimated using IDW12 (MAE = 1.697%) and θv by IDW3 (MAE = 1.814%). It was found that approach 1 underestimated θv. Approach 2 tended to overestimate θv, but reduced the prediction bias by an average of 37% and only improved the prediction accuracy by 1.3% compared to approach 1. Such a great benefit of approach 2 (i.e., the subsequent multiplication of interpolated maps of primary variables) was unexpected considering that a higher sampling density (∼14 data point ha-1 in the present study) tends to minimize the differences between interpolations techniques and approaches. In the

  17. Response of sap flow to environmental factors in the headwater catchment of Miyun Reservoir in subhumid North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Qiang; Hu, Hongchang; Tian, Fuqiang; Liu, Yaping; Xu, Ran

    2015-04-01

    Since the headwater catchment of Miyun Reservoir is the main drinking water conservation area of Beijing, its water cycle is of importance for the regional water resource. Transpiration is an important component of water cycle, which can be estimated by sap flow. In this study, the dynamics of sap flow and its response to environmental factors and relationship with leaf area index (LAI) were analyzed. The field study was conducted in the Xitaizi Experimental Catchment, located in the headwater catchment of Miyun Reservoir in subhumid North China. The Aspen (Populus davidiana) and Epinette (Larix gmelinii) are the two dominant tree species. Sap flow in 15 Aspen (Populus davidiana) trees was monitored using thermal dissipation probes (TDP) during the growing season of 2013 and 2014, and sap flow in another 3 Epinette (Larix gmelinii) trees was also monitored during September and October in 2014 for comparative analysis. Physiological and biometric parameters of the selected trees and the environmental factors, including meteorological variables, soil moisture content and groundwater table depth were measured. Vapor pressure deficit (VPD), variable of transpiration (VT) and reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) were calculated using the measured environmental factors. The LAI, which is used to characterize phenophase, was calculated using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI product (MCD15A3). Correlation analysis for daily sap flow and air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed, solar radiation, VPD, VT and ET0 under different soil moisture and groundwater table depth conditions was performed. Diurnal course and hysteresis of sap flow were analyzed as a function of air temperature, solar radiation, VPD and VT on the typical sunny, cloudy and rainy days under different soil moisture conditions. Correlation analysis between daily sap flow and LAI showed that LAI and phenophase significantly influence sap flow and restrict

  18. Response of rock-fissure seepage to snowmelt in Mount Taihang slope-catchment, North China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiansheng; Liu, Changming; Zhang, Wanjun

    2013-01-01

    The complex physiographic and hydrogeological systems of mountain terrains facilitate intense rock-fissure seepages and multi-functional ecological interactions. As mountain eco-hydrological terrains are the common water sources of river basins across the globe, it is critical to build sufficient understanding into the hydrological processes in this unique ecosystem. This study analyzes infiltration and soil/rock-fissure seepage processes from a 65 mm snowfall/melt in November 2009 in the typical granitic gneiss slope catchment in the Taihang Mountains. The snowfall, snowmelt and melt-water processes are monitored using soil-water time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes and tipping bucket flowmeters. The results suggest that snowmelt infiltration significantly influences soil/rock water seepage in the 0-100 cm soil depth of the slope-catchment. It is not only air temperature that influences snowmelt, but also snowmelt infiltration and rock-fissure seepage. Diurnal variations in rock-fissure seepage are in close correlation with air temperature (R(2) > 0.7). Temperature also varies with soil/rock water viscosity, which element in turn influences soil/rock water flow. Invariably, water dynamics in the study area is not only a critical water supply element for domestic, industrial and agricultural uses, but also for food security and social stability.

  19. Response of rock-fissure seepage to snowmelt in Mount Taihang slope-catchment, North China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiansheng; Liu, Changming; Zhang, Wanjun

    2013-01-01

    The complex physiographic and hydrogeological systems of mountain terrains facilitate intense rock-fissure seepages and multi-functional ecological interactions. As mountain eco-hydrological terrains are the common water sources of river basins across the globe, it is critical to build sufficient understanding into the hydrological processes in this unique ecosystem. This study analyzes infiltration and soil/rock-fissure seepage processes from a 65 mm snowfall/melt in November 2009 in the typical granitic gneiss slope catchment in the Taihang Mountains. The snowfall, snowmelt and melt-water processes are monitored using soil-water time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes and tipping bucket flowmeters. The results suggest that snowmelt infiltration significantly influences soil/rock water seepage in the 0-100 cm soil depth of the slope-catchment. It is not only air temperature that influences snowmelt, but also snowmelt infiltration and rock-fissure seepage. Diurnal variations in rock-fissure seepage are in close correlation with air temperature (R(2) > 0.7). Temperature also varies with soil/rock water viscosity, which element in turn influences soil/rock water flow. Invariably, water dynamics in the study area is not only a critical water supply element for domestic, industrial and agricultural uses, but also for food security and social stability. PMID:23128629

  20. North Sea research: Where might it go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, S. A.

    1995-03-01

    Seven research suggestions are discussed: the phenomenon of the rare species, the life conditions of meiofauna in suboxic sediment layers, the part-time dormancy of animals and bacteria in the sediment, the importance of lateral advection for the flux of organic matter to the benthos, the selection of sites representative of larger North Sea regions, the selection of monitoring stations, and the importance of viruses, bacteria and other parasites for the North Sea ecosystem.

  1. Testing fine sediment connectivity hypotheses using fallout radionuclide tracers in a small catchment with badlands. Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Vuolo, Diego; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Ferrer, Laura; Estrany, Joan

    2016-04-01

    In the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain), results obtained during over 20 years showed that badlands are the primary sources of sediments to the drainage network. Parent lutitic rocks are weathered during winter producing regoliths, which are eroded from badland surfaces mainly during summer intense rainstorms. Even if the produced sediments are mainly fine, due to the ephemeral nature of summer runoff events most of them are deposited on the stream beds, where they may remain during some time (months to years). Within the MEDhyCON project, a fallout radionuclides (FRNs) tracing experiment (i.e., excess lead 210 (Pbx-210) and beryllium 7 (Be-7)) is being carried out in order to investigate sediment connectivity. A simplified Pbx-210 balance model on badland surfaces suggested a seasonal sawtooth-like activity pattern: FRN being accumulated in regoliths from October to June and depleted in summer. Early summer erosion events would produce the sediments with the highest activity whereas late summer events would produce sediments with the lowest activity coming from the deeper regolith horizons. These findings lead us to launch two sediment transfer connectivity hypotheses analysing respectively the temporal and spatial variability of the Pb-210 activities within the fine sediments at the small catchment scale: (1) The temporal variability of suspended sediment activities at the gauging stations is a measure of sediment transfer immediacy, ergo connectivity. Hence, a high variability in suspended sediment activities, mimicking regolith activity temporal pattern would indicate high connectivity, whereas a low variability, meaning that sediments are mostly pooled in a large and slowly moving stock, would indicate low connectivity. (2) In a drainage system where fine sediments temporarily remain on the dry stream bed, the ratio between fine sediment activities at the sources and fine in-stream sediment activities downstream is a measure of sediment connectivity

  2. Catchment-Scale Modeling Approach for Facilitating Research and Management of Water Quality in Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental and ecological models can be used to interpret and expand outcomes of the lab experiments, answer what-if questions and predict future development of ecosystems. Developing an integrated modelling system at catchment scales is particularly important, which not only can facilitate research work, but also is a very useful tool for planning and management of water resources related to various emerging environmental issues in the future. Aquatic ecosystems are very complex and predicting change of water quality is also determined by accurate prediction of changes of hydrological, hydraulic and hydrodynamic behaviors in the system. In this study, we introduced an integrated catchment-scale modeling which includes developing hydrological-1D hydraulic models, emission and loading models as well as 3D-hydrodynamic and water quality models. We applied the integrated approach in different case studies, suggesting this modelling system may provide a useful framework for future sound management of water resources.

  3. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangen, B.; Finocchiaro, R. G.; Gleason, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been suggested as policy goal with multiple environmental benefits including enhancement of atmospheric carbon sequestration. However, there are concerns that increased CH4 emissions associated with restoration may outweigh the potential sequestration benefits. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is characterized by millions of depressional wetlands and spans climate and land-use gradients that have potential to affect biotic and abiotic factors associated with the overall greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of pothole wetland ecosystems. Thus, we conducted a comprehensive, 4-year study of 119 wetland catchments distributed throughout the U.S. portion of the PPR to assess the effects of land use and restoration practices on CH4 and N2O fluxes and soil properties.Results showed that the effects of land use on GHG fluxes and abiotic soil properties differed with respect to catchment zone (upland, wetland), wetland classification, geographic location, and year. CH4 fluxes were greater than previously reported for pothole wetlands, while N2O fluxes were comparable to previously reported values. Moreover, maximum cumulative CH4 fluxes were nearly 3 times as high as previously reported in North America.Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, but sequestration rates associated with restoration are variable. Further, when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline; conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of restoration when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability discovered by this study underscores the difficulty in quantifying the GHG balance of wetlands.

  4. Hydrological connectivity for catchment management: research approaches, pathways and future agendas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, L. J.; Ali, G.; Roy, A. G.; Smith, M. W.; Tetzlaf, D.; Wainwright, J.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of hydrological connectivity is an overarching framework for understanding runoff and runon that has come to the fore in the last decade. Catchment management is a vital end-use of research around hydrological connectivity. The purpose of management is usually to maintain appropriate (dis)connectivity for different niches (hydrological, ecological, geomorphological), especially to be able to deal with what happens when structures are perturbed. Thus, for effective management and intervention in catchments a process-based understanding of connectivity is required so that: i) the conceptual rather than solely empirical understanding drives how managers interpret a system; and ii) there is an understanding of how continuous flow fields develop under different sets of environmental conditions to enable managers to know when, where and how to intervene successfully in catchment processes. Presently there is confusion around the structure: process dichotomy, shifting focus from understanding static indices influencing hydrological connectivity, to understanding the dynamics of process. Understanding different types and states of connections in catchments is helpful, but it is better to have an appreciation of processes to know that intervention is occurring in the most suitable way, or to prioritize limited resources. The aim of this presentation is to: i) evaluate the extent to which different concepts of hydrological connectivity have emerged from different approaches to measure and predict flow in different environments; ii) discuss the extent to which these different concepts are mutually compatible; and iii) explore what further research needs to be carried out to contribute to a unified understanding of hydrological processes. Approaches to investigating hydrological connectivity can be categorised as those: evaluating soil-moisture patterns (soil-moisture connectivity); understanding hillslope runoff patterns and processes (flow-process connectivity

  5. Ecohydrological separation in a Mediterranean mountain environment (Vallcebre research catchments, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Cayuela, Carles; Sánchez-Costa, Elisenda; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Until very recently, a general paradigm in hydrology was that water is well mixed in the soil, and therefore groundwater, stream water and plant transpiration are all sourced by this well mixed pool. However, recent works (Brooks et al., 2010; Goldsmith et al., 2012) have shown the existence of different water pools in the soil, where tightly bound water, potentially used by plants, does not mix with mobile water that potentially contributes to groundwater and streamflow. This new "two water worlds hypothesis" of ecohydrological separation of water between streams and trees should however be verified in areas with different climates and land covers (McDonnell, 2014). With this objective, we examine this hypothesis in the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E) using the dual isotope-based approach combined with meteorological and hydrometric monitoring. Since May 2015, stable water-isotopes have been monitored in rainfall (2 locations), in throughfall and stemflow below Scots pines as well as in stream water at the Can Vila (0.56 km2) catchment outlet. Moreover, three spatially distributed sampling campaigns in different antecedent soil moisture conditions have been performed (May, August and November 2015) within the catchment. During the sampling campaigns soil samples (10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 cm) and xylem samples (3 Scots pines) were collected at 8 locations, with different topographic indices. Water in soil and xylem samples was extracted by cryogenic vacuum distillation. This information was complemented with mobile soil water sampled in 3 lysimetric profiles (20, 50 and 100 cm) and in 13 piezometers (150-300 cm deep) distributed within the catchment. These campaigns were combined with a similar regular sampling, every 15 days (From May to December 2015) at one of the 8 locations. All the isotopic information, obtained by infrared spectroscopy, has been combined with continuous measurement of meteorological, soil moisture and potential

  6. [Research advances in dynamic mechanism and its simulation of eco-hydrological process in forest catchment].

    PubMed

    Diao, Yiwei; Pei, Tiefan

    2004-12-01

    Hydrological process is the key link between climatic fluctuations and ecologic dynamics of forests at spatial and temporal scales. To some extent, global climate change and large-scale human's activities will impact the spatial-temporal changes of eco-hydrological process in forest catchments in the future. Therefore, researches on the dynamic mechanism of eco-hydrological processes in forest catchments play a crucial role in understanding and controlling the rational use of ecological resources, resuming regional ecology, and sustainable development in economy. This paper described the interception, evapotranspiration and rainfall-runoff of forest ecological system and their effects on hydrological process. The spatial structure of soil moisture and its evolution with time were also the cause and consequence of forest. The spatial-temporal interaction between hydrologic and ecologic dynamics, the application of distributed hydrological model, and the eco-hydrological dynamics and cybernetics of forest would be the most exciting frontiers of the relative researches in the future. PMID:15825459

  7. Hydrochemical responses among nested catchments of the Sleepers River Research Watershed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Boyer, E. W.; Shanley, J. B.; Kendall, C.

    2005-12-01

    We are probing chemical and isotopic tracers of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrate over both space and time to determine how stream nutrient dynamics change with increasing basin size and differ with flow conditions. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA, 20 to 30 nested sub-basins that ranged in size from 3 to 11,000 ha were sampled repeatedly under baseflow conditions. These synoptic surveys showed a pattern of heterogeneity in headwaters that converged to a consistent response at larger basin sizes and is consistent with findings of other studies. In addition to characterizing spatial patterns under baseflow, we sampled rainfall and snowmelt events over a gradient of basin sizes to investigate scaling responses under different flow conditions. During high flow events, DOC and nitrate flushing responses varied among different basins where high-frequency event samples were collected. While the DOC and nitrate concentration patterns were similar at four headwater basins, the concentration responses of larger basins were markedly different in that the concentration patterns, flushing duration, and maximum concentrations were attenuated from headwaters to the largest basin. We are using these data to explore how flow paths and solute mixing aggregate. Overall, these results highlight the complexities of understanding spatial scaling issues in catchments and underscore the need to consider event responses of hydrology and chemistry among catchments.

  8. Long-term changes in precipitation and stream water chemistry in small forest and moorland catchments at Beddgelert Forest, north Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, B.; Stevens, P. A.; Brittain, S. A.; Norris, D. A.; Hughes, S.; Woods, C.

    Changes in the chemistry of bulk precipitation and stream water between 1982 and 2000 are described for small moorland and forest catchments located within Beddgelert Forest in north Wales. Two forest catchments were partially clearfelled in 1984 (D2; 68% and D4; 28%) whilst a third (D3) remained as an unfelled control until autumn / winter 1998/99 when partial felling took place in the headwaters. Over the monitoring period, the annual mean pH of bulk precipitation increased from 4.6 to 5.1 whilst the annual mean non-seasalt sulphate concentration decreased from 0.53 mg S l-1 in 1985 to 0.24 mg S l-1 in 2000. Since 1985, the annual wet deposition flux of non-seasalt sulphur decreased by 50% to 8.4 kg S ha-1 yr-1 in 2000. Annual mean inorganic nitrogen concentrations and annual wet deposition fluxes have remained relatively unchanged since 1982. The decrease in atmospheric sulphur deposition is reflected by decreased annual mean concentrations of non-seasalt sulphur, acidity, aluminium and calcium in all four streams irrespective of clearfelling activities. Annual variations in nitrate-N and potassium concentrations in the forest streams, largely determined by pulses of leaching following forest clearance, had no effect on stream acidity. In common with UK upland catchments, annual mean concentrations of dissolved organic carbon have increased from about 1 mg C l-1 in 1985 to between 1.5 and 2 mg C l-1 in 2000, although there is considerable year to year variability. Two boreholes drilled adjacent to catchments D3 and D4 have confirmed the presence of alkaline, base rich groundwater at Beddgelert. Although the boreholes are only 150 m apart, there are large differences in chemistry suggesting that different groundwater reservoirs have been intercepted providing further evidence of the complexity and heterogeneity of groundwater systems in upland catchments.

  9. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Brian A; Finocchiaro, Raymond G; Gleason, Robert A

    2015-11-15

    Wetland restoration has been suggested as policy goal with multiple environmental benefits including enhancement of atmospheric carbon sequestration. However, there are concerns that increased methane (CH4) emissions associated with restoration may outweigh potential benefits. A comprehensive, 4-year study of 119 wetland catchments was conducted in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central U.S. to assess the effects of land use on greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and soil properties. Results showed that the effects of land use on GHG fluxes and abiotic soil properties differed with respect to catchment zone (upland, wetland), wetland classification, geographic location, and year. Mean CH4 fluxes from the uplands were predictably low (<0.02 g CH4 m(-2) day(-1)), while wetland zone CH4 fluxes were much greater (<0.001-3.9 g CH4 m(-2) day(-1)). Mean cumulative seasonal CH4 fluxes ranged from roughly 0-650 g CH4 m(-2), with an overall mean of approximately 160 g CH4 m(-2). These maximum cumulative CH4 fluxes were nearly 3 times as high as previously reported in North America. The overall magnitude and variability of N2O fluxes from this study (<0.0001-0.0023 g N2O m(-2) day(-1)) were comparable to previously reported values. Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, and that when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline. Conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of wetland restoration (drained, non-drained) when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability demonstrated by this study was consistent with findings of other wetland investigations and underscores the difficulty in quantifying the

  10. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Brian A; Finocchiaro, Raymond G; Gleason, Robert A

    2015-11-15

    Wetland restoration has been suggested as policy goal with multiple environmental benefits including enhancement of atmospheric carbon sequestration. However, there are concerns that increased methane (CH4) emissions associated with restoration may outweigh potential benefits. A comprehensive, 4-year study of 119 wetland catchments was conducted in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central U.S. to assess the effects of land use on greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and soil properties. Results showed that the effects of land use on GHG fluxes and abiotic soil properties differed with respect to catchment zone (upland, wetland), wetland classification, geographic location, and year. Mean CH4 fluxes from the uplands were predictably low (<0.02 g CH4 m(-2) day(-1)), while wetland zone CH4 fluxes were much greater (<0.001-3.9 g CH4 m(-2) day(-1)). Mean cumulative seasonal CH4 fluxes ranged from roughly 0-650 g CH4 m(-2), with an overall mean of approximately 160 g CH4 m(-2). These maximum cumulative CH4 fluxes were nearly 3 times as high as previously reported in North America. The overall magnitude and variability of N2O fluxes from this study (<0.0001-0.0023 g N2O m(-2) day(-1)) were comparable to previously reported values. Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, and that when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline. Conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of wetland restoration (drained, non-drained) when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability demonstrated by this study was consistent with findings of other wetland investigations and underscores the difficulty in quantifying the

  11. The Skogaryd Research Catchment - an infrastructure to integrate terrestrial and aquatic greenhouse gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemedtsson, Leif; Weslien, Per; Bastviken, David; Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Wallin, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    The Skogaryd Research Catchment (SRC; 58°23'N, 12°09'E, hemiboreal) is part of the Swedish Infrastructure for Ecosystem Science (SITES, www.fieldsites.se). SITES is a national coordinated infrastructure for terrestrial and limnological field research, consisting of nine research stations covering the different landscapes and climatic regions in Sweden. The SITES initiative is a long-term effort founded by the Swedish Research Council and the station owners. Researchers regardless of affiliation are welcome use the stations including the infrastructure in their research and perform experiments (after approval) or outsource tasks which are managed by the stations. Data collected in both background monitoring programs and previous and ongoing projects at the stations are also intended to support past, present and future research. Ecological, biogeochemical, and environmental research often focus on a specific ecosystem or have strict habitat boundaries. However, the growing awareness of systems interactions, feedbacks and large scale consequences calls for approaches that integrate across ecosystems and habitats to consider whole catchments, landscapes and regions. Thus there is an urgent need for long-term field sites that support integrative and cross-habitat-boundary research. Our aim at SRC is to develop methodologies to quantify GHG balances at the landscape scale in forested regions that include land-atmosphere, land-water, and water-atmosphere exchange of CO2, CH4 and N2O. Another aim is to promote investigations to elucidate the undelaying regulation of the biogeochemical processes. The SRC harbor several main habitats including mires, forests at different growth stages, lakes, and streams. The fluxes of greenhouse gases (GHG) are measured to a large extent according to ICOS protocol for the Eddy Covariance (EC) methodology for CO2, H2O, and CH4, as well as axillary data for habitats where such protocols exist. For aquatic habitats lacking such protocols

  12. 2. View southwest of north facade elevation. Natick Research ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View southwest of north facade elevation. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  13. 12. View north of Tropic Chamber. Natick Research & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View north of Tropic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  14. Last glacial aggradation and postglacial sediment production from the non-glacial Waipaoa and Waimata catchments, Hikurangi Margin, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marden, Michael; Mazengarb, Colin; Palmer, Alan; Berryman, Kelvin; Rowan, Donna

    2008-07-01

    The sediment flux generated by postglacial channel incision has been calculated for the 2150 km 2, non-glacial, Waipaoa catchment located on the tectonically active Hikurangi Margin, eastern North Island, New Zealand. Sediment production both at a sub-catchment scale and for the Waipaoa catchment as a whole was calculated by first using the tensioned spline method within ARC MAP to create an approximation of the aggradational Waipaoa-1 surface (contemporaneous with the Last Glacial Maximum), and second using grid calculator functions in the GIS to subtract the modern day surface from the Waipaoa-1 surface. The Waipaoa-1 surface was mapped using stereo aerial photography, and global positioning technology fixed the position of individual terrace remnants in the landscape. The recent discovery of Kawakawa Tephra within Waipaoa-1 aggradation gravels in this catchment demonstrates that aggradation was coincidental with or began before the deposition of this 22 600 14C-year-old tephra and, using the stratigraphic relationship of Rerewhakaaitu Tephra, the end of aggradation is dated at ca 15 000 14C years (ca 18 000 cal. years BP). The construction of the Waipaoa-1 terrace is considered to be synchronous and broadly correlated with aggradation elsewhere in the North Island and northern South Island, indicating that aggradation ended at the same time over a wide area. Subsequent downcutting, a manifestation of base-level lowering following a switch to postglacial incision at the end of glacial-age aggradation, points to a significant Southern Hemisphere climatic warming occurring soon after ca 15 000 14C years (ca 18 000 cal. years BP) during the Older Dryas interval. Elevation differences between the Waipaoa-1 (c.15 ka) terrace and the level of maximum channel incision (i.e. before aggradation since the turn of the 20th century) suggest about 50% of the topographic relief within headwater reaches of the Waipaoa catchment has been formed in postglacial times. The

  15. Tectonic controls of the North Anatolian Fault System (NAFS) on the geomorphic evolution of the alluvial fans and fan catchments in Erzincan pull-apart basin; Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarp, Gulcan

    2015-02-01

    The Erzincan pull-apart basin is located in the eastern section of the North Anatolian Fault System (NAFS). The tectonic evolution of this basin is mostly controlled by strike slip master faults of the NAFS. This study examines the topography-structure relationships in an effort to evaluate the tectonic signatures in the landscape, paying special attention to recent tectonic activity. In the study, the main focus is on the tectonic controls of the NAFS on the geomorphic evolution of alluvial fans and fan catchments in the Erzincan pull-apart basin. The observations of the amount of tilting of the alluvial fans (β) and its relation with morphometric (Asymmetry Factor (AF), Hypsometric Integral (HI), Fractal analysis of drainage networks (D)) properties of the fan catchments provide valuable information about the tectonic evolution of the basin area. The results of the analyses showed that the alluvial fan and fan catchment morphology in the pull-apart basin are mainly controlled by the ongoing tectonic activity of the NAFS. The fault system in the basin has controlled the accommodation space by causing differential subsidence of the basin, and aggradation processes by causing channel migration, channel incision and tilting the alluvial fans.

  16. Using object-based geomorphometry for hydro-geomorphological analysis in a Mediterranean research catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Domenico; Cuomo, Albina; Palmieri, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the paper is to apply an object-based geomorphometric procedure to define the runoff contribution areas and support a hydro-geomorphological analysis of a 3 km2 Mediterranean research catchment (southern Italy). Daily and sub-hourly discharge and electrical conductivity data were collected and recorded during a 3-year monitoring activity. Hydro-chemograph analyses carried out on these data revealed a strong seasonal hydrological response in the catchment that differed from the stormflow events that occur in the wet periods and in dry periods. This analysis enabled us to define the hydro-chemograph signatures related to increasing flood magnitude, which progressively involves various runoff components (baseflow, subsurface flow and surficial flow) and an increasing contributing area to discharge. Field surveys and water table/discharge measurements carried out during a selected storm event enabled us to identify and map specific runoff source areas with homogeneous geomorphological units previously defined as hydro-geomorphotypes (spring points, diffuse seepage along the main channel, seepage along the riparian corridors, diffuse outflow from hillslope taluses and concentrate sapping from colluvial hollows). Following the procedures previously proposed and used by authors for object-based geomorphological mapping, a hydro-geomorphologically oriented segmentation and classification was performed with the eCognition (Trimble, Inc.) package. The best agreement with the expert-based geomorphological mapping was obtained with weighted plan curvature at different-sized windows. By combining the hydro-chemical analysis and object-based hydro-geomorphotype map, the variability of the contribution areas was graphically modeled for the selected event, which occurred during the wet season, by using the log values of flow accumulation that better fit the contribution areas. The results allow us to identify the runoff component on hydro-chemographs for each time step

  17. Presence-only approach to assess landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility. A test for the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Hochschild, Volker; Rotigliano, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at comparing the performances of a presence only approach, namely Maximum Entropy, in assessing landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility within the Mili catchment, located in the north-eastern Sicily, Italy. This catchment has been recently exposed to three main meteorological extreme events, resulting in the activation of multiple fast landslides, which occurred on the 1st October 2009, 10th March 2010 and 1st March 2011. Differently from the 2009 event, which only marginally hit the catchment, the 2010 and 2011 storms fully involved the area of the Mili catchment. Detailed field data was collected to associate the thickness of mobilised materials at the triggering zone to each mass movement within the catchment. This information has been used to model the landslide susceptibility for two classes of processes clustered into shallow failures for maximum depths of 0.5m and deep ones in case of values equal or greater than 0.5m. As the authors believed that the peculiar geomorphometry of this narrow and steep catchment played a fundamental role in generating two distinct patterns of landslide thicknesses during the initiation phase, a HRDEM was used to extract topographic attributes to express near-triggering geomorphological conditions. On the other hand, medium resolution vegetation indexes derived from ASTER scenes were used as explanatory variables pertaining to a wider spatial neighbourhood, whilst a revised geological map, the land use from CORINE and a tectonic map were used to convey an even wider area connected to the slope instability. The choice of a presence-only approach allowed to effectively discriminate between the two types of landslide thicknesses at the triggering zone, producing outstanding prediction skills associated with relatively low variances across a set of 20 randomly generated replicates. The validation phase produced indeed average AUC values of 0.91 with a standard deviation of 0.03 for both the modelled landslide

  18. Fluvial responses to volcanism: resedimentation of the 1800a Taupo ignimbrite eruption in the Rangitaiki River catchment, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manville, Vern; Newton, Erin H.; White, James D. L.

    2005-02-01

    The potential for the generation of dangerous and damaging lahars and floods in response to the eruption of voluminous pyroclastic debris has become increasingly appreciated in recent years. The style and tempo of this response varies both between eruptions and between individual catchments impacted by a single eruption, so that an understanding of the factors controlling this variation is necessary for precise hazard assessment. The 1800a Taupo eruption from the Taupo Volcanic Centre in the central North Island of New Zealand devastated an area of 20,000 km 2 during eruption of a climactic ignimbrite, impacting the headwaters of all major rivers draining radially from this region. The Rangitaiki River, the subject of this paper, differs from other catchments in that the Taupo ignimbrite buried an essentially flat land surface inherited from a suite of welded ignimbrite sheets erupted between 320-340 and 230 ka. The middle reaches of the catchment are characterised by narrow, steep gorges alternating with low-gradient basins developed in tectonic half-grabens. Initially, remobilisation of pyroclastic material in the headwaters was dominated by hyperconcentrated sheet flows resulting in shallow reworking. In higher gradient areas, reintegration of drainage networks was achieved by incision of deep channels and gullies, assisted by breakouts from ephemeral lakelets developed in ignimbrite-dammed depressions. Braided, and later meandering, streams superseded this pattern as rill and gully systems stabilised and sediment yields fell leading to a decline in drainage density. Gorge reaches acted as efficient conduits for remobilised material while the basins acted as local depocentres for the temporary storage of volcaniclastic sediments, mediating the transfer of pyroclastic debris to the Bay of Plenty coast >100 km to the north. Reworking and resedimentation of pyroclastic debris began immediately after the eruption, peaking early and then rapidly declining so that

  19. Flash floods and debris flow in the city area of Messina, North-East part of Sicily, Italy in October 2009: the case of the Giampilieri catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronica, G. T.; Brigandi, G.; Morey, N.

    2010-09-01

    Flash floods are phenomena in which the important hydrologic processes are occurring on the same spatial and temporal scales as the intense precipitation. Most of the catchment in the North-East part of Sicily (Italy) are small, with a steep slope, and characterized by short concentration times. These characteristics make those catchment prone to flash flood formation, as demonstrated by events that occurred in the area around Messina in the North-East part of Sicily, Italy in the last recent years. The events occurred on 25th October 2007 in the Mastroguglielmo torrent on the ionic sea coast, on 11th December 2008 in the Elicona catchment on the Tyrrhenian sea coast and on 1st October 2009 in Racinazzi and Giampilieri torrents on the ionic sea coast are an example of flash floods and debris flow events that caused not only significant economic damages to property, buildings, roads and bridges but also, for this that concern the 1st October 2009 flash flood event, loss of human life. This work is aimed by the 1st October 2009 flash flood and debris flow event where a devastating flooding was caused by a very intense rainfall concentrated over the Messina area. The storm caused severe flash floods in many villages around the city of Messina, such as Giampilieri, Scaletta Zanclea, Altolia Superiore and Molino with forty casualties and significant damage to property, buildings, roads and bridges estimated close to 200 million Euro. Main focus of this work is to perform a post event analysis of the 2009 flash flood event, putting together available meteorological and hydrological data in order to get better insight into temporal and spatial variability of the rain storm, the soil moisture condition and the consequent flash floods in the catchment of the Giampilieri catchment. Starting from these information another objective has been, then, to document the post-failure stage of event concerning slid materials. With the help of GIS technology and particularly spatial

  20. A cross-site comparison of factors controlling streamwater carbon flux in western North American catchments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, P. D.; Biederman, J. A.; Condon, K.; Chorover, J.; McIntosh, J. C.; Meixner, T.; Perdrial, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing variability in climate is expected to alter the amount and form of terrestrial carbon in stream water both directly, through changes in the magnitude and timing of discharge, and indirectly through changes in land cover following disturbance (e.g. drought, fire, or insect driven mortality). Predicting how these changes will impact individual stream-catchment ecosystems however, is hampered by a lack of concurrent observations on both dissolved and particulate carbon flux across a range of spatial, temporal, and discharge scales. Because carbon is strongly coupled to most biogeochemical reactions within both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, this represents a critical unknown in predicting the response of catchment-ecosystems to concurrent changes in climate and land cover. This presentation will address this issue using a meta-analysis of dissolved organic, dissolved inorganic, and particulate organic carbon fluxes from multiple locations, including undisturbed sites along a climate gradient from desert rivers to seasonally snow-covered, forested mountain catchments, and sites disturbed by both fire and extensive, insect driven mortality. Initial analyses suggest that dissolved (organic and inorganic) and particulate fluxes respond differently to various types of disturbance and depend on interactions between changes in size of mobile carbon pools and changes in hydrologic routing of carbon to streamwater. Anomalously large fluxes of both dissolved and particulate organic matter are associated with episodic changes in hydrologic routing (e.g. storm floods; snowmelt) that connect normally hydrologically isolated carbon pools (e.g. surficial hillslope soils) with surface water. These events are often of short duration as the supply of mobile carbon is exhausted in short term flushing response. In contrast, disturbances that increase the size of the mobile carbon pool (e.g. widespread vegetation mortality) result smaller proportional increases in

  1. Teacher Salary Bonuses in North Carolina. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Salary Bonuses in North Carolina"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Jacob Vigdor of Duke University reviews a teacher salary bonus program operating in North Carolina. Known officially as the ABC's of Public Education, the program awards teachers with…

  2. Overview on health research ethics in Egypt and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Diaa; Abd El Aal, Wafaa; Saleh, Azza; Sleem, Hany; Khyatti, Meriem; Mazini, Loubna; Hemminki, Kari; Anwar, Wagida A

    2014-08-01

    Developing countries, including Egypt and North African countries, need to improve their quality of research by enhancing international cooperation and exchanges of scientific information, as well as competing for obtaining international funds to support research activities. Research must comply with laws and other requirements for research that involves human subjects. The purpose of this article is to overview the status of health research ethics in Egypt and North African countries, with reference to other Middle Eastern countries. The EU and North African Migrants: Health and Health Systems project (EUNAM) has supported the revision of the status of health research ethics in Egypt and North African countries, by holding meetings and discussions to collect information about research ethics committees in Egypt, and revising the structure and guidelines of the committees, as well as reviewing the literature concerning ethics activities in the concerned countries. This overview has revealed that noticeable efforts have been made to regulate research ethics in certain countries in the Middle East. This can be seen in the new regulations, which contain the majority of protections mentioned in the international guidelines related to research ethics. For most of the internationally registered research ethics committees in North African countries, the composition and functionality reflect the international guidelines. There is growing awareness of research ethics in these countries, which extends to teaching efforts to undergraduate and postgraduate medical students.

  3. Hydrological and erosion response at micro-plot to -catchment scale following forest wildfire, north-central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Diana; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Nunes, João. Pedro; Fernandes, Isabel; Ferreira, Raquel; Pereira, Luísa; Prats, Sergio; Ermitas Rial, María.; Eufemia Varela, María.

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires can have important impacts on hydrological and soil erosion processes, due to the destruction of vegetation cover and changes to soil properties. According to Shakesby and Doerr (2006), these wildfire effects are: i) much better known at small spatial scales (especially erosion plots) than at the scale of catchments; ii) much better studied with respect to overland flow and streamflow (and, then, especially peak discharges) than to soil erosion. Following up on a precursor project studying runoff generation and the associated soil losses from micro-plot to slope-scale in Portuguese eucalypt forests, the EROSFIRE-II project addresses the connectivity of these processes across hillslopes as well as within the channel network. This is done in the Colmeal study area in central Portugal, where the outlet of an entirely burnt catchment of roughly 10 ha was instrumented with a gauging station continuously recording water level and tubidity, and five slopes were each equipped with 4 runoff plots of < 0,5 m2 ("micro-plot") and 4 slope-scale plots as well as 1 slope-scale sediment fence. Starting one month after the August 2008 wildfire, the plots were monitored at 1- to 2-weekly intervals, depending on the occurrence of rainfall. The gauging station became operational at the end of November 2008, since the in-situ construction of an H-flume required several weeks. A preliminary analysis of the data collected till the end of 2008, focusing on two slopes with contrasting slope lengths as well as the gauging station: revealed clear differences in runoff and erosion between: (i) the micro-plot and slope-scale plots on the same hillslope; (ii) the two slopes; (iii) an initial dry period and a subsequent much wetter period; (iv) the slopes and the catchment-scale, also depending on the sampling period. These results suggest that the different processes govern the hydrological and erosion response at different spatial scales as well as for different periods, with soil

  4. Post-Last Glacial Maximum fluvial incision and sediment generation in the unglaciated Waipaoa catchment, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marden, M.; Betts, H.; Palmer, A.; Taylor, R..; Bilderback, E..; Litchfield, N.

    2014-06-01

    Small river systems contribute a significant component of sediment delivered to oceans, but the temporal evolution of fluvially eroded landscapes is needed. A sequence of postglacial terraces in the unglaciated Waipaoa River catchment provides the opportunity to document fluvial incision and sediment flux on an ~ 2000-year timescale since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which has previously only been undertaken for the entire post-LGM period. This study also calculates sediment mass, where previously sediment volume was calculated. Using a 15-m DEM, field mapping and surveying, and tephrochronology, we calculate rates of fluvial incision and sediment volumes excavated during successive age-constrained, postglacial, incision events and correlate these with a framework of inferred climatic events established for New Zealand. We identify seven periods of terrace formation each succeeded by a period of fluvial incision, six in total. Although the magnitude of the response during each incision event and thus the sediment volumes generated varied through time and across subcatchments draining two contrasting lithological terrains, we conclude that incision events were essentially synchronous, at least within the timeframe constrained by the ca. 2000 year interval between successive eruptive airfall events. Slope relaxation processes were simultaneous with incision thereby indicating that both processes were likely climate driven. We identify a period of accelerated fluvial incision ~ 7 mm y- 1 commencing before ca. 14.0 cal. ka BP (during the early postglacial period) and ceasing ca. 7.9 cal. ka BP toward the end of the Early Holocene Warming period. The magnitude of this incision response was significantly higher in subcatchments draining highly erodible lithologies in the higher uplifting parts of the catchment when river bedload was at over capacity. In contrast, within the remainder of subcatchments draining the more resistant lithologies and in areas of lower uplift

  5. The necessity of field research in prescription of Environmental Flows - A case of the hydropower dominated Middle Zambezi Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwelwa, Elenestina; Crosato, Alessandra; Wright, Nigel; Beevers, Lindsay

    2013-04-01

    The research work in the Middle Zambezi sub-catchment has the key objective to investigate the state of the river and its flood plain in terms of flow variation, river and flood plain morphological variation for both the pre and post hydropower schemes. From the rich biodiversity that this area supports, both Zambia and Zimbabwe has established National Parks with Mana Pools National Park, Sapi and Chewore safari areas being designated as UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984. The habitat sustenance depend on the river channels and the associated morphological features with the flood and recession interaction whose modification can lead to negative environmental consequences. The research findings on the state of the sub-catchment flows and morphology will be outlined. Highlights will be given on the following findings: dominance of hydropower regulation in the water balance of the river reach, historical map analysis and related rates of river channel morphology changes associated to dam operating events and, bed load sediment characterisation and distribution. With the use of SOBEK-Rural (1D/2D) model, analysis of future state of the sub-catchment will be outlined, taking into account the following scenarios: no dam state of the river reach; continue with current water regulation and operations; modification in water regulation to take into account favorable changes and; climate related variation of droughts. The research deductions and implications for maintaining the current dam operation practices will be outline as relates to the sustainability of the hydro-morphology and ecosystem of the catchment which support a rich wildlife habitat. The research observed critical water needs form the basis for environmental flows prescription and recommendation. Whereas the restoration of regular flooding has been identified to be important, the most critical need however is the timing of flood gate regulation which has been observed as a trigger to loss of islands and bars

  6. Olive Mounds, Roman cisterns, erosion pins - potential to characterize erosion in a Mediterranean catchment in north Jordan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, Sabine; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of a three years' time period of a PhD thesis it is luck to catch the "right" rain events for good general erosion approximations. Methods that (i) cover longer time periods, (ii) are not confined to constructed boundaries, and finally (iii) include all possible erosion processes are crucial for good average estimates of sediment yields from different landscapes. The aim of the study was to get a first understanding of erosion processes and sediment yields in a Mediterranean to semi-arid catchment in NW Jordan, wherefore different measurement methods were tested in the predominant landscape units: olive orchards (27%), fields (14%) and natural shrubs on steep slopes (~30%). One of the applied methods was the measurement of topographic olive mounds within 7 orchards with an average size of 800 m2 in synergy with tree-coring and age estimation of the orchards. Furthermore the OSL dating of deposited sediments in two roman cisterns adjacent to fields was conducted and the 9 erosion pin fields, each about 200m2 large, were installed on steep slopes with natural vegetation. The methods cover different time scales from 560 years for the fields, an average of 32 years for the olive orchards and up to two rainy seasons for the erosion pin fields. Results show that olive orchards on steep slopes (>10%) have the highest erosion potential in the region with 95±8 t ha-1year-1 followed by natural vegetated slopes with 37±4 t ha-1year-1 of dislocated material and fields with 1.22±0.06 t ha-1year-1 sediment yield. These spatially constrained outcomes are supported by geochemical sediment fingerprint results of lake sediments from the catchment and will be discussed in regard to the basic assumption that underlie the principle of measurement and the limitations of the methods.

  7. Bridging the Divide: understanding controls on nitrogen export by scaling from headwater catchments to eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, J. M.; Band, L. E.; Creed, I. F.; Duffy, C.; Green, M. B.; Groffman, P. M.; Tague, C.; Whittinghill, K. A.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    A major challenge in ecohydrology is the development of a predictive understanding of the roles of land use and climate on nitrogen (N) cycling and export at regional to continental scales. A dramatic increase in anthropogenic N loads to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems has contributed to forest decline, acidification of freshwater systems, and eutrophication of coastal and estuarine environments. Watershed studies have been a hallmark of ecosystem research and over the last few decades this approach has been refined to hierarchically link terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as a continuum of water, carbon and nutrients along hydrologic flowpaths at multiple scales. We examine nested controls and feedbacks between biotic and abiotic processes controlling N cycling and export from watersheds within temperate forest biomes in eastern North America, a region that has undergone major changes in forest cover and structure as a result of historic logging, agricultural expansion then contraction, urbanization, N deposition, and climate change. Our conceptual model is that the controls on patterns of stream N concentrations and loads exported from watersheds emerge from a cascade of sources and sinks at multiple spatial and temporal scales that accumulate along converging flowpaths. This cascade integrates atmospheric, geologic, geomorphic, land use/land cover, water infrastructure and plant, soil and microbial responses. In order to synthesize controls at continental to patch (10-100 sq. m) scales, we must: (1) Understand how N is coupled to water and carbon cycling within reference forest ecosystems, broadly defined to including surface water drainage networks, across current climate, atmospheric N deposition, geologic, geomorphic and vegetation gradients; and (2) Develop a mechanistic understanding of how human activity alters the timing, magnitude and pattern of these coupled processes. Time series of N export patterns from long-term experimental watersheds across a

  8. A critical re-evaluation of controls on spatial and seasonal variations in nitrate concentrations in river waters throughout the River Derwent catchment in North Yorkshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shaheen; Adnan, Muhammad; McClean, Colin J; Cresser, Malcolm S

    2016-05-01

    Since mean nitrate concentration along single river channels increases significantly with percent arable land use upstream of sampling points and autumn/early winter flushes in nitrate concentration are widespread, it is generally concluded that farmers contribute most of the nitrate. For the River Derwent in North Yorkshire, the correlation between nitrate concentration and percent arable land use is much poorer when tributary data are included in the equation, because of greater variations in dilution by water draining upland areas and in other N input sources. For the whole river system therefore, percent upland moorland/rough grazing land cover is an appreciably better predictor than percent arable land use for nitrate concentration. Upland land use encompasses the higher precipitation and runoff in such areas, and the subsequent greater dilution downstream of both arable land runoff and effluent from treatment works, as well as an inverse correlation to percent arable land use. This is strongly supported by the observation that, for the Derwent, Meteorological Office rainfall data alone proved even better than percent moorland rough grazing for predicting nitrate concentration. The dilution effect is therefore substantial but highly seasonal; lower runoff and dilution in summer offset the lower leaching losses from arable land, and higher dilution and runoff in winter offset greater nitrate leaching losses from arable soils. Because of this, coupled to improved efficiency of nitrogen fertilizer use, seasonality trends in nitrate concentrations that were pronounced a decade ago now have all but disappeared in the catchment.

  9. A critical re-evaluation of controls on spatial and seasonal variations in nitrate concentrations in river waters throughout the River Derwent catchment in North Yorkshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shaheen; Adnan, Muhammad; McClean, Colin J; Cresser, Malcolm S

    2016-05-01

    Since mean nitrate concentration along single river channels increases significantly with percent arable land use upstream of sampling points and autumn/early winter flushes in nitrate concentration are widespread, it is generally concluded that farmers contribute most of the nitrate. For the River Derwent in North Yorkshire, the correlation between nitrate concentration and percent arable land use is much poorer when tributary data are included in the equation, because of greater variations in dilution by water draining upland areas and in other N input sources. For the whole river system therefore, percent upland moorland/rough grazing land cover is an appreciably better predictor than percent arable land use for nitrate concentration. Upland land use encompasses the higher precipitation and runoff in such areas, and the subsequent greater dilution downstream of both arable land runoff and effluent from treatment works, as well as an inverse correlation to percent arable land use. This is strongly supported by the observation that, for the Derwent, Meteorological Office rainfall data alone proved even better than percent moorland rough grazing for predicting nitrate concentration. The dilution effect is therefore substantial but highly seasonal; lower runoff and dilution in summer offset the lower leaching losses from arable land, and higher dilution and runoff in winter offset greater nitrate leaching losses from arable soils. Because of this, coupled to improved efficiency of nitrogen fertilizer use, seasonality trends in nitrate concentrations that were pronounced a decade ago now have all but disappeared in the catchment. PMID:27102774

  10. Black raspberry phytochemical research in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research group has focused on developing black raspberries with improved disease resistance and phytochemical traits over the last seven years. Recent interest in the rich color of black raspberries, and their historical use as an effective dye, derive from their anthocyanin composition and cont...

  11. The North: New Challenges for Creative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimsson, Olafur Ragnar

    2000-01-01

    A Northern research forum of scholars from universities in Arctic countries will study issues raised by the end of the Cold War, including new political institutions and relationships instituted in Northern regions, the relationship between environmental protection and sustainable economic growth, the relevance of traditional international…

  12. Programs for invasive research in North American zoos and aquariums.

    PubMed

    Goodrowe, Karen L

    2003-01-01

    Zoo-based research in North America is an emerging field, which has progressed from an ad hoc approach in a small number of zoos to a coordinated, integrated network of scientists with recognized research programs in approximately one half of the accredited institutions in North America. The disciplines most active in these programs--veterinary medicine and pathology, nutrition, reproductive biology, contraception, and behavior--are now becoming coordinated in zoos through Scientific Advisory Groups. Zoos with research programs generally establish either an institutional animal care and use committee or another committee to evaluate research proposals. In addition to scientific merit and experimental design, zoos evaluate proposals based on factors such as priority by conservation program/identified need; direct effect on species conservation, species type, and appropriateness; availability and location of animals; operational requirements/logistics; communication between institutions; and available funding. Euthanasia is considered only in rare circumstances. Zoo-based research has evolved into an integral component in animal management and conservation programs by providing practical information that is used to improve animal care, well-being, health, and reproduction. However, the degree to which zoos participate in invasive research varies considerably among institutions, due not only to resource limitations but also to how the term "invasive" is defined and accepted at each institution. A more standardized approach among zoological institutions for examining and approving research projects that are supported by zoo-based conservation programs would greatly facilitate the wildlife research efforts of North American zoos.

  13. Research of Houjiayao Unit in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    "Houjiayao Group" is the standard stratigraphic unit of late Pleistocene in northern China, which was created by Jia Lanpo and Wei Qi during their research on Houjiayao site. Based on the mammal, ancient human fossils and Paleolithic features, "Houjiayao Group" was thought as late Pleistocene sediments. "Houjiayao Group" was defined as late Pleistocene stratigraphic units. However, the problems of the age of "Houjiayao Group", stratigraphic division and other issues, have not yet been well resolved. These issues include: the differences of age-dating results, the unclear comparison between stratigraphic units and regional contrast, the uncertain relationship between "Houjiayao Group" and "Nihewan Layer ", and so on. Houjiayao site which located in the southeast of Houjiayao village in Dongjingji town Yangyuan County, Hebei province of China, is a very important paleolithic site. But some researches show that Houjiayao site is located at the 3th terrace of Liyigou valley and there are many opinions about the age of Houjiayao site, which varies from 20-500 thousand years. Combined with former research results and many research methods, our study was mainly focused on the key problems existing in the study of "Houjiayao Group". Through the use of sequence stratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and other theoretical methods, stratigraphic section was studied in the late Pleistocene stratigraphy and sedimentary environment. Through environmental indicators and the age-dating tests, the evolution of ancient geography and environment were identified elementarily. After analyzing informations of this area, geomorphologic investigation and stratum comparation in and around Houjiayao site were done. Houjiayao site is located on the west bank of Liyigou river, which has a tributary named Black Stone River. Two or three layers of volcanic materials were found in this area, those sediments are from a buried paleovolcano in upstream of Black Stone River. The volcanic

  14. Alaska North Slope oil-field restoration research strategy. Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, J.G.; Knapp, C.M.

    1992-03-01

    The document provides a research strategy to support ecological restoration of disturbances related to oil and gas developments on the North Slope of Alaska that is mutually beneficial to the arctic ecorestoration research community and the arctic regulatory community (including at least the following entities: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, EPA, National Marine Fisheries, US FWS, BLM, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, and the North Slope Borough). The purpose of this strategy is to: (1) identify major information or knowledge gaps that have inhibited restoration activities or slowed the regulatory decision process, (2) determine the potential for filling knowledge gaps through research, and (3) suggest tentative priorities for research that are based on the needs identified in steps one and two.

  15. A new approach to modeling the sediment retention service (InVEST 3.0): Case study of the Cape Fear catchment, North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Perrine; Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Sim, Sarah; Mueller, Carina

    2015-08-15

    There is a growing call for ecosystem services models that are both simple and scientifically credible, in order to serve public and private sector decision-making processes. Sediment retention receives particular interest given the impact of this service on water quality. We developed a new version of the sediment retention model for the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs) tool to address previous limitations and facilitate model uncertainty assessment. We tested the model in the Cape Fear basin, North Carolina (NC), performing sensitivity analyses and assessing its ability to detect the spatial variability in sediment retention service for eight subcatchments. The main advantages of the revised model include the use of spatially-explicit, globally available input data, and the explicit consideration of hydrological connectivity in the landscape. The sensitivity analyses in the study catchment identified the erosivity and erodibility factors, together with the cover factor for agricultural land as the most influential parameter for sediment export. Relative predictions, representing the spatial variability in sediment exports, were correctly represented by the model. Absolute sediment exports were also highly correlated with observations, although their interpretation for socio-economic assessments is more uncertain without local knowledge of the dominant erosion processes. This work confirms that the sediment connectivity approach used in the revised InVEST model has great potential to quantify the sediment retention service. Although resources to conduct model calibration and testing are typically scarce, these practices should be encouraged to improve model interpretation and for confident application in different decision-making contexts. Without calibration, the InVEST sediment model still provides relevant information for ecosystem services assessments, especially in decision contexts that involve ranking of sediment export

  16. A new approach to modeling the sediment retention service (InVEST 3.0): Case study of the Cape Fear catchment, North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Perrine; Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Sim, Sarah; Mueller, Carina

    2015-08-15

    There is a growing call for ecosystem services models that are both simple and scientifically credible, in order to serve public and private sector decision-making processes. Sediment retention receives particular interest given the impact of this service on water quality. We developed a new version of the sediment retention model for the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs) tool to address previous limitations and facilitate model uncertainty assessment. We tested the model in the Cape Fear basin, North Carolina (NC), performing sensitivity analyses and assessing its ability to detect the spatial variability in sediment retention service for eight subcatchments. The main advantages of the revised model include the use of spatially-explicit, globally available input data, and the explicit consideration of hydrological connectivity in the landscape. The sensitivity analyses in the study catchment identified the erosivity and erodibility factors, together with the cover factor for agricultural land as the most influential parameter for sediment export. Relative predictions, representing the spatial variability in sediment exports, were correctly represented by the model. Absolute sediment exports were also highly correlated with observations, although their interpretation for socio-economic assessments is more uncertain without local knowledge of the dominant erosion processes. This work confirms that the sediment connectivity approach used in the revised InVEST model has great potential to quantify the sediment retention service. Although resources to conduct model calibration and testing are typically scarce, these practices should be encouraged to improve model interpretation and for confident application in different decision-making contexts. Without calibration, the InVEST sediment model still provides relevant information for ecosystem services assessments, especially in decision contexts that involve ranking of sediment export

  17. Environmental care in agricultural catchments: Toward the communicative catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter

    1991-11-01

    Substantial land degradation of agricultural catchments in Australia has resulted from the importation of European farming methods and the large-scale clearing of land. Rural communities are now being encouraged by government to take responsibility for environmental care. The importance of community involvement is supported by the view that environmental problems are a function of interactions between people and their environment. It is suggested that the commonly held view that community groups cannot care for their resources is due to inappropriate social institutions rather that any inherent disability in people. The communicative catchment is developed as a vision for environmental care into the future. This concept emerges from a critique of resource management through the catchment metaphors of the reduced, mechanical, and the complex, evolving catchment, which reflect the development of systemic and people-centered approaches to environmental care. The communicative catchment is one where both community and resource managers participate collaboratively in environmental care. A methodology based on action research and systemic thinking (systemic action research) is proposed as a way of moving towards the communicative catchment of the future. Action research is a way of taking action in organizations and communities that is participative and informed by theory, while systemic thinking takes into account the interconnections and relationships between social and natural worlds. The proposed vision, methodology, and practical operating principles stem from involvement in an action research project looking at extension strategies for the implementation of total catchment management in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales.

  18. Effects of land use on greenhouse gas fluxes and soil properties of wetland catchments in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Gleason, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Results suggest that soil organic carbon is lost when relatively undisturbed catchments are converted for agriculture, and that when non-drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes generally are not different than the pre-restoration baseline. Conversely, when drained cropland catchments are restored, CH4 fluxes are noticeably higher. Consequently, it is important to consider the type of wetland restoration (drained, non-drained) when assessing restoration benefits. Results also suggest that elevated N2O fluxes from cropland catchments likely would be reduced through restoration. The overall variability demonstrated by this study was consistent with findings of other wetland investigations and underscores the difficulty in quantifying the GHG balance of wetland systems.

  19. Research, management, and status of the osprey in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Chancellor, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Osprey populations were studied throughout North America during the last decade as a result of dramatic declines reported along the North Atlantic Coast in the1950s and early 1960s. Researchers used banding, localized studies, aerial surveys, and pesticide analyses to identify factors influencing regional populations. Declining populations showed extremely poor production, contamination by environmental pollutants (including DDT and its metabolites, dieldrin, and polychlorinated biphenyls) and thin-shelled eggs. Following the reduced use and eventual ban of DDT and dieldrin, productivity began to improve. Improvement in affected populations, mainly those along the Atlantic Coast and in the Great Lakes region, began in the late 1960s and is continuing in the 1970s. Most populations in the South Atlantic region, in Western North America, and in Florida and the Gulf of California appeared to be producing at normal or near-normal rates in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Although some of the most severely affected populations are still not producing at normal rates, the pattern of improvement and an increase in management activities, including provision of nesting platforms and establishment of Osprey management zones, allow cautious optimism about the future of the species in North America. With its low recruitment potential, however, recovery will be slow.

  20. Landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility, a simple proxy for landslide hazard? A test in the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Mai, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This study implements a landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility approach in order to investigate the landslide scenario in the catchment of Mili, this being located in the north-easternmost sector of Sicily (Italy). From a detailed geomorphological campaign, thicknesses of mobilised materials at the triggering zone of each mass movement were collected and subsequently used as a dependent variable to be analysed in the framework of spatial predictive models. The adopted modelling methodology consisted of a presence-only learning algorithm which differently from classic presence-absence methods does not rely on stable conditions in order to derive functional relationships between dependent and independent variables. The dependent was pre-processed by reclassifying the crown thickness spectrum into a binary condition expressing thick (values equal or greater than 1m) and thin (values less than 1m) landslide crown classes. The explanatory variables were selected to express triggering-thickness dependency at different scales, these being in close proximity to the triggering point through primary and secondary attributes from a 2m-cell side Lidar HRDEM, at a medium scale through vegetation indexes from multispectral satellite images (ASTER) and a coarser scale through a geological, land use and tectonic maps. The choice of a presence-only approach allowed to effectively discriminate between the two types of landslide thicknesses at the triggering zone, producing excellent prediction skills associated with relatively low variances across a set of 50 randomly generated replicates. In addition, the role of each predictor was assessed for the two considered classes as relevant differences arose in terms of their contribution to the final models. In this regard, predictor importance, Jack-knife tests and response curves were used to assess the reliability of the models together with their geomorphological reasonability. This work attempts to capitalize on fieldwork data

  1. Data-based modelling of runoff and chemical tracer concentrations in the Haute-Mentue research catchment (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorgulescu, I.; Beven, K. J.; Musy, A.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents a model for simulating discharge as well as chemical tracer concentration (silica and calcium) in stream flow for the Haute-Mentue research basin (Switzerland). The model structure is based on a parameterization of the three components (acid soil, AS; direct precipitation, DP; deep groundwater, GW) of a hydrochemical mixing model. Each component is modelled through an identical structure consisting of a non-linear gain, expressed by a three-parameter logistic function, and a linear transfer function with two reservoirs (fast/slow) in parallel having a constant partition between them. The model is applied on an information-rich 5-week data set. Extensive Monte Carlo realizations (more than two billion models) have identified a representative sample of behavioural models able to satisfy quite stringent fit criteria on both discharges and tracers. A descriptive statistical analysis of the behavioural parameter sets reveals significant differences between the components. In particular, the AS contribution is activated for higher catchment storages and shows a steep, almost threshold-like, increase. The partition coefficient (fast/total) for the three components is ordered as DP>AS>GW. The fast constants of the three components have a similar order of magnitude, but also show DP>AS> GW. The slow time constant of the GW component is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of DP and AS. The latter are of similar magnitude and generate a highly non-linear interflow component.

  2. Automotive Mg Research and Development in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Joseph A.; Jackman, Jennifer; Li, Naiyi; Osborne, Richard J.; Powell, Bob R.; Sklad, Philip S

    2006-01-01

    Expanding world economic prosperity and probable peaking of conventional petroleum production in the coming decades require efforts to increase the efficiency of, and the development of alternatives to, petroleum-based fuels used in automotive transportation. North America has been aggressively pursuing both approaches for over ten years. Mainly as a result of lower prices due to global sourcing, magnesium has recently emerged as a serious candidate for lightweighting, and thus increasing the fuel efficiency of, automotive transportation. Automotive vehicles produced in North America currently use more Mg than vehicles produced elsewhere in the world, but the amounts per vehicle are very small in comparison to other materials such as steel, aluminum and plastics. The reasons, besides price, are primarily a less-developed state of technology for Mg in automotive transportation applications and lack of familiarity by the vehicle manufacturers with the material. This paper reviews some publicly-known, recent, present and future North American research and development activities in Mg for automotive applications.

  3. USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory: History and current research on western North American rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poisonous plants on western North American rangelands have historically been troublesome to livestock producers. Research on toxic plants was initiated by U.S. Department of Agriculture in the late 1890’s to solve problems for the livestock industry. The USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laborator...

  4. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, S.D.; Hauk, T.F.; Leach, R.

    1997-07-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) CTBT R{ampersand}D program has made significant progress assembling a comprehensive seismic database (DB) for events and derived parameters in the Middle East and North Africa (ME/NA). The LLNL research DB provides not only a coherent framework in which store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment. The DB is designed to be flexible and extensible in order to accommodate the large volumes of data in diverse formats from many sources in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. Researchers can make use of the relational nature of the DB and interactive analysis tools to quickly and efficiently process large volumes of data. Seismic waveforms have been systematically collected form a wide range of local and regional networks using numerous earthquake bulletins and converted a common format based on CSS3.O while undergoing quality control and corrections of errors. By combining traveltime observations, event characterization studies, and regional wave-propagation studies of the LLNL CTBT team, we are assembling a library of ground truth information and event location correction surfaces required to support the ME/NA regionalization program. Corrections and parameters distilled from the LLNL research DB will provide needed contributions to the DOE knowledge base for the ME/NA region and enable the USNDC and IDC to effectively verify CTBT compliance.

  5. Understanding of research, genetics and genetic research in a rapid ethical assessment in north west Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Millard, James D.; Nji, Theobald M.; Tantoh, William F.; Nyoh, Doris N.; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Enyong, Peter A.; Newport, Melanie J.; Davey, Gail; Wanji, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background There is limited assessment of whether research participants in low-income settings are afforded a full understanding of the meaning of medical research. There may also be particular issues with the understanding of genetic research. We used a rapid ethical assessment methodology to explore perceptions surrounding the meaning of research, genetics and genetic research in north west Cameroon. Methods Eleven focus group discussions (including 107 adults) and 72 in-depth interviews were conducted with various stakeholders in two health districts in north west Cameroon between February and April 2012. Results Most participants appreciated the role of research in generating knowledge and identified a difference between research and healthcare but gave varied explanations as to this difference. Most participants' understanding of genetics was limited to concepts of hereditary, with potential benefits limited to the level of the individual or family. Explanations based on supernatural beliefs were identified as a special issue but participants tended not to identify any other special risks with genetic research. Conclusion We demonstrated a variable level of understanding of research, genetics and genetic research, with implications for those carrying out genetic research in this and other low resource settings. Our study highlights the utility of rapid ethical assessment prior to complex or sensitive research. PMID:25969503

  6. Experimental program to stimulate competitive energy research in North Dakota: Summary and significance of DOE Trainee research

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjouk, Philip

    1999-07-01

    The general goals of the North Dakota DOE/EPSCoR Program are to enhance the capabilities of North Dakota's researchers to conduct nationally competitive energy-related research and to develop science and engineering human resources to meet current and future needs in energy-related areas. Doctoral students were trained and energy research was conducted.

  7. Studies in Teaching: 2002 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2002)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the of an annual educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 11, 2002. A table of contents and 27 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: Effects of the Earth/Environmental Science Requirement on High School Science Enrollment in North…

  8. The North Wyke Farm Platform, a UK national capability for research into sustainability of temperate agricultural grassland management: progress and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul; Dungait, Jennifer; Griffith, Bruce; Shepherd, Anita; Sint, Hadewij; Blackwell, Martin; Cardenas, Laura; Collins, Adrian; Goulding, Keith; Lee, Michael; Orr, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The North Wyke Farm Platform (NWFP) at Rothamsted Research in the South-West of England, is a large, farm-scale experiment for collaborative research, training and knowledge exchange in agro-environmental sciences; with the aim of addressing agricultural productivity and ecosystem responses to different management practices. The 63 ha NWFP site, captures the spatial and/or temporal data necessary to develop a better understanding of the dynamic processes and underlying mechanisms that can be used to model how agricultural grassland systems respond to different management inputs. Here, via beef and sheep production, the underlying principle is to manage each of three farmlets (each consisting of five man-made, hydrologically-isolated sub-catchments) in three contrasting ways: (i) improvement through use of mineral fertilizers; (ii) improvement through use of legumes; and (iii) improvement through innovation. The connectivity between the timing and intensity of the different management operations, together with the transport of nutrients and potential pollutants from the NWFP is evaluated using various data collection and data modelling exercises. The primary data collection strategy involves the use of a ground-based, wireless sensor network, where in each of the fifteen sub-catchments, water characteristics such as flow, turbidity and chemistry are measured at a flume laboratory that captures the sub-catchment's water drainage (via a system of directed French drains). This sensor network also captures: precipitation, soil moisture and soil temperature data for each sub-catchment; greenhouse gas data across key subsets of the fifteen sub-catchments; and meteorological data (other than precipitation) at a single site only (representative of the NWFP site, as a whole). Such high temporal resolution data sets (but with limited spatial resolution) are coupled with a secondary data collection strategy, for high spatial resolution data sets (but with limited temporal

  9. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, D; Hauk, T; Moore, R M; O'Boyle, J; Ruppert, S

    1999-07-23

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Research and Development (CTBT R and D) program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive seismic research database (RDB) for seismic events and derived research products in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our original ME/NA study region has enlarged and is now defined as an area including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, the Former Soviet Union and the Scandinavian/Arctic region. The LLNL RDB will facilitate calibration of all International Monitoring System (IMS) stations (primary and auxiliary) or their surrogates (if not yet installed) as well as a variety of gamma stations. The RDB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction sur faces and capabilities. In order to accommodate large volumes of data from many sources with diverse formats the RDB is designed to be flexible and extensible in addition to maintaining detailed quality control information and associated metadata. Station parameters, instrument responses, phase pick information, and event bulletins were compiled and made available through the RDB. For seismic events in the MENA region occurring between 1976 and 1999, we have systematically assembled, quality checked and organized event waveforms; continuous seismic data from 1990 to present are archived for many stations. Currently, over 11,400 seismic events and 1.2 million waveforms are maintained in the RDB and made readily available to researchers. In addition to open sources of seismic data, we have established collaborative relationships with several ME/NA countries that have yielded additional ground truth and broadband waveform data essential for regional calibration and capability

  10. A new, catchment-scale model for simulating methyl and total mercury in soils and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futter, M. N.; Poste, A. E.; Whitehead, P. G.; Dillon, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent and persistent neurotoxin. It is subject to long-range atmospheric transport, accumulates in catchment soils, and can pose health risks to humans and animals both at the point of use as well as in remote locations. Elevated concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg) in fish are related to atmospheric Hg deposition and have resulted in fish consumption advisories in many parts of North America and Fennoscandia. After more than 150 years of elevated Hg deposition in Europe and North America, there remains a large inventory of Hg in the terrestrial catchments of lakes, which continues to be exported to receiving waters despite decreasing atmospheric inputs. While a substantial Hg pool exists in boreal catchment soils, fluxes of Hg from catchments via stream runoff tend to be much lower than atmospheric Hg inputs. Terrestrial catchments receiving similar atmospheric Hg inputs can have markedly different patterns of Hg output in stream water. Considering the importance of catchment processes in determining Hg flux to lakes and subsequent MeHg concentrations in fish, there is a need to characterize Hg cycling and transport in boreal and temperate forest-covered catchments. We present a new, catchment-scale, process-based dynamic model for simulating Hg in soils and surface waters. The Integrated Catchments Model for Mercury (INCA-Hg) simulates transport of gaseous, dissolved and solid Hg and transformations between elemental (Hg0), ionic (Hg(II)) and MeHg in natural and semi-natural landscapes. The mathematical description represents the model as a series of linked, first-order differential equations describing chemical and hydrological processes in catchment soils and waters which control surface water Hg dynamics and subsequent fluxes to lakes and other receiving waters. The model simulates daily time series between one and one hundred years long and can be applied to catchments ranging in size from <1 to ~10000 km2. Here we present applications

  11. Synergies between geomorphic hazard and risk and sediment cascade research fields: exploiting geomorphic processes' susceptibility analyses to derive potential sediment sources in the Oltet, river catchment, southern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurchescu, Marta-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Identifying sediment sources and sediment availability represents a major problem and one of the first concerns in the field of sediment cascade. This paper addresses the on-site effects associated with sediment transfer, investigating the degree to which studies pertaining to the field of geomorphic hazard and risk research could be exploited in sediment budget estimations. More precisely, the paper investigates whether results obtained in assessing susceptibility to various geomorphic processes (landslides, soil erosion, gully erosion) could be transferred to the study of sediment sources within a basin. The study area is a medium-sized catchment (> 2400 km2) in southern Romania encompassing four different geomorphic units (mountains, hills, piedmont and plain). The region is highly affected by a wide range of geomorphic processes which supply sediments to the drainage network. The presence of a reservoir at the river outlet emphasizes the importance of estimating sediment budgets. The susceptibility analyses are conducted separately for each type of the considered processes in a top-down framework, i.e. at two different scales, using scale-adapted methods and validation techniques in each case, as widely-recognized in the hazard and risk research literature. The analyses start at a regional scale, which has in view the entire catchment, using readily available data on conditioning factors. In a second step, the suceptibility analyses are carried out at a medium scale for selected hotspot-compartments of the catchment. In order to appraise the extent to which susceptibility results are relevant in interpreting sediment sources at catchment scale, scale-induced differences are analysed in the case of each process. Based on the amount of uncertainty revealed by each regional-scale analysis in comparison to the medium-scale ones, decisions are made on whether the first are acceptable to the aim of identifying potential sediment source areas or if they should be

  12. Studying genetic research participants: lessons from the "Learning About Research in North Carolina" study.

    PubMed

    Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Blumenthal, Connie; Henderson, Gail; Garrett, Joanne; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Moloney, Mairead; Sandler, Robert S; Lloyd, Stacey W; Dorrance, Jessica; Darter, Jane

    2008-08-01

    Given the prohibitive cost of recruiting large and diverse populations for genetic explorations in cancer research, there has been a call for genetic studies to engage existing cohorts of research participants. This strategy could lead to more efficient recruitment and potentially result in significant advances in the understanding of cancer etiology and treatment. The Learning About Research in North Carolina (LeARN) study responded to the National Human Genome Research Institute interest in research on how study participants from diverse populations who had participated in genetic research perceived the risks and benefits of participating in combined epidemiologic-genetic research, how well they understand the purpose of the research and the uses to which the research results may be put, and how involvement in such research affects perceptions of disease causality. In this article, we give an overview of the LeARN study, summarizing the methods we used, challenges we encountered, and lessons learned about recruiting participants who have previously participated in genetic research.

  13. Analysing the role of abandoned agricultural terraces on flood generation in a set of small Mediterranean mountain research catchments (Vallcebre, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Llorens, Pilar; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Latron, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    The Vallcebre research catchments are located in NE Spain, in a middle mountain area with a Mediterranean sub-humid climate. Most of the bedrock consists of continental red lutites that are easily weathered into loamy soils. This area was intensely used for agriculture in the past when most of the sunny gentle hillslopes were terraced. The land was progressively abandoned since the mid-20th Century and most of the fields were converted to meadows or were spontaneously forested. Early studies carried out in the terraced Cal Parisa catchment demonstrated the occurrence of two types of frequently saturated areas, ones situated in downslope locations with high topographic index values, and the others located in the inner parts of many terraces, where the shallow water table usually outcrops due to the topographical modifications linked to terrace construction. Both the increased extent of saturated areas and the role of a man-made elementary drainage system designed for depleting water from the terraces suggested that terraced areas would induce an enhanced hydrological response during rainfall events when compared with non-terraced hillslopes. The response of 3 sub-catchments, of increasing area and decreasing percentage of terraced area, during a set of major events collected during over 15 years has been analysed. The results show that storm runoff depths were roughly proportional to precipitations above 30 mm although the smallest catchment (Cal Parisa), with the highest percentage of terraces, was able to completely buffer rainfall events of 60 mm in one hour without any runoff when antecedent conditions were dry. Runoff coefficients depended on antecedent conditions and peak discharges were weakly linked to rainfall intensities. Peak lag times, peak runoff rates and recession coefficients were similar in the 3 catchments; the first variable values were in the range between Hortonian and saturation overland flow and the two last ones were in the range of

  14. Topographical and Hydrological Influences on the Spatial Distribution of Mercury at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunda, T.; Converse, A.; Riscassi, A.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2009-12-01

    Inorganic forms of mercury (Hg) can be converted through natural processes into methylmercury, a highly potent neurotoxin that can bioaccumulate in food chains and pose a risk to human health. Although Hg can enter aquatic environments through direct deposition, the predominant source tends to be mobilized Hg deposited in nearby terrestrial systems. Therefore, understanding the complex intermediate Hg cycling in vegetation and soils is crucial to predicting its presence in water bodies and potential for bioaccumulation. While prior studies have revealed dependence of Hg distribution on forest types and soil characteristics, less attention has been given to the role of aspect and hydrological factors on Hg deposition and consequent spatial distribution within catchments. My research addresses this by conducting a litterfall and soil sampling study to assess Hg spatial distribution within two paired catchments: northwest-facing North Fork Dry Run and southeast-facing Hannah Run. Litterfall and soil samples collected through a random stratified sampling process were analyzed for total Hg concentrations using a Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry. An analysis of variance conducted on leaf litter and soil Hg concentrations revealed that: (1) Hg accumulation in soils was significantly greater in the northwest-facing catchment than in the south-east facing catchment, while Hg accumulation in leaves was not found to differ, and (2) within each catchment the likelihood of saturation was not found to play a significant role in governing Hg accumulation in soils. Higher Hg levels in the soils of North Forth Dry Run could be attributable to predominant wind direction from sources of Hg (i.e., coal-burning power plants). Within catchments, lack of appreciable Hg deposition resulted in statistically insignificant variation amongst topographic index classes. The results of this study reveal the potential implications of mountainous terrains in distributing Hg arising from

  15. Evaluating the Impacts of Unexpected Forest Disturbances on Paired Catchment Calibrations of Sediment Yield and Turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlein, K.; Silins, U.; Williams, C.; Wagner, M. J.; Martens, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The paired catchment approach of studying the impacts of disturbance on catchment hydrology remains as perhaps the most powerful approach for direct verification of catchment scale impacts from disturbance. However, paired catchment studies are also dependent on the stability of the relationships between treated and reference catchments during calibration and evaluation periods. A long-term paired catchment study of forest harvest impacts on sediment yield and turbidity in the Rocky Mountains of southwestern Alberta, Canada has a robust 11-year pre-treatment data record. The study intends to evaluate three alternative logging practices: clear-cutting, strip-shelterwood, and partial cutting. 3 sub-catchments in Star Creek (1035 ha) underwent harvest treatments while North York Creek (865 Ha) serves as the reference. The objective of this particular study was to explore the potential effects of unplanned and unanticipated watershed changes in two watersheds during an 11-year calibration. Sediment yield (kg ha-1 d-1) and turbidity (NTU) were monitored throughout the calibration period (2004-2014) prior to the 2015 harvest in Star Creek. Two unanticipated disturbances including backcountry trail rehabilitation in North York (2010) followed by a >100 year storm event in both watersheds in June 2013 may have affected the sediment yield and turbidity calibration relationships. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to evaluate the effects of this trail rehabilitation and flooding by comparing the calibration relationships before and after these disturbances. Despite qualitative field observations of periodically affected sediment regimes, no impact on pre- or post- calibration relationships was observed. Backcountry trail rehabilitation in North York (p=0.904 and 0.416 for sediment yield and turbidity, respectively) or flooding in both watersheds (p=0.364 and 0.204 for sediment yield and turbidity, respectively) did not produce significant changes to the calibrations

  16. 2011 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Plains Water Conservation District started a water conservation project in 2010 on corn irrigation aimed at using just 12 inches of irrigation and producing 200 bu/ac of corn. This report is for 2011, the second year of the study, conducted at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) in Ett...

  17. Geologic controls on bedrock channel width in large, slowly-eroding catchments: Case study of the New River in eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotila, James A.; Moskey, Kristyn A.; Prince, Philip S.

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the geologic controls on hydraulic geometry of bedrock rivers using a single large catchment, the New River, from a stable tectonic setting with variable, resistant lithology but spatially stable climate. Our survey of channel width at 0.5 km spacing along 572 km of the river shows major variation that only roughly fits the expected scaling relationships between width, drainage area, and slope. Considerable variations in width, including steps in trends and large spikes, relate to physiogeologic boundaries that the river passes through. A large fraction (15%) of the river's length classifies as bedrock reach, showing that it behaves more like a bedrock river than an alluvial river. Unlike established trends, the channel is wider in bedrock than in alluvium. Field observations show that aspect ratio (width to depth) is not constant, but fluctuates systematically with width from wide, shallow reaches to narrower, deeper reaches. Our observations of bedrock properties suggest that susceptibility to fluvial plucking versus abrasion may control this anomalous channel morphology. One end member form with aspect ratio as high as 500, which we term the incision plain, is associated with very closely spaced discontinuities (~ 10 cm) in otherwise hard rock. We propose that the closely spaced discontinuities enable efficient plucking that leads to widening by lateral erosion. This morphology locally occurs in other passive margin rivers and may be a fundamental fluvial form that is similar to, but the inverse of, slot canyons. The other end member, which we term channel neck, is narrower and deeper with complex flow paths through blocky bedrock. This form occurs where discontinuity spacing is longer (> 0.5 m) and erosion is abrasion dominated. These results imply that changes in channel width do not necessarily reflect variations in uplift rate, but instead may result from complex response to bedrock properties.

  18. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Catchment Hydrology: A Modified Model Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), typically defined as depressional wetlands surrounded by uplands, support an array of hydrological and ecological processes. However, key research questions concerning the hydrological connectivity of GIWs and their impacts on downgradient surface waters remain unanswered. This is particularly important for regulation and management of these systems. For example, in the past decade United States Supreme Court decisions suggest that GIWs can be afforded protection if significant connectivity exists between these waters and traditional navigable waters. Here we developed a simulation procedure to quantify the effects of various spatial distributions of GIWs across the landscape on the downgradient hydrograph using a refined version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a catchment-scale hydrological simulation model. We modified the SWAT FORTRAN source code and employed an alternative hydrologic response unit (HRU) definition to facilitate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes and connectivity relationships to other surface waters, and to quantify their downgradient hydrological effects. We applied the modified SWAT model to an ~ 202 km2 catchment in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA, exhibiting a substantial population of mapped GIWs. Results from our series of GIW distribution scenarios suggest that: (1) Our representation of GIWs within SWAT conforms to field-based characterizations of regional GIWs in most respects; (2) GIWs exhibit substantial seasonally-dependent effects upon downgradient base flow; (3) GIWs mitigate peak flows, particularly following high rainfall events; and (4) The presence of GIWs on the landscape impacts the catchment water balance (e.g., by increasing groundwater outflows). Our outcomes support the hypothesis that GIWs have an important catchment-scale effect on downgradient streamflow.

  19. Inferring the effect of catchment complexity on mesoscale hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FröHlich, Holger L.; Breuer, Lutz; Vaché, Kellie B.; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2008-09-01

    The effect of catchment complexity on hydrologic and hydrochemical catchment response was characterized in the mesoscale Dill catchment (692 km2), Germany. This analysis was developed using multivariate daily stream concentration and discharge data at the basin outlet, in connection with less frequently sampled catchment-wide end-member chemistries. The link between catchment-wide runoff sources and basin output was observed through a combination of concentration-discharge (C-Q) analysis and multivariate end-member projection. Subsurface stormflow, various groundwater and wastewater sources, as well as urban surface runoff emerged in catchment output chemistry. Despite the identification of multiple sources, several runoff sources observed within the catchment failed to display consistent links with the output chemistry. This failure to associate known source chemistry with outlet chemistry may have resulted from a lack of hydraulic connectivity between sources and basin outlet, from different arrival times of subbasin-scale runoff contributions, and also from an overlap of source chemistries that subsumed discrete runoff sources in catchment output. This combination of catchment heterogeneity and complexity simply suggests that the internal spatial organization of the catchment impeded the application of lumped mixing calculations at the 692 km2 outlet. Given these challenges, we suggest that in mesoscale catchment research, the potential effects of spatial organization should be included in any interpretation of highly integrated response signals, or when using those signals to evaluate numerical rainfall-runoff models.

  20. Studies in Teaching. 1995 Research Digest. Papers Presented at the Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    This is a collection of papers reporting student research projects at the Annual Research Forum, Department of Education, Wake Forest University (North Carolina). They include: "Student Interest in Studying World History in Relation to Current Events" (Conan Arthur); "Perceptions of High School Student Athletes and Athletics" (Edward Barrett);…

  1. High-resolution monitoring of catchment nutrient response to the end of the 2011-2012 drought in England, captured by the demonstration test catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outram, F. N.; Lloyd, C.; Jonczyk, J.; Benskin, C. McW. H.; Grant, F.; Dorling, S. R.; Steele, C. J.; Collins, A. L.; Freer, J.; Haygarth, P. M.; Hiscock, K. M.; Johnes, P. J.; Lovett, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Demonstration Test Catchments (DTC) project is a UK Government funded initiative to test the effectiveness of on-farm mitigation measures designed to reduce agricultural pollution without compromising farm productivity. Three distinct catchments in England have been chosen to test the efficacy of mitigation measures on working farms in small tributary sub-catchments equipped with continuous water quality monitoring stations. The Hampshire Avon in the south is a mixed livestock and arable farming catchment, the River Wensum in the east is a lowland catchment with predominantly arable farming and land use in the River Eden catchment in the north-west is predominantly livestock farming. One of the many strengths of the DTC as a national research platform is that it provides the ability to investigate catchment hydrology and biogeochemical response across different landscapes and geoclimatic characteristics, with a range of differing flow behaviours, geochemistries and nutrient chemistries. Although numerous authors present studies of individual catchment responses to storms, no studies exist of multiple catchment responses to the same rainfall event captured with in situ high-resolution nutrient monitoring at a national scale. This paper brings together findings from all three DTC research groups to compare the response of the catchments to a major storm event in April 2012. This was one of the first weather fronts to track across the country following a prolonged drought period affecting much of the UK through 2011-2012, marking an unusual meteorological transition when a rapid shift from drought to flood risk occurred. The effects of the weather front on discharge and water chemistry parameters, including nitrogen species (NO3-N and NH4-N) and phosphorus fractions (total P (TP) and total reactive P (TRP)), measured at a half-hourly time step are examined. When considered in the context of one hydrological year, flow and concentration duration curves reveal that

  2. NASA/FAA North Texas Research Station Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    NTX Research Staion: NASA research assets embedded in an interesting operational air transport environment. Seven personnel (2 civil servants, 5 contractors). ARTCC, TRACON, Towers, 3 air carrier AOCs(American, Eagle and Southwest), and 2 major airports all within 12 miles. Supports NASA Airspace Systems Program with research products at all levels (fundamental to system level). NTX Laboratory: 5000 sq ft purpose-built, dedicated, air traffic management research facility. Established data links to ARTCC, TRACON, Towers, air carriers, airport and NASA facilities. Re-configurable computer labs, dedicated radio tower, state-of-the-art equipment.

  3. 2012 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2012 represented the third sequential year of research regarding the limited irrigation 12-200 corn production assessment study at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) with the yield results being improved from that of the 2011 season but less than of the 2010 season. The study's purpose was to ev...

  4. Recruiting Underserved Mothers to Medical Research: Findings from North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Chaya R.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; O’Neill, Jenna L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Howard, Timothy D.; Feldman, Steven R.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Representative samples are required for ethical, valid, and useful health research. Yet, recruiting participants, especially from historically underserved communities, can be challenging. This paper presents findings from in-depth interviews with 40 mothers about factors that might influence their willingness to participate or allow their children to participate in medical research. Saliency analysis organizes the findings. Frequent and important salient themes about research participation included concerns that it might cause participants harm, hope that participants might gain a health benefit, and recognition that time and transportation resources could limit participation. Ultimately, we propose that a theoretical model, such as the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), will facilitate more systematic evaluation of effective methods for recruitment and retention of participants in medical research. Future research should explore the utility of such a model for development of effective recruitment and retention strategies. PMID:24185171

  5. A North Adriatic centenarian: The marine research station at Rovinj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodnik, D.

    1995-03-01

    The institute in Rovinj was founded in 1891 as the field station of the Berlin Aquarium. It soon gained in scientific importance. From 1911, it was governed by various scientific bodies, such as the ‘Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften’, the ‘Reale Comitato Talassografico Italiano’, and the ‘Jugoslavenska Akademija znanosti i umjetnosti’. At present, it is a department of the ‘Ruđer Bo\\vsković’ Institute, called the ‘Center for Marine Research Rovinj’. In the past hundred years, the Rovinj station experienced several ascents and declines in its development: both in the First and Second World Wars the station's scientific equipment, research vessels, library and reference collections were dispersed, and from 1945 1948 the station was closed. But in “happier” periods, rich support by the state and international bodies favoured the increase in research facilities and promoted interest among visiting scientists. The station has always been involved in studies of the Adriatic Sea, especially in its northern part. It contributed much to general knowledge of oceanography, of the physics and chemistry of the sea, but its paramount contribution is to various disciplines of marine biological sciences. Applied research, however, was most oriented to fisheries biology, especially shellfish culture, to resource studies, and, recently, to toxicology, bacteriology, eutrophication and pollution monitoring. The international approach in science and applied research was always favoured. At present, the Center is well equipped for complex coastal and offshore field- and laboratory research, and maintains facilities for graduate and postgraduate teaching. Scientific dissemination is also promoted by the public aquarium and professional meetings.

  6. Runoff generation mechanism at two distinct headwater catchments - isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Michal; Votrubová, Jana; Šanda, Martin; Tesař, Miroslav; Vogel, Tomáš; Dušek, Jaromír

    2016-04-01

    Data from two headwater catchments indicate considerably different runoff formation mechanisms. The contributions of different surface and subsurface runoff mechanisms to the catchment discharge formation at these two small forested headwater catchments are studied with help of the natural isotopic signatures of the observed fluxes. The Uhlirska catchment (1.78 sq. km, Jizera Mts., Czech Republic) is situated in headwater area of Cerna Nisa stream. Deluviofluvial granitic sediments in the valley bottom areas (riparian zones/wetlands) are surrounded by gentle hillslopes with shallow soils developed on crystalline bedrock. The Liz catchment (0.99 sq. km, Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic) belongs to hillslope-type catchments without riparian zones situated in headwater area of Volynka River. The soil at Liz is developed on biotite paragneiss bedrock. Autocorrelation analysis of the measured catchment discharge rates reveals different hydrograph characteristics for each of the two catchments. Estimated autocorrelation lengths differ by an order of magnitude. Variations of oxygen-18 isotope concentrations in precipitation, groundwater and streamflow were analyzed. Several significant rainfall-runoff events at each of the two catchments were analyzed in detail. These events exhibit substantial difference in isotopic compositions of event and pre-event water, which facilitates hydrograph separation. Clockwise and counterclockwise hysteretic relationships between the stream discharge and its isotope concentration were identified. Results were confronted with the previously published concepts of the runoff formation at the catchments under study. The research was funded by the Czech Science Foundation, project No. 14-15201J.

  7. 2013 North Dakota Transgenic Barley Research and FHB Nursery Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research continues to develop and test new transgenic plants using genes provided by collaborators. As lines are developed in Golden Promise, they are crossed to Conlon for field testing. Transgenic lines developed in Conlon are being crossed to resistant lines developed by the breeding programs. ...

  8. Report of the review into the research framework in North Staffordshire.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    This review began because of complaints about the conduct of research studies in the paediatric department of the North Staffordshire Hospital in Stroke-on-Trent. As it progressed other issues were also examined such as diagnosing Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy by the use of covert video surveillance. The following extracts concentrate on research issues, and include the whole of the framework for research governance outlined in the report.

  9. Catchment Classification: Connecting Climate, Structure and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicz, K. A.; Wagener, T.; Sivapalan, M.; Troch, P. A.; Carrillo, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrology does not yet possess a generally accepted catchment classification framework. Such a classification framework needs to: [1] give names to things, i.e. the main classification step, [2] permit transfer of information, i.e. regionalization of information, [3] permit development of generalizations, i.e. to develop new theory, and [4] provide a first order environmental change impact assessment, i.e., the hydrologic implications of climate, land use and land cover change. One strategy is to create a catchment classification framework based on the notion of catchment functions (partitioning, storage, and release). Results of an empirical study presented here connects climate and structure to catchment function (in the form of select hydrologic signatures), based on analyzing over 300 US catchments. Initial results indicate a wide assortment of signature relationships with properties of climate, geology, and vegetation. The uncertainty in the different regionalized signatures varies widely, and therefore there is variability in the robustness of classifying ungauged basins. This research provides insight into the controls of hydrologic behavior of a catchment, and enables a classification framework applicable to gauged and ungauged across the study domain. This study sheds light on what we can expect to achieve in mapping climate, structure and function in a top-down manner. Results of this study complement work done using a bottom-up physically-based modeling framework to generalize this approach (Carrillo et al., this session).

  10. 238U-234U activity ratio as tracer of waterpathway within the watershed substratum: evidence of U data from the Strengbach and Ringelbach research catchments (Vosges , France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.; Schaffhausen, Th.; Pierret, M.-C.; Ambroise, B.

    2012-04-01

    U activity ratios were measured in spring and source waters collected in two small research watersheds developed on granitic bedrocks in Vosges Mountains (Eastern France), i.e., the Strengbach (http://ohge.u-strasbg.fr) and the Ringelbach catchments. The data indicates a clear relationship between the emerging altitude of sources/springs in each slope of the watersheds, and the intensity of 234U-238U activity ratios in the waters. Such a relationship can be readily explained through a scenario assuming that U mobilization in these waters and their 234U enrichment (consequence of the alpha recoil process) are controlled by the duration of the water-pathway within the substratum of the watershed: longer water pathway within the watershed, longer duration of water-rock interaction and hence higher 234U enrichment in the source/spring waters. The immediate consequence of such an interpretation is that (234U/238U) activity ratio in surface waters, at least at the scale of such small and elemental watersheds, might be a geochemical tracer useful to constrain a key hydrological parameter which controls, at least partly, the nature and the intensity of water-rock interactions in the watershed, namely the water pathway within the watershed substratum. The data also suggests that U activity ratios could be also very relevant to constrain the contribution of deep waters within surface waters. Future developments in this domain will certainly confirm the interest of U activity ratio as hydrological tracer of the water-rock interactions.

  11. Phosphorus and dissolved organic carbon export during peak flow periods in three small homogenous catchments in eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benning, R.; Schwärzel, K.; Feger, K. H.

    2012-04-01

    Regional climate change scenarios for Central Europe predict both an overall increase in temperature and alterations in annual precipitation regimes. For large parts of Central Europe, climate change is expected to result in an increase in winter precipitation and a decrease in summer precipitation. In addition, an increase in extreme conditions, such as heat waves, prolonged drought periods, and heavy rainfall events are predicted. This research examines the potential impacts of increased heavy rainfall events on matter export from small catchment areas, and how different vegetation cover and land management options effects these exports. In order to evaluate the export of matter from different land-use types in the Eastern Ore Mountains (Saxony, NE Germany, 50° 48'18.06" North, 13° 36'24.54" East), study sites were established in three small catchments with homogeneous land-use. These study areas are each sub-catchments of the Ammelsdorf catchment, which provides inflow to the Lehnmühle reservoir (a major water supply for the city of Dresden). Each sub catchment represents one of the three main land-use types in the catchment area of the reservoir: crops (winter oilseed rape, winter wheat), grasslands, and forests (primarily spruce). Since November 2009 the discharge from these sub catchments has been continuously measured and water quality was analyzed on a weekly basis. During peak flow events, discharge was collected using automatic water samplers, which allowed for high temporal resolution analysis of matter export during these periods to be made. During the 2010 and 2011 hydrological years, several heavy rainfall events occurred which have been evaluated. During a 110-hour long precipitation event (P = 170 mm) between 37 and 81 water samples per sub catchment were collected and analyzed. The resulting export of dissolved phosphorus (ortho-PO4-) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the sub catchments during this event is provided in the results. In

  12. Transit time estimation using tritium and stable isotopes in a Mediterranean mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig-Planasdemunt, Maria; Stewart, Mike; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Water resources of Mediterranean regions mainly depend on runoff generated in mountain areas. Therefore, study of the time water spends travelling through Mediterranean mountains is important for water resources management as it reflects the ability of catchments to retain and release water. Natural isotopes (tritium and stable isotopes) have been used in different environments to quantify the ages of water within catchments. However, there are relatively few studies of water transit times in Mediterranean mountain regions. Additionally, tritium dating is more common in Southern Hemisphere streams because they were less affected by tritium produced mainly in the North Hemisphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s. With the aim of improving knowledge of the hydrological catchment functioning of Mediterranean mountain areas, this work estimates water transit times in spring water, groundwater and stream water using tritium and stable isotope (δ18O and δ2H) measurements in the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). Tritium measurements from a previous study carried out in 1996-1998 (Herrmann et al., 1999) were supplemented by new samples collected on 3 November 2013. Difficulties with the age interpretation of the tritium measurements arise from the determination of the tritium input function, the different accuracies of the tritium measurements and the ambiguous ages resulting from past input of tritium from nuclear testing to the atmosphere. Water stable isotope samples were collected in rainfall, spring water, groundwater and streamwater at baseflow conditions every 15 days over a 27 month period. Detailed distributed hydrometric measurements (precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, discharge and water table level) were obtained during the same period. Preliminary results using δ18O, δ2H and tritium show that mean transit times in the Cal Rodó catchment (4.2 km2) ranged between 1.3 and 11.6 years. The lowest mean

  13. Institutional Research and Strategies for Higher Education Issues in the 1980's and Research Exchange Forum. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (7th, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 1979) and the Drive-In Conference (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Ussery, Robert M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the 1980 Research Search Exchange Drive-In Conference Program, which address the skills needed by institutional researchers to deal with the issues in higher education in the 1980s, are presented. Highlights of the North Carolina association…

  14. Characterizing streamflow generation in Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Cano Paoli, Karina; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Developing effective hydrological models for streamflow generation in Alpine catchments is challenging due to the inherent complexity of the intertwined processes controlling water transfer from hillslopes to streams and along the river network. With water discharge as the sole observational variable it is impossible to differentiate between different streamflow sources, and modelling activity is often limited to simplified phenomenological rainfall-runoff models. This study focuses on quantifying streamflow sources at different temporal scales and the associated uncertainty by using natural tracer data (electrical conductivity, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes ratios) as observational variables supplementing streamflow measurements. We determine the spatial and temporal hydrological behavior and the mean residence time of water in the Vermigliana catchment, North-Eastern Italy and we separate contributions to streamflow originating from Presena and Presanella glaciers, both exerting a strong control on the hydrologic budget of the study site. Furthermore, we identify a seasonal control on the effect of storm events. The catchment responded rapidly to precipitation events in early autumn, it was unaffected by precipitation events in early spring, while runoff generation was enhanced by snow melting in late autumn. Air temperature is identified as the main controlling parameter, in addition to precipitation. Two-component mixing analysis showed that the relative contribution of new water, which can contribute up to 75% of total streamflow, is very rapid. Only two hours time-lag was observed between the beginning of the precipitation event and the emergence of a significant contribution of new water. These results evidence the relevance of mixing between pre-event and event water in the Vermigliana catchment, and in similar high elevation Alpine catchments. This study provides new insights on the dynamics of streamflow generation in Alpine catchments and a

  15. North Dakota Senior High Industrial Arts Program of Studies--Level II. Research Series No. 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck. Research Coordinating Unit.

    This industrial arts program of a studies guide is the product of a research project designed to (1) ascertain programs and curricula trends of senior high school industrial arts in the fifty states, (2) develop a philosophical rationale for senior high schools in North Dakota secondary schools, and (3) develop a master plan and program of study…

  16. Labor Market Returns to Community College: Evidence from North Carolina. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive; Liu, Yuen Ting; Trimble, Madeline Joy

    2014-01-01

    In this brief, we summarize our research on the wage returns to community college pathways in North Carolina. We use detailed individual and college transcript information on approximately 830,000 students who attended community college during the 2000s. This transcript data is matched with earnings data from Unemployment Insurance records. We…

  17. Stormflow generation: A meta-analysis of field evidence from small, forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthold, Frauke K.; Woods, Ross A.

    2015-05-01

    Combinations of runoff characteristics are commonly used to represent distinct conceptual models of stormflow generation. In this study, three runoff characteristics: hydrograph response, time source of runoff water, and flow path are used to classify catchments. Published data from the scientific literature are used to provide evidence from small, forested catchments. Each catchment was assigned to one of the eight conceptual models, depending on the combination of quick/slow response, old/new water, and overland/subsurface flow. A standard procedure was developed to objectively diagnose the predominant conceptual model of stormflow generation for each catchment and assess its temporal and spatial support. The literature survey yielded 42 catchments, of which 30 catchments provide a complete set of qualitative runoff characteristics resulting in one of the eight conceptual models. The majority of these catchments classify as subsurface flow path dominated. No catchments were found for conceptual models representing combinations of quick response-new water-subsurface flow (SSF), slow-new-SSF, slow-old-overland flow (OF) nor new-slow-OF. Of the 30 qualitatively classified catchments, 24 provide a complete set of quantitative measures. In summary, the field support is strong for 19 subsurface-dominated catchments and is weak for 5 surface flow path dominated catchments (six catchments had insufficient quantitative data). Two alternative explanations exist for the imbalance of field support between the two flow path classes: (1) the selection of research catchments in past field studies was mainly to explain quick hydrograph response in subsurface dominated catchments; (2) catchments with prevailing subsurface flow paths are more common in nature. We conclude that the selection of research catchments needs to cover a wider variety of environmental conditions which should lead to a broader, and more widely applicable, spectrum of resulting conceptual models and process

  18. Estimating gully erosion contribution to large catchment sediment yield rate in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndomba, Preksedis Marco; Mtalo, Felix; Killingtveit, Aanund

    The objective of this paper is to report on the issues and proposed approaches in estimating the contribution of gully erosion to sediment yield at large catchment. The case study is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB) located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. Little has been done by other researchers to study and/or extrapolate gully erosion results from plot or field scale to large catchment. In this study multi-temporal aerial photos at selected sampling sites were used to estimate gully size and morphology changes over time. The laboratory aerial photo interpretation results were groundtruthed. A data mining tool, Cubist, was used to develop predictive gully density stepwise regression models using aerial photos and environment variables. The delivery ratio was applied to estimate the sediment yield rate. The spatial variations of gully density were mapped under Arc View GIS Environment. Gully erosion sediment yield contribution was estimated as a ratio between gully erosion sediment yield and total sediment yield at the catchment outlet. The general observation is that gullies are localized features and not continuous spatially and mostly located on some mountains’ foot slopes. The estimated sediment yield rate from gullies erosion is 6800 t/year, which is about 1.6% of the long-term total catchment sediment yield rate. The result is comparable to other study findings in the same catchment. In order to improve the result larger scale aerial photos and high resolution spatial data on soil-textural class and saturated hydraulic conductivity - are recommended.

  19. Studies in Teaching: 2016 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Jun 30, 2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 21st Annual Research Forum held June 30, 2016, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included are the following 11 action research papers: The Use of Mexican Folk Art to Develop Oral and Written Language Ability and Cultural Awareness in the Secondary Spanish Classroom (Antonio…

  20. Studies in Teaching: 2012 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 29, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 17th Annual Research Forum held June 29, 2012, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included herein are the following 25 action research papers: (1) "Reading and Writing": A Study Comparing the Strengths of Peer Review and Visible Author Writing Strategies (Elizabeth Behar); (2)…

  1. Studies in Teaching: 2006 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 6, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    These Proceedings document an educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 6, 2006. Table of contents and 27 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: (1) A Study of Teachers' Perceptions of High School Mathematics Instructional Methods (Caroline Adkisson); (2)…

  2. Studies in Teaching: 2005 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 7, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    These Proceedings document an educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 7, 2005. Table of contents and 26 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: (1) Mathematical Reasoning in Multiple Representations: Connections and Confidence (Justin Allman); (2) The…

  3. Studies in Teaching: 2007 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 12, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    These Proceedings document an educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 12, 2007. Table of contents and 23 research studies of high school teaching are included. Each paper contains a literature review, methodology, results, conclusions, and references. Studies include: (1) Cultural…

  4. Studies in Teaching: 2013 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 26, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 18th Annual Research Forum held June 26, 2013, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included are the following 13 action research papers: (1) Developing Oral Language Ability in the Secondary Spanish Classroom Using the Interpersonal and Presentational Modes of Communication…

  5. Studies in Teaching: 2011 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 15, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of 16th Annual Research Forum held June 15, 2011, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included herein are the following 25 action research papers: (1) The Effects of Prompted Math Journaling on Algebra 1 Students' Achievement and Attitudes (Heidi I. Arnold); (2) Group Work and Attitude…

  6. Studies in Teaching: 2015 Research Digest. Action Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, June 25, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 20th Annual Research Forum held June 25, 2015, at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Included are the following 21 action research papers: (1) History Lives! The Use of Simulations in a High School Social Studies Classroom (Lydia Adkins); (2) Using Francophone Music in the High…

  7. Studies in Teaching: 2003 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 10, 2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of an annual educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 10, 2003. A table of contents and 31 research studies of high school teaching are included. The following studies are included: (1) No, Seriously: Humor Use by High School Social Studies Teachers…

  8. Land degradation trends in upper catchments and morphological developments of braided rivers in drylands: the case of a marginal graben of the Ethiopian Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Biadgilgn; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Braided rivers have received relatively little attention in research and development activities in drylands. However, they strongly impact agroecology and agricultural activities and thereby local livelihoods. The Raya Graben (3750 km² including the escarpment) is a marginal graben of the Ethiopian Rift Valley located in North Ethiopia. In order to study the dynamics of braided rivers and the relationship with biophysical controls, 20 representative catchments were selected, ranging between 15 and 311 km². First, the 2005 morphology (length, area) of the braided rivers was related to biophysical controls (vegetation cover, catchment area and slope gradient in the steep upper catchments and gradient in the graben bottom). Second, the changes in length of the braided rivers were related to vegetation cover changes in the upper catchments since 1972. Landsat imagery was used to calculate the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and to map vegetation cover and the total length of the braided rivers. Spot CNES imagery available from Google Earth was used to identify the total area of the braided rivers in 2005. A linear regression analysis revealed that the length of braided rivers was positively related to the catchment area (R²=0.32, p<0.01), but insignificantly related to vegetation cover in the upper catchments. However, there is an indication that it is an important factor in the relationship calculated for 2005 (R²=0.2, p=0.064). Similarly, the area occupied by the braided rivers was related to NDVI (R²=0.24, p<0.05) and upper catchment area (R²=0.447, p<0.01). Slope gradient is not an important explanatory factor. This is related to the fact that slope gradients are steep (average of 38.1%) in all upper and gentle (average of 3.4%) in graben bottom catchments. The vegetation cover in the upper catchments shows a statistically insignificant increasing trend (R²=0.73, p=0.067) over the last 40 years, whereas length of rivers in the graben bottom

  9. IPY to Mark Expansion of Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, B. D.; Eicken, H.; Sheehan, G. W.; Glenn, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Barrow Global Climate Change Research Facility will open to researchers on the North Slope of Alaska during the 2007-08 anniversary of the first IPY. Between 1949 and 1980, arctic researchers were very active on the North Slope and in nearby waters largely because of the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) at Barrow. NARL provided easy access, laboratories and logistical support. NARL was closed in 1981, but particularly during this past decade, Barrow-based arctic research projects have been back on the upswing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) Barrow station was founded during the 1970s, and continues as part of NOAA's five station global network for monitoring atmospheric composition. The North Slope Borough's Department of Wildlife Management (DWM) has for the past 20 years conducted its own research. The DWM also served as logistical provider for growing numbers of arctic researchers without other logistical support. In the late 1990s, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM: DOE's principal climate change research effort) created a Cloud and Radiation Testbed on the North Slope with atmospheric instrumentation at Barrow and Atqasuk. It is now part of the ARM Climate Research Facility, a National User Facility. In response to growing researcher needs, the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium (BASC) was formed in the late 1990s as a non-profit logistical support and community coordinating organization, and received the endorsement of Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation (UIC), NSB and the local community college. BASC provides logistical support to National Science Foundation (NSF) researchers through a cooperative agreement, and to others on a fee for service basis. UIC also dedicated 11 square miles of its land as the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), and charged BASC with management of the BEO. This land that has been used for research for more

  10. Critical uncertainties and research needs for the restoration and conservation of native lampreys in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the literature, queried selected researchers, and drew upon our own experience to describe some critical uncertainties and research needs for the conservation and restoration of native lampreys in North America. We parsed the uncertainties and research needs into five general categories: (1) population status; (2) systematics; (3) passage at dams, screens, and other structures; (4) species identification in the field; and (5) geneal biology and ecology. For each topic, we describe why the subject is important for lampreys, briefly smmarize our current state of knowledge, and discuss the key data or information gaps.

  11. A history of early geologic research in the Deep River Triassic Basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Deep River Triassic basin has one of the longest recorded histories of geologic research in North Carolina. A quick perusal of nineteenth century geologic literature in North Carolina reveals the Deep River basin has received a tremendous amount of attention, second only, perhaps, to the gold deposits of the Carolina slate belt. While these early researchers' primary interests were coal deposits, many other important discoveries, observations, and hypotheses resulted from their investigations. This article highlights many of the important advances made by these early geo-explorers by trying to include information from every major geologic investigation made in the Deep River basin from 1820 to 1955. This article also provides as thorough a consolidated history as is possible to preserve the exploration history of the Deep River basin for future investigators.

  12. Building International Research Partnerships in the North Atlantic-Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benway, Heather M.; Hofmann, Eileen; St. John, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The North Atlantic-Arctic region, which is critical to the health and socioeconomic well being of North America and Europe, is susceptible to climate-driven changes in circulation, biogeochemistry, and marine ecosystems. The need for strong investment in the study of biogeochemical and ecosystem processes and interactions with physical processes over a range of time and space scales in this region was clearly stated in the 2013 Galway Declaration, an intergovernmental statement on Atlantic Ocean cooperation (http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-13-459_en.htm). Subsequently, a workshop was held to bring together researchers from the United States, Canada, and Europe with expertise across multiple disciplines to discuss an international research initiative focused on key features, processes, and ecosystem services (e.g., Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, spring bloom dynamics, fisheries, etc.) and associated sensitivities to climate changes.

  13. North American deep underground laboratories: Soudan Underground Laboratory, SNOLab, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past several decades, fundamental physics experiments have required access to deep underground laboratories to satisfy the increasingly strict requirements for ultra-low background environments and shielding from cosmic rays. In this presentation, I summarize the existing and anticipated physics programs and laboratory facilities of North America's deep facilities: The Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, SNOLab in Ontario, Canada, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

  14. Magnitudes and Sources of Catchment Sediment: When A + B Doesn't Equal C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The export of land-based sediments to receiving waters can cause degradation of water quality and habitat, loss of reservoir capacity and damage to reef ecosystems. Predictions of sources and magnitudes generally come from simulations using catchment models that focus on overland flow processes at the expense of gully and channel processes. This is not appropriate for many catchments where recent research has shown that the dominant erosion sources have shifted from the uplands and fields following European Settlement, to the alluvial valleys today. Still, catchment models which fail to adequately address channel and bank processes are still the overwhelming choice by resource agencies to help manage sediment export. These models often utilize measured values of sediment load at the river mouth to "calibrate" the magnitude of loads emanating from uplands and fields. The difference between the sediment load at the mouth and the simulated upland loading is then proportioned to channel sources.Bank erosion from the Burnett River (a "Reef Catchment" in eastern Queensland) was quantified by comparisons of bank-top locations and by numerical modeling using BSTEM. Results show that bank-derived sediment contributes between 44 and 73% of the sediment load being exported to the Coral Sea. In comparison reported results from a catchment model showed bank contributions of 8%. In absolute terms, this is an increase in the reported average, annual rate of bank erosion from 0.175 Mt/y to 2.0 Mt/y.In the Hoteo River, New Zealand, a rural North Island catchment characterized by resistant cohesive sediments, bank erosion was found to contribute at least 48% of the total specific yield of sediment. Combining the bank-derived, fine-grained loads from some of the major tributaries gives a total, average annual loading rate for fine material of about 10,900 t/y for the studied reaches in the Hoteo River System. If the study was extended to include the lower reaches of the main stem

  15. Phosphorus sources and losses in two arable catchments and implications for catchment management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, P. N. C.; Melland, A. R.; Mellander, P.-E.; Shortle, G.; Wall, D.; Jordan, P.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-scale catchment experiments allow assessment of the impact of policy measures on nutrient losses from agriculture and water quality and testing of conceptual models of nutrient loss. The potential for catchment-specific responses to be extrapolated to similar catchments country-wide can then help guide future policy measures to achieve water quality targets, such as those in the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). This paper presents results from the Agricultural Catchments Programme; an integrated advisory/research programme working with stakeholders to assess the efficacy of Ireland's National Action Programme (NAP) of measures in meeting the targets of the Nitrates Directive and WFD. Results are presented for P sources and losses over two water years in two catchments (9.5 and 11.2 km2) with intensive arable agriculture but contrasting soil drainage and geology and resultant hydrologic and nutrient transfer pathways. Phosphorus source pressures were characterised in terms of field-scale soil P status and P balances. Phosphorus loss was characterised in terms of P concentration and loads monitored with high-resolution bank-side analysers. Despite having similar P soil status (18-19 % in excess of agronomic optimum), P losses were much greater from the catchment with more poorly drained soils (0.7 kg ha-1 yr-1) than from the catchment with more freely drained soils (0.2 kg ha-1 yr-1). This paper considers the factors controlling P loss in the two catchments (farm nutrient management, soils, topography and hydrology) to explain the differences between the two catchments and the spatio-temporal variability observed. Agricultural and non-agricultural point sources, in addition to diffuse agricultural sources, are considered. Although both catchments are subject to the same NAP measures, the outcomes, in terms of both P loads and concentrations, showed that inter-annual hydrological patterns and inter-catchment hydrological properties are critical. This

  16. Diatoms as a fingerprint of sub-catchment contributions to meso-scale catchment runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Wetzel, Carlos E.; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria; Ector, Luc; Pfister, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, calls were made for new eco-hydrological approaches to improve understanding of hydrological processes. Recently diatoms, one of the most common and diverse algal groups that can be easily transported by flowing water due to their small size (~10-200 µm), were used to detect the onset and cessation of surface runoff to small headwater streams and constrain isotopic and hydro-chemical hydrograph separation methods. While the method showed its potential in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream continuum of headwater catchments, the behavior of diatoms and their use for hydrological process research in meso-scale catchments remains uncertain. Diatoms can be a valuable support for isotope and hydro-chemical tracer methods when these become ambiguous with increasing scale. Distribution and abundance of diatom species is controlled by various environmental factors (pH, soil type, moisture conditions, exposition to sunlight, etc.). We therefore hypothesize that species abundance and composition can be used as a proxy for source areas. This presentation evaluates the potential for diatoms to trace source-areas in the nested meso-scale Attert River basin (250 km2, Luxembourg, Europe). We sampled diatom populations in streamwater during one flood event in Fall 2011 in 6 sub-catchments and the basin outlet - 17 to 28 samples/catchment for the different sampling locations. Diatoms were classified and counted in every individual sample. In total more than 400 diatom species were detected. Ordination analysis revealed a clear distinction between communities sampled in different sub-catchments. The species composition at the catchment outlet reflects a mixing of the diatom composition originating from different sub-catchments. This data suggests that diatoms indeed can reflect the geographic origin of stream water at the catchment outlet. The centroids of the ordination analysis might be linked to the physiographic characteristics (geology and land use) of the

  17. North American Landscape Characterization (NALC). Pathfinder project research plan. Global Change Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lunetta, R.S.; Lyon, J.G.; Sturdevant, J.A.; Dwyer, J.L.; Elvidge, C.D.

    1993-07-01

    The project is a component of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat Pathfinder program of experiments to study global change issues. The purpose of the project is to produce land cover and land cover change data products at sub-kilometer spatial resolution across major portions of the North American continent (Central America, Mexico, Caribbean and Hawaiian Islands, and the United States). The NALC - Pathfinder is designed to provide primary data for national inventories of terrestrial carbon stocks and trace greenhouse gases (CO, CH4, and N2O) emissions in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) objectives. The objectives of the NALC project are to produce standardized remote sensing data sets, develop standardized analyses methods, and derive standardized land cover change products for priority locations in the North American continent.

  18. How old is upland catchment water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Harald; Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water supply catchments is an essential part of water management. Upland catchments provide a continuous, reliable source of high quality water not only for some of the world's biggest cities, but also for agriculture and industry. Headwater streams control river flow in lowland agricultural basins as the majority of river discharge emerges from upland catchments. Many rivers are perennial and flow throughout the year, even during droughts. However, it is still unclear how reliable and continuous upland catchment water resources really are. Despite many efforts in upland catchment research, there is still little known about where the water is stored and how long it takes to travel through upper catchments. Resolving these questions is crucial to ensure that this resource is protected from changing land use and to estimate potential impacts from a changing climate. Previous research in this important area has been limited by existing measurement techniques. Knowledge to date has relied heavily on the use of variation in stable isotope signals to estimate the age and origin of water from upland catchments. The problem with relying on these measures is that as the water residence time increases, the variation in the stable isotope signal decreases. After a maximum period of four years, no variation can be detected This means that to date, the residence time in upland catchments is likely to have been vastly underestimated. Consequently, the proportion of water flow out of upland river catchments to the total river flow is also underestimated. Tritium (3H) combines directly with water molecules and enters the flow paths with the infiltrating water. Its half-life (12.32 years) makes it ideal to describe residence times in upper catchment reservoirs as it can theoretically measure water up to about 150 years old. The bomb pulse peak in the southern hemisphere was several orders of magnitude lower than in the northern hemisphere. Hence the

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice about Research Ethics among Dental Faculty in the North India

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Kiran Kumar; Walia, Rachit; TM, Chaitra Devi; Das, Maneesha; Sepolia, Shipra; Sethi, Priyank

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research activities in dentistry are increased greatly in India during the recent decade, but there is limited of information about the knowledge and attitude of dental faculty for research ethics. To assess the knowledge and attitudes of dental faculty of North India regarding research ethics. Materials and Methods: Through convenience sampling, a questionnaire was sent either via printed copies or E-mails to 1240 dental faculty, while protecting confidentiality and anonymity of all the participants. Results: Our response rate was 76% (942). Majority (>90%) are aware of ethical committee but have poor knowledge (8-35%) about various ethical guidelines laid down at international level; however almost 20% believe that research ethics committees would delay research. A large number of researchers (78%) want some training in research ethics. There is fair knowledge about informed consent among researchers. Conclusions: We conclude that ethical norms should be strictly followed by giving due respect to confidentiality or privacy of research participants to achieve the goal of minimal risks and maximum benefits to patients and there is need of training to researchers and students to make them aware about various research principles. PMID:26668482

  20. Geoscience Research Drilling Office Operations I: the North INYO Drilling Program, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, P.

    1986-05-01

    The North Inyo Drilling Program was part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program/Thermal Regimes and it was put forth by the Department of Energy/Office of Basic Energy Sciences to explore roots of a 600 year old volcanic system which is found in the north-west corner of Long Valley Caldera, California. The responsibility of the Geoscience Research Drilling Office was to provide logistical support to the scientific drilling team. This support consisted of obtaining the necessary permits, obtaining a drilling contract and providing field services involving logging and core handling/laboratory facilities. The first portion of this program was successful when hole RDO-2b traversed the conduit which fed Obsidian Dome; the second portion succeeded when RDO-3a traversed the dike underlying the Inyo Chain of volcanoes.

  1. Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin information status and research planning meeting.

    SciTech Connect

    LaGory, K. E.; Krummel, J. R.; Hayse, J. W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Stull, E. A.; Gorenflo, L.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-26

    gathering of relevant literature; (2) synthesis and summary of the literature; and (3) identification and prioritization of information needs. To assist in gathering this information, MMS convened the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting, held in Anchorage, Alaska, from November 28 through December 1, 2006; this report presents a summary of that meeting. The meeting was the primary method used to gather input from stakeholders and identify information needs and priorities for future inventory, monitoring, and research related to potential leasing and oil and gas developments in the North Aleutian Basin.

  2. Tracer-based assessment of flow paths, storage and runoff generation in northern catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Buttle, Jim; Carey, Sean K.; McGuire, Kevin; Laudon, Hjalmar; Soulsby, Chris

    2015-04-01

    We examine how tracer studies have enhanced our understanding of flow paths, residence times and sources of stream flow in northern catchments. We define northern catchments as non-glacial sites in the temperate conifer/boreal/permafrost zone, focussing mainly on sites in North America and Europe. Improved empirical and theoretical understanding of hydrological functioning has advanced the analytical tools available for tracer-based hydrograph separations, derivation of transit time distributions and tracer-aided rainfall-runoff models that are better able to link hydrological response to storage changes. However, the lack of comprehensive tracer data sets still hinders development of a generalized understanding of how northern catchments will respond to change. This paucity of empirical data leads to many outstanding research needs, particularly in rapidly changing areas that are already responding to climatic warming and economic development. To continually improve our understanding of hydrological processes in these regions our knowledge needs to be advanced using a range of techniques and approaches. Recent technological developments for improved monitoring, distributed hydrological sensor systems, more economic analysis of large sample numbers in conjunction with novel, tracer-aided modelling approaches and the use of remote sensing have the potential to help understanding of northern hydrological systems as well as inform policy at a time of rapid environmental change.

  3. Influence of vegetation on water isotope partitioning across different northern headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, R. S.; Tetzlaff, D.; Buttle, J. M.; Carey, S. K.; Laudon, H.; Mitchell, C. P. J.; McNamara, J. P.; Soulsby, C.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrology of high latitude catchments is sensitive to small changes in temperature, and likely to be impacted by changes in climate. Vegetation water usage can play a large role in catchment hydrologic pathways, affecting how water is stored, released, and partitioned within a landscape. Thus a better understanding of how vegetation impacts water partitioning in northern catchments can help us understand how climate change will impact high-latitude hydrology. As part of the VeWa project, five catchments were chosen between 44oN and 64oN in Europe and North America, to compare the role of vegetation in the movement of water across northern landscapes. These catchments vary in aspect as well as extent of snowpack and their vegetative landscapes include heather moorland, coniferous and deciduous forests, mixed grass, and tundra landscapes. Importantly, all the catchments have records of stable isotopes in different waters of the system. An initial comparison of the water isotopes in these catchments demonstrates variation between the catchments, with the lower latitude sites showing more fractionation suggestive of evapotranspiration. While all catchments show a depletion of heavy isotopes in the spring, the depletion is most evident in catchments with a heavier snowpack. The vegetative growing season during the summer months shows the greatest impact of evapotranspiration on isotopes, indicating that an increased summer in a warmer climate would likely alter water partitioning and storage dynamics in these regions.

  4. Picturing and modelling catchments by representative hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle; Jackisch, Conrad; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling studies often start with a qualitative sketch of the hydrological processes of a catchment. These so-called perceptual models are often pictured as hillslopes and are generalizations displaying only the dominant and relevant processes of a catchment or hillslope. The problem with these models is that they are prone to become too much predetermined by the designer's background and experience. Moreover it is difficult to know if that picture is correct and contains enough complexity to represent the system under study. Nevertheless, because of their qualitative form, perceptual models are easy to understand and can be an excellent tool for multidisciplinary exchange between researchers with different backgrounds, helping to identify the dominant structures and processes in a catchment. In our study we explore whether a perceptual model built upon an intensive field campaign may serve as a blueprint for setting up representative hillslopes in a hydrological model to reproduce the functioning of two distinctly different catchments. We use a physically-based 2D hillslope model which has proven capable to be driven by measured soil-hydrological parameters. A key asset of our approach is that the model structure itself remains a picture of the perceptual model, which is benchmarked against a) geo-physical images of the subsurface and b) observed dynamics of discharge, distributed state variables and fluxes (soil moisture, matric potential and sap flow). Within this approach we are able to set up two behavioral model structures which allow the simulation of the most important hydrological fluxes and state variables in good accordance with available observations within the 19.4 km2 large Colpach catchment and the 4.5 km2 large Wollefsbach catchment in Luxembourg without the necessity of calibration. This corroborates, contrary to the widespread opinion, that a) lower mesoscale catchments may be modelled by representative hillslopes and b) physically

  5. A methodological comparison of catchment storages in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Staudinger, Maria; Stölzle, Michael; Seeger, Stefan; Seibert, Jan; Stahl, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important functions of catchments is the temporary storage of water, which directly influences runoff dynamics, rainfall-runoff transformation, partitioning of evaporation and runoff fluxes, and accessibility of water to plants. Generally, a large catchment storage is considered beneficial and in particular increases the transit times and hence the buffer functioning related to water quality. Many different methods have been developed to assess catchment storage, however, there are hardly any direct comparisons of several of these methods. One challenge is the definition of water storage, while some methods allow estimation of the entire water storage in a catchment, other methods quantify only the dynamic storage. In addition, most studies focused more on lowland catchments with rain-dominated runoff regimes and observed groundwater fluctuations. Furthermore, these studies often focus on one or two catchments, but do not consider the influence of different climates on the relevance of water storage in the catchment. We applied a range of different methods to assess catchment storage characteristics in 18 catchments in the Swiss Alps, ranging from 500 to 2000m of mean elevation and hence from rainfall- to snowmelt dominated runoff regimes. The first method use only discharge information during recession periods and with varying approaches to extract discharge and storage changes between high flow and low flow, the dynamic catchment storage can be derived. In the next methods the conceptual hydrological model HBV is calibrated to the runoff dynamics and the dynamic and total catchment storages of the different compartments are being evaluated. The last methods are based on stable water isotope data analysis. We use the model TRANSEP to derive the dynamic storage as well as the total water storage of the catchment based on the transit times using several years of fortnightly isotope data in streamflow. The results show that the derived catchment

  6. Catchment controls on solute export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamics of solute export from catchments can be classified in terms of chemostatic and chemodynamic export regimes by an analysis of concentration-discharge relationships. Previous studies hypothesized that distinct export regimes emerge from the presence of solute mass stores within the catchment and their connectivity to the stream. However, so far a direct link of solute export to identifiable catchment characteristics is missing. Here we investigate long-term time series of stream water quality and quantity of nine neighboring catchments in Central Germany ranging from relatively pristine mountain catchments to agriculturally dominated lowland catchments, spanning large gradients in land use, geology, and climatic conditions. Given the strong collinearity of catchment characteristics we used partial least square regression analysis to quantify the predictive power of these characteristics for median concentrations and the metrics of export regime. We can show that median concentrations and metrics of the export regimes of major ions and nutrients can indeed be inferred from catchment characteristics. Strongest predictors for median concentrations were the share of arable land, discharge per area, runoff coefficient and available water capacity in the root zone of the catchments. The available water capacity in the root zone, the share of arable land being artificially drained and the topographic gradient were found to be the most relevant predictors for the metrics of export regime. These catchment characteristics can represent the size of solute mass store such as the fraction of arable land being a measure for the store of nitrate. On the other hand, catchment characteristics can be a measure for the connectivity of these solute stores to the stream such as the fraction of tile drained land in the catchments. This study demonstrates the potential of data-driven, top down analyses using simple metrics to classify and better understand dominant controls of

  7. The Role of Institutional Research in Institutional Governance. Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (8th, Wrightsville, North Carolina, November 12-24, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research, which focused on the role of institutional research in institutional governance, are presented. Contents are as follows: "The Role of Institutional Research in Academic Program Evaluation: An Overview" (Dennis R. Hengstler); "The Role of Institutional…

  8. Introduction to the North Pacific Research Board Gulf of Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Research Program (GOAIERP): Volume I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Danielle M. S.; Baker, Matthew R.

    2016-10-01

    The North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) supports research to address pressing fishery management and ecosystem information needs in the marine waters of Alaska. Understanding dynamics at the scale of ecosystems requires integrated approaches that explore underlying mechanistic processes and interactions. It also requires analytic approaches that investigate the influence, cause, effect, and relative importance of various phenomena and drivers in determining ecosystem structure, processes and biophysical interactions. To address ecosystem-level hypotheses and questions at this scale, NPRB developed the Integrated Ecosystem Research Program (IERP). These programs employ multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional approaches to investigating ecosystem processes. The aim is to provide a basis for understanding core processes and to provide information and products that have targeted application to management priorities.

  9. Catchment Systems Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. F.; Wilkinson, M. E.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.

    2012-04-01

    within a catchment to take responsibility for the water quantity and quality that arises from the catchment. Further, any holistic solution requires a bottom up, problem solving agenda which is facilitated by policy makers and is underpinned by scientific knowledge. http:\\research.ncl.ac.ukproactive

  10. A detailed study on Catchment delineation for Urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, B.; B M, A.; Lohani, B.; Jain, A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban flood modelling is carried out for predicting, analysing and planning of floods in urban areas. Catchment information is an important input for urban flood modelling. Automatic catchment delineation at gully gratings for urban areas using appropriate software packages/methods along with an appropriate set of input data and parameters is still a research challenge. Considering the above, the aim of this study is to (i) identify the best suitable software for automatic catchment delineation by considering gully grating as outlet (ii) understand the effect of resolution of DEM on catchments delineated (iii) understand whether to consider DEM or DSM for catchment delineation (iv) study the effect of grid based and TIN based DEM. In this study catchment delineation has been investigated considering IIT Kanpur as a study site. LiDAR data are used to generate DEM/DSM of the study area. A comparative study of catchment delineation has been carried out between ArcHydro 10.1, BASINS 4.1, ArcSWAT, WMS 7.1, and HEC-GeoHMS approaches. Catchments have been delineated for different drainage threshold areas using gully grating points as outlets and their effects have been compared for the aforementioned software. In order to understand the effect of resolution of data, DEMs of 1m and 5m resolution have been generated and compared against each other. Effects of building ridge lines and their contribution to catchment delineation has been studied by generating a DSM of 1m resolution, and comparing the results with catchments delineated using 1m DEM. In order to assess the effects of the types of DEM over catchment delineation, a grid based DEM and TIN based DEM are compared against each other using WMS 7.1 software. The results for the catchment delineation using various software illustrate that ArcHydro 10.1 performs better than any other aforementioned software. Also, it is noted that varied drainage threshold area parameters, resolutions of DEM, selection of DEM

  11. Thresholds in Subsurface Flow Generation: An Intercomparison of Three Different Headwater Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjerdt, K. N.; McGlynn, B.; Tromp-van Meerveld, I.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hooper, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    Dynamic thresholds in catchment response and subsurface stormflow initiation are poorly understood. This remains a problem for the generalization and transferability of hydrologic models, as well as for the simulation of catchment response under variable antecedent and input conditions. Threshold processes appear to operate both spatially and temporally within a catchment and introduce non-linearity to the system response function. We present a catchment intercomparison to illustrate the common features of threshold dynamics at the hillslope and catchment scales. While our overall goal is to generalize a model structure to work in humid areas where storm response is dominated by subsurface flow, cross-comparing internal catchment dynamics is a necessary prerequisite in order to define first order controls on the generation of subsurface stormflow across different landscape types. We analyzed physical data series collected from three catchments with extremely diverse climatic and physical characteristics: (1) Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA; (2) Panola Mountain Research Watershed in central Georgia, USA; and (3) Maimai Watershed on the South Island of New Zeeland. The physical data series included continuous runoff, soil moisture probes, wells, piezometers and, for some catchments, tensiometers and hillslope trench flow. We calculated indices that characterized the timing, magnitude and duration of subsurface response in relation to stream discharge for a large number of events within each catchment. Analysis of these indices across space and time revealed distinguishable patterns of threshold behavior in the different catchments and our presentation will demonstrate the value of catchment intercomparision in this regard.

  12. The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Hemond, H.F.; Charles, D.F.; Norton, S.A.

    1993-03-05

    A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

  13. Incidental Computer Tomography Radiologic Findings through Research Participation in the North Texas Healthy Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Anna; Malone, Kendra; Balyakina, Elizabeth; Fulda, Kimberly G.; Cardarelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Although variation exists in the classification and practice of managing clinical findings in research, emerging views suggest that researchers bear some responsibility in the management of incidental findings. This study contributes to the documentation of the population characteristics and prevalence of medical findings incidental to research participation, specifically findings related to coronary calcium scores and computed tomography (CT) scans that investigated cardiovascular disparities in an asymptomatic population. Methods A total of 571 asymptomatic adult participants were recruited in the North Texas Healthy Heart Study. Participants completed a 16-slice CT scan of the heart and abdomen. Findings of radiology reports and 3 years of follow-up documentation were reviewed. Results A total of 246 clinically apparent findings were identified in 169 asymptomatic participants (32.9% of participants who completed a CT scan). Another 245 participants (48%) had findings of unknown significance, a total of 307 findings. At least 4 cases in this study led to a clinically significant intervention. Conclusion Although CT scans were completed for research purposes, study procedures resulted in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals who were previously asymptomatic. Potential clinical benefits in imaging research are moderated by considerations regarding possible harm and costs resulting from uncertain findings and the use of CT scans for nonclinical purposes. The continued development of protocols for the handling of incidental findings in research and the establishment of guidelines are needed to ensure that research procedures mirror the best interests of participants. PMID:24808109

  14. Catchments of general practice in different countries– a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area. This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  15. Water Catchment and Storage Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenig, Michael; Dunbabin, Matt; Moore, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and Sensor Networks technologies provide the means for comprehensive understanding of natural processes in the environment by radically increasing the availability of empirical data about the natural world. This step change is achieved through a dramatic reduction in the cost of data acquisition and many orders of magnitude increase in the spatial and temporal granularity of measurements. Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is undertaking a strategic research program developing wireless sensor network technology for environmental monitoring. As part of this research initiative, we are engaging with government agencies to densely monitor water catchments and storages, thereby enhancing understanding of the environmental processes that affect water quality. In the Gold Coast hinterland in Queensland, Australia, we are building sensor networks to monitor restoration of rainforest within the catchment, and to monitor methane flux release and water quality in the water storages. This poster will present our ongoing work in this region of eastern Australia. The Springbrook plateau in the Gold Coast hinterland lies within a World Heritage listed area, has uniquely high rainfall, hosts a wide range of environmental gradients, and forms part of the catchment for Gold Coast's water storages. Parts of the plateau are being restored from agricultural grassland to native rainforest vegetation. Since April 2008, we have had a 10-node, multi-hop sensor network deployed there to monitor microclimate variables. This network will be expanded to 50-nodes in February 2010, and to around 200-nodes and 1000 sensors by mid-2011, spread over an area of approximately 0.8 square kilometers. The extremely dense microclimate sensing will enhance knowledge of the environmental factors that enhance or inhibit the regeneration of native rainforest. The final network will also include nodes with acoustic and image sensing capability for

  16. Protected areas in the North Sea: An absolute need for future marine research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeboom, H. J.

    1995-03-01

    There are many signals that different human activities affect the marine ecosystem on local and sometimes regional scales. There is evidence that in the Dutch sector of the North Sea at least 25 species have decreased tremendously in numbers or have totally disappeared. But what has caused their disappearance: fisheries, pollution, eutrophication, climatic changes, or a combination of causes? On the Dutch Continental Shelf, the fisheries are now so intensive that every square metre is trawled, on an average, once to twice a year. Furthermore, it has been shown that trawling causes direct damage to the marine ecosystem. This indicates that the “natural” North Sea ecosystem we are studying is already a heavily influenced system. And what is the value of data on the diversity and production of benthic animals, if the research area has been raked by beamtrawl gear an unknown amount of times before sampling? To be able to study the natural trends in the marine ecosystem, or to answer the question which human activity has most influenced the ecosystem, there is an absolute and immediate need for protected areas to be established. The size of the protected areas must be determined by the behaviour of that species characteristic for the area. In such areas, where fisheries and local pollution would be forbidden or very limited, scientific research into the species composition and age distribution of different populations should be carried out and trends should be established.

  17. Institutional Research: New Challenges to an Evolving Role. Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (13th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 26-28, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Bayard, Comp.

    New challenges facing the institutional research profession are covered in these 1986 conference proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Paper titles and authors include: "Institutional Research at Mercer County Community College: The Changing Role in the Eighties" (F. L. Edwards); "Course Placement and Academic…

  18. Controls on suspended sediment, particulate and dissolved organic carbon export from two adjacent catchments with contrasting land-uses, Exmoor UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendell, M.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    The fluvial export of total organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) plays an important role in the transportation of organic carbon from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems, with implications for the understanding of the global carbon cycle and calculations of regional carbon budgets. The terrestrial biosphere contains large amounts of stored carbon in the soil and vegetation, thus a small change in the terrestrial carbon pool may have significant implications for atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Since the onset of agriculture, human activities have accelerated soil erosion rates 10- to 100- fold above all estimated natural background levels, especially in the uplands and at lower latitudes, whilst increasing DOC concentrations over the past decades have been reported in rivers across Western Europe and North America, raising concerns about potential destabilisation of the terrestrial soil carbon pool. The increased input of fine sediment and organic carbon into aquatic environments is also an important factor in stream water quality, being responsible for direct ecological effects as well as transport of a range of contaminants. Many factors, such as topography, hydrological regime and vegetation are known to influence the fluvial export of carbon from catchments. However, most work to date has focused on DOC losses from either forested or peaty catchments, with only limited studies examining the controls and rates of TOC (dissolved and particulate) fluxes from agricultural catchments, particularly during flood events. This research aims to: • Quantify the fluxes of total suspended sediment, total dissolved and total particulate carbon in two adjacent catchments with contrasting land-uses and • Examine the controlling factors of total fluvial carbon fluxes in a semi-natural and agricultural catchment in order to assess the impact of agricultural land-use on fluvial carbon export. The two contrasting study catchments (the Aller and Horner), in south

  19. The "Teflon basin" myth: Snow-soil interactions in mountain catchments in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. W.; Cowie, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In much of western North America, snow and snowmelt provide the primary means for storage of winter precipitation, effectively transferring water from the relatively wet winter season to the typically dry summers. A common assumption is that high-elevation catchments in the western United States behave like "Teflon basins" and that water released from seasonal storage in snow packs flows directly into streams with little or no interaction with underlying soils. Here I present information from a variety of catchments in the Colorado Front Range on snowmelt/soil interactions using isotopic, geochemical, nutrient and hydrometric data in 2- and 3- component hydrograph separations, along with end-member mixing analysis (EMMA). For most catchments we measured these parameters in weekly precipitation, the seasonal snowpack, snowmelt before contact with the ground, discharge, springs, soil solution, and groundwater. We ran EMMA at the catchment scale for catchments that represent the rain-snow transition zone in the montane forest, the seasonally snow covered sub-alpine to alpine transition zone, and a high-elevation alpine zone near the continental divide. In all catchments three end-members were the source waters for about 95% of discharge. Two end-members were the same in all catchments, snow and groundwater. For the alpine catchment talus springs was the third water source, while rain was the third water source in the two lower-elevation catchments. For all three catchments, soil solution plotted with stream waters along or near a line connecting the snow and groundwater end-members. Thus, for seasonally snow-covered catchments from montane to alpine ecosystems, snowmelt infiltrates underlying soils before snowmelt recharges groundwater reservoirs and contributes to surface flows. Seasonally snow-covered catchments are not Teflon basins. Rather, snowmelt infiltrates soils where solute concentrations are changed by biological and geochemical processes.

  20. Multiple-method approaches for quantifying fine sediment dynamics in river catchments over contemporary timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the patterns and processes of contemporary fine sediment dynamics in river catchments constitutes a key research challenge for catchment scientists. Such knowledge has considerable value for the targeting of management resources to reduce excess fine sediment supply and its impacts on water resources and aquatic ecosystems. Many past studies tended to focus on a single compartment of the fine sediment cascade and utilised a limited range of research methods. For more holistic understanding, the use of multiple-method approaches is required to provide data on the sources, transfer, storage, and transit times of fine sediment in river catchments. Such approaches would allow scientists to better conceptualise catchment processes controlling the movement of fine sediment across a range of spatial scales. It may also enhance the scientific quality of catchment-scale studies through the acquisition of multiple lines of evidence concerning a particular research problem. The specific combination of fine sediment tracing and fingerprinting procedures with catchment sediment flux measurements and sediment budget modelling has considerable potential to enhance our knowledge of contemporary sediment dynamics. This combination of techniques offers complementary information and the opportunity to compare datasets, such as estimates of catchment sediment source contributions obtained using sediment tracers with direct measurements of sediment fluxes or catchment model outputs. This contribution explores the potential for such combinations of methods to yield distinctive insights not otherwise available from the use of only one of these techniques. It draws on published examples of multiple-method studies by the author from small agricultural and wildfire-affected forest catchments (1-2 km2) in south-east Australia and from larger agricultural river catchments (38-920 km2) in south-west England. It will also identify possible directions for catchment research based

  1. Making Organisms Model Human Behavior: Situated Models in North-American Alcohol Research, 1950-onwards

    PubMed Central

    Leonelli, Sabina; Ankeny, Rachel A.; Nelson, Nicole C.; Ramsden, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Argument We examine the criteria used to validate the use of nonhuman organisms in North-American alcohol addiction research from the 1950s to the present day. We argue that this field, where the similarities between behaviors in humans and non-humans are particularly difficult to assess, has addressed questions of model validity by transforming the situatedness of non-human organisms into an experimental tool. We demonstrate that model validity does not hinge on the standardization of one type of organism in isolation, as often the case with genetic model organisms. Rather, organisms are viewed as necessarily situated: they cannot be understood as a model for human behavior in isolation from their environmental conditions. Hence the environment itself is standardized as part of the modeling process; and model validity is assessed with reference to the environmental conditions under which organisms are studied. PMID:25233743

  2. Research on Dynamic Stress Triggering at Chinese North-South Seismic Belt in Recent Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic stress triggering refers to the influence induced by one earthquake to the nearby and remote seismic activity, including static stress triggering and dynamic stress triggering. Scientists have studied static stress triggering for a long time and have got lots of achievement. However, the researches of dynamic stress triggering were scarce. The time we actually researched on seismic dynamic stress triggering was after the Landers earthquake in 1992, USA. Due to the superiority of dynamic stress triggering in explaining remote triggering, it has been developing rapidly in recent years. China locates between the Pacific Ocean seismic zone and the Asia-Europe seismic zone, so Chinese mainland and its periphery has more strong shocks. Although Chinese seismologists study seismic dynamic stress triggering later, it is necessary to study seismic dynamic stress triggering in China. In order to explore Chinese seismic dynamic stress triggering, we take Chinese North-South seismic belt as an example in this article. With the method of calculating seismic dynamic stress, we researched the triggered situation of some strong earthquakes in Chinese North-South seismic belt: calculate stress tensor and coulomb stress in triggered area, including M8.0 earthquake of 2000 in Sumatra triggered M5.8 earthquake of Jingtai in Gansu and M6.5 earthquake of Burma, M7.9 earthquake of 2003 in border of China, Russia and Mongolia triggered M6.1 earthquake of Minle-Shandan and M5.2 earthquake of Minxian in Gansu, M8.7 earthquake of 2004 in Sumatra triggered M5.1 earthquake of Shuangbai and M5.1 earthquake of Simao in Yunnan. The results show that the dynamic stress peak value on triggered fault produced by several strong shocks all exceeds to triggering threshold value. All in all, the earthquake activity is triggered easily in the North-South seismic belt, but the earthquakes in different area have different triggering effect in the North-South seismic belt, probably influenced by the

  3. Fine-suspended sediment and water budgets for a large, seasonally dry tropical catchment: Burdekin River catchment, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Zoë T.; Lewis, Stephen E.; Smithers, Scott G.; Kuhnert, Petra M.; Henderson, Brent L.; Brodie, Jon E.

    2014-11-01

    The Burdekin River catchment (˜130,400 km2) is a seasonally dry tropical catchment located in north-east Queensland, Australia. It is the single largest source of suspended sediment to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Fine sediments are a threat to ecosystems on the GBR where they contribute to elevated turbidity (reduced light), sedimentation stress, and potential impacts from the associated nutrients. Suspended sediment data collected over a 5 year period were used to construct a catchment-wide sediment source and transport budget. The Bowen River tributary was identified as the major source of end-of-river suspended sediment export, yielding an average of 530 t km-2 yr-1 during the study period. Sediment trapping within a large reservoir (1.86 million ML) and the preferential transport of clays and fine silts downstream of the structure were also examined. The data reveal that the highest clay and fine silt loads—which are of most interest to environmental managers of the GBR—are not always sourced from areas that yield the largest total suspended sediment load (i.e., all size fractions). Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating particle size into catchment sediment budget studies undertaken to inform management decisions to reduce downstream turbidity and sedimentation. Our data on sediment source, reservoir influence, and subcatchment and catchment yields will improve understandings of sediment dynamics in other tropical catchments, particularly those located in seasonally wet-dry tropical savannah/semiarid climates. The influence of climatic variability (e.g., drought/wetter periods) on annual sediment loads within large seasonally dry tropical catchments is also demonstrated by our data.

  4. A tentative of Holocene sediment budget for the Seulles catchment (western France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Vincent; Lespez, Laurent; Delahaye, Daniel; Le Gouee, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Geomorphological and paleoenvironmental researches on Holocene sedimentation in the valleys of Normandy provide evidence for fluvial system changes related to climate and human activities in the Paris basin. Alluvial and colluvial deposits are important as archives of past environments changes. They can be used to construct the temporal frameworks for historical erosion and to give an indication of the past erosion processes. Few studies attempts to make long-term soil erosion and sediment storage in the valley bottom in North-western France. This work put into forward results of a research on Holocene sediment budget. This study focuses in the Seulles catchment (430 km²), located in Normandy at the junction between the Armorican massif (upstream part) and the sedimentary Paris Basin (downstream part). In order to reconstruct the Holocene sediment budget, different approaches were used to quantify sediment deposit within the floodplain, soil erosion rates and colluvial deposition. To characterize and quantify the sediment storage into the valley bottoms, 32 partial or complete cross-sections, regularly placed along the valley bottom, were established. These field investigations allow to evaluate the global bulk of fluvial sediment storage into the catchment. In a second step, the assessment of dry bulk densities permits to convert volumetric data into weight. To establish the chronology of the alluvial filling, 6 drilling cores were realized on selected cross-sections to sample organic material content for AMS radiocarbon dating. In total, 38 dates were obtained at the catchment scale and numerous are in process. In the same way, we evaluated Holocene slope erosion and sediment storage using soils profiles descriptions determined from auger coring transects of two small catchments (15 Km²). Results demonstrate the existence until 2500 BP of two morpho-sedimentary units (a model related to sediments dynamics into the catchment and a second one related to the

  5. Exploring Research Contributions of the North American Carbon Program using Google Earth and Google Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, P. C.; Wilcox, L. E.; Morrell, A.

    2009-12-01

    The central objective of the North American Carbon Program (NACP), a core element of the US Global Change Research Program, is to quantify the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane in North America and adjacent ocean regions. The NACP consists of a wide range of investigators at universities and federal research centers. Although many of these investigators have worked together in the past, many have had few prior interactions and may not know of similar work within knowledge domains, much less across the diversity of environments and scientific approaches in the Program. Coordinating interactions and sharing data are major challenges in conducting NACP. The Google Earth and Google Map Collections on the NACP website (www.nacarbon.org) provide a geographical view of the research products contributed by each core and affiliated NACP project. Other relevant data sources (e.g. AERONET, LVIS) can also be browsed in spatial context with NACP contributions. Each contribution links to project-oriented metadata, or “project profiles”, that provide a greater understanding of the scientific and social context of each dataset and are an important means of communicating within the NACP and to the larger carbon cycle science community. Project profiles store information such as a project's title, leaders, participants, an abstract, keywords, funding agencies, associated intensive campaigns, expected data products, data needs, publications, and URLs to associated data centers, datasets, and metadata. Data products are research contributions that include biometric inventories, flux tower estimates, remote sensing land cover products, tools, services, and model inputs / outputs. Project leaders have been asked to identify these contributions to the site level whenever possible, either through simple latitude/longitude pair, or by uploading a KML, KMZ, or shape file. Project leaders may select custom icons to graphically categorize their

  6. Assessing the role of urban developments on storm runoff response through multi-scale catchment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Owen, Gareth; Geris, Josie; Soulsby, Chris; Quinn, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Many communities across the world face the increasing challenge of balancing water quantity and quality issues with accommodating new growth and urban development. Urbanisation is typically associated with detrimental changes in water quality, sediment delivery, and effects on water storage and flow pathways (e.g. increases in flooding). In particular for mixed rural and urban catchments where the spatio-temporal variability of hydrological responses is high, there remains a key research challenge in evaluating the timing and magnitude of storage and flow pathways at multiple scales. This is of crucial importance for appropriate catchment management, for example to aid the design of Green Infrastructure (GI) to mitigate the risk of flooding, among other multiple benefits. The aim of this work was to (i) explore spatio-temporal storm runoff generation characteristics in multi-scale catchment experiments that contain rural and urban land use zones, and (ii) assess the (preliminary) impact of Sustainable Drainage (SuDs) as GI on high flow and flood characteristics. Our key research catchment, the Ouseburn in Northern England (55km2), has rural headwaters (15%) and an urban zone (45%) concentrated in the lower catchment area. There is an intermediate and increasingly expanding peri-urban zone (currently 40%), which is defined here as areas where rural and urban features coexist, alongside GIs. Such a structure is typical for most catchments with urban developments. We monitored spatial precipitation and multiscale nested (five gauges) runoff response, in addition to the storage dynamics in GIs for a period of 6 years (2007-2013). For a range of events, we examined the multiscale nested runoff characteristics (lag time and magnitude) of the rural and urban flow components, assessed how these integrated with changing land use and increasing scale, and discussed the implications for flood management in the catchment. The analyses indicated three distinctly different

  7. Studies in Teaching 1999 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    This publication presents a collection of research projects presented at the Annual Research Forum at Wake Forest University: "The Use of Group Work as an Effective Teaching Technique in Lower Level Spanish Classes" (James Blackburn); "What Are the Real Factors behind Student Motivation?" (Matthew Grey Burdick); "Can Students Communicate…

  8. Characterising the progress in HIV/AIDS research in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Hanan F; Kouyoumjian, Silva P; Mumtaz, Ghina R; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is perceived to have limited HIV data. The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterise the progress in HIV research in this region since the discovery of the epidemic. Methods Four indices were defined and implemented to measure the progress of HIV research using the PubMed, Embase, MENA HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Synthesis Project and US Census Bureau HIV/AIDS Surveillance databases. The four indices provide complementary measures to characterise different aspects of the progress of HIV research. Results A total of 2118, 2352, 683 and 4889 records were identified through the PubMed, the Embase, the Synthesis Project and the HIV Prevalence indices, respectively. The proportion of the total global HIV records that relate to MENA is 1.2%. Overall, the indices show steady progress in the number of new records every year, with an accelerated pace in the last few years. The rate of progress in MENA was also higher than the rate of progress in HIV records globally. There is no evidence so far of stabilisation or a peak in the number of new records year by year. About half of the records were produced after the year 2005. The number of records shows large heterogeneity across countries. Conclusions MENA has witnessed a rapid growth in HIV research over the last decade. However, there are still large gaps in HIV scientific evidence in the region, and the progress is far from being uniform across countries. Ongoing and future research needs to be geared towards academic standard and production of scientific publications. PMID:23596206

  9. The catchment based approach using catchment system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Quinn, Paul; Barber, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The catchment based approach (CaBa) has been championed as a potential mechanism for delivery of environmental directives such as the Water Framework Directive in the UK. However, since its launch in 2013, there has been only limited progress towards achieving sustainable, holistic management, with only a few of examples of good practice ( e.g. from the Tyne Rivers trust). Common issues with developing catchment plans over a national scale include limited data and resources to identify issues and source of those issues, how to systematically identify suitable locations for measures or suites of measures that will have the biggest downstream impact and how to overcome barriers for implementing solutions. Catchment System Engineering (CSE) is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of hydrological flow pathways throughout the catchment. A significant component of the runoff generation can be managed by targeting hydrological flow pathways at source, such as overland flow, field drain and ditch function, greatly reducing erosive soil losses. Coupled with management of farm nutrients at source, many runoff attenuation features or measures can be co-located to achieve benefits for water quality and biodiversity. A catchment, community-led mitigation measures plan using the CSE approach will be presented from a catchment in Northumberland, Northern England that demonstrate a generic framework for identification of multi-purpose features that slow, store and filter runoff at strategic locations in the landscape. Measures include within-field barriers, edge of field traps and within-ditch measures. Progress on the implementation of measures will be reported alongside potential impacts on the runoff regime at both local and catchment scale and costs.

  10. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  11. Research Spotlight: Using satellite data to estimate the North Atlantic Ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-03-01

    By redistributing heat and freshwater around the planet, ocean currents play a crucial role in regulating Earth's climate. Accurate knowledge of the subtle regional variations in Earth's gravity field is fundamental to the measurement of ocean currents, but the challenge of mapping Earth's gravity in sufficient detail has previously limited scientists' ability to reliably determine the ocean's time-mean circulation. To address this problem, in October 2009 the European Space Agency launched the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite with the aim of mapping Earth's gravity field with unprecedented spatial resolution. Bingham et al. present an initial assessment of the performance of GOCE by using the first data from the satellite to estimate the time-mean circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. This basin is particularly interesting because it contains the Gulf Stream, the world's strongest current and a key component of the global overturning circulation, which carries heat from the equator to high northerly latitudes. The scientists show that with just 2 months of observations, the GOCE estimate of the North Atlantic circulation is superior to that obtained from 8 years of data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite. In many places, the current speeds estimated from the GOCE data compare well with those obtained from in situ observations, providing strong validation of the GOCE mission design. Accumulation of data as the mission progresses could lead to a more accurate and detailed map of the ocean's currents. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045633, 2011)

  12. Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states

    SciTech Connect

    Ugoretz, S.M.; Rineer, K.C.; Downing, M.

    1995-07-26

    Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

  13. Vegetation impact on mean annual evapotranspiration at a global catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Murray C.; McMahon, Thomas A.; Finlayson, Brian L.

    2010-09-01

    Research into the role of catchment vegetation within the hydrologic cycle has a long history in the hydrologic literature. Relationships between vegetation type and catchment evapotranspiration and runoff were primarily assessed through paired catchment studies during the 20th century. Results from over 200 paired catchment studies from around the world have been reported in the literature. Two constraints on utilizing the results from paired catchment studies in the wider domain have been that the catchment areas studied are generally (1) small (<10 km2) and (2) from a narrow range of climate types. The majority of reported paired catchment studies are located in the USA (˜47%) and Australia (˜27%) and experience mainly temperate (Köppen C) and cold (Köppen D) climate types. In this paper we assess the impact of vegetation type on mean annual evapotranspiration through a large, spatially, and climatically diverse data set of 699 catchments from around the world. These catchments are a subset of 861 unregulated catchments considered for the analysis. Spatially averaged precipitation and temperature data, in conjunction with runoff and land cover information, are analyzed to draw broad conclusions about the vegetation impact on mean annual evapotranspiration. In this analysis any vegetation impact signal is assessed through differences in long-term catchment average actual evapotranspiration, defined as precipitation minus runoff, between catchments grouped by vegetation type. This methodology differs from paired catchment studies where vegetation impact is assessed through streamflow responses to a controlled, within catchment, land cover change. The importance of taking the climate type experienced by the catchments into account when assessing the vegetation impact on evapotranspiration is demonstrated. Tropical and temperate forested catchments are found to have statistically significant higher median evapotranspiration, by about 170 mm and 130 mm

  14. Gender Gaps in North American Research Productivity: Examining Faculty Publication Rates in Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Gonzalez, Laura; Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Galaz-Fontes, Jesus F.; Fisher, Donald; Snee, Iain

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses gender gaps in North American research productivity, which may be influenced by personal and family variables, as well as professional and work-related variables. The study was conducted as part of the "Changing Academic Profession (CAP) International Survey", conducted in 2007-08. Using articles as indicator of…

  15. Studies in Teaching 2001 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.

    This collection of research projects includes: "What Types of Questions Do Mathematics Teachers Ask?" (Cynthia L. Adams); "Will Alternate Assessment Formats Create a Difference in Student Motivation to Study?" (Robyn J. Allen); "Factors Affecting the Motivation of Students" (Dejon J. Banks); "The Dynamics of English Classes with Gender Minorities"…

  16. Air-Quality Data from NARSTO (North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone)

    DOE Data Explorer

    NARSTO is a public/private partnership dedicated to improving management of air quality in North America. It was established on February 13, 1995 when representatives of Canada, the United States, and Mexico signed the NARSTO Charter in a ceremony at the White House. The Department of Energy is one of the charter members providing funding. The central programmatic goal of NARSTO is to provide data and information for use in the determination of workable, efficient, and effective strategies for local and regional ozone and fine particle management. Since its founding, NARSTO has completed three major scientific Assessments of critical air quality management issues. NARSTO maintains the Quality Systems Science Center and the NARSTO Data Archive for storing data from NARSTO Affiliated Research Activities and making these data available to the scientific community. NARSTO also facilitates activities, such as the Reactivity Research Working Group, which provide critical reviews of the state of the science in areas of interest to air quality policy makers. In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Sciences Division announced their sponsorship of the NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center (QSSC). The QSSC is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory within the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Quality Assurance and Data Management assistance and guidelines are provided by the QSCC, along with access to data files. The permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Center at the Langley Research Center. The archived data can be reached by a link from the QSSC.(Specialized Interface) See also the NARSTO web site at http://www.narsto.org/

  17. Progress in the identification of catchments with co-existent multiple steady states and finite resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, T. J.; Western, A. W.; Thyer, M. A.; Frost, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrology has implicitly assumed that catchments are infinitely resilient to droughts and floods. No matter the magnitude of the climatic disturbance, almost all hydrological models simulate full recovery and hence assume infinite resilience. Recent research shows that catchments can undergo fundamental change during major droughts and this change in behavior is not captured by rainfall-runoff models. To date, the field of hydrological resilience has relied on theoretical deterministic models or vague resilience concepts, with the identification of catchments with multiple steady states (henceforth, attractors) remaining elusive. This is primarily due to the challenges stochastic forcing introduces into quantifying disturbance and recovery, and because resilience theory does not adequately address stochastic forcing. Drawing from recent hydrological resilience theory on catchment disturbance and recovery, a data-driven hidden Markov model is proposed for identifying recovery to a different hydrological state following major climatic disturbances. Application to selected unregulated catchments within Victoria, Australia, shows that after the Millennium Drought (~1995-2010) some catchments are yet to recover and have persisted within a functionally different hydrological state compared to that prior to the drought. Conversely, some catchments fully recovered at the cessation of the drought. This provides the first known field evidence that some catchments may have multiple attractors. Additionally, catchments are shown to differ in their resistance to the drought, with some catchments switching to a drought state at the commencement of the meteorological drought while other catchments taking ~10 years to switch to a hydrological drought state. In addition to separating hydrological droughts from meteorological droughts, this research provides a pathway for quantifying catchment resilience and resistance to climatic disturbances.

  18. Inter-comparison of hydro-climatic regimes across northern catchments: Synchronicity, resistance and resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, S.K.; Tetzlaff, D.; Seibert, J.; Soulsby, C.; Buttle, J.; Laudon, H.; McDonnell, J.; McGuire, K.; Caissie, D.; Shanley, J.; Kennedy, M.; Devito, K.; Pomeroy, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The higher mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are particularly sensitive to climate change as small differences in temperature determine frozen ground status, precipitation phase, and the magnitude and timing of snow accumulation and melt. An international inter-catchment comparison program, North-Watch, seeks to improve our understanding of the sensitivity of northern catchments to climate change by examining their hydrological and biogeochemical responses. The catchments are located in Sweden (Krycklan), Scotland (Mharcaidh, Girnock and Strontian), the United States (Sleepers River, Hubbard Brook and HJ Andrews) and Canada (Catamaran, Dorset and Wolf Creek). This briefing presents the initial stage of the North-Watch program, which focuses on how these catchments collect, store and release water and identify 'types' of hydro-climatic catchment response. At most sites, a 10-year data of daily precipitation, discharge and temperature were compiled and evaporation and storage were calculated. Inter-annual and seasonal patterns of hydrological processes were assessed via normalized fluxes and standard flow metrics. At the annual-scale, relations between temperature, precipitation and discharge were compared, highlighting the role of seasonality, wetness and snow/frozen ground. The seasonal pattern and synchronicity of fluxes at the monthly scale provided insight into system memory and the role of storage. We identified types of catchments that rapidly translate precipitation into runoff and others that more readily store water for delayed release. Synchronicity and variance of rainfall-runoff patterns were characterized by the coefficient of variation (cv) of monthly fluxes and correlation coefficients. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed clustering among like catchments in terms of functioning, largely controlled by two components that (i) reflect temperature and precipitation gradients and the correlation of monthly precipitation and discharge and (ii

  19. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2003-04. Research Report 1-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiaoyun

    2004-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the thirty-sixth annual Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina. This report covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  20. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2006-07. Research Report 1-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiaoyun

    2007-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the thirty-ninth annual "Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolinaa." This abstract covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  1. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2008-09. Research Report 01-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Daphne

    2009-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the forty-first annual "Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina." This abstract covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  2. LLNL Middle East and North Africa and Former Soviet Union Research Database

    SciTech Connect

    O'Boyle, J.L.; Ruppert, S.D.; Hauk, T.F.; Dodge, D.; Firpo, M.

    2000-07-14

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (GNEM) R and D program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive Seismic Research knowledge Base (SRKB) and deriving calibration parameters for the Middle East and North Africa (ME/NA) and Former Soviet Union (FSU) regions. The LLNL SRKB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize very large volumes of collected seismic waveforms, associated event parameter information, and spatial contextual data, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction surfaces. The SRKB is a flexible and extensible framework consisting of a relational database (RDB), Geographical Information System (GIS), and associated product/data visualization and data management tools. This SRKB framework is designed to accommodate large volumes of data (over 2 million waveforms from 20,000 events) in diverse formats from many sources in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. Using the SRKB framework, they are combining travel-time observations, event characterization studies, and regional tectonic models to assemble a library of ground truth information and phenomenology correction surfaces required for support of the ME/NA and FSU regionalization program. Corrections and parameters distilled from the LLNL SRKB provide needed contributions to the DOE Knowledge Base (DOE KB) for the ME/NA and FSU regions and will help improve monitoring for underground nuclear testing. The LLNL research products will facilitate calibration of IMS stations (primary and auxiliary), their surrogates (if not yet installed) and selected gamma stations necessary to complete the above tasks in the ME/NA and FSU regions. They present expanded lookup tables for critical station parameter information (including location and response) and a new integrated and reconciled event catalog dataset including

  3. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The North Denmark Bacteremia Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Schønheyder, Henrik C; Søgaard, Mette

    2010-01-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Improving prevention and treatment requires better knowledge of the disease and its prognosis. However, in order to study the entire spectrum of bacteremia patients, we need valid sources of information, prospective data collection, and complete follow-up. In North Denmark Region, all patients diagnosed with bacteremia have been registered in a population-based database since 1981. The information has been recorded prospectively since 1992 and the main variables are: the patient’s unique civil registration number, date of sampling the first positive blood culture, date of admission, clinical department, date of notification of growth, place of acquisition, focus of infection, microbiological species, antibiogram, and empirical antimicrobial treatment. During the time from 1981 to 2008, information on 22,556 cases of bacteremia has been recorded. The civil registration number makes it possible to link the database to other medical databases and thereby build large cohorts with detailed longitudinal data that include hospital histories since 1977, comorbidity data, and complete follow-up of survival. The database is suited for epidemiological research and, presently, approximately 60 studies have been published. Other Danish departments of clinical microbiology have recently started to record the same information and a population base of 2.3 million will be available for future studies. PMID:20865114

  4. The Annual North American Dendroecological Fieldweek: A workweek in applied tree-ring research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.M.; Krusic, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Trees record many events or processes that influence annual growth patterns. Dendrochronology is concerned with how environment and physiology affect tree growth as recorded within tree rings. The most basic principle of dendrochronology is that of crossdating, in which calendrical years are assigned to individual rings within a tree. Once crossdated, each ring is then a reflection of the climate or other environmental conditions that influenced that tree for that year. The Annual North American Dendroecological Fieldweek is a workweek in applied tree-ring research, designed to give both beginners to the discipline an introduction to its basic methodology and applications and more experienced users a change to work with and learn from others in the field in an informal group setting. The Fieldweek has had an outstanding history to date, with almost 250 participants in the five Fieldweeks from 1990 to 1994. The 6th Fieldweek is scheduled for 30 June to 8 July, 1995, at the Kananaskis Field Station in the Canadian Rockies near Calgary, Alberta.

  5. Bridges to the Future: Building Linkages for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (27th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 4-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This document contains papers, summaries of panel presentations, and work share meetings from the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "The Influence of Personality Traits, Pre-College Characteristics, and Co-Curricular Experiences on College Outcomes" (Karen W. Bauer); (2) "Threading the…

  6. North-South Partnership in Training and Education in Space Research and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, E.

    tackled by capturing the interest of young people in science, by appealing to space science. This is an area of cooperation in which complementarities of experience, stemming from different cultural origins can yield positive results. Researches into the utilization of space-based observation to monitor and control environmental resources (forests, oceans, atmosphere etc.) and climate change, are other examples of areas in which North-South Space Research and Application partnership can be established and sustained. Another area of partnership is in the development of space-based experiments, especially in the area of Communication Satellites, Earth threatening Asteroids and Comets, Global Navigation Satellites Systems, and the promotion of public awareness in space science and technology applications. Such activities will encourage mutual exchange of ideas and intellectual input by both partners in the progress, as opposed to a unilateral transfer of ideas from one partner to the other. Collaborative projects between partners from the North and South should involve university systems, the polytechnics, elementary and secondary school systems, colleges of education, research centers and organizations, corporate enterprise training, the Internet, and all those institutions whose responsibilities are to manage education and training in the developing world. Partnership in space science and technology, if nurtured in these institutions, can in the long run become one of mutual interaction, and can be sustained for a very long time.

  7. North-South Partnership in Training and Education in Space Research and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, E.

    tackled by capturing the interest of young people in science, by appealing to space science. This is an area of cooperation in which complementarities of experience, stemming from different cultural origins can yield positive results. Researches into the utilization of space-based observation to monitor and control environmental resources (forests, oceans, atmosphere etc.) and climate change, are other examples of areas in which North-South Space Research and Application partnership can be established and sustained. Another area of partnership is in the development of space-based experiments, especially in the area of Communication Satellites, Earth threatening Asteroids and Co mets, Global Navigation Satellites Systems, and the promotion of public awareness in space science and technology applications. Such activities will encourage mutual exchange of ideas and intellectual input by both partners in the progress, as opposed to a unilateral transfer of ideas from one partner to the other. Collaborative projects between partners from the North and South should involve university systems, the polytechnics, elementary and secondary school systems, colleges of education, research centers and organizations, corporate enterprise training, the Internet, and all those institutions whose responsibilities are to manage education and training in the developing world. Partnership in space science and technology, if nurtured in these institutions, can in the long run become one of mutual interaction, and can be sustained for a very long time.

  8. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes

  9. Perceptions of cancer clinical research among African American men in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Trantham, Laurel C.; Carpenter, William R; DiMartino, Lisa D.; White, Brandolyn; Green, Melissa; Teal, Randall; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Godley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The problem of cancer health disparities is substantial. Clinical trials are widely advocated as a means of reducing disparities and bringing state-of-the-art care to the broader community, where most cancer care is delivered. This study sought to develop a better understanding of why disproportionately few African American men enroll in clinical trials given their substantial cancer burden. Design This study applied community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods to design and conduct four focus groups of African American male cancer survivors and their caregivers in North Carolina. Results Among major themes, participants expressed confusion about the relationship between clinical trials, treatment, and research, signifying patient confusion and misinterpretation of common clinical trial terminology. Social norms including gender barriers and generational differences remain problematic; participants often reported that men do not talk about health issues, are unwilling to go to the doctor, and exhibit misapprehension and distrust regarding trials. Participants perceived this as detrimental to community health and expressed the need for more clarity in clinical trials information and a more fundamental social openness and communication about cancer detection and treatment. Conclusion Findings indicate the importance of clinical trials education in both traditional provider referral to trials and also in general patient navigation. To dispel pervasive misapprehension regarding placebos, clinical trials information should emphasize the role of standard care in modern cancer treatment trials. Many participants described willingness to participate in a trial upon physician recommendation, suggesting merit in improving patient-physician communication through culturally competent terminology and trial referral systems. PMID:26113749

  10. Tidal fluxes of dissolved oxygen at the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. R.; Kjerfve, B.; Petrecca, D. M.

    2006-04-01

    Advective, dispersive and total dissolved oxygen (DO) fluxes from 1297 complete tidal cycles were analyzed to test the "outwelling" hypothesis as it pertains to DO. A 910 day time series of meteorological and water quality data (approximately 35,000 half-hourly observations) was used to assess DO fluxes and dynamics at Crab Haul Creek, a small (1.1 km 2) tidal salt marsh basin at North Inlet, South Carolina, within the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. A basin storage curve, derived from water velocity measurements made across a permanent transect in the tidal creek every half hour for eight semidiurnal tidal cycles, enabled water discharges to be estimated from tide height readings in the 910 day time series. The discharges along with DO concentration measurements were used to calculate DO fluxes for each tidal cycle in the series. The long-term mean dispersive and advective DO fluxes were -0.281 g O 2 s -1 and -0.375 g O 2 s -1, respectively. Based on " t" tests both means are significantly less than zero ( p < 0.02), indicating exports. Furthermore a significant correlation was found between the dispersive DO export and the tidal mean solar radiation, indicating that photosynthesis is the principal process driving the dispersive export of DO. On the other hand no significant correlations were found between the advective export of DO and solar radiation or between the dispersive fluxes of DO and salt. The absence of such correlations indicates that the advective export of DO is simply an artifact of a slight ebb sampling bias in our computation of the tidal mean discharge. On a unit area basis the average annual dispersive export of DO is 8.9 g m -2 yr -1 or 0.28 mol DO m -2 yr -1. This is a small fraction of the oxygen produced in the basin by phytoplankton (18 mol DO m -2 yr -1) and its contribution to the DO resources of the receiving waters is far exceeded by the oxygen demand associated with the concurrent export of dissolved

  11. USGS research on geohazards of the North Pacific: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, M. K.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The disastrous earthquakes and tsunamis of Sumatra in 2004 and Tohoku in 2011 have driven re-examination of where and how such events occur. Particular focus is on the North Pacific. Of the top 30 earthquakes recorded instrumentally worldwide, 50% occurred along the line of subduction from the Kuril Islands to the southern Alaska mainland. This region has seen monstrous volcanic eruptions (Katmai-Novarupta, 1912), destructive tsunamis (Severo-Kurilsk, 1952), and one of Earth's largest instrumentally-recorded earthquakes (M9.2 Alaska, 1964). Only the modest populations in these frontier towns half a century ago kept losses to a minimum. Impact of any natural disaster to population, vital infrastructure, and sea and air transportation would be magnified today. While USGS had a presence in Alaska for more than a century, the great Alaska earthquake of 1964 ushered in the first understanding of the area's risks. This was the first mega-thrust earthquake properly interpreted as such, and led to re-examination of the 1960 Chilean event. All modern conceptions of mega-thrust earthquakes and tsunamis derive some heritage from USGS research following the 1964 event. The discovery of oil in the Alaska Arctic prompted building a pipeline from the north slope of Alaska to the ice-free port of Valdez. The USGS identified risks from crossing permafrost and active faults. Accurate characterization of these hazards informed innovative designs that kept the pipeline from rupturing due to ground instability or during the M7.9 Denali earthquake of 2002. As a large state with few roads, air travel is common in Alaska. The frequent ash eruptions of volcanoes in the populous Cook Inlet basin became a serious issue, highlighted by the near-crash of a large passenger jet in 1989. In response, the USGS and its partners developed and deployed efficient seismic networks on remote volcanoes and initiated regular satellite surveillance for early warning of ash eruptions. Close collaboration

  12. Detecting non-stationary hydrologic model parameters in a paired catchment system using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathiraja, S.; Marshall, L.; Sharma, A.; Moradkhani, H.

    2016-08-01

    Non-stationarity represents one of the major challenges facing hydrologists. There exists a need to develop modelling systems that are capable of accounting for potential catchment changes, in order to provide useful predictions for the future. Such changes may be due to climatic temporal variations or human induced changes to land cover. Extensive research has been undertaken on the impacts of land-use change on hydrologic behaviour, however, few studies have examined this issue in a predictive modelling context. In this paper, we investigate whether a time varying model parameter estimation framework that uses the principles of Data Assimilation can improve prediction for two pairs of experimental catchments in Western Australia. All catchments were initially forested, but after three years one catchment was fully cleared whilst another had only 50% of its area cleared. Their adjacent catchments remained unchanged as a control. Temporal variations in parameters were detected for both treated catchments, with no comparable variations for the control catchments. Improved streamflow prediction and representation of soil moisture dynamics were also seen for the time varying parameter case, compared to when a time invariant parameter set from the calibration period was used. While we use the above mentioned catchments to illustrate the usefulness of the approach, the methods are generic and equally applicable in other settings. This study serves as an important validation step to demonstrate the potential for time varying model structures to improve both predictions and modelling of changing catchments.

  13. Switching the poles in sexual and reproductive health research: implementing a research capacity-strengthening network in West and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Jean-Paul; Assarag, Bouchra; Delamou, Alexandre; Van der Veken, Karen; Belaid, Loubna; Ouédraogo, Moctar; Khalfallah, Sonia; Aouras, Hayet; Diadhiou, Mohamed; Fassassi, Raïmi; Delvaux, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Health research capacities have been improved in Africa but still remain weak as compared to other regions of the World. To strengthen these research capacities, international collaboration and networking for knowledge and capacity transfer are needed. In this commentary, we present the Network for Scientific Support in the field of Sexual and Reproductive Health in West and North Africa, its priority research topics and discuss its implementation process. Established in January 2014, the Network aims at generating human rights and gender-based research fully carried out and driven by South based institutions. It is composed of 12 institutions including the Institute of Tropical Medicine of Antwerp (Belgium) and 11 institutions from eight Francophone West and North African countries. The key areas of interest of this network are health policies analysis and health system research in family planning, HIV prevention among vulnerable groups, quality of care and breast cancers. Since it started, seventeen research proposals based on locally relevant research questions have been developed. Among the seventeen proposals, eleven have been implemented. Several research institutions enhanced linkages with local representations of international partners such as UNFPA. The network is committed to strengthening methodological research capacities and soft skills such as fundraising, advocacy and leadership. Such competencies are strongly needed for developing an effective South-based leadership in Sexual and Reproductive Health research, and for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27502593

  14. Sedimentary records of earthquake-induced increase in sediment influx from lake catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avşar, Ulaş; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; De Batist, Marc; Fagel, Nathalie

    2013-04-01

    Lacustrine paleoseismological records from three small and shallow lakes (Yeniçaǧa, Ladik and Boraboy) located on the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey) are investigated. The high-resolution multi-proxy sedimentological analyses, as well as the precise sediment chronologies, allowed us to understand the sedimentological consequences of historically known paleoearthquakes. Accordingly, clastic layer intercalations within highly organic-rich background sedimentation are attributed to be the result of seismic shaking, which may increase the sediment yield from the catchment by shattering the landscape and triggering landslides. This kind of sedimentary traces are quite rare in the lacustrine paleoseismology literature. Even if seismic shaking may increase the sediment yield from the catchment, the existence of sedimentary traces of this increase depends on the catchment size relative to the lake size, i.e. small lakes having large catchments are expected to better record the catchment response. In order to make an overall comparison within the literature, the ratios of catchment area to lake area for 51 lakes were determined. Accordingly, it is found that the ratios of catchment area to lake area for Yeniçaǧa, Ladik and Boraboy lakes (i.e., 73, 52 and 81, respectively) are distinguishably higher than the average of the lakes in the lacustrine paleoseismology literature, which is around 17.5.

  15. Animal husbandry in Moretele 1 of North-West Province: implications for veterinary training and research.

    PubMed

    Letsoalo, S S; Krecek, R C; Botha, C A; Ngetu, X

    2000-06-01

    Little is known regarding the keeping of animals in the Moretele 1 area of North-West Province, South Africa. Therefore, the status and dynamics of animal husbandry, as well as a general assessment of the needs of animal owners in this area were researched. Results of the investigation will be used to make recommendations for improved veterinary extension servicing in the area. Semi-structured interviews, based on discussions with relevant stakeholders in the community and a resultant problem conceptualisation, were undertaken at 266 randomly selected households in 51 villages and centres in the area, after which the data was checked and verified before being captured and analysed. The findings reveal that within the field of veterinary extension delivery: 1) there is a demand for visual and written extension material, 2) the extension services must function where clients reside, 3) limitations in terms of infrastructure are present and should be addressed through partnerships and coordination amongst all the role-players in the Moretele 1 area, and 4) cattle and poultry are the most important of the animal species and should be the focus points of extension, but the need to curb zoonotic disease should not be disregarded. In this regard veterinary clinics, private veterinarians and other role-players should be used in partnership with extension workers. Lastly, the veterinary clinic is regarded as helpful in many respects by the community consulted and the service should be upgraded and made available to a wider client base, especially where private and state veterinarians are unavailable or too expensive in such resource-limited communities.

  16. Characterizing Runoff and Water Yield from Headwater Catchments in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate where much of the annual precipitation falls during winter, the snow-capped Sierra Nevada serves as the primary source of dry season runoff that supports agriculture, industries, urban, and other ecosystems. Increased warming has led to significant reductions in mountain snowpack accumulation and earlier snowmelt throughout the western United States where most of the snow accumulates at temperatures near the freezing point. As a result, declines in dry season runoff magnitude, earlier runoff timing, and altered flood risk have been reported across the region. An important question in this context is, how to best manage forested catchments for water and other ecosystem services? We depict the differences in hydrologic response of ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds (KREW) research project using continuous precipitation, snow, and runoff data during 2004-2014. The size of these catchments ranges from 50 to 475 ha, and they span a 600-m elevation range in the rain snow transitional zone. In terms of soil, Shaver and Gerle-Cagwin dominate the lower elevation Providence catchments, and Cagwin soils dominate the higher elevation Bull catchments. The majority of these catchments have southwest aspect, moderate average slope (i.e. <25%), and a well-developed drainage network with drainage density ranging from 4.6 to 10.1 km/km2. Bull catchments, on average, have higher runoff than the Providence catchments across all hydrologic signatures extracted from daily hydrographs. Mean annual runoff ranges between 281 to 408 mm in Providence and 436 to 656 mm in Bull catchments despite no significant difference in precipitation among KREW's four meteorological stations. However, high elevation Bull catchments receive significantly more precipitation as snow than the low elevation Providence catchments. The average runoff ratio ranges from 18% to as high as 43% among different catchments, indicating that the catchment

  17. Evaluation of TOPLATS on three Mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2016-08-01

    Physically based hydrological models are complex tools that provide a complete description of the different processes occurring on a catchment. The TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (TOPLATS) simulates water and energy balances at different time steps, in both lumped and distributed modes. In order to gain insight on the behavior of TOPLATS and its applicability in different conditions a detailed evaluation needs to be carried out. This study aimed to develop a complete evaluation of TOPLATS including: (1) a detailed review of previous research works using this model; (2) a sensitivity analysis (SA) of the model with two contrasted methods (Morris and Sobol) of different complexity; (3) a 4-step calibration strategy based on a multi-start Powell optimization algorithm; and (4) an analysis of the influence of simulation time step (hourly vs. daily). The model was applied on three catchments of varying size (La Tejeria, Cidacos and Arga), located in Navarre (Northern Spain), and characterized by different levels of Mediterranean climate influence. Both Morris and Sobol methods showed very similar results that identified Brooks-Corey Pore Size distribution Index (B), Bubbling pressure (ψc) and Hydraulic conductivity decay (f) as the three overall most influential parameters in TOPLATS. After calibration and validation, adequate streamflow simulations were obtained in the two wettest catchments, but the driest (Cidacos) gave poor results in validation, due to the large climatic variability between calibration and validation periods. To overcome this issue, an alternative random and discontinuous method of cal/val period selection was implemented, improving model results.

  18. Describing Ecosystem Complexity through Integrated Catchment Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, C. L.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Peiffer, S.

    2011-12-01

    Land use and climate change have been implicated in reduced ecosystem services (ie: high quality water yield, biodiversity, and agricultural yield. The prediction of ecosystem services expected under future land use decisions and changing climate conditions has become increasingly important. Complex policy and management decisions require the integration of physical, economic, and social data over several scales to assess effects on water resources and ecology. Field-based meteorology, hydrology, soil physics, plant production, solute and sediment transport, economic, and social behavior data were measured in a South Korean catchment. A variety of models are being used to simulate plot and field scale experiments within the catchment. Results from each of the local-scale models provide identification of sensitive, local-scale parameters which are then used as inputs into a large-scale watershed model. We used the spatially distributed SWAT model to synthesize the experimental field data throughout the catchment. The approach of our study was that the range in local-scale model parameter results can be used to define the sensitivity and uncertainty in the large-scale watershed model. Further, this example shows how research can be structured for scientific results describing complex ecosystems and landscapes where cross-disciplinary linkages benefit the end result. The field-based and modeling framework described is being used to develop scenarios to examine spatial and temporal changes in land use practices and climatic effects on water quantity, water quality, and sediment transport. Development of accurate modeling scenarios requires understanding the social relationship between individual and policy driven land management practices and the value of sustainable resources to all shareholders.

  19. Watershed scale spatial variability in dissolved and total organic and inorganic carbon in contrasting UK catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumberland, S.; Baker, A.; Hudson, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    ) Recent investigations into carbon fluxes in British rivers have focused on long term increases in DOC in rural and predominantly upland catchments. Our results suggest that research is needed into understanding long term variations in inorganic carbon concentration, as well as total (organic and inorganic) carbon fluxes from British rivers, to obtain total carbon loads. In particular, we provide evidence that DIC concentrations may be greater in urbanized catchments compared to equivalent non-urban catchments, with the implication that increasing urbanization in the future will see increases in riverine DIC and a decrease in the strength of any DOC DIC anti correlation. Further studies of urban catchment DIC sources, within stream processing, long term trends, and potential ecological impacts, are required.

  20. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  1. The Flora North America Generalized System for Describing the Morphology of Organisms. Research Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetler, Stanwyn G.

    The file organization for the computerized Flora North America (FNA) data bank is described. A four level character hierarchy allows subdivision of any flora description into as many as four levels in order to specify plant character precisely. Terms at any one level will not necessarily be parallel in status. Both PLANTS and LEAVES serve as…

  2. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1973-74. Research Report 1-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, John B., Comp.; Balfour, Linda, Comp.

    This document reviews higher education activities in North Carolina including current enrollment, enrollment trends, undergraduate transfers, degrees conferred, faculty, library resources, extension activities, student costs, admissions, student financial aid, student housing, and financial statistics. Highlights indicate: (1) In fall 1973 a total…

  3. Management of North American Culicoides biting midges: Current knowledge and research needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of two important viruses infecting North American ruminants: bluetongue (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHDV). While these viruses have been identified for over 60 years, we still lack an adequate understanding of t...

  4. Factors Associated with Expectations: North Dakota High School Seniors. Educational Research Series No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabick, Lawrence W.

    Questionnaires were completed on a single day (spring 1973) by high school seniors from 18 large and small, rural and urban, schools located throughout North Dakota in an effort to establish correlation between desired and expected occupations and expressed educational expectations. Tabular data supported previous studies which established…

  5. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1976-77. Research Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.

    The tenth annual statistical abstract of higher education in North Carolina covers higher education activities in the state in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among institutions. The specific areas abstracted include current enrollment,…

  6. Disaster Down East: Using Participatory Action Research to Explore Intimate Partner Violence in Eastern North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Pamela York; Belton, Leigh; Hooten, Elizabeth; Campbell, Marci Kramish; DeVellis, Brenda; Benedict, Salli; Carrillo, Carla; Gonzalez, Pam; Kelsey, Kristine; Meier, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd in 1999, a Community Advisory Committee requested assistance from its university partners (University of North Carolina) to address stress and increased risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Collected from 12 study work sites, baseline data indicated that IPV rates were higher among blue-collar women in…

  7. Model Store Curriculum. A Developmental Model for North Dakota Schools. Final Report. Research Series No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goschen, Todd; Warcup, Dennis

    The final report evaluates the activities of the first nine weeks of a project designed to develop a curriculum guide for a school-model store at a North Dakota high school. The program combines the favorable aspects of both the school store and the model store, providing "live" experiences as well as simulated ones. The Distributive Education One…

  8. 2010 North Plains Research Field 12-200 Limited Irrigation Corn Production Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Plains Groundwater Conservation District (NPGCD) in the Texas High Plains embarked on a demonstration program to illustrate if the region could produce 200 bushels and acres of corn using just 12 inches of irrigation water (named the 12-200 Project). This report is a summary of the first y...

  9. Influence of teleconnection on water quality in agricultural river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellander, Per-Erik; Jordan, Phil; Shore, Mairead; McDonald, Noeleen; Shortle, Ger

    2015-04-01

    Influences such as weather, flow controls and lag time play an important role in the processes influencing the water quality of agricultural catchments. In particular weather signals need to be clearly considered when interpreting the effectiveness of current measures for reducing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural sources to water bodies. In north-western Europe weather patterns and trends are influenced by large-scale systems such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the position of the Gulf Stream, the latter expressed as the Gulf Stream North Wall index (GSNW index). Here we present five years of monthly data of nitrate-N concentration in stream water and groundwater (aggregated from sub-hourly monitoring in the stream outlet and monthly sampling in multilevel monitoring wells) from four agricultural catchments (ca. 10 km2) together with monitored weather parameters, long-term weather data and the GSNW index. The catchments are situated in Ireland on the Atlantic seaboard and are susceptible to sudden and seasonal shifts in oceanic climate patterns. Rain anomalies and soil moisture deficit dynamics were similar to the dynamics of the GSNW index. There were monitored changes in nitrate-N concentration in both groundwater and surface water with no apparent connection to agricultural management; instead such changes also appeared to follow the GSNW index. For example, in catchments with poorly drained soils and a 'flashy hydrology' there were seasonal dynamics in nitrate-N concentration that correlated with the seasonal dynamics of the GSNW index. In a groundwater driven catchment there was a consistent increase in nitrate-N concentration over the monitored period which may be the result of increasingly more recharge in summer and autumn (as indicated by more flux in the GSNW index). The results highlight that the position of the Gulf Stream may influence the nitrate-N concentration in groundwater and stream water and there is a risk

  10. Coevolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takeo; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment coevolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.225 to 82.2 Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density and slope-area relationship) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseflow index, and flow-duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found a significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. The intra-annual flow variability was also significantly related to catchments age. Younger catchments tended to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibited more flashy runoff. The decrease in baseflow with catchment age is consistent with the existing hypothesis that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways change over time from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in a set of similar, but younger volcanic catchments in the Oregon Cascades, in which drainage density increased with age. In that case, older catchments were thought to show more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths. Our results suggests two competing hypotheses on the evolution of drainage density in mature catchments. One is that as catchments continue to age, the hydrologically active channels retreat

  11. Influence of network properties on routing within a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkesson (Née Gustafsson), A.; Wörman, A.; Lindstrom, G.

    2009-12-01

    This study concerns how river network characteristics (topology and geomorpholpogy) and their stage dependency can be used as means to parameterize hydrological compartment models, such as e.g. HBV. By increasing the coupling to physical properties, the performance of these models versus data is expected to be improved - especially regarding hydrological extremes. By the use of particle-tracking routing routines, distributions of flow distances and flow times through a catchment are expressed as functions of channel morphology, topology and stage. By analyzing these effects separately and together, we conclude that the transit time for water is strongly non-linearly related to stage and correlated with geomorphology as well as network topology. A primary effect is due to the change in hydraulics in parts of the river network were flooding occurs during high flows. The impact of network effects and stage on water transit times in different subcatchments are analysed. The preliminary results show that topological properties are highly responsible for the appearance of the response functions. The controlling factors are mapped in different catchments, on different areal scale and during different conditions (stages). A case study is also reported for Ronne catchment, Sweden (about 1900 km2). By relating the distributions of transit times to generalised properties of the sub-catchments, we can theoretically transfer information from one catchment to another. A later phase of this research will be to make a similar study in River Ljusnan (20 000 km2) to conclude how these generalised channel network and hydraulic characteristics can be used to bridge temporal and spatial scales in hydrology. By the increased use of GIS applications (and the continuous augmentation of this type of data), generalised channel network data of this kind can easily be obtained, even for remote catchments of little previous hydrological monitoring.

  12. Research of water resources allocation of South-to-North Water Diversion East Route Project in Jiangsu Province ,Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optimized allocation of water resources is the important means of solving regional water shortage and can improve the utilization of water resources. Water resources allocation in the large-scale water diversion project area is the current research focus. This research takes the east route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project in Jiangsu province as the research area, based on the hydrological model, agricultural irrigation quota model, and water project scheduling model, a water resources allocation model was constructed. The research carried on generalized regional water supply network, simulated the water supply, water demand and water deficit in agriculture, industry, life, ecology and lock under the status quo and planning engineering conditions. According to the results, the east route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project is helpful to improve regional water shortage situation. The results showed that pump output increase by 2.8 billion cubic meters of water. On the conditions of P = 95%, 75% and 50%, compared with the benchmark year, water demand increases slightly due to the need of social and economic development in planning years, and water supply increased significantly because of new diversion ability. Water deficit are greatly reduced by 74.9% especially in the commonly drought condition because of the new project operation and optimized allocation of water resources.

  13. Phosphorus fluxes in headwater streams draining non-research poultry-pasture operations in north-central Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeis, J. J.; Jackson, C. R.; Radcliffe, D. E.; Risse, M. L.; Bryant, J.

    2007-12-01

    Poultry production is the largest agricultural commodity in Georgia, USA. Due to inefficient utilization of the phosphorus (P) in poultry feed, the manure contains high concentrations of P. When used as fertilizer for crops and pasture, poultry manure may be washed from the soil surface and increase eutrophication risks to downstream lakes and reservoirs. Long term application of poultry manure may result in P saturation of the soils. In the upper Etowah River basin in north-central Georgia, a long history of poultry farming has resulted in high P levels in soils receiving regular poultry manure applications. Few studies to date have been performed on the estimation of P fluxes from operational commercial poultry farms in Georgia. In Fall 2006, a 20-month surface water quality monitoring program was completed that was aimed at estimating P and suspended sediment fluxes in nine headwater streams draining poultry-pasture operations in the upper Etowah River basin. The nine catchments differed in terms of land use history, soil P levels, best management practices and other factors. An additional three streams draining U.S. National Forest were also monitored to provide reference concentrations and loads. Monitoring data included continuous (5-minute) streamflow, rainfall, and water quality samples. Water quality samples included biweekly grab samples plus storm samples collected using conventional autosamplers. Storm sampling using autosamplers included collection of discrete samples and composite samples. In particular instances, the two types of storm sample were collected simultaneously. Discrete storm sampling methods enabled collection of both rising and falling hydrograph limb samples to identify potential hysteretic water quality effects. Water samples were analyzed for total P, filterable reactive P, and total suspended solids. We are using this data to compare different flux estimation methods with emphasis on regression models that utilize laboratory results

  14. Export of nitrogen from catchments within a temperate forest: Evidence for a unifying mechanism regulated by variable source area dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, I. F.; Band, L. E.

    1998-11-01

    Considerable variation in the export of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was observed among catchments located within an old-growth sugar maple forest in central Ontario. Although discharge was a strong predictor of N-export, rates of export were variable for each catchment, ranging from -50% to +50% from the catchment-average response for DIN and -25% to +25% from the catchment-average response for DON. Among the catchments, a unifying flushing behavior was apparent for NO3--N, the dominant form of DIN in the discharge waters, providing a basis for explaining the variation in the export of DIN. Flushing occurs when a water table rises to the soil surface with subsequent mobilization of nutrients stored near or at the soil surface to surface waters. Catchment-specific flushing behaviors were captured in "flushing" characteristic time constants, defined as the time interval required for a decline in N concentrations in discharge waters toe-l (37%) of their initial concentration. Variation in flushing behavior was linked to variation in N export; catchments with short flushing times (interpreted as catchments with source areas that are less variable) were observed to export less N than catchments with long flushing times (source areas that are more variable). A hypothesis was formulated in which catchment topography and its influence on variable source area dynamics accounts for variation in flushing behavior, hence variation in the export of NO3--N among the catchments. The implication of this hypothesis is that to predict accurately the export of NO3--N from catchments within a landscape, we need first to consider the influence of the topographic complexity of the catchments. Our understanding of the mechanisms of processing and export of DON is not sufficient for accurate prediction at this point, highlighting the need for additional research on DON.

  15. Understanding fine sediment and phosphorous delivery in upland catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, M. T.; Reaney, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    The uplands of UK are heavily impacted by land management including; farming and forestry operations, moorland burning, peat extraction, metal mining, artificial drainage and channelisation. It has been demonstrated that such land management activity may modify hillslope processes, resulting in enhanced runoff generation and changing the spatial distribution and magnitude of erosion. Resultantly, few upland river systems of the UK are operating in a natural state, with land management activity often resulting in increased fluxes of suspended sediment (< 2 mm) and associated pollutants (such as phosphorous). Most recent Environment Agency (EA) data reveals that 60% of monitored water bodies within upland areas of the UK are currently at risk of failing the Water Framework Directive (WFD) due to poor ecological status. In order to prevent the continual degradation of many upland catchments, riverine systems and their diverse ecosystems, a range of measures to control diffuse pollution will need to be implemented. Future mitigation options and measures in the UK may be tested and targeted through the EA's catchment pilot scheme; DEFRA's Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) programmes and through the catchment restoration fund. However, restoring the physical and biological processes of past conditions in inherently sensitive upland environments is extremely challenging requiring the development of a solid evidence base to determine the effectiveness of resource allocation and to enable reliable and transparent decisions to be made about future catchment operations. Such evidence is rarely collected, with post-implementation assessments often neglected. This paper presents research conducted in the Morland sub-catchment of the River Eden within Cumbria; UK. 80% of this headwater catchment is in upland areas and is dominated by improved grassland and rough grazing. The catchment is heavily instrumented with a range of hydro-meteorological equipment. A high-tech monitoring

  16. Impacts of climate and land use changes on regional nutrient export in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Climate and land use changes modify the physical functioning of river catchments and, in particular, influence the transport of nutrients from land to water. In large-scale catchments, where a variety of climates, topographies, soil types and land uses co-exist to form a highly heterogeneous environment, a more complex nutrient dynamic is imposed by climate and land use changes. This is the case of the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) that, along with the North Saskatchewan River, forms the largest river system in western Canada. In the past years changes in the land use and new industrial developments in the SSR area have heightened serious concerns about the future of water quality in the catchment and downstream waters. Agricultural activities have increased the supply of manure and fertilizer for cropping. Oil and gas exploitation has also increased the risk of surface water and groundwater contamination. The rapid population growth not only leads to increments in water consumption and wastewater, but in the construction of roads, railways and the expansion of new urban developments that impose hydraulic controls on the catchment hydrology and therefore the sediment and nutrient transport. Consequences of the actual anthropogenic changes have been notorious in reservoirs where algal blooms and signs of eutrophication have become common during certain times of the year. Although environmental agencies are constantly improving the mechanisms to reduce nutrient export into the river and ensure safe water quality standards, further research is needed in order to identify major nutrient sources and quantify nutrient export and also, to assess how nutrients are going to vary as a result of future climate and land use change scenarios. The SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) model is therefore implemented to assess water quality regionally, in order to describe spatial and temporal patterns to identify those factors and processes that affect water

  17. Collaborative Research: Climate Sensitivity of Thaw Lake Systems on the Alaska North Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Tingjun; Jeffries, Martin O.

    2001-01-01

    There are thousands of thaw (thermokarst) lakes on the North Slope of Alaska, where they cover as much as 40% of the land area. Their very name recognizes the fact that they owe their origin to the impact they have on the ground thermal regime, but there have been few quantitative studies of the impact of the lakes on atmosphere-land interactions in this tundra region.

  18. Identifying Barriers and Practical Solutions to Conducting Site-Based Research in North America: Exploring Acute Heart Failure Trials As a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ambrosy, Andrew P; Mentz, Robert J; Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greene, Stephen J; Severance, Harry W

    2015-10-01

    Although the prognosis of ambulatory heart failure (HF) has improved dramatically there have been few advances in the management of acute HF (AHF). Despite regional differences in patient characteristics, background therapy, and event rates, AHF clinical trial enrollment has transitioned from North America and Western Europe to Eastern Europe, South America, and Asia-Pacific where regulatory burden and cost of conducting research may be less prohibitive. It is unclear if the results of clinical trials conducted outside of North America are generalizable to US patient populations. This article uses AHF as a paradigm and identifies barriers and practical solutions to successfully conducting site-based research in North America.

  19. Remote assessment of instantaneous changes in water chemistry after liming in a Nova Scotia catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Remote assessment of instantaneous changes in water chemistry after liming in a Nova Scotia catchment ANGELIDIS, C.1, STERLING, S.1, BREEN, A.2, BIAGI, K.1., and CLAIR, T.A.1 1Dalhousie University, christine.angelidis@dal.ca, 2Bluenose Coastal Action Foundation, andrew@coastalaction.org Southwestern Nova Scotia has some of the most acidic freshwaters in North America due to its location downwind of the major emission sources in eastern Canada and the US and due to a resistant geology which offers little acid buffering capacity (Clair et al. 2007). Because of the poor buffering and regionally high runoff values, hydrological events such as snowmelt and rain storms are frequent and can cause sudden changes in water chemistry which can have devastating effects on freshwater biota due to increases in acidity and metals (Dennis and Clair in press). Clair et al. (2001) have estimated the potential frequency of acidic episodes in this region based on a number of hydrological factors, though the technology available at the time to monitor short-term changes was not dependable. Recent advances in equipment have made the assessment of the frequency and severity of acidic episodes easier and more accurate, allowing better interpretation and prediction of hydrogeochemical changes with variations in weather and deposition patterns. Here we take advantage of these recent advances to monitor water chemistry in an experimental catchment, and explore the response to catchment liming. Catchment liming is one way of mitigating the effects of acid deposition in sensitive areas. We limed a 50 ha catchment at a rate of 5 t/ha in the Gold River watershed of southwest Nova Scotia to examine the interactions between application of lime with the geological and climatological conditions of this region and acid episode frequency. In order to assess changes of episode frequency caused by liming, we established two mobile environmental monitoring platforms in the catchment: a control site

  20. North-South Partnership in Water Resource Education and Research - Lessons learnt from U.S.-Ethiopia Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, M.

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, Ethiopian and U.S. universities formed partnership to train critical mass of Ethiopians in modern water resources tools, techniques, skills and knowledge, and to strengthen the institutional capacity of Ethiopian universities to establish graduate-level programs in Ethiopia. The partnership established Ethiopia's first water resource research institute, two graduate-level programs (water resource engineering and management, water and health) that are currently training about 100 students at M.S. and Ph.D. levels, summer undergraduate outreach program that provided community-based research experience in water resource for undergraduate students, and short-term trainings to practitioners and policy makers. The design, implementation and impact of these programs have had limitations and successes. In this presentation, I will provide lessons learnt from this partnership, and suggestions of elements required for successful North-South partnership in higher education and research.

  1. Downscaling catchment scale flood risk to contributing sub-catchments to determine the optimum location for flood management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Lane, Stuart; Hardy, Richard; Reaney, Sim

    2010-05-01

    The recent increase in flood frequency and magnitude has been hypothesised to have been caused by either climate change or land management. Field scale studies have found that changing land management practices does affect local runoff and streamflow, but upscaling these effects to the catchment scale continues to be problematic, both conceptually and more importantly methodologically. The impact on downstream flood risk is highly dependent upon where the changes are in the catchment, indicating that some areas of the catchment are more important in determining downstream flood risk than others. This is a major flaw in the traditional approach to studying the effect of land use on downstream flood risk: catchment scale hydrological models, which treat every cell in the model equally. We are proposing an alternative ideological approach for doing flood management research, which is underpinned by downscaling the downstream effect (problem i.e. flooding) to the upstream causes (contributing sub-catchments). It is hoped that this approach could have several benefits over the traditional upscaling approach. Firstly, it provides an efficient method to prioritise areas for land use management changes to be implemented to reduce downstream flood risk. Secondly, targets for sub-catchment hydrograph change can be determined which will deliver the required downstream effect. Thirdly, it may be possible to detect the effect of land use changes in upstream areas on downstream flood risk, by weighting the areas of most importance in hydrological models. Two methods for doing this downscaling are proposed; 1) data-based statistical analysis; and 2) hydraulic modelling-based downscaling. These will be outlined using the case study of the River Eden, Cumbria, NW England. The data-based methodology uses the timing and magnitude of floods for each sub-catchment. Principal components analysis (PCA) is used to simplify sub-catchment interactions and optimising stepwise regression is

  2. Interventions to Promote Energy Balance and Cancer Survivorship: European and North American Priorities for Research and Care

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Catherine M.; Molfino, Alessio; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    The growing population of cancer survivors worldwide and the growing epidemics of obesity and physical inactivity have brought increased attention to the role that interventions to promote exercise and a healthy body weight might play in mitigating the chronic and late effects of cancer. In this light, we describe the similarities and differences in research and clinical priorities related to energy balance interventions among post-treatment cancer survivors in Europe vs. North America. We review the randomized, controlled trials targeting nutrition, exercise, and weight to affect survivorship outcomes. We discuss the interventions focused on improving prognosis or survival, as well as the emerging literature on interventions targeting pathways and mechanisms of prognosis or survival. We describe current North American and European guidelines for diet, exercise, and weight control among cancer survivors and discuss implications of the current state of this science for clinical care. Finally, we delineate future European and American priorities for research and care involving energy balance among survivors. We hope that this dialogue launches an international conversation that will lead to better research and care for all post-treatment cancer survivors. PMID:23695926

  3. Scale effects on headwater catchment runoff timing, flow sources, and groundwater-streamflow relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlynn, B.L.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Seibert, J.; Kendall, C.

    2004-01-01

    [1] The effects of catchment size and landscape organization on runoff generation are poorly understood. Little research has integrated hillslope and riparian runoff investigation across catchments of different sizes to decipher first-order controls on runoff generation. We investigated the role of catchment sizes on riparian and hillslope dynamics, based on hydrometric and tracer data observed at five scales ranging from trenched hillslope sections (55-285 m 2) to a 280-ha catchment at Maimai on the west coast of the South Island, New Zealand. The highly organized landscape is comprised of similar headwater catchments, regular geology, steep highly dissected topography, relatively consistent soil depths, and topographically controlled shallow through flow. We found a strong correlation between riparian zone groundwater levels and runoff for the headwaters, whereas the water tables in the valley bottom of the larger catchments were uncorrelated to runoff for 14 months of record. While there was no clear relationship between catchment size and new water contribution to runoff in the two storms analyzed in detail, lag times of tracer responses increased systematically with catchment size. The combination of hydrometric and tracer data allowed assessment of the runoff contributions from different parts of the landscape. Runoff was generated consistently in headwater riparian zones. This agreed also with the observed variations of tracer (18O and silica) responses for the different catchments. During wetter antecedent conditions or during larger events (>30 mm under dry antecedent conditions) hillslope and valley bottom floodplains did contribute to event runoff directly. We propose that analysis of landscape-scale organization and the distribution of dominant landscape features provide a structure for investigation of runoff production and solute transport, especially as catchment-scale increases from headwaters to the mesoscale.

  4. Groundwater flow behaviour during the initial development phase of an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Kai; Schoenheinz, Dagmar; Biemelt, Detlef; Grünewald, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Artificially created, spatially and structurally well defined hydrological catchments are suitable study sites for hydrological and ecosystem research. One of the largest artificial catchments named "Chicken Creek" with clearly defined boundary conditions and extended monitoring facilities was set up on a dump site from opencast mining activities in Eastern Germany. The catchment, left to undisturbed succession, enables the observation of ecosystem development from the very beginning. Precipitation as the only source of water input is the dominating driving force for the hydrological processes in the initial development phase. Due to the initial absence of vegetation or organic structures, the morphological and hydrogeological properties of the artificial catchment control the runoff and storage processes. In case of the Chicken Creek catchment, they are given by the construction design and technology. In mature natural catchments, the groundwater flow system has normally achieved a dynamic equilibrium stage. In the newly constructed artificial catchment, the groundwater body is just evolving by infiltrating and percolating precipitation which fills the pore volume of the initially unsaturated catchment body. The saturation process has started above the underlying horizontal clay layer that is acting as lower catchment boundary. The observed trend of rising groundwater table superposed by seasonal fluctuations indicates a groundwater recharge higher than the drainage. During the last four years, the filling process is extenuating and an equilibrium between groundwater recharge and drainage is establishing. Groundwater exfiltration preferentially occurs in new gully structures formed by precipitation induced erosion processes. A groundwater model is set up to simulate the groundwater dynamics during the initial phase of the catchment development. Based on the theoretical consideration of initial homogeneity and isotropy, hydrogeologically relevant structures

  5. Nitrogen Concentrations and Exports in Baseflow and Stormflow from Three Small Urban Catchments in Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Hochmuth, G.; Clark, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Export of nitrogen from different watersheds across the United States is receiving increasing attention due to the impairment of water quality in receiving water bodies. Researchers have indicated that different land uses exerted a substantial influence on the water quality. Nitrogen loadings on the watershed scale are being studied in many large ecosystems, such as the Baltimore Ecosystem and Arizona Ecosystem, but only a few focuses in a smaller scale such as catchment scale. Characterization of the land use in catchment scale can better explain the observed environmental phenomena under the watershed scale and enrich the related watershed studies. Nitrogen fluxes have been studied at Lake Alice watershed in Gainesville, Florida with a focus on the rarely studied catchments such as sports fields with intensive fertilization management (SFC), urban area with reclaimed water irrigation (RWC) and urban area without irrigation (CC). The entire study started from May 2013. Discharge was monitored in the three catchments by transducers every 5 minutes. Regular biweekly grab samples in the three catchments were used to estimate the baseflow N loads, composite samples in 13 storms were collected to estimate the stormflow N loads. The results showed that in the baseflow, the average NO3-N concentration in SFC was 12.19 mg/l, which was significantly different from the urban catchments. Also there was a significant difference between the NO3-N concentrations in RWC (1.17 mg/l on average) and CC (0.60 mg/l on average). A separate log-log relationship was developed between discharge and N loads to estimate the baseflow N loads and stormflow N loads. It showed that baseflow contributed more N loads than stormflow in the three catchments in the annual N load. In conclusion, the recreational catchment received the greatest N load compared to the other catchments, so it should be the priority catchment when it comes to adopting nutrient management practices in the Lake Alice

  6. Assessment of surface water resources availability using catchment modeling and the results of tracer studies in the meso-scale Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Mukubwa, A.; Maskey, S.; Wenninger, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the last couple of years, different hydrological research projects were undertaken in the Migina catchment (243.2 km2), a tributary of the Kagera river in Southern Rwanda. These projects were aimed to understand hydrological processes of the catchment using analytical and experimental approaches and to build a pilot case whose experience can be extended to other catchments in Rwanda. In the present study, we developed a hydrological model of the catchment, which can be used to inform water resources planning and decision making. The semi-distributed hydrological model HEC-HMS (version 3.5) was used with its soil moisture accounting, unit hydrograph, liner reservoir (for base flow) and Muskingum-Cunge (river routing) methods. We used rainfall data from 12 stations and streamflow data from 5 stations, which were collected as part of this study over a period of two years (May 2009 and June 2011). The catchment was divided into five sub-catchments each represented by one of the five observed streamflow gauges. The model parameters were calibrated separately for each sub-catchment using the observed streamflow data. Calibration results obtained were found acceptable at four stations with a Nash-Sutcliffe Model Efficiency of 0.65 on daily runoff at the catchment outlet. Due to the lack of sufficient and reliable data for longer periods, a model validation (split sample test) was not undertaken. However, we used results from tracer based hydrograph separation from a previous study to compare our model results in terms of the runoff components. It was shown that the model performed well in simulating the total flow volume, peak flow and timing as well as the portion of direct runoff and base flow. We observed considerable disparities in the parameters (e.g. groundwater storage) and runoff components across the five sub-catchments, that provided insights into the different hydrological processes at sub-catchment scale. We conclude that such disparities justify the need

  7. Integrated Landscape Responses to Climate in Northern Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; Buttle, J. M.; Carey, S. K.; Laudon, H.; McDonnell, J. J.; McGuire, K. J.; Seibert, J.; Shanley, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    In few places will the changes and challenges associated with climatic change be greater than in the circumpolar mid-high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Slight temperature differences determine whether precipitation falls as rain or snow, and the degree to which winter snow packs accumulate and the rate at which they subsequently melt. This has implications for stream flow regimes, water quality and in-stream hydroecology. The Northern Watershed Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (North-Watch) programme is an international interdisciplinary inter-site comparison project spanning a transect of hydro-climatic zones and geomorphic regions in Scotland, the USA, Canada and Scandinavia. The overall aim is to better understand the integrated consequences of climate change on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of water resources across northern regions and their resilience due to differences in landscape evolution. Here, we present initial findings from these analyses. The way in which hydroclimatic drivers interact with catchment characteristics are examined to show how the synchroneity, resistance and resilience of input-output responses varies spatially and temporally across sites. The dominant influence is the nature of the snowmelt period and how strongly this influences the hydrological regime. Linked to this is the variable nature of the threshold response of input - streamflow dynamics and how this changes for rainfall and snowmelt events. The ways in which these hydrological controls regulate Carbon and sediment fluxes from different catchments are also explored, and the implications for in-stream ecosystem response assessed. As the hydroclimatic drivers influencing the catchments are changing in a warming climate, vegetation and soil are also likely to change. This in turn will affect patterns of partitioning, storage and release of water with associated changes in streamflow dynamics. Budyko Curves are used to examine the current

  8. How tritium illuminates catchment structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M.; Morgenstern, U.; McDonnell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Streams contain water which has taken widely-varying times to pass through catchments, and the distribution of ages is likely to change with the flow. Part of the water has 'runoff' straight to the stream with little delay, other parts are more delayed and some has taken years (in some cases decades) to traverse the deeper regolith or bedrock of the catchment. This work aims to establish the significance of the last component, which is important because it can cause catchments to have long memories of contaminant inputs (e.g. nitrate). Results of tritium studies on streams world-wide were accessed from the scientific literature. Most of the studies assumed that there were just two age-components present in the streams (i.e. young and old). The mean ages and proportions of the components were found by fitting simulations to tritium data. It was found that the old component in streams was substantial (average was 50% of the annual runoff) and had considerable age (average mean age was 10 years) (Stewart et al., 2010). Use of oxygen-18 or chloride variations to estimate streamflow mean age usually does not reveal the age or size of this old component, because these methods cannot detect water older than about four years. Consequently, the use of tritium has shown that substantial parts of streamflow in headwater catchments are older than expected, and that deep groundwater plays an active and sometimes even a dominant role in runoff generation. Difficulties with interpretation of tritium in streams in recent years due to interference from tritium due to nuclear weapons testing are becoming less serious, because very accurate tritium measurements can be made and there is now little bomb-tritium remaining in the atmosphere. Mean ages can often be estimated from single tritium measurements in the Southern Hemisphere, because there was much less bomb-tritium in the atmosphere. This may also be possible for some locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Age determination on

  9. Population dynamics of the major north American needle-eating budworms. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    The report includes data from six western States provided 1,251 life tables representing western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis. These data provided projection capabilities for defoliation and successive budworm densities, as well as a basis for comparing survival rates among the three principal North American needle-eating budworms (western and eastern spruce budworms, and the jack pine budworm). Several modifications are suggested in current methods for managing budworm susceptible forests, and suggestions are provided for further studies on the budworm life systems.

  10. Leading North American programs in clinical assessment research: an assessment of productivity and impact.

    PubMed

    Morey, Leslie C

    2010-05-01

    To identify doctoral programs with strong concentrations in clinical assessment, I measured productivity and impact of faculty at North American institutions with American Psychological Association accredited clinical programs. Publications, citations, and h-indexes derived from 4 top assessment journals were calculated over a 10-year period (1999-2009). I identified a total of 42 leading programs that collectively accounted for more than half of the publications and citations in these journals. I found a moderate relationship between assessment productivity and both US News & World Report program rankings as well as general productivity rankings of clinical programs reported in an earlier study.

  11. Hydrologic regime alteration of a Mediterranean catchment under climate change projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Haykel; Benabdallah, Sihem; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Herrmann, Frank; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2014-05-01

    Most of the climate models projections for the Mediterranean basin have showed that the region will likely to experience a general tendency towards drier climate conditions with decreases in total precipitation, increases in temperature, alterations in the rainfall extreme events and droughts frequency (IPCC, 2007; Giorgi and Lionello, 2008; López-Moreno et al., 2011). The region is already suffering from water resources scarcity and vulnerability which are expected to amplify in the next century (Ludwig et al., 2011; Schneider et al., 2013). Therefore, assessing the impact of climate change on the hydrologic regime of Mediterranean catchments is with a major concern not only to scientist but also to water resources policy makers and general public. However, most of the climate change impact studies focus on the flow regime on global or regional scale rather than on the catchment scale which is more useful and more appropriate to guide practical mitigation and adaptation policy. This is because hydro-climate modeling at the local scale is confronted to the variability in climate, topography, geology, lack of observations and anthropogenic activities within the catchment. Furthermore, it is well recognized that hydrological and climate models forecasts are always affected with uncertainty making the assessment of climate change impact on Mediterranean catchment hydrology more challenging. This work aims to assess the impact of climate change on a Mediterranean catchment located in North Africa (the Chiba catchment in northeast Tunisia) through a conjunctive use of physically based hydrological model (SWAT) driven with four climate models*. Quantification of the impact of climate change has been conducted by means of the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (Richter et al., 1996) which are also ecologically meaningful. By comparing changes in these indicators in the reference period (1971-2000) to the projected ones in the future (2041-2070), it was possible to draw

  12. Research on Water cycle Impact of South-to-North Water Diversion Project to Handan District Using MODCYCLE Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chuiyu; Bi, Xue; Qin, Dayong; Wang, Lin

    2010-05-01

    South-to-North Water Diversion Project is a huge interbasin water transfer project which is being constructed in China. The purpose of the project is to solve water scarcity crisis in North China. What is the water cycle response of local water cycle system to transferred water is an important topic which needs in-depth research. For this purpose, the article selected Handan district as the representative area of North China, and use MODCYCLE model as the simulating tool to do the study. MODCYCLE model is a half-distributed basin scale hydrologic / water cycle model developed by IWHR, its main simulating theory is similar to the world widely used SWAT model. MODCYCLE is developed by Object Oriented Programming method in C++ language and its input and output is based on database. A remarkable character of the model is that it supports parallel computing. Under multicore environment, the model's computing efficient will be dramatically enhanced. Furthermore, some important water cycle processes such as water surface-ponding on soil top, is considered in the model. Firstly during the study, the research simulated the water cycle process of Handan district in present situation by a 10 years dataset from 1998 to 2007. In this process the model's main parameters were being calibrated. Then based on the calibrated model and correspond to the water demand development predictions in the future, three different scenarios were simulated. These scenarios were set on different water use assumptions and strategies. By compare the scenario's forecast results, acknowledge of the role played by transferred water in the whole water cycle system of Handan district were figured out, as well as the water cycle evolution trends under different scenarios. The research indicated that the allocated transfer water of 0.47 billion m3 to Handan district during the coming first-stage water transfer plan of the project can only relieve the degradation rate of the water cycle system, mainly

  13. River nutrient loads and catchment size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.V.; Swaney, D.P.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Scarsbrook, M.R.; Weatherhead, M.A.; Humborg, Christoph; Eriksson, H.; Hannerz, F.

    2005-01-01

    We have used a total of 496 sample sites to calibrate a simple regression model for calculating dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes via runoff to the ocean. The regression uses the logarithms of runoff and human population as the independent variables and estimates the logarithms of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus loading with R 2 values near 0.8. This predictive capability is about the same as has been derived for total nutrient loading with process-based models requiring more detailed information on independent variables. We conclude that population and runoff are robust proxies for the more detailed application, landscape modification, and in-stream processing estimated by more process-based models. The regression model has then been applied to a demonstration data set of 1353 river catchments draining to the sea from the North American continent south of the Canadian border. The geographic extents of these basins were extracted from a 1-km digital elevation model for North America, and both runoff and population were estimated for each basin. Most of the basins (72% of the total) are smaller than 103 km2, and both runoff and population density are higher and more variable among small basins than among larger ones.While total load to the ocean can probably be adequately estimated from large systems only, analysis of the geographic distribution of nutrient loading requires consideration of the small basins, which can exhibit significant hydrologic and demographic heterogeneity between systems over their range even within the same geographic region. High-resolution regional and local analysis is necessary for environmental assessment and management. ?? Springer 2005.

  14. A Catchment-Based Land Surface Model for GCMs and the Framework for its Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducharen, A.; Koster, R. D.; Suarez, M. J.; Kumar, P.

    1998-01-01

    A new GCM-scale land surface modeling strategy that explicitly accounts for subgrid soil moisture variability and its effects on evaporation and runoff is now being explored. In a break from traditional modeling strategies, the continental surface is disaggregated into a mosaic of hydrological catchments, with boundaries that are not dictated by a regular grid but by topography. Within each catchment, the variability of soil moisture is deduced from TOP-MODEL equations with a special treatment of the unsaturated zone. This paper gives an overview of this new approach and presents the general framework for its off-line evaluation over North-America.

  15. Integrated monitoring of nitrogen dynamics in contrasting catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, M.; Fleischer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The research institute WESS (Water & Earth System Science) is monitoring three adjacent meso-scale catchments (72 - 140 km2) in southwest Germany with respect to water quantity and quality. Due to their spatial proximity, the studied catchments are similar regarding climatic conditions and water balance. Geology is characterized by sedimentary rocks which are partly karstified. The catchments contrast strongly in land use and show a range from predominantly agriculture to almost exclusively forestry. In this context, a special focus of our research is the distinction of matter coming from the catchment area versus substances stemming from urban point sources. One important compound representing inputs from the catchment area is nitrogen. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient governing plant growth. If available in excess it leads to eutrophication and is therefore one of the globally most widespread contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Transport of human-derived nitrogen through landscapes including urban areas to the oceans predominantly occurs via river network systems. Hence, monitoring of nitrogen fluxes in streams and rivers reveals mechanisms and dynamics of its transport and gives also insight into hydrologic processes which influence the mobilization of nitrogen. Presently, the catchments are equipped with online probes enabling high resolution monitoring of nitrate concentrations and other parameters. We found that average nitrate concentrations in stream water perfectly reflect the portion of fertilized arable land. The dynamics of N transport, however, largely depends on the hydrologic system and is driven by the dominating runoff generation processes. The interplay between different hydrological storages, which eventually also act as N pools, turns out to be decisive for the temporal variability of N concentrations in stream discharge. Inversely, the study of N transport dynamics can be used to infer the hydrologic mechanisms responsible for N mobilization

  16. Monitoring of initial patterns and structures in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Biemelt, Detlef; Fischer, Anton

    2010-05-01

    To combine process-oriented research on initial development of ecosystems with interactions and co-development of spatial patterns and structures the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR) 38 (www.tu-cottbus.de/sfb_trr) was established as an initiative of three universities (BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich). The objective of the SFB/TRR 38 is to enhance our understanding of structure genesis in ecosystems and of process dynamics as well as their interactions during the initial development phase. The aim is to integrate these feedback mechanisms in the analysis of water and element budgets at the catchment scale and to implement them into models. To allow the clear definition of starting conditions at ´point zeró and to be able to integrate spatially distributed processes and patterns to larger units, an artificial catchment was constructed in the mining area of Lusatia/Germany as the main research site (Gerwin et al. 2009a). With an area of about 6 ha, this catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is to our knowledge the largest artificial catchment worldwide. It was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. No further measures of restoration like planting, amelioration or fertilization were carried out to allow natural succession and undisturbed development. Due to the artificial construction, boundary conditions of this site are clearly defined including well documented inner structures as compared to natural catchments. It is assumed that the interaction of patterns and processes during initial development will proceed from simpler to more complex states of the systems and that different stages along this phase can be identified at the catchment level. Changes within the catchment are intensively monitored since 2005, when construction finished (Gerwin et al. 2009b), including intensive on-site measurements and micro

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Eliciting policymakers' and stakeholders' opinions to help shape health system research priorities in the Middle East and North Africa region.

    PubMed

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Makhoul, Jihad; Jamal, Diana; Ranson, Michael Kent; Kronfol, Nabil M; Tchaghchagian, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-informed decisions can strengthen health systems. Literature suggests that engaging policymakers and other stakeholders in research priority-setting exercises increases the likelihood of the utilization of research evidence by policymakers. To our knowledge, there has been no previous priority-setting exercise in health policy and systems research in countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. This paper presents the results of a recent research priority-setting exercise that identified regional policy concerns and research priorities related to health financing, human resources and the non-state sector, based on stakeholders in nine low and middle income countries (LMICs) of the MENA region. The countries included in this study were Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia and Yemen. This multi-phased study used a combination of qualitative and quantitative research techniques. The overall approach was guided by the listening priority-setting approach, adapted slightly to accommodate the context of the nine countries. The study was conducted in four key phases: preparatory work, country-specific work, data analysis and synthesis, and validation and ranking. The study identified the top five policy-relevant health systems research priorities for each of the three thematic areas for the next 3-5 years. Study findings can help inform and direct future plans to generate, disseminate and use research evidence for LMICs in the MENA region. Our study process and results could help reduce the great chasm between the policy and research worlds in the MENA region. It is hoped that funding agencies and countries will support and align financial and human resources towards addressing the research priorities that have been identified.

  19. Catchments of general practice in different countries--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Allan, Donald P

    2014-08-29

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area.This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  20. Identifying hydrological responses of micro-catchments under contrasting land use in the Brazilian Cerrado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, R. L. B.; Guzha, A. C.; Torres, G. N.; Kovacs, K.; Lamparter, G.; Amorim, R. S. S.; Couto, E.; Gerold, G.

    2015-09-01

    topographic characteristics, and low-till farming techniques in the cropland catchment, additionally to the buffering effect of the gallery forests in these catchments. Although the results of this study provide a useful assessment of catchment rainfall-runoff controls in the Brazilian Cerrado landscape, further research is required to include quantification of the influence of the gallery forests on both hydrological and hydrochemical fluxes, which are important for watershed management and ecosystem services provisioning.

  1. Observation of hydrological processes and structures in the artificial Chicken Creek catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, K.; Schoenheinz, D.; Biemelt, D.; Schaaf, W.; Grünewald, U.

    Hydrological catchments are the essential observation spaces for hydrological and ecological studies on a landscape scale. Generally, natural catchments are characterised by high complexity and heterogeneity with uncertainties in boundaries, interior structures and properties. Artificially created, spatially and structurally well-defined hydrological catchments might be a suitable tool for enabling progress in hydrological research. “Chicken Creek”, one of the largest artificial catchments, with clearly defined boundary conditions and extended monitoring facilities, was set up on a dump site associated with opencast mining activities in East Germany. This catchment, left to undisturbed succession, has enabled the observation of ecosystem development from its very beginnings. A sophisticated measurement concept covering hydrological, meteorological and soil physical parameters was designed. It aimed at the detection and description of the hydrological processes that form structures and are controlled by structures at the catchment scale. In mature natural catchments that have already achieved a stage of dynamic equilibrium with evolved runoff structures and land cover, hot spots of hydrological interest are normally known or easily identifiable prior to the establishment of any monitoring concept. For a newly created artificial catchment, there is no recorded experience regarding hydrological development and behaviour. Under the premise of looking at a defined, initially unstructured, homogenous, isotropic, “virgin” area, a primarily grid-based observation concept was chosen as the initial approach. As components of the progressive development of the ecosystem, new soil and runoff structures have been formed, and vegetation has spread on the initially uncovered surface. As a function of the changed hydrological properties and the improved system knowledge, the initial observation programme was iteratively extended and adjusted by the addition of more

  2. SWAT-CS: Revision and testing of SWAT for Canadian Shield catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; James, April L.; Yao, Huaxia

    2014-04-01

    Canadian Shield catchments are under increasing pressure from various types of development (e.g., mining and increased cottagers) and changing climate. Within the southern part of the Canadian Shield, catchments are generally characterized by shallow forested soils with high infiltration rates and low bedrock infiltration, generating little overland flow, and macropore and subsurface flow are important streamflow generation processes. Large numbers of wetlands and lakes are also key physiographic features, and snow-processes are critical to catchment modeling in this climate. We have revised the existing, publicly available SWAT (version 2009.10.1 Beta 3) to create SWAT-CS, a version representing hydrological processes dominating Canadian Shield catchments, where forest extends over Precambrian Shield bedrock. Prior to this study, very few studies applying SWAT to Canadian Shield catchments exist (we have found three). We tested SWAT-CS using the Harp Lake catchment dataset, an Ontario Ministry of Environment research station located in south-central Ontario. Simulations were evaluated against 30 years of observational data, including streamflow from six headwater sub-catchments (0.1-1.9 km2), outflow from Harp Lake (5.4 km2) and five years of weekly snow water equivalent (SWE). The best Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) results for daily streamflow calibration, daily streamflow validation, and SWE were 0.60, 0.65, and 0.87, respectively, for sub-catchment HP4 (with detailed land use and soil data). For this range of catchment scales, land cover and soil properties were found to be transferable across sub-catchments with similar physiographic features, namely streamflow from the remaining five sub-catchments could be modeled well using sub-catchment HP4 parameterization. The Harp Lake outflow was well modeled using the existing reservoir-based target release method, generating NSEs of 0.72 and 0.67 for calibration and verification periods respectively. With

  3. Recent research on the hydrodynamics of the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta and north San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burau, J.R.; Monismith, S.G.; Stacey, M.T.; Oltmann, R.N.; Lacy, J.R.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents an overview of recent findings from hydrodynamic research on circulation and mixing in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) (Figure 1) and North San Francisco Bay (North Bay) (Figure 2). For the purposes of this article, North Bay includes San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, and Suisun Bay. The findings presented are those gained from field studies carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), and Stanford University beginning about 1993. The premise behind these studies was that a basic understanding of circulation and mixing patterns in the Bay and Delta is an essential part of understanding how biota and water quality are affected by natural hydrologic variability, water appropriation, and development activities. Data collected for the field studies described in this article have significantly improved our understanding of Bay and Delta hydrodynamics. Measured flows ,in the Delta have provided valuable information on how water moves through the Delta's network of channels and how export pumping affects flows. Studies of the shallows and shallow-channel exchange processes conducted in Honker Bay have shown that the water residence time in Honker Bay is much shorter than previously reported (on the order of hours to several tidal cycles instead ofweeks). Suisun Bay studies have provided data on hydrodynamic transport and accumulation mechanisms that operate primarily in the channels. The Suisun Bay studies have caused us to revise our understanding of residual circulation in the channels of North Bay and of "entrapment" mechanisms in the low salinity zone. Finally, detailed tidal and residual (tidally averaged) time-scale studies of the mechanisms that control gravitational circulation in the estuary show that density-driven transport in the channels is governed by turbulence time-scale (seconds) interactions between the mean flow and stratification. The hydrodynamic research

  4. Assessment of the FEH-ReFH Rainfall runoff model at the Miho catchment, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Joo, J.

    2012-04-01

    There are wide ranges of hydrological models from fully distributed model to simple rational methods. However, the choice of rainfall-runoff model for specific research or operational purpose has been an open question for hydrologists. Hydrological data is crucial for hydrological modeling; however, most of small-midsized catchments in Korea still remained as ungauged state. The regionalization of simple conceptual model is practical solution for ungauged catchment problem. The rainfall-runoff model of Flood Estimation Handbook (FEH-ReFH) is tested at sub-catchment of Miho River (FloodFreq-COST Action study catchment) for further regionalization application in Korea. Catchment characteristics of study catchments were derived and its hydrological similarity were analysed. Also, its results are compared with the results of HEC-HMS model, which is widely used in Korea. The hourly event based calibration and validation were employed in the period of 2003 to 2009. Antecedent rainfall and evapotranspiration, which are required in FEH-ReFH model, are estimated using the daily hydrological data. The application of FEH-ReFH is mixed success in model performance of the range of 0.41 to 0.99 in Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE), while the results of HEC-HMS have wide ranges of 0.15 to 0.8 in NSE. This study suggests that FEH-ReFH model is promising for the regionalization of rainfall-runoff model for ungauged catchment, Korea.

  5. Opinions of fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers towards recreational fishing issues: an exploratory analysis for North America

    SciTech Connect

    Hasler, Caleb T.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Rapp, Tobias; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Bellehumeur, Karyne; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-02

    There is a need to better understand the perspectives of various recreational fishing stakeholder groups regarding key issues related to fisheries sustainability. To provide a first snapshot and to inform future human dimension studies in this area, we distributed a Web-based open-access survey to fisheries researchers, fisheries managers, and anglers in North America. Attitudes of these respondents towards issues such as overharvest, impacts of catch and release, recreational fisheries management, and research priorities for the future were assessed. We found similar opinions and perspectives by the responding recreational anglers, managers,and researchers on a number of issues, such as the perceived impact of commercial fishing contributing to fish stock declines, the perceived importance of using and promoting gear that minimizes stress and injury to individual fish when fish are to be released, and the belief that conflicts among stakeholders is growing as is the global anti-fishing movement based on animal rights thinking. Differences among responding groups included that researchers tended to be more concerned than anglers and managers with the potential of recreational angling contributing to fish stock declines. Responding anglers were also less content with their involvement in the fisheries management process than were responding managers and researchers, and these anglers also indicated a greater desire for more human dimensions research on understanding angler attitudes and behavior than was evident for responding managers and researchers. This preliminary survey revealed some variation in attitudes among recreational fisheries stakeholders. However, due to lack of random sampling, the study results cannot be extrapolated to the population level. We nevertheless conclude that improved communication and better understanding about the different perspectives among fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers and intrasectorally among different angling

  6. Research clinics’: online journal clubs between south and north for student mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Salla; Varshney, Dinansha; Meragia, Elnta; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Diwan, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Background Capacity development in health research is high on the agenda of many low- and middle-income countries. Objective The ARCADE projects, funded by the EU, have been working in Africa and Asia since 2011 in order to build postgraduate students’ health research capacity. In this short communication, we describe one initiative in these projects, that of research clinics – online journal clubs connecting southern and northern students and experts. Design We describe the implementation of these research clinics together with student and participant experiences. Results From 2012 to 2015, a total of seven journal clubs were presented by students and junior researchers on topics related to global health. Sessions were connected through web conferencing, connecting experts and students from different countries. Conclusions The research clinics succeeded in engaging young researchers across the globe and connecting them with global experts. The contacts and suggestions made were appreciated by students. This format has potential to contribute toward research capacity building in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:27725079

  7. An Investigation of Distance Education in North American Research Literature Using Co-Word Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Stewart, Michelle; Smith, Patryce; Barron, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    The field of distance education is composed of a multiplicity of topics leading to a vast array of research literature. However, the research does not provide a chronological picture of the topics it addresses, making it difficult to develop an overview of the evolution and trends in the literature. To address this issue, a co-word analysis was…

  8. The North American Collections Inventory Project: Implications for the Future of Coordinated Management of Research Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, David; Reed-Scott, Jutta

    1989-01-01

    Describes the accomplishments of a cooperative effort to develop an online inventory of research library collections. Topics covered include the development of collection mapping tools and resources; the establishment of general requirements and policies; and the implications for the future of coordinated management of research collections. (20…

  9. Qualitative Research, Semiotics, North Beach, South of Markey, Jack London, and the Grateful Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Looks at educational research from a macro perspective, advocating semiotics as the foundation for qualitative research in education. Presents myths and disputations and an open-ended conclusion via the kaleidoscopic interpretations of Jack London, Phil Dick, Jack Kerouac, the Grateful Dead, and an assortment of street characters. (Author/VWL)

  10. The Evaluation of Educational Programmes: Methods, Uses and Benefits. Part A, Volume 24. Report of the Educational Research Workshop (North Berwick, Scotland, November 22-25, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Council for Research in Education.

    An introductory report, six commissioned papers, and four selected background reports presented at the North Berwick Workshop, one of a series of educational research meetings sponsored by the Council of Europe, are provided. The Workshop brought together research workers and educational administrators from different countries to: review…

  11. Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting at the Raleigh Hydrogeologic Research Station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2009-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station, located in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from May 2005 through September 2007 are presented in this report. Three well clusters and four piezometers were installed at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station along an assumed flow path from recharge to discharge areas. Each well cluster includes four wells to monitor the regolith, transition zone, and shallow and deep bedrock. Borehole, surface, and waterborne geophysics were conducted to examine the lithology and physical properties of the bedrock and to determine the aerial extent of near vertical diabase dikes. Slug tests were conducted in the wells at each cluster to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the formation tapped by each well. Periodic water-level altitudes were measured in all wells and in four piezometers. Continuous hourly water levels were measured in wells for variable periods of time during the study, and a surface-water gage collected 15-minute stage data from April to June 2006. In October 2005 and April 2006, water-quality samples were collected from a tributary and in all wells at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station. Continuous water-quality data were collected hourly in three wells from December 2005 through January 2007 and every 15 minutes in the tributary from May to June 2006. In August 2006, streambed temperatures and drive-point ground-water samples were collected across lines of section spanning the Neuse River.

  12. Frito-Lay North America/NREL CRADA: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-176

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.

    2013-06-01

    Frito Lay North America (FLNA) requires technical assistance for the evaluation and implementation of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in production facilities and distribution centers across North America. Services provided by NREL do not compete with those available in the private sector, but rather provide FLNA with expertise to create opportunities for the private sector renewable/efficiency industries and to inform FLNA decision making regarding cost-effective projects. Services include: identifying the most cost-effective project locations based on renewable energy resource data, utility data, incentives and other parameters affecting projects; assistance with feasibility studies; procurement specifications; design reviews; and other services to support FNLA in improving resource efficiency at facilities. This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) establishes the terms and conditions under which FLNA may access capabilities unique to the laboratory and required by FLNA. Each subsequent task issued under this umbrella agreement would include a scope-of-work, budget, schedule, and provisions for intellectual property specific to that task.

  13. Research into the functional components and antioxidant activities of North China rice wine (Ji Mo Lao Jiu)

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuai; Mao, Xiangzhao; Liu, Pei; Lin, Hong; Du, Zuyuan; Lv, Ning; Han, Jichen; Qiu, Cuifang

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, considerable experimental evidence has supported the view that grape wine and South China rice wine are rich in diverse nutrients and have powerful antioxidant activity. However, little research has been carried out for North China rice wine, of which Ji Mo Lao Jiu (JMLJ) is the outstanding representative. In this study, the functional components and antioxidant activity of JMLJ were investigated. Twenty-eight free amino acids were found in JMLJ, much more than that previously reported in other Chinese rice wines (16–21). Functional oligosaccharides (5290.222 mg/L), total phenols (722.431 ± 10.970 mg/L), and mineral elements (9) were rich in JMLJ. When compared with synthetic antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), JMLJ showed effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and reducing capacity. The results of this study lay the foundation for promoting the utilization of JMLJ and the development of North China rice wine in the food industry. PMID:24804035

  14. Storage as a Metric of Catchment Comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, J.P.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bishop, K.; Soulsby, C.; Seyfried, M.; Peters, N.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Hooper, R.

    2011-01-01

    The volume of water stored within a catchment, and its partitioning among groundwater, soil moisture, snowpack, vegetation, and surface water are the variables that ultimately characterize the state of the hydrologic system. Accordingly, storage may provide useful metrics for catchment comparison. Unfortunately, measuring and predicting the amount of water present in a catchment is seldom done; tracking the dynamics of these stores is even rarer. Storage moderates fluxes and exerts critical controls on a wide range of hydrologic and biologic functions of a catchment. While understanding runoff generation and other processes by which catchments release water will always be central to hydrologic science, it is equally essential to understand how catchments retain water. We have initiated a catchment comparison exercise to begin assessing the value of viewing catchments from the storage perspective. The exercise is based on existing data from five watersheds, no common experimental design, and no integrated modelling efforts. Rather, storage was estimated independently for each site. This briefing presents some initial results of the exercise, poses questions about the definitions and importance of storage and the storage perspective, and suggests future directions for ongoing activities. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Enhancement of health research capacity in Nigeria through north-south and in-country partnerships.

    PubMed

    Olaleye, David O; Odaibo, Georgina N; Carney, Paula; Agbaji, Oche; Sagay, Atiene S; Muktar, Haruna; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Omigbodun, Akinyinka O; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Gashau, Wadzani; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Ogunsola, Folasade; Chukwuka, Chinwe; Okonkwo, Prosper I; Meloni, Seema T; Adewole, Isaac; Kanki, Phyllis J; Murphy, Robert L

    2014-08-01

    Research productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa has the potential to affect teaching, student quality, faculty career development, and translational country-relevant research as it has in developed countries. Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, with an academic infrastructure that includes 129 universities and 45 medical schools; however, despite the size, the country has unacceptably poor health status indicators. To further develop the research infrastructure in Nigeria, faculty and research career development topics were identified within the six Nigerian universities of the nine institutions of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Nigeria (MEPIN) consortium. The consortium identified a training model that incorporated multi-institutional "train-the-trainers" programs at the University of Ibadan, followed by replication at the other MEPIN universities. More than 140 in-country trainers subsequently presented nine courses to more than 1,600 faculty, graduate students, and resident doctors throughout the consortium during the program's first three years (2011-2013). This model has fostered a new era of collaboration among the major Nigerian research universities, which now have increased capacity for collaborative research initiatives and improved research output. These changes, in turn, have the potential to improve the nation's health outcomes.

  16. Hydrological observation of the artificial catchment `Chicken Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, K.; Biemelt, D.; Schoenheinz, D.; Grünewald, U.

    2009-04-01

    In Lusatia, eastern Germany, an artificial catchment called 'Chicken Creek' was developed. The catchment with an area of 6 ha was designed as hillside on the top of a refilled open mining pit. The bottom boundary was created by a 1 to 2 m thick clay layer acting as aquiclude. The catchment body consists of a 2 to 4 m mighty layer of sandy to loamy sediments acting as aquifer. The catchment 'Chicken Creek' is the central investigation site of the German-Swiss Collaborative Research Centre SFB/TRR 38. The aim of the research is to characterise various ecosystem development phases with respect to the occurring relevant structures and processes. Therefore, structures and processes as well as interactions being dominant within the initial ecosystem development phase are investigated and will be compared to those occurring in the later stages of ecosystem development. In this context, one important part of the investigations is the detailed observation of hydrological processes and the determination of the water balance components. To achieve these objectives, a comprehensive monitoring programme was planned considering the following questions: Which parameters/data are required? Which parameters/data can be measured? Which spatial and temporal resolution of observations is required? The catchment was accordingly equipped with weirs, flumes, observation wells, probes and meteorological observation stations. First results were obtained and will be presented. The gathered data provide parameters and boundary conditions for the ensuing hydro(geo)logical modeling. Conclusions e.g. from groundwater flow simulations shall allow to improve theses about the dynamic in the saturated zone and support the quantification of the groundwater discharge as component of the water balance. First research results show that precipitation related surface runoff proves to be much more dominant in the hydrological system than initially expected. Therefore, the monitoring concept had to be

  17. Water-quality trends for streams and reservoirs in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, 1983-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.; Bathala, Neeti

    1997-01-01

    Water-quality and streamflow monitoring data, collected from 1983 to 1995, were analyzed for 34 stream and reservoir sites in a seven- county region within the upper Neuse and upper Cape Fear River Basins. Early data (1983-88) were compiled from U.S. Geological Survey water- quality studies and from the ambient water-quality monitoring network of the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources. Analyses of major ions, nutrients, metals, trace elements, and synthetic organic compounds were compiled from samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1988 to 1995 as part of a continuing project to monitor the water quality of surface-water supplies in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, and from the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources ambient water-quality monitoring network. This report presents the results of analysis of consistently increasing or decreasing trends in concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus species, suspended sediment, suspended solids, sodium, chloride, iron, manganese, zinc, and chlorophyll a from seasonal Kendall trend analysis on flow-adjusted concentrations for streams and concentrations in lakes. Total phosphorus concentrations also were tested for a step decrease in concentration (step trend) associated with the North Carolina phosphate-detergent ban of 1988. For some other constituents, insufficient data or values below laboratory detection limits precluded trend analysis. A regionwide decrease in total phosphorus, ranging from 25 to 81 percent was observed that coincided with increased phosphorus removal efforts at municipal wastewater-treatment facilities in the region and the statewide phosphate-detergent ban. Most sites had stable or decreasing trends in nitrogen concentrations; however, increasing trends occurred in the Neuse River near Clayton and at Smithfield, both of which are downstream from the developing Raleigh-Durham area. Chlorophyll a

  18. Well-controlled experimentation in artificial catchments as the key to better understand natural hydrologic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holländer, H.; Schoenheinz, D.; Stadler, S.

    2012-04-01

    Catchments are open dynamic systems that process mass and momentum, and drive energy and entropy towards an equilibrium state of development. The formulation of equations to explain these systems results in a number of redundant variables for which constitutive relationships are required at the scale of integration. This so called "closure problem" exists due to the generally unknown relationship between hydrologic state variables and fluxes. Traditionally, we deal with two complementary approaches in hydrological research: i) experimental catchment studies and ii) physically-based hydrological modelling. The unique character of each catchment and of its eco-hydrological processes often does not allow conclusions by analogy, which would require similarity and homogeneity of catchment features. Generalised theories to cope with both the closure problem and the singularity of catchments in hydrological research have not been derived so far, and the modelling of flow processes in catchments is still impeded e. g. by scale incompatibilities of involved parameters. One of the main questions addressed in our contribution is: How much improvement in hydrological research is possible by well-controlled experimentation fields as artificially created catchments? The definition of parameters and boundary conditions in such well-controlled experiments allows for an improvement in observation strategies and therefore a systematic learning from observed data and an enhanced understanding of the interrelation of given structures and process triggers. Also, the conditions for targeted testing of hydrological hypotheses are considered to be the best possible. In our contribution we identify examples for the determination of such processes and their description e.g. for water transport in the soil matrix, structure and dynamics of sedimentation as well as erosion in the artificial catchment Chicken Creek, Lusatia, Germany. We also show that there are still challenging aspects even

  19. Regional lead isotope study of a polluted river catchment: River Wear, Northern England, UK.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Thomas J; Chenery, Simon R N; Pashley, Vanessa; Lord, Richard A; Ander, Louise E; Breward, Neil; Hobbs, Susan F; Horstwood, Matthew; Klinck, Benjamin A; Worrall, Fred

    2009-08-15

    High precision, lead isotope analyses of archived stream sediments from the River Wear catchment, northeast England (1986-88), provide evidence for three main sources of anthropogenic lead pollution; lead mining, industrial lead emissions and leaded petrol. In the upper catchment, pollution is totally controlled and dominated by large lead discharges from historic mining centres in the North Pennine Orefield ((208)Pb/(206)Pb, (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios range from 2.0744-2.0954 and 0.8413-0.8554 respectively). In the lower catchment, co-extensive with the Durham Coalfield and areas of high population density, pollution levels are lower and regionally more uniform. Isotope ratios are systematically higher than in the upper catchment ((208)Pb/(206)Pb, (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios range from 2.0856-2.1397 and 0.8554-0.8896 respectively) and far exceed values determined for the geogenic regional background. Here, the pollution is characterised by the atmospheric deposition of industrial lead and petrol lead. Lead derived from the combustion of coal, although present, is masked by the other two sources. Recent sediments from the main channel of the River Wear are isotopically indistinguishable from older, low order stream sediments of the North Pennine Orefield, indicating that contamination of the river by lead mining waste (up to several 1000 mg/kg Pb at some locations) continues to pose an environmental problem; a pattern that can be traced all the way to the tidal reach. Using within-catchment isotope variation and sediment lead concentrations, estimates can be made of the discharges from discrete mines or groups of mines to the overall level of lead pollution in the River Wear. As well as providing information pertinent to source apportionment and on-going catchment remediation measures, the database is a valuable resource for epidemiologists concerned with the health risks posed by environmental lead.

  20. Fieldwork challenges: lessons learned from a north-south public health research partnership.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa A J; Flicker, Sarah; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2011-09-01

    The value of collaborative international research in addressing global public health challenges is increasingly recognized. However, little has been written about lessons learned regarding fieldwork to help guide future collaborative efforts. Through a research partnership between two Northern universities, one Southern university, and a Southern faith-based organization, we evaluated a school-based HIV prevention intervention with South African adolescents. In this article, we highlight the seven key fieldwork-related challenges experienced and identify the lessons learned. The underlying theme is that of reconciling a structured and reasoned "desk" planning process with the more fluid and unpredictable reality of conducting fieldwork. This concern is particularly significant in resource-deprived environments and/or contexts that are less familiar to Northern partners. Fieldwork is unpredictable, but obstacles can be minimized through meaningful participation in both planning and field research. Sharing practical lessons from the field can prove a useful resource for both researchers and practitioners. PMID:21422255

  1. Institutional Research and Planning in the Next Decade. Proceedings from the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (10th, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 16-18, 1983). Tenth Anniversary Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1983 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research are presented. The contribution of institutional research to university decision making and the topics of student outcomes assessment, retention/attrition studies, marketing/market research, departmental studies, computer and technological applications, and…

  2. The missing flux in a 35S budget for the soils of a small polluted catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novak, M.; Michel, R.L.; Prechova, E.; Stepanova, M.

    2004-01-01

    A combination of cosmogenic and artificial 35S was used to assess the movement of sulfur in a steep Central European catchment affected by spruce die-back. The Jezer??i?? catchment, Krus??ne?? Hory Mts. (Czech Republic) is characterized by a large disproportion between atmospheric S input and S output via stream discharge, with S output currently exceeding S input three times. A relatively high natural concentration of cosmogenic 35S (42 mBq L-1) was found in atmospheric deposition into the catchment in winter and spring of 2000. In contrast, stream discharge contained only 2 mBq L-1. Consequently, more than 95% of the deposited S is cycled or retained within the catchment for more than several months, while older S is exported via surface water. In spring, when the soil temperature is above 0 ??C, practically no S from instantaneous rainfall is exported, despite the steepness of the slopes and the relatively short mean residence time of water in the catchment (6.5 months). Sulfur cycling in the soil includes not just adsorption of inorganic sulfate and biological uptake, but also volatilization of S compounds back into the atmosphere. Laboratory incubations of an Orthic Podzol from Jezer??i?? spiked with h 720 kBq of artificial 35S showed a 20% loss of the spike within 18 weeks under summer conditions. Under winter conditions, the 35S loss was insignificant (< 5%). This missing S flux was interpreted as volatilized hydrogen sulfide resulting from intermittent dissimilatory bacterial sulfate reduction. The missing S flux is comparable to the estimated uncertainty in many catchment S mass balances (??10%), or even larger, and should be considered in constructing these mass balances. In severely polluted forest catchments, such as Jezer??i??, sulfur loss to volatilization may exceed 13 kg ha-1 a-1, which is more than the current total atmospheric S input in large parts of North America and Europe. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  3. Risk assessment and prioritisation of contaminated sites on the catchment scale.

    PubMed

    Troldborg, Mads; Lemming, Gitte; Binning, Philip J; Tuxen, Nina; Bjerg, Poul L

    2008-10-23

    Contaminated sites pose a significant threat to groundwater resources worldwide. Due to limited available resources a risk-based prioritisation of the remediation efforts is essential. Existing risk assessment tools are unsuitable for this purpose, because they consider each contaminated site separately and on a local scale, which makes it difficult to compare the impact from different sites. Hence a modelling tool for risk assessment of contaminated sites on the catchment scale has been developed. The CatchRisk screening tool evaluates the risk associated with each site in terms of its ability to contaminate abstracted groundwater in the catchment. The tool considers both the local scale and the catchment scale. At the local scale, a flexible, site specific leaching model that can be adjusted to the actual data availability is used to estimate the mass flux over time from identified sites. At the catchment scale, a transport model that utilises the source flux and a groundwater model covering the catchment is used to estimate the transient impact on the supply well. The CatchRisk model was tested on a groundwater catchment for a waterworks north of Copenhagen, Denmark. Even though data scarcity limited the application of the model, the sites that most likely caused the observed contamination at the waterworks were identified. The method was found to be valuable as a basis for prioritising point sources according to their impact on groundwater quality. The tool can also be used as a framework for testing hypotheses on the origin of contamination in the catchment and for identification of unknown contaminant sources.

  4. Modeling of matters removal from swampy catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inishev, N. G.; Inisheva, L. I.

    2010-05-01

    the estimations were made taking into account layering unevenness of snow cover in deferent landscapes. Stored water distribution in the limits of every landscape was approximated by the curve of gamma distribution with parameters which are the results of snow survey. Everyday basin water yield was determined as difference between excesses of water coming above usage for filling of its water retaining tank. The size of the water retaining tank before start of snow melting depends on the basin wetting in the previous autumn. Autumn river flow is taken as a degree of water retaining tank filling before the snow melt. It is supposed that there is a process of water accumulation at slopes. Between theses water supplies and overland runoffs there is a nonlinear link. Temporary melt water detention, which comes from mire in swamp forest, is considered. Estimations are made individually for field, forest and swamp parts of the basin of the river Kljuch. Estimation of HA removal from the surface of catchment of the river Kljuch is taken as an example of model application. The results reveal possibilities of the given approach to modeling of dissolved matters removal from the swampy area. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by RFFR (No.No. 09-05-00235, 09-05-99007), Minister of education and science (No. 02.740.11.0325).

  5. Estimating Catchment-Scale Snowpack Variability in Complex Forested Terrain, Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Brooks, P. D.; Biederman, J. A.; Swetnam, T.

    2011-12-01

    Difficulty estimating snowpack variability across complex forested terrain currently hinders the prediction of water resources in the semi-arid Southwestern U.S. Catchment-scale estimates of snowpack variability are necessary for addressing ecological, hydrological, and water resources issues, but are often interpolated from a small number of point-scale observations. In this study, we used LiDAR-derived distributed datasets to investigate how elevation, aspect, topography, and vegetation interact to control catchment-scale snowpack variability. The study area is the Redondo massif in the Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, a resurgent dome that varies from 2500 to 3430 m and drains from all aspects. Mean LiDAR-derived snow depths from four catchments (2.2 to 3.4 km^2) draining different aspects of the Redondo massif varied by 30%, despite similar mean elevations and mixed conifer forest cover. To better quantify this variability in snow depths we performed a multiple linear regression (MLR) at a 7.3 by 7.3 km study area (5 x 106 snow depth measurements) comprising the four catchments. The MLR showed that elevation explained 45% of the variability in snow depths across the study area, aspect explained 18% (dominated by N-S aspect), and vegetation 2% (canopy density and height). This linear relationship was not transferable to the catchment-scale however, where additional MLR analyses showed the influence of aspect and elevation differed between the catchments. The strong influence of North-South aspect in most catchments indicated that the solar radiation is an important control on snow depth variability. To explore the role of solar radiation, a model was used to generate winter solar forcing index (SFI) values based on the local and remote topography. The SFI was able to explain a large amount of snow depth variability in areas with similar elevation and aspect. Finally, the SFI was modified to include the effects of shading from vegetation (in and out of

  6. Current research on the late Pliocene and Pleistocene deposits north of Homa Mountain, southwestern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ditchfield, P; Hicks, J; Plummer, T; Bishop, L C; Potts, R

    1999-02-01

    The late Pliocene and Pleistocene sediments of the Homa Peninsula in southwestern Kenya are richly fossiliferous, preserve Early Stone Age archaeological traces and provide one of the few paleoanthropological data sets for the region between the branches of the East African Rift Valley. This paper presents preliminary results of our ongoing investigation of late Pliocene and Pleistocene deposits at the localities of Rawi, Kanam East, Kanam Central and Kanjera. While fossils have been collected from the peninsula since 1911, little systematic effort has been made to place them into a broader litho-and chronostratigraphic framework. This project has conclusively demonstrated that fossils occur in good stratigraphic context at all of the study localities and that claims of sediment slumping (Boswell, 1935) have been greatly overstated (Behrensmeyer et al., 1995; Plummer & Potts, 1989). A provisional chronostratigraphic framework based on magneto- and biostratigraphy is presented here. We have revised the Plio-Pleistocene stratigraphy of the Rawi and Kanam gullies to include three formations: the Rawi, Abundu and Kasibos Formations. Based on magneto- and biostratigraphy, these formations are dated between approximately three and one m.y.a. (Gauss Chron-Jaramillo Subchron) (Cande & Kent, 1995). The Apoko Formation unconformably overlies the others and may be middle to late Pleistocene in age. All formations contain rich patches of fossils, and Acheulean artifacts have been surface collected from the Abundu and Kasibos Formations. Deposition of the fossil- and artefact-bearing sediments at Kanjera North began in the early Pleistocene and continued into the middle Pleistocene. Deposition at Kanjera South began over one million years earlier than previously thought, at approximately 2.2 m.y.a., and continued into the Olduvai Subchron (1.770-1.950 m.y.a.; Cande & Kent, 1995). Excavations have recovered Oldowan artefacts in association with well-preserved fossil fauna near

  7. A small Internet controllable observatory for research and education at the University of North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardersen, P. S.; de Silva, S.; Reddy, V.; Cui, P.; Kumar, S.; Gaffey, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    One of the challenges in astronomy education today is to introduce college students to the real-world practice and science of observational astronomy. Along with a good theoretical background, college students can gain an earlier, deeper understanding of the astronomy profession through direct observational and data reduction experience. However, building and managing a modest observatory is still too costly for many colleges and universities. Fortunately, advances in commercial astronomical hardware and software now allow universities to build and operate small Internet controllable observatories for a modest investment. The advantages of an Internet observatory include: 1) remote operation from a comfortable location, 2) immediate data access, 3) telescope control via a web browser, and 4) allowing both on-campus and distance education students the ability to conduct a variety of observing projects. Internet capabilities vastly expand the number of students who will be able to use the observatory, thus exposing them to astronomy as a science and as a potential career. In September 2005, the University of North Dakota (UND) Department of Space Studies began operating a small, recently renovated Internet controllable observatory. Housed within a roll-off roof 10 miles west of UND, the observatory includes a Meade 16-inch, f/10 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, an SBIG STL-6303e CCD with broadband filters, ACP observatory control software, focuser, and associated equipment. The observatory cost \\25,000 to build in 1996; 2005 renovation costs total \\28,000. An observatory operator prepares the telescope for use each night. Through remote operation, the roof is opened and the telescope/CCD power is turned on. The telescope is then aligned and focused before allowing students to access the observatory. Students communicate with the observatory operator via an online chat room and via telephone, if necessary, to answer questions and resolve any problems. Additional

  8. Atmospheric Electric Field measurements at Eastern North Atlantic ARM Climate Research Facility: Global Electric Circuit Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Francisco; Silva, Hugo; Nitschke, Kim; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility of the ARM programme (established an supported by the U.S. Department of Energy with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores), is located at Graciosa Island of the Azores Archipelago (39° N; 28° W). It constitutes a strategic observatory for Atmospheric Electricity since it is located in the Atlantic Ocean basin exposed to clean marine aerosol conditions which reduces the well known spectral signature of atmospheric pollution and enables the study of the so called Global Electrical Circuit (GEC). First evidences of the existence of a GEC affecting the Earth's Electric Environment has retrieved by the Carnegie cruise expedition, in what became known as the Carnegie Curve. Those measurements were made in the Ocean in several campaigns and the present studies aims at reconsidering measurements in similar conditions but in a long-term basis, at least 5 years. This will contribute to the understanding of the long-term evolution of the Ionospheric Potential (IP). In literature there is theoretical evidence that it is decreasing IP in strength, but that conjecture is still lacking valid experimental evidence. Moreover, to clearly identify the GEC signal two effects must be taken into account: the effect of surface radon gas variation, because the Azores Archipelago is a seismic active region the possible influence of Earthquakes cannot be discarded easily; the effect of short-term solar activity on the Atmospheric Electricity modulation, solar flares emitting solar particles (e.g., solar energetic protons) need to be considered in this study.

  9. Process scales in catchment science: a new synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, K.; Dennedy-frank, P.; Harman, C. J.; Purucker, T.; Jackson, C. R.; Sidle, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Concerns surrounding data resolution, choice of spatial and temporal scales in research design, and problems with extrapolation of processes across spatial and temporal scales differ greatly between scientific process-elucidation research and scenario exploration for watershed management and policy. This is true whether the underlying watershed models are statistical or process-based. Watershed scientists understand that we lack the knowledge and tools to extrapolate this detailed understanding from the smallest scales of observations to larger, more heterogeneous watershed systems over larger timescales, while it is at these larger scales where our most pressing questions of water availability lie, creating a conundrum that has stymied watershed science for several decades. As a scientific community, catchment scientists clearly understand the potential problems associated with up- and down-scaling in hydrology and related processes, but we suggest that the community lacks a cohesive perspective on how to deal with these issues. Having been nearly two decades since the last major review of this topic, we offer a new synthesis on the topic of scaling in catchment science with the results of four main objectives: 1) to identify a community definition of management and policy scales and their relationship to catchment process scales, 2) to synthesize legacy perspectives on scaling in hydrology, 3) to identify known scale-dependent and scale-invariant catchment processes , and 4) to suggest methods and conceptualizations for removal of scaling barriers in future research. Suggested approaches will incorporate trans-disciplinary perspectives on scaling, and will cover: thresholds for scale-dependence, the role of the representative elementary watershed in conceptualizing scaling, existing and potential use of scaling algorithms, strengths and weaknesses of cross-scale process-based modeling, and statistical approaches for maximizing observed information and

  10. Signature Concepts of Key Researchers in North American Higher Education Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandlbinder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Universities in the English-speaking world share a common ancestry that extends back to medieval times. From these beginnings universities quickly developed distinctive qualities as they became integrated within different social and cultural systems of their home societies. A number of comparisons of higher education research have shown major…

  11. Modelling the impact of changing climate and forest cultivation on the water balance of a closed lake in North-east Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natkhin, M.; Steidl, J.; Dietrich, O.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 25 years declining water levels are observed in several lakes of forested catchments in North-east-Brandenburg (Germany). This region is located in the transition zone between maritime and continental climate. The annual lake evapotranspiration often exceeds the precipitation which annual average is below 600 mm year-1. So the groundwater recharge mainly controls the water supply of lakes. Changes of climate and forest cultivation can have highly influence on groundwater recharge. To identify and quantify the share of changes in climate and forest management in the decline of the lake water levels, the participating processes are separated and evaluated using water balance modelling in a small lowland catchment. The results and methods were used to predict the development of lake water levels in future. The lake Redernswalder See (0.5 km²) was chosen as subject of research. It has a forest dominated catchment (3.5 km²) and no outlet. Water gauge measurements over the last 25 years show a decline in lake water level by more than 3 m. Changes of climate and forest cultivation are actually observed and will alter the groundwater recharge in the catchment. Currently, the forest in the Redernswalder See catchment just as throughout North-East Brandenburg is dominated by pine monoculture. Depending on the climate conditions, groundwater recharge may be significantly lower under pine than under broad-leaved trees like beech or oak. Forestry plans to expand the share of beeches and oaks among mixed deciduous forest in future. The physically based distributed water balance model WaSiM-ETH is used to model groundwater recharge in the catchment and the lake water balance. The horizontal groundwater flow is handled by the built-in 2D groundwater model. This plays an important role as a connector between the lake and its catchment. To verify the hydrogeological conditions, a separate 3D groundwater model of this Late Pleistocene lowland catchment was built up

  12. North-South Partnership in Space Research and Application: Space Research Center at Minufiyia University, Egypt, as Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, M.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Minufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1.Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2.Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3.Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4.Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2003 and 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the worl d, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5.Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  13. The observed evapotranspiration combining the energy and water balance for different land use under semiarid Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna Chebbi, Rim; Mekki, Insaf; Jacob, Frédéric; Masmoudi, Moncef; Prévot, Laurent; Ben Mechlia, Netij; Voltz, Marc; Albergel, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean semiarid cultivated catchments are affected by global and climate change and are characterized by very complex hydrological systems. The improvement of their management requires a best understanding of the hydrological processes and developing reliable means for characterizing the temporal dynamics of soil water balance in a spatially distributed manner. The main objective of this study is: i) to analyze the observed evapotranspiration in relation to natural drivers (i.e. rainfall and soil properties) and anthropogenic forcing (i.e. land use and crop successions), and ) ii to assess the differences in both energy and water balances. We focus on a hilly semiarid Mediterranean catchment devoted to rainfed agriculture, so-called the Kamech catchment, which is located in the Cap Bon Peninsula, north-eastern Tunisia. The site belongs to the OMERE observatory for environmental research and it is monitored for the different hydrological cycle components under influence of anthropogenic forcing. The analysis is based on in-situ data measured under the common cereals/legumes/pasture cropping systems within the Kamech catchment. Energy and water balance components and vegetation parameters were collected in different fields and during various crop growth cycles. The results showed the highly variable response of energy and water balances depending on soil types, land use, and climatic conditions. The annual rainfall is mainly converted into evapotranspiration during the growing cycle for different land uses. The runoff amounts, for most of the sites, correspond to less than 10% of the rainfall amount. The evapotransipration ratios differed significantly across site and season in relation to soil properties and cumulated rainfall. We observe large differences in soil water dynamics among the legumes (fababean and chickpea) and cereals (wheat, oat, and triticale). Soil water is larger for legume crops, despite substantial plant growth during winter

  14. Doing hydrology backwards in tropical humid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real Rangel, R.; Brena-Naranjo, J. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches in hydrology offer the possibility to predict water fluxes at the catchment scale based on the interpretation of the observed hydrological response at the catchment itself. Doing hydrology backwards (inferring precipitation and evapotranspiration rates at the catchment scale from streamflow measurements, see Kirchner (2009)) can be a useful methodology for estimating water fluxes at the catchment and regional scales. Previous studies using this inverse modeling approach have been performed in regions (UK, Switzerland, France, Eastern US) where energy-limited (in winter and early spring) and water-limited conditions (in summer) prevail during a large period of the year. However, such approach has not been tested in regions characterized by a quasi-constant supply of water and energy (e.g. humid tropics). The objective of this work is to infer annual rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the last decade in 10 catchments located in Mexico's tropical humid regions. Hourly discharge measurements during recession periods were analyzed and parameters for the nonlinear storage-discharge relationship of each catchment were derived. Results showed large variability in both catchment-scale precipitation and evapotranspiration rates among the selected study sites. Finally, a comparison was done between such estimates and those obtained from remotely-sensed data (TRMM for precipitation and MOD16 for evapotranspiration).

  15. Catchment water storage: Models vs Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary

    2016-04-01

    Recent years have seen a great deal of progress in development of hydrological models that can simulate both the dynamic streamflow response and the hydrochemical flux response of a catchment. In general terms, streamflow response is driven by water deficit in the catchment, whereas hydrochemical response is driven by water storage. Therefore, models that can simultaneously predict both responses must succeed in representing these two related, but different, quantities. This presentation will consider how much information we can gain from field studies to quantify the joint deficit/storage state of a catchment. In particular, examples from two New Zealand experimental catchments in lowland and high country locations will be used to link typical measurements available with the information required by hydrological - hydrochemical models. I will then use the example catchments to assess how well the structure of a typical hydrological-hydrochemical model is supported by field measurements. In particular, can we quantify catchment storage and link this to flow response? Can we incorporate our knowledge of plant water use into such a model, including timing and depth of water withdrawn by the plant? What can field measurements tell us about spatial variability in hydrological-hydrochemical response and can this be represented in the model? I will conclude by discussing what we can learn from field data about the major challenges ahead in catchment storage modelling.

  16. Analysis of land use changes over the last 200 years in the catchment of Lake Czechowskie (Pomerania, northern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Kaczmarek, Halina

    2014-05-01

    Changes in land cover in the catchment area are, beside climate change, some of the major factors affecting sedimentation processes in lakes. With increasing human impact, changes in land cover no longer depend primarily on climate. In relation to research on sediments of Lake Czechowskie in Pomeranian Province in North Poland, land use changes over the last 200 years were analysed, with particular reference to deforestation or afforestation. The study area was the lake catchment, which covers nearly 20 km2. The analysis was based on archival and contemporary cartographic and photogrammetric materials, georeferenced and rectified using ArcGIS software. The following materials were used: Schrötter-Engelhart, Karte von Ost-Preussen nebst Preussisch Litthauen und West-Preussen nebst dem Netzdistrict, 1:50 000, section 92, 93, 1796-1802; Map Messtishchblatt, 1:25000, sheet Czarnen, (mapping conducted in 1874), 1932; Map WIG (Military Geographical Institute - Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny), 1:25000, sheet Osowo, (mapping conducted in 1929-31), 1933; aerial photos 1:13000, 1964, 1969; 1:25000, 1987; 1:26000, 1997; aerial ortophotomap , 1:5000, 2010. Today, over 60% of the catchment of Lake Czechowskie is covered with forests, dominated by planted Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), while the remaining areas are used for agricultural purposes or are built up. The first cartographic materials indicate that in the late 18th c., forest covered almost 50% of the catchment surface. By the year 1870, there was a significant reduction in the forested area, as its contribution fell to 40%. Deforestation took place mainly between the main villages. In the 1920s the forest cover increased to 44%. Today, almost the entire lake is surrounded by forest and a wetland belt (at least 0.5 km wide). Deforestation in the catchment should not be attributed solely to logging because the area of Tuchola Forests (Bory Tucholskie) was repeatedly affected by natural disasters. In the 19th c. these

  17. 2011 Photosynthesis Gordon Research Conference & Seminar (June 11-17, 2011, Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina)

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Krishna Niyogi

    2011-06-17

    Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy into chemical energy. Elucidation of the mechanisms of photosynthetic energy conversion at a molecular level is fundamentally important for understanding the biology of photosynthetic organisms, for optimizing biological solar fuels production, and for developing biologically inspired approaches to solar energy conversion. The 2011 Gordon Conference on Photosynthesis will present cutting-edge research focusing on the biochemical aspects of photosynthesis, including: (1) structure, assembly, and function of photosynthetic complexes; (2) the mechanism of water splitting by PSII; (3) light harvesting and quenching; (4) alternative electron transport pathways; (5) biosynthesis of pigments and cofactors; and (6) improvement of photosynthesis for bioenergy and food production. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of photosynthesis research, a diverse group of invited speakers will represent a variety of scientific approaches to investigate photosynthesis, such as biochemistry, molecular genetics, structural biology, systems biology, and spectroscopy. Highly interactive poster sessions provide opportunities for graduate students and postdocs to present their work and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. One of the highlights of the Conference is a session featuring short talks by junior investigators selected from the poster presentations. The collegial atmosphere of the Photosynthesis GRC, with programmed discussion sessions as well as informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, enables participants to brainstorm, exchange ideas, and forge new collaborations. For the second time, this Conference will be immediately preceded by a Gordon Research Seminar on Photosynthesis (June 11-12, 2011, at the same location), with a focus on 'Photosynthesis, Bioenergy, and the Environment.' The GRS provides an additional opportunity for graduate students and postdocs to present their research, and it

  18. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  19. Catchment characterisation through Streamflow Component mixing Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusjan, Simon

    2013-04-01

    A simple dynamical system approach was implemented in order to analyse, explain and simulate streamflow fluxes in diverse seasonal hydrological conditions. The study was implemented within 42 km2 forested Padež stream catchment in SW part of Slovenia, which is characterized by flushing, almost torrential hydrological response conditioned by flysch geological settings of low hydraulic conductivity. The hydrological characteristics of the studied catchment at first sight do not comply with the hydrological catchment storage framework in which original concept of the catchment as a simple dynamical system was developed. In the studied catchment, the streamflow formation is not controlled solely by subsurface catchment storage but is strongly influenced also by rainfall runoff that bypasses the subsurface catchment storage mechanism. Therefore, two components of the streamflow were identified, described by separate sensitivity functions and combined through simple two component mixing model which enabled us simulation of the streamflow in highly contrasting seasonal hydrological settings. According to the simulation results, the Padež stream catchment behaves primarily like a storage-dependent system under conditions of low antecedent catchment wetness and low to moderate rainfall intensities (up to 5 mm/h) when subsurface storage sensitivity function generally managed to simulate streamflows with exception of hydrograph peak formation. When rainfall intensities increase (exceed approximately 5 mm/h), secondary streamflow formation mechanism described by subsurface storage bypassing sensitivity function becomes initiated and causes fast hydrograph formation with steeply rising and falling limbs. In order to be able to implement the modelling concept for streamflow predictions, the rainfall losses in growth period, most probably associated with interception losses not covered under the potential evapotranspiration calculation, would have to be more thoroughly analysed

  20. Ecology and biology of paddlefish in North America: historical perspectives, management approaches, and research priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Cecil A.; Zigler, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Polyodontidae) are large, mostly-riverine fish that once were abundant in medium- to large-sized river systems throughout much of the central United States. Concern for paddlefish populations has grown from a regional fisheries issue to one of national importance for the United States. In 1989, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) was petitioned to list paddlefish as a federally threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The petition was not granted, primarily because of a lack of empirical data on paddlefish population size, age structure, growth, or harvest rates across the present 22-state range. Nonetheless, concern for paddlefish populations prompted the USFWS to recommend that paddlefish be protected through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The addition of paddlefish to Appendix II of CITES, which was approved in March 1992, provides a mechanism to curtail illegal trade in paddlefish and their parts and supports a variety of conservation plans. Paddlefish populations have been negatively affected by overharvest, river modifications, and pollution, but the paddlefish still occupies much of its historic range and most extant populations seem to be stable. Although many facets of paddlefish biology and ecology are well understood, the lack of information on larval and juvenile ecology, mechanisms that determine recruitment, population size and vital rates, interjurisdictional movements, and the effects of anthropogenic activities present significant obstacles for managing paddlefish populations. Questions about the size and structure of local populations, and how such populations are affected by navigation traffic, dams, and pollution are regarded as medium priority areas for future research. The availability of suitable spawning habitat and overall reproductive success in impounded rivers are unknown and represent critical areas for future research

  1. Crop residue management to reduce erosion and improve soil quality: North central. Conservation research report

    SciTech Connect

    Moldenhauer, W.C.; Mielke, L.N.

    1995-11-01

    Leaving crop residue on the soil surface has a number of clear advantages over tillage that leaves the soil surface bare. Most notable is the greatly reduced erosion from wind and water. Mandated conservation compliance by 1995 is an additional incentive for farmers to adopt crop residue management. This is one of six regional publications that assemble research results and experience for use by farmers and their advisers as they consider the factors involved in changing from tillage to a system of crop residue management.

  2. Towards integrated catchment management, Whaingaroa, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    van Roon, M; Knight, S

    2001-01-01

    The paper examines progress towards integrated catchment management and sustainable agriculture at Whaingaroa (Raglan), New Zealand. Application of the Canadian "Atlantic Coastal Action Program" model (ACAP) has been only partially successful within New Zealand's bicultural setting. Even before the introduction of the ACAP process there existed strong motivation and leadership by various sectors of the community. A merging of resource management planning and implementation processes of the larger community and that of the Maori community has not occurred. Research carried out by Crown Research Institutes has clearly shown the actions required to make pastoral farming more sustainable. There are difficulties in the transference to, and uptake of, these techniques by farmers. An examination of the socio-economic context is required. There has been a requirement on local government bodies to tighten their focus as part of recent reform. This has occurred concurrently with a widening of vision towards integrated and sustainable forms of management. This (as well as a clear belief in empowerment of local communities) has lead to Council reliance on voluntary labour. There is a need to account for the dynamic interaction between social and political history and the geological and biophysical history of the area. As part of a re-examination of sustainable development, New Zealand needs to reconcile the earning of the bulk of its foreign income from primary production, with the accelerating ecological deficit that it creates. A sustainability strategy is required linking consumer demand, property rights and responsibilities.

  3. A biogeochemical comparison of two well-buffered catchments with contrasting histories of acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kram, P.; Hruska, J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the biogeochemical cycling research in catchments in the past 25 years has been driven by acid deposition research funding. This research has focused on vulnerable base-poor systems; catchments on alkaline lithologies have received little attention. In regions of high acid loadings, however, even well-buffered catchments are susceptible to forest decline and episodes of low alkalinity in streamwater. As part of a collaboration between the Czech and U.S. Geological Surveys, we compared biogeochemical patterns in two well-studied, well-buffered catchments: Pluhuv Bor in the western Czech Republic, which has received high loading of atmospheric acidity, and Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, U.S.A., where acid loading has been considerably less. Despite differences in lithology, wetness, forest type, and glacial history, the catchments displayed similar patterns of solute concentrations and flow. At both catchments, base cation and alkalinity diluted with increasing flow, whereas nitrate and dissolved organic carbon increased with increasing flow. Sulfate diluted with increasing flow at Sleepers River, while at Pluhuv Bor the sulfate-flow relation shifted from positive to negative as atmospheric sulfur (S) loadings decreased and soil S pools were depleted during the 1990s. At high flow, alkalinity decreased to near 100 ??eq L-1 at Pluhuv Bor compared to 400 ??eq L-1 at Sleepers River. Despite the large amounts of S flushed from Pluhuv Bor soils, these alkalinity declines were caused solely by dilution, which was greater at Pluhuv Bor relative to Sleepers River due to greater contributions from shallow flow paths at high flow. Although the historical high S loading at Pluhuv Bor has caused soil acidification and possible forest damage, it has had little effect on the acid/base status of streamwater in this well-buffered catchment. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  4. Ensemble modeling of flows in ungaged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, N.; Wheater, H.; Lee, H.; Young, A.; Wagener, T.

    2005-12-01

    The established approach to rainfall-runoff model regionalisation is regression of model parameters (MPs) against numeric catchment descriptors (CDs). We argue that, due to its fundamental limitations, further refinement of the regression method is not the optimum way forward, and we introduce an alternative method based on weighed averaging and ensemble modelling. The new method consists of the following basic steps: 1) A sample of successful models is identified for each of a number of `donor' gaged catchments. 2) Each model is assigned a weight based on how well it has performed. 3) This weight is updated based on the similarity of the associated catchment to the `target' ungaged catchment. 4) All models with non-zero weight are applied to the target catchment, to produce an ensemble time-series and a weighted average prediction. The theoretical advantage is that MP interactions are not neglected or linearized to facilitate regression. The practical attraction is the ease with which all sources of uncertainty (e.g. data, CD, equifinality, model structure) can be integrated into the pool of models and the weighting scheme. A case study of daily data from 127 non-urban UK catchments is presented. A single conceptual model structure is used (a five-parameter probability distributed model) so that, in this case, differences in models are defined only by the MP sets. Each of the 127 catchments is, in turn, considered to be ungaged, so that candidate models can be drawn from up to 126 donor catchments. Relative weights are proportional to a quantitative measure of donor-target catchment similarity. Various schemes for defining catchment similarity are applied, based on CDs relating mainly to soil type, catchment size and climate. Using the models of the ten most similar catchments provided the best weighted average simulations, both in terms of NSE and a low-flow objective function. Using this scheme, in 90% of low-permeability catchments the prediction NSE was within

  5. Space and Atmospheric Physics Education and Research at North Carolina A&T State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, J. R.; Smith, G.; Kebede, A.

    2006-11-01

    gutaye@ncat.edu In this communication we discuss the new undergraduate and graduate space and atmospheric physics program at NC A&T State University. The program is designed to train future generation space scientists to meet the workforce needs of NASA, aerospace industries and academic institutions. In order to fortify this effort, we have initiated collaboration with US Air Force, GSFC and University of Michigan. We plan to contribute to the current scientific issues associated with TEC variations, scintillations and disturbances, and the morphology/manifestations of Ionospheric Spread F phenomena, and their variations with locations, specifically over low and mid-latitudes. In order to facilitate research we plan to install a magnetometer, a coherent beacon receiver and GPS receivers. In the long run the space science research community and K12 students and teachers will use of these facilities. We will discuss our recent experience during the IHY-SCINDA 2006 workshop, in Sal Cape Verde, as well as the plans of the upcoming IHY-Africa workshop, November 5-9, 2007 Addis Ababa Ethiopia.

  6. The Nazi ethnographic research of Georg Leibbrandt and Karl Stumpp in Ukraine, and its North American legacy.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, E J; Sinner, S D

    2000-01-01

    Scholars have recently debated the topic of German academics who directly or indirectly served the Nazi machinery of death and who then went on to successful professional careers after the war. This article examines the activities of two prominent émigré scholars, Drs. Georg Leibbrandt (1899-1982) and Karl Stumpp (1896-1982). These Ukrainian Germans emigrated to Germany after World War 1. In America, most members of the Russian-German ethnic community never knew that Leibbrandt had represented Alfred Rosenberg's Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories, or that under his supervision Stumpp led a Sonderkommando in Ukraine. This unit classified hundreds of villages, indirectly documenting the annihilation of Jews and others. The authors conclude that one consequence of Leibbrandt's and Stumpp's "return to normalcy" after the war was the growing fascination with genealogical research that affected the Russian-German ethnic community in North America-research partly based on 1930s and 1940s Nazi racial record-keeping.

  7. Climate-driven trends in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Whitfield, Paul H.; Burn, Donald H.; Hannaford, Jamie; Renard, Benjamin; Stahl, Kerstin; Fleig, Anne K.; Madsen, Henrik; Mediero, Luis; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna

    2016-04-01

    Every year river floods cause enormous damage around the world. Recent major floods in North America and Europe, for example, have received much press, with some concluding that these floods are more frequent in recent years as a result of anthropogenic warming. There has been considerable scientific effort invested in establishing whether observed flood records show evidence of trends or variability in flood frequency, and to determine whether these patterns can be linked to climatic changes. However, the river catchments used in many published studies are influenced by direct human alteration such as reservoir regulation and urbanisation, which can confound the interpretation of climate-driven variability. Furthermore, a majority of previous studies have analysed changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at a national scale. Few studies are known that have analysed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year floods) on a continental scale. To fill this research gap, we present a study analysing flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges across a large study domain embracing North America and much of Europe. RHNs comprise gauging stations with minimally disturbed catchment conditions, which have a near-natural flow regime and provide good quality data; RHN analyses thus allow hydro-climatic variability to be distinguished from direct artificial disturbances or data inhomogeneities. One of the key innovations in this study is the definition of an RHN-like network consisting of 1204 catchments on a continental scale. The network incorporates existing, well-established RHNs in Canada, the US, the UK, Ireland and Norway, alongside RHN-like catchments from Europe (France, Switzerland, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Spain), which have been incorporated in the network following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status of candidate gauges through consultation with local experts. As the aim of the study is to examine

  8. Pseudo Paired Catchments Analysis to Assess the Impact of Urbanization on Catchment Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati, B.; Oudin, L.; Furusho, C.; Ribstein, P.

    2014-12-01

    Paired catchments analysis provides a robust approach to assess the impact of land use changes on catchment's hydrological response. This approach is limited by the availability of data for two neighbor catchments with and without land use changes under similar climate conditions. Thus, hydrological modelling approaches are also very popular since they do not depend on data of a reference catchment. In the present study, 70 urbanized and non-urbanized paired catchments were selected in the United States. Unit housing density maps over the 1940-2010 time period were used to reconstruct historic impervious area extents with aproximatly the same resolution as the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) maps. Two approaches were compared to assess the impact of urbanization on catchment-scale hydrology: the classical paired catchments approach using observed flow time series and an alternative paired catchments approach involving hydrological modeling that allows to simulate a virtual control catchment. To this aim, the GR4J model, a conceptual daily 4-parameter hydrological model, was used. The parameters of the model calibrated on the pre urbanization period were used to predict the streamflow that would have occurred in the urban catchment if the urbanization had not taken place. Then, classical statistical methods involving ANCOVA were used to detect the significance and to quantify the change on the hydrological responses due to land use changes. Results show that the two approaches lead to similar conclusions on the impact of urbanization on catchment hydrology. Thus, the modelling approach provides a relevant alternative for case studies where data of reference catchments are not available.

  9. Evaluation of a distributed catchment scale water balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troch, Peter A.; Mancini, Marco; Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The validity of some of the simplifying assumptions in a conceptual water balance model is investigated by comparing simulation results from the conceptual model with simulation results from a three-dimensional physically based numerical model and with field observations. We examine, in particular, assumptions and simplifications related to water table dynamics, vertical soil moisture and pressure head distributions, and subsurface flow contributions to stream discharge. The conceptual model relies on a topographic index to predict saturation excess runoff and on Philip's infiltration equation to predict infiltration excess runoff. The numerical model solves the three-dimensional Richards equation describing flow in variably saturated porous media, and handles seepage face boundaries, infiltration excess and saturation excess runoff production, and soil driven and atmosphere driven surface fluxes. The study catchments (a 7.2 sq km catchment and a 0.64 sq km subcatchment) are located in the North Appalachian ridge and valley region of eastern Pennsylvania. Hydrologic data collected during the MACHYDRO 90 field experiment are used to calibrate the models and to evaluate simulation results. It is found that water table dynamics as predicted by the conceptual model are close to the observations in a shallow water well and therefore, that a linear relationship between a topographic index and the local water table depth is found to be a reasonable assumption for catchment scale modeling. However, the hydraulic equilibrium assumption is not valid for the upper 100 cm layer of the unsaturated zone and a conceptual model that incorporates a root zone is suggested. Furthermore, theoretical subsurface flow characteristics from the conceptual model are found to be different from field observations, numerical simulation results, and theoretical baseflow recession characteristics based on Boussinesq's groundwater equation.

  10. The research progress of antitumorous effectiveness of Stichopus japonicus acid mucopolysaccharide in north of China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2009-03-01

    The sea cucumbers growing in the estuary of the Pohai of northern China are called Stichopus japonicus and are the orthodox holothurians in traditional Chinese medicine. There are multiple biological active ingredients in S. japonicus, and S. japonicus acid mucopolysaccharide (SJAMP) is one of the important ingredients. SJAMP has multiple pharmacologic actions, such as antitumor, immunologic regulation, anticoagulated blood, and antivirus. The research on antitumor has been carried out by way of animal experiments aiming at studying internal tumor-inhibiting effect of SJAMP, and the route of administration is usually peritoneal or intragastric. Additionally, sea cucumbers have been widely recognized and applied as medicated food or therapeutic prescriptions during and after the treatment of some tumors.

  11. Nitrogen loadings and environmental impacts in rice agriculture catchments in subtropical central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The severe deterioration of water quality in rice agriculture catchments challenges ecologists and hydrologists in exploring how rice agriculture affects nutrient loadings and water quality. This research observed the nitrogen (N) concentrations in stream water and groundwater in one forest and five rice agriculture catchments in subtropical central China to quantify the relationships between rice agriculture intensification, water quality of water bodies, and catchment N loadings. Our results indicate that intensive rice agriculture deteriorated stream water quality. A non-linear fitting analysis using a Boltzmann sigmoid function suggests that the concentrations and mass fluxes of ammonium-N (NH4+-N), nitrate-N (NO3--N), and total N (TN) in stream water increase with the areal proportion of rice agriculture in the catchments; however, these increases can only be detected when the areal proportions of rice agriculture in the catchments are greater than 13-30%, highlighting the importance of reasonable land use planning for managing stream water quality as well as N loadings from catchments. The factorial correspondence analysis (FCA) also suggests that rice agriculture has a potential to impose groundwater NH4+-N pollution, particularly in the soil exhausting season of July - October. And, the great N fertilizer application rates for rice cropping can increase the groundwater NO3-N and TN concentrations due to large quantities of N leaching into groundwater system beneath the paddy fields. The high N concentrations in groundwater result in strong N loadings via the base flow process. The NO3--N loadings via the base flow reaches 0.12-0.27 kg N ha-1 month-1 in the rice agriculture catchments, contributing 27.3%-36.5% of the total NO3--N loadings by the stream discharge. Therefore, the best management practices for N reduction and the smart land use planning should be applied in the rice agriculture catchments to improve water quality and mitigate N loadings.

  12. Sailing into the New Millennium: Charting the Course for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (26th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 13-16, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 1999 annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "A Marketing Research Program for Commuter Colleges" (Michelle S. Appel and Craig A. Clagett); (2) "Where Do I Start? Determining Institutional Information Needs beyond Mandated Reporting" (Michelle S.…

  13. Doing Institutional Research: A Focus on Professional Development. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (9th, Durham, New Hampshire, October 17-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Diana M., Ed.

    Institutional research that focuses on professional development is addressed in 35 papers from the 1982 meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Titles and authors include the following: "Modeling College Student Adjustment and Retention for the Individual Institution" (Norman D. Aitken); "The Development Saga of an…

  14. Planning for Quality. Papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (8th, Princeton, New Jersey, November 5-7, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The proceedings of the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research, whose theme was "Planning for Quality," are presented. The 26 papers were divided into the following topics: admissions, assessment, enrollment, faculty and staff, outcomes, planning, programs and retention, the environment, and the field of…

  15. Assessment: Fad or Fact of Life? Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (14th, Rochester, New York, October 25-27, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Assessment in higher education is addressed in these proceedings of the 1987 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Papers and authors include: "Assessing the Status of Assessment" (Peter T. Ewell); "Has the Middle Class Been Pressured the Most? Multivariate Analysis of Parental Contributions to Higher Education"…

  16. The North Carolina Youth Empowerment Study (NCYES): A Participatory Research Study Examining the Impact of Youth Empowerment for Tobacco Use Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Kurt M.; Steckler, Allan; Linnan, Laura; Patterson, Carol C.; Pevzner, Eric S.; Markatos, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Adam O.; McGloin, Tim; Peterson, Arlana Bobo

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the North Carolina Youth Empowerment Study (NCYES), a 3-year participatory evaluation of youth programs addressing tobacco use prevention. The study goals of NCYES were to (1) convene an advisory board comprised of lay youths and adults in a participatory research process, (2) document the characteristics of youth programs…

  17. Institutional Research in Emerging Countries of Southern Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa: Global Frameworks and Local Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis; Saavedra, F. Mauricio; Romano, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a synthesis of the conceptualization and practice of institutional research (IR) in higher education (HE) in emerging countries across Southern Africa, Latin America and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions. The chapter contextualizes the growing need for IR in these regions, identifies problems and challenges…

  18. Special issue on mercury in Canada's North: summary and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Chételat, John; Braune, Birgit; Stow, Jason; Tomlinson, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Important scientific advances have been made over the last decade in identifying the environmental fate of mercury and the processes that control its cycling in the Canadian Arctic. This special issue includes a series of six detailed reviews that summarize the main findings of a scientific assessment undertaken by the Government of Canada's Northern Contaminants Program. It was the first assessment to focus exclusively on mercury pollution in the Canadian Arctic. Key findings, as detailed in the reviews, relate to sources and long-range transport of mercury to the Canadian Arctic, its cycling within marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments, and its bioaccumulation in, and effects on, the biota that live there. While these accomplishments are significant, the complex nature of the mercury cycle continues to provide challenges in characterizing and quantifying the relationships of mercury sources and transport processes with mercury levels in biota and biological effects of mercury exposure. Of particular concern are large uncertainties in our understanding of the processes that are contributing to increasing mercury concentrations in some Arctic fish and wildlife. Specific recommendations are provided for future research and monitoring of the environmental impacts of anthropogenic mercury emissions, influences of climate change, and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies for mercury in the Canadian Arctic.

  19. Investigation of comparative effectiveness research in Asia, Europe, and North America.

    PubMed

    Patel, Isha; Rarus, Rachel; Tan, Xi; Lee, E K; Guy, Jason; Ahmad, Akram; Chang, Jongwha

    2015-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is an important branch of pharmacoeconomics that systematically studies and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. CER plays instrumental roles in guiding government public health policy programs and insurance. Countries throughout the world use different methods of CER to help make medical decisions based on providing optimal therapy at a reduced cost. Expenses to the healthcare system continue to rise, and CER is one-way in which expenses could be curbed in the future by applying cost-effectiveness evidence to clinical decisions. China, India, South Korea, and the United Kingdom are of essential focus because these country's economies and health care expenses continue to expand. The structures and use of CER are diverse throughout these countries, and each is of prime importance. By conducting this thorough comparison of CER in different nations, strategies and organizational setups from different countries can be applied to help guide public health and medical decision-making in order to continue to expand the establishment and role of CER programs. The patient-centered medical home has been created to help reduce costs in the primary care sector and to help improve the effectiveness of therapy. Barriers to CER are also important as many stakeholders need to be able to work together to provide the best CER evidence. The advancement of CER in multiple countries throughout the world provides a possible way of reducing costs to the healthcare system in an age of expanding expenses. PMID:26729947

  20. Investigation of comparative effectiveness research in Asia, Europe, and North America

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha; Rarus, Rachel; Tan, Xi; Lee, EK; Guy, Jason; Ahmad, Akram; Chang, Jongwha

    2015-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is an important branch of pharmacoeconomics that systematically studies and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. CER plays instrumental roles in guiding government public health policy programs and insurance. Countries throughout the world use different methods of CER to help make medical decisions based on providing optimal therapy at a reduced cost. Expenses to the healthcare system continue to rise, and CER is one-way in which expenses could be curbed in the future by applying cost-effectiveness evidence to clinical decisions. China, India, South Korea, and the United Kingdom are of essential focus because these country's economies and health care expenses continue to expand. The structures and use of CER are diverse throughout these countries, and each is of prime importance. By conducting this thorough comparison of CER in different nations, strategies and organizational setups from different countries can be applied to help guide public health and medical decision-making in order to continue to expand the establishment and role of CER programs. The patient-centered medical home has been created to help reduce costs in the primary care sector and to help improve the effectiveness of therapy. Barriers to CER are also important as many stakeholders need to be able to work together to provide the best CER evidence. The advancement of CER in multiple countries throughout the world provides a possible way of reducing costs to the healthcare system in an age of expanding expenses. PMID:26729947

  1. Further research at the Oldowan site of Ain Hanech, North-eastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Sahnouni, Mohamed; Hadjouis, Djillali; van der Made, Jan; Derradji, Abd El-Kader; Canals, Antoni; Medig, Mohamed; Belahrech, Hocine; Harichane, Zoheir; Rabhi, Merouane

    2002-12-01

    Further investigations were carried out at Ain Hanech, Algeria in 1998 and 1999 to explore its potential for investigating early hominid behavioral patterns and adaptation. Research concentrated on the stratigraphy and dating, identifying new archaeological deposits, and excavating the Ain Hanech and El-Kherba localities. To enhance the chronological control within a biostratigraphic framework, the Ain Boucherit fossil-bearing stratum, yielding a Plio-Pleistocene fauna, is correlated with the regional stratigraphy. In the stratigraphic sequence, the Ain Boucherit stratum, located 13m below the Ain Hanech Oldowan occurrences, is found in Unit Q of the Ain Hanech Formation. Unit Q shows a paleomagnetically reversed polarity, which may be correlated with an age earlier than the Olduvai normal subchron (1.95-1.77Ma). Based on test trenches and stratigraphic analyses, additional Oldowan deposits A, B, and C are identified at Ain Hanech. All three deposits and the El-Kherba site contain Mode I technology artefacts associated with an Early Pleistocene fauna. El-Kherba is stratigraphically equivalent to Ain Hanech. These two archaeological sites are estimated to be dated to about 1.8Ma. PMID:12473489

  2. Climate and hydrological variability: the catchment filtering role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Doménech, I.; García-Bartual, R.; Montanari, A.; Marco, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the impact of climate change on flood frequency is a complex and controversial task. Identifying hydrological changes is difficult given the factors, other than climate variability, which lead to significant variations in runoff series. The catchment filtering role is often overlooked and thus may hinder the correct identification of climate variability signatures on hydrological processes. Does climate variability necessarily imply hydrological variability? This research aims to analytically derive the flood frequency distribution based on realistic hypotheses about the rainfall process and the rainfall-runoff transformation. The annual maximum peak flow probability distribution is analytically derived to quantify the filtering effect of the rainfall-runoff process on climate change. A sensitivity analysis is performed according to typical semi-arid Mediterranean climatic and hydrological conditions, assuming a simple but common scheme for the rainfall-runoff transformation in small-size ungauged catchments, i.e. the CN-SCS model. Variability in annual maximum peak flows and its statistical significance are analysed when changes in the climatic input are introduced. Results show that depending on changes in the annual number of rainfall events, the catchment filtering role is particularly significant, especially when the event rainfall volume distribution is not strongly skewed. Results largely depend on the return period: for large return periods, peak flow variability is significantly affected by the climatic input, while for lower return periods, infiltration processes smooth out the impact of climate change.

  3. Climate and hydrological variability: the catchment filtering role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Doménech, I.; García-Bartual, R.; Montanari, A.; Marco, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    Measuring the impact of climate change on flood frequency is a complex and controversial task. Identifying hydrological changes is difficult given the factors, other than climate variability, which lead to significant variations in runoff series. The catchment filtering role is often overlooked and in fact, this may hinder the correct identification of climate variability signatures on hydrological processes. Does climate variability necessarily imply hydrological variability? The research herein presented aims to analytically derive the flood frequency distribution basing on realistic hypotheses about the rainfall process and the rainfall-runoff transformation. The peak flow probability distribution is analytically derived to quantify the filtering effect operated by the rainfall-runoff process on climate change. A sensitivity analysis is performed according to typical semi-arid Mediterranean climatic and hydrological conditions, assuming a simple but common scheme for the rainfall-runoff transformation in small-size ungauged catchments, i.e. the CN-SCS model. Variability in peak flows and its statistical significance are analysed when changes in the climatic input are introduced. Results show that in regard to changes in the annual number of rainfall events, the catchment filtering role is particularly significant when the event rainfall volume distribution is not strongly skewed. Results largely depend on the return period: for large return periods, peak flow variability is significantly impacted by the climatic input, while for lower return periods, infiltration processes smooth out the effects of climate change.

  4. Building Partnerships and Research Collaborations to Address the Impacts of Arctic Change: The North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, J.; North, L. A.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Arctic warming influence the various atmospheric and oceanic patterns that drive Caribbean and mid-latitude climate events, including extreme events like drought, tornadoes, and flooding in Kentucky and the surrounding region. Recently, the establishment of the North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3) project at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in partnership with the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland Arctic Cooperation Network (IACN), and Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) provides a foundation from which to engage students in applied research from the local to global levels and more clearly understand the many tenets of climate change impacts in the Arctic within both a global and local community context. The NAC3 project encompasses many facets, including joint international courses, student internships, economic development, service learning, and applied research. In its first phase, the project has generated myriad outcomes and opportunities for bridging STEM disciplines with other fields to holistically and collaboratively address specific human-environmental issues falling under the broad umbrella of climate change. WKU and UNAK students desire interaction and exposure to other cultures and regions that are threatened by climate change and Iceland presents a unique opportunity to study influences such as oceanic processes, island economies, sustainable harvest of fisheries, and Arctic influences on climate change. The project aims to develop a model to bring partners together to conduct applied research on the complex subject of global environmental change, particularly in the Arctic, while simultaneously focusing on changing how we learn, develop community, and engage internationally to understand the impacts and find solutions.

  5. Drought variability in six catchments in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok-Pan, Chun; Onof, Christian; Wheater, Howard

    2010-05-01

    Drought is fundamentally related to consistent low precipitation levels. Changes in global and regional drought patterns are suggested by numerous recent climate change studies. However, most of the climate change adaptation measures are at a catchment scale, and the development of a framework for studying persistence in precipitation is still at an early stage. Two stochastic approaches for modelling drought severity index (DSI) are proposed to investigate possible changes in droughts in six catchments in the UK. They are the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and the generalised linear model (GLM) approach. Results of ARIMA modelling show that mean sea level pressure and possibly the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index are important climate variables for short term drought forecasts, whereas relative humidity is not a significant climate variable despite its high correlation with the DSI series. By simulating rainfall series, the generalised linear model (GLM) approach can provide the probability density function of the DSI. GLM simulations indicate that the changes in the 10th and 50th quantiles of drought events are more noticeable than in the 90th extreme droughts. The possibility of extending the GLM approach to support risk-based water management is also discussed.

  6. Restoring Landform Geodiversity in Modified Rivers and Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ben; Clifford, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Extensive human modification and exploitation has created degraded and simplified systems lacking many of the landforms which would characterise healthy, geodiverse rivers. As awareness of geodiversity grows we must look to ways not only to conserve geodiversity but to also restore or create landforms which contribute to geodiverse environments. River restoration, with lessons learned over the last 30 years and across multiple continents, has much to offer as an exemplar of how to understand, restore or create geodiversity. Although not mentioned explicitly, there is an implicit emphasis in the Water Framework Directive on the importance of landforms and geodiversity, with landform units and assemblages at the reach scale assumed to provide the physical template for a healthy aquatic ecosystem. The focus on hydromorphology has increased the importance of geomorphology within river restoration programmes. The dominant paradigm is to restore landforms in order to increase habitat heterogeneity and improve biodiversity within rivers. However, the process of landform restoration is also a goal in its own right in the context of geodiversity, and extensive compilations of restoration experiences allow an inventory and pattern of landform (re-) creation to be assembled, and an assessment of landform function as well as landform presence/absence to be made. Accordingly, this paper outlines three principal research questions: Which landforms are commonly reinstated in river restoration activities? How do these landforms function compared to natural equivalents and thus contribute to 'functional' geodiversity as compared to the 'aesthetic' geodiversity? How does landform diversity scale from reach to catchment and contribute to larger-scale geodiversity? Data from the UK National River Restoration Inventory and the RHS are combined to assess the frequency and spatial distribution of commonly created landforms in relation to catchment type and more local context. Analysis is

  7. Tracing crop-specific sediment sources in agricultural catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, William H.; Ficken, Katherine J.; Taylor, Philip; Russell, Mark A.; Walling, Desmond E.

    2012-02-01

    A Compound Specific Stable Isotope (CSSI) sediment tracing approach is evaluated for the first time in an agricultural catchment setting against established geochemical fingerprinting techniques. The work demonstrates that novel CSSI techniques have the potential to provide important support for soil resource management policies and inform sediment risk assessment for the protection of aquatic habitats and water resources. Analysis of soil material from a range of crop covers in a mixed land-use agricultural catchment shows that the carbon CSSI signatures of particle-reactive fatty acids label surface agricultural soil with distinct crop-specific signatures, thus permitting sediment eroded from each land-cover to be tracked downstream. High resolution sediment sampling during a storm event and analysis for CSSI and conventional geochemical fingerprints elucidated temporal patterns of sediment mobilisation under different crop regimes and the specific contribution that each crop type makes to downstream sediment load. Pasture sources (65% of the catchment area) dominated the sediment load but areal yield (0.13 ± 0.02 t ha - 1 ) was considerably less than that for winter wheat (0.44 ± 0.15 t ha - 1 ). While temporal patterns in crop response matched runoff and erosion response predictions based on plot-scale rainfall simulation experiments, comparison of biomarker and geochemical fingerprinting data indicated that the latter overestimated cultivated land inputs to catchment sediment yield due to inability to discriminate temporary pasture (in rotation) from cultivated land. This discrepancy, however, presents an opportunity since combination of the two datasets revealed the extremely localised nature of erosion from permanent pasture fields in this system (estimated at up to 0.5 t ha - 1 ). The novel use of CSSI and geochemical tracers in tandem provided unique insights into sediment source dynamics that could not have been derived from each method alone. Research

  8. Numerical Research of Steam and Gas Plant Efficiency of Triple Cycle for Extreme North Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskii, Svjatoslav; Matveev, Aleksandr; Masjuk, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The present work shows that temperature decrease of heat rejection in a cycle is necessary for energy efficiency of steam turbine plants. Minimum temperature of heat rejection at steam turbine plant work on water steam is 15°C. Steam turbine plant of triple cycle where lower cycle of steam turbine plant is organic Rankine cycle on low-boiling substance with heat rejection in air condenser, which safely allows rejecting heat at condensation temperatures below 0°C, has been offered. Mathematical model of steam and gas plant of triple cycle, which allows conducting complex researches with change of working body appearance and parameters defining thermodynamic efficiency of cycles, has been developed. On the basis of the model a program of parameters and index cycles design of steam and gas plants has been developed in a package of electron tables Excel. Numerical studies of models showed that energy efficiency of steam turbine plants of triple cycle strongly depend on low-boiling substance type in a lower cycle. Energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net 60% higher can be received for steam and gas plants on the basis of gas turbine plant NK-36ST on pentane and its condensation temperature below 0°C. It was stated that energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net linearly depends on condensation temperature of low-boiling substance type and temperature of gases leaving reco very boiler. Energy efficiency increases by 1% at 10% decrease of condensation temperature of pentane, and it increases by 0.88% at 15°C temperature decrease of gases leaving recovery boiler.

  9. Understanding Pesticide Behaviour At The Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Pendlington, D.; Groves, S.

    Pesticides in stream flow at the outlet of a 142ha catchment in Eastern England (Col- worth, Bedfordshire), have been monitored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. The data from this catchment are being used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT contaminant transport pack- age at the catchment scale. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available with a useful set of pesticide application and detection data. Following calibration and validation of the hydrology of the catchment, pesticide modelling was carried out for tebuconazole, terbutryn, and terbuthylazine. This paper reports on the results of a sen- sitivity analysis of the model, and the final calibrated pesticide component. Analysis of the results obtained show that the timing and decay of predicted pesticide concen- trations are correct. It is therefore recommended that SWAT can be used as a tool to understand pesticide behaviour at the catchment scale.

  10. Contrasting Patterns of Fine Fluvial Sediment Delivery in Two Adjacent Upland Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, M.; Bracken, L.; Warburton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying patterns of fine suspended sediment transfer in UK upland rivers is of vital importance in combating the damaging effects of elevated fluxes of suspended sediment, and sediment associated transport of contaminants, on in-stream biota. In many catchments of the UK there is still a lack of catchment-wide understanding of both the spatial patterns and temporal variation in fine sediment delivery. This poster describes the spatial and temporal distribution of in-stream fine sediment delivery from a network of 44 time-integrated mass flux samplers (TIMs) in two adjacent upland catchments. The two catchments are the Esk (210 km2) and Upper Derwent (236 km2) which drain the North York Moors National Park. Annual suspended sediment loads in the Upper Derwent are 1273 t, whereas in the Esk catchment they are greater at 1778 t. Maximum yields of 22 t km-2 yr -1 were measured in the headwater tributaries of the Rye River (Derwent), whereas peak yields in the Esk are four times greater (98 t km-2 yr-1) on the Butter Beck subcatchment. Analysis of the within-storm sediment dynamics, indicates that the sediment sources within the Upper Derwent catchment are from distal locations possibly mobilised by hillslope runoff processes, whereas in the Esk, sediment sources are more proximal to the channel e.g. within channel stores or bank failures. These estimates of suspended sediment flux are compared with the diffuse pollution potential generated by a risk-based model of sediment transfer (SCIMAP) in order to assess the similarity between the model predictions and observed fluxes.

  11. A novel modeling framework to obtain new insights into the controls of catchment mixing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Markus; Musolff, Andreas; de Rooij, Gerrit; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    der Velde, Y., P. Torfs, S. van der Zee, and R. Uijlenhoet. 2012 "Quantifying Catchment-scale Mixing and Its Effect on Time-varying Travel Time Distributions." Water Resources Research 48 (6): W06536. Botter, G., E. Bertuzzo, and A. Rinaldo. 2011. "Catchment Residence and Travel Time Distributions: The Master Equation." Geophysical Research Letters 38 (11): L11403

  12. Launch, Low-Speed, and Landing Characteristics Determined from the First Flight of the North American X-15 Research Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finch, Thomas W.; Matranga, Gene J.

    1959-01-01

    The first flight of the North American X-15 research airplane was made on June 8, 1959. This was accomplished after completion of a series of captive flights with the X-15 attached to the B-52 carrier airplane to demonstrate the aerodynamic and systems compatibility of the X-15//B-52 combination and the X-15 subsystem operation. This flight was planned as a glide flight so that the pilot need not be concerned with the propulsion system. Discussions of the launch, low-speed maneuvering, and landing characteristics are presented, and the results are compared with predictions from preflight studies. The launch characteristics were generally satisfactory, and the X-15 vertical tail adequately cleared the B-52 wing cutout. The actual landing pattern and landing characteristics compared favorably with predictions, and the recommended landing technique of lowering the flaps and landing gear at a low altitude appears to be a satisfactory method of landing the X-15 airplane. There was a quantitative correlation between flight-measured and predicted lift-drag-ratio characteristics in the clean configuration and a qualitative correlation in the landing configuration. A longitudinal-controllability problem, which became severe in the landing configuration, was evident throughout the flight and, apparently, was aggravated by the sensitivity of the side-located control stick. In the low-to-moderate angle-of-attack range covered, the longitudinal and directional stability were indicated to be adequate.

  13. Catchment scale molecular composition of hydrologically mobilized dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeke, Julia; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Bornmann, Katrin; Tittel, Jörg; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in rivers of temperate catchments in Europe and North Amerika impose new technical challenges for drinking water production. The driving factors for this decadal increase in DOM concentration are not conclusive and changes in annual temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric deposition are intensely discussed. It is known that the majority of DOM is released by few but large hydrologic events, mobilizing DOM from riparian wetlands for export by rivers and streams. The mechanisms of this mobilization and the resulting molecular composition of the released DOM may be used to infer long-term changes in the biogeochemistry of the respective catchment. Event-based samples collected over two years from streams in three temperate catchments in the German mid-range mountains were analyzed after solid-phase extraction of DOM for their molecular composition by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Hydrologic conditions, land use and water chemistry parameters were used to complement the molecular analysis. The molecular composition of the riverine DOM was strongly dependent on the magnitude of the hydrologic events, with unsaturated, oxygen-enriched compounds being preferentially mobilized by large events. This pattern is consistent with an increase in dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations. In contrast, the relative proportions of nitrogen and sulfur bearing compounds increased with an increased agricultural land use but were less affected by the mobilization events. Co-precipitation experiments with colloidal aluminum showed that unsaturated and oxygen-rich compounds are preferentially removed from the dissolved phase. The precipitated compounds thus had similar chemical characteristics as compared to the mobilized DOM from heavy rain events. Radiocarbon analyses also indicated that this precipitated fraction of DOM was of comparably young radiocarbon age. DOM radiocarbon from field samples

  14. Compilation of Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting for the Allison Woods Research Station in Iredell County, North Carolina, 2005-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Brad A.; Abraham, Joju

    2010-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Allison Woods research station near Statesville, North Carolina, in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from April 2005 through September 2008 are presented in this report. Data presented include well-construction characteristics and periodic groundwater-level measurements for 29 wells, borehole geophysical logs for 8 wells, hourly groundwater-level measurements for 5 wells, continuous water-quality measurements for 3 wells, periodic water-quality samples for 12 wells and 1 surface-water station, slug-test results for 11 wells, and shallow groundwater-flow maps. In addition, the geology and hydrogeology at the site are summarized.

  15. Regional health workforce planning through action research: lessons for commissioning health services from a case study in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Annette June; Murray, Richard; Stewart, Ruth; Mills, Jane; Beaton, Neil; Larkins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Creating a stable and sustainable health workforce in regional, rural and remote Australia has long been a challenge to health workforce planners, policy makers and researchers alike. Traditional health workforce planning is often reactive and assumes continuation of current patterns of healthcare utilisation. This demonstration project in Far North Queensland exemplifies how participatory regional health workforce planning processes can accurately model current and projected local workforce requirements. The recent establishment of Primary Health Networks (PHNs) with the intent to commission health services tailored to individual healthcare needs underlines the relevance of such an approach. This study used action research methodology informed by World Health Organization (WHO) systems thinking. Four cyclical stages of health workforce planning were followed: needs assessment; health service model redesign; skills-set assessment and workforce redesign; and development of a workforce and training plan. This study demonstrated that needs-based loco-regional health workforce planning can be achieved successfully through participatory processes with stakeholders. Stronger health systems and workforce training solutions were delivered by facilitating linkages and planning processes based on community need involving healthcare professionals across all disciplines and sectors. By focusing upon extending competencies and skills sets, local health professionals form a stable and sustainable local workforce. Concrete examples of initiatives generated from this process include developing a chronic disease inter-professional teaching clinic in a rural town and renal dialysis being delivered locally to an Aboriginal community. The growing trend of policy makers decentralising health funding, planning and accountability and rising health system costs increase the future utility of this approach. This type of planning can also assist the new PHNs to commission health services

  16. Regional health workforce planning through action research: lessons for commissioning health services from a case study in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Annette June; Murray, Richard; Stewart, Ruth; Mills, Jane; Beaton, Neil; Larkins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Creating a stable and sustainable health workforce in regional, rural and remote Australia has long been a challenge to health workforce planners, policy makers and researchers alike. Traditional health workforce planning is often reactive and assumes continuation of current patterns of healthcare utilisation. This demonstration project in Far North Queensland exemplifies how participatory regional health workforce planning processes can accurately model current and projected local workforce requirements. The recent establishment of Primary Health Networks (PHNs) with the intent to commission health services tailored to individual healthcare needs underlines the relevance of such an approach. This study used action research methodology informed by World Health Organization (WHO) systems thinking. Four cyclical stages of health workforce planning were followed: needs assessment; health service model redesign; skills-set assessment and workforce redesign; and development of a workforce and training plan. This study demonstrated that needs-based loco-regional health workforce planning can be achieved successfully through participatory processes with stakeholders. Stronger health systems and workforce training solutions were delivered by facilitating linkages and planning processes based on community need involving healthcare professionals across all disciplines and sectors. By focusing upon extending competencies and skills sets, local health professionals form a stable and sustainable local workforce. Concrete examples of initiatives generated from this process include developing a chronic disease inter-professional teaching clinic in a rural town and renal dialysis being delivered locally to an Aboriginal community. The growing trend of policy makers decentralising health funding, planning and accountability and rising health system costs increase the future utility of this approach. This type of planning can also assist the new PHNs to commission health services

  17. Hydrogeology, groundwater seepage, nitrate distribution, and flux at the Raleigh hydrologic research station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    rom 2005 to 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, conducted a study to describe the geologic framework, measure groundwater quality, characterize the groundwater-flow system, and describe the groundwater/surface-water interaction at the 60-acre Raleigh hydrogeologic research station (RHRS) located at the Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant in eastern Wake County, North Carolina. Previous studies have shown that the local groundwater quality of the surficial and bedrock aquifers at the RHRS had been affected by high levels of nutrients. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from 3 coreholes, 12 wells, and 4 piezometers at 3 well clusters, as well as from 2 surface-water sites, 2 multiport piezometers, and 80 discrete locations in the streambed of the Neuse River. Data collected were used to evaluate the three primary zones of the Piedmont aquifer (regolith, transition zone, and fractured bedrock) and characterize the interaction of groundwater and surface water as a mechanism of nutrient transport to the Neuse River. A conceptual hydrogeologic cross section across the RHRS was constructed using new and existing data. Two previously unmapped north striking, nearly vertical diabase dikes intrude the granite beneath the site. Groundwater within the diabase dike appeared to be hydraulically isolated from the surrounding granite bedrock and regolith. A correlation exists between foliation and fracture orientation, with most fractures striking parallel to foliation. Flowmeter logging in two of the bedrock wells indicated that not all of the water-bearing fractures labeled as water bearing were hydraulically active, even when stressed by pumping. Groundwater levels measured in wells at the RHRS displayed climatic and seasonal trends, with elevated groundwater levels occurring during the late spring and declining to a low in the late fall. Vertical

  18. Input sensitivity analysis of neural network models for flood event prediction in ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Christian W.; Abrahart, Robert J.

    2010-05-01

    Artificial neural networks have now been applied to problems within hydrology for nearly twenty years - primarily in rainfall-runoff modelling and flood forecasting. In recent years the scope of this research has expanded to encompass more theoretical issues and address some of the earlier criticisms of such models - including the internal behaviour of neural networks and the link with physically-based models. While there has been some work on the application of neural network models to predicting flood events in ungauged catchments, such research is limited to only a few studies in a handful of regions worldwide. In this paper neural network models are developed using the UK Environment Agency's HiFlows-UK dataset released in 2008. This dataset provides catchment descriptors and annual maximum series for over 900 sites across the UK. The neural network models predict the index flood (median flood) based on four catchment characteristics: area, standard average annual rainfall, index of flood attenuation due to reservoirs and lakes, and baseflow index. These models are assessed using a novel sensitivity analysis procedure that is designed to expose the internal relationship that has been implemented between each catchment characteristic and the index flood. Results provide some physical explanation of model behaviour - linking catchment characteristics to the calculated index flood. The results are compared with the FEH QMED mathematical model and with older equivalent models developed on the original FEH data set.

  19. Groundwater as an emergency source for drought mitigation in the Crocodile River catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussá, F. E. F.; Zhou, Y.; Maskey, S.; Masih, I.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2015-02-01

    Global climate change has received much attention worldwide in the scientific as well as in the political community, indicating that changes in precipitation, extreme droughts and floods may increasingly threaten many regions. Drought is a natural phenomenon that causes social, economical and environmental damage to society. In this study, we assess the drought intensity and severity and the groundwater potential to be used as a supplementary source of water to mitigate drought impacts in the Crocodile River catchment, a water-stressed sub-catchment of the Incomati River catchment in South Africa. The research methodology consists of three parts. First, the spatial and temporal variation of the meteorological and hydrological drought severity and intensity over the catchment were evaluated. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was used to analyse the meteorological drought and the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) was used for the hydrological drought. Second, the water deficit in the catchment during the drought period was computed using a simple water balance method. Finally, a groundwater model was constructed in order to assess the feasibility of using groundwater as an emergency source for drought impact mitigation. Results show that the low-rainfall areas are more vulnerable to severe meteorological droughts (lower and upper crocodile). Moreover, the most water stressed sub-catchments with high level of water uses but limited storage, such as the Kaap located in the middle catchment and the Lower Crocodile sub-catchments, are more vulnerable to severe hydrological droughts. The analysis of the potential groundwater use during droughts showed that a deficit of 97 Mm3 yr-1 could be supplied from groundwater without considerable adverse impacts on the river base flow and groundwater storage. Abstraction simulations for different scenarios of extremely severe droughts reveal that it is possible to use groundwater to cope with the droughts in the catchment

  20. Groundwater as an emergency source for drought mitigation in the Crocodile River catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussá, F. E. F.; Zhou, Y.; Maskey, S.; Masih, I.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2014-03-01

    Global climate change has received much attention worldwide in the scientific as well as in the political community, indicating that changes in precipitation, extreme droughts and floods may threaten increasingly many regions. Drought is a natural phenomenon that may cause social, economical and environmental damages to the society. In this study, we assess the drought intensity and severity and the groundwater potential to be used as a supplement source of water to mitigate drought impacts in the Crocodile River catchment, a water-stressed sub-catchment of the Incomati River catchment in South Africa. The research methodology consists mainly of three parts. First, the spatial and temporal variation of the meteorological and hydrological drought severity and intensity over the catchment were evaluated. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was used to analyse the meteorological drought and the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) was used for the hydrological drought. Second, the water deficit in the catchment during the drought period was computed using a simple water balance method. Finally, a groundwater model was constructed in order to assess the feasibility of using groundwater as an emergency source for drought impact mitigation. Results show that the meteorological drought severity varies accordingly with the precipitation; the low rainfall areas are more vulnerable to severe meteorological droughts (lower and upper crocodile). Moreover, the most water stressed sub-catchments with high level of water uses but limited storage, such as the Kaap located in the middle catchment and the Lower Crocodile sub-catchments are those which are more vulnerable to severe hydrological droughts. The analysis of the potential groundwater use during droughts showed that a deficit of 97 Mm3 yr-1 could be supplied from groundwater without considerable adverse impacts on the river base flow and groundwater storage. Abstraction simulations for different scenarios of extremely

  1. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  2. Distribution and diversity of fungi in freshwater sediments on a river catchment scale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Jianan; Gao, Guanghai; Bartlam, Mark G.; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities perform essential functions in biogeochemical cycles. However, knowledge of fungal community structural changes in river ecosystems is still very limited. In the present study, we combined culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to investigate fungal distribution and diversity in sediment on a regional scale in the Songhua River catchment, located in North-East Asia. A total of 147 samples over the whole river catchment were analyzed. The results showed that compared to the mainstream, the tributaries have a higher fungal community organization and culturable fungal concentration, but possess lower community dynamics as assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of DGGE bands showed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were the predominant community in the Songhua River catchment. Redundancy analysis revealed that longitude was the primary factor determining the variation of fungal community structure, and fungal biomass was mainly related to the total nutrient content. Our findings provide new insights into the characteristics of fungal community distribution in a temperate zone river at a regional scale, and demonstrate that fungal dispersal is restricted by geographical barriers in a whole river catchment. PMID:25954259

  3. Dissolved organic carbon and sulfur in southwestern Quebec lakes: Relationships with catchment and lake properties

    SciTech Connect

    Houle, D.; Carignan, R.; Lachance, M.

    1995-06-01

    In 59 southwestern Quebec lakes, dissolved organic S (DOS) concentration averages 185{+-}92 {mu}g liter{sup -1} (9.2% of total S) and ranges from undetectable to 437 {mu}g liter{sup -1} (22% of total S). DOS can be predicted from dissolved organic C (DOC) concentrations: DOS ({mu}g liter{sup -1}) = 2.20 log{sub 10}(DOC) + 7, r{sup 2} = 0.55. When applied to 1,238 lakes from five Quebec regions, this relationship indicates that DOS can account for 8.5% (Ottawa) to 22.2% (North Shore) of total S. These results stress the importance of evaluating DOS concentrations in studies of catchment S budgets. Multiple regression models using lake and catchment properties as independent variables respectively explain 75, 43, 49, and 69% of the variance in DOC, DOS, DOC: DOS, and color. The regressions found for DOC, color, and DOS include a flowpath index, accounting for dissolved organic matter (DOM) leaching from the catchment, and a term for in-lake losses. The DOC:DOS regression includes the flowpath index, lake perimeter, and altitude and suggests that DOM supply and composition also depend on catchment properties. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Flash flood modelling for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garambois, P.-A.; Roux, H.; Larnier, K.; Dartus, D.

    2012-04-01

    Flash flood is a very intense and quick hydrologic response of a catchment to rainfall. This phenomenon has a high spatial-temporal variability as its generating storm, often hitting small catchments (few km2). Data collected by (Gaume et al. 2009) about 500 flash floods over the last 50 years showed that they could occur everywhere in Europe and more often in the Mediterranean regions, Alpine regions and continental Europe. Given the small spatial-temporal scales and high variability of flash floods, their prediction remains a hard exercise as the necessary data are often scarce. Flash flood prediction on ungauged catchments is one of the challenges of hydrological modelling as defined by (Sivapalan et al. 2003). Several studies have been headed up with the MARINE model (Modélisation de l'Anticipation du Ruissellement et des Inondations pour des évèNements Extrêmes) for the Gard region (France), (Roux et al. 2011), (Castaings et al. 2009). This physically based spatially distributed rainfall runoff model is dedicated to flash flood prediction. The study aims at finding a methodology for flash flood prediction at ungauged locations in the Cévennes-Vivarais region in particular. The regionalization method is based on multiple calibrations on gauged catchments in order to extract model structures (model + parameter values) for each catchment. Several mathematical methods (multiple regressions, transfer functions, krigging…) will then be tested to calculate a regional parameter set. The study also investigates the usability of additional hydrologic indices at different time scales to constrain model predictions from parameters obtained using these indices, and this independently of the model considered. These hydrologic indices gather information on hydrograph shape or catchment dynamic for instance. Results explaining global catchments behaviour are expected that way. The spatial-temporal variability of storms is also described through indices and linked with

  5. Use of GIS Technology in Surface Water Monitoring fro Targeted Policy Intervention in a Mountainous Catchment in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giali, Gabriela; Schneider, Petra

    2015-04-01

    USE OF GIS TECHNOLOGY IN SURFACE WATER MONITORING FOR TARGETED POLICY INTERVENTION IN A MOUNTAINOUS CATCHMENT IN ROMANIA The collection of information on surface water quality is a specific activity that takes place systematically and regularly at regional and national scale, and it is important for the assessment of the water quality as well as for water management policy-making. A data base information management using a Geographical Information System (GIS) forms an important aspect of environmental management, which provides the frame for processing and visualisation of water monitoring data and information as well as for the optimisation of monitoring concepts. This paper presents an architecture performed by a GIS which provides a grafic database and attributes the nesessary measurements of the water quality to different sections of the mountainous catchment of the Suceava river in the north of Romania. With this approach the location of the water sampling points can be optimised in terms of the selection and setting of the river sections. To facilitate the setting of the sampling locations in the various sections of water sampling in the river, the presented GIS system provides to the user different information layers with combined or isolated data according to the objectives. In the frame of the research were created 5 layers of information in the basin under study, underlying the determination of a new information layer, namely the "Hydrografic Network Graded to Hydrographic Sections". Practically, in the studied basin were established 8 sections for water sampling locations, and the water quality characterization was done by the consideration of 15 quality indicators. The GIS system presented in this research is a valuable, useful and adaptable to land use changes data base that can be exploited by any number of combinations, its capabilities justify it's role as "tool to support decision making." With this characteristics it supports the policy-making of

  6. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) losses from nested artificially drained lowland catchments with contrasting soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Kahle, Petra; Lennartz, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Artificial drainage is a common practice to improve moisture and aeration conditions of agricultural land. It shortens the residence time of water in the soil and may therefore contribute to the degradation of peatlands as well as to the still elevated level of diffuse pollution of surface water bodies, particularly if flow anomalies like preferential flow cause a further acceleration of water and solute fluxes. Especially in the case of nitrate, artificially drained sub-catchments are found to control the catchment-scale nitrate losses. However, it is frequently found that nitrate losses and nitrogen field balances do not match. At the same time, organic fertilizers are commonly applied and, especially in lowland catchments, organic soils have been drained for agricultural use. Thus, the question arises whether dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) forms an important component of the nitrogen losses from artificially drained catchments. However, in contrast to nitrate and even to dissolved organic carbon (DOC), this component is frequently overlooked, especially in nested catchment studies with different soil types and variable land use. Here, we will present data from a hierarchical water quantity and quality measurement programme in the federal state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (North-Eastern Germany). The monitoring programme in the pleistocene lowland catchment comprises automatic sampling stations at a collector drain outlet (4.2 ha catchment), at a ditch draining arable land on mineral soils (179 ha), at a ditch mainly draining grassland on organic soils (85 ha) and at a brook with a small rural catchment (15.5 km²) of mixed land use and soil types. At all sampling stations, daily to weekly composite samples were taken, while the discharge and the meteorological data were recorded continuously. Water samples were analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonium-nitrogen and total nitrogen. We will compare two years: 2006/07 was a very wet year (P = 934 mm) with a high summer

  7. Stakeholder discourse and water management in a catchment in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo Stanghellini, P. S.; Collentine, D.

    2007-06-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD; directive 2000/60/EC) was created to ensure the sustainable use of water resources in the European Union. A central guideline included throughout the directive is a call for the participation of stakeholders in the management of these resources. Involving stakeholders is an important step to ensure that catchment management plans take into consideration local experience in the development of these plans and the impact of the plans on local interests. This paper describes and analyses the results of a series of workshops to facilitate implementation of the WFD at a catchment level based on the stakeholder participation model, CATCH. To test the usefulness of the stakeholder participation model CATCH for water management in a catchment area, a sub-catchment in an alpine valley in the north-east of Italy, the Alta Valsugana in the Province of Trento, was chosen as the setting for a series of workshops. In this valley water is fundamental for activities associated with agriculture, domestic use, energy production, sports and recreation. In the recent past the valley has had serious problems related to water quality and quantity. Implementation of water management plans under the WFD may lead to conflicts within the catchment between different stakeholder interest groups. Including stakeholders in the development of management plans not only follows the guidelines of the WFD but also could result in a more locally adapted and acceptable plan for the catchment. A new stakeholder analysis methodology was developed and implemented in order to identify the relevant stakeholders of the area and then two sets of workshops involving the key stakeholders identified were conducted in Spring 2006. The CATCH meetings were a new experience for the participants, who had to deal with both the principles of the WFD in general and the participation requirement in particular. During the meetings, the CATCH model played a very important role in

  8. Hydrologic connectivity between landscapes and streams: Transferring reach- and plot-scale understanding to the catchment scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jencso, K.G.; McGlynn, B.L.; Gooseff, M.N.; Wondzell, S.M.; Bencala, K.E.; Marshall, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between catchment structure and runoff characteristics is poorly understood. In steep headwater catchments with shallow soils the accumulation of hillslope area (upslope accumulated area (UAA)) is a hypothesized first-order control on the distribution of soil water and groundwater. Hillslope-riparian water table connectivity represents the linkage between the dominant catchment landscape elements (hillslopes and riparian zones) and the channel network. Hydrologic connectivity between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) landscape elements is heterogeneous in space and often temporally transient. We sought to test the relationship between UAA and the existence and longevity of HRS shallow groundwater connectivity. We quantified water table connectivity based on 84 recording wells distributed across 24 HRS transects within the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (U.S. Forest Service), northern Rocky Mountains, Montana. Correlations were observed between the longevity of HRS water table connectivity and the size of each transect's UAA (r2 = 0.91). We applied this relationship to the entire stream network to quantify landscape-scale connectivity through time and ascertain its relationship to catchment-scale runoff dynamics. We found that the shape of the estimated annual landscape connectivity duration curve was highly related to the catchment flow duration curve (r2 = 0.95). This research suggests internal catchment landscape structure (topography and topology) as a first-order control on runoff source area and whole catchment response characteristics. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Catchment biophysical drivers of streamflow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trancoso, R.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of streamflow reflect the co-evolution of climate, soils, topography and vegetation of catchments. Hydrological metrics or signatures can represent the long-term behaviour and integrate the influence of all the streamflow drivers. Although this sort of relationship has been developed in regional studies exploring prediction of Flow Duration Curves and other streamflow metrics, little is known about the controls of other key streamflow characteristics especially in continent scale. This study aims to understand how catchment biophysical variables control key hydrological metrics such as baseflow index, elasticity of streamflow to rainfall variability and intermittency in continent scale and regionally. We used a set of catchment biophysical variables to model key streamflow signatures using multivariate power-law and beta regressions in 355 catchments located along the eastern Australian seaboard. Streamflow signatures were derived from daily streamflow time series data from 1980 to 2013. We tested 52 catchment biophysical characteristics related to climate, soil, topography, geography, geomorphology, vegetation and land-cover as predictors of the streamflow signatures. The prediction R-squared ranged from 63 to 72% when relationships are built in continent scale, but can be greater than 80% when regressions are regionalised. The interpretation of the modelled relationships offers new insights regarding the controls of flow characteristics.

  10. [Application of hyperspectral remote sensing in research on ecological boundary in north farming-pasturing transition in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Kun; Xie, Ying-Zhong

    2009-06-01

    Studies of ecological boundaries are important and have become a rapidly evolving part of contemporary ecology. The ecotones are dynamic and play several functional roles in ecosystem dynamics, and the changes in their locations can be used as an indicator of environment changes, and for these reasons, ecotones have recently become a focus of investigation of landscape ecology and global climate change. As the interest in ecotone increases, there is an increased need for formal techniques to detect it. Hence, to better study and understand the functional roles and dynamics of ecotones in ecosystem, we need quantitative methods to characterize them. In the semi-arid region of northern China, there exists a farming-pasturing transition resulting from grassland reclamation and deforestation. With the fragmentation of grassland landscape, the structure and function of the grassland ecosystem are changing. Given this perspective; new-image processing approaches are needed to focus on transition themselves. Hyperspectral remote sensing data, compared with wide-band remote sensing data, has the advantage of high spectral resolution. Hyperspectral remote sensing can be used to visualize transitional zones and to detect ecotone based on surface properties (e. g. vegetation, soil type, and soil moisture etc). In this paper, the methods of hyperspectral remote sensing information processing, spectral analysis and its application in detecting the vegetation classifications, vegetation growth state, estimating the canopy biochemical characteristics, soil moisture, soil organic matter etc are reviewed in detail. Finally the paper involves further application of hyperspectral remote sensing information in research on local climate in ecological boundary in north farming-pasturing transition in China.

  11. A Successful Example of Transitioning Research to NCEP Operations: The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, M. B.; Xia, Y.; Wei, H.; Meng, J.; Dong, J.; Mitchell, K.; Wood, E. F.; Sheffield, J.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Mocko, D. M.; Cosgrove, B.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Mo, K. C.; Ebisuzaki, W.; Rosencrans, M.; Luo, L.; Luebehusen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) is a long-term, multi-institutional project initiated to provide improved land surface initial conditions for weather and climate models, and subsequently expanded to support multiple applications related to land surface hydrology. Begun as a research project in January 2000, it became quasi-operational in September 2008, and operational at NCEP in August 2014. The NLDAS development included Phase 1 to establish the NLDAS configuration, including collection of soil and vegetation data, selection of land-surface models (LSMs), generation of surface forcing data sets, and model runs for a 3-year period, with evaluation/validation of model output. Phase 2 involved 30-year (1979-2008) retrospective and near real-time runs (2009-present) of four improved LSMs and surface forcing to generate energy and water fluxes, and state variables from those LSMs. The anomalies and percentiles from the 30-year climatologies for evapotranspiration, soil moisture, runoff/streamflow, and snow water equivalent have been comprehensively evaluated against observations, and are used to support US operational drought monitoring and prediction tasks such as the U.S. Drought Monitor, NCEP Climate Prediction Center drought information, and activities of the National Integrated Drought Information System. More than 34 years of surface forcing and model output data have been distributed by the NCEP/EMC NLDAS website (www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/nldas), the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC, daac.gsfc.nasa.gov), the UCAR/NCAR Climate Data Guide (climatedataguide.ucar.edu/climate-data), and the USGS Geo Portal (cida.usgs.gov/gdp). The operational implementation provides more reliable and timely access to NLDAS products. This presentation summarizes experiences of NLDAS, status and format of current NLDAS products, and the future plans for NLDAS.

  12. Differentiating causes for erosion at the catchment scale: do soil conservation measures mitigate weather dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barneveld, Robert; Greipsland, Inga

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of most measures to control soil loss is well established at the field or plot scale. Less well documented are the changes in hydrological behaviour and sediment production at the scale of the (small) catchment. In Norway, incentives to reduce tillage have been in place for over decades. However, even long time (20 years) discharge monitoring of a series of small catchments does not show a clear effect of the application of conservation measures. This research hypothesizes that the effect of weather conditions for a 4.2 km2 catchment in southeastern Norway outweighs the effect of conservation measures in the time series on runoff and sediment load. To test this, it was assumed that trends and changes in soil loss E over time are the product of an agromic index C, precipitation P and rainfall erosivity R. The values of C were calculated based on extensive farm records, covering every tillage operation for every field in the catchment for the period of investigation. Runoff and sediment load records were used to parameterise and test different correlative models. In order to quantify the effect of topography on the degree to which conservations measures reduce soil loss at catchment level, a spatially distributed connectivity index was calculated and multiplied with C. Calculations were carried out for a 10 year period, in monthly time steps. The following statistical models proved the most promising to correlate sediment load to precipitation and agronomic practice. Et=a \\cdot Ptb \\cdot Pt-1c \\cdot Ctd Et=a \\cdot Rtb \\cdot Pt-1c \\cdot Ctd where Pt-1c, the precipition in the prior month, is a proxy indicator for antecedent moisture conditions. The results show that precipitation dynamics outweigh the effect of soil conservation measures for this typical agricultural catchment. It also shows that the inclusion of a hydrological connectivity index improves the quantification of the effect of soil conservation measures on the catchment scale.

  13. Scaling ET from different data sources gives insight in catchment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, Willem; Henry, Joseph; Gharun, Mana; Adams, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Depending on the available funding and equipment, environmental data are often available at one scale, while predictions or forecasts are needed at a larger or smaller scale. The scientific literature is therefore full of comments and papers about scaling, upscaling and downscaling. Brought back to its basics, all scaling problems are essentially model prediction problems. Thus seeking a universal scaling law is unlikely to deliver results. Our interest has been in scaling evapotranspiration. A literature review revealed that most of the work in estimating evapotranspiration in Australia has occurred at short time scales at the local tree level, scaling to the stand or hillslope level. There has been limited work at scaling to larger scales, such as the catchment, although there has been work at the much larger continental scales (reference), scaling from a limited number of EC towers. However, from a hydrological prediction point of view, estimates of evapotranspiration at the catchment scale or distributed across the catchment scale are crucial to improve water balance estimates for water resource management. Here we compare several different approaches to scale local ET estimates to catchment scale ET and highlight how they all produce different results due to limitations with each of the methods. However, each of the scaling exercises reveals other aspects of the overall catchment system behaviour that cannot be identified at an individual scale. In this research we used collected field site in a model (WAVES) to predict local scale ET using different approaches and scaled this to catchment level ET, derived from the water balance and derived from the satellite MODIS ET estimates. The model was calibrated to sapflow measurements scaled to stand, introducing another opportunity for uncertainty. We discuss how at each of this scales lack of knowledge influences the estimates, but that the combined analysis reveals more about the temporal and spatial variation in

  14. Identifying critical source areas for phosphorus loss in Ireland using field and catchment scale ranking schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, K. J.; Magette, W. L.; Kurz, I.

    2005-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) in agricultural runoff is a major pollutant in many of Ireland's surface waters. Identification of areas that are at a high risk for P loss to surface waters is a critical component of river basin management. Two P ranking schemes (PRS's) were developed for Ireland, based on multi-criteria analysis approaches proposed in both the US and Europe, to predict the relative likelihood of P loss at both the field and catchment scales. The Field PRS was evaluated by comparing predicted rankings of potential P loss and transport against measured edge-of-field Dissolved Reactive P (DRP) loss for three fields with varying soil P levels. Qualitatively, results indicated that the Field PRS rankings corresponded to the magnitudes of measured P loss for the field sites, as well as to a reasoned evaluation of the relative likelihood that the fields would lose P that would subsequently make its way to surface water. The Catchment PRS was evaluated on a total of 31 catchments and sub-catchments by comparing predicted rankings of potential P loss and transport against measured in-stream median Molybdate Reactive P (MRP). Rankings of the relative likelihood of P loss and transport predicted by the Catchment PRS were positively correlated with median in-stream MRP ( r=0.51, P<0.05). Although the data available for these evaluations were limited, especially at field scale, and further research may identify the opportunity for modifications, both field and catchment scale P ranking schemes demonstrated a potential for identifying critical P source areas within catchments dominated by grass-based agricultural production systems, such as those in Ireland.

  15. A methodology to determine pesticides pollution sources in water catchments: study case (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Limbourg, Q; Noel, S; Huyghebaert, B; Capette, L; Hallet, V

    2009-01-01

    In the Walloon Region (Belgium), a Committee of Investigation was created in 2007 to investigate and determine the potential pesticides pollution sources in drinkable water catchments. This Committee, constituted by a multidisciplinary team of experts i.e agronomists, soil scientists, phyto-chemists, hydrogeologists, is coordinated by the Walloon Agricultural Research Centre (CRA-W) and funded by the Société Publique de Gestion des Eaux (SPGE). The diagnosis method is inspired of the AQUAPLAINE method (Arvalis, France), and is composed of four steps: 1/preparing the diagnosis using existing data, 2/diagnosis using data bank completed by field observations, 3/meeting and discussion with the pesticide users, 4/final diagnosis and remediation proposal. In a rural district of Walloon Region, a water producer who possesses two catchments ("Les marroniers" (P1) and "Puits N2" (P2)) has problems with pesticides. The pollution started in 1998 with atrazine and bromacile detected in the two catchments. In 2004, 2,6-dichlorobenzamide, metabolite of dichlobenil, was also detected in the catchments. At present, all these pesticides are still found in the catchment P1 and only the 2,6 dichlorobenzamide is found in the other catchment. These active ingredients are not used in agriculture expect atrazine. Indeed, the main user of these products is the public sector. An investigation was realised to locate the main sites which are treated with these pesticides in this commune. The conclusion of this study is that the local authority used dichlobenil, bromacile and atrazine to weed the public areas. In more, the filling and the cleaning areas of sprayer, used for the treatment, are located near the catchments.

  16. Establishing an Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) program in East Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Booth, C A; Warianti, A; Wrigley, T

    2001-01-01

    The Brantas is one of Indonesia's most important catchments. It is the "rice bowl" of Java and nationally important for its industrial activity. Surabaya, Indonesia's second largest city, is located at the mouth of the Brantas River which is pivotal to the city's water supply. The challenges associated with the institutional framework for natural resource management in East Java parallels that of many states and provinces around the globe. It is multi-layered and complex. Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) may be defined as "the co-ordinated and sustainable management of land, water, soil vegetation, fauna and other natural resources on a water catchment basis". Over a period of six months, an ICM Strategy was researched and facilitated for the Brantas River Catchment in East Java via a short term advisor attachment. The aim of the Strategy is to improve coordination, co-operation, communication and consistency of government and community efforts towards sustaining the catchment's environmental, economic and social values. The attachment was part of the Pollution Control Implementation (PCI) Project funded by AusAid and the Indonesian Government. The ICM Strategy developed was broad based and addressed the priority natural resource management issues facing the Brantas Catchment. It was co-ordinated by BAPEDALDA, the Provincial Environmental Protection Agency, and developed by all agencies involved in natural resource management in the catchment. Various Universities and Non Government Organisations (NGOs) were also involved in the ICM process which developed the Strategy. At the conclusion of the attachment, a draft ICM Strategy and a proposed institutional framework had been developed. A working group of key agencies was also established to further enhance local "ownership", finalise timescales and implementation responsibilities within the Strategy and bring the institutional arrangements into being through a Governor's Decree.

  17. Before and After Integrated Catchment Management in a Headwater Catchment: Changes in Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Andrew O.; Quinn, John M.

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  18. Before and after integrated catchment management in a headwater catchment: changes in water quality.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew O; Quinn, John M

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures. PMID:25228091

  19. Before and after integrated catchment management in a headwater catchment: changes in water quality.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew O; Quinn, John M

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  20. Studies in Teaching: 2009 Research Digest. Research Projects Presented at Annual Research Forum (15th, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the Annual Research Forum. Included herein are the following 29 studies: (1) What Factors Influence Algebra 1 Students' Attitudes toward Math? (Elizabeth A. Allen); (2) Low-Income Student and Teacher Impressions of Kagan Cooperative Learning (Andrea Anderson); (3) Developing and Implementing an Articulated…

  1. Hydrological monitoring of experimental karst catchment Sutina - Karakašica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, O.; Andrić, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Sutina - Karakašica is an ungauged karst catchment in southern part of Croatia with relative small area but with existing records of several events of flash flood that compromised the structures as bridge and roads along the stream. This poster gives an overview of the creation of the experimental catchment and establishment of the hydrological monitoring system which has for a goal a better understanding of runoff processes within the experimental karst area as well as flash flood occurrence analysis. The studied catchment is located in Dalmatia, southern part of Croatia, a region of Dinaric karst. Although it is very difficult to determine catchment borders in the karstic terrain, for the porpoises of the study the area of the catchment is estimated to 8 km2. The length of the stream flow up to the control cross section is 4.4 km. The highest point of the studied catchment area is on the 941 m a.s.l. and the lowest at the 300 m a.s.l. The geological settings of the catchment are characterized by the sedimentary rocks, mostly limestone and dolomites with discontinuities (cracks, and fractures) filled up with terra rossa and breccias. The presence of mudstone patches in the surface ensures the continuous surface flow of the studied stream. Some caves are also to be found in the catchment area. In the karst watersheds the occurrence of flash floods can be registered due to the exceptional meteorologic events during the year. The intensive rainfall in the short time period can trigger a flash flood that can induce overbank flow, immense changes in channel morphology and in sediment distribution. In order to produce a hydrological model that could predict the events of flash flood in the studied area, a continuous monitoring of meteorological and hydrological parameters in the catchment is established. The predictions of exceptional flooding events derived from a useful hydrological model based on the study site can be used further on to quantify the possible

  2. Investigating the potential to reduce flood risk through catchment-based land management techniques and interventions in the River Roe catchment, Cumbria,UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Callum; Reaney, Sim; Bracken, Louise; Butler, Lucy

    2015-04-01

    Throughout the United Kingdom flood risk is a growing problem and a significant proportion of the population are at risk from flooding throughout the country. Across England and Wales over 5 million people are believed to be at risk from fluvial, pluvial or coastal flooding (DEFRA, 2013). Increasingly communities that have not dealt with flooding before have recently experienced significant flood events. The communities of Stockdalewath and Highbridge in the Roe catchment, a tributary of the River Eden in Cumbria, UK, are an excellent example. The River Roe has a normal flow of less than 5m3 sec-1 occurring 97 percent of the time however there have been two flash floods of 98.8m3 sec-1 in January 2005 and 86.9m3 sec-1 in May 2013. These two flash flood events resulted in the inundation of numerous properties within the catchment with the 2013 event prompting the creation of the Roe Catchment Community Water Management Group which aims are to deliver a sustainable approach to managing the flood risk. Due to the distributed rural population the community fails the cost-benefit analysis for a centrally funded flood risk mitigation scheme. Therefore the at-risk community within the Roe catchment have to look for cost-effective, sustainable techniques and interventions to reduce the potential negative impacts of future events; this has resulted in a focus on natural flood risk management. This research investigates the potential to reduce flood risk through natural catchment-based land management techniques and interventions within the Roe catchment; providing a scientific base from with further action can be enacted. These interventions include changes to land management and land use, such as soil aeration and targeted afforestation, the creation of runoff attenuation features and the construction of in channel features, such as debris dams. Natural flood management (NFM) application has been proven to be effective when reducing flood risk in smaller catchments and the

  3. Validation of Pacific Northwest hydrologic landscapes at the catchment scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and de...

  4. Identification of internal flow dynamics in two experimental catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, D.P.; Jakeman, A.J.; Kendall, C.; Weizu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the internal flow dynamics in catchments is difficult because of the lack of information in precipitation -stream discharge time series alone. Two experimental catchments, Hydrohill and Nandadish, near Nanjing in China, have been set up to monitor internal flows reaching the catchment stream at various depths, from the surface runoff to the bedrock. With analysis of the precipitation against these internal discharges, it is possible to quantify the time constants and volumes associated with various flowpaths in both catchments.

  5. Use of color maps and wavelet coherence to discern seasonal and interannual climate influences on streamflow variability in northern catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Sean K.; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Buttle, Jim; Laudon, Hjalmar; McDonnell, Jeff; McGuire, Kevin; Seibert, Jan; Soulsby, Chris; Shanley, Jamie

    2013-10-01

    The higher midlatitudes of the northern hemisphere are particularly sensitive to change due to the important role the 0°C isotherm plays in the phase of precipitation and intermediate storage as snow. An international intercatchment comparison program called North-Watch seeks to improve our understanding of the sensitivity of northern catchments to change by examining their hydrological and biogeochemical variability and response. Here eight North-Watch catchments located in Sweden (Krycklan), Scotland (Girnock and Strontian), the United States (Sleepers River, Hubbard Brook, and HJ Andrews), and Canada (Dorset and Wolf Creek) with 10 continuous years of daily precipitation and runoff data were selected to assess daily to seasonal coupling of precipitation (P) and runoff (Q) using wavelet coherency, and to explore the patterns and scales of variability in streamflow using color maps. Wavelet coherency revealed that P and Q were decoupled in catchments with cold winters, yet were strongly coupled during and immediately following the spring snowmelt freshet. In all catchments, coupling at shorter time scales occurred during wet periods when the catchment was responsive and storage deficits were small. At longer time scales, coupling reflected coherence between seasonal cycles, being enhanced at sites with enhanced seasonality in P. Color maps were applied as an alternative method to identify patterns and scales of flow variability. Seasonal versus transient flow variability was identified along with the persistence of that variability on influencing the flow regime. While exploratory in nature, this intercomparison exercise highlights the importance of climate and the 0°C isotherm on the functioning of northern catchments.

  6. Natural flood risk management in flashy headwater catchments: managing runoff peaks, timing, water quality and sediment regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Addy, Steve; Ghimire, Sohan; Kenyon, Wendy; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; Stutter, Marc; Watson, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade many European catchments have experienced an unusually high number of flood events. A large number of these events are the result of intense rainfall in small headwater catchments which are dominated by surface runoff generation, resulting in flash flooding of local communities. Soil erosion and related water quality issues, among others, are typically associated with such rapid runoff generation. The hazard of flooding is increasing owing to impacts of changing climatic patterns (including more intense summer storms), intensification of agriculture within rural catchments and continued pressure to build on floodplains. Concurrently, the cost of constructing and maintaining traditional flood defences in small communities outweigh the potential benefits. Hence, there is a growing interest in more cost effective natural approaches that also have multipurpose benefits in terms of sediment, water quality, and habitat creation. Many catchments in Europe are intensively farmed and there is great potential for agriculture to be part of the solution to flood risk management. Natural flood management (NFM) is the alteration, restoration or use of landscape features with the aim of reducing flood risk by slowing down, storing (and filtering) rapid surface runoff. NFM includes measures such as temporarily storing water in ponds/wetlands, increasing soil infiltration, planting trees on floodplains and within catchments, re-meandering and wood placements in streams/ditches. In this presentation we highlight case studies from densely instrumented research sites across the UK (which could be typical of many European catchments) where NFM measures have been installed in small scale flashy catchments. The presentation will give an overview of the function of these measures in these catchments and how other multiple benefits are being accrued. Study catchments include the headwater catchments of the Bowmont (3 to 8 km2) and Belford Burn (6 km2) catchments. These

  7. Groundwater vulnerability assessment in Jaworzynka's Valley catchment basin (Tatra Mountains, Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cypel, M.

    2012-04-01

    During the research an attempt was made to assess an intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to contamination in Tatra Mountains (Poland. Assessment of the degree of hazard of permeating pollutions from land surface directly to the ground water table was the main target of the research. The Jaworzynka's Valley in West Tatra Mountains was chosen as the exact research area. Jaworzynka's Valley is a typical karst catchment basin. Location of study area wasn't accidental, because in the north part of the valley there is a well which is being used as drinking water intake for the whole Zakopane City. This is the reason, why the quality of ground water is so important. The method used in this research, entitled KARSTIC, wasn't applied in Poland before. This is a parametric method of groundwater vulnerability assessment. KARSTIC is a modification of much better known DRASTIC method, specialized for specific karst terrain. KARSTIC method created by A. Davis and others (1994), was used for the first time, during a research in the Black Hills Mountains, USA. Research in Jaworzynka's Valley was based on the Black Hills study. In order to apply this method in Tatra Mountains, it was necessary to make a few changes in relation to original area. Applying KARSTIC method consists of successive stages. Schematization of hydrogeological conditions is an inseparable part of KARSTIC method. The first step bases on collecting all of available data such as maps, databases and documentations. Next stage consists of classifying all parameters employed in this method and then assigning a ratings and weights for this parameters. Subsequently it is necessary to use a mathematical formula, named Pollution Potential Index, which presents a ground water vulnerability in each point. The final step is visualization on the ground water vulnerability map. The result of research displays the high vulnerability in close proximity of the drinking water intake. The most vulnerable areas in Jaworzynka

  8. Storage selection functions: A coherent framework for quantifying how catchments store and release water and solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Benettin, Paolo; Harman, Ciaran J.; Hrachowitz, Markus; McGuire, Kevin J.; van der Velde, Ype; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Botter, Gianluca

    2015-06-01

    We discuss a recent theoretical approach combining catchment-scale flow and transport processes into a unified framework. The approach is designed to characterize the hydrochemistry of hydrologic systems and to meet the challenges posed by empirical evidence. StorAge Selection functions (SAS) are defined to represent the way catchment storage supplies the outflows with water of different ages, thus regulating the chemical composition of out-fluxes. Biogeochemical processes are also reflected in the evolving residence time distribution and thus in age-selection. Here we make the case for the routine use of SAS functions and look forward to areas where further research is needed.

  9. Modeling daily streamflow at ungauged catchments: What information is necessary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S.; Stieglitz, M.

    2011-12-01

    Streamflow modeling at ungauged catchments involves transfer of information (viz., model structure and parameters) from gauged to ungauged catchments that are judged to be hydrologically similar. In this study, we focus on identifying: (1) what constitutes the critical information that needs to be transferred among hydrologically similar catchments to achieve good predictability using models at ungauged sites, and (2) which is the best approach for transferring this information from gauged to ungauged catchments. We develop a simple hydrologic model with minimal calibration requirement and implement it over 756 catchments located across the continental United States. The model computes water balance at a daily time-step and conceptualizes subsurface runoff through a storage-dependent exponential decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity. Snow accumulation and melt are modeled using the thermal degree-day concept. The calibrated model performs better in humid runoff-dominated regions than in the drier evapotranspiration-dominated regions. Results show that within a region, transfer of hydrograph recession information alone is sufficient for reliable streamflow predictions at ungauged catchments. Information transfer from spatially proximate gauged catchments provides better streamflow predictability at ungauged catchments than transfer from catchments identified as physically similar. When considering spatially proximate catchments, information transfer from multiple donor catchments is preferable to transfer from a single donor catchment.

  10. Hydrogeology, groundwater seepage, nitrate distribution, and flux at the Raleigh hydrologic research station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    rom 2005 to 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, conducted a study to describe the geologic framework, measure groundwater quality, characterize the groundwater-flow system, and describe the groundwater/surface-water interaction at the 60-acre Raleigh hydrogeologic research station (RHRS) located at the Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant in eastern Wake County, North Carolina. Previous studies have shown that the local groundwater quality of the surficial and bedrock aquifers at the RHRS had been affected by high levels of nutrients. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from 3 coreholes, 12 wells, and 4 piezometers at 3 well clusters, as well as from 2 surface-water sites, 2 multiport piezometers, and 80 discrete locations in the streambed of the Neuse River. Data collected were used to evaluate the three primary zones of the Piedmont aquifer (regolith, transition zone, and fractured bedrock) and characterize the interaction of groundwater and surface water as a mechanism of nutrient transport to the Neuse River. A conceptual hydrogeologic cross section across the RHRS was constructed using new and existing data. Two previously unmapped north striking, nearly vertical diabase dikes intrude the granite beneath the site. Groundwater within the diabase dike appeared to be hydraulically isolated from the surrounding granite bedrock and regolith. A correlation exists between foliation and fracture orientation, with most fractures striking parallel to foliation. Flowmeter logging in two of the bedrock wells indicated that not all of the water-bearing fractures labeled as water bearing were hydraulically active, even when stressed by pumping. Groundwater levels measured in wells at the RHRS displayed climatic and seasonal trends, with elevated groundwater levels occurring during the late spring and declining to a low in the late fall. Vertical

  11. Global investigation of vegetation impact on mean annual catchment evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Murray C.; McMahon, Thomas A.; Finlayson, Brian L.

    2010-05-01

    Historically, relationships between catchment vegetation type, evapotranspiration and runoff have been assessed primarily through paired catchment studies. The literature contains results from over 200 of these studies from around the world but two factors limit the applicability of the results to the wider domain. Firstly, catchment areas are generally small (<10 km2). Secondly, the range of climate types is narrow, with temperate (Köppen C) and cold (Köppen D) climate types in the majority. Here we present results from a global assessment of the impact of vegetation type on mean annual catchment evapotranspiration for a large, spatially and climatically diverse dataset of 699 catchments. This assessment is based on analysis of areal precipitation, temperature, runoff, and land cover information from each catchment, which differs from the paired catchment methodology where streamflow responses to a controlled land cover change are assessed. When catchments are grouped by vegetation type, any evidence of differing vegetation impact on actual evapotranspiration will be observed through differences in mean annual actual evapotranspiration, defined as precipitation minus runoff. Stratifying catchments by climate type was observed to be important when assessing the vegetation impact on evapotranspiration. Tropical and temperate forested catchments had significantly higher median evapotranspiration (~170mm and ~130mm, respectively) than non-forested catchments. Cold forested catchments unexpectedly had significantly lower median evapotranspiration (~90mm) than non-forested catchments. No significant difference in median evapotranspiration was found between temperate evergreen and deciduous forested catchments, though sample sizes were small. Temperate evergreen needleleaf forested catchments had significantly higher median evapotranspiration than evergreen broadleaf forested catchments, though again sample sizes were small. The significant difference in median

  12. Identification of weathered structures and aquifers from resistivity observations in the Strengbach catchment (Vosges, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, Julien; Sailhac, Pascal; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Viville, Daniel; Pierret, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    In low mountain regions, natural water resources used for agriculture or drinking water generally come from natural sources. Management of these water resources is complex for some catchments where most of the water flows is exfiltrating from bedrock aquifers characterized by important spatial heterogeneity and different connectivity levels in space and time. The Strengbach catchment (Vosges, North East France) is a hydro-geochemical observatory monitored for more than 25 years. The numerous geochemical studies have highlighted the existence of different lithological and structural units in the catchment constituted by different weathered granitic aquifers. Their spatial extension has been determined through the measurement of the soil electrical resistivity using 20 Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles. The profiles have been inverted separately with the BERT software in 2D and compared to 2.5 D inversions, where the inversion accounts for the profile crossings. The comparison between 2D and 2.5D inversion results allows validating the 2-D assumption. The 20 profiles are distributed over the complete catchment and cover more densely the water source area of the Strengbach stream. The shallow resistivities (5-10 m) measured highlight several weathered zones possibly characterized by different porosity. A combined analysis with soil water conductivity measurements in boreholes allows proposing a map of the spatial extension of these units. The resistivity data are also used to assess the depth of the main reservoir at the scale of the catchment. The hypothesis of the existence of a deeper reservoir is brought out by Audio-Magneto Telluric (AMT) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurements.

  13. A Many-Objective Approach to Developing Adaptive Water Supply Portfolios in the 'Research Triangle' Region of North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeff, H. B.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Reed, P. M.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    This study uses many-objective evolutionary optimization to quantify the tradeoffs water utilities face when developing flexible water shortage response plans. Alternatives to infrastructure development, such as temporary demand management programs and inter-utility water transfer agreements, allow local water providers to develop portfolios of water supply options capable of adapting to changing hydrologic conditions and growing water demand. The extent to which these options are implemented will be determined by a number of conflicting operational and financial considerations. An integrated reservoir simulation model including four large water utilities in the 'Research Triangle' region of North Carolina is used to evaluate the potential tradeoffs resulting from regional demands on shared infrastructure, customer concerns, and the financial uncertainty caused by the intermittent and irregular nature of drought. Instead of providing one optimal solution, multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) use the concept of non-dominations to discover a set of portfolio options in which no solution is inferior to any other solution in all objectives. Interactive visual analytics enable water providers to explore these tradeoffs and develop water shortage response plans tailored to their individual circumstances. The simulation model is evaluated under a number of different formulations to help identify and visualize the impacts of water efficiency, revenue/cost variability, consumer effects, and inter-utility cooperation. The different problems are formulated by adding portfolio options and objectives in such a way that the lower dimensional problem formulations are sub-sets of the full formulation. The full formulation considers reservoir reliability, water use restriction frequency, total water transfer allotment, total costs, revenue/cost variability, and additional consumer losses during restrictions. The simulation results highlight the inadequacy of lower order

  14. Extending a rainfall-runoff model for lowland catchments from lumped to semi-distributed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) is a parametric rainfall-runoff model for catchments with shallow groundwater (Brauer et al., 2014ab). WALRUS was developed using data and experience from two Dutch experimental catchments: the Hupsel Brook catchment (6.5 km2) and the Cabauw polder (0.5 km2). We identified key processes for runoff generation in lowland catchments, notably (1) groundwater-unsaturated zone coupling, (2) wetness-dependent flow routes, (3) groundwater-surface water feedbacks and (4) seepage and surface water supply, and accounted for these in the model structure. Up to now, WALRUS has been used in a lumped manner. However, water managers and researchers have expressed an interest in a semi-distributed version for application to larger catchments with varying forcing and catchment characteristics and to investigate the effect of groundwater flow within the catchment on modelled variables (e.g. groundwater depth). We combined WALRUS and a model for 2-dimensional groundwater flow into a simple modelling framework. WALRUS was already designed to cope with groundwater flow into or out of the model domain, because seepage and lateral groundwater flow are common in lowlands. In the semi-distributed version, we used this feature to couple different WALRUS elements (grid cells or subcatchments) to each other. Groundwater flow was computed using a digital elevation model, groundwater depths computed by WALRUS, soil transmissivity data and Darcy's law. Finally, we implemented a surface routing model including backwater effects, which are relevant in areas with little relief. With respect to the lumped version, the semi-distributed requires more data. Therefore, we investigated the added value of different data sources (forcing, elevation, soil, surface water) separately. We will present the rationale behind the semi-distributed model and show how the model structure compares to observations and and simulations without lateral transport. C.C. Brauer

  15. Development and testing of a bank erosion modelling tool for informing catchment management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, V.; Nicholas, A.; Collins, A.; Quine, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    migration rates was investigated using existing meander migration models (e.g., Howard and Knutson, 1984; Lancaster and Bras, 2002). Model outputs were compared to the observed channel evolution from GIS and regression relationships. The migration models and GIS data were then used to investigate the relationship between channel sinuosity and bank erosion further. It was noted that this relationship is linear up to a threshold value, at which point bank erosion rate does not increase with an additional increase in channel sinuosity. An index incorporating factors observed to have significant influence on bank erosion rates from the research was developed. The performance of the bank erosion index was then evaluated against GIS data. This index out-performs existing modelling approaches and seeks to incorporate the key physical controls on bank erosion, hence it is expected that it will have wide applicability in catchment- to national-scale bank erosion assessment.

  16. Investigating catchment-scale hysteretic behaviour of nutrients at annual and individual storm time-resolutions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Charlotte; Freer, Jim; Johnes, Penny; Collins, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires that all water bodies should be maintained at, or raised to, good ecological status, driven by improved integrated catchment management. Therefore, it is necessary to implement cost-effective mitigation strategies to reduce pollution from nutrients and improve overall water quality. If successful mitigation strategies are to be designed then it is imperative that catchment scale responses to environmental and anthropogenic changes are better understood. Against this background, this presentation investigates changes in hysteretic behaviours of nutrients in response to different environmental drivers using high resolution monitoring techniques. Observations of hysteretic behaviour can provide insights into the dominant flow pathways of pollutants. Therefore, monitoring changes in nutrient hysteresis can provide a useful tool for detecting regime differences or changes within and between catchments. In the UK, the Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) project has been set up to monitor evidence for improving water quality problems arising specifically from diffuse pollution from agriculture using targeted mitigation experiments and high resolution monitoring. This research platform provides an opportunity to compare storm-driven nutrient behaviour between catchments which have differing geologies, as well as how these behaviours evolve on a seasonal and annual basis. The monitoring to date has included a period of drought, directly followed by extreme wet conditions in the UK and therefore offers opportunities to assess the effect of differences in antecedent conditions on monitored nutrient response to rainfall events. The study compares the hysteretic behaviour of nutrients, including nitrogen and phosphorus species as well as sediment from a number of storm events of varying magnitudes throughout the 2011-2012 monitoring period in the Hampshire Avon catchment as part of the DTC programme. The investigation focuses

  17. DOC quantity and quality in northeastern USA catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Aiken, G.; Pellerin, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont we have studied interactions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycling and hydrological processes for nearly 20 years to determine how and when DOC is transported through the landscape. Stream DOC concentration in this cool temperate forested catchment varies from ~1 to ~15 mg L-1 and is transport-limited; concentrations increase with increasing flow, even under the wettest conditions, suggesting shifting but non-depletable sources. Specific UV absorbance (SUVA) also increases consistently with flow. Source strength does vary seasonally, however, evidenced by higher DOC for a given flow during autumn leaf fall relative to spring snowmelt. Recent high-frequency optical sensor measurements have revealed fine-scale structure in the temporal DOC pattern not possible from discrete sampling. We observe a consistent counterclockwise hysteresis and diurnal cycles with seasonally variable amplitude. In this presentation we infer DOC sources and processes through analysis of antecedent moisture conditions and concurrent variations in nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen, and SUVA. With sensors and sampling in place at several other research catchments, we are investigating the similarity of patterns across the northeastern USA.

  18. Compilation of water-resources data and hydrogeologic setting for four research stations in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of North Carolina, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Brad A.; Pfeifle, Cassandra A.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Bolich, Richard E.; Campbell, Ted R.; Geddes, Donald J.; Pippin, Charles G.

    2006-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at four research stations in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from September 2000 through September 2004 are presented in this report. The locations and periods of data collection are as follows: the Lake Wheeler Road research station (Raleigh) from April 2001 to September 2004, the Langtree Peninsula research station (Mooresville) from September 2000 to September 2004, the Upper Piedmont research station (Reidsville) from March 2002 to September 2004, and the Bent Creek research station (Asheville) from July 2002 to September 2004. Data presented in this report include well-construction characteristics for 110 wells, periodic ground-water-level measurements for 96 wells, borehole geophysical logs for 23 wells, hourly ground-water-level measurements for 12 wells, continuous-stage measurements for 2 streams, continuous water-quality measurements for 8 wells and 2 streams, periodic water-quality samples for 57 wells and 6 stream sites, slug-test results for 38 wells, and shallow ground-water-flow maps. In addition, the geology and hydrogeology at each site are summarized.

  19. Establishment of a hydrological monitoring network in a tropical African catchment: An integrated participatory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomani, M. C.; Dietrich, O.; Lischeid, G.; Mahoo, H.; Mahay, F.; Mbilinyi, B.; Sarmett, J.

    Sound decision making for water resources management has to be based on good knowledge of the dominant hydrological processes of a catchment. This information can only be obtained through establishing suitable hydrological monitoring networks. Research catchments are typically established without involving the key stakeholders, which results in instruments being installed at inappropriate places as well as at high risk of theft and vandalism. This paper presents an integrated participatory approach for establishing a hydrological monitoring network. We propose a framework with six steps beginning with (i) inception of idea; (ii) stakeholder identification; (iii) defining the scope of the network; (iv) installation; (v) monitoring; and (vi) feedback mechanism integrated within the participatory framework. The approach is illustrated using an example of the Ngerengere catchment in Tanzania. In applying the approach, the concept of establishing the Ngerengere catchment monitoring network was initiated in 2008 within the Resilient Agro-landscapes to Climate Change in Tanzania (ReACCT) research program. The main stakeholders included: local communities; Sokoine University of Agriculture; Wami Ruvu Basin Water Office and the ReACCT Research team. The scope of the network was based on expert experience in similar projects and lessons learnt from literature review of similar projects from elsewhere integrated with local expert knowledge. The installations involved reconnaissance surveys, detailed surveys, and expert consultations to identify best sites. First, a Digital Elevation Model, land use, and soil maps were used to identify potential monitoring sites. Local and expert knowledge was collected on flow regimes, indicators of shallow groundwater plant species, precipitation pattern, vegetation, and soil types. This information was integrated and used to select sites for installation of an automatic weather station, automatic rain gauges, river flow gauging stations

  20. Hydrological modelling of urbanized catchments: A review and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadore, Elga; Bronders, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the conceptual detail of hydrological models has dramatically increased as a result of improved computational techniques and the availability of spatially-distributed digital data. Nevertheless modelling spatially-distributed hydrological processes can be challenging, particularly in strongly heterogeneous urbanized areas. Multiple interactions occur between urban structures and the water system at various temporal and spatial scales. So far, no universal methodology exists for simulating the urban water system at catchment scale. This paper reviews the state of the art on the scientific knowledge and practice of modelling the urban hydrological system at the catchment scale, with the purpose of identifying current limitations and defining a blueprint for future modelling advances. We compare conceptual descriptions of urban physical hydrological processes on basis of a selection of 43 modelling approaches. The complexity of the urban water system at the catchment scale results in an incomplete understanding of the interaction between urban and natural hydrological systems, and in a high degree of uncertainty. Data availability is still a strong limitation since current modelling practice recognizes the need for high spatial and temporal resolution. Spatio-temporal gaps exist between the physical scales of hydrological processes and the resolution of applied models. Therefore urban hydrology is often simplified either as a study of surface runoff over impervious surfaces or hydraulics of piped systems. Many approaches target very specific objectives and the level of detail in representing physical processes is not consistent. Based on our analysis, we propose a blueprint for a highly complex integrated urban hydrological model. We regard flexibility, in terms of model structure and data assimilation, as the key characteristic for overcoming these limitations. We advocate the use of modular, process-based approaches, which are flexible and adaptable

  1. Ecosystem Services Derived from Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from the USEPA’s wadeable streams assessment (WSA), US Forest Service’s forest inventory and analysis (FIA), and select USFS experimental forests (EF) to investigate potential ecosystems services derived from headwater catchments. C, N, and P inputs to these catchmen...

  2. Hydrological Modelling of Small Catchments Using Swat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Groves, S.

    The data from a 142ha catchment in Eastern England(Colworth, Bedfordshire)are be- ing used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT software for modelling hydrology of small catchments. Stream flow at the catchment outlet has been mon- itored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available. Calibration and validation of stream flow was carried out with both runoff modelling options in the SWAT model (USDA curve number method and the Green and Ampt method). The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiencies for the calibration period were 66% and 63% respec- tively. The performance of SWAT was better in the validation period as a whole, with regard to timing of peaks, baseflow values and Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency. An ef- ficiency of 70% was obtained using the curve number method, which is comparable with the efficiencies obtainable with more complex models. Despite this performance, SWAT is under predicting stream flow peaks. A detailed investigation of important model components, has allowed us to identify some of the reasons for under predic- tion of stream flow peaks.

  3. Streamflow variation of forest covered catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribovszki, Z.; Kalicz, P.; Kucsara, M.

    2003-04-01

    Rainfall concentration and runoff, otherwise rainfall-runoff processes, which cause river water discharge fluctuation, is one of the basic questions of hydrology. Several social-economy demands have a strong connection with small or bigger rivers from the point of view both quantity and quality of the water. Gratification or consideration of these demands is complicated substantially that we have still poor knowledge about our stream-flow regime. Water resources mainly stem from upper watersheds. These upper watersheds are the basis of the water concentration process; therefore we have to improve our knowledge about hydrological processes coming up in these territories. In this article we present runoff regime of two small catchments on the basis of one year data. Both catchments have a similar magnitude 0.6 and 0.9 km^2. We have been analyzed in detail some hydrological elements: features of rainfall, discharge, rainfall induced flooding waves and basic discharge in rainless periods. Variances of these parameters have been analyzed in relation to catchments surface, vegetation coverage and forest management. Result data set well enforce our knowledge about small catchments hydrological processes. On the basis of these fundamentals we can plan more established the management of these lands (forest practices, civil engineering works, and usage of natural water resources).

  4. Patterns of Living Related to Income Poverty in Disadvantaged Families, A Basebook. North Central Regional Research Publication No. 217.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liston, Margaret I., Ed.

    The Technical Committee for NC-90, sponsored by the Agricultural and Home Economics Experiment Stations of 13 states (Alaska, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) and in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has compiled a basebook which identifies…

  5. "Making Connections" at the University of North Carolina: Moving toward a Global Curriculum at a Flagship Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jay M.; Kruse, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has reformed its undergraduate curriculum to create connections across disciplines and advance efforts to internationalize its campus. As a result, global issues, experiential learning, study abroad, and international course clusters have become an integral part of a curriculum that emphasizes…

  6. A Comparative Economic Analysis of North-Central New Mexico. New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report 211.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Garrey E.; Eastman, Clyde

    North-Central New Mexico has many of the problems common to other rural areas. Unemployment and underemployment rates tend to be high and per capita income relatively low. This study evaluated regional economic performance over a 19-year period (1949-1968) as compared to other regions and the nation. Shift analysis (a means of examining regional…

  7. Policy Fuzz and Fuzzy Logic: Researching Contemporary Indigenous Education and Parent-School Engagement in North Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Tess; Thompson, Helen; McRae-Williams, Eva; Wegner, Aggie

    2011-01-01

    "Engagement" is the second of six top priorities in Australia's most recent Indigenous education strategy to "close the gap" in schooling outcomes. Drawing on findings from a three-year ethnographic analysis of school engagement issues in the north of Australia, this article situates engagement within the history of Indigenous education policy,…

  8. Downscaled TRMM Rainfall Time-Series for Catchment Hydrology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnavsky, E.; Mulligan, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrology in semi-arid regions is controlled, to a large extent, by the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall defined in terms of rainfall depth and intensity. Thus, appropriate representation of the space-time variability of rainfall is essential for catchment-scale hydrological models applied in semi-arid regions. While spaceborne platforms equipped with remote sensing instruments provide information on a range of variables for hydrological modelling, including rainfall, the necessary spatial and temporal detail is rarely obtained from a single dataset. This paper presents a new dynamic model of dryland hydrology, DryMOD, which makes best use of free, public-domain remote sensing data for representation of key variables with a particular focus on (a) simulation of spatial rainfall fields and (b) the hydrological response to rainfall, particularly in terms of rainfall-runoff partitioning. In DryMOD, rainfall is simulated using a novel approach combining 1-km spatial detail from a climatology derived from the TRMM 2B31 dataset (mean monthly rainfall) and 3-hourly temporal detail from time-series derived from the 0.25-degree gridded TRMM 3B42 dataset (rainfall intensity). This allows for rainfall simulation at the hourly time step, as well as accumulation of infiltration, recharge, and runoff at the monthly time step. In combination with temperature, topography, and soil data, rainfall-runoff and soil moisture dynamics are simulated over large dryland regions. In order to investigate the hydrological response to rainfall and variable catchment characteristics, the model is applied to two very different catchments in the drylands of North and West Africa. The results of the study demonstrate the use of remote sensing-based estimates of precipitation intensity and volume for the simulation of critical hydrological parameters. The model allows for better spatial planning of water harvesting activities, as well as for optimisation of agricultural activities

  9. Catchment scale afforestation for mitigating flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mhari; Quinn, Paul; Bathurst, James; Birkinshaw, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    After the 2013-14 floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. At present, 1 in 6 homes in Britain are at risk of flooding and current EU legislation demands a sustainable, 'nature-based solution'. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management technique remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. SHETRAN, physically-based spatially-distributed hydrological models of the Irthing catchment and Wark forest sub-catchments (northern England) have been developed in order to test the hypothesis of the effect trees have on flood magnitude. The advanced physically-based models have been designed to model scale-related responses from 1, through 10, to 100km2, a first study of the extent to which afforestation and woody debris runoff attenuation features (RAFs) may help to mitigate floods at the full catchment scale (100-1000 km2) and on a national basis. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, and the installation of nature-based RAFs, such as woody debris dams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. The impacts of riparian planting and the benefits of adding large woody debris of several designs and on differing sizes of channels has also been simulated using advanced hydrodynamic (HiPIMS) and hydrological modelling (SHETRAN). With the aim of determining the effect forestry may have on flood frequency, 1000 years of generated rainfall data representative of current conditions has been used to determine the difference between current land-cover, different distributions of forest cover and the defining scenarios - complete forest removal and complete afforestation of the catchment. The simulations show the percentage of forestry required to have a significant impact on mitigating

  10. Boron water quality for the Plynlimon catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C.

    Boron concentrations in rainfall, throughfall and stemflow for Spruce stands, mist, streamwater and groundwater are compared with chloride to assess atmospheric sources and catchment input-output balances for the Plynlimon catchments. In rainfall, boron concentration averages about 4.5 μg-B l-1 and approximately two thirds of this comes from anthropogenic sources. In through-fall and stemflow, boron concentrations are approximately a factor of ten times higher than in rainfall. This increase is associated with enhanced scavenging of mist and dry deposition by the trees. As the sampling sites were close to a forest edge, this degree of scavenging is probably far higher than in the centre of the forest. The throughfall and stemflow concentrations of boron show some evidence of periodic variations with time with peak concentrations occurring during the summer months indicating some vegetational cycling. In mist, boron concentrations are almost twenty times higher than in rainfall and anthropogenic sources account for about 86% of this. Within the Plynlimon streams, boron concentrations are about 1.4 to 1.7 times higher than in rainfall. However, after allowance for mist and dry deposition contributions to atmospheric deposition, it seems that, on average, about 30% of the boron input is retained within the catchment. For the forested catchments, felling results in a disruption of the biological cycle and a small increase in boron leaching from the catchment results in the net retention by the catchment being slightly reduced. Despite the net uptake by the catchment, there is clear evidence of a boron component of weathering from the bedrock. This is shown by an increased boron concentration in a stream influenced by a nearby borehole which increased groundwater inputs. The weathering component for boron is also observed in Plynlimon groundwaters as boron concentrations and boron to chloride ratios are higher than for the streams. For these Goundwaters, increases in

  11. Hydrological improvements for nutrient and pollutant emission modeling in large scale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höllering, S.; Ihringer, J.

    2012-04-01

    hydrological system is simulated spatially differentiated and emissions from urban and rural areas into river courses can be detected separately. In the Ruhr catchment (4.485 km2) as a right tributary of the Rhine located in the lower mountain range of North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany for the validation period 2002-2006 the hydrological model showed first satisfying results. The feasibility study in the Ruhr shows the suitability of the approach and illustrates the potentials for further developments in terms of an implementation throughout the German and contiguous watersheds. IWG, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). 2011. http://isww.iwg.kit.edu/MoRE.php. [Online] Institute for Water and River Basin Management, Department of Aquatic Environmental Engineering, October 2011. USGS, U.S. Geological Survey. 2009. PRMS-2009, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. Denver, Colorado : s.n., 2009. Bd. U.S. Geologic Survey Open File Report.

  12. Spatial and temporal simulation of groundwater age distributions of a small mountainous catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundel, Anita; Weiler, Markus; Schirmer, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and temporal storage characteristics of catchments are relevant to identify the vulnerability of catchments to climate change. Areas with high mean groundwater ages imply long residence times of water particles in the aquifer and are therefore a good indicator for high storage capacity of a catchment. Groundwater age in general is strongly influenced by porosity, flow direction and flow velocity. Hence, the great challenge for moutainous catchments is the steep topography and the complex geology which has the greatest impact on the groundwater age distribution. The main purpose of this study is the simulation of the groundwater age of a well-instrumented pre-alpine catchment in time and space to identify storage characteristics. One possibility to simulate groundwater age distributions in space and time is the application of a numerical groundwater model, which takes into account complex geological structures as well as the flow and transport processes of the unsaturated and saturated zone. In our study, we used the numerical 3D-finite-element groundwater flow and transport model FEFLOW with a transient direct mean age simulation method based on a mass-weighted average age. The study catchment Rietholzbach is located in the north-east of Switzerland, for which an adequate data set of discharge, groundwater level, and isotopic composition of the groundwater and stream water exists. First of all, a steady-state groundwater flow model was developed to validate the stability and accuracy of the flow simulation and model structure. Secondly, the steady-state results provide the initial conditions for the transient flow and transport simulation of the groundwater age distribution. Residence time simulations of this model were benchmarked against the stable isotope signal δ18O of groundwater and discharge. The results show that less water is stored along the creek in the shallow aquifer (young water) whereas substantial storage capacities (old water) are

  13. What is the Source? Post-glacial sediment flux from the Waipaoa Catchment, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilderback, E. L.; Pettinga, J. R.; Litchfield, N. J.; Quigley, M.; Marden, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the Waipaoa, and for much of the eastern North Island, the shift from the last glacial coldest period to the current interglacial climatic regime resulted in Late Pleistocene-Holocene catchment-wide channel incision (Berryman et al., 2000; Litchfield and Berryman, 2005). Only ~25% of the total post 18 ka sediment yield for the Waipaoa Catchment can be accounted for by channel incision, one of the most widespread and most effective erosive processes in the catchment (Orpin et al., 2006; Marden et al., 2008). We find that deep-seated landslides, which are pervasive, cannot make up this apparent source area sediment deficit. This presents a challenge to our current understanding of the Waipaoa Sedimentary System. New high resolution topographic data sets (lidar and photogrammetry) combined with tephrochronology and field mapping have enabled us to approximate the sediment flux from post 18 ka deep-seated landslides. The sediment delivered to the offshore sink from these upper Waipaoa landslides is likely to be less than 20% of the sediment volume calculated for channel incision. A further GIS analysis of the ~2500 km2 Waipaoa catchment using work from Crosby and Whipple (2006) delineating relict topography and Marden et al. (2008) accounting for river incision and slopes stabilized behind terrace remnants indicates that only about half of the available catchment area could have contributed additional large volumes of sediment to the offshore post 18 ka sink. The presence of tephra cover older than 18 ka on landforms ranging from flat ridgelines to steep (>30 degree) slopes in this remaining terrestrial source area suggests that it has not been eroded en mass. The apparent source deficit remains even though many of the major erosive processes available to fill this deficit have been studied and the potentially contributing catchment area is dramatically reduced by these studies. This analysis raises questions about erosive processes and our ability to balance large

  14. Development of soil quality along a chronosequence under natural succession in the Dragonja catchment, SW Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hall, Rutger; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural fields have been increasingly abandoned in several regions in Southern Europe. In many cases this leads to natural vegetation succession which may have a direct impact on soil quality,biodiversity and hydrological connectivity. This research aims at getting insight on the effects of natural vegetation succession on the development of soil quality in the Sub-Mediterranean Dragonja catchment in SW Slovenia. This site was chosen due to its uniform geology, geomorphology and soil types. Four different stages of vegetation succession (i.e. field, abandoned field, young forest, semi-mature forest) were selected and sampled on both north-, and south-facing slopes, resulting in 8 treatments for which 6 representative sites were sampled. Samples were analysed on OC and TN content, EC, pH, bulk density, aggregate stability and grain size distribution. To get insight on the changes in biodiversity vegetation records were made distinguishing five different plant functional groups (i.e. juveniles, grasses, herbs, shrubs and trees). Age group (i.e. stage of vegetation succession) significantly influenced the OC and TN content, aggregate stability, bulk density and pH. Directly after abandonment, between age group 0 and 1, OC and TN content, aggregate stability and pH increased significantly and bulk density decreased significantly. OC content was most affected by age group and furthermore significantly correlated to TN content, aggregate stability, bulk density and pH. Regarding biodiversity, there was a significant increase in cover by trees between age group 1 and 2 and a significant decrease between age group 2 and 3. Cover by herbs decreased significantly between age group 1 and 2. The number of different trees and shrubs increased significantly between age group 0 and 1, and the number of different juveniles increased significantly between age group 2 and 3. Another factor significantly influencing the soil's quality is aspect. Although not found for each age

  15. Evaluating an ecosystem management approach for improving water quality in two contrasting study catchments in south-west England.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendell, Miriam; Brazier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) 2000 established a new emphasis for the management of freshwaters by establishing ecologically-based water quality targets that are to be achieved through holistic, catchment-scale, ecosystem management approaches. However, significant knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the cumulative effectiveness of multiple mitigation measures on a number of pollutants at a catchment scale. This research furthers the understanding of the effectiveness of an ecosystem management approach to deliver catchment-scale water quality improvements in two contrasting study catchments in south-west England: the lowland agricultural Aller and the upland semi-natural Horner Water. Characterisation of the spatial variability of soil properties (bulk density, total carbon, nitrogen, C:N ratio, stable isotope δ15N, total, organic and inorganic phosphorus) in the two study catchments demonstrated extensive alteration of soil properties in the agricultural catchment, with likely long-term implications for the restoration of ecosystem functioning and water quality management (Glendell et al., 2014b). Further, the agricultural catchment supported a proportionally greater total fluvial carbon (dissolved and particulate) export than the semi-natural catchment. During an eight month period for which a comparable continuous turbidity record was available, the estimated SS yields from the agricultural catchment (25.5-116.2 t km-2) were higher than from the semi-natural catchment (21.7-57.8 t km-2). In addition, the agricultural catchment exported proportionally more TPC (0.51-2.59 kg mm-1) than the semi-natural catchment (0.36-0.97 kg mm-1) and a similar amount of DOC (0.26-0.52 kg mm-1 in the Aller and 0.24-0.32 kg mm-1 in Horner Water), when normalised by catchment area and total discharge, despite the lower total soil carbon pool, thus indicating an enhanced fluvial loss of sediment and carbon (Glendell and Brazier, in review). Whilst

  16. Response of current phosphorus mitigation measures across the nutrient transfer continuum in two hydrological contrasting agricultural catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Noeleen; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik; Shortle, Ger; Jordan, Phil

    2015-04-01

    Effective assessment of National Action Programme (NAP) measures introduced under the EU Nitrates Directive (ND), to manage nutrient use and risk of loss to waters from agriculture, is best achieved when examined across the nutrient transfer continuum at catchment scale. The Irish NAP measures are implemented on a whole-territory basis for both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), with P being the key trophic pressure. The aim of this research was to observe the efficacy of P regulation measures and P source management across the transfer continuum and resultant water quality status (i.e. source to impact), in two contrasting agricultural catchments over a four year period. The catchments are ca. 11 km2 and are located in the south-east of Ireland. One is well-drained and arable dominated, while the other is mostly poorly-drained and grassland dominated. In 2009 and 2013 soil surveys for plant-available P were carried out (<2 ha sample areas) in both catchments. Concurrently, high temporal resolution monitoring of water discharge and P concentration was conducted at each catchment outlet across four hydrological years (April to March). Ecological impact surveys were carried out at four sites within each catchment in May and September across the observed four year period (2009-2013). Importantly, the proportion of farmland with excessive soil P concentrations decreased in both the arable (20% to 11.8%) and grassland catchments (5.9 to 3.6%). However, soil P concentrations also declined critically in both catchments, as proportional areas below the national crop agronomic optimum thresholds (grassland; <5 mg P l-1, arable; <6 mg P l-1) increased from 57% to 68% in the arable catchment and 75% to 87% in the grassland catchment. This decline in plant available P strongly indicates a reduced or sustained level of P inputs in both catchments. Indications of responses to soil P change in the surface waters of these catchments appeared to be highly influenced by their

  17. A mediated modelling approach to promote collaborative learning in Andean rural micro-catchments in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowing, John; Dominguez, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    In rural catchments of developing countries water-related diseases, due to land use patterns (agriculture and livestock), microbial pollution, inadequate sanitation systems, access to water of poor quality, and lack of institutional support are common problems which disproportionally affect poor and vulnerable people. This research aims at developing a system dynamic model to improve the understanding of the macro and micro factors that influence human health and environmental health in rural micro-catchments in Valle del Cauca, Colombia. In this catchment livelihoods for most people depend on agriculture, particularly coffee. The research uses a mediated modeling approach, in which different stakeholders in modeling sessions, develop a STELLA model that allows them to identify relations between the economic, social and environmental factors and driving forces over the performance of their system. Stakeholders jointly develop the model structure in sessions facilitated by the researcher and the data required is gathered using secondary information from the different relevant institutions and primary information from field surveys that cover socioeconomic and environmental aspects that has not been previously collected by any institution or organization (i.e. household survey, stream water survey, and drinking water survey). Representation and understanding of their system will allow the stakeholders to test the effect of different management strategies in the micro-catchment and their associated socioeconomic, environmental and human health outcomes.

  18. Hydrological Processes in Precambrian Shield Catchments of Southeastern Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, G.

    2004-05-01

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PRECAMBRIAN SHIELD CATCHMENTS OF SOUTHEAST MANITOBA G.A. Thorne and J. Hawkins Whiteshell Laboratories decommissioning AECL Whiteshell Laboratories Pinawa, Manitoba ROE 1LO email: thorneg@aecl.ca Hydrological investigations were carried out over a 20 year period on the Canadian Shield in Southeast Manitoba as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The aim of these studies was to increase our understanding of surface and subsurface flow and to use this information to develop defensible models of groundwater flow in granitic terrane environments. Three small catchments located on the Underground Research Laboratory lease area of S.E. Manitoba were selected for detailed and continuous investigation to determine water budget components and evaluate surface water-groundwater interaction. Measurements of soil heat flux, soil temperatures and soil moisture content provided additional insight on infiltration, groundwater recharge and groundwater fluxes for both summer and winter periods. Water budgets for catchments in this study area show that average annual precipitation is 562 mm with 430 mm received as rainfall and 132 mm as snow. Runoff averages about 100 mm, evaporation 460 mm, and groundwater discharge is estimated to account for only about 2 mm of the total annual water budget. During the mid-summer months evaporation losses from the clay-rich overburden deposits can exceed precipitation. This is shown by absence or very low runoff and the recording of large soil moisture deficits (up to 170 mm) in the overburden deposits within the catchments. Autumn rainfall can reduce this soil moisture deficit but snowmelt waters and early summer rainfall are the major sources for replenishment. Groundwater recharge occurs mainly by infiltration of precipitation waters into the vertical and sub-vertical exposed bedrock fractures of the upland outcrop areas. These fractures are often infilled with clays, silts and sand. Following

  19. Predominant Runoff Components During Heavy Rainfall Events on Cultivated Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeřábek, J.; Zumr, D.; Strouhal, L.

    2015-12-01

    The fact that flash floods initiated in arable catchments are often accompanied by massive sediment and nutrient loads often leads to the assumption that surface runoff is the principle pathway by which runoff reaches watercourses. But the hydrology of cultivated catchments has its specific features due to the temporary variable topsoil properties and a sharp divide between topsoil and compacted subsoil. Under various conditions the prevailing runoff mechanisms may vary from surface runoff to subsurface runoff or deep percolation. On the basis of an evaluation of several rainfall-runoff events in a representative agricultural catchment (Nucice, Czech Republic), we show that runoff from cultivated land may be generated in a way similar to that seen on forested slopes, where shallow subsurface runoff is the predominant pathway. To identify the predominant runoff pathway, we employed a combination of turbidity measurements and stream discharge data. Although we observed temporal variability of topsoil properties attributable to seasonal weather changes and agricultural activities, e.g. bulk density and porosity, runoff generation was mainly driven by precipitation characteristics and the initial catchment saturation. The concept of the runoff formation was also observed during plot scale experiments with rainfall simulator. Various initial soil moisture conditions, and vegetation stages delimited the simulations. Variable proportions of both monitored runoff components were observed in relation to rainfall intensity and duration, ranging from zero surface runoff to a distinct dominance of surface runoff. Even with the highest tested precipitation intensities, surface runoff always formed due to saturation excess of the topsoil, irrespective of the topsoil properties and crops. The experiments were numerically modelled and analysed to understand the effect of temporal variability in the macropores and intra-aggregate voids ratio within the topsoil. We used a

  20. The artifcial catchment Chicken Creek as a tool to study initial ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, W.; Elmer, M.; Fischer, A.; Gerwin, W.; Nenov, R.

    2011-12-01

    The artificial catchment Chicken Creek was constructed in 2005 to study the increasingly complex interactions of processes and structures during initial development of ecosystems. The 6ha area serves as the central research site for the Transregional Collaborative Research Center 38. Both internal and external factors could be identified as driving forces for the formation of structures and patterns in the artificial catchment during the first five years of development. Initial structures formed by the construction process (e.g. catchment morphology, subsurface structures like clay dams and dumping cones, caterpillar tracks at the surface) and initial substrate characteristics (e.g. texture, geochemistry) were decisive both for the distribution and flow of precipitation water and for vegetation succession. External factors like episodic events (e.g. heavy thunderstorms) triggered erosion and dissection during this initial phase, promoted by the low vegetation cover and the unconsolidated sandy substrate. These processes resulted in transport and redistribution of water and sediment within the catchment, mainly along the main slope, and the formation of new structural elements like gullies and channels, a sedimentation fan above and sediments within the pond. As a result, we observed an overall differentiation of the site, e.g. with respect to water availability and texture redistribution, into areas with abrasion or accumulation processes dominating and areas with stable surfaces. During further development, both external factors and processes within the catchment continued to influence the site. For example, beside the initial soil seed bank, the surrounding environment of the catchment clearly affected species invasion. The dissection and stability of surfaces may be an important factor for the establishment of plants and habitats as well as for the formation of vegetation patterns and biological soil crusts. The transformation of the initial geo-system into

  1. SINUDYM - an event-based water quality model for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hong Quan; Meon, Guenter

    2013-04-01

    SINUDYM - an event-based water quality model for ungauged catchments Hong Quan Nguyen, Günter Meon Water quality assessment of surface flow especially in ungauged catchments requires a proper tool. In this paper, the development, testing and application of the SINUDYM (Simplified Nutrient Dynamics Model) model to cope with practical issues (e.g. limited data, error propagation) in a robust way is presented. A simplified model structure and limited model parameters are the most appealing features of the model. With the model, event-based water balance and nutrient transport as well as relevant water quality parameters of the river system can be simulated. All model components are coupled and controlled within one file for use as an operational tool. Here, the Geomorphology Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (GIUH), a simplified process erosion and sedimentation component, the loading function and the river routing from different existing modeling systems had been adopted and linked together. Furthermore, an add-in Monte - Carlo simulation tool is implemented providing an uncertainty analysis tool for the users. SINUDYM was, among others, applied successfully within a joint German-Vietnamese research project to simulate nutrient dynamics at a small catchment scale during flood events in southern Vietnam. The success of the developed model has proven the importance of selecting suitable model components and a model complexity being adapted to the data availability. For application to catchments with a poor database or to ungauged catchments, only the dominant processes of the nutrient transport should be captured in the model, whereas minor processes may be neglected or treated in a less complex manner. Key words: SINUDYM, water quality model, nutrient transport, ungauged catchment, uncertainty analysis, Vietnam.

  2. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #33: PUBLICATION OF RESEARCH AGENDA FROM UNITED STATES - CANADA SYMPOSIUM ON NORTH AMERICAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND WEATHER EXTREMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-day workshop on climate variability and change and extreme weather events in North America was held in October 1999 in Atlanta, Georgia. The workshop was a bi-national effort conducted under the auspices of a United States - Canada agreement fostering cooperation on activ...

  3. Effect of bedrock permeability on stream base flow mean transit time scaling relations: 1. A multiscale catchment intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, V. Cody; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of bedrock permeability and underlying catchment boundaries on stream base flow mean transit time (MTT) and MTT scaling relationships in headwater catchments is poorly understood. Here we examine the effect of bedrock permeability on MTT and MTT scaling relations by comparing 15 nested research catchments in western Oregon; half within the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and half at the site of the Alsea Watershed Study. The two sites share remarkably similar vegetation, topography, and climate and differ only in bedrock permeability (one poorly permeable volcanic rock and the other more permeable sandstone). We found longer MTTs in the catchments with more permeable fractured and weathered sandstone bedrock than in the catchments with tight, volcanic bedrock (on average, 6.2 versus 1.8 years, respectively). At the permeable bedrock site, 67% of the variance in MTT across catchments scales was explained by drainage area, with no significant correlation to topographic characteristics. The poorly permeable site had opposite scaling relations, where MTT showed no correlation to drainage area but the ratio of median flow path length to median flow path gradient explained 91% of the variance in MTT across seven catchment scales. Despite these differences, hydrometric analyses, including flow duration and recession analysis, and storm response analysis, show that the two sites share relatively indistinguishable hydrodynamic behavior. These results show that similar catchment forms and hydrologic regimes hide different subsurface routing, storage, and scaling behavior—a major issue if only hydrometric data are used to define hydrological similarity for assessing land use or climate change response.

  4. Hydrogeochemical signatures of catchment evolution - the role of calcium and sulphate release in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Hu, Yuzhu; Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Hinz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment is an ecohydrological system in an initial state of development. The catchment with an area of 6 ha was built up from quaternary sediments in the post-mining landscape of Lusatia in Eastern Germany and serves as a critical zone observatory for detecting ecosystem transition. The soil substrate is characterized as sands to loamy sands with low carbonate contents but significant amounts of gypsum in the sediments of the catchment. The catchment undergoes a strong transition from an abiotic system in the initial years to a system with growing influence of biota. Concerning the hydrology, a regime shift from surface runoff to groundwater flow dominated processes is significant. It is of interest, whether the catchment transition is also reflected by hydrogeochemical indicators. We assume gypsum dissolution as dominant process at the catchment scale. In order to investigate the hydrogeochemical evolution of the catchment we analysed electric conductivity, calcium and sulphate concentrations and pH-values of biweekly composite samples from 2007-2013 of the atmospheric deposition, of runoff and soil water. The two observation points in the flowing water represent surface runoff and groundwater discharge respectively. Soil water has been analysed at four soil pits in three depths. The monitoring data were provided by the Research Platform Chicken Creek (https://www.tu-cottbus.de/projekte/en/oekosysteme/startseite.html). From the macroscopic data analysis we found an exponential decay of the electric conductivity, calcium and sulphate concentrations in the flowing waters and some of the soil pits. In the flowing water, the decrease slope of the electric conductivity and the calcium and sulphate concentrations is almost identical. The calcium / sulphate molar ratio as an indicator of gypsum dissolution is almost equal to one up to 2010, afterwards more calcium than sulphate is released. The pH-values in the flowing

  5. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2005-12-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2) in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. A detailed covariance analysis was performed

  6. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2006-06-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2 in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. Application of a 2-dimensional numerical

  7. Response of surface and groundwater on meteorological drought in Topla River catchment, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendekova, Miriam; Fendek, Marian; Vrablikova, Dana; Blaskovicova, Lotta; Slivova, Valeria; Horvat, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Continuously increasing number of drought studies published in scientific journals reflects the attention of the scientific community paid to drought. The fundamental works among many others were published by Yevjevich (1967), Zelenhasic and Salvai (1987), later by Tallaksen and van Lanen Eds. (2004). The aim of the paper was to analyze the response of surface and groundwater to meteorological drought occurrence in the upper and middle part of the Topla River Basin, Slovakia. This catchment belongs to catchments with unfavourable hydrogeological conditions, being built of rocks with quite low permeability. The basin is located in the north-eastern part of Slovakia covering the area of 1050.05 km2. The response was analyzed using precipitation data from the Bardejov station (long-term annual average of 662 mm in 1981 - 2012) and discharge data from two gauging stations - Bardejov and Hanusovce nad Toplou. Data on groundwater head from eight observation wells, located in the catchment, were also used, covering the same observation period. Meteorological drought was estimated using characterisation of the year humidity and SPI index. Hydrological drought was evaluated using the threshold level method and method of sequent peak algorithm, both with the fixed and also variable thresholds. The centroid method of the cluster analysis with the squared Euclidean distance was used for clustering data according to occurrence of drought periods, lasting for 100 days and more. Results of the SPI index showed very good applicability for drought periods identification in the basin. The most pronounced dry periods occurred in 1982 - 1983, 1984, 1998 and 2012 being classified as moderately dry, and also in 1993 - 1994, 2003 - 2004 and 2007 evolving from moderately to severely dry years. Short-term drought prevailed in discharges, only three periods of drought longer than 100 days occurred during the evaluated period in 1986 - 1987, 1997 and 2003 - 2004. Discharge drought in the

  8. Wildfire effects on water quality in forest catchments: A review with implications for water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh G.; Sheridan, Gary J.; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Nyman, Petter; Haydon, Shane

    2011-01-01

    SummaryWildfires burn extensive forest areas around the world each year. In many locations, fire-prone forest catchments are utilised for the supply of potable water to small communities up to large cities. Following wildfire, increased erosion rates and changes to runoff generation and pollutant sources may greatly increase fluxes of sediment, nutrients and other water quality constituents, potentially contaminating water supplies. Most research to date has focused on suspended sediment exports and concentrations after wildfire. Reported first year post-fire suspended sediment exports varied from 0.017 to 50 t ha -1 year -1 across a large range of catchment sizes (0.021-1655 km 2). This represented an estimated increase of 1-1459 times unburned exports. Maximum reported concentrations of total suspended solids in streams for the first year after fire ranged from 11 to ˜500,000 mg L -1. Similarly, there was a large range in first year post-fire stream exports of total N (1.1-27 kg ha -1 year -1) and total P (0.03-3.2 kg ha -1 year -1), representing a multiple change of 0.3-431 times unburned, while NO3- exports of 0.04-13.0 kg ha -1 year -1 (3-250 times unburned) have been reported. NO3-, NO2-, and NH 3/ NH4+ concentrations in streams and lakes or reservoirs may increase after wildfire but appear to present a generally low risk of exceeding drinking water guidelines. Few studies have examined post-fire exports of trace elements. The limited observations of trace element concentrations in streams after wildfire found high levels (well over guidelines) of Fe, Mn, As, Cr, Al, Ba, and Pb, which were associated with highly elevated sediment concentrations. In contrast, Cu, Zn, and Hg were below or only slightly above guideline values. Elevated Na +, Cl - and SO42- solute yields have been recorded soon after fire, while reports of concentrations of these constituents were mostly confined to coniferous forest areas in North America, where maximum sampled values were well

  9. Assessing and Synthesizing the Last Decade of Research on the Major Pools and Fluxes of the Carbon Cycle in the US and North America: An Interagency Governmental Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Stover, D. B.; Zhu, Z.; Ombres, E. H.; Deangelo, B.

    2015-12-01

    The 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is focused on US and North American carbon stocks and fluxes in managed and unmanaged systems, including relevant carbon management science perspectives and tools for supporting and informing decisions. SOCCR-2 is inspired by the US Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011) which emphasizes global scale research on long-lived, carbon-based greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, and the major pools and fluxes of the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, the questions framing the Plan inform this report's topical roadmap, with a focus on US and North America in the global context: 1) How have natural processes and human actions affected the global carbon cycle on land, in the atmosphere, in the oceans and in the ecosystem interfaces (e.g. coastal, wetlands, urban-rural)? 2) How have socio-economic trends affected the levels of the primary carbon-containing gases, carbon dioxide and methane, in the atmosphere? 3) How have species, ecosystems, natural resources and human systems been impacted by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, the associated changes in climate, and by carbon management decisions and practices? To address these aspects, SOCCR-2 will encompass the following broad assessment framework: 1) Carbon Cycle at Scales (Global Perspective, North American Perspective, US Perspective, Regional Perspective); 2) Role of carbon in systems (Soils; Water, Oceans, Vegetation; Terrestrial-aquatic Interfaces); 3) Interactions/Disturbance/Impacts from/on the carbon cycle. 4) Carbon Management Science Perspective and Decision Support (measurements, observations and monitoring for research and policy relevant decision-support etc.). In this presentation, the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group and the U.S. Global Change Research Program's U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office will highlight the scientific context, strategy, structure, team and production process of the report, which is part of the USGCRP's Sustained

  10. Establishing a connection between hydrologic model parameters and physical catchment signatures for improved hierarchical Bayesian modeling in ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, L. A.; Weber, K.; Smith, T. J.; Greenwood, M. C.; Sharma, A.

    2012-12-01

    In an effort to improve hydrologic analysis in areas with limited data, hydrologists often seek to link catchments where little to no data collection occurs to catchments that are gauged. Various metrics and methods have been proposed to identify such relationships, in the hope that "surrogate" catchments might provide information for those catchments that are hydrologically similar. In this study we present a statistical analysis of over 150 catchments located in southeast Australia to examine the relationship between a hydrological model and certain catchment metrics. A conceptual rainfall-runoff model is optimized for each of the catchments and hierarchical clustering is performed to link catchments based on their calibrated model parameters. Clustering has been used in recent hydrologic studies but catchments are often clustered based on physical characteristics alone. Usually there is little evidence to suggest that such "surrogate" data approaches provide sufficiently similar model predictions. Beginning with model parameters and working backwards, we hope to establish if there is a relationship between the model parameters and physical characteristics for improved model predictions in the ungauged catchment. To analyze relationships, permutational multivariate analysis of variance tests are used that suggest which hydrologic metrics are most appropriate for discriminating between calibrated catchment clusters. Additional analysis is performed to determine which cluster pairs show significant differences for various metrics. We further examine the extent to which these results may be insightful for a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach that is aimed at generating model predictions at an ungauged site. The method, known as Bayes Empirical Bayes (BEB) works to pool information from similar catchments to generate informed probability distributions for each model parameter at a data-limited catchment of interest. We demonstrate the effect of selecting

  11. Using high resolution water quality monitoring across three English catchments to capture a storm event during a transition from dry to wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outram, F.; Lloyd, C.; Jonczyk, J.; Benskin, C.; Grant, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) project is a UK government funded initiative to test the effectiveness of on-farm mitigation measures designed to reduce agricultural pollution without compromising farm productivity. Three distinct catchments in England have been chosen to test mitigation measures on working farms in small tributary catchments equipped with continuous water quality monitoring stations. The River Avon in the south is a chalk and sandstone catchment with livestock and arable farming, the River Wensum in the east is a lowland chalk catchment with predominantly arable farming and the River Eden in the North has a limestone and sandstone geology with predominantly livestock farming. One of the many strengths of the DTC as a national programme is that it provides the ability to investigate catchment hydrology and biogeochemical response across three different English landscapes. This is a collaborative paper involving members of all three DTC consortia, which aims to compare the responses of each of the catchments to a single storm event from April 2012, which was as a result of one of the first weather fronts to track across the country following a drought period affecting much of the UK, producing heavy rainfall in all three catchments. This was an unusual meteorological period, with subsequent hydrological implications when a rapid shift from drought to flood risk occurred across parts of the country. The effects of the weather front on discharge and water chemistry parameters, including N (NO3- and NH4), P (Total P (TP) and Total Reactive P (TRP)), dissolved oxygen (DO), chlorophyll and turbidity, measured at a half-hourly time step, are examined. When considered in the context of one hydrological year, flow and concentration duration curves reveal that the weather fronts resulted in extreme flow, nitrate and TP concentrations in all three catchments but with distinct differences in hydrograph and nutrient response. Hysteresis loops constructed

  12. Using protection motivation theory and formative research to guide an injury prevention intervention: increasing adherence to the North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Sato; Heaney, Catherine A; Kmet, Jennifer M; Wilkins, J R

    2011-05-01

    The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) were developed to reduce childhood agricultural injuries by assisting adults in assigning appropriate chores and providing needed supervision and training. To develop an effective intervention to increase adherence to NAGCAT among farm parents, formative research (focus groups and pilot-testing) was conducted. Protection motivation theory (PMT) was used to guide this research and inform intervention development. Focus group results suggested how PMT constructs might be addressed to increase adherence. A home visit intervention, using a standardized presentation in POWERPoint™, was developed to (a) introduce NAGCAT, (b) increase motivation to use NAGCAT and enhance safe work behaviors, and (c) ultimately reduce agricultural work-related injuries among youth. Process evaluation data suggests that the intervention was well received by farm parents. Conducting theory-guided formative research identified motivational barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers that might not have been otherwise apparent.

  13. Nonstationarities in Catchment Response According to Basin and Rainfall Characteristics: Application to Korean Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun-Han; Kim, Jin-Guk; Jung, Il-Won

    2015-04-01

    It must be acknowledged that application of rainfall-runoff models to simulate rainfall-runoff processes are successful in gauged watershed. However, there still remain some issues that will need to be further discussed. In particular, the quantitive representation of nonstationarity issue in basin response (e.g. concentration time, storage coefficient and roughness) along with ungauged watershed needs to be studied. In this regard, this study aims to investigate nonstationarity in basin response so as to potentially provide useful information in simulating runoff processes in ungauged watershed. For this purpose, HEC-1 rainfall-runoff model was mainly utilized. In addition, this study combined HEC-1 model with Bayesian statistical model to estimate uncertainty of the parameters which is called Bayesian HEC-1 (BHEC-1). The proposed rainfall-runofall model is applied to various catchments along with various rainfall patterns to understand nonstationarities in catchment response. Further discussion about the nonstationarity in catchment response and possible regionalization of the parameters for ungauged watershed are discussed. KEYWORDS: Nonstationary, Catchment response, Uncertainty, Bayesian Acknowledgement This research was supported by a Grant (13SCIPA01) from Smart Civil Infrastructure Research Program funded by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MOLIT) of Korea government and the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA).

  14. The Computable Catchment: An executable document for model-data software sharing, reproducibility and interactive visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Y.; Duffy, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes the concept of a "Computable Catchment" which is used to develop a collaborative platform for watershed modeling and data analysis. The object of the research is a sharable, executable document similar to a pdf, but one that includes documentation of the underlying theoretical concepts, interactive computational/numerical resources, linkage to essential data repositories and the ability for interactive model-data visualization and analysis. The executable document for each catchment is stored in the cloud with automatic provisioning and a unique identifier allowing collaborative model and data enhancements for historical hydroclimatic reconstruction and/or future landuse or climate change scenarios to be easily reconstructed or extended. The Computable Catchment adopts metadata standards for naming all variables in the model and the data. The a-priori or initial data is derived from national data sources for soils, hydrogeology, climate, and land cover available from the www.hydroterre.psu.edu data service (Leonard and Duffy, 2015). The executable document is based on Wolfram CDF or Computable Document Format with an interactive open-source reader accessible by any modern computing platform. The CDF file and contents can be uploaded to a website or simply shared as a normal document maintaining all interactive features of the model and data. The Computable Catchment concept represents one application for Geoscience Papers of the Future representing an extensible document that combines theory, models, data and analysis that are digitally shared, documented and reused among research collaborators, students, educators and decision makers.

  15. Monitoring of fluvial transport in small upland catchments - methods and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Grzegorz; Rodzik, Jan; Chabudziński, Łukasz; Franczak, Łukasz; Siłuch, Marcin; Stępniewski, Krzysztof; Dyer, Jamie L.; Kołodziej, Grzegorz; Maciejewska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    In April 2011 a study was initiated, financed from resources of the Polish National Science Centre, entitled: ‘Rainstorm prediction and mathematic modelling of their environmental and social-economical effects’ (No. NN/306571640). The study, implemented by a Polish-American team, covers meteorological research, including: (1) monitoring of single cell storms developing in various synoptic situations, (2) detection of their movement courses, and (3) estimation of parameters of their rain field. Empirical studies, including hydrological and geomorphological measurements, are conducted in objects researched thoroughly in physiographic terms (experimental catchments) in the Lublin region (SE Poland), distinguished by high frequency of occurrence of the events described. For comparative purposes, studies are also carried out on selected model areas in the lower course of the Mississippi River valley (USA), in a region with high frequency of summer rainstorms. For detailed studies on sediment transport processes during rainstorm events, catchments of low hydrological rank and their sub-catchments in a cascade system were selected. For the basic, relatively uniform geomorpho logical units distinguished this way, erosion and deposition balance of material transported was determined. The aim of work was to determine influence of weather condition on fluvial transport rate in small catchment with low hydrological order

  16. Baseline Q-values for streams in intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melland, Alice; Jordan, Phil; Wall, David; Mellander, Per-Erik; Mechan, Sarah; Shortle, Ger

    2010-05-01

    The effectiveness of regulations introduced in Ireland in 2006 in response to the European Union Nitrates Directives for minimising nutrient loss to waterways from farms is being studied by Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority as part of an Agricultural Catchments Programme from 2008 - 2011. The regulations in Ireland require that during winter, green cover is established and maintained on arable farms, manure is stored and not spread, ploughing is not conducted and that chemical fertiliser is not spread. The regulations also require buffer zones between fields and water courses when applying organic or chemical fertilisers and that nutrient application rates and timing match crop requirements. An upper limit for livestock manure loading of 170 kg ha-1 organic N each year is also set. The biophysical research component of the Agricultural Catchments Programme is focussed on quantifying nutrient source availability, surface and subsurface transport pathways and stream chemical water quality. A baseline description of stream ecological quality was also sought. Stream ecology was measured in autumn 2009 at 3-5 locations within four surface water catchments and at the spring emergence of a catchment underlain by karst limestone. Landuse in each catchment is dominated by medium to high intensity grassland or cereal farming and annual average rainfall ranges from 900 - 1200 mm. Surveys were conducted in 1st to 3rd order streams throughout each catchment at locations which had minimal observed point source inputs for 100m upstream, incomplete shade, a hard streambed substrate and riffle conditions suitable for the sampling methods. Benthic macroinvertebrates were identified and quantified and used to calculate the biological indices Small Stream Risk Score, Q-value, Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP), Average Score Per Taxa (ASPT) and EQR (Observed Q-value/Reference Q-value). Diatom community assemblages were identified from samples

  17. Catchments as simple dynamical systems: A case study on methods and data requirements for parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke; Teuling, Adriaan; van Berkum, Sonja; Torfs, Paul; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    In many rainfall-runoff models at least some calibration of model parameters has to take place. Especially for ungauged or poorly gauged basins this can be problematic, because there is little or no data available for calibration. A possible solution to overcome the problems caused by data scarcity is to set up a measurement campaign for a short time period. With the employed approach based on the theory of Kirchner (2009), a model was developed and applied to the Rietholzbach catchment in Switzerland (Teuling et al., 2010, Seneviratne et al., 2012), with only two parameters. These two parameters describe a unique storage-discharge relation. The model is constructed such that the parameters can be determined not only with automatic calibration, but also by recession analysis and a priori from Boussinesq theory. The automatic calibration and the recession analysis have been fed with different selections of the full data record as well as with the full data record itself. For Boussinesq theory, catchment characteristics were given as required input. In the end, a comparison of the performance of the three different methods was made, and a comparison on the amount of data that is required by each of the three parameter identification methods. Melsen, L.A., Teuling, A.J., van Berkum, S.W., Torfs, P.J.J.F., Uijlenhoet, R. (2013) Catchments as simple dynamical systems: A case study on methods and data requirements for parameter identification, Water Resour. Res., under review References Kirchner, J.W. (2009), Catchments as simple dynamical systems: Catchment characterization, rainfall-runoff modeling, and doing hydrology backward, Water Resour. Res. 45:W02429. Seneviratne, S.I., I. Lehner, J. Gurtz, A.J. Teuling, H Lang, U. Moser, D. Grebner, L. Menzel, K. Schro, T. Vitvar, and M. Zappa (2012), Swiss prealpine Rietholzbach research catchment and lysimeter: 32 year time series and 2003 drought event, Water Resour. Res. 48:W06526. Teuling, A. J., I. Lehner, J. W. Kirchner

  18. Assessment of the indirect calibration of a rainfall-runoff model for ungauged catchments in Flanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, Niels; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.

    2013-04-01

    In this research the potential of discharge-based indirect calibration of the Probability Distributed Model (PDM), a lumped rainfall-runoff (RR) model, is examined for six selected catchments in Flanders. The concept of indirect calibration indicates that one has to estimate the calibration data because the catchment is ungauged. A first case in which indirect calibration is applied is that of spatial gauging divergence: Because no observed discharge records are available at the outlet of the ungauged catchment, the calibration is carried out based on a rescaled discharge time series of a very similar donor catchment. The latter is selected out of a catchment population on the basis of a dissimilarity measure which takes in account the mutual catchment distance and differences in drainage area, land topography, soil composition and land cover. Both a calibration in the time domain and the frequency domain (a.k.a. spectral domain) are carried out. Furthermore, the case of temporal gauging divergence is considered: Limited (e.g. historical or very recent) discharge records are available at the outlet of the ungauged catchment. Additionally, no time overlap exists between the forcing and discharge records. Therefore, only an indirect spectral calibration can be performed in this case. To conclude also the combination case of spatio-temporal gauging divergence is considered. In this last case only limited discharge records are available at the outlet of a donor catchment. Again the forcing and discharge records are not contemporaneous which only makes feasible an indirect spectral calibration. The post calibration model performance is assessed using four indicators: the Pearson correlation coefficient (R), the relative absolute bias (BIASn), the relative Root Mean Square Error (RMSEn) and the Nash- Sutcliffe coefficient (NS). The modelled discharge time series are found to be acceptable in all three considered cases. In the case of spatial gauging divergence, indirect

  19. Assessment of catchment scale connectivity in different catchments using measured suspended sediment output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in hydrology and geomorphology include the connectivity principle, which describes how different elements in a landscape are connected and how water and matter moves between these elements. So far, studies on connectivity have been mainly of a conceptual nature and have been done on a small scale, while studies that map, quantitatively establish relations, and model water and sediment transport in connectivity are rare. In this study we established a relation between change in connectivity within four catchments and the time of year by using suspended sediment data. The data were collected for four catchments in Navarra, Spain of which two catchments are dominated by forest and pasture, while the other two catchments are dominated by agriculture and have no forest. Data were collected during a 13 year period; 4 samples were taken a day at 6 hour intervals which were mixed to obtain a daily average suspended sediment concentration. This was then converted into daily suspended sediment output using the measured total daily discharge. The effect of precipitation on the sediment output data was minimized by using an antecedent precipitation index (API), which consists of the precipitation of the current day added by the precipitation of the previous 14 days, where the influence of the previous days decays exponentially with time. The daily total suspended sediment output was divided by the API, to obtain a measure for sediment output independent of precipitation. This sediment output then serves as a measure for the connectivity within the catchment. The connectivity of the four catchments throughout the years will be compared to each other and we hypothesise that the two catchments dominated by forests and pastures will change only slightly throughout the year, whereas we expect to see large differences in connectivity in the two agricultural catchments. The agricultural catchments are likely to display a highly varying connectivity throughout the

  20. Chlorine And Chloroform Transport In A Small Forested Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, T.

    2006-12-01

    It is generally known that chlorine compounds are ubiquitous in the environment. In recent years, researchers have concluded that chlorine is part of a biogeochemical cycle in soil involving an interaction between chloride and organic-matter-bound chlorine. Even though there is indisputable evidence that organochlorines are formed naturally, there are actually few simultaneous field measurements of organochlorines and chloride. Previously stipulated conclusions with respect to underlying processes and transport estimates have thus been deduced from rather few concentration measurements. The on-site variation organic-matter-bound chlorine, chloroform and chloride runoff water were observed and input and output fluxes estimated over a 2-yr period in a small coniferous catchment (0.22 km2) in southeast Sweden. The results show that the transport is dominated by chloride whereas the storage in soil is dominated by organic-matter-bound chlorine and that the storage is far much larger than the transport. Still, input and output is nearly in balance for all investigated chlorine species. It is interesting to note that these observations resemble observations made for carbon, nitrogen and sulphur; i.e. a large storage, small transport, complex biogeochemical cycling processes at hand but still close to steady state conditions with respect to output- input balances. It appears as if topsoil acts as a sink for chloride, while deeper soil acts as a source of chloride. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, neither flux estimates nor mass balances have previously been made for chloroform on a catchment scale, nor have data regarding natural runoff variation with time been gathered. Concentrations of chloroform in runoff were found to be generally high during wet periods, such as spring, but also peaked during summer rain events. The observed pattern suggests that chloroform is formed in surface soil layers and transported to the outlet under high-flow conditions and during

  1. Catchment Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. F.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Wilkinson, M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.; Proactive Team

    2011-12-01

    Recent catchment initiatives have highlighted the need for new holistic approaches to sustainable water management. Here, a catchment engineering approach seeks to describe catchment 'function' (or role) as the principal driver for evaluating how it should be managed in the future. Catchment engineering does not seek to re-establish a natural system but seeks to work with natural processes in order to engineer landscapes so that multiple benefits accrue. This approach involves quantifying and assessing catchment change and impacts but most importantly suggests an urgent and proactive agenda for future planning. In particular, an interventionist approach to managing hydrological flow pathways across scale is proposed. It is already accepted that future management will require a range of scientific expertise and full engagement with stakeholders, namely the general public and policy makers. This inclusive concept under a catchment engineering agenda forces any consortia to commit to actively changing and perturbing the catchment system and thus learn, in situ, how to manage the environment for collective benefits. The shared cost, the design, the implementation, the evaluation and any subsequent modifications should involve all relevant parties in the consortia. This joint ownership of a 'hands on' interventionist agenda to catchment change is at the core of catchment engineering. In this paper we show a range of catchment engineering projects from the UK that have addressed multi-disciplinary approaches to flooding, pollution and ecosystem management whilst maintaining economic food production. Local scale demonstration activities, led by local champions, have proven to be an effective means of encouraging wider uptake. Catchment engineering is a concept that relies on all relevant parties within a catchment to take responsibility for the water quantity and quality that arises from the catchment. Further, any holistic solution requires a bottom up, problem solving

  2. Co-evolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Present day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment co-evolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.22 to 82Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseow index, and flow duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found signicant correlation between drainage density and baseow index with age, but not with climate. The age of the catchments was also signicantly related to intra-annual flow variability. Younger catchments tend to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibit more flashy runoff. The decrease of baseflow with catchment age confirms previous studies that hypothesized that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways have changed over time, from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in similar volcanic catchments but of signicant younger age than the ones explored here. In these younger catchments, an increase in drainage density with age was observed, and it was hypothesized that this was because of more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths in more mature catchments. Our results suggest that as catchments further evolve, hydrologically active channels retreat as less recharge leads to lower average aquifer levels

  3. Dynamic processes in the mountain catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Arakelian, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The process of the river cftchment foundation and the mechanisms being in the basis of its development are not clear at present. Principal phenomena determining the dynamics of formation of the river catchment are under our study in this paper for the case of the mountain basin as an example. The methodology of this monitoring includes the space image recognition and computer data processing of the images for the Maliy Caucasus Mountains. Mountain river catchment formation on the slope of the ridge can be considered as a self-organizing staged process of its evolution passing through several non-equilibrium but steady-state conditions. We consider a system of tributaries in the mountain river catchment as a system of cracks, which are formed on the slope of the mountain massif. In other words, the formation of river networks should be the result of development of several processes, among of which the mechanisms of crack development should play a dominant role. The principal results, discussed in the present report, can be formulated as follow. (1) The mountain catchment (litho-watershed) formation takes place under conditions of the confined states of a mountain massif: on the one hand it is bounded by the surface of the slope; but on the other hand, - by a primary cracks density occurrence (as a spatial distribution 3D-crack net). (2) The development in time of the river catchment takes place by several stages. Each stage specifies a definite energetic state of the system in the mountain massif. (3) The overhead river streams arise not only due to surface water, but and namely due to rising of water from underground water horizons over the watercourse cracks penetrating deeply into the underground. (4) The 3D-river catchment structure results in concept in behavior of the unit as an open nonlinear dynamic system with a spatially distributed feedback. The energetic (endogen) processes of formation, rising and bifurcation for cracks are the consequence of relaxation

  4. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, L.; Miller, D.; Barquín, J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2), in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we coupled general principles of hydro-geomorphic processes with computer tools to characterize the fluvial landscape. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to topography, valley morphology, river network structure, and fan and terrace landforms. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  5. Groundwater recharge from point to catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leterme, Bertrand; Di Ciacca, Antoine; Laloy, Eric; Jacques, Diederik

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of groundwater recharge is a challenging task as only a few devices (if any) can measure it directly. In this study, we discuss how groundwater recharge can be calculated at different temporal and spatial scales in the Kleine Nete catchment (Belgium). A small monitoring network is being installed, that is aimed to monitor the changes in dominant processes and to address data availability as one goes from the point to the catchment scale. At the point scale, groundwater recharge is estimated using inversion of soil moisture and/or water potential data and stable isotope concentrations (Koeniger et al. 2015). At the plot scale, it is proposed to monitor the discharge of a small drainage ditch in order to calculate the field groundwater recharge. Electrical conductivity measurements are necessary to separate shallow from deeper groundwater contribution to the ditch discharge (see Di Ciacca et al. poster in session HS8.3.4). At this scale, two or three-dimensional process-based vadose zone models will be used to model subsurface flow. At the catchment scale though, using a mechanistic, process-based model to estimate groundwater recharge is debatable (because of, e.g., the presence of numerous drainage ditches, mixed land use pixels, etc.). We therefore investigate to which extent various types of surrogate models can be used to make the necessary upscaling from the plot scale to the scale of the whole Kleine Nete catchment. Ref. Koeniger P, Gaj M, Beyer M, Himmelsbach T (2015) Review on soil water isotope based groundwater recharge estimations. Hydrological Processes, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10775

  6. Dynamics of large wood during a flash flood in two mountain catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía, A.; Comiti, F.; Borga, M.; Cavalli, M.; Marchi, L.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and modelling the dynamics of large wood (LW) in rivers during flood events has spurred a great deal of research in recent years. However, few studies have documented the effect of high-magnitude flash floods on LW recruitment, transport and deposition. On 25 October 2011, the Magra river basin (north-western Italy) was hit by an intense rainstorm, with hourly rainfall rates up to 130 mm h-1 and event rain accumulations up to 540 mm in 8 h. Such large rainfall intensities originated flash floods in the main river channels and in several tributaries, causing severe damages and loss of lives. Numerous bridges were partly or fully clogged by LW jams. A post-flood survey was carried out along the channels of two catchments that were severely and similarly affected by this event, the Gravegnola (34.3 km2) and Pogliaschina (25.1 km2). The analysis highlighted a very relevant channel widening in many channel reaches, which was more marked in the Gravegnola basin due to highly erodible material forming the slopes adjacent to the fluvial corridor. Large wood recruitment rates were very high, up to 1270 m3 km-1, and most of it (70-80 %) was eroded from the floodplains as a consequence of channel-widening processes, while the rest came from hillslopes processes. Overall, drainage area and channel slope are the most relevant controlling variables in explaining the reach-scale variability of LW recruitment, whereas LW deposition appears to be more complex, as correlation analysis did not evidence any statistically significant relationship with the tested controlling variables. Indeed, in-channel LW displacement during the flood has been mostly limited by the presence of bridges, given the relatively large width attained by channels after the event.

  7. The assessment of developmental status using the Ages and Stages questionnaire-3 in nutritional research in north Indian young children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective and background For large epidemiological studies in low and middle-income countries, inexpensive and easily administered developmental assessment tools are called for. This report evaluates the feasibility of the assessment tool Ages and Stages Questionnaire 3.edition (ASQ-3) “home procedure” in a field trial in 422 North Indian young children. Methods ASQ-3 was translated and adjusted for a North Indian Hindi setting. Three examiners were trained by a clinical psychologist to perform the assessments. During the main study, ten % of the assessments were done by two examiners to estimate inter-observer agreement. During all sessions, the examiners recorded whether the scoring was based on observation of the skill during the session, or on caregiver’s report of the child’s skill. Intra class correlation coefficient was calculated to estimate the agreement between the raters and between the raters and a gold standard. Pearson product moment correlation coefficient and standardized alphas were calculated to measure internal consistency. Principal findings Inter-observer agreement was strong both during training exercises and during the main study. In the Motor subscales and the Problem Solving subscale most items could be observed during the session. The standardized alphas for the total ASQ-3 scale across all ages were strong, while the alpha values for the different subscales and age levels varied. The correlations between the total score and the subscale scores were consistently strong, while the correlations between subscale scores were moderate. Conclusions/significance We found that the translated and adjusted ASQ-3 “home procedure” was a feasible procedure for the collection of reliable data on the developmental status in infants and young children. Examiners were effectively trained over a short period of time, and the total ASQ scores showed adequate variability. However, further adjustments are needed to obtain satisfying alpha values in

  8. Similarity and scale in catchment storm response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Beven, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, very little progress had been made in understanding the relationship between small-scale variability of topography, soil, and rainfalls and the storm response seen at the catchment scale. The work reviewed here represents the first attempt at a systematic theoretical framework for such understanding in the context of surface runoff generation by different processes. The parameterization of hydrological processes over a range of scales is examined, and the concept of the 'representative elementary area' (REA) is introduced. The REA is a fundamental scale for catchment modeling at which continuum assumptions can be applied for the spatially variable controls and parameters, and spatial patterns no longer have to be considered explicitly. The investigation of scale leads into the concept of hydrologic similarity in which the effects of the environmental controls on runoff generation and flood frequency response be investigated independently of catchment scale. The paper reviews the authors' initial results and hopefully will motivate others to also investigate the issues of hydrologic scale and similarity.

  9. Modeling of facade leaching in urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, S.; Del Giudice, D.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Building facades are protected from microbial attack by incorporation of biocides within them. Flow over facades leaches these biocides and transports them to the urban environment. A parsimonious water quantity/quality model applicable for engineered urban watersheds was developed to compute biocide release from facades and their transport at the urban basin scale. The model couples two lumped submodels applicable at the basin scale, and a local model of biocide leaching at the facade scale. For the facade leaching, an existing model applicable at the individual wall scale was utilized. The two lumped models describe urban hydrodynamics and leachate transport. The integrated model allows prediction of biocide concentrations in urban rivers. It was applied to a 15 km2urban hydrosystem in western Switzerland, the Vuachère river basin, to study three facade biocides (terbutryn, carbendazim, diuron). The water quality simulated by the model matched well most of the pollutographs at the outlet of the Vuachère watershed. The model was then used to estimate possible ecotoxicological impacts of facade leachates. To this end, exceedance probabilities and cumulative pollutant loads from the catchment were estimated. Results showed that the considered biocides rarely exceeded the relevant predicted no-effect concentrations for the riverine system. Despite the heterogeneities and complexity of (engineered) urban catchments, the model application demonstrated that a computationally "light" model can be employed to simulate the hydrograph and pollutograph response within them. It thus allows catchment-scale assessment of the potential ecotoxicological impact of biocides on receiving waters.

  10. Can spatial study of hydrological connectivity explain some behaviors of catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantreul, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Erosion is a major threat to European soil. Consequences can be very important both on-site and off-site. Belgian loamy soils are highly vulnerable to this threat because of their natural sensitivity to erosion on the one hand, and because the land is mainly used for intensive agricultural practices on the other hand. Over the last few decades, rising erosion has even been observed in our regions. This shows the importance of a deeper understanding of the coupled phenomena of runoff and erosion in order to manage soils at catchment scale. Plenty of research have already studied this but all agree to say that it seems to have a non-linear relationship between rainfall and discharge, as well as between rainfall and erosion. For that reason, a new concept has been developed a few years ago: the hydrological connectivity. Several research have focused on connectivity but up to now, each there are as much definition as papers. In this thesis, it will be important firstly to resume all these definitions to clarify this concept. Secondly, a methodology using various transects on the watershed and some pertinent field measurements will be used. These measurements include spatial distribution of particle size, surface states and soil moisture. A new approach of photogrammetry using an UAV will be used to observe erosion and deposition zones on the watershed. In this framework, several time scales will be studied from the event scale to the annual scale passing by monthly and seasonal scales. All this will serve to progress toward a better understanding of the concept of hydrological connectivity in order to study erosion at catchment scale. The final goal of this study is to describe hydrologically each different part of the catchment and to generalize these behaviors to other catchments with similar properties if possible. Afterwards, this research will be integrated in an existing (or not) model to improve the modelling of discharge and erosion in the catchment. Thanks to

  11. The hydrological response of a small catchment after the abandonment of terrace cultivation. A study case in northwestern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente-Adán, Jose A.; Lana-Renault, Noemí; Galilea, Ianire; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificacion

    2015-04-01

    Terrace construction for cultivation results in a complete transformation of the hillslopes to a series of flat sectors and almost vertical steps. This strategy, which involves a redistribution of soils and a re-organization of the drainage network, provides fertile soil over steep slopes, improves infiltration and controls overland flow under conditions of intense rainstorms. In Camero Viejo (north-western Iberian ranges) most of the hillslopes are occupied by terraced fields. During the XXth century, rural population declined and agricultural practices were abandoned. In this area, a small catchment (1.9 km2) was monitored in 2012 for studying how the abandonment of agricultural terraces affect water and sediment transfer from the hillslopes to the channels. Terraces occupy 40% of the catchment and are covered by sparse grass and shrubs. The equipment installed in the catchment registers continuously meteorological data, discharge and water table fluctuations. Data on suspended sediment transport is obtained by means of a rising-stage sampler. Here we present the hydrological results corresponding to the years 2012-13 and 2013-14. The hydrological response of the catchment was moderate (annual runoff coefficient < 0.20), which could be in part explained by the high evapotranspiration rates reported in the area. Lows flows were recorded in summer and autumn, when the water reserves of the catchment were dry, and high flows occurred from January, when the catchment became wetter. The shape of the hydrographs, with slow response times, moderate peakflows and long recession limbs suggested a large contribution of subsurface flow, probably favored by deep and well structured soils in the bench terraces. Soil saturation areas were not observed during the study period, suggesting that soil infiltration processes and subsurface flow are important, and that the drainage system of the terraces is probably well maintained. No suspended sediment has been collected so far

  12. Effects of model input data uncertainty in simulating water resources of a transnational catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargos, Carla; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Landscape consists of different ecosystem components and how these components affect water quantity and quality need to be understood. We start from the assumption that water resources are generated in landscapes and that rural land use (particular agriculture) has a strong impact on water resources that are used downstream for domestic and industrial supply. Partly located in the north of Luxembourg and partly in the southeast of Belgium, the Haute-Sûre catchment is about 943 km2. As part of the catchment, the Haute-Sûre Lake is an important source of drinking water for Luxembourg population, satisfying 30% of the city's demand. The objective of this study is investigate impact of spatial input data uncertainty on water resources simulations for the Haute-Sûre catchment. We apply the SWAT model for the period 2006 to 2012 and use a variety of digital information on soils, elevation and land uses with various spatial resolutions. Several objective functions are being evaluated and we consider resulting parameter uncertainty to quantify an important part of the global uncertainty in model simulations.

  13. WORKSHOP REPORT: COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY: FRAMEWORK, PARTNERSHIPS, AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, SEPTEMBER 29-30, 2003, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology is a new research initiative being developed within the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Operationally, it is defined as the application of mathematical and computer models together with molecular c...

  14. The role of groundwater in streamflow in a headwater catchment with sub-humid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaping; Tian, Fuqiang; Hu, Hongchang; Tie, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that bedrock groundwater can exert considerable influence on streamflow in headwater catchments under humid climate. However, study of the role of bedrock groundwater is still challenged due to limited direct observation data. In this study, by utilizing observed hydrometric and hydrochemical data, we aimed at characterize the bedrock groundwater's response to rainfall at hillslope and catchment scales in a small headwater catchment with sub-humid climate. We selected Xitaizi catchment with area of 6.7 km in the earth-rock mountain region, which located in the north of Beijing, China, as study area. The catchment bedrock is mainly consist of fractured granite. Four weather stations were installed to observe the weather condition and soil volumetric water content (VWC) at depth of 10-60 cm with 10-minute interval. Five wells with depth of 10 m were drilled in two slopes to monitor the bedrock water table by pneumatic water gauge. At slope 1, the soil VWC at depth of 10-80 cm were also observed by soil moisture sensors, and surface/subsurface hillslope runoff at three different layers (0-20cm, 20-80cm, 80-300cm) was observed by three recording buckets. Field works were conducted from July 2013 to November 2014. During the period, precipitation, river, spring and groundwater were sampled nearly monthly. Water temperature, electrical conductivity (EC) and pH were measured in site with portable instruments. In addition, the precipitation, river and groundwater were also sampled intensively during two storm events. All the samples were subjected to stable isotope analysis, the samples taken monthly during the period from July 2013 to July 2014 were subjected to hydrochemistry analysis. Our results show that: (1) the bedrock groundwater is the dominant component of streamflow in the headwater catchment with sub-humid climate; (2) stream is recharged by groundwater sourcing from different mountains with different hydrochemistry characteristics

  15. The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): implementation and application to the freely draining Hupsel Brook catchment and controlled Cabauw polder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Recently, we developed the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) to fill the gap between complex, spatially distributed models which are often used in lowland catchments and simple, parametric models which have mostly been developed for mountainous catchments. This parametric rainfall-runoff model can be used all over the world in both freely draining lowland catchments and polders with controlled water levels. Here, we present the model implementation, opportunities for practical application and experience from validation studies with data from two field sites. The open source model code is implemented in R and is set-up such that it can be used by both practitioners and researchers. For direct use by practitioners, defaults are implemented for relations between model variables and to compute initial conditions, leaving only four parameters which require calibration. For research purposes, the defaults can easily be changed. WALRUS is computationally efficient, which allows operational forecasting and uncertainty estimation by creating ensembles. An approach for flexible time steps increases numerical stability and makes model parameter values independent of time step size, which facilitates use of the model with the same parameter set for multi-year water balance studies as well as detailed analyses of individual flood peaks. We applied WALRUS to two contrasting Dutch catchments: the slightly sloping, freely draining Hupsel Brook catchment and the flat Cabauw polder with controlled water levels. In both catchments, WALRUS performs well during the years used for calibration and validation. The model also performs well during extremely wet periods (flash flood in the Hupsel Brook catchment in August 2010) and extremely dry periods (summer 1976) and can forecast the effect of control operations (changing weir elevations and surface water supply).

  16. Integration of NASA Research into Undergraduate Education in Math, Science, Engineering and Technology at North Carolina A&T State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Joseph; Kelkar, Ajit

    2003-01-01

    The NASA PAIR program incorporated the NASA-Sponsored research into the undergraduate environment at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. This program is designed to significantly improve undergraduate education in the areas of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology (MSET) by directly benefiting from the experiences of NASA field centers, affiliated industrial partners and academic institutions. The three basic goals of the program were enhancing core courses in MSET curriculum, upgrading core-engineering laboratories to compliment upgraded MSET curriculum, and conduct research training for undergraduates in MSET disciplines through a sophomore shadow program and through Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) programs. Since the inception of the program nine courses have been modified to include NASA related topics and research. These courses have impacted over 900 students in the first three years of the program. The Electrical Engineering circuit's lab is completely re-equipped to include Computer controlled and data acquisition equipment. The Physics lab is upgraded to implement better sensory data acquisition to enhance students understanding of course concepts. In addition a new instrumentation laboratory in the department of Mechanical Engineering is developed. Research training for A&T students was conducted through four different programs: Apprentice program, Developers program, Sophomore Shadow program and Independent Research program. These programs provided opportunities for an average of forty students per semester.

  17. Controls on Nitrate Spatial Variability in Paine Run Catchment of Shenandoah National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, S. M.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This research examines the catchment-scale controls on in-stream nitrate concentrations by (1) quantifying nitrate spatial variability in a headwater catchment and (2) determining the biophysical processes underlying this variability. The Shenandoah Watershed Study (SWAS) established thirty-eight stream sampling sites in the Paine Run catchment to collect field data on stream chemistry, discharge and transient storage. An evaluation of SWAS data at these sites from the early 1990s to 2007 reveals spatial and temporal variability in nitrate concentrations following the gypsy moth defoliation. We observed high in-stream nitrate concentrations with elevation and an apparent dilution at lower elevations. Main topographic descriptors related to the spatial distribution of nitrate, elevation and contributing area, are associated with differing biophysical factors such as soil residence time, bacterial denitrification, vegetation and mineralization. Previous studies have demonstrated that the physical properties of hyporheic zones can strongly influence denitrification rates. We examined this in the Paine Run catchment with tracer tests to evaluate dilution effects and predict stream outflow and inflow from hyporheic zones responsible for denitrification. We then looked for biophysical processes responsible for higher nitrate levels at higher elevation by using the OTIS model for transient storage to evaluate hyporhiec zones in Paine Run. We also established a method to evaluate soil parameters for depth and permeability. By identifying the controls on nitrate inputs, transport and denitrification, we isolated a set of criteria applied to a quantitative model for nitrate spatial variability. This research has important implications for defining nutrient availability both within the stream network and at the outlet of forested headwater catchments.

  18. Incorporating flood event analyses and catchment structures into model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppel, Henning; Schumann, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The space-time variability in catchment response results from several hydrological processes which differ in their relevance in an event-specific way. An approach to characterise this variance consists in comparisons between flood events in a catchment and between flood responses of several sub-basins in such an event. In analytical frameworks the impact of space and time variability of rainfall on runoff generation due to rainfall excess can be characterised. Moreover the effect of hillslope and channel network routing on runoff timing can be specified. Hence, a modelling approach is needed to specify the runoff generation and formation. Knowing the space-time variability of rainfall and the (spatial averaged) response of a catchment it seems worthwhile to develop new models based on event and catchment analyses. The consideration of spatial order and the distribution of catchment characteristics in their spatial variability and interaction with the space-time variability of rainfall provides additional knowledge about hydrological processes at the basin scale. For this purpose a new procedure to characterise the spatial heterogeneity of catchments characteristics in their succession along the flow distance (differentiated between river network and hillslopes) was developed. It was applied to study of flood responses at a set of nested catchments in a river basin in eastern Germany. In this study the highest observed rainfall-runoff events were analysed, beginning at the catchment outlet and moving upstream. With regard to the spatial heterogeneities of catchment characteristics, sub-basins were separated by new algorithms to attribute runoff-generation, hillslope and river network processes. With this procedure the cumulative runoff response at the outlet can be decomposed and individual runoff features can be assigned to individual aspects of the catchment. Through comparative analysis between the sub-catchments and the assigned effects on runoff dynamics new

  19. Recovery from acidification in the Tillingbourne catchment, southern England: catchment description and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Hill, T J; Skeffington, R A; Whitehead, P G

    2002-01-23

    Measurements of acid deposition and streamwater chemistry made in 1979-1982 and 1999-2000 are compared for a small, acid-sensitive catchment in Southeast England. The location, geology, soils, vegetation and hydrology of the catchment are described. The catchment is located on an acidic cretaceous sandstone with a low permeability clay sub-stratum. Soils are predominantly podzol and gley, with some mesotrophic peat. The catchment is forested. Mean volume-weighted concentrations in precipitation have changed approximately in proportion to emission changes. SO4(2-) has declined by 61%, H+ by 75%, both NO- and NH4+ by 37% and Cl- by 26%. Changes in wet deposition are greater, sulfate deposition declined by 69%, non-marine SO4(2-) by 73%, H+ deposition by 75%, NO3- and NH4+ by 50% and Cl- by 41%. Sulfate deposition in throughfall, a surrogate for total deposition measurement, has declined by 82% and non-marine SO4(2-) by 86%. Some of these changes are due to alterations in the tree cover and location of the collectors. In 1979-1982, the flux of NO3- and NH4+ in throughfall was less than in rainfall, 7.5 compared with 11.3 kg N ha(-1) year(-1), showing that N uptake by the canopy was greater than dry deposition of these species. However, in 1999-2000, the throughfall flux of N was greater than rainfall, 19.6 compared to 5.7 kg N ha year(-1), indicating that canopy uptake is not occurring to the same extent. Surface water was sampled at the same locations in the catchment during the two periods. At the catchment exit, mean pH increased, from 3.93 to 4.21 mg l(-1), and SO4(2-) declined from 20.2 to 16.7 mg l(-1) (18%). The decrease in SO4(2-) is much less than the reduction in deposition, suggesting that the predicted recovery is being delayed by release of sulfur from the soil. In contrast, NO3- concentrations in the catchment waters increased from 0.22 to 0.52 mg N l(-1) (133%) despite the reduction in N deposition. NH4+ concentrations were low during both study periods

  20. A Catchment-Based Hydrologic and Routing Modeling System with explicit river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goteti, Gopi; Famiglietti, James S.; Asante, Kwabena

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we present a macroscale hydrologic modeling system with an explicit representation of storage and movement of water in river channels and floodplains. The overall modeling system, called the Catchment-Based Hydrologic and Routing Modeling System (CHARMS), is composed of a land surface model and a river routing model that operate on a network of hydrologic catchments (or watersheds). The land surface model in CHARMS is based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model. The river routing model in CHARMS generates river discharge by transporting runoff generated by the catchment-based CLM through the river network. The routing model uses information on channel cross-section geometry, derived from the 90 m Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model, to simulate river discharge and the associated flow depth and inundation width. CHARMS was implemented over the Wabash River basin in the central United States (drainage area 72282 km2), and simulated streamflow was validated using daily observations. Simulated flow depth and inundation extent generally followed seasonal variations in observed flooding and droughts. Limitations of some of the assumptions and scaling factors used in this study and the issues that need to be addressed for a continental- or global-scale implementation of CHARMS are discussed. This paper serves as the foundation for a catchment-based, global land surface modeling framework that could incorporate spatiotemporal variations in surface water bodies, as well as satellite measurements of these variations.

  1. An ice core derived 1013-year catchment-scale annual rainfall reconstruction in subtropical eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer, Carly R.; Vance, Tessa R.; Roberts, Jason L.; Kiem, Anthony S.; Curran, Mark A. J.; Moy, Andrew D.

    2016-05-01

    Paleoclimate research indicates that the Australian instrumental climate record (˜ 100 years) does not cover the full range of hydroclimatic variability that is possible. To better understand the implications of this on catchment-scale water resources management, a 1013-year (1000-2012 common era (CE)) annual rainfall reconstruction was produced for the Williams River catchment in coastal eastern Australia. No high-resolution paleoclimate proxies are located in the region and so a teleconnection between summer sea salt deposition recorded in ice cores from East Antarctica and rainfall variability in eastern Australia was exploited to reconstruct the catchment-scale rainfall record. The reconstruction shows that significantly longer and more frequent wet and dry periods were experienced in the preinstrumental compared to the instrumental period. This suggests that existing drought and flood risk assessments underestimate the true risks due to the reliance on data and statistics obtained from only the instrumental record. This raises questions about the robustness of existing water security and flood protection measures and has serious implications for water resources management, infrastructure design and catchment planning. The method used in this proof of concept study is transferable and enables similar insights into the true risk of flood/drought to be gained for other paleoclimate proxy poor regions for which suitable remote teleconnected proxies exist. This will lead to improved understanding and ability to deal with the impacts of multi-decadal to centennial hydroclimatic variability.

  2. Monitoring temporal changes in use of two cathinones in a large urban catchment in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Thai, Phong K; Lai, Foon Yin; Edirisinghe, Methsiri; Hall, Wayne; Bruno, Raimondo; O'Brien, Jake W; Prichard, Jeremy; Kirkbride, K Paul; Mueller, Jochen F

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater analysis was used to examine prevalence and temporal trends in the use of two cathinones, methylone and mephedrone, in an urban population (>200,000 people) in South East Queensland, Australia. Wastewater samples were collected from the inlet of the sewage treatment plant that serviced the catchment from 2011 to 2013. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure mephedrone and methylone in wastewater sample using direct injection mode. Mephedrone was not detected in any samples while methylone was detected in 45% of the samples. Daily mass loads of methylone were normalized to the population and used to evaluate methylone use in the catchment. Methylone mass loads peaked in 2012 but there was no clear temporal trend over the monitoring period. The prevalence of methylone use in the catchment was associated with the use of MDMA, the more popular analogue of methylone, as indicated by other complementary sources. Methylone use was stable in the study catchment during the monitoring period whereas mephedrone use has been declining after its peak in 2010. More research is needed on the pharmacokinetics of emerging illicit drugs to improve the applicability of wastewater analysis in monitoring their use in the population. PMID:26747989

  3. Landslide triggering rainfall thresholds estimation using hydrological modelling of catchments in the Ialomita Subcarpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitu, Zenaida; Busuioc, Aristita; Burcea, Sorin; Sandric, Ionut

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the hydro-meteorological analysis for landslide triggering rainfall thresholds estimation in the Ialomita Subcarpathians. This specific area is a complex geological and geomorphic unit in Romania, affected by landslides that produce numerous damages to the infrastructure every few years (1997, 1998, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2012 and 2014). Semi-distributed ModClark hydrological model implemented in HEC HMS software that integrates radar rainfall data, was used to investigate hydrological conditions within the catchment responsible for the occurrence of landslides during the main rainfall events. Statistical analysis of the main hydro-meteorological variables during the landslide events that occurred between 2005 and 2014 was carried out in order to identify preliminary rainfall thresholds for landslides in the Ialomita Subcarpathians. Moreover, according to the environmental catchment characteristics, different hydrological behaviors could be identified based on the spatially distributed rainfall estimates from weather radar data. Two hydrological regimes in the catchments were distinguished: one dominated by direct flow that explains the landslides that occurred due to slope undercutting and one characterized by high soil water storage during prolonged rainfall and therefore where subsurface runoff is significant. The hydrological precipitation-discharge modelling of the catchment in the Ialomita Subcarpathians, in which landslides occurred, helped understanding the landslide triggering and as such can be of added value for landslide research.

  4. Data mining methods for predicting event runoff coefficients in ungauged basins using static and dynamic catchment characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Weiler, Markus; Seibert, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Transferring hydrological information into ungauged basin by regionalisation approaches is an ongoing field of research. Usually regionalisation techniques use physical landscape descriptors to transfer either model parameters or hydrological characteristics from a catchment to another. A common problem of these approaches is the high degree of uncertainty associated to their results. One reason is that often solely static (structural) catchment characteristics such as catchment area, physiographic properties or land use data are used for regionalisation. However, it is well known that the hydrological response of a 'natural' system is a complex and a non-linear interaction of its structure, state and forcing. Here it is important to note, that only structure is a static property. State and forcing are highly dynamic when considering the temporal and spatial scale of a rainfall-runoff event. To overcome the limitations associated with 'static' regionalisation techniques we propose a regionalisation technique for event runoff coefficients combining static and dynamic catchment properties. The approach is based on the two data mining algorithms 'random forests' and 'quantile regression forests'. The static catchment characteristics include standard variables such as physiographic properties, land cover and soil data. The dynamic variables include event based properties of the forcing (i.e. rainfall amount, intensity,...) and proxies for the initial state of the catchment (i.e. initial soil moisture). Together with the runoff coefficient these quantities were extracted form hydro-meteorological time series (precipitation, discharge and soil moisture) using an automated rainfall-runoff event detection technique. We tested our method using a set of 60 meso-scale catchments (3.1 to 205,6 km2, covering a range of different geologies and land uses) from Southwest Germany. We randomly separated the catchments in two groups. The first group (30 donor catchments) was used to

  5. Patterns and processes of nutrient transfers from land to water: a catchment approach to evaluate Good Agricultural Practice in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellander, P.-E.; Melland, A. R.; Shortle, G.; Wall, D.; Mechan, S.; Buckley, C.; Fealy, R.; Jordan, P.

    2009-04-01

    grassland soils; areas where arable production represents a significant landuse; and catchments on productive and unproductive aquifers. The catchments were identified using a GIS-based multicriteria decision analysis with objective criteria that included landuse data (including agricultural and settlement statistics) combined with soils and geology data to evaluate the risk of P and N loss. Shortlisted catchments were then finalised using practical criteria based on the potential for hydrometry and hydrochemistry research. In each catchment, a conceptual model approach is being used to hypothesize the sources, seasonal mobilisation and pathways of nutrients and water through the soil/subsoil system and transfer into surface and ground water systems to stratify each catchment experimental design. Knowledge of the nutrient management of each catchment farm and resulting soil fertility will be used to monitor the sources of agricultural N and P. Environmental soil nutrient tests will provide baselines and checks on the potential for mobilisation. Areas of high soil fertility that are coincident with high surface or sub-surface hydrological connectivity will be monitored for subsequent nutrient transfer. Other potential nutrient source loads within the catchments, such as rural waste-water treatment plants and domestic septic systems, will be factored in as non-agricultural sources. Similarly, the potential for farmyard transfers will also be assessed. The net balance of nutrient transfer at the catchment outlets will be monitored using a high resolution method that is coincident with hydrometric measurements to ensure that there is a full understanding of the inter-dependence between point and diffuse nutrient transfers and hydrodynamics. This source to transfer approach is highly appropriate and a move towards inductive understanding of nutrient use and export in river catchments - the scale at which policies for water resources management will be assessed under the WFD. The

  6. First-order catchment mass balance during the wet season in the Panama Canal Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzialek, Justin M.; Ogden, Fred L.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryTropical hydrology is poorly understood for a number of reasons. Intense biological activity in the tropics introduces complexities to the hydrologic process. Bioturbation, rapid rates of decay, and intensive insect activity all tend to promote rapid flow paths in the upper soil. Aggressive weathering leads to clays depleted of light cations and deep soil profiles. Processes in the seasonal tropics are further complicated by seasonal transitions, and very large changes in catchment storage between seasons. Beginning in 2005, we installed a suite of hydrologic sensors in a 16.7 ha first-order catchment in the Panama Canal Watershed to observe hydrologic variables and identify the dominant streamflow generation processes. The site is located near the village of Gamboa, which is located on the east bank of the Panama Canal at the confluence of Lake Gatun and the Chagres River. The study catchment is located on the north side of a ridge off the eastern flank of a 230 m tall hill known as Cerro Pelado, and is covered by 70-120 year old re-growth triple-canopy forest. Measurements included: rainfall above the canopy, throughfall, stemflow, evapotranspiration, shallow groundwater levels and streamflow. Deep groundwater storage was not measured. This paper describes measurements made, data collected, and the worth of those data in estimating the mass balance closure of a first-order catchment during the wet season. We compare measurements of the different components of the water cycle with observations from other published studies from the tropics. Data analysis results indicate water balance closure errors of approximately 8%.

  7. Catchment-mediated atmospheric nitrogen deposition drives ecological change in two alpine lakes in SE Tibet.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhujun; Anderson, Nicholas John; Yang, Xiangdong; McGowan, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    The south-east margin of Tibet is highly sensitive to global environmental change pressures, in particular, high contemporary reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition rates (ca. 40 kg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ), but the extent and timescale of recent ecological change is not well prescribed. Multiproxy analyses (diatoms, pigments and geochemistry) of (210) Pb-dated sediment cores from two alpine lakes in Sichuan were used to assess whether they have undergone ecological change comparable to those in Europe and North America over the last two centuries. The study lakes have contrasting catchment-to-lake ratios and vegetation cover: Shade Co has a relatively larger catchment and denser alpine shrub than Moon Lake. Both lakes exhibited unambiguous increasing production since the late 19th to early 20th. Principle component analysis was used to summarize the trends of diatom and pigment data after the little ice age (LIA). There was strong linear change in biological proxies at both lakes, which were not consistent with regional temperature, suggesting that climate is not the primary driver of ecological change. The multiproxy analysis indicated an indirect ecological response to Nr deposition at Shade Co mediated through catchment processes since ca. 1930, while ecological change at Moon Lake started earlier (ca. 1880) and was more directly related to Nr deposition (depleted δ(15) N). The only pronounced climate effect was evidenced by changes during the LIA when photoautotrophic groups shifted dramatically at Shade Co (a 4-fold increase in lutein concentration) and planktonic diatom abundance declined at both sites because of longer ice cover. The substantial increases in aquatic production over the last ca. 100 years required a substantial nutrient subsidy and the geochemical data point to a major role for Nr deposition although dust cannot be excluded. The study also highlights the importance of lake and catchment morphology for determining the response of alpine lakes to

  8. Catchment Prediction In Changing Environments (CAPICHE): A collaborative experiment in an open water science laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    Predicting the function of hydrological systems under near-stationary conditions faces a number of challenges due to incomplete system understanding, and uncertainty in models and measurements. However, due to changes in climate, land use/land cover, and water demand, the hydrological function of many catchments cannot be considered as stationary. Such changes make modelling catchment systems more difficult, as models need to account for non-stationary forcing and boundary conditions, which in turn can change internal catchment function, and the states and processes that dominate hydrological response. In addition, such models may need to be used to make predictions beyond a range of conditions for which they were originally calibrated. Despite these problems, deriving accurate hydrological predictions under changing conditions is increasingly important for future water resource and flood hazard assessment. Simulating catchments under changing conditions may require more complex distributed models in order to adequately represent spatial changes in boundary conditions (e.g. land cover change). However, the potential for complex models to address these issues cannot be realised in many places because of data problems, which may result from a lack of data, data access issues, and time-consuming problems in bringing diverse sources of data together and into a useable format. A greater understanding of the link between model complexity and data is required to make appropriate modelling choices. Virtual water science laboratories offer the ideal opportunity to explore the issues of model complexity and data availability in the context of predictions under changing environments because they: (1) provide an opportunity to share open data; (2) provide a platform to compare different models; (3) facilitate collaboration between different modelling research groups. This paper introduces a new collaborative experiment, conducted in an open virtual water science laboratory as

  9. Linking on-farm change to catchment response using dynamic simulation modelling: assessing the impacts of farm-scale land management change on catchment-scale phosphorus transport processes and water-quality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M.; Clarendon, S.

    2012-04-01

    Australian Natural Resource Management and Agri-industry Development agencies have recently invested considerable resources into a number of research and development projects that have investigated the actual and potential economic, social and, particularly, environmental impacts of varying farming activities (with a strong focus on dairies) in a "catchment context". These activities have resulted in the development of a much-improved understanding of the likely impacts of changed farm management practices within the farms and regions in which they were investigated, as well as the development of a number of conceptual models which place dairy farming within this broader catchment context. The project discussed in this paper was charged with the objective of transforming these conceptual models of dairy farm nutrient management and transport processes into a more temporally and spatially dynamic model. This could then be loaded with catchment-specific data and used as a "policy support tool" to allow the Australian dairy industry to examine the potential farm and catchment-scale impacts of varying dairy farm management practices within some key dairy farming regions. This paper describes the series of dynamic models and farm management - land use scenarios which were executed to examine these issues. Models were developed, validated and calibrated for the Peel-Harvey catchment in Western Australia and the Gippsland and Latrobe (a sub-catchment of Gippsland) catchments in Victoria. Scenarios which range from simple, on-farm riparian management, through changes in fertiliser application rates, to gross changes in the land use mosaic were examined and described in terms which included changes to phosphorus (P) loss rates at the farm scale, the relative contributions to catchment P loads from dairying and, ultimately, changes to downstream water quality. A comprehensive suite of scenarios and policy options was examined but, in summary, the results indicate that whilst

  10. Collaborative Catchment-Scale Water Quality Management using Integrated Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Huma; Harris, Nick; Merrett, Geoff

    2013-04-01

    collaborative information sharing can have a direct influence on agricultural practice. We apply a nutrient management scheme to a model of an example catchment with several individual networks. The networks are able to correlate catchment events to events within their zone of influence, allowing them to adapt their monitoring and control strategy in light of wider changes across the catchment. Results indicate that this can lead to significant reductions in nutrient losses (up to 50%) and better reutilization of nutrients amongst farms, having a positive impact on catchment scale water quality and fertilizer costs. 1. EC, E.C., Directive 2000/60/EC establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy, 2000. 2. Rivers, M., K. Smettem, and P. Davies. Estimating future scenarios for farm-watershed nutrient fluxes using dynamic simulation modelling-Can on-farm BMPs really do the job at the watershed scale? in Proc.29th Int.Conf System Dynamics Society, 2011. 2010. Washington 3. Liu, C., et al., On-farm evaluation of winter wheat yield response to residual soil nitrate-N in North China Plain. Agronomy Journal, 2008. 100(6): p. 1527-1534. 4. Kotamäki, N., et al., Wireless in-situ sensor network for agriculture and water monitoring on a river basin scale in Southern Finland: Evaluation from a data user's perspective. Sensors, 2009. 9(4): p. 2862-2883.

  11. Catchments network on badlands around Mediterranean area (RESOBAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, Yoann; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Regues-Munoz, David; Latron, Jerome; Solé-Benet, Albert; Canton, Yolanda; Nadal-Romero, Estela; Della Seta, Marta; Rossi, Mauro; Capolongo, Domenico; Maquaire, Olivier; Forey, Estelle; Di-Giovanni, Christian; Gallart, Francesc; Delmonte, Maurizio; Vergari, Francesca; Massei, Nicolas; Torri, Dino

    2016-04-01

    Between 2013 and 2014, a network funded by MISTRALS-ENVIMED institution, was born around some instrumented catchments developing a badland-type morphology. This network has grouped 3 countries (France, Spain and Italy) with 12 scientific labs. RESOBAM has concerned two sites in France (Draix-Bléone and Vaches Noires), three in Spain (Vallcebre, Araguas and El Cautivo) and some sites in Italy (Tuscany, Basilicata). Main goal of this network was to federate the research around badlands at the European scale, by proposing some scientific topics as: sediment and water transports / budget, (bio)geochemical cycles, agricultural (farming), education, restoration, cultural heritage, soil conservation / biodiversity, climatic change etc. Other main interests were also to propose some common scientific projects and the development of students exchanges. This communication presents the synthesis of our four meetings held at Draix, Zaragoza, Almeriá and Rouen and some perspectives to continue this network.

  12. Exploring links between tectonics, catchment morphology and hydrographs across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Campforts, Benjamin; Van Ruyskensvelde, Glenn; Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of studies show that contemporary catchment sediment yields (SY, [t/km²/y]) are strongly correlated to patterns of seismic activity at regional to continental scales. Nonetheless, the mechanisms explaining these correlations are still poorly understood. Seismicity may increase SY by triggering landslides or weakening the surface lithology. On the other hand seismicity can be considered as a proxy for tectonic movements, while there is a growing consensus that tectonics exert an important influence on catchment morphology. This morphology influences the properties of runoff events (e.g. peak discharge, stream power). Given the large influence of large runoff events on annual SY, it is therefore possible that observed correlations between SY and seismicity are (at least partly) attributable to tectonic influences on catchment morphology. We test this hypothesis by investigating links between runoff hydrographs and patterns in catchment properties at a European scale using numerous catchment indices such as the slope, channel steepness, circularity, drainage length, river network topology, etc. From DEMs with a resolution of ca. 100m we randomly delineated over 5000 catchments across Europe with an area of 90 to 100 km². For each of these catchments, we simulated a runoff hydrograph, using a simple Hortonian runoff model that routes water through the catchment based on previously proposed flow velocity equations. We made abstraction of rainfall patterns, lithology, land use and all factors other than topography. Hence, the hydrographs only reflect the influence of the morphological properties of the catchments and allow for comparisons. First results show that, apart from average catchment slope, there are very few regional patterns in catchment morphological properties that may significantly affect hydrographs. In some tectonically active regions, channel slopes are slightly steeper compared to catchments with the same average catchment slope in

  13. Catchment-scale evaluation of pollution potential of urban snow at two residential catchments in southern Finland.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, Nora; Koivusalo, Harri

    2013-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of snow in the hydrological cycle in cold climate conditions, monitoring studies of urban snow quality often lack discussions about the relevance of snow in the catchment-scale runoff management. In this study, measurements of snow quality were conducted at two residential catchments in Espoo, Finland, simultaneously with continuous runoff measurements. The results of the snow quality were used to produce catchment-scale estimates of areal snow mass loads (SML). Based on the results, urbanization reduced areal snow water equivalent but increased pollutant accumulation in snow: SMLs in a medium-density residential catchment were two- to four-fold higher in comparison with a low-density residential catchment. The main sources of pollutants were related to vehicular traffic and road maintenance, but also pet excrement increased concentrations to a high level. Ploughed snow can contain 50% of the areal pollutant mass stored in snow despite its small surface area within a catchment.

  14. Hydrology Research with the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) Datasets at the NASA GES DISC Using Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mocko, David M.; Rui, Hualan; Acker, James G.

    2013-01-01

    The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) is a collaboration project between NASA/GSFC, NOAA, Princeton Univ., and the Univ. of Washington. NLDAS has created a surface meteorology dataset using the best-available observations and reanalyses the backbone of this dataset is a gridded precipitation analysis from rain gauges. This dataset is used to drive four separate land-surface models (LSMs) to produce datasets of soil moisture, snow, runoff, and surface fluxes. NLDAS datasets are available hourly and extend from Jan 1979 to near real-time with a typical 4-day lag. The datasets are available at 1/8th-degree over CONUS and portions of Canada and Mexico from 25-53 North. The datasets have been extensively evaluated against observations, and are also used as part of a drought monitor. NLDAS datasets are available from the NASA GES DISC and can be accessed via ftp, GDS, Mirador, and Giovanni. GES DISC news articles were published showing figures from the heat wave of 2011, Hurricane Irene, Tropical Storm Lee, and the low-snow winter of 2011-2012. For this presentation, Giovanni-generated figures using NLDAS data from the derecho across the U.S. Midwest and Mid-Atlantic will be presented. Also, similar figures will be presented from the landfall of Hurricane Isaac and the before-and-after drought conditions of the path of the tropical moisture into the central states of the U.S. Updates on future products and datasets from the NLDAS project will also be introduced.

  15. The Impact of Enhanced Summer Thaw, Hillslope Disturbances, and Late Season Rainfall on Solute Fluxes from High Arctic Headwater Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafreniere, M. J.; Lamoureux, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines variations in the composition and total seasonal fluxes of dissolved solutes in several small High Arctic headwater catchments at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO), Melville Island, Nunavut (74°54'N, 109°35'W) over multiple snowmelt seasons (2007, 2008, 2009) with contrasting climate and permafrost active layer conditions. Climate warming in the High Arctic will affect a number processes that will alter the hydrological and biogeochemical exports from the landscape. Climate change is projected to alter precipitation regimes, resulting in increases in both winter and summer precipitation in the High Arctic, thereby altering hydrological regimes. Warming will result in thickening of the seasonal active layer, which will alter hydrological flow paths and water and solute sources. Additionally, active layer thickening and permafrost warming is also project to enhance the development of thermokarst features, including hillslope disturbances, such as active layer detachment slides and retrogressive thaw slumps. This research compares the flux of inorganic and organic solutes emanating from a group of catchments that were subject to a range hillslope disturbances, or active layer detachment slides (ALDs), at the end of summer 2007. One of the catchments, Goose, was not subject to any disturbance, while active layer slides covered between 6% and 46% of the catchment area in the disturbed catchments. It was hypothesised that solute fluxes would increase primarily with increasing extent and degree of disturbance. This however, was not observed. Rather, comparing five sites with varying degrees of disturbance in 2009 illustrates that on a specific area and specific volume of runoff basis, solute fluxes were unrelated to disturbance extent. Comparing two catchments that were monitored from 2007 (pre-disturbance) through to 2009 (2 yrs post disturbance), shows that both catchments were subject to solute flux increases, however the solute

  16. Melt Energetics of 25-years of Distributed, Physically Based Snowcover Simulations in a Small Headwater Semiarid Mountain Catchment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reba, M. L.; Marks, D. G.; Winstral, A. H.; Kumar, M.

    2013-12-01

    Water in the western US is over-allocated due to both urban and rural demands. Over the last 20-30 years climate warming in western North America has resulted in a critical shift in patterns of snow deposition and melt. A carefully collected, processed, and validated meteorological dataset for the 1984 - 2008 water years was assembled for a headwater catchment within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains of Idaho. Data from this catchment are representative of conditions across a large region of the interior western US. These data are used to simulate patterns of snow deposition and melt over the catchment for the 25-year period. The simulation period includes both the wettest (1984) and driest (1992) water years, along with a high degree of inter-annual variability. Energetics of six landcover zones and the average within the catchment are compared. Two of these zones are characterized by wind exposure (drift, scour), and four others by general vegetation cover vegetation (fir/conifer, aspen/willow, big sage, mid-sage). Energetics are compared and analyzed to understand how site characteristics moderate the climatic and atmospheric conditions, which control the establishment, development and ablation of the seasonal snowcover.

  17. Stakeholder discourse and water management - implementation of the participatory model CATCH in a Northern Italian alpine sub-catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo Stanghellini, P. S.; Collentine, D.

    2008-03-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD, directive 2000/60/EC) was created to ensure the sustainable use of water resources in the European Union. A central guideline included throughout the directive is a call for the participation of stakeholders in the management of these resources. Involving stakeholders is an important step to ensure that catchment management plans take into consideration local experience in the development of these plans and the impact of the plans on local interests. This paper describes and analyses the results of a series of workshops to facilitate implementation of the WFD at a catchment level based on the stakeholder participation model, CATCH. To test the usefulness of the CATCH model, developed for water management in a catchment area, a sub-catchment in an alpine valley in the north-east of Italy, the Alta Valsugana in the Province of Trento, was chosen as the setting for a series of workshops. In this valley water is fundamental for activities associated with agriculture, domestic use, energy production, sports and recreation. In the recent past the valley has had serious problems related to water quality and quantity. Implementation of water management plans under the WFD may lead to conflicts within the catchment between different stakeholder interest groups. Including stakeholders in the development of management plans not only follows the guidelines of the WFD but also could result in a more locally adapted and acceptable plan for the catchment. A new stakeholder analysis methodology was developed and implemented in order to identify the relevant stakeholders of the area and then two sets of workshops involving the key stakeholders identified were conducted in Spring 2006. The CATCH meetings were a new experience for the participants, who had to deal with both the principles of the WFD in general and the participation requirement in particular. During the meetings, the CATCH model played a very important role in structuring the

  18. Transport of dissolved carbon and CO2 degassing from a river system in a mixed silicate and carbonate catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Mitra B.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Jin, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the origin, transformation and transport of terrestrially derived carbon in river systems is critical to regional and global carbon cycles, particularly in carbonate terrains, which represent the largest carbon reservoir on the earth’s surface. For this reason, we evaluated sources, cycling, and fluxes of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC) and riverine CO2 degassing to the atmosphere in the Santa Fe River in north-central Florida, a sub-tropical river that flows across two distinct hydrogeological settings of a region dominated by carbonate karst. One setting occurs in the upper river catchment, where the carbonate Floridan aquifer is confined by the siliciclastic Hawthorn Group, while the other setting occurs in the lower catchment where the river flows across the unconfined Floridan aquifer. The upper catchment is characterized by DOC-rich and DIC-poor water and the DIC has more variable and lower δ13C values compared to the lower catchment. The river in the upper catchment degasses more CO2 to the atmosphere (1156 g C m-2 yr-1) than in the lower catchment (402 g C m-2 yr-1) because soil respired carbon and organic matter decomposition increase dissolved CO2 concentration, much of which is consumed during carbonate dissolution reactions in the lower catchment. The CO2 flux from the water surface to the atmosphere during a flood event is three times greater than during base flow, suggesting that excess precipitation flushes soil organic carbon to the river through interflow and enhances the loss of terrestrial carbon via river water to the atmosphere. Our values of CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere lie within the range of fluxes from the world’s rivers, but fluxes from the carbonate dominated region are at the low end, while fluxes from the siliciclastic region are at the high end. These results indicate that catchment lithologies, particularly whether carbonate or siliciclastic, as well as flow, are critical to carbon budgets in rivers

  19. Streamflow response to fire in large catchments of a Mediterranean-climate region using paired-catchment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, Ryan; Hope, Allen

    2010-07-01

    SummaryUnderstanding post-fire streamflow dynamics in large California catchments is limited by a lack of direct empirical evidence. Scaling results from small experimental catchments to large catchments for practical applications is challenging. We investigated the possibility of using streamflow data from an existing gauge network in central and southern California to examine the effects of fire on streamflow using a paired-catchment approach. Post-fire streamflow change was examined in six paired catchments at annual, seasonal and monthly time-periods. Prediction intervals associated with the pre-fire calibration regression models were used to identify statistically significant changes in post-fire streamflow. The identification of suitable paired test and control catchments presented a major challenge, despite the large number of potential catchments in the network. The best calibration results were associated with catchment pairs that had similar orographic controls over rainfall, with proximity to one another being a secondary control. The effect of fires on streamflow, regardless of time-period examined, was found to be variable, depending mostly on post-fire wetness conditions. No relation was evident between post-fire streamflow change and catchment size or area burnt.

  20. Runoff and suspended sediment transport after plantation interventions in experimental catchments with contrasting rainfall conditions, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iroume, A.; Schuller, P.; Bronstert, A.; Carey, P.; Palacios, H.; Ulloa, H.

    2012-04-01

    dry in Nacimiento and this fact could explain the minor differences in suspended sediments transport between the control and treatment catchments. In Los Ulmos mean monthly suspended sediment loads for the pre-treatment period were 63.9 kg/ha in LUC and 165 kg/ha in LUT. Then, mean monthly suspended sediment loads during the first year of the post-harvesting period (May to December 2010) were 70 kg/ha in LUC and 203 kg/ha in LUT and 38 kg/ha in LUC and 103 kg/ha in LUT from January to August 2011. Low soil disturbances associated to the summer logging operations in NT and the very dry year following clearfelling could explain the similarities among suspended sediment transport in the two Nacimiento catchments. Major differences were registered in the LUT catchment, probably associated to higher erosive processes in this rainy site. This research is supported by the Chilean Government through projects FONDECYT Project 1090574 and CONICYT/BMBF 243-2010. The authors acknowledge the support of Forestal Mininco S.A. and the Forest Research Centre of Universidad Austral de Chile.

  1. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (29th, Annapolis, Maryland, November 16-19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 2002 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research, a meeting devoted to assessment in the 21st century and the challenges that face institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Putting Community College Enrollment Trends in Perspective by the Use of Census Data and Market…

  2. ON-ROAD REMOTE SENSING OF AUTOMOBILE EMISSIONS IN THE RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA AREA: 1997-2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes automobile exhaust remote sensing data collected by EPA at a number of sites in the Research Triangle Park, NC area during 1997. Data were also collected at one site in Raleigh, NC from 1998 through 2001 for the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) study of re...

  3. Continuation Proposal to the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (1988-89) for a Project To Enhance the Educational Research Awareness of Faculty in the Historically Black Institutions of the University of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Richard M.

    This report of the Project to Enhance the Educational Research Awareness of Faculty in the Historically Black Institutions of the University of North Carolina includes its first annual report of project activities, presenting information on the eight Educational Research Fellows, the mentorship program, a workshop on oral presentation of research…

  4. Highlighting the Impacts of North-South Research Collaboration among Canadian and Southern Higher Education Partners (Principaux impacts des collaborations de recherche Nord-Sud entre les partenaires des etablissements d'enseignement superieur du Canada et du Sud)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) felt it was timely to create an academic forum in which university researchers have the opportunity to engage with their peers and relevant stakeholders and document the impacts of their North-South research collaboration in a peer-reviewed publication. The Association achieved this by…

  5. Controls on old and new water contributions to stream flow at some nested catchments in Vermont, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kendall, C.; Smith, T.E.; Wolock, D.M.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.

    2002-01-01

    Factors controlling the partitioning of old and new water contributions to stream flow were investigated for three events in four catchments (three of which were nested) at Sleepers River Research Watershed in Danville, Vermont. In the 1993 snowmelt period, two-component isotopic hydrograph separations showed that new water (meltwater) inputs to the stream ranged widely from 41 to 74%, and increased with catchment size (41 to 11 125 ha) (with one exception) and with open land cover (0-73%). Peak dissolved organic carbon concentrations and relative alkalinity dilution in stream water ranked in the same order among catchments as the new water fractions, suggesting that new water followed shallow flow paths. During the 1994 snowmelt, despite similar timing and magnitude of melt inputs, the new-water contribution to stream flow ranged only from 30 to 36% in the four catchments. We conclude that the uncommonly high and variable new water fractions in streamwater during the 1993 melt were caused by direct runoff of meltwater over frozen ground, which was prevalent in open land areas during the 1993 winter. In a high-intensity summer rainstorm in 1993, new water fractions were smaller relative to the 1993 snowmelt, ranging from 28 to 46%, but they ranked in the identical catchment order. Reconciliation of the contrasting patterns of new-old water partitioning in the three events appears to require an explanation that invokes multiple processes and effects, including: 1 topographically controlled increase in surface-saturated area with increasing catchment size; 2 direct runoff over frozen ground; 3 low infiltration in agriculturally compacted soils; 4 differences in soil transmissivity, which may be more relevant under dry antecedent conditions. These data highlight some of the difficulties faced by catchment hydrologists in formulating a theory of runoff generation at varying basin scales. Copyright ?? 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  6. Which hillslopes sustain baseflow during low flow conditions? Lessons from winter discharge observations in the alpine Poschiavino catchment, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriancic, Marius; Smoorenburg, Maarten; Margreth, Michael; Naef, Felix

    2014-05-01

    Estimation of water availability during low flow conditions is important for many economic and environmental services. Yet, particularly in mountainous terrain, knowledge of which areas in a catchment store water long enough to sustain streamflow during low flow conditions is very limited. Not only the storage volume, but also the drainage time scale is important for understanding recession dynamics. To identify how alpine hillslopes contribute to baseflow recession at the catchment scale, a detailed field study of winter low flows was conducted in the 14.1 km2 upper Poschiavino catchment in southeast Switzerland. Winter discharge observations in alpine catchments are particularly suitable for studying drainage behavior because there is little recharge and groundwater reservoirs are depleted by drainage only. The upper Poschiavino catchment with its crystalline geology is an interesting research area because of its high winter discharge (Q95 approximately 10 l/s/km2). Based on geo(morpho)logical maps, digital elevation model, aerial photographs and field observations a variety of geomorphological storages, like glacial, rockfall and fluvial deposits, was identified. Frequent discharge measurements during winter allowed obtaining a baseflow recession time series for nested subcatchments in various geomorphological settings. The discharge observations were augmented with electrical conductivity measurements and analysis of stream water chemistry. These observations form a spatial dataset of low flow distribution in the river network that allows identifying the drainage timescales and the storages involved. We found much variation in the contribution of these hillslopes and tried to attribute these variations to properties of the storages, like catchment area, geomorphology and physical parameters of the sediments. A classification of the different storage types regarding capacity and drainage behavior was developed. This classification formed the basis for a

  7. Modeling relationships between catchment attributes and river water quality in southern catchments of the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasani Sangani, Mohammad; Jabbarian Amiri, Bahman; Alizadeh Shabani, Afshin; Sakieh, Yousef; Ashrafi, Sohrab

    2015-04-01

    Increasing land utilization through diverse forms of human activities, such as agriculture, forestry, urban growth, and industrial development, has led to negative impacts on the water quality of rivers. To find out how catchment attributes, such as land use, hydrologic soil groups, and lithology, can affect water quality variables (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), HCO 3 (-) , pH, TDS, EC, SAR), a spatio-statistical approach was applied to 23 catchments in southern basins of the Caspian Sea. All input data layers (digital maps of land use, soil, and lithology) were prepared using geographic information system (GIS) and spatial analysis. Relationships between water quality variables and catchment attributes were then examined by Spearman rank correlation tests and multiple linear regression. Stepwise approach-based multiple linear regressions were developed to examine the relationship between catchment attributes and water quality variables. The areas (%) of marl, tuff, or diorite, as well as those of good-quality rangeland and bare land had negative effects on all water quality variables, while those of basalt, forest land cover were found to contribute to improved river water quality. Moreover, lithological variables showed the greatest most potential for predicting the mean concentration values of water quality variables, and noting that measure of EC and TDS have inversely associated with area (%) of urban land use. PMID:25395322

  8. Modeling relationships between catchment attributes and river water quality in southern catchments of the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasani Sangani, Mohammad; Jabbarian Amiri, Bahman; Alizadeh Shabani, Afshin; Sakieh, Yousef; Ashrafi, Sohrab

    2015-04-01

    Increasing land utilization through diverse forms of human activities, such as agriculture, forestry, urban growth, and industrial development, has led to negative impacts on the water quality of rivers. To find out how catchment attributes, such as land use, hydrologic soil groups, and lithology, can affect water quality variables (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), HCO 3 (-) , pH, TDS, EC, SAR), a spatio-statistical approach was applied to 23 catchments in southern basins of the Caspian Sea. All input data layers (digital maps of land use, soil, and lithology) were prepared using geographic information system (GIS) and spatial analysis. Relationships between water quality variables and catchment attributes were then examined by Spearman rank correlation tests and multiple linear regression. Stepwise approach-based multiple linear regressions were developed to examine the relationship between catchment attributes and water quality variables. The areas (%) of marl, tuff, or diorite, as well as those of good-quality rangeland and bare land had negative effects on all water quality variables, while those of basalt, forest land cover were found to contribute to improved river water quality. Moreover, lithological variables showed the greatest most potential for predicting the mean concentration values of water quality variables, and noting that measure of EC and TDS have inversely associated with area (%) of urban land use.

  9. Unravelling past flash flood activity in a forested mountain catchment of the Spanish Central System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan A.; Rodríguez-Morata, Clara; Garófano-Gómez, Virginia; Rubiales, Juan M.; Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Flash floods represent one of the most common natural hazards in mountain catchments, and are frequent in Mediterranean environments. As a result of the widespread lack of reliable data on past events, the understanding of their spatio-temporal occurrence and their climatic triggers remains rather limited. Here, we present a dendrogeomorphic reconstruction of past flash flood activity in the Arroyo de los Puentes stream (Sierra de Guadarrama, Spanish Central System). We analyze a total of 287 increment cores from 178 disturbed Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris L.) which yielded indications on 212 growth disturbances related to past flash flood impact. In combination with local archives, meteorological data, annual forest management records and highly-resolved terrestrial data (i.e., LiDAR data and aerial imagery), the dendrogeomorphic time series allowed dating 25 flash floods over the last three centuries, with a major event leaving an intense geomorphic footprint throughout the catchment in 1936. The analysis of meteorological records suggests that the rainfall thresholds of flash floods vary with the seasonality of events. Dated flash floods in the 20th century were primarily related with synoptic troughs owing to the arrival of air masses from north and west on the Iberian Peninsula during negative indices of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The results of this study contribute considerably to a better understanding of hazards related with hydrogeomorphic processes in central Spain in general and in the Sierra de Guadarrama National Park in particular.

  10. Critical source times for nutrient loss in agricultural catchment streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melland, Alice; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik; McDonald, Noeleen; Shortle, Ger; Murphy, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Identifying periods of the year when there is a high risk of incidental nutrient loss from farms via runoff to streams underpins current nutrient management legislation in Europe. This research explored high-temporal resolution nutrient transfer patterns relative to the time that manure and fertiliser are prohibited from being spread (the mandatory spreading 'closed' period) in five Irish agricultural catchments. Catchment nutrient losses during the 12 week closed periods in 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 were compared with losses during the remainder of the year, and with losses in the two week 'shoulder' periods immediately before and after the closed period. The closed period losses were assumed to be residual from soil nutrient stores and the 'shoulder' periods were considered to also include incidental losses. Nutrient loss was measured at sub-hourly frequency as total phosphorus (P) and total oxidised nitrogen (mostly nitrate-N) fluxes in streamflow. The streamflow fluxes showed that the proportion of the annual nitrate-N loss occurring during the closed periods (33-61%) was high compared with the remainder of the year. Six to ten times more nitrate-N loss occurred in the two weeks after, compared with the two weeks before, the closed period. These two week 'shoulder' period losses were, on average, less than or equal to 2.5 kg nitrate-N/ha and 9% of total annual nitrate-N loss in streamflow. On average, 40-53% of the annual P loss occurred during the closed periods but in a runoff-prone catchment in a year with a wet summer, the closed period was the less risky period. Similar to nitrate-N, two to twenty times more P loss occurred in the two weeks after, compared with the two weeks before, the closed period. These shoulder period losses were, on average, less than or equal to 0.027 kg/ha and 4.2% of total annual P loss in streamflow. The proportion of the shoulder period loss that could be attributed to recently spread nutrients was not known but can be

  11. Validation of Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Landscapes at the Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicz, K. A.; Leibowitz, S. G.; Comeleo, R. L.; Wigington, P. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between the physical properties of a catchment (form) and climatic forcing of precipitation and energy control how water is partitioned, stored, and conveyed through a catchment (function). Hydrologic Landscapes (HLs) were previously developed across Oregon and describe climatic and physical properties for over 5000 assessment units. This approach was then extended to the three Pacific Northwest states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho (PNW HL). The HLs were developed using the National Hydrography Dataset's WBD HU12 scale and are comprised of classification components describing climate, climate seasonality, aquifer permeability, terrain, and soil permeability. To compare the PNW HL classification to catchment hydrologic behavior, HLs were aggregated to catchment scale to compare against the input/output of water in the catchment. HL aggregation must preserve information on the location of the HL within the catchment outlet (upstream vs. downstream) and properties of that HL (i.e. water source vs. sink). Catchment function was investigated by use of hydrologic signatures, which are attributes of long-term time series of water into and out of the catchment. Signatures include Runoff Ratio, Baseflow Index, Snow Ratio, and Recession Coefficients. This study has three primary objectives: 1) derivation of hydrologic signatures to capture the hydrologic behavior for catchments in the Pacific Northwest: 2) development of methodology to aggregate HLs to the catchment scale; and 3) statistical analysis of signature values and trends with respect to aggregated HL classification. We hypothesize that we will find: 1) strong relationships between aggregated HLs and hydrologic signatures; 2) signatures related to water balance are explained by climatic conditions; and 3) signatures describing flow paths are predicted by terrain, soil, and aquifer permeability. This study examined 230 catchments to achieve objectives and test hypotheses stated.

  12. Making a World of Difference. Dimension: Language '91. Selected Papers from the Joint Meeting of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching and the Foreign Language Association of North Carolina (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Robert M., Ed.

    Papers from the 1991 joint Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT)/ Foreign Language Association of North Carolina (FLANC) conference are presented. Because the state of North Carolina is in the forefront of state-mandated foreign language education in the elementary schools (FLES), 4 of the 10 articles in this volume address FLES…

  13. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  14. Equitable water allocation in a heavily committed international catchment area: the case of the Komati Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkomo, Sakhiwe; van der Zaag, Pieter

    This paper investigates water availability and use in the Komati catchment. The Komati catchment is shared by Swaziland and South Africa and forms part of the Incomati basin, with Mozambique as the third riparian country. In 2002 the three countries reached agreement about how the scarce water should be allocated, based on the principle of equitable and sustainable utilization, as stipulated by the SADC Protocol. The Komati catchment has five main water uses: afforestation, irrigation, the environment, urban/industrial/mining (UIM), and interbasin water transfers (for industrial use). In addition, South Africa and Swaziland have committed themselves to satisfy a certain cross border flow to downstream Mozambique. Frequently, debate has arisen between users and riparian countries on the direction that water resources development has taken in the catchment. Downstream farmers have often complained about interbasin transfers taking place in the upstream portions of the catchment. There has also been animosity about effecting environmental flow releases. A relatively simple, spreadsheet-based water resources model (Waflex) was developed to analyse water availability and use under current and future scenarios. The results were then compared to results obtained from another model that was used in a joint study by Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland. The Waflex model showed a high degree of consistency with the one used for comparison, especially in terms of trends. It was found that the recent completion of two new dams has improved water supply to irrigation in the two countries. Future water demands will result in appreciable shortages for irrigation and domestic use. The agreed maximum development levels will soon outstrip the ability of the catchment’s supply. The paper shows that a combination of measures will be required to ensure equitable and sustainable water utilisation in the Komati catchment. These will have to be agreed by the riparian countries

  15. Simulation of hydrological impact of dumped sediment structures in the artificial Chicken Creek catchment, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzel, H.; Diekkrüger, B.; Biemelt, D.; Gädeke, A.

    2012-04-01

    Revealing the hydrological impact of sediment structures promises a better understanding of the influence of the spatial variability of sediment properties on the hydrological patterns and processes at the catchment scale. To improve the knowledge of structure-process interactions in initial ecosystems, the 6-ha artificial Chicken Creek Catchment in Germany was investigated by the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 38 (SFB/TRR 38). Sediment structures called pour-ribs, which are dumped by stackers during the construction process, lead to differently compacted sediment zones, which increase the spatial variability of sediments' hydraulic properties. Although levelled afterwards by caterpillars, the majority of these structures remain in the subsurface. To analyse the effects of pour-ribs on the hydrological catchment's behaviour, the process-based spatially distributed Water balance Simulation Model (WaSiM-ETH) was applied. The results show that the consideration of pour-ribs improves the runoff simulation and significantly affects the simulated soil moisture patterns and, thereby, the initial stage of the ecosystem development. Compacted zones act as hydraulic barriers and inhibit subsurface lateral water flow, whereas non-compacted zones constitute areas with increased water storage capacity. Both effects cause reduced catchment runoff. Moreover, disregarding of the pour-ribs was identified as a source of model uncertainty in previous studies. A further outcome of this study is the importance of a global sensitivity analysis as a tool for model improvement. Finally, the results stress the importance of considering the variability of sediment properties for hydrological modelling at the catchment scale.

  16. Overland flow and sediment transport in an agricultural lowland catchments: a focus on tile drain export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandromme, Rosalie; Grangeon, Thomas; Cerdan, Olivier; Manière, Louis; Salvador Blanes, Sébastien; Foucher, Anthony; Chapalain, Marion; Evrard, Olivier; Le Gall, Marion

    2016-04-01

    Rural landscapes have been extensively modified by human activities in Western Europe since the beginning of the 20th century in order to intensify agricultural production. Cultivated areas often expanded at the expense of grassland and wetlands located in lowland areas (de Groot et al., 2002). Therefore, large modifications were made to the agricultural landscapes: stream redesign, land consolidation, removal of hedges, and installation of tile drainage networks to drain the hydromorphic soils. These changes modified sediment processes and resulted in large morphological alterations (e.g. channel bed incision, deposition of fine sediment, channel bank erosion). Accordingly, these alterations threaten water quality and prevent to meet the requirements of the European directives. Improving water quality requires a clear understanding of the hydrosedimentary dynamics in these lowland cultivated catchments. However, few studies were conducted in drained environments. To fill this research gap, a pilot study was started in cultivated catchment of the Loire River basin, France, where tile drain densities are very high (> 1.5 km/km²). Six hydro-sedimentary monitoring stations were installed in the Louroux catchment (24 km²). One of them was specifically dedicated to measuring water/sediment fluxes from tile drains. Water level and turbidity were continuously monitored and sediments were sampled during floods and low stage periods. Samples were measured for particle size distribution, and sediment tracing studies are currently being developed to quantify the contribution of potential sources (e.g. surface vs subsurface, lithologies) to river sediment. Hydro-sedimentary fluxes were quantified and modelled for some selected events. The catchment hydrosedimentary fluxes and their properties were shown to be impacted by tile drain sediment transport, especially regarding particle size distribution, with the dominant export of very fine particles (< 2 μm) from tile drains

  17. Impact of dumped sediment structures on hydrological modelling in the artificial Chicken Creek catchment, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzel, Herwig; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Biemelt, Detlef; Gädeke, Anne

    2013-01-01

    SummaryRevealing the hydrological impact of sediment structures promises a better understanding of the influence of the spatial variability of sediment properties on the hydrological patterns and processes at the catchment scale. To improve the knowledge of structure-process interactions in initial ecosystems, the 6-ha artificial Chicken Creek Catchment in Germany was investigated by the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 38 (SFB/TRR 38). Sediment structures called pour-ribs, which are dumped by stackers during the construction process, lead to differently compacted sediment zones, which increase the spatial variability of sediments' hydraulic properties. Although levelled afterwards by bulldozers, the majority of these structures remain in the subsurface. To analyse the effects of pour-ribs on the hydrological catchment's behaviour, the process-based spatially distributed Water balance Simulation Model (WaSiM-ETH) was applied. The results show that the consideration of pour-ribs improves the runoff simulation and significantly affects the simulated soil moisture patterns and, thereby, the initial stage of the ecosystem development. Compacted zones act as hydraulic barriers and inhibit subsurface lateral water flow, whereas non-compacted zones constitute areas with increased water storage capacity. Both effects cause reduced catchment runoff. Moreover, disregarding of the pour-ribs was identified as a source of model uncertainty in previous studies. A further outcome of this study is the importance of a global sensitivity analysis as a tool for model improvement. Finally, the results stress the importance of considering the variability of sediment properties for hydrological modelling at the catchment scale.

  18. Assessing catchment connectivity using hysteretic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Masselink, Rens; Goni, Mikel; Campo, Miguel Angel; Gimenez, Rafael; Casali, Javier; Seeger, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Sediment connectivity is a concept which can explain the origin, pathways and sinks of sediments within landscapes. This information is valuable for land managers to be able to take appropriate action at the correct place. Hysteresis between sediment and water discharge can give important information about the sources , pathways and conditions of sediment that arrives at the outlet of a catchment. "Hysteresis" happens when the sediment concentration associated with a certain flow rate is different depending on the direction in which the analysis is performed -towards the increase or towards the diminution of the flow. This phenomenon to some extent reflects the way in which the runoff generation processes are conjugated with those of the production and transport of sediments, hence the usefulness of hysteresis as a diagnostic hydrological parameter. However, the complexity of the phenomena and factors which determine hysteresis make its interpretation uncertain or, at the very least, problematic. Many types of hysteretic loops have been described as well as the cause for the shape of the loop, mainly describing the origin of the sediments. In this study, several measures to objectively classify hysteretic loops in an automated way were developed. These were consecutively used to classify several hundreds of loops from several agricultural catchments in Northern Spain. The data set for this study comes from four experimental watersheds in Navarre (Spain), owned and maintained by the Government of Navarre. These experimental watersheds have been monitored and studied since 1996 (La Tejería and Latxaga) and 2001 (Oskotz "principal", Op, and Oskotz "woodland", Ow). La Tejería and Latxaga watersheds, located in the Central Western part of Navarre, are roughly similar to each other regarding size (approximately 200 ha), geology (marls and sandstones), soils (fine texture topsoil), climate (humid sub Mediterranean) and land use (80-90% cultivated with winter grain crops

  19. Simiyu River catchment parameterization using SWAT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulungu, Deogratias M. M.; Munishi, Subira E.

    The paper presents advances in hydrologic modelling of the Simiyu River catchment using the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT). In this study, the SWAT model set-up and subsequent application to the catchment was based on high-resolution data such as land use from 30 m LandSat TM Satellite, 90 m Digital Elevation Model and Soil from Soil and Terrain Database for Southern Africa (SOTERSAF). The land use data were reclassified based on some ground truth maps using IDRISI Kilimanjaro software. The Soil data were also reclassified manually to represent different soil hydrologic groups, which are important for the SWAT model set-up and simulations. The SWAT application first involved analysis of parameter sensitivity, which was then used for model auto-calibration that followed hierarchy of sensitive model parameters. The analysis of sensitive parameters and auto-calibration was achieved by sensitivity analysis and auto-calibration options, which are new in the recent version of SWAT, SWAT 2005. The paper discusses the results of sensitivity and auto-calibration analyses, and present optimum model parameters, which are important for operation and water/land management studies (e.g. rain-fed agriculture and erosion/sediment and pollutant transport) in the catchment using SWAT. The river discharge estimates from this and a previous study were compared so as to evaluate performances of the recent hydrologic simulations in the catchment. Results showed that surface water model parameters are the most sensitive and have more physical meaning especially CN2 (the most sensitive) and SOL_K. Simulation results showed more or less same estimate of river flow at Ndagalu gauging station. The model efficiencies ( R2%) in this and in the pervious study during calibration and validation periods were, respectively, 13.73, 14.22 and 40.54, 36.17. The low level of model performance achieved in these studies showed that other factors than the spatial land data are greatly important for

  20. The Demonstration Test Catchment Approach to Land and Water Management in the river Eden Watershed, UK. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonczyk, J.; Quinn, P. F.; Haygarth, P.; Reaney, S.; Wilkinson, M.; Burke, S.; McGonigle, D.; Harris, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) initiative is a five year project to address pollution issues in catchments. The initiative will study the wider environmental problems suffered by catchments which are under intense farming pressures and potential climate change impacts. The UK Department for Food, Agriculture and Rural Affairs (Defra) in partnership with the Environment Agency for England and Wales (EA) have funded this initiative to answer key policy concerns in catchments. The first key step has been the establishment of a ‘research platform’ at three catchments in the UK (The Eden, Wensum and Hampshire Avon) whereby funding of 9.3 million dollars has gone into funding new equipment and pollution sampling regimes have been established. Within each catchment between three and four, 8-10km2 sub-catchments have been established. The experimental design and thinking for DTCs will be explained fully in this paper. The next phase of the project will install an extensive suite of land management and pollution mitigation interventions. In parallel to this monitoring work, a full knowledge exchange package will seek to engage with farmers, the rural community and understand the governance regime at the broader catchment scale. There is also a need for a modelling component to upscale the findings to the whole of the UK. Whilst this is an ambitious goal, there is a very basic commitment of working with rural communities to come up with real solutions that will help underpin effective policy making for the future. The research platform covers a multi-scale approach to the monitoring strategy that will allow local grouping of mitigation measures to be studied local in terms of impact and propagated to the catchment scale. Even with high level of funding, the DTC can only fully instrument a catchment of 8-10km2. Beyond this scale, the EA and the standard catchment monitoring will continue as normal. The focus here is to prove that mitigation can be achieved within

  1. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  2. Assessment of zinc loading in an acid rock drainage alpine catchment using a tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, C. M.; McKnight, D. M.; Todd, A.

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal low flow conditions in acid rock drainage (ARD) streams result in increased acidity and metal ion concentrations - changes that have been shown to become more pronounced with longer dry periods. These resulting increases in acidity and metals concentrations may pose an increasing danger to aquatic ecosystems and drinking water supplies. For example, in many ARD-impacted mountain streams, fish populations are not self-sustaining. The study site in the Upper Snake River watershed in Colorado is an alpine catchment impacted by acid rock drainage thought to originate from the natural weathering of pyrite whereas the main stem of the Snake River and its other tributaries are impacted by accelerated ARD resulting from historic mining activities. Because concentrations toxic to aquatic life persist well downstream of the ARD inputs, dissolved zinc is