Science.gov

Sample records for research general practice

  1. General practice research. Is it worth it?

    PubMed

    Russell, G

    1998-01-01

    It is a sad fact that even with liberal doses of curiosity, an interesting issue and enough time and money, many good research ideas fail to reach the stage of a completed project. Not all of us have the time to devote to the research methods courses and workshops that have sprung up around the country in the past few years. The Research Committee of the RACGP plans to help. This is the first article in a series that will provide the new GP researcher with guidelines on asking the right question, choosing the best method, and getting results published. The series aims to make research in general practice more accessible by demystifying the jargon, clarifying the statistics and explaining the rules of publication. PMID:9503711

  2. Doing research in general practice: advice for the uninitiated.

    PubMed

    Pierce, M

    1998-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of primary care research in relation to diabetes. Doing research in general practice is in many ways different from the hospital setting. This article considers some of the potential barriers to doing valid and reliable research in general practice. It is written for both novice researchers and researchers new to the general practice setting. Careful initial definition of the research question is crucial, especially as the clinical material may be less well defined in general practice and patients' problems need addressing on many levels (physical, psychological, social, cultural). Searching the literature for general practice-based studies is not straightforward. If your study involves more than one geographical site you may have to obtain ethical approval from multiple research ethical committees, and it is prudent to discuss your research with the Local Medical Committee. Practical advice is given on working with practices: improving response rates from questionnaires; recruiting and retaining practices; 'getting hold' of the GPs; particular difficulties related to novice or experienced practices; ensuring uniformity of methodology; and the importance of ancillary staff. Contentious issues such as money should be discussed at the outset. Many areas of the country now have General Practice Research Networks, and many of these now have NHS R&D support funding. Training in research methodology can be accessed through the Association of University Departments of General Practice or Royal College of General Practitioners or local departments of general practice. A list of useful contacts is given.

  3. Clinical examination for abdominal aortic aneurysm in general practice: report from the Medical Research Council's General Practice Research Framework.

    PubMed Central

    Zuhrie, S R; Brennan, P J; Meade, T W; Vickers, M

    1999-01-01

    At the time of the 1992-1994 annual reviews in the thrombosis prevention trial, general practitioners (GPs) carried out clinical examination for aneurysms by abdominal palpation in 4171 men. When an aneurysm was suspected, the patient was referred to hospital for further investigation. Aneurysm was suspected in 60 men (1.4%) and confirmed in 25 (0.6%), the mean diameter of confirmed aneurysms being 5.0 cm (range = 3.1-8.0 cm). Of the 25 men in whom aneurysm was confirmed, 10 (40%) underwent elective surgery and one died while under investigation. Examination by abdominal palpation for aortic aneurysm, which is not widely used in either general practice or in hospital practice, other than vascular surgery, is clinically worthwhile even though not all aneurysms will be detected by this means. PMID:10756617

  4. The practice manager role and relevance to general practice-based research: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wood, Anna; Hocking, Jane; Temple-Smith, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Research based in Australian general practice is essential to ensure that health care provided in this setting is evidenced-based and delivered effectively. Research designed for general practice must be feasible and acceptable to general practitioners (GPs) and practice managers (PMs), who are responsible for coordinating practice activities. However, little is known about the PM role and their contribution to research undertaken in general practice. The aim of this systematic review is to examine this role and its relevance to the conduct of general practice-based research. Databases searched (Medline, PubMed, CINAHL and Scopus) identified six relevant studies. One study investigated the role of the PM in general practice-based research and five examined aspects of the PM role. Data about study design, number and type of participants and findings was extracted and managed using a matrix framework. The limited findings suggested PMs are interested in managing research at the practice level. The PM is central to practice communication and coordination but the role varies depending on qualifications, size of practice and expectations of the GPs. This paper highlights the paucity of evidence about the PM role and their contribution to the conduct of research undertaken in general practice. Further investigation is required to gain insights into establishing and managing future research in Australian general practice. PMID:26750155

  5. Idaho forestry best management practices: Compilation of research on their effectiveness. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedbagheri, K.A.

    1996-10-01

    A search was conducted for quantitative Idaho research results on the effectiveness of the Idaho Forest Practices Act rules and regulations pertaining to timber harvest and forest road construction and maintenance. These rules and regulations are designated as the `best management practices` for the prevention of nonpoint source pollution from silviculture under provisions of the Federal Clean Water Act. For each practice, the relevant research results are summarized; more general summaries for related groups of practices are also provided.

  6. Mackenzie's puzzle--the cornerstone of teaching and research in general practice.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, J C

    1997-10-01

    The new-found popularity of generalism as a political force has emphasized the need to clarify the essential philosophy that underpins its practice, teaching, and research. Drawing on the example of Sir James Mackenzie, the author seeks to clarify certain essential issues that need to be emphasized if we are to promote and develop general practice as a distinct academic discipline. Dissatisfaction, uncertainty about our role, and continuing contact with real people seems to be essential to continuing creativity.

  7. Barriers to the development of collaborative research in general practice: a qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, R W; Woodward, N J; Carter, Y H

    2001-01-01

    General practice-based research activity is increasing rapidly, particularly for large, collaborative, multi-centre studies. We conducted semi-structured interviews with general practitioners and other professionals at practices in the East London and the City Health Authority area, to investigate the difficulties presented by becoming involved in these studies. Interviewees' main concerns were: time constraints; team motivation; the perception that external researchers have unrealistic expectations; the need for good communications throughout and, specifically, for good feedback from these researchers. PMID:11255904

  8. Patient satisfaction surveys as a market research tool for general practices.

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, K; Salter, B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recent policy developments, embracing the notions of consumer choice, quality of care, and increased general practitioner control over practice budgets have resulted in a new competitive environment in primary care. General practitioners must now be more aware of how their patients feel about the services they receive, and patient satisfaction surveys can be an effective tool for general practices. AIM. A survey was undertaken to investigate the use of a patient satisfaction survey and whether aspects of patient satisfaction varied according to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, sex, social class, housing tenure and length of time in education. METHOD. A sample of 2173 adults living in Medway District Health Authority were surveyed by postal questionnaire in September 1991 in order to elicit their views on general practice services. RESULTS. Levels of satisfaction varied with age, with younger people being consistently less satisfied with general practice services than older people. Women, those in social classes 1-3N, home owners and those who left school aged 17 years or older were more critical of primary care services than men, those in social classes 3M-5, tenants and those who left school before the age of 17 years. CONCLUSION. Surveys and analyses of this kind, if conducted for a single practice, can form the basis of a marketing strategy aimed at optimizing list size, list composition, and service quality. Satisfaction surveys can be readily incorporated into medical audit and financial management. PMID:8204335

  9. Lifestyle variables and the risk of myocardial infarction in the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joseph AC; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Brophy, James M; Steele, Russell J; Opatrny, Lucie; Suissa, Samy

    2007-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study is to estimate the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As a secondary objective, we considered the association between other lifestyle variables, smoking and heavy alcohol use, and AMI risk. Methods This study was conducted in the general practice research database (GPRD) which is a database based on general practitioner records and is a representative sample of the United Kingdom population. We matched cases of first AMI as identified by diagnostic codes with up to 10 controls between January 1st, 2001 and December 31st, 2005 using incidence density sampling. We used multiple imputation to account for missing data. Results We identified 19,353 cases of first AMI which were matched on index date, GPRD practice and age to 192,821 controls. There was a modest amount of missing data in the database, and the patients with missing data had different risks than those with recorded values. We adjusted our analysis for each lifestyle variable jointly and also for age, sex, and number of hospitalizations in the past year. Although a record of underweight (BMI <18.0 kg/m2) did not alter the risk for AMI (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87–1.11) when compared with normal BMI (18.0–24.9 kg/m2), obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) predicted an increased risk (adjusted OR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.35–1.47). A history of smoking also predicted an increased risk of AMI (adjusted OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.75–1.87) as did heavy alcohol use (adjusted OR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06–1.26). Conclusion This study illustrates that obesity, smoking and heavy alcohol use, as recorded during routine care by a general practitioner, are important predictors of an increased risk of a first AMI. In contrast, low BMI does not increase the risk of a first AMI. PMID:18088433

  10. Osteoporosis and venous thromboembolism: a retrospective cohort study in the UK General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, C.; Meyer, O.; Speirs, C.; Deltour, N.; Reginster, J. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD), there was a greater association of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in osteoporotic than in non-osteoporotic female patients. No greater association was shown in treated patients with strontium ranelate or alendronate compared to untreated osteoporotic female patients. Introduction We explored the risk of VTE in usual practice in osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic women with and without anti-osteoporotic treatment. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the GPRD in the UK. The cohorts consisted of untreated osteoporotic women (N = 11,546), osteoporotic women treated with alendronate (N = 20,084), or strontium ranelate (N = 2,408), and a sample of non-osteoporotic women (N = 115,009). Cohorts were compared using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results There was a significantly increased relative risk for VTE in untreated osteoporotic women versus non-osteoporotic women (annual incidence 5.6 and 3.2 per 1,000 patient–years, respectively; relative risk 1.75 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.84]). Results were confirmed using adjusted models. The annual incidences of VTE in osteoporotic patients treated with strontium ranelate and alendronate were 7.0 and 7.2 per 1,000 patient–years, respectively, with no significant difference between untreated and treated patients whatever the treatment. Adjusted hazard ratios for treated versus untreated osteoporotic women were 1.09 (95% CI, 0.60–2.01) for strontium ranelate and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.63–1.33) for alendronate. Conclusion This study shows a greater association of VTE in osteoporotic compared to non-osteoporotic patients, but does not show any greater association in treated patients with strontium ranelate or alendronate compared to untreated osteoporotic patients. PMID:19806285

  11. Juvenile Huntington's disease: a population-based study using the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Ian; Evans, Stephen; Rawlins, Michael D; Smeeth, Liam; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Wexler, Nancy S

    2013-01-01

    Background The juvenile form of Huntington's disease (HD) is a rare disorder. There are no population-based estimates of either its incidence or prevalence in any population in the world. The present study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of juvenile HD in the UK and to examine the range of pharmacological treatments used in its management. Method The records of individuals under the age of 21 who had recorded diagnoses of HD were retrieved from the General Practice Research Database from 1990 through 2010. From these data estimates of incidence and prevalence were made as well as the specific treatments used in the treatment of its physical and psychological manifestations. Results 12 incident and 21 prevalent patients with juvenile HD were identified. The 21 prevalent cases included the 12 incident cases. The minimum population-based estimate of incidence is 0.70 (95% CI 0.36 to 1.22) per million patient-years. The minimum estimate of prevalence is 6.77/million (95% CI 5.60 to 8.12) per million patient-years. Patients were most frequently prescribed antidepressants, hypnotics, antipsychotics and treatments for motor abnormalities. Conclusions In the UK, juvenile HD is an extremely rare and complex disorder. The prescribing data demonstrate that the clinical management of juvenile HD is undertaken with no formal evidence base for the efficacy or safety of the treatments used. Research into the safety and efficacy of appropriate therapies is urgently required to offset the haphazard nature of prescribing. Multinational collaboration will be necessary to enrol sufficient numbers. Exploratory studies, though, should begin now. PMID:23558730

  12. Meditation in general practice.

    PubMed

    Hassed, C

    1996-08-01

    Growing scientific evidence, clinical experience and community attitudes are encouraging a shift to more natural and holistic forms of therapy as alternatives or adjuncts to pharmacological approaches to a variety of conditions. Meditation and relaxation exercises have a wide range of applications but are especially useful in treating stress and related disorders. They are easily adapted to the general practice setting by adequately trained practitioners who have first hand experience of them. In this short article the practical and experiential aspects of such exercises are examined which, combined with examining the scientific evidence, provide a much more complete understanding of their potential uses and therapeutic effects.

  13. Does it matter whether the recipient of patient questionnaires in general practice is the general practitioner or an independent researcher? The REPLY randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, James A; Butters, Peter; Bhattacharya, Debi; Holland, Richard C; Wright, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background Self-administered questionnaires are becoming increasingly common in general practice. Much research has explored methods to increase response rates but comparatively few studies have explored the effect of questionnaire administration on reported answers. Methods The aim of this study was to determine the effect on responses of returning patient questionnaires to the respondents' medical practice or an independent researcher to questions relating to adherence and satisfaction with a GP consultation. One medical practice in Waveney primary care trust, Suffolk, England participated in this randomised trial. Patients over 18 years initiated on a new long-term medication during a consultation with a GP were randomly allocated to return a survey from their medical practice to either their medical practice or an independent researcher. The main outcome measures were self reported adherence, satisfaction with information about the newly prescribed medicine, the consultation and involvement in discussions. Results 274 (47%) patients responded to the questionnaire (45% medical practice, 48% independent researcher (95% CI -5 to 11%, p = 0.46)) and the groups appeared demographically comparable, although the high level of non-response limits the ability to assess this. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to total adherence or any of the satisfaction scales. Five (4%) patients reported altering doses of medication in the medical practice group compared with 18 (13%) in the researcher group (P = 0.009, Fisher's exact test). More patients in the medical practice group reported difficulties using their medication compared to the researcher group (46 (35%) v 30 (21%); p = 0.015, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion Postal satisfaction questionnaires do not appear to be affected by whether they are returned to the patient's own medical practice or an independent researcher. However, returning postal questionnaires relating to detailed

  14. [Manual therapy in general practice].

    PubMed

    Березуцкий, Владимир И

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to manual therapy practice for diagnostics and treatment of vertebrogenic pain syndrome in general practice. Analytical roundup of sources proves medical advantage of implementation of manual therapy basic methods by general practice specialists. PMID:27487550

  15. [Manual therapy in general practice].

    PubMed

    Березуцкий, Владимир И

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to manual therapy practice for diagnostics and treatment of vertebrogenic pain syndrome in general practice. Analytical roundup of sources proves medical advantage of implementation of manual therapy basic methods by general practice specialists.

  16. General Dentists’ Use of Isolation Techniques During Root Canal Treatment: from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Eleazer, Paul D.; Benjamin, Paul L.; Worley, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A preliminary study done by a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network precursor observed that 44% of general dentists (GDs) reported always using a rubber dam (RD) during root canal treatment (RCT). This full-scale study quantified use of all isolation techniques, including RD use. Methods Network practitioners completed a questionnaire about isolation techniques used during RCT. Network Enrollment Questionnaire data provided practitioner characteristics. Results 1,490 of 1,716 eligible GDs participated (87%); 697 (47%) reported always using a RD. This percentage varied by tooth type. These GDs were more likely to always use a RD: do not own a private practice; perform less than 10 RCT/month; have postgraduate training. Conclusions Most GDs do not use a RD all the time. Ironically, RDs are used more frequently by GDs who do not perform molar RCT. RD use varies with tooth type and certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. PMID:26015159

  17. Researching Practice and Practicing Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPardo, Anne

    2011-01-01

    When works of teacher scholars were recognized with major National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) research awards, and the sections and conferences instituted research initiatives of their own, many were filled with the soaring hope that a new synergy was in the making. The "Research in the Teaching of English" (RTE) Alan C. Purves Award,…

  18. Obesity in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Malterud, Kirsti; Ulriksen, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore obese patients' experiences with GPs' management of their weight problems. Methods Focus-group study with a purposive sample of 13 participants (eight women and five men), aged 30–55 years, with BMI above 40, or BMI above 35 with additional weight-related problems. Two focus-group interviews were conducted, inviting the participants to speak about their health care experiences from general practice. Analysis applied Systematic Text Condensation inspired by Giorgi's approach, searching for issues describing or discussing participants' experiences of GPs' obesity management. Results Obese patients want their GPs to put their weight problems on the agenda. When the patient appears reluctant, it may be a sign of embarrassment rather than rejection of the issue. However, restricted attention to obesity could lead to neglect of patients' problems. Participants complained that GPs often demonstrated insufficient engagement and knowledge regarding service resources for obesity treatment, leaving the responsibility for information on available referral resources to the patient. Finally, considerate attitudes in the GPs are needed for follow-up to be experienced as helpful by the patients. Vulnerable feelings of failure could be reinforced by well-intended advice. Degrading attitudes were perceived as especially subversive when they came from doctors. Conclusions The challenge for the GP is to increase his or her competence in individualized and evidence-based counselling, while acknowledging the efforts needed by the patient to achieve permanent change, and shifting attention from shame to coping. PMID:20942741

  19. Recruitment of general practices: Is a standardised approach helpful in the involvement of healthcare professionals in research?

    PubMed Central

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine E; Maindal, Helle T; Bro, Flemming; Jensen, Martin B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health service research often involves the active participation of healthcare professionals. However, their ability and commitment to research varies. This can cause recruitment difficulties and thereby prolong the study period and inflate budgets. Solberg has identified seven R-factors as determinants for successfully recruiting healthcare professionals: relationships, reputation, requirements, rewards, reciprocity, resolution, and respect. Method: This is a process evaluation of the seven R-factors. We applied these factors to guide the design of our recruitment strategy as well as to make adjustments when recruiting general practices in a guideline implementation study. In the guideline implementation study, we studied the effect of outreach visits, quality reports, and new patient stratification tools for low back pain patients. Results: During a period of 15 months, we recruited 60 practices, which was fewer than planned (100 practices). In this evaluation, five of Solberg’s seven R-factors were successfully addressed and two factors were not. The need to involve (reciprocity) end users in the development of new software and the amount of time needed to conduct recruitment (resolution) were underestimated. Conclusion: The framework of the seven R-factors was a feasible tool in our recruitment process. However, we suggest further investigation in developing systematic approaches to support the recruitment of healthcare professionals to research. PMID:27551424

  20. General Practice in Northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Black, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of general practice in northern Norway where conditions are similar to parts of rural Canada. The Norwegian general practitioner has developed expertise in the preventive and psychosocial aspects of practice and the team concept is highly developed. Since the general practitioner is separated from the hospital, his facilities for procedures and diagnostic workups are primitive. Involvement of general practitioners in medical education is not yet well developed although all new graduates spend a compulsory period in rural practice. PMID:20469187

  1. A career structure for general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Handysides, S.

    1994-01-01

    Training for general practitioners usually provides little experience in research, business management, or dealing with chronic disease. It is these areas that could provide scope for further training after becoming a general practitioner principal and provided career goals. Formally recognised research practices, perhaps with one partner coordinating research but all participating, and district research facilitators could increase both the quality and the quantity of research in general practice. Recognising the different skills of doctors in the partnership and referring patients to the most appropriate partner will improve care for patients as well as provide career development. Further training could be aimed at filling gaps in the practice's pool of skills. Good management skills are becoming more important as practice teams get bigger and fundholding spreads. Some doctors may wish to become full time or part time managers and the idea of accredited courses for management has been raised. Images p255-a PMID:8111263

  2. Involving migrants in the development of guidelines for communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations: a participatory learning and action research project

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; MacFarlane, Anne; de Brún, Tomas; Okonkwo, Ekaterina; Bonsenge Bokanga, Jean Samuel; Manuela De Almeida Silva, Maria; Ogbebor, Florence; Mierzejewska, Aga; Nnadi, Lovina; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; van Weel, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research was to involve migrants and other key stakeholders in a participatory dialogue to develop a guideline for enhancing communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations. In this paper, we focus on findings about the use of formal versus informal interpreters because dialogues about these issues emerged as central to the identification of recommendations for best practice. Design This qualitative case study involved a Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) research methodology. Participants The sample comprised 80 stakeholders: 51 from migrant communities; 15 general practitioners (GPs) and general practice staff; 7 established migrants as peer researchers; 5 formal, trained interpreters; and 2 service planners from the national health authority. Setting Galway, Ireland. Results There was 100% consensus across stakeholder groups that while informal interpreters have uses for migrants and general practice staff, they are not considered acceptable as best practice. There was also 100% consensus that formal interpreters who are trained and working as per a professional code of practice are acceptable as best practice. Conclusions Policymakers and service planners need to work in partnership with service providers and migrants to progress the implementation of professional, trained interpreters as a routine way of working in general practice. PMID:26391628

  3. Training for general practice: a national survey.

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, H S; Levin, J B

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(a) To compare current vocational training in general practice with that ascertained by a survey in 1980; (b) to compare the training of trainees in formal training schemes with that of trainees arranging their own hospital and general practice posts. DESIGN--National questionnaire survey of United Kingdom and armed services trainees who were in a training practice on 1 April 1989. Questionnaires were distributed by course organisers. SETTING--Research project set up after an ad hoc meeting of trainees at the 1988 national trainee conference. SUBJECTS--2132 Of the 2281 trainees (93%) known to be in a training practice on 1 April 1989. RESULTS--1657 Trainees returned the questionnaires, representing 73% of all trainees known to be in a training practice on 1 April 1989. Between 1980 and 1989 there were significant improvements in the trainee year, and there was also evidence of improvements in general practice study release courses. There was no evidence of improvement in other aspects of training. General practice trainees spent an average of three years in junior hospital posts, which provided very little opportunity for study related to general practice. Training received during tenure of hospital posts differed significantly between trainees in formal schemes and those arranging their own hospital posts. During the trainee year training was almost the same for those in formal schemes and those arranging their own posts. Regions varied significantly in virtually all aspects of general practice training. CONCLUSIONS--The trainee year could be improved further by enforcing the guidelines of the Joint Committee on Postgraduate Training for General Practice. The poor training in junior hospital posts reflected the low priority that training is generally given during tenure of these posts. A higher proportion of general practice trainees should be attached to vocational training schemes. More hospital trainees could attend general practice study release

  4. Patient Experience of Australian General Practices.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ajit; Greco, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The number of data-based research articles focusing on patient sociodemographic profiling and experience with healthcare practices is still relatively small. One of the reasons for this relative lack of research is that categorizing patients into different demographic groups can lead to significant reductions in sample numbers for homogeneous subgroups. The aim of this article is to identify problems and issues when dealing with big data that contains information at two levels: patient experience of their general practice, and scores received by practices. The Practice Accreditation and Improvement Survey (PAIS) consisting of 27 five-point Likert items and 11 sociodemographic questions is a Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)-endorsed instrument for seeking patient views as part of the accreditation of Australian general practices. The data were collected during the 3-year period May 2011-July 2014, during which time PAIS was completed for 3734 individual general practices throughout Australia involving 312,334 anonymous patients. This represents over 60% of practices in Australia, and ∼75% of practices that undergo voluntary accreditation. The sampling method for each general practice was convenience sampling. The results of our analysis show how sociodemographic profiles of Australian patients can affect their ratings of practices and also how the location of the practice (State/Territory, remote access area) can affect patient experience. These preliminary findings can act as an initial set of results against which future studies in patient experience trends can be developed and measured in Australia. Also, the methods used in this article provide a methodological framework for future patient experience researchers to use when dealing with data that contain information at two levels, such as the patient and practice. Finally, the outcomes demonstrate that different subgroups can experience healthcare provision differently, especially

  5. Patient Experience of Australian General Practices.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ajit; Greco, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The number of data-based research articles focusing on patient sociodemographic profiling and experience with healthcare practices is still relatively small. One of the reasons for this relative lack of research is that categorizing patients into different demographic groups can lead to significant reductions in sample numbers for homogeneous subgroups. The aim of this article is to identify problems and issues when dealing with big data that contains information at two levels: patient experience of their general practice, and scores received by practices. The Practice Accreditation and Improvement Survey (PAIS) consisting of 27 five-point Likert items and 11 sociodemographic questions is a Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)-endorsed instrument for seeking patient views as part of the accreditation of Australian general practices. The data were collected during the 3-year period May 2011-July 2014, during which time PAIS was completed for 3734 individual general practices throughout Australia involving 312,334 anonymous patients. This represents over 60% of practices in Australia, and ∼75% of practices that undergo voluntary accreditation. The sampling method for each general practice was convenience sampling. The results of our analysis show how sociodemographic profiles of Australian patients can affect their ratings of practices and also how the location of the practice (State/Territory, remote access area) can affect patient experience. These preliminary findings can act as an initial set of results against which future studies in patient experience trends can be developed and measured in Australia. Also, the methods used in this article provide a methodological framework for future patient experience researchers to use when dealing with data that contain information at two levels, such as the patient and practice. Finally, the outcomes demonstrate that different subgroups can experience healthcare provision differently, especially

  6. Negotiating Practice Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julkunen, Ilse; Uggerhoj, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of carrying out practice research in social service organizations is often matched by the complexity of teaching future social work practitioners to use and engage in practice research. To appreciate the scope of the teaching challenge, it is important to reflect on the evolving definition of practice research and issues involved in…

  7. Family support in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goodhart, C; Layzell, S; Cook, A; Graffy, J

    1999-01-01

    At a time when social services are overburdened in Britain, family support in general practice offers one way to fill the gap. In the Well Family Project, a 'family support coordinator' worked within a general practice in Hackney, London. In the first eighteen months she saw 113 clients. Evaluation was by semistructured interviews with a sample of these clients and with professional workers. Comments from those interviewed indicate that the family support was valued. The general practice base was convenient and non-stigmatizing. By adopting a proactive approach, the project was able to work with clients who had previously 'slipped through the net'. Some of the professionals interviewed would have liked to provide the same help, but were unable to do so because of time and other constraints. Family support provided through general practice was well received by vulnerable families. Although there was overlap with the remit of health visitors and social workers, the protected time and the independence of the coordinator enabled clients to obtain the help they wanted. The replicability of this strategy now needs to be assessed. PMID:10692905

  8. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 2. Results: Primary care management and community orientation.

    PubMed

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    At the WONCA Europe conference 2009 the recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' was presented. It is a background paper and reference manual, providing advocacy of general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) in Europe. The Research Agenda summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the WONCA Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In this second article, the results for the core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' are presented. Though there is a large body of research on various aspects of 'primary care management', it represents a very scattered rather than a meta view. Many studies focus on care for specific diseases, the primary/secondary care interface, or the implications of electronic patient records. Cost efficiency or process indicators of quality are current outcomes. Current literature on community orientation is mainly descriptive, and focuses on either care for specific diseases, or specific patient populations, or on the uptake of preventive services. Most papers correspond poorly to the WONCA concept. For both core competencies, there is a lack of research with a longitudinal perspective and/or relevant health or quality of life outcomes as well as research on patients' preferences and education for organizational aspects of GP/FM.

  9. Maximizing the Yield of Small Samples in Prevention Research: A Review of General Strategies and Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Hopkin, Cameron R.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Gottfredson, Nisha C.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this manuscript is describe strategies for maximizing the yield of data from small samples in prevention research. We begin by discussing what “small” means as a description of sample size in prevention research. We then present a series of practical strategies for getting the most out of data when sample size is small and constrained. Our focus is the prototypic between-group test for intervention effects; however, we touch on the circumstance in which intervention effects are qualified by one or more moderators. We conclude by highlighting the potential usefulness of graphical methods when sample size is too small for inferential statistical methods. PMID:25578307

  10. The discipline and literature of general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D P; Wright, A; O'Dowd, T; Dunn, G; Hannay, D; King, M; Kinmonth, A L; Taylor, R; Waine, C; Wilmot, J

    1997-01-01

    In response to a review recently carried out by the Royal College of General Practitioners, the British Journal of General Practice is soon to be issued in a new and expanded format. While continuing to develop its primary role as a leading scientific journal of record, the journal will accommodate a monthly selection of integrated news, information and features. The editorial board welcomes the opportunities provided by these changes, but wishes to emphasize the continuing importance of general practice as a scientific discipline in its own right and to reaffirm its commitment to the publication of high-quality, peer-reviewed original research papers. It is hoped that the newlook journal will have a wide appeal. But, as the first-and still the foremost-journal of general practice in the world, it will continue to be a journal of record serving both its authors and the academic community worldwide. PMID:9167316

  11. The care work of general practice receptionists.

    PubMed

    Neuwelt, Pat M; Kearns, Robin A; Cairns, Isobel R

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION The care work of general practice receptionists has received limited research attention, despite receptionists position at the beginning of patients' journeys in many health care systems. We examine receptionists' perceptions of their work and the opportunities and constraints they experience in caring for patients while providing administrative support to practices. METHODS Data were collected in focus group interviews with 32 receptionists from urban and rural general practices in the Auckland and Northland regions of New Zealand. We employed tools from inductive thematic analysis and Straussian grounded theory in interpreting the data. FINDINGS We found that the way receptionists identified with a caring role strongly challenged the pejorative view of them in public discourse. Receptionists provide care in two key ways: for the practice and for patients. The juggling they do between the demands of the practice and of patients creates considerable work tensions that are often invisible to other staff members. CONCLUSION Receptionists have a critical role as the first step in the patient care pathway, bridging health care system and community. For general practice to be patient-centred and improve accessibility for the most vulnerable, the care work of receptionists must be considered core. KEYWORDS Receptionists; general practice; care; New Zealand. PMID:27477554

  12. Educational Researchers and Practicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Velzen, Joke H.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an attempt to identify further directions in research designs that researchers can use to contribute to the relevance of educational research findings, by including teachers' practicality issues, is presented. Sixty experienced teachers in secondary education read the reporting of modified experimental research findings about…

  13. [Rheumatology emergencies in general practice].

    PubMed

    Fahrer, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    In rheumatology there may occur emergencies especially in the field of inflammable diseases, the sudden occlusion of the central retinal artery in temporal arteritis as an example. Such incidents are rare. The general practitioner is more often confronted with not necessarily threatening, but very painful and function obstructing acute cases. In this paper four typical problems are represented which can be seen in everyday practice, sometimes misleading to wrong actions and therefore needing to be recognized in time and treated correctly: acute low back pain, periarthropathy of the shoulder joint, crystal arthritis and ruptured Baker's cyst. PMID:25533251

  14. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  15. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    PubMed

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects.

  16. Use of caries preventive agents on adult patients compared to pediatric patients by general practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Williams, O. Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that caries prevention reduces caries in adults. This study tested the frequency of recommended caries prevention agents for children compared to adult patients. Methods This study surveyed 467 Dental Practice-Based Research Network general dentists who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. Dentists were asked the percentage of their patients who are administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse, and xylitol gum. Results Adults were less likely to receive in-office caries preventive agents compared to pediatric patients. However, the rate of recommendation for at-home preventive regimens was very similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use caries prevention at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, practices with a greater number of patients with dental insurance were significantly less likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to their pediatric patients. Conclusion In-office caries prevention agents are more commonly used by general dentists for their pediatric patients compared to their adult patients. Practice Implications Some general dentists should consider providing additional in-office prevention agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk for dental caries. PMID:20516100

  17. Defining frequent attendance in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Frans TM; Mohrs, Jacob J; Beem, Ellen E; Bindels, Patrick JE; van Weert, Henk CPM

    2008-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) or researchers sometimes need to identify frequent attenders (FAs) in order to screen them for unidentified problems and to test specific interventions. We wanted to assess different methods for selecting FAs to identify the most feasible and effective one for use in a general (group) practice. Methods In the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice, data were collected on 375 899 persons registered with 104 practices. Frequent attendance is defined as the top 3% and 10% of enlisted patients in each one-year age-sex group measured during the study year. We used these two selections as our reference standard. We also selected the top 3% and 10% FAs (90 and 97 percentile) based on four selection methods of diminishing preciseness. We compared the test characteristics of these four methods. Results Of all enlisted patients, 24 % did not consult the practice during the study year. The mean number of contacts in the top 10% FAs increased in men from 5.8 (age 15–24 years) to 17.5 (age 64–75 years) and in women from 9.7 to 19.8. In the top 3% of FAs, contacts increased in men from 9.2 to 24.5 and in women from 14 to 27.8. The selection of FAs becomes more precise when smaller age classes are used. All selection methods show acceptable results (kappa 0.849 – 0.942) except the three group method. Conclusion To correctly identify frequent attenders in general practice, we recommend dividing patients into at least three age groups per sex. PMID:18412954

  18. Integrating research into operational practice.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alastair

    2015-08-01

    Research and development can be classified into three categories: technology adoption, technology extension, and knowledge and technology creation. In general, technology adoption is embedded in operational forensic science laboratory practice but the latter two categories require partnerships with industry and/or academia both to conduct the research and implement the outcomes. In a 2012 survey, Australian and New Zealand forensic science laboratories identified a number of 'roadblocks' to undertaking research and operationalizing research outcomes. These included insufficient time and funding, a lack of in-house research experience and the absence of a tangible research culture. Allied to this is that, increasingly, forensic science research is conducted in a 'commercial in confidence' environment and the outcomes are not readily or cost-effectively available to be integrated into operational forensic science laboratories. The paper is predominantly reflective of the current situation in Australia and New Zealand.

  19. Integrating research into operational practice

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Research and development can be classified into three categories: technology adoption, technology extension, and knowledge and technology creation. In general, technology adoption is embedded in operational forensic science laboratory practice but the latter two categories require partnerships with industry and/or academia both to conduct the research and implement the outcomes. In a 2012 survey, Australian and New Zealand forensic science laboratories identified a number of ‘roadblocks’ to undertaking research and operationalizing research outcomes. These included insufficient time and funding, a lack of in-house research experience and the absence of a tangible research culture. Allied to this is that, increasingly, forensic science research is conducted in a ‘commercial in confidence’ environment and the outcomes are not readily or cost-effectively available to be integrated into operational forensic science laboratories. The paper is predominantly reflective of the current situation in Australia and New Zealand PMID:26101286

  20. General practice education in Australia. Current issues.

    PubMed

    Sturmberg, Joachim; Heard, Sam

    2004-05-01

    General practice education is rapidly changing. Medical students now have exposure to general practice at most year levels, vocational training has been opened to competition, and continuing professional development is a mandatory requirement for maintenance of Health Insurance Commission recognition, and increasingly for state registration. This article outlines the foundations for, and challenge to, building a framework for quality general practice education in Australia. PMID:15227866

  1. [Psychotic disorders: special aspects in general practice].

    PubMed

    Kurmann, Julius

    2015-09-30

    In emergency situations the general practitioner is often the first professional contact psychotic patients have. The following article conveys basic knowledge about psychotic disorders and their clinical features typically seen in general practice.

  2. The Instructional Context of Inclusive Secondary General Education Classes: Teachers' Instructional Roles and Practices, Curricular Demands, and Research-Based Practices and Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulgren, Janis A.; Marquis, Janet G.; Deshler, Donald D.; Schumaker, Jean B.; Lenz, B. Keith; Davis, Betsy; Grossen, Bonnie

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain information about the high school general educational context for students with and without disabilities. A questionnaire was administered to general education teachers who taught required high school courses in which students with disabilities and students who were low achievers were enrolled. Instructional…

  3. Use of information technology in general practice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason J; Mallard-Smith, Rebecca J; Beattie, Victoria; Beattie, David K

    2003-08-01

    The internet and NHS Net are used increasingly in UK general practice. A questionnaire survey conducted in southern England examined these applications. 77 (55%) of 141 practices responded. Of these, 71 were connected to one or other service and 27 offered a practice website. Only a small minority used a website for direct patient booking or access to pathology results. Moreover, among those with a practice website, none paid the necessary attention to data security. The survey revealed some fundamental misunderstandings that may partly account for the slow uptake of these technologies in British general practice. PMID:12893856

  4. Risk of mortality (including sudden cardiac death) and major cardiovascular events in atypical and typical antipsychotic users: a study with the general practice research database.

    PubMed

    Murray-Thomas, Tarita; Jones, Meghan E; Patel, Deven; Brunner, Elizabeth; Shatapathy, Chetan C; Motsko, Stephen; Van Staa, Tjeerd P

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased cardiac events including mortality. This study assessed cardiac events including mortality among antipsychotic users relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was used to identify antipsychotic users, matched general population controls, and psychiatric diseased nonusers. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD), all-cause mortality (excluding suicide), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ventricular arrhythmias (VA). Sensitivity analyses were conducted for age, dose, duration, antipsychotic type, and psychiatric disease. Results. 183,392 antipsychotic users (115,491 typical and 67,901 atypical), 544,726 general population controls, and 193,920 psychiatric nonusers were identified. Nonusers with schizophrenia, dementia, or bipolar disorder had increased risks of all-cause mortality compared to general population controls, while nonusers with major depression had comparable risks. Relative to psychiatric nonusers, the adjusted relative ratios (aRR) of all-cause mortality in antipsychotic users was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.64-1.87); cardiac mortality 1.72 (95% CI: 1.42-2.07); SCD primary definition 5.76 (95% CI: 2.90-11.45); SCD secondary definition 2.15 (95% CI: 1.64-2.81); CHD 1.16 (95% CI: 0.94-1.44); and VA 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.31). aRRs of the various outcomes were lower for atypical versus typical antipsychotics (all-cause mortality 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80-0.85); cardiac mortality 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.97); and SCD secondary definition 0.76 (95% CI: 0.55-1.04). Conclusions. Antipsychotic users had an increased risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and SCD compared to a psychiatric nonuser cohort.

  5. Stakeholder experiences with general practice pharmacist services: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Edwin C K; Stewart, Kay; Elliott, Rohan A; George, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    research should investigate the feasibility and sustainability of general practice pharmacist roles. PMID:24030867

  6. Recent advances in the utility and use of the General Practice Research Database as an example of a UK Primary Care Data resource.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tim; van Staa, Tjeerd; Puri, Shivani; Eaton, Susan

    2012-04-01

    Since its inception in the mid-1980s, the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) has undergone many changes but remains the largest validated and most utilised primary care database in the UK. Its use in pharmacoepidemiology stretches back many years with now over 800 original research papers. Administered by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency since 2001, the last 5 years have seen a rebuild of the database processing system enhancing access to the data, and a concomitant push towards broadening the applications of the database. New methodologies including real-world harm-benefit assessment, pharmacogenetic studies and pragmatic randomised controlled trials within the database are being implemented. A substantive and unique linkage program (using a trusted third party) has enabled access to secondary care data and disease-specific registry data as well as socio-economic data and death registration data. The utility of anonymised free text accessed in a safe and appropriate manner is being explored using simple and more complex techniques such as natural language processing.

  7. Developing organisational vision in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    al-Shehri, A; Stanley, I; Thomas, P

    1993-01-01

    Vision is a fashionable but ill defined term in management circles. Nevertheless, it embodies a significant concept related to guiding an organisation from present realities, through opportunities and hazards, to a viable future. Until recently a typical general practice could assume a stable external environment, but now it is caught up in the uncertainties stemming from the NHS reforms. For such a practice to undertake effective strategic planning it will have to develop a vision connecting the present with aspirations for the future. While vision is usually considered to be an individual talent, it is possible to develop a collective organisational vision within a general practice, and the small size of general practices makes this relatively easy. The vision needs to be broad; it needs to be continuous; and its capacity to predict the future needs to be monitored. PMID:8343704

  8. Childhood onset arthritis is associated with an increased risk of fracture: a population based study using the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, J M; Shults, J; Weinstein, R; Lewis, J D; Leonard, M B

    2006-01-01

    Background Childhood onset arthritis is associated with low bone mass and strength. Objective To determine whether childhood onset arthritis is associated with greater fracture risk. Methods In a retrospective cohort study all subjects with onset of arthritis between 1 and 19 years of age in the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database were identified. As controls, all sex and age matched subjects from a practice that included a subject with arthritis were included. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for first fracture were generated using Mantel‐Haenszel methods and Poisson regression. Results 1939 subjects with arthritis (51% female) and 207 072 controls (53% female) were identified. The median age at arthritis diagnosis was 10.9 years. A total of 129 (6.7%) first fractures were noted in subjects with arthritis compared with 6910 (3.3%) in controls over a median follow up of 3.90 and 3.95 years in the subjects with arthritis and controls, respectively. The IRR (95% confidence interval) for first fracture among subjects with arthritis, compared with controls, according to the age at the start of follow up were 1.49 (0.91 to 2.31) for age <10 years, 3.13 (2.21 to 4.33) at 10–15 years, 1.75 (1.18 to 2.51) at 15–20 years, 1.40 (0.91 to 2.08) at 20–45 years, and 3.97 (2.23 to 6.59) at >45 years. Conclusions Childhood onset arthritis is associated with a clinically significant increased risk of fracture in children, adolescents and, possibly, adults. Studies are urgently needed to characterise the determinants of structural bone abnormalities in childhood arthritis and devise prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:16627541

  9. Research in dental practice: a 'SWOT' analysis.

    PubMed

    Burke, F J T; Crisp, R J; McCord, J F

    2002-03-01

    Most dental treatment, in most countries, is carried out in general dental practice. There is therefore a potential wealth of research material, although clinical evaluations have generally been carried out on hospital-based patients. Many types of research, such as clinical evaluations and assessments of new materials, may be appropriate to dental practice. Principal problems are that dental practices are established to treat patients efficiently and to provide an income for the staff of the practice. Time spent on research therefore cannot be used for patient treatment, so there are cost implications. Critics of practice-based research have commented on the lack of calibration of operative diagnoses and other variables; however, this variability is the stuff of dental practice, the real-world situation. Many of the difficulties in carrying out research in dental practice may be overcome. For the enlightened, it may be possible to turn observations based on the volume of treatment carried out in practice into robust, clinically related and relevant research projects based in the real world of dental practice. PMID:11928346

  10. Adherence to asthma guidelines in general practices.

    PubMed

    Roghmann, M C; Sexton, M

    1999-06-01

    Adherence to asthma practice guidelines is low. Improved compliance could potentially improve care of patients with asthma. The purpose of this study was to determine if patients managed in a general practice with an associated asthma clinic are more likely to use asthma medications according to clinical practice guidelines than patients managed in the general surgery of the practice. A cross-sectional study of adult asthmatics, aged 18-55 years, was conducted in six British general practices. Prescription data on all asthma medication was collected for a 6-month period. Information on asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, and how patients used their inhaled beta2-agonist was collected through questionnaire. The prescription data for asthma medication and patient use of inhaled beta2-agonist were compared to the British Thoracic Society's (BTS) Guidelines for Management of Asthma in Adults to determine if the patient's asthma medication regimen was appropriate. There was no significant association found between appropriate asthma medication and asthma clinic attendance or other patient characteristics. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low. Fifty-eight percent of the asthma patients used asthma medication regimens that were not consistent with the BTS guidelines published 1 year earlier. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low regardless of patient characteristics, including asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, or individual practice. These findings underscore the need to document the utility of clinical practice guidelines which may improve physician compliance.

  11. Investigation of the temporal association of Guillain-Barre syndrome with influenza vaccine and influenzalike illness using the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Wise, Lesley; Miller, Elizabeth

    2009-02-01

    In 1976, the national swine influenza vaccination program in the United States was suspended because of an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Subsequent studies of seasonal influenza vaccine have given conflicting results. The authors used the self-controlled case series method to investigate the relation of Guillain-Barré syndrome with influenza vaccine and influenzalike illness using cases recorded in the General Practice Research Database from 1990 to 2005 in the United Kingdom. The relative incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome within 90 days of vaccination was 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.41, 1.40). In contrast, the relative incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome within 90 days of an influenzalike illness was 7.35 (95% confidence interval: 4.36, 12.38), with the greatest relative incidence (16.64, 95% confidence interval: 9.37, 29.54) within 30 days. The relative incidence was similar (0.89, 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 1.89) when the analysis was restricted to a subset of validated cases. The authors found no evidence of an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome after seasonal influenza vaccine. The finding of a greatly increased risk after influenzalike illness is consistent with anecdotal reports of a preceding respiratory illness in Guillain-Barré syndrome and has important implications for the risk/benefit assessment that would be carried out should pandemic vaccines be deployed in the future.

  12. Treatment of depression in general practice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D A

    1973-04-01

    With the co-operation of the family doctors in five selected urban general practices the general-practitioner treatment of 73 patients suffering from a new episode of depressive illness was evaluated over a period of four months. The purpose was to test the belief that general practitioners are best fitted to manage most psychological ailments, and depression was chosen as the psychiatric illness most commonly seen in general practice. Medication was the principal treatment offered, and this was often inadequate in dosage or the patient defaulted. Drug defaulting was thought to be due partly to failure of supervision and follow-up and to too low a consultation rate. The low consultation rate was also thought to explain why few patients thought there was a therapeutic value in the doctor-patient relationship. The results of the study indicate that patients with depressive illness do not receive the best treatment in general practice. The reasons are several and responsibility must be shared by the medical practitioners, the current system of the general practice, and the patients themselves.

  13. The Practice of Research on Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    A major focus for research in preparation programs should be on the practice of administration. For some time, the preparation of educational administrators has been rooted in the traditional liberal arts approach--the approach of a discipline--as a model for preparing the practitioner. Emphasis has shifted to the concept of the accurate…

  14. The LUCK study: Laxative Usage in patients with GP-diagnosed Constipation in the UK, within the general population and in pregnancy. An epidemiological study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD)

    PubMed Central

    Shafe, Anna C. E.; Lee, Sally; Dalrymple, Jamie S. O.; Whorwell, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the high prevalence of constipation and its related public health implications, there is relatively little research available on the condition from large epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of general practitioner (GP)-diagnosed constipation and the prescribing trends for laxatives in the UK, within the general population and during pregnancy. Methods: A cohort study for the period from 2005 to 2009 was performed using the UK primary care database (General Practice Research Database), which contains information on over 3 million individuals. Results: The prevalence of GP-diagnosed constipation ranged from 12 per 1000 persons in 2005 (0.012 per person year) to 12.8 per 1000 in 2009 (0.013 per person year). The prevalence was almost twice as high in women as in men, and was higher in older patients. In 2005 the most commonly prescribed laxatives were lactulose (37%), senna (26%), macrogol (19%), ispaghula (6%), docusate sodium (5%), bisacodyl (4%) and glycerol suppositories (2%). By 2009, this pattern had changed: macrogol (31%), lactulose (29%), senna (22%), ispaghula (5%), docusate sodium (6%), bisacodyl (3%) and glycerol suppositories (3%). In pregnancy, lactulose accounted for 81% of laxative use in 2005, falling to 64% by 2009. In contrast, macrogol use in pregnancy rose from 13% in 2005 to 32% in 2009. Conclusions: GP-diagnosed constipation is common, accounting for a large number of consultations. Laxative prescribing trends have changed over the 5-year study period, prescriptions for macrogol becoming increasingly common and prescriptions for lactulose and senna less common. Macrogol also appears to have been replacing lactulose for treating constipation in pregnant women. PMID:22043228

  15. Research Supporting Middle Grades Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, David L., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Exemplary Middle Grades Research: Evidence-Based Studies Linking Theory to Practice features research published throughout 2009 in MGRJ that has been identified by the Information Age Publishing's review board as the most useful in terms of assisting educators with making practical applications from evidence-based studies to classroom and school…

  16. Research, Practice, Uncertainty and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsmose, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Three issues concerning the relationship between research and practice are addressed. (1) A certain "prototype mathematics classroom" seems to dominate the research field, which in many cases seems selective with respect to what practices to address. I suggest challenging the dominance of the discourse created around the prototype mathematics…

  17. Action Research in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Action research places a powerful tool for school improvement in the hands of teachers. By highlighting the outcomes that are possible and presenting clear steps in the research process, this book is one to encourage anyone who is seeking to implement evidence-based school improvement. Eileen Piggot-Irvine uses her Problem Resolving Action…

  18. The research potential of practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jacqueline; Heyman, Bob; Bryar, Rosamund; Graffy, Jonathan; Gunnell, Caroline; Lamb, Bryony; Morris, Lana

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the research aspirations and experiences of practice nurses. The study discussed in the present paper had three main aims: (1) to assess the level of research interest among practice nurses working in Essex and East London, UK; (2) to identify practice nurses' research priorities; and (3) to explore factors which facilitate and impede the development of practice nursing research. All practice nurses (n = 1,054) in the above areas were sent a questionnaire, and a total of 40% (n = 426) responded after two follow-up letters. Fifty-five respondents who volunteered for further participation were interviewed, either individually or in focus groups. About half (n = 207) of the survey respondents expressed an interest in undertaking research. One-third (n = 145) reported previous participation in research, and 20% (n = 85) had initiated their own research. Logistic regression showed that practice nurses educated to graduate level, and those working in practices with nurse training or participation in external research, were most likely to want to undertake research. Working in a medical training practice was found to be a negative predictor of research interest. Respondents prioritised research into long-term health problems with a high prevalence in the local population; for example, diabetes. Their reasons for wishing to engage in research included improving the service, career development, making work more interesting and reducing isolation. The main barriers identified were lack of time, lack of support from some general practitioners and poor access to higher education resources outside formal courses. The development of practice nurse research would provide a distinctive perspective on health need and service provision. It would contribute to the achievement of the national strategic objective of improving the quality of primary care, enhance the status of the profession, utilise the enthusiasm of individuals, increase job satisfaction and

  19. [Local registries in general/family practice].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Entering medical records into registries of all sorts has always been a part of everyday work of a general/family physician. There is a distinction between public/population registries on the one hand, and internal, local registries on the other hand. Local registries refer to the catchment population of a particular general/family practice. While keeping population-registries has become a routine with a high level of uniformity in collecting, delivering, recording, analyzing and controlling information, there are no recommendations or standards for keeping local registries, although their importance as well as indisputable necessity have been recognized. They are invaluable for providing an insight into the condition and history of a particular disease in a particular area, planning and taking preventive measures and activities, supervising therapy and medical treatment, as well as for statistical analyses and scientific studies. The most important registry in the field of general practice is the one called "List of health care under the supervision of chosen general/family physicians", which can serve as an index for any other individual record or record of diseases by name kept at a particular general/family practice. Although local registries have "evolved" from notebooks into modern informatic databases, the problem of up-to-dateness cannot be solved until the whole health care system has been connected for competent and authorized persons to be able to record changes of data where and when they take place.

  20. An economic model of general practice.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, J A; Hall, J; Logan, J; McDonald, M L

    1984-05-26

    The public perceives that doctors earn too much, while general practitioners complain that their income is dwindling . In the absence of reliable data on doctors' incomes, it is impossible to determine whether medical fees are set appropriately, and what effects Medicare might have on general practice. An economic model of practice, using estimates of income and expenditure derived from specified assumptions, was constructed. Then, the effects of changes in various parameters of the model were examined in turn to show how economic forces are likely to affect the behaviour of doctors. It is shown that a general practitioner working at a moderate rate during a normal working week will earn a low income under current schedule fees. Some implications of these findings for practitioners, fee setting, and the public are explored. PMID:6717350

  1. The new Australian after-hours general practice incentive payment mechanism: equity for rural general practice?

    PubMed

    Neil, Amanda L; Nelson, Mark; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    In July 2015, a national scheme for after-hours incentive funding for general practices was re-introduced in Australia, 2-years after funding was transferred to regional primary health care organisations (Medicare Locals). The re-introduction was recommended in a 2014 review of after-hours primary care reflecting the "overwhelming desire" among general practice. Given the centrality of after-hours care provision in rural and remote practices identified in the review, we compare and contrast the current and historical after-hours incentive funding mechanisms focussing on fairness towards rural general practices. While there are similarities between the current and historical mechanisms, significant differences exist. The comparison is not straightforward. The major consistency is utilisation of practice standardised whole patient equivalents (SWPE) as the basis of funding, inherently favouring large urban general practices. This bias is expected to increase given a shift in focus from practices with no option but to provide 24/7 care to any practice providing 24/7 care; and an associated increased funding per SWPE. Differences primarily pertain to classification processes, in which the realities of rural service provision and recognition of regional support mechanisms are given minimal consideration. Rapid introduction of the new general practice after-hours incentive funding mechanism has led to inconsistencies and has exacerbated inherent biases, particularly inequity towards rural providers. Impact on morale and service provision in non-urban areas should be monitored.

  2. The new Australian after-hours general practice incentive payment mechanism: equity for rural general practice?

    PubMed

    Neil, Amanda L; Nelson, Mark; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    In July 2015, a national scheme for after-hours incentive funding for general practices was re-introduced in Australia, 2-years after funding was transferred to regional primary health care organisations (Medicare Locals). The re-introduction was recommended in a 2014 review of after-hours primary care reflecting the "overwhelming desire" among general practice. Given the centrality of after-hours care provision in rural and remote practices identified in the review, we compare and contrast the current and historical after-hours incentive funding mechanisms focussing on fairness towards rural general practices. While there are similarities between the current and historical mechanisms, significant differences exist. The comparison is not straightforward. The major consistency is utilisation of practice standardised whole patient equivalents (SWPE) as the basis of funding, inherently favouring large urban general practices. This bias is expected to increase given a shift in focus from practices with no option but to provide 24/7 care to any practice providing 24/7 care; and an associated increased funding per SWPE. Differences primarily pertain to classification processes, in which the realities of rural service provision and recognition of regional support mechanisms are given minimal consideration. Rapid introduction of the new general practice after-hours incentive funding mechanism has led to inconsistencies and has exacerbated inherent biases, particularly inequity towards rural providers. Impact on morale and service provision in non-urban areas should be monitored. PMID:27237945

  3. Implementing Research Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Calvin

    2006-01-01

    Special education research has undergone one of the most significant developments in the history of education during the past two decades (Gersten, Vaughn, Deshler, & Schiller, 1997). These developments can be related to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 and the resulting knowledge about teaching individuals with…

  4. Bridging Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Rachel G.; Khoong, Elaine C.; Chambers, David; Brownson, Ross C.

    2013-01-01

    Context Theories and frameworks (hereafter called models) enhance dissemination and implementation (D&I) research by making the spread of evidence-based interventions more likely. This work organizes and synthesizes these models by: (1) developing an inventory of models used in D&I research; (2) synthesizing this information; and (3) providing guidance on how to select a model to inform study design and execution. Evidence acquisition This review began with commonly cited models and model developers and used snowball sampling to collect models developed in any year from journal articles, presentations, and books. All models were analyzed and categorized in 2011 based on three author-defined variables: construct flexibility, focus on dissemination and/or implementation activities (D/I), and the socio-ecological framework (SEF) level. Five-point scales were used to rate construct flexibility from broad to operational and D/I activities from dissemination-focused to implementation-focused. All SEF levels (system, community, organization, and individual) applicable to a model were also extracted. Models that addressed policy activities were noted. Evidence synthesis Sixty-one models were included in this review. Each of the five categories in the construct flexibility and D/I scales had/contained at least four models. Models were distributed across all levels of the SEF; the fewest models (n=8) addressed policy activities. To assist researchers in selecting and utilizing a model throughout the research process, the authors present and explain examples of how models have been used. Conclusions These findings may enable researchers to better identify and select models to inform their D&I work. PMID:22898128

  5. Feasibility of contact surveys in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A; Mant, D

    1987-01-01

    Surveys to evaluate risk factors for disease in the general population are popular with health authorities for assessing the effectiveness of their preventive measures. A contact survey of the lifestyles of 2000 randomly selected patients aged 25-64 was conducted in five general practices over 18 months; the medical records of the patients selected were tagged, and when the patients first visited the surgery they were given a questionnaire by the receptionists, which they completed in the waiting room. Over the 18 months at least 1400 of these patients visited the practices, of whom 1106 (55%) completed a questionnaire and 20 refused to do so; 896 (81%) completed it within one year. Information on the patients who were not surveyed was obtained by sending the questionnaire by post and by audit of medical records. The population surveyed on contact with the surgeries contained a higher proportion of young women, and possibly a higher proportion of patients from social classes IIIM-V, than the other patients. No important or consistent bias towards unhealthy patients at high risk was identified in the contact survey. A one year contact survey of a random, tagged sample is feasible in estimating the risk factors in a population and may be the method of choice in general practice because of its low cost and adaptability. PMID:3120900

  6. Family planning: general practice and clinic services.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, S

    1985-04-01

    The growing trend in the UK toward family planning provision by general practitioners rather than physicians at community family planning clinics has been accompanied by a lack of cooperation and communication--even competition--between these 2 services. In general, clinics provide a wider range of contraceptive methods and personnel are more likely to have special training in counseling for psychosexual problems, abortion, and sterilization. On the other hand, general practitioners are often preferred because of their knowledge of a woman's medical history and longer office hours. Courses to update knowledge about contraception are an important asset for general practitioners. At times, however, it is in the best interests of the patient to be referred to a clinic by a general practitioner. If community clinics are to remain open, they must provide modern contraceptive technology and be able to deal with difficult problems. Pregnancy testing facilities should be available on the premises. Bureaucratic rules that make it difficult for individual clinic physicians to prescribe Depo-Provera, postcoital pills, or IUDs should be abolished. In addition, men should be welcomed. The future of the clinics is further dependent on the establishment of a proper career structure in community health. It is concluded that professionals working in both clinics and general practice should seek to improve their standards and work in greater cooperation.

  7. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  8. Overseas Research. A Practical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Christopher B.; Cason, Jeffrey W.

    This guide is intended to give practical advice that prepares graduate student researchers for the realities and challenges of living and working abroad, with a particular focus on that area of research experience that is between participation and observation. Drawing on the experiences of 150 scholars, funded over a 6-year period by the MacArthur…

  9. Arterial pressures in a general practice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, T; Merrett, J D

    1974-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic readings of blood pressure were recorded for 5386 (2585 males and 2801 females) members of a general practice situated in and around Ballycastle, County Antrim. Polynomials to predict blood pressure from age were derived for systolic and diastolic pressures of males and females. Polynomials to predict blood pressure variance from age were derived for both systolic and diastolic pressure of each sex. Age-sex adjusted diastolic and systolic scores were calculated for each of the 5386 members of the practice using a technique similar to that reported by Hamilton et al. (1954 a, b).Parent-child correlations ranging from -0.21 to 0.17 were observed; however, when all sibships were considered together irrespective of size coefficients which were significantly greater than zero generally involved the mother of the child. No sib-sib correlation (all sibship sizes combined), except those involving twins exceeded the value 0.13. Husband-wife correlations were similar to the corresponding parent-offspring correlations when both husband and wife were aged 45 years or more. Generally speaking, the coefficients found in this study were lower than those of other workers and reasons are discussed why the estimates of the present paper may not be unbiased.

  10. In-practice and distance consultant on-call general practitioner supervisors for Australian general practice?

    PubMed

    Wearne, Susan M

    2011-08-15

    Increasing numbers of medical students and junior doctors learn and work in general practice. Increased supervisory responsibilities for general practitioners threaten the quality of care provided to patients and the income thus derived. Incremental changes to infrastructure and funding are welcome, but insufficient. Alternative models must be funded, trialled and evaluated. One such model, involving consultant on-call GP supervisors, is proposed.

  11. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Evaluating Diagnostic Test Accuracy: A Practical Review for Clinical Researchers-Part I. General Guidance and Tips

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Juneyoung; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi

    2015-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA), the use of systematic review and meta-analyses is steadily increasing. By means of objective evaluation of all available primary studies, these two processes generate an evidence-based systematic summary regarding a specific research topic. The methodology for systematic review and meta-analysis in DTA studies differs from that in therapeutic/interventional studies, and its content is still evolving. Here we review the overall process from a practical standpoint, which may serve as a reference for those who implement these methods. PMID:26576106

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Evaluating Diagnostic Test Accuracy: A Practical Review for Clinical Researchers-Part I. General Guidance and Tips.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Juneyoung; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho

    2015-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA), the use of systematic review and meta-analyses is steadily increasing. By means of objective evaluation of all available primary studies, these two processes generate an evidence-based systematic summary regarding a specific research topic. The methodology for systematic review and meta-analysis in DTA studies differs from that in therapeutic/interventional studies, and its content is still evolving. Here we review the overall process from a practical standpoint, which may serve as a reference for those who implement these methods. PMID:26576106

  13. Computerisation of general practice in the Republic of Croatia: experience gained in general practice use.

    PubMed

    Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Katić, Milica; Kern, Josipa

    2007-01-01

    Well-organised medical records are the prerequisite for achieving a high level of performance in primary healthcare settings. Recording balanced structured and coded data as well as free text can improve both quality and organisation of work in the office. It provides a more substantiated support of financial transactions and accountancy, allows better communication with other facilities and institutions, and is a source of valuable scientific research material. This article is the result of an individual experience gained in general practice use of various programs/systems employed within the family medicine frame, and the frame of evaluation of available and commonly-exploited program solutions. The use of various programs allows for systematic adjustments as to the increasingly complex requirements imposed on electronic medical records (EMRs). The experience of a general practitioner, presented in this paper, confirms the assumption that an adequate program to be employed with EMRs should be developed, provided that family medicine practitioners, that is, the final users, have been involved in each and every stage of its development, adjustment, implementation and evaluation.

  14. Practice nurses experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Peters, Kath; McInnes, Susan

    2012-07-01

    Internationally, the delivery of health services has shifted from secondary to primary care, necessitating an exponential growth of the nursing workforce and expansion of the nursing role in general practice. This growth, and the subsequent need to develop this workforce, has created a need to expose undergraduate nurses to general practice nursing as a viable career option. Concurrently, universities are struggling to find sufficient clinical places for their undergraduate students to gain clinical experience. It is logical, therefore, to increase the number of undergraduate nursing student placements in general practice. Through qualitative research methods, this paper seeks to explore the experiences of practice nurses mentoring undergraduate students on clinical placements within the general practice setting. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Promoting Practice Nursing: We really need to get students in, (2) Mentoring future co-workers: Patience and reassurance, and (3) Reciprocity in learning: It's a bit of a two way street, which show the benefits of such placements. Clinical placements in general practice settings can be mutually beneficial in terms of providing quality teaching and learning experiences for students. Conversely, the experience provides an impetus for practice nurses to maintain currency of their clinical skills and knowledge through mentoring student nurses. PMID:21908081

  15. Autism: From Research to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Autism is the most commonly studied of a spectrum of developmental disorders that are believed to be neurobiologically based but which, at this point, for lack of good biomarkers, are defined purely by behavior. In the last 20 years, the definition of autism has shifted in emphasis from extreme aloofness and positive signs of abnormality in repetitive and sensori-motor behaviors to a greater awareness of the importance of more subtle reciprocal social-communication deficits as core features. Standard diagnostic instruments were developed for research purposes to acquire information both through caregiver interviews and direct clinical observation. Use of these instruments in clinical practice resulted in major improvements which in turn affected research results. These results yielded further improvements that led to changes in clinical practice over time. The synergism between research and clinical practice in the understanding of autism is discussed. PMID:21058793

  16. Opportunities for research in rural practice.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The contributions of Denis Burkitt, William Budd, Sir James MacKenzie and Will Pickles, among others, are examples of the research that can be accomplished by busy doctors in a general practice or a rural setting with a minimum of equipment. It is still possible to undertake worthwhile research in rural areas of Canada. This contention is supported by many examples of published work from northern Newfoundland and Labrador. The studies have dealt with conditions that are particularly frequent in each region, including those due to nutritional deficiency, infection, extremes of climate and genetic factors. Epidemiologic studies have compared the occurrence of disease in different geographic regions and in different races. The content of general practice and methods of health care delivery have also been investigated. It is suggested that some of these observations could have been made only in the context of rural medical practice. Images p1246-a p1246-b PMID:445268

  17. Research Schools: Grounding Research in Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Christina; Fischer, Kurt W.

    2008-01-01

    Education lacks a strong infrastructure for connecting research with educational practice and policy. The need for this linkage grows as findings in cognitive science and biology become ever more relevant to education. Teachers often lack the background knowledge needed to interpret scientific results, whereas scientists often lack an…

  18. Interacting institutional logics in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Rebecca; Holt, Robin

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the organisational field of general dental practice and how agents change or maintain the institution of values associated with the everyday work of health care provision. Our dataset comprise archival literature and policy documents, interview data from field level actors, as well as service delivery level interview data and secondary data gathered (2011-12) from 16 English dental practices. Our analysis provides a typology of institutional logics (prevailing systems of value) experienced in the field of dental practice. Confirming current literature, we find two logics dominate how care is assessed: business-like health care and medical professionalism. We advance the literature by finding the business-like health care logic further distinguished by values of commercialism on the one hand and those of accountability and procedural diligence on the other. The logic of professionalism we also find is further distinguished into a commitment to clinical expertise and independence in delivering patient care on the one hand, and concerns for the autonomy and sustainability of a business enterprise on the other. PMID:23931946

  19. Improving acute eye consultations in general practice: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Teo, Michelle Ai Ling

    2014-01-01

    There is significant evidence that patients with acute eye symptoms are poorly assessed in primary care. There is a tendency to diagnose viral or bacterial conjunctivitis in any acutely red eye. This has led to delays in treatment and in some cases, permanent loss of sight. The aim of this project was to improve acute eye consultations within the Birchwood Medical Practice. The project focused on the "red flag" findings that would identify patients who require referral for same-day ophthalmology assessment. A retrospective baseline audit was carried out on all cases read-coded "conjunctivitis" over the period of one year. Initially, only 2.8% of consultations had documented all four findings. By considering the main factors that lead to poor eye assessments, two main areas for improvement were identified. These were education (reinforced with memory aids) and improving the availability of eye examination equipment within each consultation room. An "eye examination kit" was developed with the needs of the general practitioner in mind. The practice was re-audited six weeks following the intervention. Consultations where all four red flag findings were documented rose from 2.8% to 50%. This was found to be a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01). Pain was checked 63% of the time, compared to 26% prior to intervention. Visual acuity screening had increased to from 35% to 69%. Photophobia was the most significantly increased metric, from being documented only 6% of the time to now 63% of the time. Documentation of whether the symptoms were unilateral or bilateral had also increased from 88% to 94% of consultations. The initial audit indicated that general practitioners often diagnosed conjunctivitis without screening for symptoms of sight-threatening disease. However, it was clear from the results that the doctors had made a significant change to their approach to acute eye consultations. This shows that doctors are willing to make changes to their behaviour

  20. Action Research as a Practice-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmis, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Action research changes people's practices, their understandings of their practices, and the conditions under which they practice. It changes people's patterns of "saying", "doing" and "relating" to form new patterns--new ways of life. It is a meta-practice: a practice that changes other practices. It transforms the sayings, doings and relating…

  1. Practical Action Research for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmuck, Richard A.

    This book presents information on action research for teachers and administrators. Chapter 1, Reflective Professional Practice, discusses reflective professionals, urges active use of solitary dialogue and personal journals to enhance reflectiveness, delineates concerns of maturing educators, and summarizes meditative steps of reflective practice…

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in general practice in England 2000–2011: a population-based study using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Wetten, Sally; Mohammed, Hamish; Yung, Mandy; Mercer, Catherine H; Cassell, Jackie A; Hughes, Gwenda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relative contribution of general practices (GPs) to the diagnosis of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in England and whether treatment complied with national guidelines. Design Analysis of longitudinal electronic health records in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and national sexually transmitted infection (STI) surveillance databases, England, 2000–2011. Setting GPs, and community and specialist STI services. Participants Patients diagnosed with chlamydia (n=1 386 169) and gonorrhoea (n=232 720) at CPRD GPs, and community and specialist STI Services from 2000–2011. Main outcome measures Numbers and rates of chlamydia and gonorrhoea diagnoses; percentages of patients diagnosed by GPs relative to other services; percentage of GP patients treated and antimicrobials used; percentage of GP patients referred. Results The diagnosis rate (95% CI) per 100 000 population of chlamydia in GP increased from 22.8 (22.4–23.2) in 2000 to 29.3 (28.8–29.7) in 2011 (p<0.001), while the proportion treated increased from 59.5% to 78.4% (p=0.001). Over 90% were prescribed a recommended antimicrobial. Over the same period, the diagnosis rate (95% CI) per 100 000 population of gonorrhoea in GP ranged between 3.2 (3–3.3) and 2.4 (2.2–2.5; p=0.607), and the proportion treated ranged between 32.7% and 53.6% (p=0.262). Despite being discontinued as a recommended therapy for gonorrhoea in 2005, ciprofloxacin accounted for 42% of prescriptions in 2007 and 20% in 2011. Over the study period, GPs diagnosed between 9% and 16% of chlamydia cases and between 6% and 9% of gonorrhoea cases in England. Conclusions GP makes an important contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial STIs in England. While most patients diagnosed with chlamydia were managed appropriately, many of those treated for gonorrhoea received antimicrobials no longer recommended for use. Given the global threat of antimicrobial resistance, GPs should remain

  3. Organising a physiotherapy service in general practice.

    PubMed

    Waters, W H; Udy, S C; Lunn, J E

    1975-08-01

    This paper describes three years' experience of running a domiciliary physiotherapy service based on general practice and financed by limited voluntary funds.The need arose from the remoteness of, and lack of, open access to, hospital physiotherapy. This was particularly so for elderly patients who were often frail and mentally confused. In addition there were obvious advantages in properly instructing relatives in management and treatment, especially since many of the patients and their relatives expressed a desire for home treatment.There was also a desire on the part of the general practitioners, nurses, and ancillary workers to develop further the teamwork in the health services of the four villages involved. Details of the constitution of the voluntary service and its financial arrangements are given.The results of the service and the nature of its work are described. There were no difficulties experienced in selecting the correct patients for treatment and the type of equipment required was almost all normally available through the health authority nursing service. There was no great need for expensive or heavy equipment and no transport problems arose.It was found that one hour of physiotherapist's time per 1,000 patients per week was adequate to cover all patients requiring short-term intensive therapy and to allow a small amount of palliative therapy in addition, although this had not been the original intention of the service.The physiotherapist averaged about 40 hours work per month and under these conditions the travelling and costs averaged 1.54 miles and 83 pence per visit. With self-determined hours of work and flexible timing, these conditions proved ideal for a married physiotherapist with the responsibility of a young family. Expansion of the hours of work in this particular area would have led to wasteful visits devoted to palliative and placebo therapy; and extension of the service beyond the area defined, would have increased travelling time at

  4. Drug defaulting in a general practice.

    PubMed

    Porter, A M

    1969-01-25

    Different groups of patients in a general practice have been under close observation by defined methods to assess the extent of their adherence to drug schedules. Patients taking antibiotics, admitted to a short drug trial and prescribed long-term treatments, proved in most cases to be compliant. Antenatal patients taking a once-daily dosage of prophylactic iron were more co-operative than those taking divided dosages. Socially isolated patients and those of low social class were particularly likely to neglect their drugs.It is suggested that the significance and extent of the problem have been largely ignored and that all drug trials undertaken on outpatients should incorporate methods of detecting defaulters.

  5. Improving infection control in general practice.

    PubMed

    Farrow, S C; Zeuner, D; Hall, C

    1999-03-01

    Infection control measures in the health care setting should protect patients and staff from cross-infection. The prevention of harm is an essential part of good medical practice and failure might result in professional misconduct proceedings by the General Medical Council (GMC) and prosecution under the Health and Safety at Work legislation, as well as civil liability. For a health authority, overall responsibility for public health includes arrangements for the control of communicable diseases and infection in hospital and the community (NHS Management Executive, 1993), a function usually led by the Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC). This paper describes one district's collaborative approach between public health and GPs to assess and improve local infection control standards.

  6. Confidentiality governing surgical research practice.

    PubMed

    Mavroforou, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Mavrophoros, Dimitrios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel

    2005-02-01

    Healthy subjects or patients volunteering to participate in trials expect that their privacy and autonomy will be protected. The aim of this article is to highlight issues related to confidentiality governing surgical research practice. A search of the current relevant literature was undertaken. Consent to the disclosure of any information should be sought wherever practicable, but disclosures should be kept to the minimum necessary. The data should be made anonymous where unidentifiable data serve the purpose. Where the previously described actions are not practicable for various reasons, data may be disclosed for research, provided participants have been given information about access to their records and about their right to object. Personal information may only be disclosed without individual's consent when it is for the protection of the public interest, but this has proved too ambiguous a rubric to be useful without proper clarification. Hampering of noncommercial medical research should also be avoided, as it may cause serious damage to public health. Confidentiality in research is an important issue in the protection of the participants' rights to privacy and autonomy, and it should be considered in the design of each study. Breach of confidentiality is legally justifiable for the sake of the public interest, but proper clarification of the law is required in order to avoid hampering noncommercial medical research that is vital for the public health.

  7. The European General Practice Research Network Presents the Translations of Its Comprehensive Definition of Multimorbidity in Family Medicine in Ten European Languages

    PubMed Central

    Le Reste, Jean Yves; Nabbe, Patrice; Rivet, Charles; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Doerr, Christa; Czachowski, Slawomir; Lingner, Heidrun; Argyriadou, Stella; Lazic, Djurdjica; Assenova, Radost; Hasaganic, Melida; Munoz, Miquel Angel; Thulesius, Hans; Le Floch, Bernard; Derriennic, Jeremy; Sowinska, Agnieska; Van Marwijk, Harm; Lietard, Claire; Van Royen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review. Objective To translate that English definition into European languages and to validate the semantic, conceptual and cultural homogeneity of the translations for further research. Method Forward translation of the EGPRN’s definition of multimorbidity followed by a Delphi consensus procedure assessment, a backward translation and a cultural check with all teams to ensure the homogeneity of the translations in their national context. Consensus was defined as 70% of the scores being higher than 6. Delphi rounds were repeated in each country until a consensus was reached Results 229 European medical expert FPs participated in the study. Ten consensual translations of the EGPRN comprehensive definition of multimorbidity were achieved. Conclusion A comprehensive definition of multimorbidity is now available in English and ten European languages for further collaborative research in FM and long-term care. PMID:25607642

  8. Can research influence clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2007-06-01

    After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

  9. Violence in general practice: a gendered risk?

    PubMed

    Elston, Mary Ann; Gabe, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    This article focuses on the extent to which violence against family doctors in England is experienced in gendered terms. It draws on data from two studies: a postal survey of 1,300 general practitioners (GPs) (62% response rate) and in-depth interviews with 26 doctors who have been assaulted or threatened; and 13 focus groups with primary care teams and 19 in-depth interviews with GPs who had expressed an interest in the topic of violence against doctors. Most GPs, regardless of gender, reported receiving verbal abuse over the last two years, often interpreted as a consequence of declining deference to professionals, while actual physical assaults and threats were much rarer and more likely to be reported by men. Overall, women GPs were much more likely to express concern about violence and to take personal precautions, although younger male GPs working in inner-city practices also had high levels of concern. The study shows how some aspects of family doctors' work has been organised on gendered lines and how these contribute to the differences in experience of violence. We suggest that the increasing proportion of women among family doctors may have implications for these, often tacit, organisational routines. PMID:26498299

  10. Catchments of general practice in different countries– a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area. This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  11. Influence of population and general practice characteristics on prescribing of minor tranquilisers in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andrew C.; Hann, Mark; Ashcroft, Daren M.

    2010-01-01

    Prevalence of generalised anxiety disorders is widespread in Great Britain. Previous small-scale research has shown variations in minor tranquiliser prescribing, identifying several potential predictors of prescribing volume. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between general practice minor tranquiliser prescribing rates and practice population and general practice characteristics for all general practices in England. Methods: Multiple regression analysis of minor tranquiliser prescribing volumes during 2004/2005 for 8,291 English general practices with general practice and population variables obtained from the General Medical Services (GMS) statistics, Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), 2001 Census and 2004 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD). Results: The highest rates of minor tranquiliser prescribing were in areas with the greatest local deprivation while general practices situated in areas with larger proportions of residents of black ethnic origin had lower rates of prescribing. Other predictors of increased prescribing were general practices with older general practitioners and general practices with older registered practice populations. Conclusion: Our findings show that there is wide variation of minor tranquilisers prescribing across England which has implications regarding access to treatment and inequity of service provision. Future research should determine the barriers to equitable prescribing amongst general practices serving larger populations of black ethnic origin. PMID:25126140

  12. The academic base for general practice: the case for change.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J; Wilson, A; Fraser, R; Gray, D P

    1993-01-01

    University departments of general practice and the postgraduate education system for general practice have developed separately over the past 30 years. This separation is now impeding the academic development of the discipline and causes difficulties with recruitment and career progression. These problems could be eased by the creation of integrated departments. This would establish a critical mass for research and educational development, allow human and other resources to be used more flexibly and effectively, and provide a strong base for undergraduate education, vocational training, higher professional training, and continuing education. It could encourage collaborative ventures with other disciplines and also lead to higher standards of patient care. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:8401096

  13. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP) AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic) AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”). Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders rather than single company

  14. [General practice quality circles in the large city. Participation by Hamburg general physicians].

    PubMed

    Steinkohl, M; Niemann, D

    1997-01-01

    Quality circles (peer review) will play an increasing and important role in ambulatory care when they are based on voluntary participation and in a setting of open discussion. Goal is the further qualification of physicians by critical reflections on their practice based on learning processes and the experiences of the participants. Reported are experiences from the unit for primary care and health service research of the Hamburg University on implementing quality circles. Engagement in quality assurance may be helpful in the shaping and professionalisation of general practice.

  15. Clinical placements in general practice: relationships between practice nurses and tertiary institutions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kathleen; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; McInnes, Susan

    2013-05-01

    As a practice-based discipline a key component of undergraduate nurse education is clinical practice experience. The quality of clinical experiences has a significant impact on the students' ability to function competently post graduation. The relationship between higher education institutions (HEIs) and health service placement providers impacts upon the quality of clinical placements. In Australia, the growth of primary care nursing and the shortage of acute clinical places has prompted HEIs to explore the placement of students in general practice. Given the increasing attention being paid to non-traditional clinical placements, it is timely to explore how universities are establishing relationships and models of clinical placement. This paper uses qualitative research methods to explore the perspectives of 12 Australian general practice nurses who have experience in facilitating undergraduate clinical placements about the relationships between HEIs and nurses. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Appropriate preparation for placement: They don't know what primary health really means, (2) Seeking greater consultation in the organisation of clinical placements: they've got to do it one way for everyone, and (3) Uncertainty and lack of support: I had no contact with the university. Clinical placements in general practice can be an innovative strategy providing non-traditional, yet high quality, teaching and learning experiences for undergraduate nursing students. To optimise the quality of these placements, however, it is essential that HEIs provide appropriate support to the practice nurses mentoring these students. PMID:23069694

  16. Practice-based research: necessary intersection between academics and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Paul M

    2008-08-01

    Practice-based research networks are an exciting way for pediatric practitioners to contribute to the knowledge necessary to provide the best care to their patients. Academic pediatricians should view research networks a necessary and essential aspect of clinical research.

  17. Access to the General Curriculum: The Mandate and Role of Context in Research-Based Practice for Students with Extensive Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryndak, Diane Lea; Moore, Margaret A.; Orlando, Ann-Marie; Delano, Monica

    2009-01-01

    The reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and the No Child Left Behind Act requires that students with extensive support needs have access to, participate in, and make progress on the general curriculum along with their grade-level general education peers. This article suggests that the terms used in this…

  18. Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Suzanne L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Middle school general music may be a student's last encounter with school music. A practical book with accessible pedagogical resources on middle school general music is needed for methods courses and music practitioners' use. The book "Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music" presents numerous ways to engage…

  19. Professional autonomy - is it the future of general practice?

    PubMed

    Fraser, John

    2006-05-01

    Internationally, rising financial costs and increasing expectations of health care delivery have increased regulation and decreased the autonomy of general practitioners and other health care professionals. This article explores professional autonomy within Australian general practice, and outlines the importance of autonomy in systems approaches to organisational change in general practice. PMID:16680218

  20. Clinical and administrative review in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Stott, N. C. H.; Davis, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Clinical and administrative review in primary medical care can be an enjoyable and creative part of group-practice life. A series of such reviews are described which improve internal or external communication for the primary care team. PMID:1223278

  1. [Research in general medicine, role of the medical thesis].

    PubMed

    Levasseur, G; Schweyer, F X

    2003-06-01

    General practice doctors are naturally presented as being actors on the front lines of public health. The ability of general practitioners to be aware of and deal with public health questions largely depends upon their training. Perhaps one could consider the general practitioner's thesis as a preparatory analytical work within the area of their future field of practice. Do these theses serve to provide food for thought on general practice and its contribution to public health, and if not, could they? An analysis conducted within four medical schools in western France demonstrates that the work produced for general medicine identified as such only constitutes a fraction of the overall number of medical (non-university) theses (approximately 5%). Two possible explanations may be put forward. First, on the one hand, the theses highly depend on the context of the training and the work produced is a direct result of this. Second, on the other hand, the current methods of indexing notes in the university databases does not enable general medicine to be clearly seen and visibly recognised as an academic discipline. Two questions then remain: Can medical theses be considered as research? Should research in general medicine be carried out solely by general practitioners? It is vital that resources from outside the medical field be raised and mobilised for general practice research, whose themes are multi-disciplinary and not only clinical.

  2. Research Making Its Way into Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter; Goatley, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Identifying researchers whose work has influenced classroom practice, raises questions about the nature of research and its relationship with practice, and the means through which knowledge is distributed. We argue that normally, influence arises through lines of research more than individuals, that knowing-in-practice distribution systems should…

  3. Data Content and Exchange in General Practice: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Kalankesh, Leila R; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Rahimi, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    Background: efficient communication of data is inevitable requirement for general practice. Any issue in data content and its exchange among GP and other related entities hinders continuity of patient care. Methods: literature search for this review was conducted on three electronic databases including Medline, Scopus and Science Direct. Results: through reviewing papers, we extracted information on the GP data content, use cases of GP information exchange, its participants, tools and methods, incentives and barriers. Conclusion: considering importance of data content and exchange for GP systems, it seems that more research is needed to be conducted toward providing a comprehensive framework for data content and exchange in GP systems. PMID:25648317

  4. Practice-Based Research: Another Pathway for Closing the Research-Practice Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooke, Pamela J.; Olswang, Lesley B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Practice-based research is proposed as an additional way to bridge the divide between research and practice. Method: The article compares the traditional, laboratory-based research with research that is generated from practice: practice-based research. The defining features of each are described, with an emphasis on contrasting internal…

  5. Measuring the General Education Outcomes: Practical Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Anne; And Others

    Prepared in an effort to more clearly define and measure general education outcomes at Columbus State Community College, in Ohio, this handbook describes outcomes and associated student behaviors and provides suggestions for assessing the outcomes. Following introductory materials, a list is provided of the college's six general education…

  6. Some Contributions of General Systems Theory, Cybernetics Theory and Management Control Theory to Evaluation Theory and Practice. Research on Evaluation Program Paper and Report Series. Interim Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Desmond L.

    This document, one of a series of reports examining the possible contribution of other disciplines to evaluation methodology, describes the major elements of general systems theory (GST), cybernetics theory (CT) and management control theory (MCT). The author suggests that MCT encapsulates major concerns of evaluation since it reveals that…

  7. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural…

  8. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    The currently used internal and external program evaluation processes for general practice residency and advanced education in general dentistry programs are discussed, noting accrediting and evaluation groups, criteria, and designs. A generalized evaluation plan is proposed. (MSE)

  9. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  10. Intervention Fidelity in Special and General Education Research Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Elizabeth; Wanzek, Jeanne; Haring, Christa; Ciullo, Stephen; McCulley, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Treatment fidelity reporting practices are described for journals that published general and special education intervention research with high impact factors from 2005 through 2009. The authors reviewed research articles, reported the proportion of intervention studies that described fidelity measurement, detailed the components of fidelity…

  11. Assessment of management in general practice: validation of a practice visit method.

    PubMed Central

    van den Hombergh, P; Grol, R; van den Hoogen, H J; van den Bosch, W J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice management (PM) in general practice is as yet ill-defined; a systematic description of its domain, as well as a valid method to assess it, are necessary for research and assessment. AIM: To develop and validate a method to assess PM of general practitioners (GPs) and practices. METHOD: Relevant and potentially discriminating indicators were selected from a systematic framework of 2410 elements of PM to be used in an assessment method (VIP = visit instrument PM). The method was first tested in a pilot study and, after revision, was evaluated in order to select discriminating indicators and to determine validity of dimensions (factor and reliability analysis, linear regression). RESULTS: One hundred and ten GPs were assessed with the practice visit method using 249 indicators; 208 of these discriminated sufficiently at practice level or at GP level. Factor analysis resulted in 34 dimensions and in a taxonomy of PM. Dimensions and indicators showed marked variation between GPs and practices. Training practices scored higher on five dimensions; single-handed and dispensing practices scored lower on delegated tasks, but higher on accessibility and availability. CONCLUSION: A visit method to assess PM has been developed and its validity studied systematically. The taxonomy and dimensions of PM were in line with other classifications. Selection of a balanced number of useful and relevant indicators was nevertheless difficult. The dimensions could discriminate between groups of GPs and practices, establishing the value of the method for assessment. The VIP method could be an important contribution to the introduction of continuous quality improvement in the profession. PMID:10198481

  12. General Practice Teaching--Within the Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, M.

    1976-01-01

    A program of integrated teaching by consultants and general practitioners is described. The teaching took place in the hospitals used for the purpose by the Medical Faculty of the University of Birmingham. (Author)

  13. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  14. General practitioners' continuing medical education within and outside their practice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. A.; Allery, L. A.; Harding, K. G.; Hayes, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    To study continuing medical education 96 out of 101 general practitioners chosen at random from the list held by a family practitioner committee were interviewed. The results provided little evidence of regular attendance at local postgraduate centre meetings, though practice based educational meetings were common. Thirty one of the general practitioners worked in practices that held one or more practice based educational meetings each month at which the doctors provided the main educational content. Performance review was undertaken in the practices of 51 of the general practitioners, and 80 of the doctors recognised its value. The general practitioners considered that the most valuable educational activities occurred within the practice, the most valued being contact with partners. They asked for increased contact with hospital doctors. The development of general practitioners' continuing medical education should be based on the content of the individual general practitioner's day to day work and entail contact with his or her professional colleagues. PMID:2504381

  15. Locating the Elderly in a General Practice*

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, J. A.

    1969-01-01

    A preliminary survey undertaken before compiling a geriatric register showed that about 90% of the information on the practice files for patients over 65 was accurate. It is emphasized that such a register—which should be as accurate and up-to-date as possible—is important for the successful organization of a preventive geriatric clinic, or to any project designed to “screen” a defined population. PMID:5776221

  16. Practice-oriented research: what it takes to do collaborative research in private practice.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Kelly; Castonguay, Louis G

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the authors' experience conducting research in and for private practice. Based on two distinct research programs (one guided by a scientist practitioner leading various groups of clinicians and another from a network of practitioners and researchers), a number of practice-oriented studies are presented. Lessons learned from these collaborative projects are discussed in terms of challenges and strategies to deal with them, as well as benefits that can be earned from conducting empirical studies within clinical routine. General recommendations are then offered to foster the engagement of clinicians in their own working environment and to facilitate partnerships between researchers and practitioners in developing and implementing valid, feasible, and informative clinical studies.

  17. Violence at work: the experience of general practice receptionists.

    PubMed

    Chambers, F; Kelly, M

    2006-06-01

    Receptionists act as intermediaries between the General Practitioner and the public, and are often involved in conflicts between the GP and a demanding patient. However there is a paucity of research in this area. The aim of this study was to quantify the extent of violence directed towards GP receptionists and to categorise the type, frequency and impact of such aggression in two health board areas. A postal questionnaire was designed, piloted and sent to 400 randomly selected receptionists in the former Northern Area Health Board and the Western Health Board. We found that 62% (n= 168) of receptionists experienced violence in the past. 99% (n=166) had experienced verbal abuse while 31% (n=52) had experienced threats of physical abuse. 6% (n= 10) experienced physical abuse. In most cases the perpetrator was the patient 98% (n= 160). 28% (n=75) of practices had a practice policy for dealing with violence while only 13% (n=34) of receptionists received education on dealing with violence. This study shows that violence is a major problem among GP receptionists in Ireland. Aggression during the day is a regular feature for a GP receptionist. There is a higher reporting of violence in the Northern Area Health Board compared to the Western Health Board. We suggest that further education, research and practice policy development is needed to help target this problem and improve the overall quality of healthcare.

  18. Improvisational Practices in Elementary General Music Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenhagen, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Despite historic and ongoing support for the inclusion of improvisation in the elementary general music curriculum, music educators consistently report challenges with implementation of improvisational activities in their classes. This study was designed to examine (a) the extent to which improvisational activities were occurring in the…

  19. 47 CFR 76.1001 - Unfair practices generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Competitive Access to Cable Programming § 76.1001 Unfair practices generally. (a) Unfair practices generally. No cable operator, satellite cable programming vendor in which a cable operator has an attributable interest, or satellite broadcast programming...

  20. 47 CFR 76.1001 - Unfair practices generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Competitive Access to Cable Programming § 76.1001 Unfair practices generally. (a) Unfair practices generally. No cable operator, satellite cable programming vendor in which a cable operator has an attributable interest, or satellite broadcast programming...

  1. 47 CFR 76.1001 - Unfair practices generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Competitive Access to Cable Programming § 76.1001 Unfair practices generally. (a) Unfair practices generally. No cable operator, satellite cable programming vendor in which a cable operator has an attributable interest, or satellite broadcast programming...

  2. 47 CFR 76.1001 - Unfair practices generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Competitive Access to Cable Programming § 76.1001 Unfair practices generally. (a) Unfair practices generally. No cable operator, satellite cable programming vendor in which a cable operator has an attributable interest, or satellite broadcast programming...

  3. [Euthanasia and general practice in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Thomas, J M

    2014-09-01

    In Belgium, the GP can perform euthanasia or be called as a consultant. He must know the laws concerning the end of life and be able to explain his rights to his patients. He will know the best practices and techniques for euthanasia. If necessary, he will call help or refer to a more competent colleague. He negotiates with the patient an advanced care planning following the evolution of its pathologies and will witness its wishes regarding end of life against other institutions and doctors.

  4. The ethics of general practice and advertising.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, R D

    1989-01-01

    UK general practitioners (GPs) are self-employed entrepreneurs running small businesses with commercial considerations. In this situation there is no clear distinction between information, self-promotion and advertising. In response to the growing public demand for more information about medical services, the medical profession should voluntarily accept the notion of soft self-promotion in the form of 'notices' or 'announcements' placed in newspapers. Newspapers are the most effective way of giving easy access to information. The resistance to newspapers may be more concerned with preserving certain medical traditions than consideration of the public interest. The General Medical Council's (GMC's) arguments against soft self-promotion are seen as misguided paternalism, inconsistent and irrational. PMID:2746609

  5. What is a 'learning organization' in general practice? A case study.

    PubMed

    Cantle, F

    2000-08-01

    The focus of the research herein was to examine the main characteristics of a learning organization in a general practice. An ethnographic approach was taken. Blockage instrument, structured interviews and documentary evidence were used to establish the validity and the reliability of the research. Data were collected and analysed systematically. It is shown that the case study practice contains the characteristics of a learning organization and key management and organizational issues, such as policy making, practice management and performance management, are identified. Management strategies are offered and recommendations made both for the case study practice and generally for primary and secondary healthcare services. We hope that our research will guide further strategic planning in the case study practice, and that it will help other general practices and the NHS as a whole in the development of a learning organization.

  6. What type of general practice do patients prefer? Exploration of practice characteristics influencing patient satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R; Streatfield, J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practice is currently experiencing a large number of developments. Studies of patient satisfaction are required to guide the changes that many general practitioners are introducing. AIM: A study set out to examine the characteristics of general practices that influence patient satisfaction. METHOD: In 1991-92, a surgery satisfaction questionnaire of demonstrated reliability and validity was administered to 220 patients in each of 89 general practices. A further questionnaire completed by a member of practice staff collected information about practice characteristics including total list size, number, age and sex of practice partners, training status, fundholding status, presence of a practice manager and whether there was a personal list system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were undertaken to identify those practice characteristics that influenced patient satisfaction. RESULTS: The mean of the response rates of patients completing questionnaires in each practice was 82%. An increasing total list size of patients registered with practices was associated with decreasing levels of general satisfaction and decreased satisfaction with accessibility, availability, continuity of care, medical care and premises. The presence of a personal list system was associated with increased levels of general satisfaction and increased satisfaction with accessibility, availability, continuity of care and medical care. Training practices were associated with decreased levels of general satisfaction and decreased satisfaction with availability and continuity of care. CONCLUSION: The patients of practices in this study preferred smaller practices, non-training practices and practices that had personal list systems. Practice organization should be reviewed in order to ensure that the trend towards larger practices that provide a wider range of services does not lead to a decline in patient satisfaction. General practitioners should have personal list systems

  7. Factors influencing pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmacy practice research and strategies for promoting research interest in pharmacy practice

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, Vicky S.; Saini, Bandana; Carter, Stephen; Moles, Rebekah J.; Krass, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To (1) investigate the relationships between students’ characteristics and their (a) perceptions of research in general and (b) attitudes towards pharmacy practice research; (2) identify strategies that could be used by pharmacy educators to promote research interest in pharmacy practice; and (3) identify perceived barriers to the pursuit or completion of a pharmacy practice research degree. Methods: A survey was administered to all students enrolled in each year of the four-year pharmacy undergraduate program, University of Sydney, Australia. Perceptions of research in general were measured using 4 items on a five-point semantic-differential scale and attitudes towards pharmacy practice research were measured using 16 items on a five-point Likert scale. Student characteristics were also collected as were responses to open-ended questions which were analysed using content analysis. Results: In total 853 students participated and completed the survey (83% response rate). Participants’ characteristics were associated with some but not all aspects of research and pharmacy practice research. It appeared that positive attitudes and perspectives were influenced strongly by exposure to the ‘research’ process through projects, friends or mentors, previous degrees or having future intentions to pursue a research degree. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest positive attitudes and perceptions of research can be nurtured through the formal inclusion in research processes, particularly the utility of practice research in clinical practice across the four years of study. Participants indicated there was a lack of awareness of the needs, benefits and career opportunities associated with pharmacy practice research and voiced clear impediments in their career path with respect to the choice of practice research-related careers. Conclusions: Future research should investigate changes in perceptions and attitudes in a single cohort

  8. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    PubMed Central

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, microwave, laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. Each technique, although similar in purpose, has specific and optimal indications. This review serves to discuss general principles and technique, reviews each modality, and discusses modality selection. PMID:24238374

  9. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system. PMID:27477369

  10. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system.

  11. Participatory Research: New Approaches to the Research to Practice Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.; Park, Hyun-Sook; Grenot-Scheyer, Marquita; Schwartz, Ilene; Harry, Beth

    1998-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for incorporating elements of participatory research approaches into intervention research intended to improve practice. After an overview of the research-to-practice problem, it illustrates how the incorporation of participatory research approaches applied to various decision points can enhance the construction…

  12. Going for gold: the health promoting general practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion has been influential in guiding the development of 'settings' based health promotion. Over the past decade, settings such as schools have flourished and there has been a considerable amount of academic literature produced, including theoretical papers, descriptive studies and evaluations. However, despite its central importance, the health-promoting general practice has received little attention. This paper discusses: the significance of this setting for health promotion; how a health promoting general practice can be created; effective health promotion approaches; the nursing contribution; and some challenges that need to be resolved. In order to become a health promoting general practice, the staff must undertake a commitment to fulfil the following conditions: create a healthy working environment; integrate health promotion into practice activities; and establish alliances with other relevant institutions and groups within the community. The health promoting general practice is the gold standard for health promotion. Settings that have developed have had the support of local, national and European networks. Similar assistance and advocacy will be needed in general practice. This paper recommends that a series of rigorously evaluated, high-quality pilot sites need to be established to identify and address potential difficulties, and to ensure that this innovative approach yields tangible health benefits for local communities. It also suggests that government support is critical to the future development of health promoting general practices. This will be needed both directly and in relation to the capacity and resourcing of public health in general.

  13. Vertical Integration in Teaching And Learning (VITAL): an approach to medical education in general practice.

    PubMed

    Dick, Marie-Louise B; King, David B; Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Kelly, Glynn D; Buckley, John F; Garside, Susan J

    2007-07-16

    There is increasing demand to provide clinical and teaching experiences in the general practice setting. Vertical integration in teaching and learning, whereby teaching and learning roles are shared across all learner stages, has the potential to decrease time demands and stress on general practitioners, to provide teaching skills and experience to GP registrars, and to improve the learning experience for medical students, and may also help meet the increased demand for teaching in general practice. We consider potential advantages and barriers to vertical integration of teaching in general practice, and provide results of focus group discussions with general practice principals and registrars about vertical integration. We recommend further research into the feasibility of using vertical integration to enhance the capacity to teach medical students in general practice.

  14. A study of bereavement in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Levy, B.; Sclare, A. Balfour

    1976-01-01

    Forty six bereaved relatives were assessed by a general practitioner four to eight weeks after the bereavement. In 36 (78·3 per cent) the immediate reaction to bereavement was one of numbness or stupefaction; in seven (15·2 per cent) emotional relief occurred; and in three cases (6·5 per cent) there was no obvious immediate reaction. The numbness reaction was limited in duration to a week or less in 31 of the 36 instances. At four to eight weeks after bereavement 29 (63·0 per cent) of the subjects continued to experience difficulty in coming to terms with their loss. Twenty subjects reported guilt feelings and a similar number expressed aggressive reactions. The bereaved subjects tended to increase their consumption of cigarettes and alcohol, while their appetite and weight tended to be reduced. Thirty six (78·3 per cent) of the subjects reported physical symptoms, notably headache, dizziness, generalised aches, and abdominal complaints. The most prominent psychological features of bereavement were found to be: preoccupation with thoughts of the deceased, idealisation of the lost person, depressive mood, and loneliness. The findings are discussed and reference made to the role of the family doctor in the management of bereavement reactions. PMID:957295

  15. Assessment of general education teachers' Tier 1 classroom practices: contemporary science, practice, and policy.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Linda A; Fabiano, Gregory A; Jimerson, Shane R

    2013-12-01

    Progress monitoring is a type of formative assessment. Most work on progress monitoring in elementary school settings has been focused on students. However, teachers also can benefit from frequent evaluations. Research addressing teacher progress monitoring is critically important given the recent national focus on teacher evaluation and effectiveness. This special topic section of School Psychology Quarterly is the first to showcase the current research on measuring Tier 1 instructional and behavioral management practices used by prekindergarten and elementary school teachers in general education settings. The three studies included in the special section describe the development and validation efforts of several teacher observational and self-report measures of instruction and/or behavioral management. These studies provide evidence for the utility of such assessments for documenting the use of classroom practices, and these assessment results may be leveraged in innovative coaching models to promote best practice. These articles also offer insight and ideas for the next generation of teacher practice assessment for the field. Finally, the special topic is capped by a commentary synthesizing the current work and offers "big ideas" for future measurement development, policy, and professional development initiatives.

  16. Night cough and general practice research.

    PubMed

    Toop, L J; Howie, J G; Paxton, F M

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-four children, aged between three and nine years, presenting with nocturnal cough, were studied on successive nights using an automatic voice activated tape recorder system. Children with a family history of atopy coughed significantly more than children without such a family history. A wide variation in cough frequency was found both between and within subjects. No effects of treatment on cough frequency were demonstrated. Some of the physiological and pathological mechanisms underlying night cough are discussed.

  17. Efficacy of venlafaxine in depressive illness in general practice.

    PubMed

    Lecrubier, Y; Bourin, M; Moon, C A; Schifano, F; Blanchard, C; Danjou, P; Hackett, D

    1997-06-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 229 patients with a Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnosis of major, minor or intermittent depression was used to compare the clinical profiles of venlafaxine and imipramine in general practice. Venlafaxine produced a significant improvement compared to placebo in symptoms of depression and anxiety as rated by the total MADRS and percentage of responders, the CGI improvement, the CGI severity of illness, the BSA psychic anxiety item and the HSCL. On a number of these measures, venlafaxine was also significantly more effective than imipramine. Venlafaxine was significantly superior to both imipramine and placebo for the SARS total score and the items 'social/leisure' and 'extended family.' A similar proportion of patients discontinued treatment in each group, but fewer patients on venlafaxine discontinued treatment because of an unsatisfactory response.

  18. Position Paper: Dental General Practice Residency Programs: Financing and Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Paul W.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of changeable economic issues that can affect dental general practice residency program planning includes costs and resource allocation, maximizing efficiency and productivity, ambulatory and inpatient revenue sources, management functions, faculty as practitioners, faculty appointments, and marketing. (MSE)

  19. Australian and overseas models of general practice training.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard B; Morgan, Simon

    2011-06-01

    General practice training in Australia continues to evolve. It is now the responsibility of an independent organisation, is delivered by regional training providers, and comprises a structured training program. Overseas, general practice varies in its importance to health care systems, and training models differ considerably. In some cases training is mandatory, in others voluntary, but the aim is always similar--to improve the quality of care delivered to the large majority of populations that access health care through primary care. We review the current status of vocational general practice training in Australia, compare it with selected training programs in international contexts, and describe how the local model is well placed to address future challenges. Challenges include changes in population demographics, increasing comorbidity, increasing costs of technology-based health care, increasing globalisation of health, and workforce shortages. Although general practice training in Australia is strong, it can improve further by learning from other training programs to meet these challengers. PMID:21644855

  20. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  1. Australian and overseas models of general practice training.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard B; Morgan, Simon

    2011-06-01

    General practice training in Australia continues to evolve. It is now the responsibility of an independent organisation, is delivered by regional training providers, and comprises a structured training program. Overseas, general practice varies in its importance to health care systems, and training models differ considerably. In some cases training is mandatory, in others voluntary, but the aim is always similar--to improve the quality of care delivered to the large majority of populations that access health care through primary care. We review the current status of vocational general practice training in Australia, compare it with selected training programs in international contexts, and describe how the local model is well placed to address future challenges. Challenges include changes in population demographics, increasing comorbidity, increasing costs of technology-based health care, increasing globalisation of health, and workforce shortages. Although general practice training in Australia is strong, it can improve further by learning from other training programs to meet these challengers.

  2. Case stories in general practice: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Flottorp, Signe; Stensland, Per

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the interactive process of sharing case stories in small-group activity in general practice. Design Qualitative focus group study. Setting Peer-group meetings of doctors attending specialist training or continuous medical education in general practice. Participants Twenty female and 30 male doctors working in general practice in Norway. Results The storyline of case presentations included detailed stories with emotional engagement, co-authored by other group members. The stories initiated discussions and reflections concerning patients’ and doctors’ perspectives, medical ethics as well as clinical problems. The safe atmosphere allowed testing out boundaries of socially shared knowledge. Conclusions Sharing case stories in small groups in general practice initiated interaction that facilitated meaning-making, reflection and peer support. PMID:22874630

  3. P-12 Engineering Education Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tamara; Richards, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of "Advances in Engineering Education" explores recent developments in P-12 Engineering Education. It includes papers devoted to research and practice, and reports some of the most exciting work in the field today. In our Call of Papers, we solicited two types of papers: Research papers and Practice papers. The former…

  4. From Research Assistant to Professional Research Assistance: Research Consulting as a Form of Research Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollon, Dawn E.; Herbert, Monique; Chahine, Saad; Falenchuk, Olesya

    2013-01-01

    Research assistantships have long been viewed as an extension of the formal education process, a form of apprenticeship, and a pathway into the professional practice of research in institutional settings. However, there are other contexts in which researchers practice research. This self-study documents the formative role research assistantships…

  5. Adolescent Literacy Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jetton, Tamara L., Ed.; Dole, Janice A., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book addresses the role of literacy instruction in enhancing content area learning and fostering student motivation and success well beyond the primary grades. The unique literacy needs of middle school and secondary students are thoroughly examined and effective practices and interventions identified. Reviewing the breadth of current…

  6. Perspectives on Writing: Research, Theory, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina, Ed.; Squire, James R., Ed.

    Providing a foundation in which researchers may build future research and theory and in which teachers may design more effective classroom practice, this book presents 12 essays that bring together the contributions of researchers and teacher-scholars to present the significant theory and research related to the writing process. The book is…

  7. Medicine and management: a conflict facing general practice?

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, P; White, T

    1997-01-01

    Partners and practice managers are beginning to understand implications of management issues raised by recent reforms. Practices involved in this study agree the need for improvement, but partners and managers were often unable to define improvements needed. Demonstrates that effective management structure is vital to future success for general practice. To achieve this involves understanding new managerial challenges practices must meet and different organizational competences required. To change requires a radical restructure of many practice roles and several options are considered. Regardless of the chosen option the question of training remains. There is a need to involve consultants, managers, and doctors already advancing the boundaries of practice development, in a dialogue with institutions providing management training, to design suitable programmes. Academic institutions too often produce management programmes geared towards the old environment, whereas managerial skills which changes in the NHS demand from future practice managers are now required.

  8. How to choose a new partner in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    King, J; Whitfield, M

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To provide a guide to choosing a new partner in general practice by using psychometric assessments. DESIGN--A descriptive account of the experience of one practice. SETTING--A general practice in Bristol. RESULTS--The partners found that using a psychologist to assess both themselves and the candidates facilitated the selection process. During the pre-interview stage the partners learnt about the dynamics of the practice and their own personalities. The examination of the candidates by an outside assessor as well as the partners gave a sense of security and a certainty that mistakes were unlikely to be made. CONCLUSION--More practices should consider adopting a selection process using psychometric assessments when appointing a new partner. PMID:2271828

  9. The state, the market, and general practice: the Australian case.

    PubMed

    White, K N

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the development of general practice in the latter half of the 20th century, documenting the issues of concern to both the profession and the state. General practice developed hand in hand with the welfare state in Australia. As the structural changes associated with restructuring of the welfare state have advanced, so have the fortunes of general practice declined, despite significant attempts in the 1970s and 1980s to "save" general practice by both the profession and the state. These structural changes have operated on two fronts, the economic and the cultural. On the economic, changes to the employment of general practitioners clearly indicate ongoing proletarianization, particularly in a changing environment of labor-capital relations. At the cultural level, development of the self-help and the women's movements and the elective affinity of these groups with the individualism of the new right are leading to deprofessionalization. The author advances this argument in a review of general practice over the last 40 years and in a case study of community health services. Theoretically he argues for a combination of the proletarianization and the deprofessionalization theses.

  10. Translating research and into everyday clinical practice: Lessons learned from a USA national dental practice-based research network

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies are of paramount importance for testing and translation of the research findings to the community. Despite the existence of clinical studies, a significant delay exists between the generation of new knowledge and its application into the medical/dental community and their patients. One example is the repair of defective dental restorations. About 75% of practitioners in general dental practices do not consider the repair of dental restorations as a viable alternative to the replacement of defective restorations. Engaging and partnering with health practitioners in the field on studies addressing everyday clinical research questions may offer a solution to speed up the translation of the research findings. Practice-based research (PBR) offers a unique opportunity for practitioners to be involved in the research process, formulating clinical research questions. Additionally, PBR generates evidence-based knowledge with a broader spectrum that can be more readily generalized to the public. With PBR, clinicians are involved in the entire research process from its inception to its dissemination. Early practitioner interaction in the research process may result in ideas being more readily incorporated into practice. This paper discusses PBR as a mean to speed up the translation of research findings to clinical practice. It also reviews repair versus replacement of defective restorations as one example of the delay in the application of research findings to clinical practice. PMID:22889478

  11. The future of general practice in Newcastle upon Tyne.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M; Jachuck, S J; Walters, F; van Zwanenberg, T D

    1986-02-15

    A plan is presented for the future of general practice in Newcastle upon Tyne, in which general practices rather than individual practitioners would be responsible for providing a package of guaranteed minimum services. The services would include, at least, 24 h care of acute illness, continuity of care, management of specified chronic conditions according to agreed protocols, and certain preventive programmes. A computerised reporting system linked to computerised patient registration would enable targets to be set for the preventive programmes. Such an approach to primary health care follows the philosophy of Health for All, and could form the basis of a new general practitioner contract. Appropriate government funding in the future might be assured if general practice could demonstrate its ability to deliver a cost-effective service. PMID:2868306

  12. Control of infection in general practice: a survey and recommendations.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P. N.; Cooke, E. M.; Larkin, D. P.; Southgate, L. J.; Mayon-White, R. T.; Pether, J. V.; Wright, A. E.; Keenlyside, D.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty general practices in four areas in Britain were surveyed to establish their needs for and practices of sterilising and disinfecting equipment. Of the 327 items of equipment and instruments examined in the survey, 190 were satisfactorily decontaminated, 100 were treated in a way judged to result in doubtful decontamination, and in 37 cases treatment was considered unsatisfactory. Decontamination apparatuses (autoclaves, hot air ovens, and hot water disinfectors) were generally in good working order, but the use of chemical disinfectants was often inappropriate. Recommendations were made on appropriate methods of decontamination for various items in common use in general practice. By virtue of the large numbers of patients treated by general practitioners there is a substantial possibility of transmitting infection; having appropriate methods for decontaminating instruments and equipment is therefore imperative. PMID:3408909

  13. Strategic directions for developing the Australian general practice nurse role in cardiovascular disease management.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Yallop, Julie; Griffiths, Rhonda; Daly, John

    2007-08-01

    Practice nursing is an integral component of British and New Zealand primary care, but in Australia it remains an emerging specialty. Despite an increased focus on the Australian practice nurse role, there has been limited strategic role development, particularly relating to national health priority areas. This paper reports the third stage of a Project exploring the Australian practice nurse role in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stage involved a consensus development conference, undertaken to identify strategic, priority recommendations for practice nurse role development. 1. Practice nurses have an important role in developing systems and processes for CVD management; 2. A change in the culture of general practice is necessary to promote acceptance of nurse-led CVD management; 3. Future research needs to evaluate specific models of care, incorporating outcome measures sensitive to nursing interventions; 4. Considerable challenges exist in conducting research in general practice; and 5. Changes in funding models are necessary for widespread practice nurse role development. The shifting of funding models provides evidence to support interdisciplinary practice in Australian general practice. The time is ripe, therefore, to engage in prospective and strategic planning to inform development of the practice nurse role.

  14. Teaching Reading: Research into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macalister, John

    2014-01-01

    In pre-service and in-service language teacher education, and in curriculum-related projects in second and foreign language settings, a recurrent issue is the failure to relate the teaching of reading to reading as a meaning-making activity. In this paper, I will consider what current research on second language (L2) reading has actually succeeded…

  15. Seeding Literacy: Adult Educators Research Their Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Janelle; Searle, Jean

    This publication presents five reports that represent research conducted by adult educators. "Supporting Adult Educators in Researching Their Practice" (Janelle Davis, Jean Searle) presents results of four action research projects related to developing literacies for disadvantaged groups or groups with special needs. "Towards Mutual Benefits:…

  16. Methodology and the Research-Practice Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the mismatch between educational research methodologies and its application to generic features of practice and proposes a problem-based methodology that better links research with problem solving. Implications of this methodology are discussed from recent research on school tracking. (GR)

  17. Build a Relationship between Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Unlike every other developed country, Canada has had no national or pan-Canadian agency that works to support and promote research in education, and especially to build connections between research, policy, and practice. Canada has a national granting council that funds academic research in all fields, including education (the Social Sciences and…

  18. Prevalence of symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Silman, A; Holligan, S; Brennan, P; Maddison, P

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon in the populations of five general practices. DESIGN--Two populations studied. A questionnaire was given to all new patients attending five general practices over four weeks, and the same questionnaire was sent by post to a random sample of adults from two of the practices. SETTING--General practices in inner London, Merseyside, and Cheshire. SUBJECTS--1532 Patients who completed questionnaires (1119 who attended the surgeries (response rate unknown) and 413 respondents to the postal survey (response rate 69%)). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Response to questionnaire on symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon: patients were regarded as having the disease if they had episodes of blanching of the fingers that were precipitated by cold and accompanied by sensory symptoms (pins and needles or numbness). Subsequent interview and clinical appraisal of patients with the disease according to their responses to the questionnaire. RESULTS--The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon was 11% (26/231) and 19% (34/182) respectively in men and women who completed the postal questionnaire and 16% (56/357) and 21% (157/762) respectively in those who completed the questionnaire when attending their general practice. Thus the overall rates were slightly higher in women, but there was no effect of age even after adjustment of the rates for practice and method of survey. CONCLUSION--The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon is high compared with the low number of patients who seek treatment for the disease. PMID:2242457

  19. Spot-checks to measure general hygiene practice.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Ina L; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A variety of hygiene behaviors are fundamental to the prevention of diarrhea. We used spot-checks in a survey of 761 households in Burundi to examine whether something we could call general hygiene practice is responsible for more specific hygiene behaviors, ranging from handwashing to sweeping the floor. Using structural equation modeling, we showed that clusters of hygiene behavior, such as primary caregivers' cleanliness and household cleanliness, explained the spot-check findings well. Within our model, general hygiene practice as overall concept explained the more specific clusters of hygiene behavior well. Furthermore, the higher general hygiene practice, the more likely children were to be categorized healthy (r = 0.46). General hygiene practice was correlated with commitment to hygiene (r = 0.52), indicating a strong association to psychosocial determinants. The results show that different hygiene behaviors co-occur regularly. Using spot-checks, the general hygiene practice of a household can be rated quickly and easily. PMID:27666296

  20. Annual night visiting rates in 129 general practices in one family health services authority: association with patient and general practice characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, F A; Cook, D G; Hilton, S; Poloniecki, J; Hagen, A

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Rates of night visiting by general practitioners have increased steadily over the last 30 years and vary widely between general practices. AIM. An ecological study was carried out to examine night visiting rates by general practices in one family health services authority, and to determine the extent to which differences in night visiting rates between practices could be explained by patient and practice characteristics. METHOD. The study examined the variation in annual night visiting rates, based on night visit fees claimed between April 1993 and March 1994, among 129 general practices in Merton, Sutton and Wandsworth Family Health Services Authority, London. RESULTS. Practices' annual night visiting rates varied from three per 1000 to 75 per 1000 patients. The percentages of the practice population aged under five years and aged five to 14 years were both positively correlated with night visiting rates (r = 0.38 and r = 0.35, respectively), as were variables associated with social deprivation such as the estimated percentage of the practice population living in one-parent households (r = 0.24) and in households where the head of household was classified as unskilled (r = 0.20). The percentage of the practice population reporting chronic illness was also positively associated with night visiting rates (r = 0.26). The percentages of the practice population aged 35 to 44 years and 45 to 54 years were both negatively associated with night visiting rates (r = -0.34 and r = -0.31, respectively) as was the estimated list inflation for a practice (r = -0.31). There was no significant correlation between night visiting rates and the distance of the main practice surgery from the nearest hospital accident and emergency department. There was also no association between night visiting rates and permission to use a deputizing service. In a stepwise multiple regression model, the multiple correlation coefficient was 0.56 with four factors (percentage of the

  1. Systems and Complexity Thinking in the General Practice Literature: An Integrative, Historical Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Sturmberg, Joachim P.; Martin, Carmel M.; Katerndahl, David A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Over the past 7 decades, theories in the systems and complexity sciences have had a major influence on academic thinking and research. We assessed the impact of complexity science on general practice/family medicine. METHODS We performed a historical integrative review using the following systematic search strategy: medical subject heading [humans] combined in turn with the terms complex adaptive systems, nonlinear dynamics, systems biology, and systems theory, limited to general practice/family medicine and published before December 2010. A total of 16,242 articles were retrieved, of which 49 were published in general practice/family medicine journals. Hand searches and snowballing retrieved another 35. After a full-text review, we included 56 articles dealing specifically with systems sciences and general/family practice. RESULTS General practice/family medicine engaged with the emerging systems and complexity theories in 4 stages. Before 1995, articles tended to explore common phenomenologic general practice/family medicine experiences. Between 1995 and 2000, articles described the complex adaptive nature of this discipline. Those published between 2000 and 2005 focused on describing the system dynamics of medical practice. After 2005, articles increasingly applied the breadth of complex science theories to health care, health care reform, and the future of medicine. CONCLUSIONS This historical review describes the development of general practice/family medicine in relation to complex adaptive systems theories, and shows how systems sciences more accurately reflect the discipline’s philosophy and identity. Analysis suggests that general practice/family medicine first embraced systems theories through conscious reorganization of its boundaries and scope, before applying empirical tools. Future research should concentrate on applying nonlinear dynamics and empirical modeling to patient care, and to organizing and developing local practices, engaging in

  2. Public health practice is not research.

    PubMed

    Otto, Jean Lin; Holodniy, Mark; DeFraites, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Scientific and clinical activities undertaken by public health agencies may be misconstrued as medical research. Most discussions of regulatory and legal oversight of medical research focus on activities involving either patients in clinical practice or volunteers in clinical trials. These discussions often exclude similar activities that constitute or support core functions of public health practice. As a result, public health agencies and practitioners may be held to inappropriate regulatory standards regarding research. Through the lens of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, and using several case studies from these departments, we offer a framework for the adjudication of activities common to research and public health practice that could assist public health practitioners, research oversight authorities, and scientific journals in determining whether such activities require regulatory review and approval as research. PMID:24524499

  3. Public Health Practice Is Not Research

    PubMed Central

    Holodniy, Mark; DeFraites, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Scientific and clinical activities undertaken by public health agencies may be misconstrued as medical research. Most discussions of regulatory and legal oversight of medical research focus on activities involving either patients in clinical practice or volunteers in clinical trials. These discussions often exclude similar activities that constitute or support core functions of public health practice. As a result, public health agencies and practitioners may be held to inappropriate regulatory standards regarding research. Through the lens of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, and using several case studies from these departments, we offer a framework for the adjudication of activities common to research and public health practice that could assist public health practitioners, research oversight authorities, and scientific journals in determining whether such activities require regulatory review and approval as research. PMID:24524499

  4. The research environment in family practice.

    PubMed

    Perkoff, G T

    1985-11-01

    Both the place of family practice in academic medicine and the intellectual underpinning of the specialty itself are thought by many to depend on the development of successful research programs in academic departments of family medicine. Yet many believe less research than desired is being done in such departments, even by faculty trained in research. To gain additional information on this important subject, a survey was conducted of the departmental research experiences of 42 graduates of the several Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Family Practice Academic Fellowship Programs who had had the opportunity for at least one year of faculty experience. The responses indicate that the majority of such graduates spend 20 percent or less of their time in research, that most perceive administrative duties as interfering with research, that a minority have budgeted research time, and few have departmental research funds. Despite these obstacles, those who do research publish with surprising frequency, about one paper per fellow per year. Several ways are presented to improve the research environment in departments of family practice and to lead to even more productive, secure research activities of these and other family practice faculty.

  5. Relationships between the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) and self-reported research practices.

    PubMed

    Crain, A Lauren; Martinson, Brian C; Thrush, Carol R

    2013-09-01

    The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) is a validated tool to facilitate promotion of research integrity and research best practices. This work uses the SORC to assess shared and individual perceptions of the research climate in universities and academic departments and relate these perceptions to desirable and undesirable research practices. An anonymous web- and mail-based survey was administered to randomly selected biomedical and social science faculty and postdoctoral fellows in the United States. Respondents reported their perceptions of the research climates at their universities and primary departments, and the frequency with which they engaged in desirable and undesirable research practices. More positive individual perceptions of the research climate in one's university or department were associated with higher likelihoods of desirable, and lower likelihoods of undesirable, research practices. Shared perceptions of the research climate tended to be similarly predictive of both desirable and undesirable research practices as individuals' deviations from these shared perceptions. Study results supported the central prediction that more positive SORC-measured perceptions of the research climate were associated with more positive reports of research practices. There were differences with respect to whether shared or individual climate perceptions were related to desirable or undesirable practices but the general pattern of results provide empirical evidence that the SORC is predictive of self-reported research behavior.

  6. Children's Emergent Literacy: From Research to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancy, David F., Ed.

    Noting that renaming common folk practices as "emergent literacy" practices legitimizes these unacknowledged ways of learning to read and write, this book highlights the importance of out-of-school literacy experiences and the value of real literature and real writing. It stresses a reciprocal relationship between basic research on the social,…

  7. Bringing Research into Educational Practice: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hille, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Bringing research into educational practice is necessary but does not happen automatically. The Transfercenter for Neuroscience and Learning, at the University of Ulm in Germany, is set up to transfer (neuro)scientific knowledge into educational practice. In doing so we have learned why this does not happen automatically, and have tried to make…

  8. Family-Centered Practices. Research in Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews early education practices that respect families' effects on child development, acknowledges families as decision makers, and supports families' role in educating and caring for children. Discusses three principles for family-centered practice and describes continuing challenges and opportunities suggested in the research findings. Charts…

  9. Career pathways in research: clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Foxcroft, K J

    This article, the first in a five-part series on career pathways, discusses the facility for nurses to develop their clinical expertise to consultant level, which is an exciting development on the career pathway for nurses in clinical practice. The introduction of consultant nurses has re-emphasised the need for experienced leadership in research and practice development in clinical settings.

  10. Turning Contemporary Reading Research into Instructional Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frager, Alan; Hahn, Amos

    1988-01-01

    Highlights contemporary reading research as well as some implied instructional practices in four areas, including direct teacher explanation, reading-writing connection, top-level text structure, and main idea identification. (ARH)

  11. Transition of Research into Medical Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James D.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process of transforming medical research into practical medicine for astronauts and for every day people. Several examples of medical practices that started in space medical research and then were proved useful in other settings: Actigraphy, bone density scanning, the use of Potassium Citrate as a countermeasure used to lessen the risk of kidney stone formation, and ultrasound uses in remote and telemedicine,

  12. Training Research: Practical Recommendations for Maximum Impact

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Koerner, Kelly; Weingardt, Kenneth R.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This review offers practical recommendations regarding research on training in evidence-based practices for mental health and substance abuse treatment. When designing training research, we recommend: (a) aligning with the larger dissemination and implementation literature to consider contextual variables and clearly defining terminology, (b) critically examining the implicit assumptions underlying the stage model of psychotherapy development, (c) incorporating research methods from other disciplines that embrace the principles of formative evaluation and iterative review, and (d) thinking about how technology can be used to take training to scale throughout all stages of a training research project. An example demonstrates the implementation of these recommendations. PMID:21380792

  13. Time to talk, time to see: changing microeconomies of professional practice among nurses and doctors in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christine; Dwan, Kathryn; Pearce, Christopher; Hall, Sally; Porritt, Julie; Yates, Rachel; Sibbald, Bonnie

    2007-08-01

    In Australia, more nurses are entering general practice, and nurses' work is being funded in increasingly complex ways through Medicare. Little research has explored the ways doctors and nurses realign their priorities and activities when working together in general practice. We undertook rapid, intensive multimethod studies of 25 general practices to explore the ways in which the labour of nurses and doctors was structured, and the implicit decisions made by both professions about the values placed on different ways of working and on their time. Data collected included photographs, floor-plans, interviews with 37 nurses, 24 doctors and 22 practice managers, and 50 hours of structured observation. Nursing time was constructed by both nurses and doctors as being fluid and non-contingent; they were regarded as being 'available' to patients in a way that doctors were not. Compared to medical time, nursing time could be disposed more flexibly, underpinning a valorized attribute of nursing: deep clinical and personal contact with patients. The location of practice nurses' desks in areas of traffic, such as administrative stations, or in the treatment room, underpinned this valuable unstructured contact with patients. Changes to the practice nurse role through direct fee-for-service items for nurses may lead to greater congruence between the microeconomies of nursing and medicine in general practice. In a time of pressure upon a primary care workforce, this is likely to lead to more independent clinical work by nurses, but may also lead to a decrease in flexible contact with patients. PMID:18041994

  14. Practical Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy for the General Equine Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kaneps, Andris J

    2016-04-01

    Physical treatment and rehabilitation play major roles in recovery and maintenance of the equine athlete, and many therapeutic measures are accessible by the veterinarian in general practice. An accurate diagnosis of the condition undergoing treatment is a requirement, and measurable parameters obtained at diagnosis allows for quantification of treatment outcomes. Therapeutic modalities accessible to the general practicing veterinarian are reviewed. Mechanisms of action, indications, and treatment protocols of thermal therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, extracorporeal shock wave, and laser are discussed. Manipulative therapies, including stretching and use of core strengthening exercises and equipment, are outlined. PMID:26898959

  15. Socioeconomic determinants of rates of consultation in general practice based on fourth national morbidity survey of general practices.

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Hill, R. A.; Rice, N.; Roland, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To identify the socioeconomic determinants of consultation rates in general practice. DESIGN--Analysis of data from the fourth national morbidity survey of general practices (MSGP4) including sociodemographic details of individual patients and small area statistics from the 1991 census. Multilevel modelling techniques were used to take account of both individual patient data and small area statistics to relate socioeconomic and health status factors directly to a measure of general practitioner workload. RESULTS--Higher rates of consultations were found in patients who were classified as permanently sick, unemployed (especially those who became unemployed during the study year), living in rented accommodation, from the Indian subcontinent, living with a spouse or partner (women only), children living with two parents (girls only), and living in urban areas, especially those living relatively near the practice. When characteristics of individual patients are known and controlled for the role of "indices of deprivation" is considerably reduced. The effect of individual sociodemographic characteristics were shown to vary between different areas. CONCLUSIONS--Demographic and socioeconomic factors can act as powerful predictors of consultation patterns. Though it will always be necessary to retain some local planning discretion, the sets of coefficients estimated for individual level factors, area level characteristics, and for practice groupings may be sufficient to provide an indicative level of demand for general medical services. Although the problems in using socioeconomic data from individual patients would be substantial, these results are relevant to the development of a resource allocation formula for general practice. PMID:8616346

  16. A Practical School Public Relations Research Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in communication technology have created many new tools for school communicators--as well as increasing complexities for their programs. As a result, solid school communication research programs offering practical research insights for planning, tracking, and assessing school communication efforts are more important than ever. Still, many…

  17. Educational Research as a Practical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Wilfred

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a philosophical contribution to recent debates about the assessment of quality in educational research. It shows how criticisms of the quality of educational research--pointing to its failure to meet epistemic criteria of rigour and practical criteria of relevance--are an inevitable manifestation of the flawed assumption that…

  18. Educational Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammersley, Martyn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Combining classic articles that have been key markers in recent debates with new and influential material, this book addresses the problems involved in educational research and the issues surrounding its contribution to policymaking and practice. The authors examine the diverse approaches within qualitative research and address some of the key…

  19. Doing Developmental Research: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striano, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Addressing practical issues rarely covered in methods texts, this user-friendly, jargon-free book helps students and beginning researchers plan infant and child development studies and get them done. The author provides step-by-step guidance for getting involved in a developmental laboratory and crafting effective research questions and proposals.…

  20. Efficiency in mental health practice and research.

    PubMed

    Lagomasino, Isabel T; Zatzick, Douglas F; Chambers, David A

    2010-01-01

    Limited financial resources, escalating mental health-related costs and opportunities for capitalizing on advances in health information technologies have brought the theme of efficiency to the forefront of mental health services research and clinical practice. In this introductory article to the journal series stemming from the 20th NIMH Mental Health Services Research Conference, we first delineate the need for a new focus on efficiency in both research and clinical practice. Second, we provide preliminary definitions of efficiency for the field and discuss issues related to measurement. Finally, we explore the interface between efficiency in mental health services research and practice and the NIMH strategic objectives of developing improved interventions for diverse populations and enhancing the public health impact of research. Case examples illustrate how perspectives from dissemination and implementation research may be used to maximize efficiencies in the development and implementation of new service delivery models. Allowing findings from the dissemination and implementation field to permeate and inform clinical practice and research may facilitate more efficient development of interventions and enhance the public health impact of research.

  1. Questioning behaviour in general practice: a pragmatic study.

    PubMed Central

    Barrie, A. R.; Ward, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the extent to which general practitioners' questioning behaviour in routine practice is likely to encourage the adoption of evidence based medicine. DESIGN: Self recording of questions by doctors during consultations immediately followed by semistructured interview. SETTING: Urban Australian general practice. SUBJECTS: Random sample of 27 general practitioners followed over a half day of consultations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of recording of clinical questions about patients' care which doctors would like answered; frequency with which doctors found answers to their questions. RESULTS: Doctors asked a total of 85 clinical questions, at a rate of 2.4 for every 10 patients seen. They found satisfactory answers to 67 (79%) of these questions. Doctors who worked in small practices (of one or two doctors) had a significantly lower rate of questioning than did those in larger practices (1.6 questions per 10 patients v 3.0 patients, P = 0.049). No other factors were significantly related to rate of questioning. CONCLUSIONS: These results do not support the view that doctors routinely generate a large number of unanswered clinical questions. It may be necessary to promote questioning behaviour in routine practice if evidence based medicine and other forms of self directed learning are to be successfully introduced. PMID:9420495

  2. The Learning Research Cycle: Bridging Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuessy, Carol L.; Metty, Jane S.

    2007-01-01

    A science teacher and her mentor reflect on their participation in the Learning Research Cycle, a professional learning model that bridges research and practice in both university and public school contexts. Teachers do scientific research in scientists' laboratories, then bridge their scientific experiences with the design of new classroom…

  3. Student Guide for Documenting Experiential Learning: General Office Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coastline Community Coll., Fountain Valley, CA.

    Coastline Community College has developed a series of guides to assist adults who wish to obtain college credit or advanced standing in evaluating and verifying their non-college learning experiences. This guide lists the competency requirements of four courses within the General Office Practice program: Filing, Business Correspondence,…

  4. Chemical Aspects of General Anesthesia: Part II. Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunsvold, Robert; Ostercamp, Daryl L.

    2006-01-01

    The basics of balanced general anesthesia developed since 1956 and the update on existing practices of intravenous induction anesthetics and inhalational anesthetics are discussed. Some of the progressive anesthetics discussed are propofol instead of barbiturate such as thiopental or methohexital, inhalational anesthetic halothane,…

  5. A joint course for general practitioner and practice nurse trainers.

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, K J; Lewis, A P

    1990-01-01

    An experimental multidisciplinary course for prospective general practitioner and practice nurse trainers is described. Factual knowledge and attitudes were measured before and after the course and some of the changes measured emphasized the importance of multidisciplinary training. The ideas generated by the group of nurse trainers in terms of their future professional development were identified. PMID:2265007

  6. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 1 - GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is Volume 1 of a three volume series that provides guidance on the selection and design of stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs). This first volume provides general considerations associated with the selection and design of BMPs.
    Volume I provi...

  7. The British Telecom radiopaging service in general practice.

    PubMed

    Cole, F H

    1981-10-01

    This paper reports a new radiopaging service supplied by British Telecom that will eventually cover the whole United Kingdom. The use of this service by a three-man practice is described. The service is considered to be a major development in communications that will be of interest to most general practitioners.

  8. Pure tone audiometry: comparison of general practice and hospital services

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael C.F.; Cable, Hugh R.; Wilmot, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Pure tone audiometry was obtained for both ears of 32 children by a general practitioner using a simple audiometer in his surgery, and by audiometricians in a hospital department on the same day. Comparing the worst hearing threshold at any of the three tested frequencies, the general practitioner did not find any ears to hear more than 10 dB better than the hospital (no false negatives). However, there were six false positives (9%) where the general practitioner identified an apparent hearing loss of greater than 15 dB. It is concluded that pure tone audiometry could be carried out accurately in the practice. PMID:3267745

  9. Barriers to prevocational placement programs in rural general practice.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Alistair W; Tarala, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Despite explicit support of the federal and state health departments, most prevocational trainees do not experience general practice or rural medicine. We have been running a program of prevocational placements of trainees working as rural general practitioners under supervision. From our experience, we have identified various barriers to implementation of such programs. These barriers include: funding issues (trainees are providing federally funded Medicare-rebatable services, while receiving state-funded hospital salaries); conflicts between the placement of trainees outside the hospital when hospitals are undergoing staffing crises; difficulties in coordinating the many organisations (funding bodies, practices, hospitals) involved in providing the placement; and the isolation experienced by trainees when they arrive in rural practice. Funding from a single administration and coordination by a locally appointed rural Director of Clinical Training are essential to overcome these barriers. PMID:12831378

  10. Barriers to prevocational placement programs in rural general practice.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Alistair W; Tarala, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Despite explicit support of the federal and state health departments, most prevocational trainees do not experience general practice or rural medicine. We have been running a program of prevocational placements of trainees working as rural general practitioners under supervision. From our experience, we have identified various barriers to implementation of such programs. These barriers include: funding issues (trainees are providing federally funded Medicare-rebatable services, while receiving state-funded hospital salaries); conflicts between the placement of trainees outside the hospital when hospitals are undergoing staffing crises; difficulties in coordinating the many organisations (funding bodies, practices, hospitals) involved in providing the placement; and the isolation experienced by trainees when they arrive in rural practice. Funding from a single administration and coordination by a locally appointed rural Director of Clinical Training are essential to overcome these barriers.

  11. Patients' assessment of out of hours care in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Bollam, Mary J; McCarthy, Mark; Modell, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A sample of 177 patients drawn from 13 north London practices were interviewed shortly after they had sought help from their practice outside normal surgery hours. Patients were asked to describe the process and outcome of their out of hours call, to comment on specific aspects of the consultation, and to access their overall satisfaction with the encounter. Parents seeking consultations for children were least satisfied with the consultation; those aged over 60 responded most positively. Visits from general practitioners were more acceptable than visits from deputising doctors for patients aged under 60, but for patients aged over 60 visits from general practitioners and deputising doctors were equally acceptable. Monitoring of patients' views of out of hours consultations is feasible, and the findings of this study suggest that practices should regularly review the organisation of their out of hours care and discuss strategies for minimising conflict in out of hours calls—particularly those concerning children. PMID:3130934

  12. Professional Practices in Undergraduate Research Programs.

    PubMed

    Seeling, Joni M; Choudhary, Madhusudan

    2016-05-01

    The undergraduate research experience (URE) is an important avenue within a college trajectory in which students enhance their critical thinking, learn about the scientific process, and develop the knowledge and values that will guide their future scientific and professional careers. Individual institutions, programs, departments, and faculty administer undergraduate research differently, but each should adhere to a common set of guidelines which govern the research mentoring process. Adherence to standard practices will enhance the research experience for both students and mentors. This article examines standards and guidelines for professional practices involving undergraduate research and scholarship, and will discuss lapses and limitations that students and faculty frequently confront. The growth, support, and proper management of undergraduate research programs (URPs) at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) is important for maintaining a talented pool of young scientists, as students benefit greatly from direct interactions with faculty mentors that predominate at PUIs. PMID:27158305

  13. Professional Practices in Undergraduate Research Programs.

    PubMed

    Seeling, Joni M; Choudhary, Madhusudan

    2016-05-01

    The undergraduate research experience (URE) is an important avenue within a college trajectory in which students enhance their critical thinking, learn about the scientific process, and develop the knowledge and values that will guide their future scientific and professional careers. Individual institutions, programs, departments, and faculty administer undergraduate research differently, but each should adhere to a common set of guidelines which govern the research mentoring process. Adherence to standard practices will enhance the research experience for both students and mentors. This article examines standards and guidelines for professional practices involving undergraduate research and scholarship, and will discuss lapses and limitations that students and faculty frequently confront. The growth, support, and proper management of undergraduate research programs (URPs) at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) is important for maintaining a talented pool of young scientists, as students benefit greatly from direct interactions with faculty mentors that predominate at PUIs.

  14. Professional Practices in Undergraduate Research Programs

    PubMed Central

    Seeling, Joni M.; Choudhary, Madhusudan

    2016-01-01

    The undergraduate research experience (URE) is an important avenue within a college trajectory in which students enhance their critical thinking, learn about the scientific process, and develop the knowledge and values that will guide their future scientific and professional careers. Individual institutions, programs, departments, and faculty administer undergraduate research differently, but each should adhere to a common set of guidelines which govern the research mentoring process. Adherence to standard practices will enhance the research experience for both students and mentors. This article examines standards and guidelines for professional practices involving undergraduate research and scholarship, and will discuss lapses and limitations that students and faculty frequently confront. The growth, support, and proper management of undergraduate research programs (URPs) at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) is important for maintaining a talented pool of young scientists, as students benefit greatly from direct interactions with faculty mentors that predominate at PUIs. PMID:27158305

  15. Evidence-Based Practice: A Matrix for Predicting Phonological Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Hulse, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a matrix for clinical use in the selection of phonological treatment targets to induce generalization, and in the identification of probe sounds to monitor during the course of intervention. The matrix appeals to a set of factors that have been shown to promote phonological generalization in the research literature, including…

  16. NASA Research on General Aviation Power Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. L.; Weber, R. J.; Willis, E. A.; Sievers, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Propulsion systems are key factors in the design and performance of general aviation airplanes. NASA research programs that are intended to support improvements in these engines are described. Reciprocating engines are by far the most numerous powerplants in the aviation fleet; near-term efforts are being made to lower their fuel consumption and emissions. Longer-term work includes advanced alternatives, such as rotary and lightweight diesel engines. Work is underway on improved turbofans and turboprops.

  17. Receptionists' experiences of occupational violence in general practice: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Magin, Parker; Joyce, Terry; Adams, Jon; Goode, Susan; Cotter, Georgina

    2009-01-01

    Background The significance of occupational violence in general practice is well established, but research has focused almost exclusively on the experiences of GPs. Only limited research has examined the role of general practice receptionists despite their acknowledged vulnerability to violent patient behaviour. No qualitative research has explored this problem. Aim To explore the experiences of general practice receptionists regarding occupational violence and the effects of violence on their psychological and emotional wellbeing and on their work satisfaction and performance. Design of study Qualitative study. Setting Constituent practices of an Australian network of research general practices. Practices were located in a range of socioeconomic settings. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with practice receptionists. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and subjected to thematic analysis employing a process of constant comparison in which data collection and analysis were cumulative and concurrent. Qualitative written responses from a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study performed concurrently with the qualitative study were similarly analysed. Results Nineteen interviews were conducted and 12 written responses were received. Violence was found to be a common, sometimes pervasive, experience of many receptionists. Verbal abuse, both ‘across the counter’ and telephone abuse, was the most prominent form of violence, although other violence, including assault and threats with guns, was reported. Experiences of violence could have marked emotional and psychological effects and could adversely affect job satisfaction, performance, and commitment. Conclusion It is apparent that occupational violence is a whole-of-practice problem and strategies for GP and staff safety will need to take a whole-of-practice approach. PMID:22751233

  18. Developing Inclusive Practices through Collaborative Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Vassilios S.; Nikolaraizi, Magda A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper highlights the framework and discusses the results of an action research network which aimed to promote academic access in two general educational settings within which a pupil with blindness and a deaf pupil were educated respectively. The persons involved in this collaborative scheme were general teachers, a school counsellor,…

  19. Reframing placebo in research and practice.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Wayne B

    2011-06-27

    The terms 'placebo' and 'placebo effects' cause confusion among patients, practitioners and scientists. This confusion results in both the adoption of practices that have no evidence of specificity yet considerable risk (such as surgery for low back pain) or the elimination of clinical practices proven to facilitate healing because they are not 'better than placebo' (such as acupuncture for low back pain). In this article, I discuss these issues and introduce the concept of optimal healing environment as a framework for disentangling what is useful from placebo research for adopting into clinical practice in a manner that is ethical and evidence-based.

  20. [Research and professional practice in speech therapy].

    PubMed

    Monfort, Isabelle; Monfort, Marc; Juárez-Sánchez, Adoración

    2014-02-24

    The relationship between research and clinical practice is discussed based on the request of this last on new therapeutic perspectives and empirical confirmations of their decisions. Two examples of a clear and justified relation between theoretical research data and the later development of an intervention program illustrate the achievements and disappointments of these relationships. From this analysis, the proposal of evidence-based practice is discussed, the requirements involved and the difficulties in its practical application, especially in the intervention in aspects such as semantics and pragmatics. It finally points out the lack of research on an item that is considered crucial to the effectiveness of therapy: the characteristics and skills of the therapist.

  1. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers. PMID:25746786

  2. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers.

  3. Algorithm linking patients and general practices in Denmark using the Danish National Health Service Register

    PubMed Central

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Vedsted, Peter; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Vestergaard, Mogens; Flarup, Kaare Rud; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Background The patient list system in Denmark assigns virtually all residents to a general practice. Nevertheless, historical information on this link between patient and general practice is not readily available for research purposes. Objectives To develop, implement, and evaluate the performance of an algorithm linking individual patients to their general practice by using information from the Danish National Health Service Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Materials and methods The National Health Service Register contains information on all services provided by general practitioners from 1990 and onward. On the basis of these data and information on migration history and death obtained from the Civil Registration System, we developed an algorithm that allocated patients to a general practice on a monthly basis. We evaluated the performance of the algorithm between 2002 and 2007. During this time period, we had access to information on the link between patients and general practices. Agreement was assessed by the proportion of months for which the algorithm allocated patients to the correct general practice. We also assessed the proportion of all patients in the patient list system for which the algorithm was able to suggest an allocation. Results The overall agreement between algorithm and patient lists was 98.6%. We found slightly higher agreement for women (98.8%) than for men (98.4%) and lower agreement in the age group 18–34 years (97.1%) compared to all other age groups (≥98.6%). The algorithm had assigned 83% of all patients in the patient list system after 1 year of follow-up, 91% after 2 years of follow-up, and peaked at 94% during the fourth year. Conclusion We developed an algorithm that enables valid and nearly complete linkage between patients and general practices. The algorithm performs better in subgroups of patients with high health care needs. The algorithm constitutes a valuable tool for primary health care research. PMID

  4. Clinical nurse specialists driving research and practice through Research Roundtables.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Schafer, Deborah J

    2009-01-01

    Providing patient care based on the best evidence is a priority for healthcare institutions across the country to improve practice and patient outcomes. Creating a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) within an organization can be a challenging task. Literature has identified numerous barriers to EBP including negative attitudes and perceptions among nurses and lack of organizational support, time, resources, and confidence with these skills. Creating programs that help nurses appreciate the value and importance of nursing research for practice can be an effective approach in changing the culture. Research Roundtable is a collaborative partnership between a healthcare system and a baccalaureate nursing program to promote EBP and research skills in nurses and nursing students. Initial goals of the program focused on increasing the nurses' knowledge base of the research process and applying research to actual clinical problems. Over the course of 3 years, Roundtable evolved from development and implementation of research projects to concentrating on the identification of clinical problems that could be analyzed and solved through the use of EBP processes. The program has resulted in the completion of research studies, implementation of practice changes based on evidence uncovered in group work, and the approval of research projects in data collection phases. The positive impacts of Roundtable have been identified at the level of the staff nurse and the organization as a whole. This article describes the role of the clinical nurse specialist in the development and implementation of the Research Roundtable. PMID:19858901

  5. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices,The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, M. A.; Koopmans, M. P.; Kortbeek, L. M.; van Leeuwen, N. J.; Bartelds, A. I.; van Duynhoven, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for gastroenteritis (cases) and an equal number of patients visiting for nongastrointestinal symptoms (controls) were invited to participate in a case-control study. The incidence of gastroenteritis was 79.7 per 10,000 person years. Campylobacter was detected most frequently (10% of cases), followed by Giardia lamblia (5%), rotavirus (5%), Norwalk-like viruses (5%) and Salmonella (4%). Our study found that in the Netherlands (population 15.6 million), an estimated 128,000 persons each year consult their general practitioner for gastroenteritis, slightly less than in a comparable study in 1992 to 1993. A pathogen could be detected in almost 40% of patients (bacteria 16%, viruses 15%, parasites 8%). PMID:11266298

  6. Communications with research participants and communities: foundations for best practices.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Rebecca T

    2004-11-01

    Communities and research participants increasingly feel that they have rights to be equal partners with researchers and to have access to the results of studies to which they have contributed. Concurrently, research sponsors have become aware of legal liabilities, societal repercussions, and credibility impacts of ignoring research communication responsibilities. However, issues related to research communications are rarely discussed at professional meetings or taught in academic programs. As a result, individual investigators may not be clear about their duties to communicate the results of their research. It is important to address this gap between expectations and abilities, because researchers' lack of communication fosters a climate of distrust in science and implies disinterest or disrespect for participants and communities. Ethical, legal, and professional frameworks and practices were reviewed to develop insights about principles, guidelines, and means that can be used to promote best practices. A review of general research guidance and specific requests for proposals revealed sponsors' communication priorities. While there are barriers to research communication, there is an increasing awareness among sponsors and investigators that effective and responsive communication is not a cheap or uniform add-on to a project or proposal. Communications must be tailored to the project considering all potential stakeholders, and resources need to be allocated specifically for communication activities within projects. Researchers, sponsors, professional societies and academia all have opportunities to improve principles, policies, frameworks, guidelines and strategies to foster "best practice" communication of research results.

  7. Researcher Practice: Embedding Creative Practice within Doctoral Research in Industrial Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the potential for a researcher to use their own creative practice as a method of data collection. Much of the published material in this field focuses on more theoretical positions, with limited use being made of specific PhDs that illustrate the context in which practice was undertaken by the researcher. It explores…

  8. Laparoscopic entry: a review of Canadian general surgical practice

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, Christopher; McLeod, Natalie T.; Ternamian, Artin

    2011-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery has gained popularity over open conventional surgery as it offers benefits to both patients and health care practitioners. Although the overall risk of complications during laparoscopic surgery is recognized to be lower than during laparotomy, inadvertent serious complications still occur. Creation of the pneumoperitoneum and placement of laparoscopic ports remain a critical first step during endoscopic surgery. It is estimated that up to 50% of laparoscopic complications are entry-related, and most injury-related litigations are trocar-related. We sought to evaluate the current practice of laparoscopic entry among Canadian general surgeons. Methods We conducted a national survey to identify general surgeon preferences for laparoscopic entry. Specifically, we sought to survey surgeons using the membership database from the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) with regards to entry methods, access instruments, port insertion sites and patient safety profiles. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used as a representative general surgical procedure. Results The survey was completed by 248 of 1000 (24.8%) registered members of CAGS. Respondents included both community and academic surgeons, with and without formal laparoscopic fellowship training. The demographic profile of respondents was consistent nationally. A substantial proportion of general surgeons (> 80%) prefer the open primary entry technique, use the Hasson trocar and cannula and favour the periumbilical port site, irrespective of patient weight or history of peritoneal adhesions. One-third of surgeons surveyed use Veress needle insufflation in their surgical practices. More than 50% of respondents witnessed complications related to primary laparoscopic trocar insertion. Conclusion General surgeons in Canada use the open primary entry technique, with the Hasson trocar and cannula applied periumbilically to establish a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery. This

  9. Are guidelines ethical? Some considerations for general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Wendy A

    2002-01-01

    Guidelines have been promoted in various roles in general practice, e.g. to improve quality of care, to assist patient decision making, and to improve resource allocation. This paper examines these claims using ethical analysis. Guidelines may help general practitioners to act for thegood of their patients and avoid harm; but, on their own, guidelines cannot ensure quality of care or the protection of patients' interests. Patient choice may be limited rather than enhanced by following guideline recommendations. Guidelines contribute to rationing of resources but do not use explicit citeria for this. The ethical implications for guideline use are complex and far-reaching PMID:12171228

  10. Psychological aspects of acute low back pain in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Iain C.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective controlled study of acute low back pain in general practice was carried out. The presence of psychiatric illness was measured by use of the general health questionnaire (GHQ), by clinical assessment, and personality factors by use of the Eysenck personality inventory (EPI). It was found that overall the amount of psychiatric illness did not differ between patients with back pain and their controls at the time of presentation, although there was a higher prevalence of previous psychiatric illness in the back-pain group. The only difference in the personality factors measured was a higher degree of extraversion in the back-pain patients. PMID:6224930

  11. From research to practice: one organisational model for promoting research based practice.

    PubMed

    Kitson, A

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a framework used by the National Institute for Nursing in Oxford to integrate research, development and practice. With the increasing attention given to the topic of how research findings are implemented into clinical practice, it was felt important to share the challenges that have arisen in attempting to combine traditional research activities with more practice based development work. The emerging conceptual framework, structures and functions are described highlighting the variety of partnerships to be established in order to achieve the goal of integrating research into practice. While the underpinning principles of the framework--generating knowledge, implementing research into practice and evaluating the effectiveness of programmes--are not new, it is the way they have been combined within an organisational structure that could be helpful to others considering such a strategy. Both the strengths and weaknesses of the model are discussed, a number of conclusions drawn as to its robustness and consideration given to its replication.

  12. The epidemiology of prescribing in an urban general practice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The total prescribing in an urban general practice was recorded over a six-month period and classified according to the length of time that drugs were continued. The number of patients receiving any prescription rose with age, as did the total number of items per patient prescribed for; while the continued items rose with age, the number of items prescribed once only per patient remained constant in all age groups. The bulk of the total prescribing was for the elderly and this was mainly for continued items. The classification also shows that certain drug groups are liable to be continued whereas others are virtually always prescribed once only. The implications of these findings for self-audit of prescribing and the care of the elderly in general practice are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7452600

  13. General practice--a post-modern specialty?

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, N; Rowland, S

    1997-01-01

    The 'modern' view of the world is based on the premise that we can discover the essential truth of the world using scientific method. The assumption is made that knowledge so acquired has been 'uncontaminated' by the mind of the investigator. Post-modern theory, however, is concerned with the process of knowing and how our minds are part of the process, i.e. our perceptions of reality and the relationships between different concepts are important influences on our ways of knowing. The values of post-modern theory are those of uncertainty, many different voices and experiences of reality and multifaceted descriptions of truth. These values are closer to our experience of general practice than the 'modern' values of scientific rationalism and should be reflected in a new curriculum for general practice. PMID:9167325

  14. Dental therapists in general dental practices: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Heffley, Dennis R; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    Dental access disparities are well documented and have been recognized as a national problem. Their major cause is the lack of reasonable Medicaid reimbursement rates for the underserved. Specifically, Medicaid reimbursement rates for children average 40 percent below market rates. In addition, most state Medicaid programs do not cover adults. To address these issues, advocates of better oral health for the underserved are considering support for a new allied provider--a dental therapist--capable of providing services at a lower cost per service and in low-income and rural areas. Using a standard economic analysis, this study estimated the potential cost, price, utilization, and dentist's income effects of dental therapists employed in general dental practices. The analysis is based on national general dental practice data and the broadest scope of responsibility for dental therapists that their advocates have advanced, including the ability to provide restorations and extractions to adults and children, training for three years, and minimum supervision. Assuming dental therapists provide restorative, extraction, and pulpal services to patients of all ages and dental hygienists continue to deliver all hygiene services, the mean reduction in a general practice costs ranges between 1.57 and 2.36 percent. For dental therapists treating children only, the range is 0.31 to 0.47 percent. The effects on price and utilization are even smaller. In addition, the effects on most dentists' gross income, hours of work, and net income are negative. The estimated economic impact of dental therapists in the United States on private dental practice is very limited; therefore, the demand for dental therapists by private practices also would probably be very limited.

  15. Participatory design of a preliminary safety checklist for general practice

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Paul; Ferguson, Julie; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; de Wet, Carl; McNab, Duncan; Kelly, Moya; McKay, John; Atkinson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of checklists to minimise errors is well established in high reliability, safety-critical industries. In health care there is growing interest in checklists to standardise checking processes and ensure task completion, and so provide further systemic defences against error and patient harm. However, in UK general practice there is limited experience of safety checklist use. Aim To identify workplace hazards that impact on safety, health and wellbeing, and performance, and codesign a standardised checklist process. Design and setting Application of mixed methods to identify system hazards in Scottish general practices and develop a safety checklist based on human factors design principles. Method A multiprofessional ‘expert’ group (n = 7) and experienced front-line GPs, nurses, and practice managers (n = 18) identified system hazards and developed and validated a preliminary checklist using a combination of literature review, documentation review, consensus building workshops using a mini-Delphi process, and completion of content validity index exercise. Results A prototype safety checklist was developed and validated consisting of six safety domains (for example, medicines management), 22 sub-categories (for example, emergency drug supplies) and 78 related items (for example, stock balancing, secure drug storage, and cold chain temperature recording). Conclusion Hazards in the general practice work system were prioritised that can potentially impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of patients, GP team members, and practice performance, and a necessary safety checklist prototype was designed. However, checklist efficacy in improving safety processes and outcomes is dependent on user commitment, and support from leaders and promotional champions. Although further usability development and testing is necessary, the concept should be of interest in the UK and internationally. PMID:25918338

  16. Irish general practice study of acetylcysteine (Fabrol) in chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, A B; Bridgman, K M; Huitson, A

    1984-01-01

    The results of this general practice study in 248 patients suggest that acetylcysteine (Fabrol) administered orally for 2 months to patients with chronic bronchitis effectively changes the viscosity and character of sputum with resultant ease of expectoration and cough severity. There was a notable improvement in associated abnormal physical signs such as the presence of rhonchi, crepitations and symptoms including dyspnoea at rest. Tolerability was good, with 77% of patients experiencing no side-effects.

  17. Over-the-counter drugs and prescribing in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, D L; Whynes, D K

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both the government and the pharmaceutical industry are interested in increasing the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. The reaction on the part of general practitioners is more circumspect. AIM: To investigate whether fundholding or dispensing status and patient exemption from, or prepayment of prescription charges influence the behaviour of general practitioners with respect to prescribing preparations otherwise available OTC. METHOD: Regression analysis of data for all 105 Lincolnshire practices for the fiscal year 1993-94, using the number of items prescribed by the practice that were also available OTC as the outcome variable. Comparison of Audit Commission Thematic Analysis of Prescribing (ACTAP) data for fundholders' and non-fundholders' OTC prescribing in the same year. RESULTS: The prescription of medicines otherwise available OTC is less likely when the practice is fundholding and more likely when the practice has dispensing status. Prescription of such medicines also increases as the proportion of patients exempt from, or having prepaid prescription charges increases. PMID:9196964

  18. Cultural Reflexivity in Health Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This “misrecognition,” which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice. PMID:25905833

  19. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    PubMed

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  20. Making Connections between Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew; McMaken, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening connections between research and practice is an important goal in education. Making the connection has both a supply side and a demand side but the demand is often ignored in education. The authors offer six hypotheses about why this situation occurs.

  1. Just in Time Research: Privacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grama, Joanna Lyn

    2014-01-01

    The January 2014 edition of the ECAR Update subscriber newsletter included an informal poll on information privacy practices. The poll was intended to collect a quick snapshot of the higher education community's thoughts on this important topic during Data Privacy Month. Results of the poll will be used to inform EDUCAUSE research, programs,…

  2. Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M., Ed.; Schafer, William D., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of articles 1 through 14 of volume 6 of "Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation": (1) "Seven Myths about Literacy in the United States" (Jeff McQuillan); (2) "Implementing Performance Assessment in the Classroom" (Amy Brualdi); (3) "Some Evaluation Questions" (William Shadish); (4) "Item Banking" (Lawrence Rudner); (5)…

  3. Leadership Practices and School Choice. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cravens, Xiu; Goldring, Ellen; Penaloza, Roberto V.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a larger study on school choice, researchers at the National Center on School Choice examined variation in leadership practices across school types, relying on a convenience matched sample of schools that included charter, magnet, private, and traditional public schools. A total of 284 schools agreed to participate in the study--116…

  4. Kindergarten Education: Theory, Research, and Practice, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Violet B., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two 2000 issues of a biannually-published journal featuring research studies, theoretical essays, and classroom practice articles about the development and education of kindergarten children as well as occasional articles concerning preschool and the early primary grades. The spring 2000 issue contains the…

  5. The Gap between Research and Practice Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korthagen, Fred A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, teachers--but also parents and politicians--voice dissatisfaction with the divide they experience between research and practice and the resulting minimal impact of teacher education (Ashton, 1996; Barone, Berliner, Blanchard, Casanova, & McGowan, 1996). The problem seems to be perennial. More than a century ago, John Dewey pointed…

  6. Contemporary Play Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Charles E., Ed.; Gerard Kaduson, Heidi, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This highly practical book presents current developments in play therapy, including innovative applications for particular problems and populations. Contributors first discuss the latest ideas and techniques emerging from object-relations, experiential, dynamic, and narrative perspectives. Next, research evaluating the effectiveness of play…

  7. Readings in Reading: Practice, Theory, Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G., Ed.; Torgerson, Theodore L., Ed.

    Designed to give teachers, specialists, and students insight into the historical development of trends, theory, research, and current practices in reading instruction, 82 selections written over a period of nearly 150 years have been compiled from books, monographs, pamphlets, yearbooks, conference proceedings, and education periodicals. The…

  8. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M., Ed.; Schafer, William D., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of papers published in the electronic journal "Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation" during 2000-2001: (1) "Advantages of Hierarchical Linear Modeling" (Jason W. Osborne); (2) "Prediction in Multiple Regression" (Jason W. Osborne); (3) Scoring Rubrics: What, When, and How?" (Barbara M. Moskal); (4) "Organizational…

  9. Practical Engagements and Co-Created Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jennifer Lyn; Seibold, David R.

    2008-01-01

    In this essay we foreground the value of engaging meaningfully with practitioners in our work. We review research by scholars whose work cuts across topics and contexts to gain insight into the power and practice of human communication as it shapes the world in which we live-highlighting work that is at its best because of its co-creation with…

  10. Medical ethics research between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    ten Have, H A; Lelie, A

    1998-06-01

    The main object of criticism of present-day medical ethics is the standard view of the relationship between theory and practice. Medical ethics is more than the application of moral theories and principles, and health care is more than the domain of application of moral theories. Moral theories and principles are necessarily abstract, and therefore fail to take account of the sometimes idiosyncratic reality of clinical work and the actual experiences of practitioners. Suggestions to remedy the illness of contemporary medical ethics focus on re-establishing the connection between the internal and external morality of medicine. This article discusses the question how to develop a theoretical perspective on medical ethical issues that connects philosophical reflection with the everyday realities of medical practice. Four steps in a comprehensive approach of medical ethics research are distinguished: (1) examine health care contexts in order to obtain a better understanding of the internal morality of these practices; this requires empirical research; (2) analyze and interpret the external morality governing health care practices; sociological study of prevalent values, norms, and attitudes concerning medical-ethical issues is required; (3) creation of new theoretical perspectives on health care practices; Jensen's theory of healthcare practices will be useful here; (4) develop a new conception of bioethics that illuminates and clarifies the complex interaction between the internal and external morality of health care practices. Hermeneutical ethics can be helpful for integrating the experiences disclosed in the empirical ethical studies, as well as utilizing the insights gained from describing the value-contexts of health care practices. For a critical and normative perspective, hermeneutical ethics has to examine and explain the moral experiences uncovered, in order to understand what they tell us. PMID:9691788

  11. Medical ethics research between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    ten Have, H A; Lelie, A

    1998-06-01

    The main object of criticism of present-day medical ethics is the standard view of the relationship between theory and practice. Medical ethics is more than the application of moral theories and principles, and health care is more than the domain of application of moral theories. Moral theories and principles are necessarily abstract, and therefore fail to take account of the sometimes idiosyncratic reality of clinical work and the actual experiences of practitioners. Suggestions to remedy the illness of contemporary medical ethics focus on re-establishing the connection between the internal and external morality of medicine. This article discusses the question how to develop a theoretical perspective on medical ethical issues that connects philosophical reflection with the everyday realities of medical practice. Four steps in a comprehensive approach of medical ethics research are distinguished: (1) examine health care contexts in order to obtain a better understanding of the internal morality of these practices; this requires empirical research; (2) analyze and interpret the external morality governing health care practices; sociological study of prevalent values, norms, and attitudes concerning medical-ethical issues is required; (3) creation of new theoretical perspectives on health care practices; Jensen's theory of healthcare practices will be useful here; (4) develop a new conception of bioethics that illuminates and clarifies the complex interaction between the internal and external morality of health care practices. Hermeneutical ethics can be helpful for integrating the experiences disclosed in the empirical ethical studies, as well as utilizing the insights gained from describing the value-contexts of health care practices. For a critical and normative perspective, hermeneutical ethics has to examine and explain the moral experiences uncovered, in order to understand what they tell us.

  12. An ethnographic exploration of influences on prescribing in general practice: why is there variation in prescribing practices?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribing is a core activity for general practitioners, yet significant variation in the quality of prescribing has been reported. This suggests there may be room for improvement in the application of the current best research evidence. There has been substantial investment in technologies and interventions to address this issue, but effect sizes so far have been small to moderate. This suggests that prescribing is a decision-making process that is not sufficiently understood. By understanding more about prescribing processes and the implementation of research evidence, variation may more easily be understood and more effective interventions proposed. Methods An ethnographic study in three Scottish general practices with diverse organizational characteristics. Practices were ranked by their performance against Audit Scotland prescribing quality indicators, incorporating established best research evidence. Two practices of high prescribing quality and one practice of low prescribing quality were recruited. Participant observation, formal and informal interviews, and a review of practice documentation were employed. Results Practices ranked as high prescribing quality consistently made and applied macro and micro prescribing decisions, whereas the low-ranking practice only made micro prescribing decisions. Macro prescribing decisions were collective, policy decisions made considering research evidence in light of the average patient, one disease, condition, or drug. Micro prescribing decisions were made in consultation with the patient considering their views, preferences, circumstances and other conditions (if necessary). Although micro prescribing can operate independently, the implementation of evidence-based, quality prescribing was attributable to an interdependent relationship. Macro prescribing policy enabled prescribing decisions to be based on scientific evidence and applied consistently where possible. Ultimately, this influenced prescribing

  13. Do quality indicators for general practice teaching practices predict good outcomes for students?

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Maggie; Potts, Jessica; McKinley, Bob

    2016-07-01

    Keele medical students spend 113 days in general practices over our five-year programme. We collect practice data thought to indicate good quality teaching. We explored the relationships between these data and two outcomes for students; Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores and feedback regarding the placements. Though both are surrogate markers of good teaching, they are widely used. We collated practice and outcome data for one academic year. Two separate statistical analyses were carried out: (1) to determine how much of the variation seen in the OSCE scores was due to the effect of the practice and how much to the individual student. (2) to identify practice characteristics with a relationship to student feedback scores. (1) OSCE performance: 268 students in 90 practices: six quality indicators independently influenced the OSCE score, though without linear relationships and not to statistical significance. (2) Student satisfaction: 144 students in 69 practices: student feedback scores are not influenced by practice characteristics. The relationships between the quality indicators we collect for practices and outcomes for students are not clear. It may be that neither the quality indicators nor the outcome measures are reliable enough to inform decisions about practices' suitability for teaching. PMID:27117344

  14. Practice nurse involvement in general practice clinical care: policy and funding issues need resolution.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Karnon, Jonathan; Beilby, Justin; Gray, Jodi; Holton, Christine; Banham, David

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, primary care-based funding initiatives have been implemented to encourage general practices to employ practice nurses. The aim of this paper is to discuss limitations of the current funding and policy arrangements in enhancing the clinical role of practice nurses in the management of chronic conditions. This paper draws on the results of a real-world economic evaluation, the Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP). The PCSIP linked routinely collected clinical and resource use data to undertake a risk-adjusted cost-effectiveness analysis of increased practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of diabetes and obesity. The findings of the PCSIP suggested that the active involvement of practice nurses in collaborative clinical-based activities is cost-effective, as well as addressing general practice workforce issues. Although primary healthcare organisations (e.g. Medicare Locals) can play a key role in supporting enhanced practice nurse roles, improvements to practice nurse funding models could further encourage more efficient use of an important resource. PMID:24870661

  15. Becoming willing to role model. Reciprocity between new graduate nurses and experienced practice nurses in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Hoarea, Karen J; Millsc, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Graduate nurses in general practice became a feature of New Zealand's health care system in 2008 following an expansion of the New Entrant to Practice Programme. General practice in New Zealand comprises general practitioner business owners who employ nursing and administration staff. Practice nurses are an ageing workforce in New Zealand, it is imperative therefore to attract younger nurses into general practice. This paper reports a section of the findings from a constructivist grounded theory study which examines the use of information by practice nurses in New Zealand. Initially data were collected using the ethnographic technique of observation and field notations in one general practice. Theoretical sensitivity to the value of role models was heightened by this first phase of data collection. A total of eleven practice nurses were interviewed from six general practices. One practice nurse agreed to a second interview; five of the interviewees were new graduate nurses and the other six were experienced practice nurses. The grounded theory constructed from this research was reciprocal role modelling which comprises the following three categories, becoming willing, realising potential and becoming a better practitioner. Graduate nurses and experienced practice nurses enter into a relationship of reciprocal role modelling. Becoming willing, the first core category of this grounded theory features three sub-categories: building respectful relationships, proving yourself and discerning decision making which are reported in this paper. Findings from this study may address the reported phenomenon of 'transition shock' of newly graduated nurses in the work place.

  16. Becoming willing to role model. Reciprocity between new graduate nurses and experienced practice nurses in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Hoarea, Karen J; Millsc, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Graduate nurses in general practice became a feature of New Zealand's health care system in 2008 following an expansion of the New Entrant to Practice Programme. General practice in New Zealand comprises general practitioner business owners who employ nursing and administration staff. Practice nurses are an ageing workforce in New Zealand, it is imperative therefore to attract younger nurses into general practice. This paper reports a section of the findings from a constructivist grounded theory study which examines the use of information by practice nurses in New Zealand. Initially data were collected using the ethnographic technique of observation and field notations in one general practice. Theoretical sensitivity to the value of role models was heightened by this first phase of data collection. A total of eleven practice nurses were interviewed from six general practices. One practice nurse agreed to a second interview; five of the interviewees were new graduate nurses and the other six were experienced practice nurses. The grounded theory constructed from this research was reciprocal role modelling which comprises the following three categories, becoming willing, realising potential and becoming a better practitioner. Graduate nurses and experienced practice nurses enter into a relationship of reciprocal role modelling. Becoming willing, the first core category of this grounded theory features three sub-categories: building respectful relationships, proving yourself and discerning decision making which are reported in this paper. Findings from this study may address the reported phenomenon of 'transition shock' of newly graduated nurses in the work place. PMID:23898596

  17. Data Resource Profile: Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)

    PubMed Central

    Herrett, Emily; Gallagher, Arlene M; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Forbes, Harriet; Mathur, Rohini; van Staa, Tjeerd; Smeeth, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) is an ongoing primary care database of anonymised medical records from general practitioners, with coverage of over 11.3 million patients from 674 practices in the UK. With 4.4 million active (alive, currently registered) patients meeting quality criteria, approximately 6.9% of the UK population are included and patients are broadly representative of the UK general population in terms of age, sex and ethnicity. General practitioners are the gatekeepers of primary care and specialist referrals in the UK. The CPRD primary care database is therefore a rich source of health data for research, including data on demographics, symptoms, tests, diagnoses, therapies, health-related behaviours and referrals to secondary care. For over half of patients, linkage with datasets from secondary care, disease-specific cohorts and mortality records enhance the range of data available for research. The CPRD is very widely used internationally for epidemiological research and has been used to produce over 1000 research studies, published in peer-reviewed journals across a broad range of health outcomes. However, researchers must be aware of the complexity of routinely collected electronic health records, including ways to manage variable completeness, misclassification and development of disease definitions for research. PMID:26050254

  18. Editorial: A Note on Good Research Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-07-01

    Good scientific practice and research misconduct have been concerns of mine for more than a decade (Dooley and Kerch, 2000) and in my role as an editor of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, I feel it is time to speak up and at the very least share my concerns and suggestions as they relate to the integrity of the research published in this journal. Rather than wait to write an editorial on good research practices in response to a major incident, I thought it might be best to be proactive and address some of the trends we see in submissions to this peer reviewed journal and to offer some suggestions for improvement improving the level of scholarship in some – but by no means all – of the papers submitted.

  19. The general practice formulary — its role in rational therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Philip E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a project in which a voluntary preferred prescribing list (general practice formulary), analogous to those already in use in some hospitals, was created, implemented and monitored. Cooperation between a pharmacist with knowledge of drug information, access to specialist advice and back-up in the form of evaluated information from drug information centres and a group of five general practitioners and their trainees was necessary. The formulary was well accepted with between 68.2% and 89.6% compliance in therapeutic classes corresponding to the recent National Health Service restricted groups. This method enhances the critical appraisal of prescribing rationale, takes into account the needs of doctors and patients, and reduces costs. Such work highlights the value and scope of interdisciplinary liaison between pharmacists, general practitioners and clinical pharmacologists and it could prove beneficial on a national scale. PMID:4093901

  20. Role of research in best practices.

    PubMed

    Revell, Maria A

    2015-03-01

    Evidence based care (EBP) is imperative to the promotion of best practices. EBP forms the foundation for safe, efficient, and cost-effective patient management. It gives nurses the ability to implement care activities with proved outcomes and validate interventions from a database of sources. EBP not only has an impact on nursing practice but also affects theoretic models and care frameworks. It forms a foundation for professional care activities that use grounded protocols and guidelines and nursing education. This article includes resources to promote continued use of research evidence to guide in patient care areas. PMID:25680484

  1. Ad hoc supervision of general practice registrars as a 'community of practice': analysis, interpretation and re-presentation.

    PubMed

    Clement, T; Brown, J; Morrison, J; Nestel, D

    2016-05-01

    General practice registrars in Australia undertake most of their vocational training in accredited general practices. They typically see patients alone from the start of their community-based training and are expected to seek timely ad hoc support from their supervisor. Such ad hoc encounters are a mechanism for ensuring patient safety, but also provide an opportunity for learning and teaching. Wenger's (Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, New York, 1998) social theory of learning ('communities of practice') guided a secondary analysis of audio-recordings of ad hoc encounters. Data from one encounter is re-presented as an extended sequence to maintain congruence with the theoretical perspective and enhance vicariousness. An interpretive commentary communicates key features of Wenger's theory and highlights the researchers' interpretations. We argue that one encounter can reveal universal understandings of clinical supervision and that the process of naturalistic generalisation allows readers to transfer others' experiences to their own contexts. The paper raises significant analytic, interpretive, and representational issues. We highlight that report writing is an important, but infrequently discussed, part of research design. We discuss the challenges of supporting the learning and teaching that arises from adopting a socio-cultural lens and argue that such a perspective importantly captures the complex range of issues that work-based practitioners have to grapple with. This offers a challenge to how we research and seek to influence work-based learning and teaching in health care settings.

  2. Implementation of a clinical workstation for general practice.

    PubMed

    Lovell, N H; Celler, B G

    1995-01-01

    It is now well recognized that achieving international best practice in the primary health sector will require the development of methods based on a fundamental integration of communications and information technologies with clinical practice. This will have far reaching effects, both on the pattern of medical practice and domiciliary care and on patient outcomes. In the past, information and communications technology has been presented as a tool for management, rather than as a tool for supporting, improving, and making more efficient the professional practice of medicine and the delivery of health care to the patient and the community. In this paper, we propose that an essential element for the achievement of international best practice in the health sector is the development and widespread use of information, measurement, and communications technology targeted towards the clinical practice of medicine, the provision of health services and domiciliary care in the community, and the analysis of morbidity patterns and health care outcomes. A key element of this strategy is the development of an integrated Clinical Workstation specifically designed for the general practitioner, practice nurses, and domiciliary care nurses in their professional tasks of measurement, diagnosis, management, and delivery of health care to the community. We will present our work on the design of an integrated Clinical Workstation for Primary Health Care. The Workstation is Windows based, has a sophisticated user interface, and supports a wide range of computing platforms, from desktop to laptop to hand-held notebook computers. The Workstation will be modular and expandable, both in its software and hardware components, so that users may select only those modules appropriate to their own roles, clinical practice, and levels of expertise. The design will focus on the provision of clinical services and will integrate the following key components: Patient records and basic practice

  3. Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methologies for World Language Teachers. Research in Second Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzer, David, Ed.; Petron, Mary, Ed.; Luke, Christopher, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methodologies for World Language Educators" is an edited volume that focuses on innovative, nontraditional methods of teaching and learning world languages. Using teacher-research projects, each author in the volume guides readers through their own personal journey and…

  4. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format

    PubMed Central

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. Methods First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. Results CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Conclusions Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. PMID:26850504

  5. [Quality of dental radiographs. A sample from 52 general practices].

    PubMed

    Mol, A; Hack, B; van Aken, J; van Straaten, F J; van Foreest, J D

    1989-12-01

    To assess the quality of dental radiographs in general practice, 1000 radiographs in 52 practices were collected and evaluated. The radiographs were judged by two examiners using standard series of X-ray film, showing different degrees of the nine different types of errors studied. Furthermore, the diagnostic quality was assessed; if the diagnostic value was poor, the cause was registered. Only 3.1% of the investigated radiographs met all the criteria, and the quality of 13.4% was found to be poor. The main causes were filmpositioning, density and errors in the category 'residual'. It also appeared that a combination of errors in one radiograph, which were individually not very serious, resulted in an unacceptable radiograph.

  6. The climate change challenge for general practice in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Rochelle; Randerson, Rebecca; Blashki, Grant

    2011-04-29

    Climate change is one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. Despite some inherent uncertainties in making predictions about climate change, there is wide scientific consensus that global warming is occurring; that it is largely due to manmade greenhouse gas emissions; and that it will have substantial health implications for the future. The predicted health impacts of climate change are now clearer for New Zealand, and general practitioners can take action to mitigate these impacts and adapt to the future environment. Actions required involve a combination of 'top-down' and 'ground-up' approaches; effective leadership and policy from our health institutions and, importantly, individual practice initiatives that transform these goals into practical outcomes.

  7. Data management practices for collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Charles P; Burchinal, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The success of research in the field of maternal-infant health, or in any scientific field, relies on the adoption of best practices for data and knowledge management. Prior work by our group and others has identified evidence-based solutions to many of the data management challenges that exist, including cost-effective practices for ensuring high-quality data entry and proper construction and maintenance of data standards and ontologies. Quality assurance practices for data entry and processing are necessary to ensure that data are not denigrated during processing, but the use of these practices has not been widely adopted in the fields of psychology and biology. Furthermore, collaborative research is becoming more common. Collaborative research often involves multiple laboratories, different scientific disciplines, numerous data sources, large data sets, and data sets from public and commercial sources. These factors present new challenges for data and knowledge management. Data security and privacy concerns are increased as data may be accessed by investigators affiliated with different institutions. Collaborative groups must address the challenges associated with federating data access between the data-collecting sites and a centralized data management site. The merging of ontologies between different data sets can become formidable, especially in fields with evolving ontologies. The increased use of automated data acquisition can yield more data, but it can also increase the risk of introducing error or systematic biases into data. In addition, the integration of data collected from different assay types often requires the development of new tools to analyze the data. All of these challenges act to increase the costs and time spent on data management for a given project, and they increase the likelihood of decreasing the quality of the data. In this paper, we review these issues and discuss theoretical and practical approaches for addressing these issues.

  8. Data Management Practices for Collaborative Research

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Charles P.; Burchinal, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The success of research in the field of maternal–infant health, or in any scientific field, relies on the adoption of best practices for data and knowledge management. Prior work by our group and others has identified evidence-based solutions to many of the data management challenges that exist, including cost–effective practices for ensuring high-quality data entry and proper construction and maintenance of data standards and ontologies. Quality assurance practices for data entry and processing are necessary to ensure that data are not denigrated during processing, but the use of these practices has not been widely adopted in the fields of psychology and biology. Furthermore, collaborative research is becoming more common. Collaborative research often involves multiple laboratories, different scientific disciplines, numerous data sources, large data sets, and data sets from public and commercial sources. These factors present new challenges for data and knowledge management. Data security and privacy concerns are increased as data may be accessed by investigators affiliated with different institutions. Collaborative groups must address the challenges associated with federating data access between the data-collecting sites and a centralized data management site. The merging of ontologies between different data sets can become formidable, especially in fields with evolving ontologies. The increased use of automated data acquisition can yield more data, but it can also increase the risk of introducing error or systematic biases into data. In addition, the integration of data collected from different assay types often requires the development of new tools to analyze the data. All of these challenges act to increase the costs and time spent on data management for a given project, and they increase the likelihood of decreasing the quality of the data. In this paper, we review these issues and discuss theoretical and practical approaches for addressing these issues

  9. Study of general practice consultations and menopausal problems. Oxford General Practitioners Menopause Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, D H; Brockie, J A; Rees, C M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the nature of work related to the menopause in general practice. DESIGN--Questionnaire study over six months among general practitioners after each consultation with a woman aged 40-69 at which issues related to the climacteric had been discussed. SETTING--9 General practices in the Oxford area. SUBJECTS--416 Women who had 572 consultations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Age, menopausal state, and first or subsequent consultation. Symptoms were classified together with the treatment and the outcome of the consultation. RESULTS--The consultation rate varied greatly between practices, the overall rate being 4.4%. There were many premenopausal women and women in their 60s presenting; women with hysterectomies presented more often--36% (37/103) of women with hysterectomies had more than one consultation compared with 26% (38/144) for premenopausal women and 24% (38/155) for postmenopausal women. 409 women had symptoms and 218 were prescribed oestrogen treatment. 156 of the consultations involved discussion and advice only. Only four women were referred to a local specialist clinic. CONCLUSION--There is a low overall use of hormone replacement therapy in the general postmenopausal population despite the recent media coverage of its benefits in the prevention of osteoporosis and subsequent fractures. PMID:1998795

  10. Instructional Simulation Integrates Research, Education, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Thomas A; Mapes, Sheryl A; Henley, Omolara; Lindsey, Jeanene; Dillard, Della

    2016-01-01

    Instructional simulation is widely used in clinical education. Examples include the use of inanimate models meant to imitate humans, standardized patients who are actors portraying patients with certain conditions, and role-play where learners experience the disease through props and circumstances. These modalities are briefly described, and then case examples are provided of simulation curricula in use that integrate research findings and clinical practice expertise to guide development and implementation steps. The cases illustrate how formative and summative feedback from two legs of the "three-legged stool" can be potent integrating forces in development of simulation curricula. In these examples, the educational outputs benefit from purposeful inclusion of research and practice inputs. Costs are outlined for instructor and learner time commitments, space considerations, and expendables. The authors' data and experience suggest that instructional simulation that is supported by a solid scientific base and clinical expertise is appreciated by teachers and learners.

  11. Instructional Simulation Integrates Research, Education, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Thomas A; Mapes, Sheryl A; Henley, Omolara; Lindsey, Jeanene; Dillard, Della

    2016-01-01

    Instructional simulation is widely used in clinical education. Examples include the use of inanimate models meant to imitate humans, standardized patients who are actors portraying patients with certain conditions, and role-play where learners experience the disease through props and circumstances. These modalities are briefly described, and then case examples are provided of simulation curricula in use that integrate research findings and clinical practice expertise to guide development and implementation steps. The cases illustrate how formative and summative feedback from two legs of the "three-legged stool" can be potent integrating forces in development of simulation curricula. In these examples, the educational outputs benefit from purposeful inclusion of research and practice inputs. Costs are outlined for instructor and learner time commitments, space considerations, and expendables. The authors' data and experience suggest that instructional simulation that is supported by a solid scientific base and clinical expertise is appreciated by teachers and learners. PMID:26106812

  12. Musculoskeletal clinic in general practice: study of one year's referrals.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D; Davies, P; Pietroni, P

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. A musculoskeletal clinic, staffed by a general practitioner trained in osteopathy, medical acupuncture and intralesional injections, was set up in an inner London general practice in 1987. AIM. A retrospective study was undertaken of one year's referrals to the clinic in 1989-90 to determine how general practitioners were using the clinic in terms of problems referred; consultation patterns of patients attending the clinic and 12 months after initially being seen; and how access to the clinic influenced referrals to relevant hospital departments. METHOD. Day sheets were studied which recorded information on demographic characteristics of patients referred to the clinic and their problems, diagnoses made, duration of symptoms, number and range of treatments given, and recurrence of problems. Use of secondary referral sources was also examined. RESULTS. During the study year 154 of 3264 practice patients were referred to the musculoskeletal clinic, and attended a mean of 3.5 times each. Of all the attenders 64% were women and 52% were 30-54 years old. Eighty one patients (53%) presented with neck, back or sciatic pain. A specific traumatic, inflammatory or other pathological process could be ascribed to only 19% of patients. Regarding treatment, 88% of patients received osteopathic manual treatment or acupuncture, or a combination of these treatments and 4% received intralesional injections. Nine patients from the clinic (6%) were referred to an orthopaedic specialist during the year, two with acute back pain. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists by the practice as a whole were not significantly lower than the national average, although the practice made fewer referrals to physiotherapy and rheumatology departments than national figures would have predicted. Seventeen patients (11%) returned to the clinic with a recurrence of their main complaint within a year of their initial appointment; second courses of treatment were usually brief. CONCLUSION. The

  13. Computer based learning in general practice--options and implementation.

    PubMed

    Mills, K A; McGlade, K

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the 30 departments of general practice in the UK revealed that only three are currently making use of any form of computer based learning materials for teaching their undergraduate students. One of the reasons for the low level of usage is likely to be the relatively poor availability of suitable courseware and lack of guidance as to how to utilise what is available. This short paper describes the types of courseware that are available and the advantages and disadvantages of using acquired courseware as opposed to writing your own. It also considers alternative strategies for making computer based learning (CBL) courseware available to students. PMID:1608334

  14. Emotional disturbance in newly registered general practice patients.

    PubMed

    Corser, C M; Philip, A E

    1978-02-01

    The General Health Questionnaire has had some popularity as an index of minor psychiatric morbidity and was used in the present study to ascertain the emotional state of newcomers to a practice in a new town. High scorers on the GHQ had more episodes of illness, had more severe ratings of psychological problems, and were more likely to receive a formal psychiatric diagnosis than were low scorers. A second survey one year later confirmed the variability of response to the GHQ inherent in a 'present state' inventory. Doubts are expressed as to the psychiatric nature of the emotional upset measured by the GHQ.

  15. [Cannabis use: what to do in general practice?].

    PubMed

    Benard, Victoire; Rolland, Benjamin; Messaadi, Nassir; Petit, Aymeric; Cottencin, Olivier; Karila, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use is now more frequent than alcohol drinking or tobacco smoking among young people (15-34years), whereas it may induce numerous medical aftermaths. Identifying and assessing cannabis use in general practice have become a current public health issue. The two steps of screening consist in spotting risky use of cannabis, and then in checking criteria for cannabis use disorder (CUD). Risky use requires a "brief intervention" by the general practitioner (GP). In case of CUD, the new DSM-5 criteria allow measuring the severity of the subsequent disorder, and listing the medical and social consequences. Using these criteria can help the GP to decide when the patient should be referred to an addiction-specialized unit. The GP has also to spot the different physical and psychiatric complications of cannabis use, in order to coordinate care between the different specialists.

  16. Drug treatment of psychiatric patients in general practice.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, P

    1978-10-01

    The prescribing of psychotropic drugs by general practitioners was assessed by analysing the drug treatment of all patients referred from general practice to a psychiatric outpatient clinic over four years. Of the 287 patients, 220 were taking one or more of 56 different psychotropic drugs at referral, diazepam being the most common. Benzodiazepines and barbiturates had been taken for significantly longer than other drugs, and, of a total of 342 drugs, 61 had been prescribed regularly for over a year. Half of the drugs were considered to be incorrectly prescribed on pharmacological grounds, the main errors being unnecessarily prolonged regular treatment, incorrect dosage (particularly common with antidepressants), and polypharmacy with drugs of similar pharmacological action. A basic grounding in the pharmacology of psychotropic drugs might help practitioners to avoid prescribing errors of this kind.

  17. Medical education practice-based research networks: Facilitating collaborative research

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alan; Young, Robin; Hicks, Patricia J.; APPD LEARN, For

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Research networks formalize and institutionalize multi-site collaborations by establishing an infrastructure that enables network members to participate in research, propose new studies, and exploit study data to move the field forward. Although practice-based clinical research networks are now widespread, medical education research networks are rapidly emerging. Aims: In this article, we offer a definition of the medical education practice-based research network, a brief description of networks in existence in July 2014 and their features, and a more detailed case study of the emergence and early growth of one such network, the Association of Pediatric Program Directors Longitudinal Educational Assessment Research Network (APPD LEARN). Methods: We searched for extant networks through peer-reviewed literature and the world-wide web. Results: We identified 15 research networks in medical education founded since 2002 with membership ranging from 8 to 120 programs. Most focus on graduate medical education in primary care or emergency medicine specialties. Conclusions: We offer four recommendations for the further development and spread of medical education research networks: increasing faculty development, obtaining central resources, studying networks themselves, and developing networks of networks. PMID:25319404

  18. Environmental practices for biomedical research facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Medlin, E L; Grupenhoff, J T

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment, the Facilities Committee focused its work on the development of best environmental practices at biomedical research facilities at the university and independent research facility level as well as consideration of potential involvement of for-profit companies and government agencies. The designation "facilities" includes all related buildings and grounds, "green auditing" of buildings and programs, purchasing of furnishings and sources, energy efficiency, and engineering services (lighting, heating, air conditioning), among other activities. The committee made a number of recommendations, including development of a national council for environmental stewardship in biomedical research, development of a system of green auditing of such research facilities, and creation of programs for sustainable building and use. In addition, the committee recommended extension of education and training programs for environmental stewardship, in cooperation with facilities managers, for all research administrators and researchers. These programs would focus especially on graduate fellows and other students, as well as on science labs at levels K--12. PMID:11121360

  19. Environmental practices for biomedical research facilities.

    PubMed

    Medlin, E L; Grupenhoff, J T

    2000-12-01

    As a result of the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment, the Facilities Committee focused its work on the development of best environmental practices at biomedical research facilities at the university and independent research facility level as well as consideration of potential involvement of for-profit companies and government agencies. The designation "facilities" includes all related buildings and grounds, "green auditing" of buildings and programs, purchasing of furnishings and sources, energy efficiency, and engineering services (lighting, heating, air conditioning), among other activities. The committee made a number of recommendations, including development of a national council for environmental stewardship in biomedical research, development of a system of green auditing of such research facilities, and creation of programs for sustainable building and use. In addition, the committee recommended extension of education and training programs for environmental stewardship, in cooperation with facilities managers, for all research administrators and researchers. These programs would focus especially on graduate fellows and other students, as well as on science labs at levels K--12.

  20. Nutrition education: linking research, theory, and practice.

    PubMed

    Contento, Isobel R

    2008-01-01

    The increase in obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease worldwide reflects the complex interactions of biology, personal behaviour and environment. Consequently there has been a greater recognition of the importance of nutrition education. An analysis of the evidence from 300+ studies shows that nutrition education is more likely to be effective when it focuses on behaviour/ action (rather than knowledge only) and systematically links theory, research and practice. There are three essential components to nutrition education: 1. A motivational component, where the goal is to increase awareness and enhance motivation by addressing beliefs, attitudes through effective communication strategies. 2. An action component, where the goal is to facilitate people's ability to take action through goal setting and cognitive self-regulation skills. 3. An environmental component, where nutrition educators work with policymakers and others to promote environmental supports for action. Each component needs to be based on appropriate theory and research. The procedure for program design can use the logic model: Inputs are the resources needed as well as the needs analysis process. The outputs are the activities within the three components of nutrition education described above. Here the behavioural focus is selected and theory and research are used to design appropriate educational strategies to achieve the targeted behaviours. The outcomes are the short, medium or long-term impacts of the nutrition program. These are evaluated through the use of appropriate designs and instruments. Nutrition education programs that link research, theory, and practice are more likely to be effective.

  1. Bias in patient assessments of general practice: general practice assessment survey scores in surgery and postal responders.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Peter; Roland, Martin O

    2003-01-01

    Patient-based measures of the quality of primary care are increasingly important. However, their effective use requires bias to be minimised. Scores on the General Practice Assessment Survey (GPAS) differ according to whether patients are surveyed in the surgery or by post. It is not clear whether these differences relate to the mode of administration or to the types of patients who complete the scale in postal and surgery samples. Regression indicates that the bias reflects both effects and should be considered when GPAS scores are being interpreted. PMID:12817358

  2. Pursuing the course from research to practice.

    PubMed

    Dusenbury, Linda; Hansen, William B

    2004-03-01

    Diffusion of Innovation Theory describes the typical course by which innovations become standard practice. Research-based prevention programs are one such innovation. These programs have passed through the early phases of diffusion-innovation development and adoption by progressive schools that seek out innovations. With one quarter of the nation's schools having adopted a research-based program, the field is currently in the early majority phase of diffusion. If the patterns of normal diffusion hold true, this phase is likely to be characterized by emerging tensions between program developers and adopting schools. There are several concerns that require attention from researchers and practitioners. Practitioners need to develop their capacity to implement programs with fidelity and to adapt programs appropriately to meet their circumstance. Program developers need to simplify and redesign programs to make them appealing and useful to teachers. Operational capacity to fulfill orders and provide training needs to be developed.

  3. Food parenting practices and child dietary behavior. Prospective relations and the moderating role of general parenting.

    PubMed

    Sleddens, Ester F C; Kremers, Stef P J; Stafleu, Annette; Dagnelie, Pieter C; De Vries, Nanne K; Thijs, Carel

    2014-08-01

    Research on parenting practices has focused on individual behaviors while largely failing to consider the context of their use, i.e., general parenting. We examined the extent to which food parenting practices predict children's dietary behavior (classified as unhealthy: snacking, sugar-sweetened beverage; and healthy: water and fruit intake). Furthermore, we tested the moderating role of general parenting on this relationship. Within the KOALA Birth Cohort Study, in the Netherlands, questionnaire data were collected at 6 and 8 years (N = 1654). Correlations were computed to assess the association between food parenting practices and general parenting (i.e., nurturance, behavioral control, structure, coercive control, and overprotection). Linear regression models were fitted to assess whether food parenting practices predict dietary behavior. Instrumental and emotional feeding, and pressure to eat were found to have associations with undesirable child dietary behavior (increased unhealthy intake/decreased healthy intake), whereas associations were in the desirable direction for covert control, encouragement and restriction. Moderation analyses were performed by evaluating interactions with general parenting. The associations of encouragement and covert control with desirable child dietary behaviors were found to be stronger for children who were reared in a positive parenting context. Future research should assess the influence of contextual parenting factors moderating the relationships between food parenting and child dietary behavior as the basis for the development of more effective family-based interventions. PMID:24727101

  4. Research and Practical Trends in Geospatial Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpik, A. P.; Musikhin, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years professional societies have been undergoing fundamental restructuring brought on by extensive technological change and rapid evolution of geospatial science. Almost all professional communities have been affected. Communities are embracing digital techniques, modern equipment, software and new technological solutions at a staggering pace. In this situation, when planning financial investments and intellectual resource management, it is crucial to have a clear understanding of those trends that will be in great demand in 3-7 years. This paper reviews current scientific and practical activities of such non-governmental international organizations as International Federation of Surveyors, International Cartographic Association, and International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, analyzes and groups most relevant topics brought up at their scientific events, forecasts most probable research and practical trends in geospatial sciences, outlines topmost leading countries and emerging markets for further detailed analysis of their activities, types of scientific cooperation and joint implementation projects.

  5. Foundations of Intervention Research in Instrumental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Johannes L.; Lemyre, Pierre-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The goals of the present study are to evaluate, implement, and adapt psychological skills used in the realm of sports into music performance. This research project also aims to build foundations on how to implement future interventions to guide music students on how to optimize practice toward performance. A 2-month psychological skills intervention was provided to two students from the national music academy's bachelor program in music performance to better understand how to adapt and construct psychological skills training programs for performing music students. The program evaluated multiple intervention tools including the use of questionnaires, performance profiling, iPads, electronic practice logs, recording the perceived value of individual and combined work, as well as the effectiveness of different communication forms. Perceived effects of the intervention were collected through semi-structured interviews, observations, and logs. PMID:26834660

  6. Integrating a pharmacist into the general practice environment: opinions of pharmacist’s, general practitioner’s, health care consumer’s, and practice manager’s

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacists are viewed as highly trained yet underutilised and there is growing support to extend the role of the pharmacist within the primary health care sector. The integration of a pharmacist into a general practice medical centre is not a new concept however is a novel approach in Australia and evidence supporting this role is currently limited. This study aimed to describe the opinions of local stakeholders in South-East Queensland on the integration of a pharmacist into the Australian general practice environment. Methods A sample of general practitioners, health care consumers, pharmacists and practice managers in South-East Queensland were invited to participate in focus groups or semi-structured interviews. Seeding questions common to all sessions were used to facilitate discussion. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Leximancer software was used to qualitatively analyse responses. Results A total of 58 participants took part in five focus groups and eighteen semi-structured interviews. Concepts relating to six themes based on the seeding questions were identified. These included positively viewed roles such as medication reviews and prescribing, negatively viewed roles such as dispensing and diagnosing, barriers to pharmacist integration such as medical culture and remuneration, facilitators to pharmacist integration such as remuneration and training, benefits of integration such as access to the patient’s medical file, and potential funding models. Conclusions These findings and future research may aid the development of a new model of integrated primary health care services involving pharmacist practitioners. PMID:22852792

  7. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  8. Is a practice-based rural research network feasible in Europe?

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kurpas, Donata; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Petrazzuoli, Ferdinando; Jacquet, Jean-Pierre; Buono, Nicola; Lopez-Abuin, Jose; Lionis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Research in family medicine is a well-established entity nationally and internationally, covering all aspects of primary care including remote and isolated practices. However, due to limited capacity and resources in rural family medicine, its potential is not fully exploited yet. An idea to foster European rural primary care research by establishing a practice-based research network has been recently put forward by several members of the European Rural and Isolated Practitioners Association (EURIPA) and the European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN). Two workshops on why, and how to design a practice-based research network among rural family practices in Europe were conducted at two international meetings. This paper revisits the definition of practice-based research in family medicine, reflects on the current situation in Europe regarding the research in rural family practice, and discusses a rationale for practice-based research in rural family medicine. A SWOT analysis was used as the main tool to analyse the current situation in Europe regarding the research in rural family practice at both meetings. The key messages gained from these meetings may be employed by the Wonca Working Party on research, the International Federation of Primary Care Research Network and the EGPRN that seek to introduce a practice-based research approach. The cooperation and collaboration between EURIPA and EGPRN creates a fertile ground to discuss further the prospect of a European practice-based rural family medicine research network, and to draw on the joint experience. PMID:26134091

  9. Is a practice-based rural research network feasible in Europe?

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kurpas, Donata; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Petrazzuoli, Ferdinando; Jacquet, Jean-Pierre; Buono, Nicola; Lopez-Abuin, Jose; Lionis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Research in family medicine is a well-established entity nationally and internationally, covering all aspects of primary care including remote and isolated practices. However, due to limited capacity and resources in rural family medicine, its potential is not fully exploited yet. An idea to foster European rural primary care research by establishing a practice-based research network has been recently put forward by several members of the European Rural and Isolated Practitioners Association (EURIPA) and the European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN). Two workshops on why, and how to design a practice-based research network among rural family practices in Europe were conducted at two international meetings. This paper revisits the definition of practice-based research in family medicine, reflects on the current situation in Europe regarding the research in rural family practice, and discusses a rationale for practice-based research in rural family medicine. A SWOT analysis was used as the main tool to analyse the current situation in Europe regarding the research in rural family practice at both meetings. The key messages gained from these meetings may be employed by the Wonca Working Party on research, the International Federation of Primary Care Research Network and the EGPRN that seek to introduce a practice-based research approach. The cooperation and collaboration between EURIPA and EGPRN creates a fertile ground to discuss further the prospect of a European practice-based rural family medicine research network, and to draw on the joint experience.

  10. Teachers' General and Contextualised Research Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schouteden, Wendy; Verburgh, An; Elen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The integration of research into teaching is a new and important focus in teaching-intensive institutions in higher education. Given the paucity of empirical insight into the research--teaching relationship in teaching-intensive institutions, teachers' research conceptions are studied as a first step in understanding the research--teaching…

  11. Developing Communication Skills for the General Practice Consultation Process

    PubMed Central

    Nystrup, Jørgen; Larsen, Jan-Helge; Risør, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Medical curriculum revisions all over the world in the last 20 years have increased the number of teaching hours in communication skills. This article describes a concrete communication skills teaching programme focused on general practice. Since the spring of 1992, more than 2,000 physicians from Denmark, Sweden and Finland have attended courses within this programme in Kalymnos, Greece. The training mainly takes place in groups of 8 doctors and 1 supervisor. The skills training is based on video feedback using the Window Supervision Method described here. We have identified several classical pitfalls for the doctor which this training programme seeks to address. We have also defined the 9 steps in an effective consultation process, which are given the acronym PRACTICAL. The major issue is to discriminate between the patient’s, the doctor’s and the shared part of the communication process. In our experience, this model shortens the consultation time to c. 15 minutes as doctors collaborate with their patients and build up an agreed agenda in order to deal effectively with the main problems of the patients. PMID:21509251

  12. Evidence based general practice: a retrospective study of interventions in one training practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, P.; Dowell, A. C.; Neal, R. D.; Smith, N.; Heywood, P.; Wilson, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the proportion of interventions in general practice that are based on evidence from clinical trials and to assess the appropriateness of such an evaluation. DESIGN--Retrospective review of case notes. SETTING--One suburban training general practice. SUBJECTS--122 consecutive doctor-patient consultations over two days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Proportions of interventions based on randomised controlled trials (from literature search with Medline, pharmaceutical databases, and standard textbooks), on convincing non-experimental evidence, and without substantial evidence. RESULTS--21 of the 122 consultations recorded were excluded due to insufficient data; 31 of the interventions were based on randomised controlled trial evidence and 51 based on convincing non-experimental evidence. Hence 82/101 (81%) of interventions were based on evidence meeting our criteria. CONCLUSIONS--Most interventions within general practice are based on evidence from clinical trials, but the methods used in such trials may not be the most appropriate to apply to this setting. PMID:8608291

  13. Communicating Educational Research Data to General, Nonresearcher Audiences. ERIC/AE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacColl, Gail S.; White, Kathleen D.

    This digest describes some of the problems researchers face in communicating educational research data to general, nonresearcher audiences. Accessibility is one problem. Most research on effective educational practices does not filter down to the people who contribute or control funding. Another problem is that of readability. In the rare event…

  14. Prakriti-based research: Good reporting practices.

    PubMed

    Bhalerao, Supriya; Patwardhan, Kishor

    2016-03-01

    The recent advances in the fields of genomics, personalized medicine, and Ayurveda have motivated many researchers to look at the relationship between Prakriti (phenotype-based Ayurveda constitution) and various objective biological parameters. As a result, a number of studies reporting such a relationship have made their way into mainstream scholarly journals. However, when it comes to the protocols that these workers follow to identify one's Prakriti, there are several issues that are yet to be resolved. In this communication, we propose a few reporting practices that such workers are required to be encouraged to follow, while submitting their work on Prakriti to scholarly journals. We have arranged this proposal under the following domains that may serve as a preliminary checklist in this context: The textual references, validation process, assessment of characters, scoring pattern, weightage assignment, criterion for expressing the final Prakriti type, and a need to publish the complete Prakriti-determination tool. We advocate that only if the workers in the field adhere to these good reporting practices, one will be able to draw meaningful, generalizable, and applicable interpretations out of such studies. We also suggest that the editors of relevant scholarly journals may recommend these reporting practices while considering such reports for publication. PMID:27297513

  15. A General Survey of Qualitative Research Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cary, Rick

    Current definitions and philosophical foundations of qualitative research are presented; and designs, evaluation methods, and issues in application of qualitative research to education are discussed. The effects of positivism and the post-positivist era on qualitative research are outlined, and naturalist and positivist approaches are contrasted.…

  16. The role of culture in the general practice consultation process.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nasreen; Atkin, Karl; Neal, Richard

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, we will examine the importance of culture and ethnicity in the general practice consultation process. Good communication is associated with positive health outcomes. We will, by presenting qualitative material from an empirical study, examine the way in which communication within the context of a general practitioner (GP) consultation may be affected by ethnicity and cultural factors. The aim of the study was to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which white and South Asian patients communicate with white GPs and to explore any similarities and differences in communication. This paper reports on South Asian and white patients' explanations of recent videotaped consultations with their GP. We specifically focus on the ways in which issues of ethnic identity impacted upon the GP consultation process, by exploring how our sample of predominantly white GPs interacted with their South Asian patients and the extent to which the GP listened to the patients' needs, gave patients information, engaged in social conversation and showed friendliness. We then go on to examine patients' suggestions on improvements (if any) to the consultation. We conclude, by showing how a non-essentialist understanding of culture helps to comprehend the consultation process when the patients are from Great Britain's ethnicised communities. Our findings, however, raise generic issues of relevance to all multi-racial and multi-ethnic societies.

  17. Predicting acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J. G.; Schmidt, H.; Rosborg, J.; Lund, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the diagnostic value of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C reactive protein for acute maxillary sinusitis. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study. SETTING--Danish general practice in cooperation with the otorhinolaryngology and neuroradiology department at Aalborg County Hospital. SUBJECTS--174 patients aged 18-65 years who were suspected by the general practitioner of having acute maxillary sinusitis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--The independent association of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and concentration of C reactive protein in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis defined as purulent or mucopurulent antral aspirate. RESULTS--Only raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.01) and raised C reactive protein (P = 0.007) were found to be independently associated with a diagnosis of acute maxillary sinusitis. The combination of the two variables had a sensitivity of 0.82 and a specificity of 0.57. CONCLUSION--Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein are useful diagnostic criteria for acute maxillary sinusitis. PMID:7627042

  18. Pruritus as Reason for Encounter in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Thomas; Herrmann, Kristin; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2011-01-01

    Background Pruritus is a common reason for consulting the general practitioner. Data from a primary care setting have seldom been published. The goal of the recent investigation was to characterize the consultation prevalence of pruritus, frequency of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, accompanying symptoms and results of encounter or diagnoses of patients with pruritus. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected from randomly selected patients during the SESAM 2 study and compared with unpublished but publicly available data from the Dutch Transition Project and the published Australian BEACH study data. Results Overall 64 of the 8,877 patients from the SESAM 2 study consulted a physician for pruritus. The male to female ratio was 1.0 : 1.3. Pruritus was more frequent in children and people aged over 75 years. Physical examination was performed in all patients. Further diagnostic measures were seldom necessary. Drugs were prescribed in 84% of the cases. Allergic contact eczema and infectious diseases of the skin were the most frequent results of encounter or diagnoses. Medical adverse effects and allergic reactions should be considered as causes of pruritus. We found no significant association to systemic diseases. Conclusions In a primary care setting, pruritus occurs regularly. It is associated to (infectious) skin diseases. Acute dangerous courses are rare. Keywords Pruritus; Itch; General practice; Primary care; Reason for encounter PMID:22383909

  19. Patient-centred care in general dental practice - a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delivering improvements in quality is a key objective within most healthcare systems, and a view which has been widely embraced within the NHS in the United Kingdom. Within the NHS, quality is evaluated across three key dimensions: clinical effectiveness, safety and patient experience, with the latter modelled on the Picker Principles of Patient-Centred Care (PCC). Quality improvement is an important feature of the current dental contract reforms in England, with “patient experience” likely to have a central role in the evaluation of quality. An understanding and appreciation of the evidence underpinning PCC within dentistry is highly relevant if we are to use this as a measure of quality in general dental practice. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the features of PCC relevant to dentistry and ascertain the current research evidence base underpinning its use as a measure of quality within general dental practice. Results Three papers were identified which met the inclusion criteria and demonstrated the use of primary research to provide an understanding of the key features of PCC within dentistry. None of the papers identified were based in general dental practice and none of the three studies sought the views of patients. Some distinct differences were noted between the key features of PCC reported within the dental literature and those developed within the NHS Patient Experience Framework. Conclusions This systematic review reveals a lack of understanding of PCC within dentistry, and in particular general dental practice. There is currently a poor evidence base to support the use of the current patient reported outcome measures as indicators of patient-centredness. Further research is necessary to understand the important features of PCC in dentistry and patients’ views should be central to this research. PMID:24902842

  20. Putting Research Findings into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Deepa; Al-Lawatia, Zainab; Al-Abri, Rashid; Bhargava, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A perception exists that clinicians in Oman are reluctant to adopt evidence-based practice (EBP). This pilot study was undertaken to study the feasibility of using EBP pathways at the point of care in otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery. The ultimate aim was to facilitate EBP with the probability of developing a new system for implementing research findings/translational research at the clinical point of care. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective questionnaire pilot survey of clinicians at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Oman, a tertiary care medical centre, was undertaken. Respondents included 135 physicians and surgeons with between 3 months and 25 years of clinical experience and included personnel ranging from interns to senior consultants, in areas ranging from primary care to specialist care. Results: Of those polled, 90% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85–95%) either strongly agreed or agreed that evidence-based practice protocols (EBPP) could help in decision making. A total of 87.4% of participants (95% CI 81.8–93%) either strongly agreed or agreed that EBPPs can improve clinical outcomes; 91.8% of participants (95% CI 87.2–96.4%) would use and apply EBPP in day-to-day care if they were available at the point of care and embedded in the hospital information system. Conclusions: The perception that clinicians at SQUH are reluctant to adopt EBP is incorrect. The introduction of EBP pathways is very feasible at the primary care level. Institutional support for embedding EBP in hospital information systems is needed as well as further outcome research to assess the improvement in quality of care. PMID:22548137

  1. General practice based teaching exchanges in Europe. Experiences from the EU Socrates programme 'primary health care'.

    PubMed

    van Weel, Chris; Mattsson, Bengt; Freeman, George K; de Meyere, Marc; von Fragstein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of international exchange of medical students for general practice. The experience is based on the EU Socrates programme 'Primary Health Care' that offers, since 1992, clinical attachments and research electives in primary care. This programme involves 11 university departments of general practice/primary care in eight countries: Austria - Vienna; Belgium - Gent; Germany Düsseldorf; Italy - Monza, Udine; Netherlands Nijmegen; Slovenia - Ljubljana; Sweden - Göteborg; and the UK - Edinburgh, Imperial College London and Nottingham. More than 150 students have taken part in the programme, most in the last four years. For clinical attachment communication to patients is essential, and students should be able to speak the language of the host university. A research elective in primary care is less demanding and requires students' ability to communicate in English. Despite marked differences in health care structure in the countries involved, it is quite possible to provide a valuable teaching environment in general practice, and the experience gained by students in the exchanges more than equals that what they would gain at home. The added value is in experiencing the influence of another health care system and of working in another academic primary care centre. A substantial number of research electives have been published in international peer reviewed scientific journals with the student as first (occasionally second) author and staff members of the student's host and home university as co-authors. A further benefit of the exchange programme lies in the transfer teaching innovations between universities.

  2. Personalizing Research: Special Educators' Awareness of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guckert, Mary; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence-based practices are considered critical to student success, a research-to-practice gap exists. This qualitative study examined practicing special education teachers' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practices. Special education teachers were interviewed and their classroom practices examined. Major themes emerged and…

  3. The proposed general practice descriptors--will they influence preventive medicine?

    PubMed

    Moorhead, R G

    1989-01-01

    The proposed descriptor bill to change Medicare rebates to general practice patients could have a benefit to general practice preventive medicine. This seems possible through rewarding practitioners who spend more time with their patients and the positive effects of continuing medical education. However, the potential exists for whittling away any rewards for these practitioners by future governments and the audit of general practices could become a method of political control of Australian general practice. PMID:2691193

  4. Introducing a drug formulary to general practice — effects on practice prescribing costs

    PubMed Central

    Beardon, P.H.G.; Brown, S.V.; Mowat, D.A.E.; Grant, J.A.; McDevitt, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    A drug formulary comprising 249 preparations of 132 drugs and drug combinations was prepared by the partners in a three-doctor general practice serving more than 5000 patients. No attempt was made to change to generic prescribing nor were repeat prescription drugs altered. Introduction of the formulary in September 1981 was followed by an increase in the proportion of prescriptions containing drugs from the formulary from about 55% to more than 60% for both repeat and non-repeat prescriptions. The proportion of formulary drugs on non-repeat prescriptions reached a maximum of 78% within the first year with the additional influence of information feedback. Over the first year the level of formulary drugs used for both repeat and nonrepeat prescribing levelled off at about 62%. Even with these modest changes, when compared with the costs of general practice prescribing in Scotland as a whole, the introduction of the formulary resulted in savings of approximately 10% within the practice for the mean ingredient costs both per patient and per prescription. PMID:3449632

  5. Grappling with the Literature of Education Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The absence of a central database and use of specialized language hinder nonexperts in becoming familiar with the science teaching and learning literature and using it to inform their work. The challenge of locating articles related to a specific question or problem, coupled with the difficulty of comprehending findings based on a variety of different perspectives and practices, can be prohibitively difficult. As I have transitioned from bench to classroom-based research, I have become familiar with how to locate, decipher, and evaluate the education research literature. In this essay, I point out analogies to the literature of science research and practice, and I reference some of the literature that I have found useful in becoming an education researcher. I also introduce a new regular feature, “Current Insights: Recent Research in Science Teaching and Learning,” which is designed to point CBE—Life Sciences Education (CBE-LSE) readers to current articles of interest in life sciences education, as well as more general and noteworthy publications in education research. PMID:18056300

  6. Exploring Practice-Research Networks for Critical Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleby, Yvon; Hillier, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the contribution that practice-research networks can make to support critical professional development in the Learning and Skills sector in England. By practice-research networks we mean groups or networks which maintain a connection between research and professional practice. These networks stem from the philosophy of…

  7. Motivational effect of cholesterol measurement in general practice health checks.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, I; Phillips, A; Mant, D; Thorogood, M; Fowler, G; Fuller, A; Yudkin, P; Woods, M

    1992-01-01

    A randomized trial was conducted in five general practices in and around Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire to assess the motivational effect of cholesterol measurement on compliance with advice to reduce dietary fat intake and to stop smoking. The advice was given by practice nurses during health checks for cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 578 patients were recruited to the study and randomized into two groups. Both groups were given the same advice and were followed up after a median of three months, but the intervention group was also given immediate feedback on their cholesterol concentration. Follow up was completed for 88.2% of subjects, and those who were not followed up were assumed not to have changed their behaviour. The mean fall in total cholesterol at follow up was 0.11 mmol l-1 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.18) in the intervention group who were told their cholesterol result and 0.02 mmol l-1 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.10) in the control group who were not. The proportion of smokers who were not smoking at follow up was 10.7% and 10.1% in the two groups, respectively. Patients in the intervention group with an initial total cholesterol level of 6.50 mmol l-1 or greater showed a mean fall of 6.2% in cholesterol level whereas those with an initial cholesterol level of less than 5.20 mmol l-1 experienced a mean increase of 3.6%, but as differences of this magnitude were also seen in the control group they probably reflect regression to the mean rather than an effect of knowledge of cholesterol level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1472394

  8. Improving communication between health-care professionals and patients with limited English proficiency in the general practice setting.

    PubMed

    Attard, Melanie; McArthur, Alexa; Riitano, Dagmara; Aromataris, Edoardo; Bollen, Chris; Pearson, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Quality service provision and patient safety and satisfaction in encounters with health-care professionals relies on effective communication between the practitioner and patient. This study aimed to identify effective practices for improving communication between clinical staff in general practice and patients with limited English proficiency, and to promote their implementation in general practice. Effective interventions and strategies were identified from a review of international research. Experiences with their use in practice were explored via focus group discussions with general practitioners and practice nurses. The results suggest that, wherever possible, communication in the patient's primary language is preferable; use of a qualified medical interpreter should be promoted, and practices should have a standardised and documented procedure for accessing interpreter services. General practice staff must increase their awareness about services that are available to facilitate communication with patients with limited English proficiency, and also develop attitudes, both individual and organisational, that will maximise the effectiveness of these strategies. These findings were used to develop brief, evidence-based practice guidelines that were disseminated to focus group participants for evaluation of utility and general feedback. This evidence-based guidance is now available to assist clinical and administrative general practice staff across regional and metropolitan South Australia.

  9. Adult Numeracy Development: Theory, Research, Practice. Series on Literacy: Research, Policy, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gal, Iddo, Ed.

    This book contains 16 papers on the theory, research, and practice of adult numeracy development. The following papers are included: "The Numeracy Challenge" (Iddo Gal); "Numeracy, Mathematics, and Adult Learning" (Diane Coben); "Building a Problem-Solving Environment for Teaching Mathematics" (Peter Kloosterman, Bin Hassan Mohamad-Ali, Lynda R.…

  10. MODEL UPDATING: TRANSITION FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE?

    SciTech Connect

    D. C. ZIMMERMAN; F. M. HEMEZ

    2000-10-01

    This session offers an open forum to discuss issues associated with the transition of nearly two decades of engineering research into computational guided model updating into industry state-of-the-practice. Related technical issues are the model updating technology, model reduction, test-analysis correlation and optimization strategies. The session is organized as follows. Technical presentations review the state-of-the-art in finite element model updating and present examples of industrial applications. The results of a recent survey on the potential and usefulness of the model updating technology are discussed. Panel discussions and interaction with the audience discuss industrial needs, future trends and challenges and why negative model updating results are never discussed within the structural dynamics community.

  11. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    PubMed

    Conway, R; Kavanagh, R; Coughlan, R J; Carey, J J

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant's confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant's self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases. PMID:25803956

  12. Nursing research ethics, guidance and application in practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Noonan, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Ethics is fundamental to good research practice and the protection of society. From a historical point of view, research ethics has had a chequered past and without due cognisance there is always the potential for research to do harm. Research ethics is fundamental to research practice, nurse education and the development of evidence. In conducting research, it is important to plan for and anticipate any potential or actual risks. To engage in research, researchers need to develop an understanding and knowledge of research ethics and carefully plan how to address ethics within their research. This article aims to enhance students' and novice researchers' research ethics understanding and its application to nursing research.

  13. Atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis in general practice and the open population: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pols, D. H. J.; Wartna, J. B.; Moed, H.; van Alphen, E. I.; Bohnen, A. M.; Bindels, P. J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether significant differences exist between the self-reported prevalence of atopic disorders in the open population compared with physician diagnosed prevalence of atopic disorders in general practice. Methods Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Publisher, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register databases were systematically reviewed for articles providing data on the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema in a GP setting. Studies were only included when they had a cross-sectional or cohort design and included more than 100 children (aged 0-18 years) in a general practice setting. All ISAAC studies (i.e. the open population) that geographically matched a study selected from the first search, were also included. A quality assessment was conducted. The primary outcome measures were prevalence of eczema, asthma and allergic rhinitis in children aged 0-18 years. Results The overall quality of the included studies was good. The annual and lifetime prevalences of the atopic disorders varied greatly in both general practice and the open population. On average, the prevalence of atopic disorders was higher in the open population. Conclusion There are significant differences between the self-reported prevalence of atopic disorders in the open population compared with physician diagnosed prevalence of atopic disorders in general practice. Data obtained in the open population cannot simply be extrapolated to the general practice setting. This should be taken into account when considering a research topic or requirements for policy development. GPs should be aware of the possible misclassification of allergic disorders in their practice. Key PointsEpidemiological data on atopic disorders in children can be obtained from various sources, each having its own advantages and limitations.On average, the prevalence of atopic disorders is higher in the open population.GPs should take into account the possible

  14. Interpreted consultations as 'business as usual'? An analysis of organisational routines in general practices.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Voisey, Christopher; Robb, Nadia

    2007-09-01

    UK general practices operate in an environment of high linguistic diversity, because of recent large-scale immigration and of the NHS's commitment to provide a professional interpreter to any patient if needed. Much activity in general practice is co-ordinated and patterned into organisational routines (defined as repeated patterns of interdependent actions, involving multiple actors, bound by rules and customs) that tend to be stable and to persist. If we want to understand how general practices are responding to pressures to develop new routines, such as interpreted consultations, we need to understand how existing organisational routines change. This will then help us to address a second question, which is how the interpreted consultation itself is being enacted and changing as it becomes routinised (or not) in everyday general practice. In seeking answers to these two questions, we undertook a qualitative study of narratives of interpreted primary care consultations in three London boroughs with large minority ethnic populations. In 69 individual interviews and two focus groups, we sought accounts of interpreted consultations from service users, professional interpreters, family member interpreters, general practitioners, practice nurses, receptionists, and practice managers. We asked participants to tell us both positive and negative stories of their experiences. We analysed these data by searching for instances of concepts relating to the organisational routine, the meaning of the interpreted consultation to the practice, and the sociology of medical work. Our findings identified a number of general properties of the interpreted consultation as an organisational routine, including the wide variation in the form of adoption, the stability of the routine, the adaptability of the routine, and the strength of the routine. Our second key finding was that this variation could be partly explained by characteristics of the practice as an organisation, especially

  15. Bridging the Research-Practice Gap: Research Translation and/or Research Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschkorn, Mark; Geelan, David

    2008-01-01

    The issue of the "research-practice gap"--the problematic relationship between research in education and educational practice--has been widely reported in the literature. This critical literature review explores some of the causes and features of the gap and suggests some possible approaches for addressing it. These solutions involve changes in…

  16. Peer relations, adolescent behavior, and public health research and practice.

    PubMed

    Crosnoe, Robert; McNeely, Clea

    2008-01-01

    Peer relations are central to adolescent life and, therefore, are crucial to understanding adolescents' engagement in various behaviors. In recent years, public health research has increasingly devoted attention to the implications of peer relations for the kinds of adolescent behaviors that have a direct impact on health. This article advocates for a continuation of this trend. With this aim, we highlight key themes in the rich literature on the general developmental significance of adolescent-peer relations, provide an overview of how these themes have been incorporated into public health research and practice, and suggest future avenues for peer-focused public health research that can inform adolescent health promotion in the United States.

  17. Catchments of general practice in different countries--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Allan, Donald P

    2014-08-29

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on catchment areas of private general practices in different developed countries because healthcare reform, including primary health care, has featured prominently as an important political issue in a number of developed countries. The debates around health reform have had a significant health geographic focus. Conceptually, GP catchments describe the distribution, composition and profile of patients who access a general practitioner or a general practice (i.e. a site or facility comprising one or more general practitioners). Therefore, GP catchments provide important information into the geographic variation of access rates, utilisation of services and health outcomes by all of the population or different population groups in a defined area or aggregated area.This review highlights a wide range of diversity in the literature as to how GP catchments can be described, the indicators and measures used to frame the scale of catchments. Patient access to general practice health care services should be considered from a range of locational concepts, and not necessarily constrained by their place of residence. An analysis of catchment patterns of general practitioners should be considered as dynamic and multi-perspective. Geographic information systems provide opportunities to contribute valuable methodologies to study these relationships. However, researchers acknowledge that a conceptual framework for the analysis of GP catchments requires access to real world data. Recent studies have shown promising developments in the use of real world data, especially from studies in the UK. Understanding the catchment profiles of individual GP surgeries is important if governments are serious about patient choice being a key part of proposed primary health reforms. Future health planning should incorporate models of GP catchments as planning tools, at the micro level as well as the macro level, to assist policies on the

  18. Associations between child emotional eating and general parenting style, feeding practices, and parent psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Braden, Abby; Rhee, Kyung; Peterson, Carol B; Rydell, Sarah A; Zucker, Nancy; Boutelle, Kerri

    2014-09-01

    Emotional eating is the tendency to eat in response to negative emotions. Prior research has identified a relationship between parenting style and child emotional eating, but this has not been examined in clinical samples. Furthermore, the relationship between specific parenting practices (e.g., parent feeding practices) and child emotional eating has not yet been investigated. The current study examined relationships between child emotional eating and both general and specific parenting constructs as well as maternal symptoms of depression and binge eating among a treatment-seeking sample of overweight children. Participants included 106 mother-child dyads who attended a baseline assessment for enrollment in a behavioral intervention for overeating. Ages of children ranged from 8 to 12  years old. Mothers completed self-report measures of their child's emotional eating behavior, their own feeding practices, and symptoms of depression and binge eating. Children completed a self-report measure of their mothers' general parenting style. A stepwise regression analysis was conducted to identify the parent variable that was most strongly related to child emotional eating, controlling for child age and gender. Emotional feeding behavior (i.e., a tendency to offer food to soothe a child's negative emotions) was the parent factor most significantly related to child emotional eating. Findings suggest that emotional feeding practices in parents may be related to emotional eating in children. Treatment with overweight children who engage in emotional eating may be improved by targeting parent feeding practices.

  19. Associations between child emotional eating and general parenting style, feeding practices, and parent psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Braden, Abby; Rhee, Kyung; Peterson, Carol B; Rydell, Sarah A; Zucker, Nancy; Boutelle, Kerri

    2014-09-01

    Emotional eating is the tendency to eat in response to negative emotions. Prior research has identified a relationship between parenting style and child emotional eating, but this has not been examined in clinical samples. Furthermore, the relationship between specific parenting practices (e.g., parent feeding practices) and child emotional eating has not yet been investigated. The current study examined relationships between child emotional eating and both general and specific parenting constructs as well as maternal symptoms of depression and binge eating among a treatment-seeking sample of overweight children. Participants included 106 mother-child dyads who attended a baseline assessment for enrollment in a behavioral intervention for overeating. Ages of children ranged from 8 to 12  years old. Mothers completed self-report measures of their child's emotional eating behavior, their own feeding practices, and symptoms of depression and binge eating. Children completed a self-report measure of their mothers' general parenting style. A stepwise regression analysis was conducted to identify the parent variable that was most strongly related to child emotional eating, controlling for child age and gender. Emotional feeding behavior (i.e., a tendency to offer food to soothe a child's negative emotions) was the parent factor most significantly related to child emotional eating. Findings suggest that emotional feeding practices in parents may be related to emotional eating in children. Treatment with overweight children who engage in emotional eating may be improved by targeting parent feeding practices. PMID:24780349

  20. The evaluation of stress management strategies in general practice: an evidence-led approach.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, J

    1997-01-01

    Recent surveys have highlighted sources of stress for UK general practitioners (GPs). Interventions to reduce stress in general practice have been introduced at both an individual and an organizational level, but there is little published evidence of their effectiveness. This paper systematically reviews the literature and reports that the research evidence from stress management programmes employed with other workforces is equivocal. Results so far suggest that relaxation and cognitive behavioural skills are helpful and that group methods are both more cost-effective and more beneficial than individual counselling. It is important for scientific, practical, and financial reasons that stress management programmes be properly evaluated. This paper suggests possible avenues for future interventions to alleviate stress. PMID:9406495

  1. The Recursive Practice of Research and Teaching: Reframing Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Rebecca; Lemon, Narelle; Mathewson Mitchell, Donna; Reid, Jo-Anne

    2016-01-01

    As a field, Teacher Education has lived with continued criticism from governmental and research bodies on the quality of professional preparation and the lack of a strong research base. We respond to such criticisms by considering possibilities for further exploration of the "research of practice" and the "practice of research"…

  2. Strategic Integration: The Practical Politics of Integrated Research in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kerkhoff, Lorrae

    2005-01-01

    Designing an integrative research program requires that research leaders negotiate a balance between the scientific interest of research and the practical interests of non-scientific partners. This paper examines the ways integrated research is formally categorised, and analyses the tangible expressions of the practical politics involved in…

  3. Applying Research on Family Violence to Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Considers whether research on family violence can be applied to clinical practice. Suggests limitations of the knowledge base constrain the application of research on family violence to clinical work, and certain aspects of the research paradigm also limit the transfer of research knowledge to clinical practice. (Author)

  4. Clinical consultations in an aboriginal community-controlled health service: a comparison with general practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D P; Heller, R F; Hunt, J M

    1998-02-01

    Clinical consultation at Danila Dilba, an Aboriginal community-controlled health service in Darwin, were compared with consultations in Australian general practice. We described 583 consultations, using a questionnaire based on the International Classification of Primary Care. The methods were similar to those of the Australian Morbidity and Treatment Survey (AMTS) of consultations in Australian general practice undertaken by the University of Sydney Family Medicine Research Unit. Compared with Australian general practice consultations, consultations with Danila Dilba were more complex: more young patients, more new patients, more home visits, more problems managed, more new problems and more consultations leading to emergency hospital admission. Skin infections, diabetes mellitus, chronic alcohol abuse, rheumatic heart disease (or rheumatic fever) and chronic suppurative otitis media were much more commonly managed at study consultations at Danila Dilba than at consultations with general practitioners in the AMTS. Nearly all patients saw an Aboriginal health worker first, and nearly half the consultations were with Aboriginal health workers alone. The results suggest possible limitations of fee-for-item Medicare funding of Aboriginal community-controlled health services compared with existing block grant funding. PMID:9599858

  5. Boosting uptake of influenza immunisation: a randomised controlled trial of telephone appointing in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Sally; Hagdrup, Nicola; Hart, Ben; Griffiths, Chris; Hennessy, Enid

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunisation against influenza is an effective intervention that reduces serologically confirmed cases by between 60% and 70%. Almost all influenza immunisation in the UK is done within general practice. Current evidence on the effectiveness of patient reminders for all types of immunisation programmes is largely based on North American studies. AIM: To determine whether telephone appointments offered bygeneral practice receptionists increase the uptake of irfluenza immunisation among the registered population aged over 65 years in east London practices. DESIGN OF STUDY: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Three research general practices within the East London and Essex network of researchers (ELENoR). METHOD: Participants were 1,820 low-risk patients aged 65 to 74 years who had not previously been in a recall system for influenza immunisation at their general practice. The intervention, during October 2000, was a telephone call from the practice receptionist to intervention group households, offering an appointment for influenza immunisation at a nurse-run. clinic Main outcome measures were the numbers of individuals in each group receiving immunisation, and practice costs of a telephone-appointing programme. RESULTS: intention to treat analysis showed an immunisation rate in the control group of 44%, compared with 50% in the intervention group (odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 1.63). Of the patients making a telephone appointment, 88% recieved immunisation, while 22% of those not wanting an appointment went on to be immunised. In the controlgroup, income generated was 11.35 pounds per immunisation, for each additional immunisation in the intervention group the income was 5.20 pounds. The 'number needed to telephone' was 17. CONCLUSION: Uptake of influenza immunisation among the low-risk older population in inner-city areas can be boosted by around 6% using a simple intervention by receptionists. Immunisation rates in this low

  6. Is the internet an integral part of general practice in Australia?

    PubMed

    Williams, P A; Maj, S P

    2001-01-01

    Computerisation has seen significant changes in information management and procedures in General Practice. Whilst the majority of changes to date, have been apparent in administration, the clinical aspect of primary care is now increasingly taking advantage of the computer and significantly, the Internet. The professional obligation to maintain currency in medical developments has provided an opportunity to use the Internet as a low cost method to access a wide range of medical research information worldwide. Furthermore traditional methods of communication within the medical community have the potential to be transformed by the availability and use of electronic communication techniques such as email. The incorporation of these new technologies in clinical practice is not without its challenges, and includes quality, timeliness, information management and attitudes to Internet based information. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of GP's undertaken in Western Australia analysing the usage of, and attitude to, the Internet in clinical practice. PMID:11604771

  7. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  8. Ad Hoc Supervision of General Practice Registrars as a "Community of Practice": Analysis, Interpretation and Re-Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, T.; Brown, J.; Morrison, J.; Nestel, D.

    2016-01-01

    General practice registrars in Australia undertake most of their vocational training in accredited general practices. They typically see patients alone from the start of their community-based training and are expected to seek timely ad hoc support from their supervisor. Such ad hoc encounters are a mechanism for ensuring patient safety, but also…

  9. Patient safety in primary care: incident reporting and significant event reviews in British general practice.

    PubMed

    Rea, David; Griffiths, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, healthcare has adapted to the 'quality revolution' by moving away from direct provision and hierarchical control mechanisms. In their place, new structures based on contractual relationships are being developed coupled with attempts to create an organisational culture that shares learning and that scrutinises existing practice so that it can be improved. The issue here is that contractual arrangements require surveillance, monitoring, regulation and governance systems that can be perceived as antipathetic to the examination of practice and subsequent learning. Historically, reporting levels from general practice have remained low; little information is shared and consequently lessons are not shared across the general practice community. Given large-scale under-engagement of general practitioners (GPs) in incident reporting systems, significant event analysis is advocated to encourage sharing of information about incidents to inform the patient safety agenda at a local and national level. Previous research has concentrated on the secondary care environment and little is known about the situation in primary care, where the majority of patient contacts with healthcare occur. To explore attitudes to incident reporting, the study adopted a qualitative approach to GPs working in a mixture of urban and rural practices reporting to a Welsh Local Health Board. The study found that GPs used significant event analysis methodology to report incidents within their practice, but acknowledged under-reporting. They were less enthusiastic about reporting externally. A number of barriers exist to reporting, including insufficient time to report, lack of feedback, fear of blame, and damage to reputations and patient confidence in a competitive environment. If incident reporting processes are perceived as supportive and formative, and where protected time is allocated to discuss incidents, then GPs are willing to participate. They also need to know how the

  10. Patient safety in primary care: incident reporting and significant event reviews in British general practice.

    PubMed

    Rea, David; Griffiths, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, healthcare has adapted to the 'quality revolution' by moving away from direct provision and hierarchical control mechanisms. In their place, new structures based on contractual relationships are being developed coupled with attempts to create an organisational culture that shares learning and that scrutinises existing practice so that it can be improved. The issue here is that contractual arrangements require surveillance, monitoring, regulation and governance systems that can be perceived as antipathetic to the examination of practice and subsequent learning. Historically, reporting levels from general practice have remained low; little information is shared and consequently lessons are not shared across the general practice community. Given large-scale under-engagement of general practitioners (GPs) in incident reporting systems, significant event analysis is advocated to encourage sharing of information about incidents to inform the patient safety agenda at a local and national level. Previous research has concentrated on the secondary care environment and little is known about the situation in primary care, where the majority of patient contacts with healthcare occur. To explore attitudes to incident reporting, the study adopted a qualitative approach to GPs working in a mixture of urban and rural practices reporting to a Welsh Local Health Board. The study found that GPs used significant event analysis methodology to report incidents within their practice, but acknowledged under-reporting. They were less enthusiastic about reporting externally. A number of barriers exist to reporting, including insufficient time to report, lack of feedback, fear of blame, and damage to reputations and patient confidence in a competitive environment. If incident reporting processes are perceived as supportive and formative, and where protected time is allocated to discuss incidents, then GPs are willing to participate. They also need to know how the

  11. Practice as Research: A Fine Art Contextual Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Suze

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the dynamic interplay between practice and theory in practice-led research in the visual arts. Building on recent debate around the issue and following appropriately rigorous models, the importance of locating a suitable methodology to adequately reflect the integrated process of research practice in written as well as visual…

  12. Translating research to practice in bullying prevention.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a concern in schools and communities across the United States and worldwide, yet there is uncertainty regarding the most effective approaches for preventing it and addressing its impacts on children and youth. This paper synthesizes findings from a series of studies and meta-analyses examining the efficacy of bullying prevention programs. This paper considers some methodological issues encountered when testing the efficacy and effectiveness of bullying prevention and intervention approaches. It also identifies several areas requiring additional research in order to increase the effectiveness of bullying prevention efforts in real-world settings. Drawing upon a public health perspective and findings from the field of prevention science, this paper aims to inform potential future directions for enhancing the adoption, high quality implementation, and dissemination of evidence-based bullying prevention programs. It is concluded that although bullying prevention programs can be effective in reducing bullying and victimization among school-aged youth, there is a great need for more work to increase the acceptability, fidelity, and sustainability of the existing programs in order to improve bullying-related outcomes for youth. The findings from this review are intended to inform both policy and public health practice related to bullying prevention. PMID:25961313

  13. Urinary tract infections in adult general practice patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are symptomatic infections of the urinary tract, mainly caused by the bacterium Escherichia coli. One in two women suffers from a UTI at least once in her life. The young and sexually active are particulaly affected, but it is also seen in elderly, postmenopausal women. The likelihood of recurrence is high. Diagnosis is made with regard to typical complaints and the presence of leucocytes and nitrites in the urine. A culture is unnecessary in most cases. Uncomplicated UTI should be distinguished from complicated UTI, which has a risk of severe illness. The treatment of choice--short-term therapy with trimethoprim or nitrofurantoin--is successful in over 80% of the cases. Co-trimoxazol fluoroquinolones or cephalsporins are not considered first-choice drugs. There are indications that general practitioners' (GPs') management of UTI is not always optimal, specifically concerning diagnostic tests, the application of second-choice antibiotics, and the length of prescribed treatment courses. Many points relevant to GPs requirefurther research, such as epidemiology and resistance of urinary pathogens in the community and natural history of UTI, as well as optimal management in elderly or complicated patients and men. PMID:12236281

  14. A Virtual Community of Practice for General Practice Training: A Preimplementation Survey

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Robinson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Professional isolation is an important factor in low rural health workforce retention. Objective The aim of this study was to gain insights to inform the development of an implementation plan for a virtual community of practice (VCoP) for general practice (GP) training in regional Australia. The study also aimed to assess the applicability of the findings of an existing framework in developing this plan. This included ascertaining the main drivers of usage, or usefulness, of the VCoP for users and establishing the different priorities between user groups. Methods A survey study, based on the seven-step health VCoP framework, was conducted with general practice supervisors and registrars—133 usable responses; 40% estimated response rate. Data was analyzed using the t test and the chi-square test for comparisons between groups. Factor analysis and generalized linear regression modeling were used to ascertain factors which may independently predict intention to use the VCoP. Results In establishing a VCoP, facilitation was seen as important. Regarding stakeholders, the GP training provider was an important sponsor. Factor analysis showed a single goal of usefulness. Registrars had a higher intention to use the VCoP (P<.001) and to perceive it as useful (P<.001) than supervisors. Usefulness independently predicted intention to actively use the VCoP (P<.001). Regarding engagement of a broad church of users, registrars were more likely than supervisors to want allied health professional and specialist involvement (P<.001). A supportive environment was deemed important, but most important was the quality of the content. Participants wanted regular feedback about site activity. Regarding technology and community, training can be online, but trust is better built face-to-face. Supervisors were significantly more likely than registrars to perceive that registrars needed help with knowledge (P=.01) and implementation of knowledge (P<.001). Conclusions Important

  15. 14 CFR 61.43 - Practical tests: General procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... performing each task successfully; (3) Demonstrating proficiency and competency within the approved standards... be a single pilot, then the applicant must demonstrate single pilot proficiency on the practical test... single pilot, then the applicant must demonstrate single pilot proficiency on the practical test. (3)...

  16. Correlates of the Orthodontic Aspects of the General Dentist's Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manasse, Robert J.; Dooley, Raynard J.

    1980-01-01

    A study undertaken to determine the extent of orthodontic referrals and treatment performed by general dentists is discussed. Results indicate that general practitioners who graduated after 1945 tend to make more referrals, and general practitioners who had treated patients orthodontically in their predoctoral training tend to continue in…

  17. Patients with shoulder syndromes in general and physiotherapy practice: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder complaints are commonly seen in general practice and physiotherapy practice. The only complaints for which general practitioners (GPs) refer more patients to the physiotherapist are back and neck pain. However, a substantial group have persistent symptoms. The first goal of this study is to document current health care use and the treatment process for patients with shoulder syndromes in both general practice and physiotherapy practice. The second goal is to detect whether there are differences between patients with shoulder syndromes who are treated by their GP, those who are treated by both GP and physiotherapist and those who access physiotherapy directly. Methods Observational study using data from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice and the National Information Service for Allied Health Care. These registration networks collect healthcare-related information on patient contacts including diagnoses, prescriptions, referrals, treatment and evaluation on an ongoing basis. Results Many patients develop symptoms gradually and 35% of patients with shoulder syndromes waited more than three months before visiting a physiotherapist. In 64% of all patients, treatment goals are fully reached at the end of physiotherapy treatment. In general practice, around one third of the patients return after the referral for physiotherapy. Patients with shoulder syndromes who are referred for physiotherapy have more consultations with their GP and are prescribed less medication than patients without a referral. Often, this referral is made at the first consultation. In physiotherapy practice, referred patients differ from self-referrals. Self-referrals are younger, they more often have recurrent complaints and their complaints are more often related to sports and leisure activities. Conclusions There is a fairly large group of patients with persistent symptoms. Early referral by a GP is not advised under current guidelines. However, in many

  18. Virtual Communities of Practice: Bridging Research and Practice Using Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Laura A.; Koston, Zoe; Quartley, Marjorie; Adsit, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A significant dilemma for the health and human service professions continues to be the question of how best to bridge the divide between academic research and practice. Communities of practice have traditionally been a vehicle for collaborative research and for information exchange (Moore, 2008). Through collaboration, communities of practice have…

  19. Duration of general practice consultations: association with patient occupational and educational status.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Sanson-Fisher, R

    1997-04-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that the majority of health care visits are made to general practitioners, and that socio-economically disadvantaged individuals are significantly more likely to use such services. Relatively little is known, however, about the quality of general practice care provided to patients of different socio-economic status. The specific aims of the study were to determine whether an association existed between consultation duration and patient educational and occupational status, and if an association was evident, to determine the extent of association after taking into account a range of identified confounding variables and the effect of a clustered sample design. Consecutive consultations from a randomly selected sample of general practitioners were audiotaped and their durations measured electronically. Patient education and occupational status were obtained by questionnaire. Information concerning a range of additional patient, practitioner and consultation variables was also assessed in order to identify possible confounders of the association between consultation duration and patient occupational and educational status. No association was evident between consultation duration and level of patient educational qualification. Independent of identified confounding variables and the effect of a clustered sample design, general practitioners spent less time with those patients employed in unskilled occupations. Unskilled patients received 2.1 min or 21% less time per consultation than patients in professional occupations. The odds of patients in unskilled occupations receiving a long consultation (> 10 min) were 26% less than the odds of patients in professional occupations. The finding of an occupational status differential in the duration of general practice consultations suggests that socio-economically disadvantaged patients may not be receiving the health care they require. Further research is required to confirm these findings and to

  20. Symptoms of vertigo in general practice: a prospective study of diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, K; O' Dowd, T

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little published evidence of the general practice experience of the diagnostic outcomes when symptoms of vertigo present. What research there is has been dominated by specialist centres. This gives a skewed view of the prevalence of the causes of such symptoms. AIM: To describe the likely diagnosis of symptoms of vertigo. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective cohort study METHODS: Thirteen GPs were recruited and trained to clinically assess and follow up all patients presenting with symptoms of vertigo over a six-month period Age-sex data were simultaneously gathered on those who consulted with non-vertiginous dizziness. RESULTS: The main diagnoses assigned by the GPs in 70 patients were benign positional vertigo, acute vestibular neuronitis and Ménière's disease, which together accounted for 93% (95% confidence interval = 71% to 100%) of patients' symptoms. Ninety-one per cent of patients were managed in general practice and 60% received a prescription for a vestibular sedative. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that presentations of symptoms of vertigo can be clinically diagnosed in most cases. The diagnoses recorded by GPs differ in proportion to those in specialist centres, with a larger number of patients suffering from benign positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuronitis in general practice, in contrast with specialist centres, which see more patients with Ménière's disease. PMID:12392120

  1. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 9, Issue A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is a publication of the US Division of World Education, Inc. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to connecting research with practice, to…

  2. Education(al) Research, Educational Policy-Making and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Professor Whitty has endorsed the consensus that research into education is empirical social science, distinguishing "educational research" which seeks directly to influence practice, and "education research" that has substantive value but no necessary practical application. The status of the science here is problematic. The positivist approach is…

  3. Implementation Practice and Implementation Research: A Report from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, John S.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Pancake, Laura; O, Anne; Lewis, Jenebah; Duke, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    The Interventions and Practice Research Infrastructure Program (IPRISP) funding mechanism was introduced by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to bridge the gap between the worlds of services research and the usual care practice in the community. The goal was to build infrastructure that would provide a platform for research to…

  4. Conceptualizing Research-Practice Partnerships as Joint Work at Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Allen, Anna-Ruth; Coburn, Cynthia E.; Farrell, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual framework for analyzing how researchers and district leaders perceive and navigate differences they encounter in the context of research-practice partnerships. Our framework contrasts with images of partnership work as facilitating the translation of research into practice. Instead, we argue that partnership…

  5. Addressing the Research/Practice Divide in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessner, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Educational scholars often describe a research/practice divide. Similarly, students in teacher education programs often struggle to navigate the differences between university coursework and expectations they face in field-based placements. This self-study analyzes one researcher's attempt to address the research/practice divide from the position…

  6. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 9, Issue B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is a publication of the U.S. Division of World Education, Inc. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to connecting research with practice, to…

  7. Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice: Implementation Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olswang, Lesley B.; Prelock, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article introduces implementation science, which focuses on research methods that promote the systematic application of research findings to practice. Method: The narrative defines implementation science and highlights the importance of moving research along the pipeline from basic science to practice as one way to facilitate…

  8. [Hydrogen (H2) exhalation tests--methods for general practice].

    PubMed

    Bornschein, W

    1988-04-01

    According to the literature as well as to own experience hydrogen breath tests seem to be suitable for a gastroenterologist's practice because of their practicability (this means non invasive and cheap methods) and their diagnostic relevance (sensitivity, specificity). Although hydrogen breath test with lactose is now the best way for diagnosis of lactose intolerance, hydrogen breath test with glucose as a mean of investigation of small bowel bacterial overgrowth still is subject to discussion. Lactulose hydrogen breath test in order to estimate small bowel transit time is of minor importance in gastroenterologist's practice. Yet at special questions it still may be of relevance (e.g. suspicion of functional diarrhea).

  9. Experimenting Clinical Pathways in General Practice: a Focus Group Investigation with Italian General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results Four major themes emerged: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment. Acknowledgments the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cantù and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers. PMID:25181354

  10. Conceptual and Practical Implications for Rehabilitation Research: Effect Size Estimates, Confidence Intervals, and Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrin, James M.; Bishop, Malachy; Tansey, Timothy N.; Frain, Michael; Swett, Elizabeth A.; Lane, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    For a number of conceptually and practically important reasons, reporting of effect size estimates, confidence intervals, and power in parameter estimation is increasingly being recognized as the preferred approach in social science research. Unfortunately, this practice has not yet been widely adopted in the rehabilitation or general counseling…

  11. Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

  12. Antibiotic prescribing for the future: exploring the attitudes of trainees in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Anthea; van Driel, Mieke; van de Mortel, Thea; Magin, Parker

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern worldwide. A high proportion of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care, often for conditions where there is no evidence of benefit. Without a change in these prescribing patterns, resistance will persist as a significant problem in the future. Little is known about how trainees in general practice perceive and develop their prescribing. Aim To explore the attitudes of trainees in general practice towards antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived influences on their prescribing. Design and setting A qualitative study of 17 vocational trainees in general practice (GP registrars) in both rural and urban areas in Australia employing semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Method Maximum variation purposive sampling of GP registrars from diverse backgrounds and training stages continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Topics of discussion included awareness of antibiotic resistance, use of evidence-based guidelines, and perceived influences on prescribing. Transcribed interviews were coded independently by two researchers. Data collection and analysis were concurrent and cumulative, using a process of iterative thematic analysis. Results Registrars were aware of the importance of evidence-based antibiotic prescribing and the impact of their decisions on resistance. Many expressed a sense of dissonance between their knowledge and behaviours. Contextual influences on their decisions included patient and system factors, diagnostic uncertainty, transitioning from hospital medicine, and the habits of, and relationship with, their supervisor. Conclusion Understanding how trainees in general practice perceive and develop antibiotic prescribing habits will enable targeted educational interventions to be designed and implemented at a crucial stage in training, working towards ensuring appropriate antibiotic prescribing in the future. PMID:25179070

  13. Research and Practice: An Evolving Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Hasselkus, Betty R.

    1988-01-01

    States that low research productivity in occupational therapy is primarily motivational and attitudinal. Suggests the need for (1) research and scholarly behavior models, (2) positive reinforcement, (3) a focus on clinical significance, and (4) multiple research approaches. (CH)

  14. Case against targeting long term non-attenders in general practice for a health check.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K J; Nicholl, J P; Fall, M; Lowy, A; Williams, B T

    1993-07-01

    A study was undertaken to describe the consequences of implementing that part of the 1990 contract for general practitioners which requires them to offer health checks to all patients aged 16-74 years not seen within the previous three years. A random sample of 679 patients who had not attended for three years and 379 patients who had attended in this period were identified from 30 practice lists (including eight inner city practices) in five family health services authority areas. All patients were sent an invitation to a health check by their own practice and an attempt was made by the research team to conduct a home interview. The results showed that a considerable proportion of non-attenders were not in a position to take advantage of such an invitation; 17% of those at inner city practices were known to have received the invitation, 68% in practices elsewhere. Interviewed non-attenders (76% of those known to have received their invitation) had sociodemographic characteristics similar to the comparison group of interviewed attenders, although women aged 55-74 years were over-represented. At interview, non-attenders reported relatively less use of accident and emergency services and preventive health care and scored significantly better on all six dimensions of the perceived health status measure. Overall, 3% of all identified non-attenders in the inner city practices and 13% elsewhere accepted the invitation to a health check. Low levels of morbidity were found at health checks for those who had and who had not attended their general practitioners in the previous three years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8398245

  15. Nursing consultations and control of diabetes in general practice: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Murrells, Trevor; Ball, Jane; Maben, Jill; Ashworth, Mark; Griffiths, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects around 3.6 million people in the UK. Previous research found that general practices employing more nurses delivered better diabetes care, but did not include data on individual patient characteristics or consultations received. Aim To examine whether the proportion of consultations with patients with diabetes provided by nurses in GP practices is associated with control of diabetes measured by levels of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Design and setting A retrospective observational study using consultation records from 319 649 patients with diabetes from 471 UK general practices from 2002 to 2011. Method Hierarchical multilevel models to examine associations between proportion of consultations undertaken by nurses and attaining HbA1c targets over time, controlling for case-mix and practice level factors. Results The proportion of consultations with nurses has increased by 20% since 2002 but patients with diabetes made fewer consultations per year in 2011 compared with 2002 (11.6 versus 16.0). Glycaemic control has improved and was more uniformly achieved in 2011 than 2002. Practices in which nurses provide a higher proportion of consultations perform no differently to those where nurse input is lower (lowest versus highest nurse contact tertile odds ratio [OR] [confidence interval {95% CI}]: HbA1c ≤53 mmol/mol (7%) 2002, 1.04 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.25] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.03]; HbA1c ≤86 mmol/mol (10%) 2002, 0.97 [95% CI = 0.73 to 1.29] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.86 to 1.04]). Conclusion Practices that primarily use GPs to deliver diabetes care could release significant resources with no adverse effect by switching their services towards nurse-led care. PMID:26412840

  16. The importance of diet and physical activity in the treatment of conditions managed in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Little, P; Margetts, B

    1996-01-01

    Evidence from meta-analyses, physiological data and individual studies suggests that diet and exercise are important in the aetiology and treatment of many of the conditions that are managed predominantly in primary care (hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and excess alcohol intake). However, much of the evidence comes from outside primary care, and it is doubtful whether those studies done in primary care used optimal intervention strategies. A priority for future research should be to demonstrate the feasibility, efficacy and efficiency of lifestyle interventions in a general practice setting. PMID:8731628

  17. ELSI practices in genomic research in East Asia: implications for research collaboration and public participation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Common infrastructures and platforms are required for international collaborations in large-scale human genomic research and policy development, such as the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health and the ‘ELSI 2.0’ initiative. Such initiatives may require international harmonization of ethical and regulatory requirements. To enable this, however, a greater understanding of issues and practices that relate to the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of genomic research will be needed for the different countries and global regions involved in such research. Here, we review the ELSI practices and regulations for genomic research in six East Asian countries (China, Indonesia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan), highlighting the main similarities and differences between these countries, and more generally, in relation to Western countries. While there are significant differences in ELSI practices among these East Asian countries, there is a consistent emphasis on advancing genomic science and technology. In addition, considerable emphasis is placed on informed consent for participation in research, whether through the contribution of tissue samples or personal information. However, a higher level of engagement with interested stakeholders and the public will be needed in some countries. PMID:24944586

  18. Supporting General Educators' Inclusive Practices in Mathematics and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs-Richardson, Rita; Al-Juraid, Sarah E.; Stuker, Jodi D.

    This paper describes a state-funded project at Southeastern Louisiana University that offered coursework and direct classroom assistance to general educators attempting to include students with disabilities for mathematics and science instruction. Thirty-five general educators in five parish school systems participated. A sequence of three credit…

  19. Observations on Citation Practices in Mathematics Education Research. Research Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leatham, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    The author argues that the field of mathematics education as a whole can and should improve its citation practices. He discusses 4 forms of citation practice and considers how they vary with respect to transparency of voice. He also discusses several ways that citation practices may misrepresent cited authors' ideas. He concludes with suggestions…

  20. Qualitative Research Practice in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Peter, Ed.; Neville, Bernie, Ed.

    This collection of 20 papers is aimed at researchers, research students, and research supervisors interested in qualitative research into facilitated adult learning in the workplace, formal education programs, professional development, and community settings. "Introduction" (Willis) provides a summary of the papers. "Qualitative Inquiry: Meaning…

  1. Action Research: Informing Professional Practice within Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Gregory S. C.; Lavery, Shane D.

    2014-01-01

    This research paper explores the experiences of three teacher-researchers, "Simone", "Damian" and "Michael", who undertook an action research project in their respective schools as part of their postgraduate studies. The paper initially outlines the construct of action research in the light of its applicability to…

  2. Consensus radiation protection practices for academic research institutions.

    PubMed

    Schiager, K J; McDougall, M M; Christman, E A; Party, E; Ring, J; Carlson, D E; Warfield, C A; Barkley, W E

    1996-12-01

    Under the auspices of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a set of consensus guidelines for Radiation Protection Practices has been developed for biomedical research using radioactive materials. The purposes of the guidelines are (1) to promote good radiation protection practices consistent with the needs of biomedical research, the ALARA principle, and regulatory requirements; (2) to establish common goals and consistent practices within radiation safety programs; and (3) to build a meaningful partnership between radiation safety professionals and the biomedical research community. These practices are intended to enhance radiation protection and the efficiency of the research staff. The consensus guidelines will lessen the variability in radiation safety practices that is evident among many academic research institutions and will encourage better acceptance and regulatory compliance by users of radioactive materials in biomedical research. PMID:8919082

  3. Theory in Educational Research and Practice in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Leonie G.

    2013-01-01

    A problem in education, that has long concerned philosophers of education, is the problem of the relationship between theory and practice in educational research and practice. Despite the fact that much has been written on the relationship between theory and practice in education, it would seem that teachers continue to cling to an image of theory…

  4. Getting Research into Practice: Healing Damaged Attachment Processes in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Tony; McDaniel, Benny

    2005-01-01

    The translation of research into practice in social care is long on theory and short on practical examples. We describe a pilot project, which identified an important practice issue--the promotion of positive attachment in early infancy--explored the evidence base, summarised the findings, and devised an implementation process. The site of the…

  5. Nurse-led general practice blazes a trail.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-02-24

    The nurse-led Cuckoo Lane Surgery in London has been rated outstanding by the Care Quality Commission. Nurses run the practice and deliver most of the care to patients. Patient satisfaction rates are very high, and staff say Cuckoo Lane is an exceptionally rewarding place to work. PMID:26907124

  6. [Lasers in general dental practice, an added value].

    PubMed

    De Moor, R; Nammour, S

    2009-01-01

    Laser treatment in promoting dental care is present in many areas and disciplines. Modern practice management implies also the introduction of new technology. As there is evidence of the added value for lasers in different disciplines in dentistry practitioners should not be hold back and not wait for patients demanding for this technology for dental treatment.

  7. 47 CFR 76.1001 - Unfair practices generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Competitive Access to Cable Programming § 76.1001 Unfair... shall engage in unfair methods of competition or unfair or deceptive acts or practices, the purpose or...) The phrase “unfair methods of competition or unfair or deceptive acts or practices” as used...

  8. Inservice Best Practices: The Learnings of General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Harry

    A composite model of exemplary inservice education, derived from a selection of comprehensive sources and basic references in the field, is described. In examining best practice statements, differentiation was made between three domains of inservice. The procedural domain includes chiefly political questions of control, support, and delivery of…

  9. [Dealing with uncertainty--the hypermodernity of general practice].

    PubMed

    Barth, Niklas; Nassehi, Armin; Schneider, Antonius

    2014-01-01

    The general practitioner is fundamentally dealing with uncertainty. On the one hand, we want to demonstrate that uncertainty cannot simply be stipulated as a matter of fact. Instead, we will show that this uncertainty is a performative effect of the primary care setting. On the other hand, we want to point out that the general practitioner's ability to bear uncertainty is a genuinely hypermodern way of productively dealing with uncertainty.

  10. Links between Conflict Management Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roloff, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explicates the implications of my research on conflict management for self improvement and for practitioners who work to improve the conflict management of others. I also note how my experiences with practitioners have informed my research.

  11. Effective Teaching of Reading: Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, James V., Ed.

    Distilling and interpreting past and current research on the effective teaching of reading is the focus of this volume. The titles and authors are as follows: "Research in Effective Teaching: An Overview of Its Development" (William H. Rupley, Beth S. Wise, and John W. Logan); "Process-Product Research on Effective Teaching: A Primer for a…

  12. Survey Practices in Dental Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; Kuster, Curtis G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of mailed questionnaires in research on dental education is examined, and several factors that researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors are identified. Examples from the "Journal of Dental Education" are used. (Author/MLW)

  13. Children's Comprehension of Text: Research into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, K. Denise, Ed.

    Reflecting the concerns of researchers and practitioners about children's text comprehension, this book defines and provides examples of narrative and expository text and describes research-based strategies for helping children comprehend these two types of text. The book contains the following chapters: (1) "Research on Stories: Implications for…

  14. Are Irish adult general practice consultation rates as low as official records suggest? A cross sectional study at six general practices.

    PubMed

    Behan, W; Molony, D; Beamer, C; Cullen, W

    2013-01-01

    Accurate data on primary care activity is key to health services planning and reconfiguration. Official data estimate general practice adult consultation rates to be 3.2 visits annually, based on patient self reports. We aim to estimate the consultation rate using practice based data and compare this to official estimates. We interrogated six general practices' information systems and estimated consultation rates based on practice, telephone, domiciliary and out of hours consultations by patients aged 18 years or older. The study population (20,706 patients) was representative of the national population in terms of age and GMS status. The mean consultation rate was 5.17, though this was higher among GMS-eligible patients and among older age groups. Estimates of consultation rates derived from practice based data are likely to be higher than that derived from other approaches. Using multiple sources of data will enhance accuracy of workload estimates and this will benefit service planning. PMID:24579407

  15. The work, education and career pathways of nurses in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Parker, Rhian; Keleher, Helen; Forrest, Laura

    2011-01-01

    There is little understanding about the educational levels and career pathways of the primary care nursing workforce in Australia. This article reports on survey research conducted to examine the qualifications and educational preparation of primary care nurses in general practice, their current enrolments in education programs, and their perspectives about post-registration education. Fifty-eight practice nurses from across Australia completed the survey. Over 94% reported that they had access to educational opportunities but identified a range of barriers to undertaking further education. Although 41% of nurses said they were practising at a specialty advanced level, this correlated with the number of years they had worked in general practice rather than to any other factor, including level of education. Respondents felt a strong sense of being regarded as less important than nurses working in the acute care sector. Almost 85% of respondents reported that they did not have a career pathway in their organisation. They also felt that while the public had confidence in them, there was some way to go regarding role recognition.

  16. Receptionist input to quality and safety in repeat prescribing in UK general practice: ethnographic case study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Myall, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    . Clinicians were often unaware of this input and it did not feature in policy documents or previous research. Yet it was sometimes critical to getting the job done and contributed in subtle ways to safeguarding patients. Conclusion Receptionists and administrative staff make important “hidden” contributions to quality and safety in repeat prescribing in general practice, regarding themselves accountable to patients for these contributions. Studying technology-supported work routines that seem mundane, standardised, and automated, but which in reality require a high degree of local tailoring and judgment from frontline staff, opens up a new agenda for the study of patient safety. PMID:22053317

  17. Women's evaluation of abuse and violence care in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial (weave)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intimate partner abuse (IPA) is a major public health problem with serious implications for the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of women, particularly women of child-bearing age. It is a common, hidden problem in general practice and has been under-researched in this setting. Opportunities for early intervention and support in primary care need to be investigated given the frequency of contact women have with general practice. Despite the high prevalence and health consequences of abuse, there is insufficient evidence for screening in primary care settings. Furthermore, there is little rigorous evidence to guide general practitioners (GPs) in responding to women identified as experiencing partner abuse. This paper describes the design of a trial of a general practice-based intervention consisting of screening for fear of partner with feedback to GPs, training for GPs, brief counselling for women and minimal practice organisational change. It examines the effect on women's quality of life, mental health and safety behaviours. Methods/Design weave is a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Approximately 500 women (16-50 years) seen by the GP in the previous year are mailed a short lifestyle survey containing an item to screen for IPA. Women who indicate that they were afraid of a partner/ex-partner in the last year and provide contact details are invited to participate. Once baseline data are collected, GPs are randomly assigned to either a group involving healthy relationship and responding to IPA training plus inviting women for up to 6 sessions of counselling or to a group involving basic education and usual care for women. Outcomes will be evaluated by postal survey at 6 and 12 months following delivery of the intervention. There will be an economic evaluation, and process evaluation involving interviews with women and GPs, to inform understanding about implementation and outcomes. Discussion The

  18. Flexible but boring: medical students' perceptions of a career in general practice.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Nicole; McMenamin, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Australia will continue to face a general practitioner (GP) shortage unless a significant number of medical students make general practice their chosen career. Perceptions regarding general practice may influence career choices. Thus this study investigated what Australian medical students perceived to be the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a career in general practice via an anonymous online survey. Fifty-one students indicated general practice to be their first ranked career preference, 200 indicated a career other than general practice, and 106 were undecided. Two-hundred and two students reported having been on a GP placement, whereas 88 students had not. Flexibility, continuity of patient care and work-life balance were the three most common stated advantages to pursuing a career in general practice whereas general practice being boring, poorly paid, and of low prestige were the three most common disadvantages stated. Some disadvantages stated by those with a non-GP preference were not stated by those with a GP preference (e.g. lack of procedural skills, lack of career advancement opportunities). Students with more than 80 h of GP placement experience were more likely to list the advantages of work-life balance and a diversity of problems/illnesses/patients than those with no placement experience but were also more likely to list the disadvantage of low prestige. Negative stereotypes regarding general practice continue to exist which may influence students' career choices.

  19. Education Research Australia: A Changing Ecology of Knowledge and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Terri; Bennett, Dawn; Bennett, Sue; Bobis, Janette; Chan, Philip; Harrison, Neil; Shore, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Processes of national research assessment, such as Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) are a type of audit technology that confronts and steers established institutional identities and traditions. This nexus between policy and practice drives boundary work that diffracts prevailing policy logics, organisational practices, and habits of…

  20. Fostering Elementary Teachers' Research on Their Science Teaching Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of a program fostering prospective and practicing elementary school teachers' research on their science-teaching practices, discussing the science-education community's recognition of the importance of teacher research, examining beliefs underlying development of the program, describing the program's setting, summarizing…

  1. Practices of Legitimacy and the Problem of Artistic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matcham, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the positioning of art practice as a mode of research through various legitimising practices. While frequently fruitful, the imperative to make art justify itself as a form of research in order to achieve legitimacy allows that in art which does not engage in negative dialectics to slip from view. The possibility of the kind of…

  2. What Is Implementation Research? Rationale, Concepts, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Onil; Reeves, Scott; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on evidence-based practices in social work and medicine, there is a large gap between what is known and what is consistently done. Implementation research is the study of methods to promote the uptake of research findings into routine practice. In this article, we describe the rationale for implementation…

  3. Using Action Research Projects to Examine Teacher Technology Integration Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kara

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the technology integration practices of teachers involved in a statewide initiative via one cycle of action research. It differs from other studies of teacher technology integration practices because it simultaneously involved and provided direct benefits to teachers and researchers. The study used thematic analysis to provide…

  4. Strategic Approaches to Practice: An Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burwell, Kim; Shipton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The importance of personal practice for instrumentalists and vocalists is well established among researchers, and axiomatic for practitioners. This paper reports on a phase of an action research project, investigating student approaches to personal practice. Following a preliminary questionnaire study, a residential clinic was conducted by…

  5. Theoretical Trajectories within Communities of Practice in Higher Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummons, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the role of theory in higher education research is problematised using a communities of practice framework. Drawing on a case study derived from the author's own published work and doctoral study, the article concludes that the differential uses of theory within communities of research practice can be fruitfully explored, in part,…

  6. [General Strategies for Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Torres-Arreola, Laura Laura

    2015-01-01

    The need to use clinical practice guidelines (CPG) arises from the health conditions and problems that public health institutions in the country face. CPG are informative documents that help improve the quality of care processes and patient safety; having among its objectives, to reduce the variability of medical practice. The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social designed a strategic plan for the dissemination, implementation, monitoring and control of CPG to establish an applicable model in the medical units in the three levels of care at the Instituto. This paper summarizes some of the strategies of the plan that were made with the knowledge and experience of clinicians and managers, with which they intend to promote the adoption of the key recommendations of the guidelines, to promote a sense of belonging for health personnel, and to encourage changes in organizational culture.

  7. The management of alcohol-related problems in general practice in north India.

    PubMed

    Varma, V K; Malhotra, A K

    1988-07-01

    Twenty-seven general medical practitioners (GPs) were administered WHO semi-structured schedule enquiring "The Management of Alcohol-Related Problems in General Practice". Majority of the GPs had some involvement in each one of the specified alcohol-related problems. The involvement in alcohol and health education had been modest. Involvement in the control and regulatory activities was minimal. None of them felt that they had any role in the development of health and alcohol policy. Treatment response lo three typical situations appeared to be quite appropriate. To regulate production, to market less potent drinks at cheaper rates, to organize public health education programme through mass media were the suggestions made by them. It is suggested that GPs can and should be encouraged in leadership roles in policy decisions regarding the delivery of services, control and regulation of alcohol and research.

  8. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  9. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Massoome; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Kaviani, Ahmad; Hashemi, Esmat; Montazeri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Background There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. Results In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS) and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P < 0.01). There were no associations between BCS practice and the other variables studied. The most frequent reasons for not performing BCS were uncertainty about conservative therapy results (46%), uncertainty about the quality of available radiotherapy services (32%), and the probability of patients' non-compliance in radiotherapy (32%). Conclusion The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance). PMID:15811187

  10. Partnership and Recognition in Action Research: Understanding the Practices and Practice Architectures for Participation and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards-Groves, Christine; Olin, Anette; Karlberg-Granlund, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    This article is the first and introductory article of this special issue. The article gives a societist account of the principles of partnership and recognition as they are encountered and experienced in practices in action research. A societist account of practices requires a social theory for understanding practices. Therefore, the article…

  11. Public Health Advocacy to Change Corporate Practices: Implications for Health Education Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Corporate practices, such as advertising, public relations, lobbying, litigation, and sponsoring scientific research, have a significant impact on the health of the people in the United States. Recently, health professionals and advocates have created a new scope of practice that aims to modify corporate practices that harm health. This article…

  12. Creating High Functioning Schools: Practice and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cano, Yvonne, Ed.; Wood, Fred H., Ed.; Simmons, Jan C., Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers, chosen from those presented within the last 2 years at the annual National Conference on Creating the Quality School, hosted by the Center for the Study of Small/Rural Schools at the University of Oklahoma. The papers are grouped into three sections: leadership for school improvement; classroom practices for school…

  13. Cooperative Learning: Review of Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from pre-school through to tertiary level and across different subject domains. It involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks--goals and tasks that they would be unable to complete by…

  14. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  15. Vocabulary Instruction: Research to Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kame'enui, Edward J., Ed.; Baumann, James F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This highly regarded work brings together prominent authorities on vocabulary teaching and learning to provide a comprehensive yet concise guide to effective instruction. The book showcases practical ways to teach specific vocabulary words and word-learning strategies and create engaging, word-rich classrooms. Instructional activities and games…

  16. Challenging Teachers' Practice through Learning: Reflections on the Enhancing Effective Practice in Special Education Programme of Research and Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Roseanna

    2006-01-01

    When teachers participate in professional development and learning opportunities it enables them to reconceptualise their assessment and teaching practices with the support of facilitators and researchers. National programmes of professional development and research, such as the three year Enhancing Effective Practice in Special Education (EEPiSE)…

  17. Reconceptualizing Intervention Integrity: A Partnership-Based Framework for Linking Research with Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Thomas J.; Blom-Hoffman, Jessica; Clarke, Angela T.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Kelleher, Constance; Manz, Patricia H.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention and intervention research studies often fail to include an assessment of program integrity, and when they do, it is often examined in a limited way. Further, despite efforts to reform the intervention research process to include community stakeholders more actively in every phase of investigation, current practice generally employs a…

  18. Best Practices for Young Children's Music Education: Guidance from Brain Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews best practices for young children's music experiences in light of developments in brain research. The first section reviews research music and brain topics including neuromyths, effect of music on structural brain changes and general intelligence, plasticity, critical and optimal periods, and at-risk student populations. The…

  19. Highlighting the Need for Further Response to Intervention Research in General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara; Albritton, Kizzy; Roach, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) provides a framework for effective prevention and intervention at all achievement levels. RtI also allows school districts to use an alternative method for identifying students with disabilities, but there is a paucity of published empirical research aimed to inform RtI best practices among general educators. The…

  20. 14 CFR 61.43 - Practical tests: General procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (2) If the aircraft's type certification data sheet requires the pilot flight crew complement be a... certification data sheet allows the pilot flight crew complement to be either a single pilot, or a pilot and a... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS General §...

  1. The use of psychotropic drugs in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    All the psychotropic tablets prescribed by a general practitioner in one year are itemised. The patients who received them are separated into diagnostic groups and their treatment is analysed by the number of attendances, prescriptions, and duration of therapy. Hospital referrals and overdoses over a longer period are recorded. My policy in psychiatric conditions is indicated. PMID:496

  2. General practice in remote areas: attractions, expectations, and experiences

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Jim; Horobin, Gordon

    1978-01-01

    Interviews with a sample of general practitioners in remote areas of Scotland revealed a strong commitment to a wide family counsellor role as well as a wish to use clinical skills more fully. While many urban doctors express similar orientations we believe that rural practitioners feel better able to implement their preferred style of work which combines personal and professional elements. PMID:702438

  3. Pragmatism in practice: mixed methods research for physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James A; Connelly, Denise M; Zecevic, Aleksandra A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an argument for the place of mixed methods research across practice settings as an effective means of supporting evidence-based practice in physiotherapy. Physiotherapy practitioners use both qualitative and quantitative methods throughout the process of patient care-from history taking, assessment, and intervention to evaluation of outcomes. Research on practice paradigms demonstrates the importance of mixing qualitative and quantitative methods to achieve 'expert practice' that is concerned with optimizing outcomes and incorporating patient beliefs and values. Research paradigms that relate to this model of practice would integrate qualitative and quantitative types of knowledge and inquiry, while maintaining a prioritized focus on patient outcomes. Pragmatism is an emerging research paradigm where practical consequences and the effects of concepts and behaviors are vital components of meaning and truth. This research paradigm supports the simultaneous use of qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry to generate evidence to support best practice. This paper demonstrates that mixed methods research with a pragmatist view provides evidence that embraces and addresses the multiple practice concerns of practitioners better than either qualitative or quantitative research approaches in isolation.

  4. General practice observed. A do-it-yourself medical centre.

    PubMed

    Ganner, A N; Lockie, A C

    1979-11-17

    A group practice commissioned a local building company to build their own medical centre comprising 370 m2 (4000 ft2) of building with an adequate car park at a total cost of 60 000 pounds with design to completion in nine months. A bank loan for 10 years was assigned to the partnership and each partner made his own arrangements for repayment. The updated cost for June 1979 is 80 000-85 000 pounds. Building a centre in this way is professionally and financially rewarding.

  5. Instrument Reporting Practices in Second Language Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Deirdre J.

    2016-01-01

    Second language (L2) researchers often have to develop or change the instruments they use to measure numerous constructs (Norris & Ortega, 2012). Given the prevalence of researcher-developed and -adapted data collection instruments, and given the profound effect instrumentation can have on results, thorough reporting of instrumentation is…

  6. Research into Practice: Grammar Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This selective review of the second language acquisition and applied linguistics research literature on grammar learning and teaching falls into three categories: where research has had little impact (the non-interface position), modest impact (form-focused instruction), and where it potentially can have a large impact (reconceiving grammar).…

  7. Connecting Research and Practice in TESOL: A Community of Practice Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavakoli, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    In line with a growing interest in teacher research engagement in second language education, this article is an attempt to shed light on teachers' views on the relationship between teaching and practice. The data comprise semi-structured interviews with 20 teachers in England, examining their views about the divide between research and practice in…

  8. [The practice guideline 'Pregnancy and puerperium' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine].

    PubMed

    Giesen, P H; Slagter-Roukema, T M

    2004-01-10

    The first revision of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline about pregnancy and puerperium does not significantly differ from the first edition. The guideline is extensive, is well-worth reading and supports daily practice. There is a greater emphasis on the importance of cooperation and differentiation in primary care (midwifes and general practitioners). During the last decade many general practitioners stopped doing home deliveries and have therefore lost their experience in obstetric care and pathology. The guideline describes the general practitioner's tasks as a preconception counsellor, a professional expert on illnesses during pregnancy and after the delivery, and as the doctor of the newborn baby. It will hopefully stimulate a revived interest of and involvement in pregnancy and post-partum care among general practitioners. PMID:14753124

  9. Leadership and management skills of general practice nurses: experience or education?

    PubMed

    Lau, Rosalind; Cross, Wendy; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Annie; De Castro, Magali; Oxley, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    A key finding of this qualitative exploratory descriptive study into advanced nursing for general practice nurses (Australian setting) revealed that participants viewed leadership and management as best learnt 'apprenticeship' style on the job by years of experience. Participants (48) comprised of general practice nurses, practice managers and general practitioners from metropolitan Melbourne were interviewed. Other findings demonstrated that the participants generally had limited awareness that postgraduate education can assist in the development of leadership and management in advanced nursing practice. The participants lacked clarity about professional competencies and generally did not connect these to leadership and management. Professional bodies need to take the opportunity to promote awareness of the national competency standards. All three groups of participants expressed hopes about the future provision of professional development opportunities and support by the Medicare Local for leadership and management aspirations within advanced practice nursing.

  10. Leadership and management skills of general practice nurses: experience or education?

    PubMed

    Lau, Rosalind; Cross, Wendy; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Annie; De Castro, Magali; Oxley, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    A key finding of this qualitative exploratory descriptive study into advanced nursing for general practice nurses (Australian setting) revealed that participants viewed leadership and management as best learnt 'apprenticeship' style on the job by years of experience. Participants (48) comprised of general practice nurses, practice managers and general practitioners from metropolitan Melbourne were interviewed. Other findings demonstrated that the participants generally had limited awareness that postgraduate education can assist in the development of leadership and management in advanced nursing practice. The participants lacked clarity about professional competencies and generally did not connect these to leadership and management. Professional bodies need to take the opportunity to promote awareness of the national competency standards. All three groups of participants expressed hopes about the future provision of professional development opportunities and support by the Medicare Local for leadership and management aspirations within advanced practice nursing. PMID:25679023

  11. Knowledge-based generalization of metabolic networks: a practical study.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, Anna; Sherman, David J

    2014-04-01

    The complex process of genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction involves semi-automatic reaction inference, analysis, and refinement through curation by human experts. Unfortunately, decisions by experts are hampered by the complexity of the network, which can mask errors in the inferred network. In order to aid an expert in making sense out of the thousands of reactions in the organism's metabolism, we developed a method for knowledge-based generalization that provides a higher-level view of the network, highlighting the particularities and essential structure, while hiding the details. In this study, we show the application of this generalization method to 1,286 metabolic networks of organisms in Path2Models that describe fatty acid metabolism. We compare the generalised networks and show that we successfully highlight the aspects that are important for their curation and comparison. PMID:24712528

  12. Team work load in an English general practice. I.

    PubMed

    Marsh, G N; McNay, R A

    1974-02-23

    A survey of the total care provided by a general practitioner and his paramedical team for 3,137 patients in Teesside in 1972 showed that even in this area of high morbidity and mortality the work load was very small. The doctor held an average of 2.3 consultations per patient per year, and the overall average for the team of doctor, nurse, and health visitor was only 3.1. By delegating work to a team of trained paramedical workers, by increasing the proportion of personal medicine, and by engaging the co-operation of his patients, the general practitioner reduced his work load considerably, without any apparent reduction in standard of care.

  13. Knowledge-based generalization of metabolic networks: a practical study.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, Anna; Sherman, David J

    2014-04-01

    The complex process of genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction involves semi-automatic reaction inference, analysis, and refinement through curation by human experts. Unfortunately, decisions by experts are hampered by the complexity of the network, which can mask errors in the inferred network. In order to aid an expert in making sense out of the thousands of reactions in the organism's metabolism, we developed a method for knowledge-based generalization that provides a higher-level view of the network, highlighting the particularities and essential structure, while hiding the details. In this study, we show the application of this generalization method to 1,286 metabolic networks of organisms in Path2Models that describe fatty acid metabolism. We compare the generalised networks and show that we successfully highlight the aspects that are important for their curation and comparison.

  14. The Educator as Researcher: Principles and Practice of Participatory Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Alma Flor; And Others

    The text of three papers are presented. The first, by Alma Ada Flor, focuses on the question "What is participatory research?" It is suggested that participatory research enriches the knowledge of participants and opens up new topics to them. The nature and theory fundmental to participatory research and the relation of participatory research to…

  15. Exciting Research Transforms Practice: 1989 AASA Research Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Administrator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Features researchers reviewed by the AASA Advisory Committee on Higher Education Relationships and selected to present research findings at the 1989 AASA convention. Iris McGinnis won the Research Award in the graduate student research category for work on school board participation in contract bargaining. Two other commendation awards are…

  16. A modified framework for rural general practice: the importance of recruitment and retention.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, J S; Rolley, F

    1998-04-01

    Whilst definitions of what constitutes general practice vary according to purpose, the pivotal role of general practitioners as key providers of health and medical services is acknowledged. Recent concerns to address both what general practitioners and their patients want and get from general practice stem from a recognized need to include stakeholder concerns about the adequacy of general practice alongside workforce issues such as recruitment and retention. Nowhere is this need so crucial as in rural areas where the range of health services is limited and major inequities exist in the availability of general practitioners. An extended framework for evaluating what general practitioners and their patients expect and receive from general practice, with particular reference to rural general practice in Australia is presented. Three inter-related dimensions of recruitment, retention and a whole patient/whole family approach to health care are suggested as underpinning this framework. The significance of each dimension to ensuring the provision of quality general practice care in rural communities, and the links between them, are outlined in the proposed framework. PMID:9579746

  17. Advancing practice inquiry: research foundations of the practice doctorate in nursing.

    PubMed

    Magyary, Diane; Whitney, Joanne D; Brown, Marie Annette

    2006-01-01

    The University of Washington Doctor of Nursing Practice program entails 3 curricular dimensions: advanced practice, leadership, and practice inquiry. In this article, the practice inquiry dimension is discussed and defined as a type of clinical investigation that closely aligns with the realities and complexities of everyday practice by advanced practice nurses (APNs). The advancement of APNs' practice inquiry competencies is timely for its interfaces with the national scientific agenda's emphasis on translating science to clinical practice, health care delivery systems and policy. A framework for conceptualizing a practice inquiry curriculum and competencies is proposed. In addition, the divergent and convergent comparisons with Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) nursing programs are discussed, with emphasis placed on potential collaborative clinical research endeavors.

  18. Operator Priming and Generalization of Practice in Adults' Simple Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yalin; Campbell, Jamie I. D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a renewed debate about whether educated adults solve simple addition problems (e.g., 2 + 3) by direct fact retrieval or by fast, automatic counting-based procedures. Recent research testing adults' simple addition and multiplication showed that a 150-ms preview of the operator (+ or ×) facilitated addition, but not multiplication,…

  19. [The practice of research in history].

    PubMed

    Poisson, Michel

    2013-11-01

    History is a discipline whose research methods present similarities with those of other human and social sciences, with certain specificities. The nursing profession can use these methods to showcase its history and the history of nursing care.

  20. University Libraries and Other General Research Libraries Section. General Research Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on university and other research libraries, presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "The Impact of Technology on Users of Academic and Research Libraries," in which C. Lee Jones (United States) focuses on the impact of technical advances in computing and telecommunication…

  1. Nurse practitioners in general practice: an expanding role.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, G

    1996-11-13

    At a time when the government is proposing to allow nurses to become equal partners with GPs and a consultative report commissioned by the NHSE found that nurse practitioners provide cheaper and better services for patients (NHSE 1996), this article describes the role of a nurse practitioner working in a GP fundholding practice in the UK. The author considers issues of autonomy and accountability surrounding the development of the role. Its relationship to the development of nursing and caring is examined in the light of some doctors' and nurses' scepticism and ambivalence. The benefits to patients are presented to highlight the value of a properly structured nurse practitioner role integrated into primary care provision.

  2. Limits of Generalizing in Education Research: Why Criteria for Research Generalization Should Include Population Heterogeneity and Uses of Knowledge Claims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercikan, Kadriye; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Generalization is a critical concept in all research designed to generate knowledge that applies to all elements of a unit (population) while studying only a subset of these elements (sample). Commonly applied criteria for generalizing focus on experimental design or representativeness of samples of the population of units. The criteria…

  3. A Translational Model of Research-Practice Integration

    PubMed Central

    Vivian, Dina; Hershenberg, Rachel; Teachman, Bethany A.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Goldfried, Marvin R.; Wolfe, Barry

    2013-01-01

    We propose a four-level, recursive Research-Practice Integration framework as a heuristic to (a) integrate and reflect on the articles in this Special Section as contributing to a bidirectional bridge between research and practice, and (b) consider additional opportunities to address the research–practice gap. Level 1 addresses Treatment Validation studies and includes an article by Lochman and colleagues concerning the programmatic adaptation, implementation, and dissemination of the empirically supported Coping Power treatment program for youth aggression. Level 2 translation, Training in Evidence-Based Practice, includes a paper by Hershenberg, Drabick, and Vivian, which focuses on the critical role that predoctoral training plays in bridging the research–practice gap. Level 3 addresses the Assessment of Clinical Utility and Feedback to Research aspects of translation. The articles by Lambert and Youn, Kraus, and Castonguay illustrate the use of commercial outcome packages that enable psychotherapists to integrate ongoing client assessment, thus enhancing the effectiveness of treatment implementation and providing data that can be fed back to researchers. Lastly, Level 4 translation, the Cross-Level Integrative Research and Communication, concerns research efforts that integrate data from clinical practice and all other levels of translation, as well as communication efforts among all stakeholders, such as researchers, psychotherapists, and clients. Using a two-chair technique as a framework for his discussion, Wolfe's article depicts the struggle inherent in research–practice integration efforts and proposes a rapprochement that highlights advancements in the field. PMID:22642522

  4. Training for systemic general practice: a new approach from the Tavistock Clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Launer, J; Lindsey, C

    1997-01-01

    A new course at the Tavistock Clinic offers general practitioners (GPs) and primary care nurses a training based on family therapy principles but directed at developing skills and conceptualization across the whole range of general practice work. The course may point to a new way forward for postgraduate training in general practice, creating links with the social sciences and giving doctors and nurses appropriate training for the 'postmodern' world. PMID:9281876

  5. NONVERBAL TREATMENT OF NEUROSIS—Techniques for General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Batten, Charles T.

    1959-01-01

    “Psychosomatic medicine” does not demand that the general practitioner function as a psychiatrist; rather, it is a psychiatric orientation that can increase the effectiveness of purely medical treatment for such conditions as neuroses. The general practitioner to whom the patient turns may achieve permanent results with nonverbal techniques where formal psychotherapy would be impracticable or unacceptable. The first aim is to relieve pressure so that the patient can regain his mental balance and thereby his self-confidence. Arts, hobbies, sports, and the like can be prescribed rather specifically according to the patient's personality and needs. Nutrition can be improved simply at first by prescribing needed additions to diet rather than imposing restrictions. Vitamin deficiency may by itself be the cause of neurosis or more serious mental disease, whereas psychic stress by itself may create a need for additional vitamin intake. Hormone therapy may be extremely helpful but must be based on clear indication and limited to specific purposes. Since lack of sleep and rest quickly impairs mental function, it is important for neurotic persons to learn relaxation as a necessity for sleep. Sedatives may be used in a crisis but should be abandoned as soon as possible. With all drugs there are problems of excess and habituation. The least, the mildest, the shortest dosage is the ideal. The initial steps of psychotherapy are available to any physician: Establishing rapport, noting how complaints are stated, encouraging ventilation, winning confidence rather than immediate results. PMID:13638823

  6. Bipolar disorder in general practice: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Piterman, Leon; Jones, Kay M; Castle, David J

    2010-08-16

    General practitioners are involved in the continuing care and shared care of patients with chronic mental illness, including bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists are particularly reliant on GPs to monitor and treat comorbidities as well as the psychiatric condition itself. Management of chronic mental illness is compromised by a number of factors, including problems with diagnosis, physical comorbidity, erratic attendance and poor compliance with treatment. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder is often delayed, and differential diagnoses to be considered include unipolar depression, anxiety disorder, drug and alcohol dependence, personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and general medical and central nervous system diseases. New Medicare items have been introduced under the Better Access to Mental Health Care initiative. However, uptake for patients with chronic psychiatric illness, including bipolar disorder, is low. Patients with bipolar disorder may be prone to a range of comorbid psychological, social and physical problems, and GPs need to be vigilant to detect and manage comorbidity and social problems as part of the overall plan. This includes assistance with certification for sickness and unemployment benefits. GPs may become involved during crises affecting patients and this may pose significant problems for GPs who need to provide ongoing care following patient discharge from hospital. Despite these difficulties, opportunities exist for GPs to play a vital and ongoing role in the management of patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:20712554

  7. A Qualitative Investigation of Practicing Psychologists' Attitudes Toward Research-Informed Practice: Implications for Dissemination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rebecca E.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Chambless, Dianne L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a qualitative analysis of interviews with 25 psychologists in independent practice, investigating everyday treatment decisions and attitudes about treatment outcome research and empirically supported treatments (ESTs). Clinicians noted positive aspects about treatment outcome research, such as being interested in what works. However, they had misgivings about the application of controlled research findings to their practices, were skeptical about using manualized protocols, and expressed concern that nonpsychologists would use EST lists to dictate practice. Clinicians reported practicing in an eclectic framework, and many reported including cognitive-behavioral elements in their practice. To improve their practice, they reported valuing clinical experience, peer networks, practitioner-oriented books, and continuing education when it was not too basic. Time and financial barriers concerned nearly all participants. Clinicians suggested they might be interested in ESTs if they could integrate them into their current frameworks, and if resources for learning ESTs were improved. PMID:22654246

  8. Research into Practice: How Research Appears in Pronunciation Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levis, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Research into pronunciation has often disregarded its potential to inform pedagogy. This is due partly to the historical development of pronunciation teaching and research, but its effect is that there is often a mismatch between research and teaching. This paper looks at four areas in which the (mis)match is imperfect but in which a greater…

  9. [Impaired immunity: risk groups and consequences for general practice].

    PubMed

    Opstelten, W; Bijlsma, J W J; Gelinck, L B S; Hielkema, C M J; Verheij, Th J M; van Eden, W

    2016-01-01

    - Due to medication use, comorbidities and/or age, an increasing number of patients have an impaired immunity to infection.- Impaired immunity may lead to an increased risk of (opportunistic) infection, complications from infections, and difficulties in the diagnosis of infections.- Guided by clinical parameters, a general practitioner can classify an impaired immunity as 'clinically irrelevant', 'limitedly relevant' or 'potentially serious'.- Tocilizumab impairs the production of CRP, which makes it unreliable as an infection parameter.- In case of a suspected infection in patients with severe immunosuppression, it will often be necessary to consult a specialist as quickly as possible about further diagnostic procedures and the need for, type and administration route of antimicrobials.- In patients with an impaired immunity, adaptation of the antibiotic policy and prophylactic measures, such as vaccination, may be indicated.- Patients with (functional) asplenia should immediately start antibiotic treatment in case of fever, pending clinical evaluation by a physician. PMID:27299487

  10. Fluorescent-protein-based probes: general principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-01-01

    An important application of fluorescent proteins is to derive genetically encoded fluorescent probes that can actively respond to cellular dynamics such as pH change, redox signaling, calcium oscillation, enzyme activities, and membrane potential. Despite the large diverse group of fluorescent-protein-based probes, a few basic principles have been established and are shared by most of these probes. In this article, the focus is on these general principles and strategies that guide the development of fluorescent-protein-based probes. A few examples are provided in each category to illustrate the corresponding principles. Since these principles are quite straightforward, others may adapt them to create fluorescent probes for their own interest. Hopefully, the development of the ever-growing family of fluorescent-protein-based probes will no longer be limited to a small number of laboratories specialized in senor development, leading to the situation that biological studies will be bettered assisted by genetically encoded sensors.

  11. [Prevention in general practice: what is dangerous for liver cells?].

    PubMed

    Riemann, J F

    1978-11-16

    The liver is engaged in detoxication and elimination of toxic-nutritional foreign material. In addition it is of high affinity to viruses and parasites. Different influences may cause pathological reactions, which are of great consequence to the normal and even more to the previously damaged liver. In general, interactions and cumulative effects of different toxic agents occur. The increase of chronic hepatic disorders in the last years has to be noticed considering economic and social medical aspects. At the first place of agents with a toxic effect to the liver there is alcohol, followed by hyperalimentation and malnutrition. Numerous drugs with different reactions to liver morphology, liver impairment caused by environmental influences and infections retain further places. Prophylaxis and therapy of toxic-nutritional liver damage is based on recognition and elimination of the noxes. Patients with chronic liver disease need a special management and consultation by their physician.

  12. Classroom Authority: Theory, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Judith L., Ed.; Hemmings, Annette B., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This book describes and analyzes authority relationships in classrooms through explorations of theory, prior research, and contemporary qualitative studies. The emphasis is on the social construction of authority and the crucial role authority plays in K-16 teachers' pedagogy and students' academic engagement and achievement. The introductory…

  13. Contextualizing Theories and Practices of Bricolage Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, bricolage, as an approach to qualitative inquiry, has gained popularity in academic circles. However, while conceptual and concrete precedents exist, the approach has remained relatively misunderstood, and unpopular, in broader research communities. This may be because the complexity of the approach has stymied widespread…

  14. Adolescent Literacy Resources: Linking Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Julie

    Secondary school educators too often find that their students do not have the necessary literacy skills to use reading and writing effectively to learn subject matter. For middle and high school educators searching for ways to promote literacy, this book bridges the divide between what the research says works in literacy and what is happening in…

  15. The Evolution and Practice of Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John; Hanlon, Martin; Yorke, Mantz

    2013-01-01

    Although institutional research has been a significant feature of U.S. higher education for more than 50 years, it is not so well understood in other parts of the world. As higher education around the world faces increasingly challenging times in responding to pressures of massification and globalization, increasing forms of accountability and…

  16. Research, Theory and Practice in the USSR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondakov, Mikhail I.

    1983-01-01

    A prominent Soviet educator is interviewed about education in the Soviet Union. Topics covered include the goals of Soviet education, the current 10-year plan for education, school consolidation and upgrading, the use of national languages and Russian in the school system, and educational research and its dissemination. (IS)

  17. English Teaching: Theory, Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji; Kitao, S. Kathleen

    The collection of papers on the teaching of English as a second language includes: "Teaching English in Japan"; "Reading and Evaluating Quantitative Research"; "Transformational Generative Grammar and Language Teaching"; "Process and Social Aspects of Writing: Theory and Classroom Application"; "Contrastive Analysis Between English…

  18. Developing a Community of Research Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Rowena

    2012-01-01

    Writing journal articles is essential for academics and professionals to develop their ideas, make an impact in their fields and progress in their careers. Research assessment makes successful performance in this form of writing even more important. This article describes a course on writing journal articles and draws on interviews with…

  19. Converging Paths: Creativity Research and Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Michael Hanchett

    2014-01-01

    Education has long been a central issue for creativity research, and the integration of creativity and education has remained a goal and controversy. In spite of over sixty years of trying to bring creativity into education, education is often criticized for not teaching creative thinking, while also criticized from other quarters for not meeting…

  20. Writing across the Disciplines: Research into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Art, Ed.; Fulwiler, Toby, Ed.

    The impact of a writing-across-the-curriculum program on the professional life of a single university department and on the pedagogical life of an entire campus community is the focus of this book. The essays in the first section explain writing across the curriculum and provide a context for collective writing research. This section demonstrates…

  1. Multicultural Issues in Literacy Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Arlette Ingram, Ed.; Garcia, Georgia Earnest, Ed.; Barrera, Rosalinda B., Ed.; Harris, Violet J., Ed.

    This book addresses the lack of research and scholarly discussion on multicultural literacies. A common theme across chapters is the ways in which elements of difference--race, ethnicity, gender, class, and language--create tensions that influence students' literacy experiences and achievements. Sections explore the relationships among culture,…

  2. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  3. Positivistic Educational Administration Research, Theory, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    Logical positivism, or logical empiricism, emphasizes rationality, especially preferring the verification of facts over speculation. This report clearly places traditional research methodology in education in the arena of logical positivism. Since reality is seen as ordered and objective, assumptions are made about people and the gathering of…

  4. Psychology and Health: Research, Practice, and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Norine G.

    2003-01-01

    Since World War II, American psychology's role in health care has significantly expanded. This was formally recognized in 2001 when the membership of the American Psychological Association (APA) approved a bylaw change in its mission statement to include the word health. An accumulating body of research demonstrates and recent reviews conclude…

  5. An Introduction to Research and Evaluation in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flor, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research and evaluation are tools that can help validate experiential education practice and provide a better understanding of it. Defines types of research and evaluation and discusses the benefits of these activities. Reasons for conducting research include (1) gaining support and credibility; (2) program improvement; and (3) marketing. (KS)

  6. Practical steps to community engaged research: from inputs to outcomes.

    PubMed

    Isler, Malika Roman; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2012-01-01

    For decades, the dominant research paradigm has included trials conducted in clinical settings with little involvement from communities. The move toward community engaged research (CEnR) necessitates the inclusion of diverse perspectives to address complex problems. Using a relationship paradigm, CEnR reframes the context, considerations, practical steps, and outcomes of research.

  7. Environmental Design: Research and Practice, Volumes One and Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, William J., Ed.

    One hundred and fifty papers deal with the current range of concerns in the emergent field of environmental design research and emphasize the relating of research to practice. The papers focus on (1) original research in the social and behavioral sciences with direct relevance to environmental design, planning, and management; and (2) new methods…

  8. Extending Engineering Practice Research with Shared Qualitative Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevelyan, James

    2016-01-01

    Research on engineering practice is scarce and sharing of qualitative research data can reduce the effort required for an aspiring researcher to obtain enough data from engineering workplaces to draw generalizable conclusions, both qualitative and quantitative. This paper describes how a large shareable qualitative data set on engineering…

  9. Towards Creative Practice in Research in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    This paper traces an experience of designing and conducting qualitative research in dance education. The primary aim is to highlight the importance of giving consideration to research methodologies in the emergence of personal research practice. Making decisions about what method/s to use will ultimately direct the engagement with any study,…

  10. Addressing Quandaries in Early Education through Research Practice Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Carla; Connolly, Faith; Doss, Chris; Grigg, Jeffrey; Gorgen, Perry; Wentworth, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This panel examines research on early education from two research practice partnerships, the Baltimore Education Research Consortium (BERC) with Baltimore City Schools and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and the Stanford-SFUSD Partnership with San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) and Stanford University in San Francisco,…

  11. Assessment as Action Research: Bridging Academic Scholarship and Everyday Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malenfant, Kara J.; Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke; Gilchrist, Debra

    2016-01-01

    This introductory essay to this special issue demonstrates that action research has a vital role in evidence-informed practice in academic libraries. This special issue of "College and Research Libraries" ("C&RL") proudly features a selection of action research studies by participants of the Association of College and…

  12. Evidence-based practice, research, peer review, and publication.

    PubMed

    Gunn, I P

    1998-11-01

    For about a quarter of a century, concerns have been expressed about published biomedical research. It became more acute after some published research and broad dissemination was found fraudulent. With the emphasis now being placed on scientifically validated or evidence-based practice, it has become more imperative that clinical guidelines be based on credible information in our textbooks and research literature. Since the early 1990s, it has been found that much of the research in our electronic databases does not meet quality standards and often is irrelevant, calling into questions problems with peer review, including the selection and publication process of our journals. This column is devoted to calling attention to these problems not only to CRNAs and other researchers, but also to the consumers of research who often use it to make changes in their practice. It also calls attention to the CRNA community about the movement toward calls for greater accountability in practice, both as to quality and cost, from which the movement toward evidence-based practice, the identification and benchmarking of best practices, and the development and implementation of clinical practice guideline has evolved. To feel ownership in anesthesia-related clinical practice guidelines, CRNAs must become involved in their development and implementation. PMID:9866493

  13. Invisible nursing research: thoughts about mixed methods research and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    In this this essay, the author addresses the close connection between mixed methods research and nursing practice. If the assertion that research and practice are parallel processes is accepted, then nursing practice may be considered "invisible mixed methods research," in that almost every encounter between a nurse and a patient involves collection and integration of qualitative (word) and quantitative (number) information that actually is single-case mixed methods research.

  14. Refugee experiences of general practice in countries of resettlement: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, I-Hao; Drillich, Ann; Schattner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Refugees and asylum seekers often struggle to use general practice services in resettlement countries. Aim To describe and analyse the literature on the experiences of refugees and asylum seekers using general practice services in countries of resettlement. Design and setting Literature review using systematic search and narrative data extraction and synthesis methodologies. International, peer-reviewed literature published in English language between 1990 and 2013. Method Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, and CINAHL databases were searched using the terms: refugee, asylum seeker, experience, perception, doctor, physician, and general practitioner. Titles, abstracts and full texts were reviewed and were critically appraised. Narrative themes describing the refugee or asylum seeker’s personal experiences of general practice services were identified, coded, and analysed. Results From 8722 papers, 85 were fully reviewed and 23 included. These represented the experiences of approximately 864 individuals using general practice services across 11 countries. Common narrative themes that emerged were: difficulties accessing general practice services, language barriers, poor doctor–patient relationships, and problems with the cultural acceptability of medical care. Conclusion The difficulties refugees and asylum seekers experience accessing and using general practice services could be addressed by providing practical support for patients to register, make appointments, and attend services, and through using interpreters. Clinicians should look beyond refugee stereotypes to focus on the needs and expectations of the individual. They should provide clear explanations about unfamiliar clinical processes and treatments while offering timely management. PMID:25733438

  15. The utility of an online diagnostic decision support system (Isabel) in general practice: a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Emily J; Rubin, Greg P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the utility of Isabel, an online diagnostic decision support system developed by Isabel Healthcare primarily for secondary medical care, in the general practice setting. Design Focus groups were conducted with clinicians to understand why and how they used the system. A modified online post-use survey asked practitioners about its impact on their decision-making. Normalization process theory (NPT) was used as a theoretical framework to determine whether the system could be incorporated into routine clinical practice. Setting The system was introduced by NHS County Durham and Darlington in the UK in selected general practices as a three-month pilot. Participants General practitioners and nurse practitioners who had access to Isabel as part of the Primary Care Trust's pilot. Main outcome measures General practitioners’ views, experiences and usage of the system. Results Seven general practices agreed to pilot Isabel. Two practices did not subsequently use it. The remaining five practices conducted searches on 16 patients. Post-use surveys (n = 10) indicated that Isabel had little impact on diagnostic decision-making. Focus group participants stated that, although the diagnoses produced by Isabel in general did not have an impact on their decision-making, they would find the tool useful if it were better tailored to the primary care setting. Our analysis concluded that normalization was not likely to occur in its current form. Conclusions Isabel was of limited utility in this short pilot study and may need further modification for use in general practice. PMID:23772310

  16. Council tax valuation band as marker of deprivation and of general practice workload.

    PubMed

    Beale, N; Baker, N; Straker-Cook, D

    2000-07-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that Council Tax Valuation Banding (CTVB) is a measure both of UK socioeconomic status and of general practice workload. It is a retrospective cohort study based in a UK semi-rural general practice, North Wiltshire. The study group is a randomised selection of UK general practice patients. The outcome measures are socio-demographic and primary care workload parameters versus CTVBs by logistic regression analyses in a sample of 378 patients (90% participation rate). People who pay little or no council tax are significantly less likely to live in owner-occupied homes or to have access to a car than their counterparts. There is also a significant inverse association between CTVB and demand for general practitioner services. CTVB could be an accessible, universal, non-census marker of UK socioeconomic status and of general practice workload that would have validity in the context of primary care resource allocation and is a concept worthy of further investigation.

  17. Working with laboratory animals: general principles and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Wright, K C

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory animals play an indispensable role in research discovery and technological advances, and they will continue to yield basic, exciting, and prodigious information that can enrich the future of people and other animals. For both ethical and scientific reasons, all-individuals whose work requires the use of laboratory animals must take the time to conduct a thorough review of the literature to determine what animal models are available and which are the most relevant, and they must learn and understand the uniqueness of the selected species, breed, and strain. Scientists have the privilege, but not the right, to use animals as experimental subjects. This privilege must not be abused. Therefore, it is imperative that before working with any laboratory animal, you know your "subject." PMID:9152909

  18. Practical library research: a tool for effective library management.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, E; Mankin, C J; Bastille, J D

    1995-01-01

    Librarians are being urged to conduct research as one of their professional responsibilities. Many librarians, however, avoid research, because they believe it is beyond their capabilities or resources. This paper discusses the importance of conducting applied research-research directed toward solving practical problems. The paper describes how one library conducted practical research projects, including use studies and surveys, over an eighteen-year period. These projects produced objective data that were used by the library to make management decisions that benefited both the library and its parent institution. This paper encourages other librarians to conduct practical research projects and to share the results with their colleagues through publication in the professional literature. PMID:7703934

  19. Particularizing the general: Sustaining theoretical integrity in the context of an evidence-based practice agenda.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Sally; Sawatzky, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of demands for accountability and health care quality places nurses under constant pressure to ensure professional practice is evidence-based. The corresponding emphasis on knowledge that pertains to general populations challenges nursing's traditional focus on the uniqueness of each individual patient. Considering how nurses engage with professional systematic thinking processes, we reflect on ways competing agendas in the evidence-based practice environment compromise the professional vision aspired to by an earlier era of nursing model and framework builders. Exploring the scientific thinking underpinning practice evidence, we contemplate implications for applying general knowledge to particular practice, reconsidering options for conceptualizing nursing praxis.

  20. Need for Practice-Based Research in School Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Place, A. Will; Edmister, Julie; Zigler, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article's first objective is to establish the need for elevating the quantity and quality of practice-based research in school administration. The requirement is addressed in relation to (a) persisting social demands for school reform, (b) heightened demands for evidence-based practice in all professions, and (c) persistent…

  1. Digital Video as Research Practice: Methodology for the Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrum, Wesley; Duque, Ricardo; Brown, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This essay has its origin in a project on the globalization of science that rediscovered the wisdom of past research practices through the technology of the future. The main argument of this essay is that a convergence of digital video technologies with practices of social surveillance portends a methodological shift towards a new variety of…

  2. Evaluation of Research. A Selection of Current Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Michael; Georghiou, Luke

    This report is based on selected surveys of research practices used in eight countries (Canada, France, Germany, Japan, The Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States). It is designed as a technical approach to help both scientists and decision makers unfamiliar with these procedures to define the most relevant practices in…

  3. Discovering Letters and Sounds. Research in Practice Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topfer; Christine

    2007-01-01

    The Research in Practice Series has been developed to provide practical, easy to read, up-to-date information and support to a growing national readership of early childhood workers. Letters and sounds are the foundation blocks for communication -- the pathway to success in school and life. Topfer explains how to use games and activities involving…

  4. Teacher Inquiry: Living the Research in Everyday Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Anthony, Ed.; Erickson, Gaalen, Ed.

    This book includes 22 papers in three parts. After (1) "Teacher Inquiry: A Defining Feature of Professional Practice" (Anthony Clarke and Gaalen Erickson), Part 1, "Enacting Teacher Research in Practice Settings," includes (2) "Writing Matters: Exploring the Relationship between Writing Instruction and Assessment" (Kim Douillard); (3)…

  5. Numeracy into Action: Putting Numeracy Research into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Daniel; Byrne, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 the National Adult Literacy Agency (NALA) published a research report titled "What Really Counts Next: Action Learning Project with Numeracy Tutors" (Sellers and Byrne, 2014). The report provided an in-depth insight into the way tutors made changes to their practice, and offered practical tips on how to teach numeracy to adult…

  6. Elements of Diversity in Invitational Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Invitational theory uses many elements to define, describe, and delineate its beliefs and practices. For example, the Five Ps of people, places, policies, programs, and processes are consistently cited in the literature and research as the framework for assessing inviting practices. Another example is the presentation of four areas of inviting:…

  7. Strengthening Research by Designing for Coherence and Connections to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerst, Timothy; Confrey, Jere; Heck, Daniel; Knuth, Eric; Lambdin, Diana V.; White, Dorothy; Baltzley, Patricia C.; Quander, Judith Reed

    2010-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) is committed to strengthening relations between research and practice and to the development of a coherent knowledge base that is usable in practice. The need to work toward connection and coherence is not unique to the field of mathematics education. Fields such as medicine, software…

  8. Researching "Practiced Language Policies": Insights from Conversation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonacina-Pugh, Florence

    2012-01-01

    In language policy research, "policy" has traditionally been conceptualised as a notion separate from that of "practice". In fact, language practices were usually analysed with a view to evaluate whether a policy is being implemented or resisted to. Recently, however, Spolsky in ("Language policy". Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 2004;…

  9. Online Education and Its Effective Practice: A Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Anna; Chen, Xiufang

    2016-01-01

    Using a qualitative content analysis approach, this study reviewed 47 published studies and research on online teaching and learning since 2008, primarily focusing on how theories, practices and assessments apply to the online learning environment. The purpose of this paper is to provide practical suggestions for those who are planning to develop…

  10. Double Blind: Supervising Women as Creative Practice-Led Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Courtney; Haynes, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Many women creative practice-led researchers appear inhibited by a number of factors directly connected to their gender. This article discusses these factors, including the culture of visual arts professional practice, the circumstances surrounding women postgraduate students and unproductive self-theories about intelligence and creativity. A…

  11. Problems in Communications with Patients in General Surgery Outpatient Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tonguc Utku; Gumus, Enes; Salman, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Communication between the patient and physician is central to medical care. However communication skills in Turkey haven’t been gained so much concern. This situation effect the national quality of health care. Here, we tried to perform some basic communication skills and to find the problems with the possible solution suggestions. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for a month in general surgery outpatient department located in the slum part of Ankara with low socio-economic population. Basic communication skills were performed. The age, sex, education levels of the patients were obtained. Total symptom expression and interview time were recorded. Previous medical histories were asked. Interruptions including telephone, door knocking were noted. The questions of the patients at the end of the interview classified as hospital setting, nutrition and treatment. Results: Total 410 interviews were analysed. Mean symptom expression and interview times were 22.9 sec and 7.05 min, respectively. Educated patients, males and young patients expressed symptoms longer than the others (p<0.05). There were 174 interruptions in which total interview time signifantly increased than the non interrupted ones (p<0.05). Final questions about hospital setting were signifantly higher in illiterate patients than the educated ones (p<0.05). Awareness of medical history is higher in educated and young patients. Conclusion: Basic communications skills can be performed whether in rural regions. Much more concern should be given to the education of communication skills. The obstacles in communication in medicine are low education levels, and unorganised health system. PMID:26644767

  12. [Research Biomedical Ethics and Practical Wisdom].

    PubMed

    Vergara, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    As is well known, in the field of Biomedical Ethics some methodological proposals have been put forward. They try to provide some guidelines in order to take proper decisions. These methodologies are quite useful insofar as they supply reasons for action, but they are essentially insufficient. In fact, taking a good decision requires a special skill that goes beyond sheer technique, and this skill is traditionally called practical wisdom. Not in the usual and more outlying sense of sheer caution, but in the more central one of phronesis or prudentia. Although it is not a new notion, it usually appears blurred in biomedical decision-making theory, playing the wrong role, or in a marginal or indefinite way. From this postulate, we will try to make a double analysis. First, we will try to show the need for a proper understanding of the core role that phronesis plays in decision making. Second, we will try to get the original meaning of Aristotelian phronesis back. For reasons of space, in this paper the second question will be just partially addressed. PMID:26378599

  13. Developing Social Work Professional Judgment Skills: Enhancing Learning in Practice by Researching Learning in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawles, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this article are twofold: to discuss the value of practice-based research as a basis for enhancing learning and teaching in social work and, as an illustration of this, to present the findings of a preliminary qualitative research study into social work students' development of professional judgment skills. The research was conducted…

  14. Using Qualitative Research to Bridge Research, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret W.; Flood, Julee T.

    2012-01-01

    Too often, researchers get a bad name for engaging in inquiry that is inaccessible to the practitioner and policy communities who could most benefit from it. Although speaking to others in the scholarly community is important, researchers must also be able to translate their results into more accessible language for multiple audiences. This…

  15. Research into Practice. Leaders Sharing--Research Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, John W.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses three compendiums of Ed Tech research giving readers a fairly broad overview of where the field stands today. But, just as with technology, research is constantly moving forward. New and exciting ways to use technology and valuable data to support different kinds of technology use are continually being discovered. The texts…

  16. Nurses and the wise organisation: techne and phronesis in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally

    2013-06-01

    This paper draws on classical theories of wisdom to explore the organisational impact of nurses on Australian general practice. Between 2004 and 2008, numbers of general practice nurses doubled, the most rapid influx of nurses into any Australian workplace over the decade. Using data from the Australian General Practice Nurses Study, we argue that nurses had a positive impact because they introduced techne at the organisational level and amplified phronesis in clinical activities. In its Hippocratic formulation, techne refers to a field of definable knowledge, which is purposeful and useful and requires mastery of rational principles. Nursing, with its focus on system and accountability, brought techne out of the GP's consulting room and into the general practice as a whole. Nurses also exemplify phronesis, an Aristotelian virtue connoting a reasoned and honourable capacity to make judgements: the practical wisdom that defines the interaction between clinician and patient in general practice. At a time of significant GP shortage, doctors and nurses began to collaborate around their more complex and time-consuming patients, leading to a deepening of phronesis in the workplace. By bringing techne to bear on the organisation, and complementing and enhancing phronesis, nurses propel organisational wisdom in general practices.

  17. Practices and opinions of Connecticut general dentists regarding dental treatment during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pina, Patricia M; Douglass, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the opinions and practices of general dentists in Connecticut regarding dental care during pregnancy. A survey was mailed to Connecticut general dentists to acquire data regarding age, gender, training, type of practice, years in practice, payment types accepted, procedures provided for pregnant women according to trimester, provider comfort level with treating pregnant patients, reasons for not treating pregnant patients, and provider opinions about dental care during pregnancy. The response rate was 42%, yielding a sample of 116 dentists. The majority of respondents (97%) reported treating pregnant patients; however, only 45% felt "very comfortable" treating these patients. All dentists in the sample agreed that physicians need to include an oral health evaluation and appropriate referral for patients' prenatal care. However, 70% of respondents had never received a dental referral for a pregnant patient. The majority of dentists favored providing dental treatment during the second trimester of pregnancy. Most dentists (77%) would take a radiograph for a patient 10 weeks into the pregnancy seeking treatment for dental pain, but only 2% would take routine radiographs regardless of the pregnancy trimester. There was a lack of consensus about medications dentists reported acceptable to prescribe for pregnant patients, and female dentists were significantly less likely than males to prescribe ibuprofen (P < 0.05). At least half of the respondents reported not being completely comfortable treating pregnant patients. Further, many dentists appear to not follow medication prescribing guidelines for this population. While additional research is needed, these initial results indicate that additional education regarding the treatment of pregnant patients would be a beneficial addition to dental school and continued education course curricula.

  18. A Small Acoustic Goniometer for General Purpose Research.

    PubMed

    Pook, Michael L; Loo, Sin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acoustic events and monitoring their occurrence is a useful aspect of many research projects. In particular, acoustic goniometry allows researchers to determine the source of an event based solely on the sound it produces. The vast majority of acoustic goniometry research projects used custom hardware targeted to the specific application under test. Unfortunately, due to the wide range of sensing applications, a flexible general purpose hardware/firmware system does not exist for this purpose. This article focuses on the development of such a system which encourages the continued exploration of general purpose hardware/firmware and lowers barriers to research in projects requiring the use of acoustic goniometry. Simulations have been employed to verify system feasibility, and a complete hardware implementation of the acoustic goniometer has been designed and field tested. The results are reported, and suggested areas for improvement and further exploration are discussed. PMID:27136563

  19. A Small Acoustic Goniometer for General Purpose Research

    PubMed Central

    Pook, Michael L.; Loo, Sin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acoustic events and monitoring their occurrence is a useful aspect of many research projects. In particular, acoustic goniometry allows researchers to determine the source of an event based solely on the sound it produces. The vast majority of acoustic goniometry research projects used custom hardware targeted to the specific application under test. Unfortunately, due to the wide range of sensing applications, a flexible general purpose hardware/firmware system does not exist for this purpose. This article focuses on the development of such a system which encourages the continued exploration of general purpose hardware/firmware and lowers barriers to research in projects requiring the use of acoustic goniometry. Simulations have been employed to verify system feasibility, and a complete hardware implementation of the acoustic goniometer has been designed and field tested. The results are reported, and suggested areas for improvement and further exploration are discussed. PMID:27136563

  20. Consultations in general practices with and without mental health nurses: an observational study from 2010 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Magnée, Tessa; de Beurs, Derek P; de Bakker, Dinny H; Verhaak, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate care for patients with psychological or social problems provided by mental health nurses (MHNs), and by general practitioners (GPs) with and without MHNs. Design An observational study with consultations recorded by GPs and MHNs. Setting Data were routinely recorded in 161–338 Dutch general practices between 2010 and 2014. Participants All patients registered at participating general practices were included: 624 477 patients in 2010 to 1 392 187 patients in 2014. Outcome measures We used logistic and Poisson multilevel regression models to test whether GPs recorded more patients with at least one consultation for psychological or social problems and to analyse the number of consultations over a 5-year time period. We examined the additional effect of an MHN in a practice, and tested which patient characteristics predicted transferral from GPs to MHNs. Results Increasing numbers of patients with psychological or social problems visit general practices. Increasing numbers of GPs collaborate with an MHN. GPs working in practices with an MHN record as many consultations per patient as GPs without an MHN, but they record slightly more patients with psychological or social problems (OR=1.05; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.08). MHNs most often treat adult female patients with common psychological symptoms such as depressive feelings. Conclusions MHNs do not seem to replace GP care, but mainly provide additional long consultations. Future research should study to what extent collaboration with an MHN prevents patients from needing specialised mental healthcare. PMID:27431902

  1. Reconciling Evidenced-Based Research Practice with Rehabilitation Philosophy, Ethics and Practice: From Dichotomy to Dialectic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarvydas, Vilia; Addy, Amanda; Fleming, Allison

    2010-01-01

    The recent shift in the helping professions to the implementation of evidenced-based practice (EBP) presents challenges to the field of rehabilitation counseling, most notably in the areas of integrating rehabilitation philosophy, ethics, and the relationship between research and practice. A dichotomy between the history and the future of the…

  2. Practice-Near and Practice-Distant Methods in Human Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froggett, Lynn; Briggs, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses practice-near research in human services, a cluster of methodologies that may include thick description, intensive reflexivity, and the study of emotional and relational processes. Such methods aim to get as near as possible to experiences at the relational interface between institutions and the practice field.…

  3. 76 FR 77299 - Generalized System of Preferences (GSP): Notice of Review of Certain Pending Country Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... a country practice petition related to the Republic of Georgia. (See 76 FR 67530.) FOR FURTHER... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Generalized System of Preferences (GSP): Notice of Review of Certain Pending... available on the USTR Web site at...

  4. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Stephanie P; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C; Wagener, Diane K

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems' behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations-such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications-may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices- the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language-and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers.

  5. Provision of care to general practice patients with disabling long-term mental illness: a survey in 16 practices.

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, T; Burns, T; Freeling, P; Sibbald, B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Increasing numbers of long-term mentally ill people now live in the community, many of whom lose contact with psychiatric services and come to depend on general practitioners for medical care. However, it has been suggested that general practitioners may be unaware of some of these patients and their needs. AIM. This study set out to investigate the care received by this group of patients. METHOD. Case registers of adults disabled by long-term mental illness were set up in 16 of 110 group general practices asked to participate. A search of each practice's record systems was combined with a survey of local psychiatric and social service teams, to seek practice patients who might not be identified from the general practice data. RESULTS. Of the 440 patients found, 90% were identified from information within the practices, mainly computerized repeat prescription and diagnostic data. The other 10% were identified only by psychiatric services. Over one third of the patients had no current contact with psychiatric services. Patients in contact with psychiatric services had been ill for a shorter time than those not in contact. More patients suffering from psychotic illnesses were in current contact than those with non-psychotic diagnoses. Over 90% of the patients had been seen by their general practitioners within 12 months, on average eight times. Most consultations were for minor physical disorders, repeat prescriptions and sickness certificates. Elements of the formal mental state examination were recorded in one third of cases and adjustments of psychotropic medication in one fifth. CONCLUSION. These findings suggest that patients in long-term contact with specialist services cannot be taken as representative of the whole population with long-term mental illness. General practitioners could use their frequent contacts with long-term mentally ill people to play a greater role in monitoring the mental state and drug treatment of this group. PMID:8068376

  6. Homicide survivors: research and practice implications.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Marci Feldman; Prothrow-Stith, Deborah; Chery, Clementina

    2005-12-01

    Approximately 16.4 million people in the United States have been affected by homicide. Five million adults have experienced the murder of an immediate family member; 6.6 million people have experienced the murder of a relative other than a family member, and 4.8 million have experienced the murder of a close friend. These homicide survivors experience a variety of difficulties, some similar to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The large incidence of homicide in the U.S. warrants an examination of the research on the impact of a murder on a victim's friends and family and the implications for healthcare providers. Homicide survivors experience negative psychological and physical effects that often result in an increase in the usage of primary care services. Provider training should include protocols to screen for, discuss, and make referrals for the family and friends of homicide victims. This article recommends the development of a training program to equip providers with the tools to recognize and serve this growing population of patients.

  7. The Tile and General Research Imaging System (TIGRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.J.; Al-Rawi, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Tile and General Research Imaging System (TIGRIS) is a UNIX-based image software system implemented in, and strictly conforming to, UNIX, C/ANSI C, and X11 Window standards. The TIGRIS design and implementation emulates UNIX at the user, application, and system levels. The TIGRIS Application Programmer Interface (API) provides a convenient way to create divers image processing and analysis applications. TIGRIS has been used primarily to support satellite remote sensing, global change research, and operational activities. Numerous applications related to specific remote sensing issues (e.g., cloud detection, noise reduction in AVHRR Channel 3 data, oceanic transport) are included in the application layer. In addition, a number of powerful general purpose imaging applications (e.g., image algebra, morphological operations, textural analysis) are provided which support general image processing, analysis, interactive visualization, and noninteractive image product generation. Use of TIGRIS to accomplish a few complex image analysis tasks is demonstrated.

  8. A Help To Start Research/Practice That Facilitates Self-Directed Learning in a Japanese Language Class: 50 Questions That Promote Research [and] Related Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariizumi, Yoshihiko

    This paper presents 50 questions that promote research/practices to facilitate self-directed learning in Japanese language classes. The questions are divided into the five following categories: (1) general questions and general research methodology issues (e.g., Why is it important to nurture self-directed learning?); (2) learners' readiness for…

  9. General practitioners’ and students’ experiences with feedback during a six-week clerkship in general practice: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Gran, Sarah Frandsen; Brænd, Anja Maria; Lindbæk, Morten; Frich, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Feedback may be scarce and unsystematic during students' clerkship periods. We wanted to explore general practitioners' (GPs) and medical students' experiences with giving and receiving supervision and feedback during a clerkship in general practice, with a focus on their experiences with using a structured tool (StudentPEP) to facilitate feedback and supervision. Design Qualitative study. Setting Teachers and students from a six-week clerkship in general practice for fifth year medical students were interviewed in two student and two teacher focus groups. Subjects 21 GPs and nine medical students. Results We found that GPs first supported students' development in the familiarization phase by exploring the students' expectations and competency level. When mutual trust had been established through the familiarization phase GPs encouraged students to conduct their own consultations while being available for supervision and feedback. Both students and GPs emphasized that good feedback promoting students' professional development was timely, constructive, supportive, and focused on ways to improve. Among the challenges GPs mentioned were giving feedback on behavioral issues such as body language and insensitive use of electronic devices during consultations or if the student was very insecure, passive, and reluctant to take action or lacked social or language skills. While some GPs experienced StudentPEP as time-consuming and unnecessary, others argued that the tool promoted feedback and learning through mandatory observations and structured questions. Conclusion Mutual trust builds a learning environment in which supervision and feedback may be given during students' clerkship in general practice. Structured tools may promote feedback, reflection and learning. Key PointsObserving the teacher and being supervised are essential components of Medical students' learning during general practice clerkships.Teachers and students build mutual trust in the

  10. Relational Coordination and Organisational Social Capital Association with Characteristics of General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Thomas Bøllingtoft; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Søndergaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background. Relational coordination (RC) and organisational social capital (OSC) are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance, which have not previously been analysed together, in general practice. Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse the associations between RC and OSC, and characteristics of general practice. Methods. Questionnaire survey study comprising 2074 practices in Denmark. Results. General practitioners (GPs) rated both RC and OSC in their general practice higher than their secretaries and nurses. The practice form was statistically significantly associated with high RC and OSC. RC was positively associated with the number of patients listed with a practice per staff, where staff is defined as all members of a practice including both owners and employees. Conclusion. The study showed that RC and OSC were significantly associated with type of profession and practice type. RC was also found to be significantly positively associated with number of patients per staff. However, the low response rate must be taken into consideration when interpreting the self-reported results of this study. PMID:25045537

  11. Relational coordination and organisational social capital association with characteristics of general practice.

    PubMed

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Knudsen, Thomas Bøllingtoft; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Reventlow, Susanne; Søndergaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background. Relational coordination (RC) and organisational social capital (OSC) are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance, which have not previously been analysed together, in general practice. Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse the associations between RC and OSC, and characteristics of general practice. Methods. Questionnaire survey study comprising 2074 practices in Denmark. Results. General practitioners (GPs) rated both RC and OSC in their general practice higher than their secretaries and nurses. The practice form was statistically significantly associated with high RC and OSC. RC was positively associated with the number of patients listed with a practice per staff, where staff is defined as all members of a practice including both owners and employees. Conclusion. The study showed that RC and OSC were significantly associated with type of profession and practice type. RC was also found to be significantly positively associated with number of patients per staff. However, the low response rate must be taken into consideration when interpreting the self-reported results of this study.

  12. "Empathy" and "Sympathy" in Action: Attending to Patients' Troubles in Finnish Homeopathic and General Practice Consultations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruusuvuori, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes "empathy" and "sympathy" as situated practices, sequential processes that are coconstructed by the participants in the situation. The data consists of 228 sequences of patients' descriptions of their problematic experiences and professionals' responses to them in videorecorded general practice and homeopathic consultations. One…

  13. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 6, Issue A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  14. Research and Practice in Education: Building Alliances, Bridging the Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Cynthia E., Ed.; Stein, Mary Kay, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    That there is a divide between research and practice is a common lament across policy-oriented disciplines, and education is no exception. Rhetoric abounds about the role research plays (or does not play) in the improvement of schools and classrooms, and policy makers push solutions that are rooted in assumptions about the way that research…

  15. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Learning disabilities is the theme of the latest issue of "Focus on Basics," the World Education publication that brings together research, policy, and practice in adult basic education. Starting with an update on research on neurobiology and dyslexia, this issue also examines how the adult basic education system supports students with learning…

  16. e-Learning and Action Research as Transformative Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farren, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    As a reflective practitioner of higher education, Margaret Farren seeks to contribute to a knowledge base of professional practice by using a "living educational theory" form of action research in her approach to teaching and learning. She focuses her research on the Masters program in e-learning at Dublin City University where professional…

  17. Collective Genius: Bridging the Gaps among Research, Innovation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hair, Mary John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on bridging the gaps among research, innovation, and practice. First, the author reflects on historical perspectives involving the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. Second, the author explores the current climate as reflected by three national reports highlighting future roles of…

  18. Arts Integration Frameworks, Research & Practice. A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnaford, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This literature review is an essential resource for anyone involved in the research, theories, or methods and practices of arts integration. It covers what has been written between 1995 and 2007 in the U.S. and abroad and includes an historical overview, definitions and theoretical frameworks for arts integration, research and evaluation studies…

  19. Informing Our Practice: Useful Research on Young Children's Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essa, Eva L., Ed.; Burnham, Melissa M., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Best practice is based on knowledge--not on beliefs or guesses--about how children learn and develop. This volume contains 20 overviews of research on aspects of young children's social, emotional, cognitive, or physical development, as well as how the findings can be applied in the classroom. Originally "Research in Review" articles in NAEYC's…

  20. Anatomy of Professional Practice: Promising Research Perspectives on Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick W.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first book to bring into focus the full scope of professional practice in educational leadership. This book probes the limitations of traditional research in fully comprehending the true nature of leadership, and points out how future research must be expanded to deal with understanding the complexity of educational leadership…

  1. A Practical Examination of Two Diverse Research Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript examines the practical differences between quantitative and qualitative inquiry by comparing the differences between one article from each paradigm. Quantitative research differs greatly from qualitative inquiry in purpose, assumptions, methodology, and representation. While quantitative research has been the dominant paradigm for…

  2. Rethinking Critically Reflective Research Practice: Beyond Popper's Critical Rationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Werner

    2006-01-01

    We all know that ships are safest in the harbor; but alas, that is not what ships are built for. They are destined to leave the harbor and to confront the challenges that are waiting beyond the harbor mole. A similar challenge confronts the practice of research. Research at work cannot play it safe and stay in whatever theoretical and…

  3. Sequential Research Needs in Evolving Disciplines of Social Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.

    The author suggests that the emerging fields of social practice (such as recreation, social work, and adult education) must all go through a sequential pattern of research needs, first superficially, and then in ever deeper cycles. The six phases of these research needs are: definition of the field (survey and descriptive studies, census studies,…

  4. Teacher Research as a Practical Tool for Learning to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysaker, Judith; Thompson, Becky

    2013-01-01

    Teacher research has a long, rich history. However, teacher research is primarily limited to practicing teachers and those pursuing graduate education. It is only beginning to be used as means of understanding the instructional needs of English learners. In this article, a preservice teacher and her university instructor describe the role of…

  5. Putting Writing Research into Practice: Applications for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troia, Gary A., Ed.; Shankland, Rebecca K., Ed.; Heintz, Anne, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    What are the most effective methods for teaching writing across grade levels and student populations? What kind of training do teachers need to put research-validated methods into practice? This unique volume combines the latest writing research with clear-cut recommendations for designing high-quality professional development efforts. Prominent…

  6. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  7. Silent Conversations in the Labyrinth of Artistic Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eis, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores silent conversations with the past, but also navigates through the labyrinth of artistic process, with its manifold passages of research, chance occurrence and aesthetic experimentation. The double metaphors of silent conversations and labyrinths apply to the essay and the artwork within it, to the research and to the practice.…

  8. Finding Nexus: Connecting Youth Work and Research Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormally, Sinéad; Coburn, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Participation in educational and social research helps to develop understanding of how young people learn and to consider wider aspects of their lives to enable their voices to be heard and acted upon. Research also facilitates the articulation and sharing of methodologies across a range of professional practices. We assert that theory and…

  9. Networks of Practice in Science Education Research: A Global Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sonya N.; Siry, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employ cultural sociology and Braj Kachru's model of World Englishes as theoretical and analytical tools for considering English as a form of capital necessary for widely disseminating research findings from local networks of practice to the greater science education research community. We present a brief analysis of recent…

  10. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 7, Issue D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  11. Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice: Voice of Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrani, Mehdi B.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the strategies that could be potentially employed in the Iranian ELT context to bridge the gap between research and practice. Data were collected through conducting a "focus group discussion" with a number of practitioner-researchers. The findings showed that to improve the relationship between…

  12. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. Articles appearing in this issue are: (1)…

  13. Encouraging a Culture of Research in Practicing Teachers in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Chan, Yvonne Yoke Yin; Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Upgrading the status of early childhood teaching and improving job satisfaction are areas of concern to practitioners, policy makers and other stakeholders in the early childhood field. Ways to upgrade practicing teachers, including their involvement in research, is an on-going challenge. This paper reports on a research in Singapore where a…

  14. Science and Mathematics Education: International Innovations, Research, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Donna F., Ed.; White, Arthur L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The chapters in this book reflect the work of science and mathematics educators who have worked for many years at the international level. As members of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education, their work provides readers with issues, models, practices, and research results that have applicability and…

  15. A Review of Practical Reasoning in Child and Youth Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the review is to investigate various relations between the concepts of competence and participation found within child and youth research with the aim of identifying differences in practical reasoning of the various kinds of child research. The search identified 260 articles, and an in-depth analysis of 39 articles was conducted,…

  16. From evidence-based practice making to practice-based evidence making: creating communities of (research) and practice.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Paul W; Viehbeck, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    Models of research translation frequently emphasize independent roles for research producers and intended users. This article describes a novel approach for enhancing exchange between researchers and practitioners. The framework is based on Wenger's notion of Communities of Practice (CoP) where knowledge is regarded as a social enterprise at the center of member interactions. Research-based practices and policies emerge when research producers and users mutually engage one another about specific health promotion problems through negotiation and by creating and sharing technical standards and other resources. CoPs are more than loose networks or task-oriented teams. They aim to create both social and intellectual capital through mutual negotiation, reciprocity, trust, and cohesion. A Consortium of Quitline Operators across North America and a Canadian project to enhance research capacity for tobacco control research serve as examples of how the model has been successfully operationalized. PMID:17384405

  17. The Use of the Internet to Support General Aviation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowbottom, James H.

    1995-01-01

    For the past few years, innovation in the field of General Aviation (GA) has declined. The reason for this decline has not been because of a lack of ideas, but rather a lack of funds necessary to convert these ideas into reality. NASA implemented the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program in an effort to promote new technology in General Aviation. Under this program, small business with good ideas present them to NASA who reviews them and determines their value potential in the GA market. If the company's idea proves worthy, NASA subsidizes their research in three phases that include the research, testing, development, and production of their product. The purpose of my internship this summer was to use the Internet to promote the work of SBIR companies globally to prospective investors.

  18. Guidelines for composite materials research related to general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, N. F.; Humphreys, E. A.; Rosen, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines for research on composite materials directed toward the improvement of all aspects of their applicability for general aviation aircraft were developed from extensive studies of their performance, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness. Specific areas for research and for manufacturing development were identified and evaluated. Inputs developed from visits to manufacturers were used in part to guide these evaluations, particularly in the area of cost effectiveness. Throughout the emphasis was to direct the research toward the requirements of general aviation aircraft, for which relatively low load intensities are encountered, economy of production is a prime requirement, and yet performance still commands a premium. A number of implications regarding further directions for developments in composites to meet these requirements also emerged from the studies. Chief among these is the need for an integrated (computer program) aerodynamic/structures approach to aircraft design.

  19. Research to reality: moving evidence into practice through an online community of practice.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Margaret M; La Porta, Madeline; Gallagher, Alissa; Vinson, Cynthia; Bernal, Sarah Bruce

    2014-01-01

    How can a community of practice help further the practical application of cancer control research? In 2011, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) launched an online community of practice, Research to Reality (R2R). R2R aims to infuse evidence-based strategies into communities by engaging researchers and practitioners in a joint approach to research dissemination. To measure community growth and engagement, NCI measures data across 3 program domains: content, interaction, and activity. NCI uses Web analytics, usability testing, and content analyses to manage and evaluate R2R. As of December 2013, R2R had more than 1,700 registered members. More than 500 researchers and practitioners register for the monthly cyber-seminars, and 40% return each month. R2R hosts more than 15,500 page views and 5,000 site visits in an average month. This article describes the process of convening this online community and quantifies our experiences to date.

  20. Light transport and general aviation aircraft icing research requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeze, R. K.; Clark, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A short term and a long term icing research and technology program plan was drafted for NASA LeRC based on 33 separate research items. The specific items listed resulted from a comprehensive literature search, organized and assisted by a computer management file and an industry/Government agency survey. Assessment of the current facilities and icing technology was accomplished by presenting summaries of ice sensitive components and protection methods; and assessments of penalty evaluation, the experimental data base, ice accretion prediction methods, research facilities, new protection methods, ice protection requirements, and icing instrumentation. The intent of the research plan was to determine what icing research NASA LeRC must do or sponsor to ultimately provide for increased utilization and safety of light transport and general aviation aircraft.