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Sample records for research reactor vessel

  1. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallows surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on a shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  3. Reactor vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Holley, John C.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  4. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cyrus M; Nanstad, Randy K; Clayton, Dwight A; Matlack, Katie; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Light, Glenn

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have

  7. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  8. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  9. Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

    1980-05-09

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  10. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission HSST and HSSI Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-02-01

    This report discusses development on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on reactor pressure vessel steel have shown that local brittle zones do not significantly degrade the material fracture toughness, constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased fracture toughness, and biaxial loading reduces but does not eliminate the shallow-flaw fracture toughness elevation. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch versus temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement and the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  11. Reactor vessel stud thread protector

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparro, M.R.

    1989-04-04

    This patent describes a stud thread protector for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The vessel has a removable closure head, the closure head being sealingly engaged with the pressure vessel by a plurality of stud bolts, an upper end thereof having a threaded section for threadingly engaging a nut and a vertical bore being disposed within the stud bolt. The stud thread protector encloses the exposed upper portion of the bolt and associated nut projecting above the closure head. The reactor vessel stud thread protector is comprised of: a tubular wall portion being opened at its lower end and substantially closed at its upper end; a drip pan associated with the outer surface of the protector, the drip pan being disposed radially inwardly with respect to the outer periphery of the vessel head, whereby the drip pan collects any fluid being emitted from the reactor vessel; and means for fastening the stud thread protector to an associated stud.

  12. Reactor vessel seal service fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ritz, W.C.

    1975-12-01

    An apparatus for the preparation of exposed sealing surfaces along the open rim of a nuclear reactor vessel comprised of a motorized mechanism for traveling along the rim and simultaneously brushing the exposed surfaces is described.

  13. Reactor-vessel-sectioning demonstration.

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, R.A.

    1981-07-01

    A successful technical demonstration of simulated reactor vessel sectioning was completed using the combined techniques of air arc gouging and flame cutting. A 4-ft x 3-ft x 9-in. thick sample was fabricated of A36 carbon steel to simulate a reactor vessel wall. A 1/4-in layer of stainless steel (SS) was tungsten inert gas (TIG)-welded to the carbon steel. Several techniques were considered to section the simulated reactor vessel: an air arc gouger was chosen to penetrate the stainless steel, and flame cutting was selected to sever the carbon steel. After the simulated vessel was successfully cut from the SS side, another cut was made, starting from the carbon steel side. This cut was also successful. Cutting from the carbon steel side has the advantages of cost reduction since the air arc gouging step is eliminated and contamination controlled because the molten metal is blown inward.

  14. Research Reactor MZFR, Karlsruhe, Germany Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and of the Thermal Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, A.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m{sup 3}. Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (authors)

  15. Reactor vessel annealing system

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Phillip E.; Katz, Leonoard R.; Nath, Raymond J.; Blaushild, Ronald M.; Tatch, Michael D.; Kordalski, Frank J.; Wykstra, Donald T.; Kavalkovich, William M.

    1991-01-01

    A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

  16. CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

  17. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.

  18. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  19. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  20. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  1. Evaluation of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling for integral reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, R. J.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, S. B.; Jin, Y.; Kim, H. Y.

    2012-07-01

    In-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) for a small integral reactor has been evaluated to determine the thermal margin for the prevention of a reactor vessel failure. A thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel wall in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel has been performed to determine the heat flux distribution. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the outer reactor vessel wall has been determined to fix the maximum heat removal rate through the external coolant between the outer reactor vessel and the insulation of the reactor vessel. Finally, the thermal margin has been evaluated by comparison of the thermal load with the maximum heat removal rate of the CHF on the outer reactor vessel wall. The maximum heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is estimated at approximately 0.25 MW/m{sup 2} in the metallic layer because of the focusing effect. The CHF of the outer reactor vessel is approximately 1.1 MW/m{sup 2} because of a two phase natural circulation mass flow. Since the thermal margin for the IVR-ERVC is sufficient, the reactor vessel integrity is maintained during a severe accident of a small integral reactor. (authors)

  2. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  3. Inspecting the reactor vessel penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Bodson, F.; Fleming, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    The susceptibility of Alloy 600 to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) continues to plague nuclear power plants. Recently, the problem of PWSCC cracking has manifested itself in Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) head penetrations in nuclear plants in Europe. Framatome has been extensively involved in the performance of both inspections and repairs of CRDM head penetrations at Electricite de France (EdF) plants. B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT), building on Framatome technology, has developed a fully integrated service package and robotic manipulator to inspect and repair CRDM head penetrations for US utilities. Reactor vessel bottom penetration are also made of Alloy 600 and to tackle this potential PWSCC problem at EdF plants, Framatome has been performing specific inspections in order to detect the appearance of the phenomenon. This paper describes the overall range of inspection techniques and toolings developed to address these issues.

  4. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Sharbaugh, John E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment

  5. LPT. EBOR reactor vessel in TAN 646. Pressure vessel head ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR reactor vessel in TAN 646. Pressure vessel head being installed in vault. Refueling port extension (right) and control rod nozzles (center). Camera facing northwest. Photographer: Comiskey. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-241 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Norman R.

    2011-11-22

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  7. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  8. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center`s (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions.

  9. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  10. TMI-2 reactor vessel plenum final lift

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D C

    1986-01-01

    Removal of the plenum assembly from the TMI-2 reactor vessel was necessary to gain access to the core region for defueling. The plenum was lifted from the reactor vessel by the polar crane using three specially designed pendant assemblies. It was then transferred in air to the flooded deep end of the refueling canal and lowered onto a storage stand where it will remain throughout the defueling effort. The lift and transfer were successfully accomplished on May 15, 1985 in just under three hours by a lift team located in a shielded area within the reactor building. The success of the program is attributed to extensive mockup and training activities plus thorough preparations to address potential problems. 54 refs.

  11. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high

  12. Pressure vessel calculations for VVER-440 reactors.

    PubMed

    Hordósy, G; Hegyi, Gy; Keresztúri, A; Maráczy, Cs; Temesvári, E; Vértes, P; Zsolnay, E

    2005-01-01

    For the determination of the fast neutron load of the reactor pressure vessel a mixed calculational procedure was developed. The procedure was applied to the Unit II of Paks NPP, Hungary. The neutron source on the outer surfaces of the reactor was determined by a core design code, and the neutron transport calculations outside the core were performed by the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The reaction rate in the activation detectors at surveillance positions and at the cavity were calculated and compared with measurements. In most cases, fairly good agreement was found.

  13. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  14. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  15. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  16. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Reactor vessel fluence evaluation and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The methodology currently in use for the estimation of the fast neutron fluence to the pressure vessel (inside surface and reactor cavity) is based on discrete ordinates two-dimensional codes such as DOT or its updated version DORT. This methodology assumes a P[sub 3] scattering, an S[sub 8] quadrature approximation, and cross sections based on the ENDF/B-IV file. Associated one-dimensional codes are often used for the cross-section collapsing portion of the calculation. The neutron spectrum at the pressure vessel location of interest is estimated assuming a [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, or [sup 241]Pu source spectrum or an appropriate combination thereof. The two-dimensional codes and associated methodologies were benchmarked in the early eighties using the results of the PCA and PSF Oak Ridge National Laboratory reactor experiments. The benchmarking experiments were estimated to provide an uncertainty of [approx]10%. The results of the calculations applied to a reactor were estimated to have an uncertainty of [approx]20%. This level of uncertainty was assumed in the estimation of the margin term defined in 10CFR50.61

  18. Reactor vessel cladding separate effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of a layer of tough weld overlay cladding on the interior of a light-water reactor pressure vessel could mitigate damage caused during certain overcooling transients. The potential benefit of the cladding is that it could keep a short surface flaw, which would otherwise become long, from growing either by impeding crack initiation or by arresting a running crack. Two aspects critical to cladding behavior will be reported: irradiation effects on cladding toughness and the response of mechanically loaded, flawed structures in the presence of cladding. 15 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lipinski, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  20. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration.

  1. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  2. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger

    2013-07-01

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to

  3. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-06-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected.

  4. Dual shell pressure balanced reactor vessel. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER) has previously provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) engineers have recently developed and patented (U.S. patent 5,167,930 December 1, 1992) a concept for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R&D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER. Innotek Corporation is a small business that would be one logical end-user of the DSPBV reactor technology. Innotek is working with several major U.S. engineering firms to evaluate the potential of this technology in the disposal of wastes from sewage treatment plants. PNL entered into a CRADA with Innotek to build a bench-scale demonstration reactor and test the system to advance the economic feasibility of a variety of high pressure chemical processes. Hydrothermal processing of corrosive substances on a large scale can now be made significantly safer and more economical through use of the DSPBV. Hydrothermal chemical reactions such as wet-air oxidation and supercritical water oxidation occur in a highly corrosive environment inside a pressure vessel. Average corrosion rates from 23 to 80 miles per year have been reported by Rice (1994) and Latanision (1993).

  5. Flux effect analysis in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Blagoeva, D.; Debarberis, L.

    2013-11-01

    The results of long term research programme concerning the determination of irradiation embrittlement dependence on fast neutron flux for WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels before and after annealing are presented in this paper. The study of flux effect was carried out on commercial WWER-440 steels which differ significantly in phosphorous (0.013-0.036 wt%) and copper (0.08-0.20 wt%) contents. All specimens were irradiated in surveillance channel positions under similar conditions at high ˜4 × 1012 сm-2 s-1 and low ˜6 × 1011 сm-2 s-1 fluxes (E > 0.5 MeV) at a temperature of 270 °С. The radiation embrittlement was evaluated by transition temperature shift on the basis of Charpy specimens test results. In case of low flux, the measured Tk shifts could be 25-50 °C bigger than the Tk shifts obtained from high flux data. A significant flux effect is observed in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels with higher copper content (>0.13 wt%).

  6. Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Zeltner, Walter A.

    1992-08-11

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

  7. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). After lowering reactor vessel onto blocks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). After lowering reactor vessel onto blocks, it is rolled on logs into PBF. Metal framework under vessel is handling device. Various penetrations in reactor bottom were for instrumentation, poison injection, drains. Large one, below center "manhole" was for primary coolant. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: February 13, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-736 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for a HLMC reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J. J.; Spencer, B. W.

    2000-01-13

    The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small (300 MWt) reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100%+ natural circulation heat removal from the low power density/low pressure drop ultra-long lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the Reactor Exterior Cooling System (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

  9. Life extension approach to the reactor vessel of a nuclear production reactor: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Awadalla, N.G.; Baumann, N.P.; Mehta, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear materials production reactors at the Savannah River Plant have been in service for over 35 years. All the primary components of the reactor system are readily accessible for repair or replacement as needed except for the reactor vessel and thermal shields. The reactor vessel of a Savannah River Plant reactor is a cylindrical tank approximately 16 feet in diameter and 14 feet high and is not pressurized except for a 5 psig helium blanket gas in addition to the hydrostatic head of the heavy water (D/sub 2/O) moderator. The vessels are made of American Iron and Steel Institute Type 304 stainless steel fabricated into cylindrical shells with four to six wrought plates per vessel, 1.27 cm (0.5-inches) thick. The shells were made up in flat in two half-sections for later rolling and welding. The vessel bottom section containing the moderator effluent nozzles was welded to the shell in a T-joint configuration. All joining was performed with multipass Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding. The service life assessment of the reactor vessel addresses the corrosive effects of the D/sub 2/O moderator and the degradation of the vessel material properties through exposure of the vessel to neutron irradiation. Potential degradation mechanisms include radiation embrittlement, Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking; and Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking. 15 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Life extension of the St. Lucie unit 1 reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, G.A.; Sun, J.B.; Mott, S.L. )

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989, Florida Power and Light Company (FP and L) established the policy that St. Lucie unit 1 should not be prevented from achieving a 60-yr operating life by reactor vessel embrittlement. A 60-yr operating life means that the plant would be allowed to operate until the year 2036, which is 20 years beyond the current license expiration date of 2016. Since modifications to the reactor vessel and its components are projected to be expensive, the desire of FP and L management was to achieve this lifetime extension through the use of fuel management and proven technology. The following limitations were placed on any acceptable method for achieving this lifetime extension capability: low fuel cycle cost; low impact on safety parameters; very little or no operations impact; and use of normal reactor materials. A task team was formed along with the Advanced Nuclear Fuels Company (ANF) to develop a vessel-life extension program.

  11. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  12. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Reactor vessel has been tilted upwards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Reactor vessel has been tilted upwards, but handling device is too large to fit into pit. Workman uses torch to cut metal. Contrast the scale of the man vis-a-vis the (massive!) vessel. Photographer: Holmes. Date: February 26, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-981 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Evaluation of HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of approx.10/sup 4/ less), that is, a rate effect.

  14. In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)

    SciTech Connect

    F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

    2005-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

  15. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  16. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Camera looks into reactor vessel. Control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Camera looks into reactor vessel. Control rods are positioned at outer perimeter; transient rods, at inner perimeter. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: November 2, 1972. INEEL negative no. 72-5266 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Reactor vessel arrives from gate city ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Reactor vessel arrives from gate city steel at door of PBF. On flatbed, it is too high to fit under door. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: February 13, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-737 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Bottom of reactor vessel shows beyond ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Bottom of reactor vessel shows beyond handling beams. Hole at right is opening for coolant pipe. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: February 13, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-989 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A.

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  20. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, CW

    1980-08-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  1. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, S.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  2. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    SciTech Connect

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S.

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  3. Annealing the reactor vessel at the Palisades Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Fenech, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    In the way of background, Palisades was licensed in 1967 and went commercial in 1971. Jumping to two years ago, we faced at that time three issues that challenged our ability to operate to end-of-license, which would be 2007 without any extensions. The three items were regulatory performance, economic performance, and reactor vessel embrittlement. We had not been operating the plant with the kind of conservative decisions and with the kind of safety margins that one is expected to operate a plant in the United States at this time. Our economic performance was not satisfactory in that our capacity factor was low and our costs high. In the area of reactor vessel embrittlement, our analysis showed that we would reach the NRC screening criteria for embrittlement in the year 2004. Over the last two years, we have made significant improvements in the first two areas. Our decision-making has changed. Our performance, especially over the last year and a half, has been excellent. In addition, we have gotten our capacity factors up and our costs under control. Clearly, sustained performance is what is going to carry the day but from what we can see and from where we are, we are in more of a maintenance-of-performance than in a turn-around situation. On the other hand, in the area of reactor vessel embrittlement, about a year and a half ago we had a bit of a setback. We had taken material from retired steam generators that had welds identical to the welds in our reactor vessel. When we analyzed the welds from our steam generators, we were given some surprises about the chemistry makeup. When we applied the new information to our analysis, we changed the date on which we would reach our screening criteria from 2004 to late 1999.

  4. Code System to Calculate Probability of Reactor Vessel Failure.

    2000-04-24

    Version: 00 VISA2 (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) was developed to estimate the failure probability of nuclear reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock conditions. The deterministic portion of the code performs heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations for a vessel subjected to a user-specified temperature and pressure transient. The probabilistic analysis performs a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the probability of vessel failure. Parameters such as initial crack size and position, copper and nickelmore » content, fluence, and the fracture toughness values for crack initiation and arrest are treated as random variables. Linear elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to model crack initiation and growth. This includes cladding effects in the heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations. The simulation procedure treats an entire vessel and recognizes that more than one flaw can exist in a given vessel. The flaw model allows random positioning of the flaw within the vessel wall thickness, and the user can specify either flaw length or length-to-depth aspect ratio for crack initiation and arrest predictions. The flaw size distribution can be adjusted on the basis of different inservice inspection techniques and inspection conditions. The toughness simulation model includes a menu of alternative equations for predicting the shift in the reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition. VISA2 is an upgraded release from the original VISA program developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff. Improvements include a treatment of cladding effects; a more general simulation of flaw size, shape and location; a simulation of inservice inspection; a revised simulation of the reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition; and treatment of vessels with multiple welds and initial flaws.« less

  5. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  7. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel outside the astm specification A508 CL2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachur, D.; Krawczynski, S. J.; Derz, H.; Pott, G.

    1990-04-01

    Radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels is of considerable significance for safety engineering. Steel manufacturers must therefore comply with specifications defined by national design codes. The extent to which a steel deviating from the specification is influenced by irradiation is being examined under the German Research Programme on the Integrity of Reactor Components. Charpy-V specimens were taken from a forged steel block longitudinally and vertically to the direction of main deformation and irradiated in the FRJ-1 research reactor at a temperature of 288 °C corresponding to the operating temperature of power reactors. The neutron fluences obtained ranged between 0.8 × 10 19 and 8 × 10 19n/ cm2. Instrumented pendulum impact tests have been evaluated and the load signals measured were analysed, fitting and calculating transition temperature curves and trend curves.

  8. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  9. Stresses in reactor pressure vessel nozzles -- Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1995-11-01

    Reactor pressure vessel nozzles are characterized by a high stress concentration which is critical in their low-cycle fatigue assessment. Program of experimental verification of stress/strain field distribution during elastic-plastic loading of a reactor pressure vessel WWER-1000 primary nozzle model in scale 1:3 is presented. While primary nozzle has an ID equal to 850 mm, the model nozzle has ID equal to 280 mm, and was made from 15Kh2NMFA type of steel. Calculation using analytical methods was performed. Comparison of results using different analytical methods -- Neuber`s, Hardrath-Ohman`s as well as equivalent energy ones, used in different reactor Codes -- is shown. Experimental verification was carried out on model nozzles loaded statically as well as by repeated loading, both in elastic-plastic region. Strain fields were measured using high-strain gauges, which were located in different distances from center of nozzle radius, thus different stress concentration values were reached. Comparison of calculated and experimental data are shown and compared.

  10. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

  11. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

    1993-12-07

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

  12. Perspectives on research reactor utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Brian; Dolan, Thomas J.; Laraia, Michele; Ritchie, Iain

    2002-01-01

    The current state of research reactors around the world is summarized using information from the Research Reactor Database. Some current trends of research reactors in advanced and developing countries are described. The need for strategic planning is emphasized, and elements of a typical strategic plan are presented. The problems of reactor lifetime extension, nuclear fuel cycle issues, and decommissioning are briefly discussed. It is concluded that research reactors will continue to be vital elements of the nuclear infrastructures in many countries, and that the IAEA can help countries solve their problems of utilization, safety, lifetime extension, fuel cycle, and decommissioning.

  13. Design criteria for prestressed concrete reactor vessels for high-temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Elter, C.; Becker, G.

    1982-11-01

    For the design and construction of prestressed concrete reactor vessels, data on loading, construction materials, and safety factors are required. A description is given of the design conditions according to the current state of technology in the Federal Republic of Germany. Special consideration is given to the allowable stresses and an appropriate proposal for such stresses is suggested.

  14. 46 CFR 3.05-3 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 3.05-3 Section 3.05-3... OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 3.05-3 Oceanographic research vessel. “An oceanographic research vessel is a vessel which the U.S. Coast Guard finds is employed exclusively in one...

  15. 46 CFR 3.05-3 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 3.05-3 Section 3.05-3... OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 3.05-3 Oceanographic research vessel. “An oceanographic research vessel is a vessel which the U.S. Coast Guard finds is employed exclusively in one...

  16. 46 CFR 3.05-3 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 3.05-3 Section 3.05-3... OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 3.05-3 Oceanographic research vessel. “An oceanographic research vessel is a vessel which the U.S. Coast Guard finds is employed exclusively in one...

  17. 46 CFR 3.05-3 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 3.05-3 Section 3.05-3... OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 3.05-3 Oceanographic research vessel. “An oceanographic research vessel is a vessel which the U.S. Coast Guard finds is employed exclusively in one...

  18. 46 CFR 3.05-3 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 3.05-3 Section 3.05-3... OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 3.05-3 Oceanographic research vessel. “An oceanographic research vessel is a vessel which the U.S. Coast Guard finds is employed exclusively in one...

  19. Laser in vessel-viewing system for nuclear fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, Luciano; Bordone, Andrea; Coletti, Alberto; Ferri De Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Lupini, S.; Neri, Carlo; Poggi, Claudio; Riva, Marco; Semeraro, Luigi; Talarico, Carlo

    2000-11-01

    An amplitude modulated laser radar has been developed by ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment) for periodic in-vessel inspection in large fusion machines. Its overall optical design has been developed taking into account the extremely high radiation levels and operating temperatures foreseen in large European fusion machines such as JET (Joint European Torus) and ITER (International Thermo- nuclear Experimental Reactor). The viewing system is based on a transceiving optical radar using a RF modulated single mode 840 nm wavelength laser beam. The sounding beam is transmitted through a coherent optical fiber and a focusing optic to the inner part of the nuclear reactor vessel by a stainless steel probe on the tip of which a suitable scanning silica prism steers the laser beam along a linear raster spanning a -90 degree(s) to +60 degree(s) in elevation and 360 degree(s) in azimuth for a complete mapping of the vessel itself. All the electronics, including the laser source, avalanche photodiode and all the active components are located outside the bioshield, while passive components (receiving optics, transmitting collimator, fiber optics), located in the torus hall, are made of fused silica so that the overall laser radar is radiation resistant. The signal is acquired, the raster lines being synchronized with the aid of optical encoders linked to the scanning prism, thus yielding a TV like image. Preliminary results have been obtained scanning large sceneries including several real targets having different backscattering properties, colors and surface reflectivity ranging over several decades to simulate the expected dynamic range of the video signals incoming from the vessel.

  20. High aspect reactor vessel and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Sams, Clarence F. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An improved bio-reactor vessel and system useful for carrying out mammalian cell growth in suspension in a culture media are presented. The main goal of the invention is to grow and maintain cells under a homogeneous distribution under acceptable biochemical environment of gas partial pressures and nutrient levels without introducing direct agitation mechanisms or associated disruptive mechanical forces. The culture chamber rotates to maintain an even distribution of cells in suspension and minimizes the length of a gas diffusion path. The culture chamber design is presented and discussed.

  1. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  2. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, Roger B.; Fero, Arnold H.; Sejvar, James

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  3. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

    1997-12-16

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

  4. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  5. IAEA international studies on irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Steele, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    In last 25 years, three phases a Co-operative Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels has been organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This programme started with eight countries in 1971 and finally 16 countries took part in phase III of the Programme in 1983. Several main efforts were put into preparation of the programme, but the principal task was concentrated on an international comparison of radiation damage characterization by different laboratories for steels of {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} (with high impurity contents) and {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} (with low impurity contents) types as well as on development of small scale fracture mechanics procedures applicable to reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes. This year, a new programme has been opened, concentrated mostly on small scale fracture mechanics testing.

  6. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  7. Insights from Investigations of In-Vessel Retention for High Powered Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-10-01

    In a three-year U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI), state-of-the-art analytical tools and key U.S. and Korean experimental facilities were used to explore two options, enhanced ERVC performance and the use of internal core catchers, that have the potential to increase the margin for in-vessel retention (IVR) in high power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). This increased margin has the potential to improve plant economics (owing to reduced regulatory requirements) and increase public acceptance (owing to reduced plant risk). Although this program focused upon the Korean Advanced Power Reactor -- 1400 MWe (APR 1400) design, recommentations were developed so that they can easily be applied to a wide range of existing and advanced reactor designs. This paper summarizes new data gained for evaluating the margin associated with various options investigated in this program. Insights from analyses completed with this data are also highlighted.

  8. Use of MCNP for characterization of reactor vessel internals waste from decommissioned nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.F.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.D.

    1995-09-01

    This study describes the use of the Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon (MCNP) code for determining activation levels of irradiated reactor vessel internals hardware. The purpose of the analysis is to produce data for the Department of Energy`s Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program. An MCNP model was developed to analyze the Yankee Rowe reactor facility. The model incorporates reactor geometry, material compositions, and operating history data acquired from Yankee Atomic Electric Company. In addition to the base activation analysis, parametric studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of activation to specific parameters. A component sampling plan was also developed to validate the model results, although the plan was not implemented. The calculations for the Yankee Rowe reactor predict that only the core baffle and the core support plates will be activated to levels above the Class C limits. The parametric calculations show, however, that the large uncertainties in the material compositions could cause errors in the estimates that could also increase the estimated activation level of the core barrel to above the Class C limits. Extrapolation of the results to other reactor facilities indicates that in addition to the baffle and support plates, core barrels may also be activated to above Class C limits; however the classification will depend on the specific operating conditions of the reactor and the specific material compositions of the metal, as well as the use of allowable concentration averaging practices in packaging and classifying the waste.

  9. ETR, TRA642. ON GROUND FLOOR. THE 60TON ETR REACTOR VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. ON GROUND FLOOR. THE 60-TON ETR REACTOR VESSEL IS DROPPED INTO PLACE OVER PIT. KAISER USED TWO MULTI-BLOCK DRUM PULLEYS WITH A COMBINED CAPACITY OF 100 TONS AND A 100-TON DRUM HOIST. THE VESSEL WAS 35 1/2 FEET LONG. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4149. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 12/18/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Integrating Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vessels, Surface Vessels and Aircraft into Oceanographic Research Vessel Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillivary, P. A.; Borges de Sousa, J.; Martins, R.; Rajan, K.

    2012-12-01

    Autonomous platforms are increasingly used as components of Integrated Ocean Observing Systems and oceanographic research cruises. Systems deployed can include gliders or propeller-driven autonomous underwater vessels (AUVs), autonomous surface vessels (ASVs), and unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). Prior field campaigns have demonstrated successful communication, sensor data fusion and visualization for studies using gliders and AUVs. However, additional requirements exist for incorporating ASVs and UASs into ship operations. For these systems to be optimally integrated into research vessel data management and operational planning systems involves addressing three key issues: real-time field data availability, platform coordination, and data archiving for later analysis. A fleet of AUVs, ASVs and UAS deployed from a research vessel is best operated as a system integrated with the ship, provided communications among them can be sustained. For this purpose, Disruptive Tolerant Networking (DTN) software protocols for operation in communication-challenged environments help ensure reliable high-bandwidth communications. Additionally, system components need to have considerable onboard autonomy, namely adaptive sampling capabilities using their own onboard sensor data stream analysis. We discuss Oceanographic Decision Support System (ODSS) software currently used for situational awareness and planning onshore, and in the near future event detection and response will be coordinated among multiple vehicles. Results from recent field studies from oceanographic research vessels using AUVs, ASVs and UAS, including the Rapid Environmental Picture (REP-12) cruise, are presented describing methods and results for use of multi-vehicle communication and deliberative control networks, adaptive sampling with single and multiple platforms, issues relating to data management and archiving, and finally challenges that remain in addressing these technological issues. Significantly, the

  11. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... thermal annealing or to operate the nuclear power reactor following the annealing must be identified. The... licensee shall so confirm in writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The...

  12. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... thermal annealing or to operate the nuclear power reactor following the annealing must be identified. The... licensee shall so confirm in writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The...

  13. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... thermal annealing or to operate the nuclear power reactor following the annealing must be identified. The... licensee shall so confirm in writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The...

  14. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... thermal annealing or to operate the nuclear power reactor following the annealing must be identified. The... licensee shall so confirm in writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The...

  15. ETR, TRA642. ON BASEMENT FLOOR. REACTOR VESSEL WILL BE PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. ON BASEMENT FLOOR. REACTOR VESSEL WILL BE PLACED WITHIN THE INNER METAL FORM. WHEN CONCRETE IS POURED OUTSIDE THIS FORM, CONDUIT HOLES WILL BE PRESERVE SPACE THROUGH HOLES. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-1507. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 5/8/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-03-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  17. BWR reactor pressure vessel license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, D.; Stancavage, P.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). The scope of the IR provides the technical basis for license renewal for U.S. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs). The report includes the following RPV components: attachment welds, closure studs, nozzles and safe ends, penetrations, vessel shell and flanges, top and bottom heads and vessel support skirt. The scope is limited to domestic BWRs designated by GE Nuclear Energy as BWR/2 through BWR/6.

  18. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. PWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwirian, R.; Robison, G.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). Pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by all three U.S. PWR nuclear steam supply system vendors have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits; inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of PWR reactor pressure vessel internals for license renewal.

  20. The Gamma Ray Spectra Measurement in Reactor Pressure Vessel Simulator in WWER-1000 Engineering Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ošmera, B.; Kyncl, J.; Mařík, M.; Cvachovec, F.; Smutný, V.; Králík, M.

    2003-06-01

    The space - energy distribution of the mixed neutron - photon radiation field has been measured over the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) simulator thickness in the WWER-1000 engineering benchmark assembly in the LR-0 experimental reactor (in Nuclear Research Institute Řež plc) with a scintillation spectrometer. The spectra have been measured before the RPV in one quarter, one half, and three quarters of its thickness and behind the RPV in the energy range 0.5 - 10 MeV. The evaluated integral fluxes above 1 MeV and their ratio are compared with the MCNP and DORT calculation, the measured spectra are presented graphically. The measurements are being performed in the frame of the project REDOS [1], 5th Framwork Programme of the European Community 1998 - 2002.

  1. LPT. EBOR (TAN646) reactor vessel. Top view of reflector support ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR (TAN-646) reactor vessel. Top view of reflector support tank. Photographer: Comiskey. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-234 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. LPT. EBOR (TAN646) reactor vessel, distribution tank. View of top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR (TAN-646) reactor vessel, distribution tank. View of top of tank, with coolant port below. Photographer: Lowin. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-236 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S.; Park, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

  4. Development of heat transfer enhancement techniques for external cooling of an advanced reactor vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    Nucleate boiling is a well-recognized means for passively removing high heat loads (up to ˜106 W/m2) generated by a molten reactor core under severe accident conditions while maintaining relatively low reactor vessel temperature (<800 °C). With the upgrade and development of advanced power reactors, however, enhancing the nucleate boiling rate and its upper limit, Critical Heat Flux (CHF), becomes the key to the success of external passive cooling of reactor vessel undergoing core disrupture accidents. In the present study, two boiling heat transfer enhancement methods have been proposed, experimentally investigated and theoretically modelled. The first method involves the use of a suitable surface coating to enhance downward-facing boiling rate and CHF limit so as to substantially increase the possibility of reactor vessel surviving high thermal load attack. The second method involves the use of an enhanced vessel/insulation design to facilitate the process of steam venting through the annular channel formed between the reactor vessel and the insulation structure, which in turn would further enhance both the boiling rate and CHF limit. Among the various available surface coating techniques, metallic micro-porous layer surface coating has been identified as an appropriate coating material for use in External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) based on the overall consideration of enhanced performance, durability, the ease of manufacturing and application. Since no previous research work had explored the feasibility of applying such a metallic micro-porous layer surface coating on a large, downward facing and curved surface such as the bottom head of a reactor vessel, a series of characterization tests and experiments were performed in the present study to determine a suitable coating material composition and application method. Using the optimized metallic micro-porous surface coatings, quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were conducted in the Sub

  5. Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture Analysis Capabilities in Grizzly

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Chakraborty, Pritam; Hoffman, William

    2015-03-01

    Efforts have been underway to develop fracture mechanics capabilities in the Grizzly code to enable it to be used to perform deterministic fracture assessments of degraded reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Development in prior years has resulted a capability to calculate -integrals. For this application, these are used to calculate stress intensity factors for cracks to be used in deterministic linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) assessments of fracture in degraded RPVs. The -integral can only be used to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws because it can only be used to obtain the stress intensity factor for pure Mode I loading. Off-axis flaws will be subjected to mixed-mode loading. For this reason, work has continued to expand the set of fracture mechanics capabilities to permit it to evaluate off-axis flaws. This report documents the following work to enhance Grizzly’s engineering fracture mechanics capabilities for RPVs: • Interaction Integral and -stress: To obtain mixed-mode stress intensity factors, a capability to evaluate interaction integrals for 2D or 3D flaws has been developed. A -stress evaluation capability has been developed to evaluate the constraint at crack tips in 2D or 3D. Initial verification testing of these capabilities is documented here. • Benchmarking for axis-aligned flaws: Grizzly’s capabilities to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws have been benchmarked against calculations for the same conditions in FAVOR. • Off-axis flaw demonstration: The newly-developed interaction integral capabilities are demon- strated in an application to calculate the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for off-axis flaws. • Other code enhancements: Other enhancements to the thermomechanics capabilities that relate to the solution of the engineering RPV fracture problem are documented here.

  6. LPT. EBOR (TAN646) reactor vessel, flow distribution tank. Outlet nozzle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR (TAN-646) reactor vessel, flow distribution tank. Outlet nozzle on side of vessel will be connected to coolant duct. Photographer: Lowin. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-237 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leopando, Leonardo; Warnecke, Ernst

    2008-01-15

    Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

  8. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  9. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-18

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  10. Pressure Vessel and Internals of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, C.V.; Padovani, E.; Cammi, A.; Collado, J.M.; Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral light water cooled, low-to-medium power reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors. Its integrated layout features a pressure vessel containing all the main primary circuit components: the internals and the biological shield, here described together with the pressure vessel, plus the steam generators, the pressurizer, and the main coolant pumps described in companion papers. For this reason the pressure vessel is a crucial component of the plant, which deserves the most demanding design effort. The wide inner annulus around the core is exploited to insert steel plates, in order to improve the inner shielding capability up to the elimination of the external biological shielding and to simplify decommissioning activities by having all the irradiated components inside the vessel. (authors)

  11. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  12. Development of Observation Techniques in Reactor Vessel of Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Imaizumi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Akinori; Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Yukimoto

    In-Vessel Observations (IVO) techniques for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) are important in confirming its safety and integrity. And several IVO equipments for an SFR are developed. However, in order to secure the reliability of IVO techniques, it was necessary to demonstrate the performance under the actual reactor environment with high temperature, high radiation dose and remained sodium. During the investigation of an incident that occurred with Joyo, IVO using a standard Video Camera (VC) and a Radiation-Resistant Fiberscope (RRF) took place at (1) the top of the Sub-Assemblies (S/As) and the In-Vessel Storage rack (IVS), (2) the bottom face of the Upper Core Structure (UCS). A simple 6 m overhead view of each S/A, through the fuel handling or inspection holes etc, was photographed using a VC for making observations of the top of S/As and IVS. About 650 photographs were required to create a composite photograph of the top of the entire S/As and IVS, and a resolution was estimated to be approximately 1mm. In order to observe the bottom face of the UCS, a Remote Handling Device (RHD) equipped with RRFs (approximately 13 m long) was specifically developed for Joyo with a tip that could be inserted into the 70 mm gap between the top of the S/As and the bottom of the UCS. A total of about 35,000 photographs were needed for the full investigation. Regarding the resolution, the sodium flow regulating grid of 0.8mm in thickness could be discriminated. The performance of IVO equipments under the actual reactor environment was successfully confirmed. And the results provided useful information on incident investigations. In addition, fundamental findings and the experience gained during this study, which included the design of equipment, operating procedures, resolution, lighting adjustments, photograph composition and the durability of the RRF under radiation exposure, provided valuable insights into further improvements and verifications for IVO techniques to

  13. R- AND P- REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING VISUALIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N.; Bobbitt, J.; Howard, M.

    2010-06-07

    The R- & P- Reactor facilities were constructed in the early 1950's in response to Cold War efforts. The mission of the facilities was to produce materials for use in the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. R-Reactor was removed from service in 1964 when President Johnson announced a slowdown of he nuclear arms race. PReactor continued operation until 1988 until the facility was taken off-line to modernize the facility with new safeguards. Efforts to restart the reactor ended in 1990 at the end of the Cold War. Both facilities have sat idle since their closure and have been identified as the first two reactors for closure at SRS.

  14. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  15. Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1995-04-11

    A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo`s structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated. 5 figures.

  16. Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo's structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated.

  17. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

  18. 46 CFR 188.10-53 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 188.10-53 Section 188.10-53 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-53 Oceanographic research...

  19. 46 CFR 188.10-53 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 188.10-53 Section 188.10-53 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-53 Oceanographic research...

  20. Reactor Pressure Vessel Temperature Analysis for Prismatic and Pebble-Bed VHTR Designs

    SciTech Connect

    H. D. Gougar; C. B. Davis

    2006-04-01

    Analyses were performed to determine maximum temperatures in the reactor pressure vessel for two potential Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs during normal operation and during a depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The purpose of the analyses was to aid in the determination of appropriate reactor vessel materials for the VHTR. The designs evaluated utilized both prismatic and pebble-bed cores that generated 600 MW of thermal power. Calculations were performed for fluid outlet temperatures of 900 and 950 °C, corresponding to the expected range for the VHTR. The analyses were performed using the RELAP5-3D and PEBBED-THERMIX computer codes. Results of the calculations were compared with preliminary temperature limits derived from the ASME pressure vessel code.

  1. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel (nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)). This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected.

  2. Designs for remote inspection of the ALMR Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J. ); Carroll, D.G. ); Chen, C. ); Crane, C.; Dalton, R. ); Taylor, J.R. ); Tosunoglu, S. )

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important safety systems in General Electric's (GI) Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS). Because of high temperature, radiation, and restricted space conditions, GI desired methods to remotely inspect the RVACS, emissive coatings, and reactor vessel welds during normal refueling operations. The DOE/NE Robotics for Advanced Reactors program formed a team to evaluate the ALMR design for remote inspection of the RVACS. Conceptual designs for robots to perform the required inspection tasks were developed by the team. Design criteria for these remote systems included robot deployment, power supply, navigation, environmental hardening of components, tether management, communication with an operator, sensing, and failure recovery. The operation of the remote inspection concepts were tested using 3-D simulation models of the ALMR. In addition, the team performed an extensive technology review of robot components that could survive the environmental conditions in the RVACS.

  3. In-place nuclear reactor vessel annealing demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this paper was a discussion of the proposed annealing demonstration project at the canceled Marble Hill-1 reactor. The discussion, which was a compilation of transparencies on the noted subject, included overall objectives, scope of work, staging of equipment, and analytical objectives. Current status, including funding was summarized.

  4. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  5. Analysis of dpa rates in the HFIR reactor vessel using a hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic method

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa), particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this study we apply the Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) technique in the ADVANTG code to develop variance reduction parameters for use in the MCNP radiation transport code. We initially evaluated dpa rates for dosimetry capsule locations, regions in the vicinity of the HB-2 beamline, and the vessel beltline region. We then extended the study to provide dpa rate maps using three-dimensional cylindrical mesh tallies that extend from approximately 12 below to approximately 12 above the axial extent of the core. The mesh tally structures contain over 15,000 mesh cells, providing a detailed spatial map of neutron and photon dpa rates at all locations of interest. Relative errors in the mesh tally cells are typically less than 1%.

  6. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

  7. 77 FR 16270 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... components exposed to treated borated water. DATES: Submit comments by May 21, 2012. Comments received after... COMMISSION Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water... availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35510). The NRC staff has...

  8. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  9. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. ); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  10. Intercalibration of research survey vessels on Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyson, J.T.; Johnson, T.B.; Knight, C.T.; Bur, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Fish abundance indices obtained from annual research trawl surveys are an integral part of fisheries stock assessment and management in the Great Lakes. It is difficult, however, to administer trawl surveys using a single vessel-gear combination owing to the large size of these systems, the jurisdictional boundaries that bisect the Great Lakes, and changes in vessels as a result of fleet replacement. When trawl surveys are administered by multiple vessel-gear combinations, systematic error may be introduced in combining catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) data across vessels. This bias is associated with relative differences in catchability among vessel-gear combinations. In Lake Erie, five different research vessels conduct seasonal trawl surveys in the western half of the lake. To eliminate this systematic bias, the Lake Erie agencies conducted a side-by-side trawling experiment in 2003 to develop correction factors for CPUE data associated with different vessel-gear combinations. Correcting for systematic bias in CPUE data should lead to more accurate and comparable estimates of species density and biomass. We estimated correction factors for the 10 most commonly collected species age-groups for each vessel during the experiment. Most of the correction factors (70%) ranged from 0.5 to 2.0, indicating that the systematic bias associated with different vessel-gear combinations was not large. Differences in CPUE were most evident for vessels using different sampling gears, although significant differences also existed for vessels using the same gears. These results suggest that standardizing gear is important for multiple-vessel surveys, but there will still be significant differences in catchability stemming from the vessel effects and agencies must correct for this. With standardized estimates of CPUE, the Lake Erie agencies will have the ability to directly compare and combine time series for species abundance. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  11. Long- and short-term trends in vessel conditioning of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; Bell, M.G.; Boody, F.P.; Bush, C.E.; Groebuer, R.J.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.

    1986-10-01

    We have investigated trends in the conditioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel during the May 1984 to April 1985 run period. The initial conditioning of the vessel, consisting of glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and pulse discharge cleaning (PDC) in concert with a 150/sup 0/C vessel bakeout, is necessary to assure plasma operation after atmospheric venting. A long-term conditioning process, ascribed to limiter conditioning, effectively improves operational conditions during the course of the run. Over several thousand high power plasma discharges, the improvement was documented by using standard parameter (fiducial) plasma discharges. Several techniques demonstrated short-term improvements in vessel conditioning during this time period, including: Cr gettering and programming the plasma position relative to the limiter contact area.

  12. Neutron Doses to the Concrete Vessel and Tendons of a Magnox Reactor Using Retrospective Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. A.; Thornton, D. A.; Wright, G. A.; Bird, A. J.; Rycroft, S.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the assessment of neutron doses to the concrete pressure vessels and stressing tendons above the cores of the Wylfa nuclear power plant. Following the observation of unexpected levels of activation in a routinely removed tendon from the top cap gallery, it was thought prudent to assess neutron doses to the vessel and its tendons and to consider the effect of potential radiation damage to the vessel integrity. To achieve this, the opportunity was taken to perform neutron activation measurements on tendon samples and to compare them with the results of predictions using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The results were used to underwrite neutron dose predictions for the concrete vessel and earlier results for the standpipes in this region of the reactor.

  13. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-04-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called ';Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, …) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  15. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Morrell

    2011-03-01

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  16. MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  17. Specific effects in microwave chemistry explored through reactor vessel design, theory, and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Bridgett; Lovingood, Derek D; Chiu, Yu-Che; Gao, Hanwei; Owens, Jeffery; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2015-11-01

    Microwave chemistry has revolutionized synthetic methodology for the preparation of organics, pharmaceuticals, materials, and peptides. The enhanced reaction rates commonly observed in a microwave have led to wide speculation about the function of molecular microwave absorption and whether the absorption leads to microwave specific effects and enhanced molecular heating. The comparison of theoretical modeling, reactor vessel design, and dielectric spectroscopy allows the nuance of the interaction to be directly understood. The study clearly shows an unaltered silicon carbide vessel allows measurable microwave penetration and therefore, molecular absorption of the microwave photons by the reactants within the reaction vessel cannot be ignored when discussing the role of molecular heating in enhanced molecular reactivity for microwave synthesis. The results of the study yield an improved microwave reactor vessel design that eliminates microwave leakage into the reaction volume by incorporating a noble metal surface layer onto a silicon carbide reaction vessel. The systematic study provides the necessary theory and measurements to better inform the arguments in the field.

  18. Reactivity Transients in Nuclear Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    Version 01 AIREMOD-RR is a point kinetics code which can simulate fast transients in nuclear research reactor cores. It can also be used for theoretical reactor dynamics studies. It is used for research reactor kinetic analysis and provides a point neutron kinetic capability. The thermal hydraulic behavior is governed by a one-dimensional heat balance equation. The calculations are restricted to a single equivalent unit cell which consists of fuel, clad and coolant.

  19. Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Richard D.; Upham, Gerald A.; Anderson, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

  20. Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

  1. 46 CFR 188.10-53 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and other marine geophysical or geological surveys, atmospheric research, and biological research. ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 188.10-53 Section 188.10-53 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH...

  2. 46 CFR 188.10-53 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and other marine geophysical or geological surveys, atmospheric research, and biological research. ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 188.10-53 Section 188.10-53 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH...

  3. 46 CFR 188.10-53 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and other marine geophysical or geological surveys, atmospheric research, and biological research. ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 188.10-53 Section 188.10-53 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH...

  4. Feasibility for development of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution: Sensitivity analyses and NDE (nondestructive evaluation) capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rosinski, S.T. ); Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor pressure vessels operate under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) rules and regulatory guides that are intended to maintain a low probability of vessel failure. The NRC has also addressed neutron embrittlement of pressurized water reactor pressure vessels by imposing regulations on plant operation. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified by these rules and regulations are required, among other things, to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue safe operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. A fracture mechanics sensitivity study was performed to quantify the effect of the assumed flaw distribution on the predicted vessel performance under a specified pressurized thermal shock transient and to determine the critical crack size. Results of the analysis indicate that vessel performance in terms of the estimated probability of failure is very sensitive to the assumed flaw distribution. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

  6. Evaluation of reactor vessel beltline integrity following unanticipated operating events: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.

    1987-04-01

    The ASME Section XI Special Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria began in March 1983 to develop a simplified method for evaluating the severity of an unanticipated event that violated the pressure temperature limits in the Plant Technical Specifications. This report presents the technical bases for the ASME Code guidelines to determine if a reactor can be returned to normal operation following an unanticipated operating event. These guidelines include: (1) a screening criterion that can be used to quickly assess, without significant analysis, vessel integrity subsequent to an unanticipated transient, and (2) a general fracture mechanics evaluation procedure and acceptance criterion for detailed assessment of vessel integrity following a reactor transient. The results from this work have been placed into the ASME Code, Section XI as Paragraph IWB-3700, ''Analytical Evaluation of Plant Operating Events,'' which references nonmandatory Appendix E, ''Evaluation of Unanticipated Operating Events.''

  7. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  8. A Reactor Pressure Vessel Dosimetry Calculation Using ATTILA, An Unstructured Tetrahedral Mesh Discrete-Ordinates Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; Parsons, D.K.; Pautz, S.

    1997-12-31

    Recently, a new state-of-the-art discrete-ordinates code, ATTILA, was developed. ATTILA provides the capabilities to solve geometrically complex 3-D transport problems by using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh. In this paper we describe the application of ATTILA to a 3-D reactor pressure vessel dosimetry problem. We provide numerical results from ATTILA and the Monte Carlo code, MCNP. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of ATTILA for such calculations.

  9. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  10. Issues of intergranular embrittlement of VVER-type nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusov, O.

    2016-04-01

    In light of worldwide tendency to extension of service life of operating nuclear power plants - VVER-type in the first place - recently a special attention is concentrated on phenomena taking place in reactor pressure vessel materials that are able to lead to increased level of mechanical characteristics degradation (resistibility to brittle fracture) during long term of operation. Formerly the hardening mechanism of degradation (increase in the yield strength under influence of irradiation) mainly had been taken into consideration to assess pressure vessel service life limitations, but when extending the service life up to 60 years and more the non-hardening mechanism (intergranular embrittlement of the steels) must be taken into account as well. In this connection NRC “Kurchatov Institute” has initiated a number of works on investigations of this mechanism contribution to the total embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The main results of these investigations are described in this article. Results of grain boundary phosphorus concentration measurements in specimens made of first generation of VVER-type pressure vessels materials as well as VVER-1000 surveillance specimens are presented. An assessment of non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total ductile-to- brittle transition temperature shift is given.

  11. Analysis of dpa Rates in the HFIR Reactor Vessel using a Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risner, J. M.; Blakeman, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa), particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this study we apply the Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) technique in the ADVANTG code to develop variance reduction parameters for use in the MCNP radiation transport code. We initially evaluated dpa rates for dosimetry capsule locations, regions in the vicinity of the HB-2 beamline, and the vessel beltline region. We then extended the study to provide dpa rate maps using three-dimensional cylindrical mesh tallies that extend from approximately 12 in. below to approximately 12 in. above the height of the core. The mesh tally structures contain over 15,000 mesh cells, providing a detailed spatial map of neutron and photon dpa rates at all locations of interest. Relative errors in the mesh tally cells are typically less than 1%. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The US Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the US Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for the US Government purposes.

  12. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-07-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods.

  13. Generic analyses for evaluation of low Charpy upper-shelf energy effects on safety margins against fracture of reactor pressure vessel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50 requires that reactor pressure vessel beltline material maintain Charpy upper-shelf energies of no less than 50 ft-lb during the plant operating life, unless it is demonstrated in a manner approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), that lower values of Charpy upper-shelf energy provide margins of safety against fracture equivalent to those in Appendix G to Section XI of the ASME Code. Analyses based on acceptance criteria and analysis methods adopted in the ASME Code Case N-512 are described herein. Additional information on material properties was provided by the NRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Materials Engineering Branch. These cases, specified by the NRC, represent generic applications to boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor vessels. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 140.

  14. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  15. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  16. Analyses of fluid-structure interaction and structural response of reactor vessels to a postulated accident

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the improved hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water outside the reactor vessel, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  17. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  18. Furfural-based polymers for the sealing of reactor vessels dumped in the Arctic Kara Sea

    SciTech Connect

    HEISER,J.H.; COWGILL,M.G.; SIVINTSEV,Y.V.; ALEXANDROV,V.P.; DYER,R.S.

    1996-10-07

    Between 1965 and 1988, 16 naval reactor vessels were dumped in the Arctic Kara Sea. Six of the vessels contained spent nuclear fuel that had been damaged during accidents. In addition, a container holding {approximately} 60% of the damaged fuel from the No. 2 reactor of the atomic icebreaker Lenin was dumped in 1967. Before dumping, the vessels were filled with a solidification agent, Conservant F, in order to prevent direct contact between the seawater and the fuel and other activated components, thereby reducing the potential for release of radionuclides into the environment. The key ingredient in Conservant F is furfural (furfuraldehyde). Other constituents vary, depending on specific property requirements, but include epoxy resin, mineral fillers, and hardening agents. In the liquid state (prior to polymerization) Conservant F is a low viscosity, homogeneous resin blend that provides long work times (6--9 hours). In the cured state, Conservant F provides resistance to water and radiation, has high adhesion properties, and results in minimal gas evolution. This paper discusses the properties of Conservant F in both its cured and uncured states and the potential performance of the waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel in the Arctic Kara Sea.

  19. Helium Leak Detection of Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, N. G.

    2012-11-01

    Bharatiya Nabhikiya Vidyut Nigam (BHAVINI) is engaged in construction of 500MW Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpak am, Chennai. In this very important and prestigious national programme Special Product Division (SPD) of M/s Kay Bouvet Engg.pvt. ltd. (M/s KBEPL) Satara is contributing in a major way by supplying many important sub-assemblies like- Under Water trolley (UWT), Airlocks (PAL, EAL) Container and Storage Rack (CSR) Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) etc for PFBR. SPD of KBEPL caters to the requirements of Government departments like - Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), BARC, Defense, and Government undertakings like NPCIL, BHAVINI, BHEL etc. and other precision Heavy Engg. Industries. SPD is equipped with large size Horizontal Boring Machines, Vertical Boring Machines, Planno milling, Vertical Turret Lathe (VTL) & Radial drilling Machine, different types of welding machines etc. PFBR is 500 MWE sodium cooled pool type reactor in which energy is produced by fissions of mixed oxides of Uranium and Plutonium pellets by fast neutrons and it also breeds uranium by conversion of thorium, put along with fuel rod in the reactor. In the long run, the breeder reactor produces more fuel then it consumes. India has taken the lead to go ahead with Fast Breeder Reactor Programme to produce electricity primarily because India has large reserve of Thorium. To use Thorium as further fuel in future, thorium has to be converted in Uranium by PFBR Technology.

  20. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  1. Isothermal and thermal-mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Balazs; Trampus, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin-Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  2. Supply of enriched uranium for research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, H.

    1997-08-01

    Since the RERTR-meeting In Newport/USA in 1990 the author delivered a series of papers in connection with the fuel cycle for research reactors dealing with its front-end. In these papers the author underlined the need for unified specifications for enriched uranium metal suitable for the production of fuel elements and made proposals with regard to the re-use of in Europe reprocessed highly enriched uranium. With regard to the fuel cycle of research reactors the research reactor community was since 1989 more concentrating on the problems of its back-end since the USA stopped the acceptance of spent research reactor fuel on December 31, 1988. Now, since it is apparent that these back-end problem have been solved by AEA`s ability to reprocess and the preparedness of the USA to again accept physically spent research reactor fuel the author is focusing with this paper again on the front-end of the fuel cycle on the question whether there is at all a safe supply of low and high enriched uranium for research reactors in the future.

  3. Design of the reactor vessel inspection robot for the advanced liquid metal reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-06-01

    A consortium of four universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in an advanced nuclear reactor. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a mock non-hostile environment and shown to perform as expected, as detailed in this report.

  4. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  5. VISA: a computer code for predicting the probability of reactor pressure-vessel failure. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Strosnider, J. Jr.; Klecker, R.W.; Engel, D.W.; Johnson, K.I.

    1983-09-01

    The VISA (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) code was developed as part of the NRC staff evaluation of pressurized thermal shock. VISA uses Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the failure probability of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to a pressure and thermal transient specified by the user. Linear elastic fracture mechanics are used to model crack initiation and propagation. parameters for initial crack size, copper content, initial RT/sub NDT/, fluence, crack-initiation fracture toughness, and arrest fracture toughness are treated as random variables. This report documents the version of VISA used in the NRC staff report (Policy Issue from J.W. Dircks to NRC Commissioners, Enclosure A: NRC Staff Evaluation of Pressurized Thermal Shock, November 1982, SECY-82-465) and includes a user's guide for the code.

  6. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessil and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication (with a through-wall dimension of approx.6 mm (approx.0.24 in.)) was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications (i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m/sup 2/ (72 ft/sup 2/) of cladding surface).

  7. Large-scale testing of in-vessel debris cooling through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel in the CYBL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Bergeron, K.D.; Slezak, S.E.; Simpson, R.B.

    1994-04-01

    The possibility of achieving in-vessel core retention by flooding the reactor cavity, or the ``flooded cavity``, is an accident management concept currently under consideration for advanced light water reactors (ALWR), as well as for existing light water reactors (LWR). The CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility is a facility specifically designed to perform large-scale confirmatory testing of the flooded cavity concept. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner 3.7 m diameter tank simulates the reactor vessel, and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. The energy deposition on the bottom head is simulated with an array of radiant heaters. The array can deliver a tailored heat flux distribution corresponding to that resulting from core melt convection. The present paper provides a detailed description of the capabilities of the facility, as well as results of recent experiments with heat flux in the range of interest to those required for in-vessel retention in typical ALWRs. The paper concludes with a discussion of other experiments for the flooded cavity applications.

  8. Distribution of properties in nuclear reactor vessel shells in the unirradiated state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skundin, M. A.; Chernobaeva, A. A.; Zhurko, D. A.; Krasikov, E. A.; Medvedev, K. I.

    2013-04-01

    The distributions of the chemical composition, the strength characteristics, and critical ductile-brittle transition temperature T cr are studied in the axial, radial, and tangential directions of the material of a test ring cut from a standard forging used for a VVER-1000 reactor vessel shell. The values of T cr of specimens cut from the test ring are shown to be well below those of the internal volume of the shell, which can explain the substantial scatter of the results obtained on reference specimens cut from the base metal.

  9. Wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor for initial core-loading of advanced breeder reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delorenzo, J. T.; Kennedy, E. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Rochelle, J. M.; Chiles, M. M.; Valentine, K. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor was developed to measure the reactivity of an advanced breeder reactor as the core is loaded for the first time to preclude an accidental critically incident. The environment is liquid sodium at a temperature of approx. 220 C, with negligible gamma or neutron radiation. With ultrasonic transmission of neutron data, no fundamental limitation was observed after tests at 230 C for 2000 h. The neutron sensitivity was approx. 1 count/s-nv, and the potential data transmission rate was approx. 10,000 counts/s.

  10. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  11. A structural evaluation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport impact conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, M.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1989-03-24

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, is being decommissioned and dismantled. This government-leased property will be returned, in a radiologically safe condition, to its owner. All radioactive material is being removed from the Shippingport Station and transported for burial to the DOE Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) will be transported by barge to Hanford. This paper describes an evaluation of the structural response of the RPV to the normal and accident impact test conditions as required by the Code of Federal Regulations. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Positron annihilation study of Fe-ion irradiated reactor pressure vessel model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Li, Z. C.; Schut, H.; Sekimura, N.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of reactor pressure vessel steels under irradiation, which results from the hardening and embrittlement caused by a high number density of nanometer scale damage, is of increasingly crucial concern for safe nuclear power plant operation and possible reactor lifetime prolongation. In this paper, the radiation damage in model alloys with increasing chemical complexity (Fe, Fe-Cu, Fe-Cu-Si, Fe-Cu-Ni and Fe-Cu-Ni-Mn) has been studied by Positron Annihilation Doppler Broadening spectroscopy after 1.5 MeV Fe-ion implantation at room temperature or high temperature (290 oC). It is found that the room temperature irradiation generally leads to the formation of vacancy-type defects in the Fe matrix. The high temperature irradiation exhibits an additional annealing effect for the radiation damage. Besides the Cu-rich clusters observed by the positron probe, the results show formation of vacancy-Mn complexes for implantation at low temperatures.

  13. Assemblies and methods for mitigating effects of reactor pressure vessel expansion

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Gou, Perng-Fei; Chu, Cherk Lam; Oliver, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Support assemblies for allowing RPV radial expansion while simultaneously limiting horizontal, vertical, and azimuthal movement of the RPV within a nuclear reactor are described. In one embodiment, the support assembly includes a support block and a guide block. The support block includes a first portion and a second portion, and the first portion is rigidly coupled to the RPV adjacent the first portion. The guide block is rigidly coupled to a reactor pressure vessel support structure and includes a channel sized to receive the second portion of the support block. The second portion of the support block is positioned in the guide block channel to movably couple the guide block to the support block.

  14. Assemblies and methods for mitigating effects of reactor pressure vessel expansion

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Gou, P.F.; Chu, C.L.; Oliver, R.P.

    1999-07-27

    Support assemblies for allowing RPV radial expansion while simultaneously limiting horizontal, vertical, and azimuthal movement of the RPV within a nuclear reactor are described. In one embodiment, the support assembly includes a support block and a guide block. The support block includes a first portion and a second portion, and the first portion is rigidly coupled to the RPV adjacent the first portion. The guide block is rigidly coupled to a reactor pressure vessel support structure and includes a channel sized to receive the second portion of the support block. The second portion of the support block is positioned in the guide block channel to movably couple the guide block to the support block. 6 figs.

  15. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  16. Structural behavior of a pool-type LMFBR reactor-vessel deck to beyond-design-basis loads

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.; Pan, Y.C.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the structural response of the reactor vessel deck to loads resulting from a hypothetical energetic accident for a conceptual design of a pool-type LMFBR was presented. The size of the reactor was in the 1000 MWe range with a 22m reactor vessel diameter and a vessel depth of 21 m. The vessel contains the entire primary system which includes the primary pumps, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs), reactor core, core support structure, a cylindrical internal vessel, called a redan, and the sodium pool. The redan serves as a separator between the hot sodium emerging from the top of the reactor and the cooler bulk sodium. The deck structure provides support to the rotatable plug assembly, primary pumps and IHXs. In order to evaluate the structural integrity of this deck during a 1000 MJ excursion, a three-dimensional finite element model was developed for a 45 degree sector of the deck. The model included the main structural elements or the deck and the conical support skirt. The triple rotatable plug (TRP), pumps, and IHXs were represented by concentrated masses.

  17. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  18. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  19. Photofission Analysis for Fissile Dosimeters Dedicated to Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourganel, Stéphane; Faucher, Margaux; Thiollay, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Fissile dosimeters are commonly used in reactor pressure vessel surveillance programs. In this paper, the photofission contribution is analyzed for in-vessel 237Np and 238U fissile dosimeters in French PWR. The aim is to reassess this contribution using recent tools (the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code) and latest nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII nuclear libraries). To be as exhaustive as possible, this study is carried out for different configurations of fissile dosimeters, irradiated inside different kinds of PWR: 900 MWe, 1300 MWe, and 1450 MWe. Calculation of photofission rate in dosimeters does not present a major problem using the TRIPOLI-4® Monte Carlo code and the coupled neutron-photon simulation mode. However, preliminary studies were necessary to identify the origin of photons responsible of photofissions in dosimeters in relation to the photofission threshold reaction (around 5 MeV). It appears that the main contribution of high enough energy photons generating photofissions is the neutron inelastic scattering in stainless steel reactor structures. By contrast, 137Cs activity calculation is not an easy task since photofission yield data are known with high uncertainty.

  20. Slug impact loading on the vessel head during a postulated in-vessel steam explosion in pressurized water reactors -- Assessments and discussion of the investigation strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R.; Malmberg, T.; Messemer, G.; Stach, T.; Stratmanns, E.

    1995-09-01

    The most severe consequence of a pressurized water reactor in-vessel steam explosion is a molten fuel slug impact against the head of the reactor pressure vessel that could cause a failure of this head and lead to missiles endangering the reactor containment. An investigation is described that attempts to determine the maximum slug impact that a vessel head is capable of withstanding without failing and, consequently, without impairing the containment safety-related function. Preliminary theoretical assessments are presented that suggest that the head might be able to withstand rather strong impacts and that the shape of the fuel slug will have only a moderate influence on the results, provided the upper internal structures are taken into account. A low sensitivity against the slug shape is an essential prerequisite for a reliable safety proof. However, investigations primarily based on computational models are not sufficient; therefore, an investigation concept is proposed that relies on model experiments in which the geometry is scaled down by factors of 10 and 20, respectively. Theoretical and experimental investigations for liquid-structure impact problems in different scales are discussed to assess the degree of similarity that can be obtained. Finally, model experiments are described in some detail simulating the molten fuel slug impact on the vessel head.

  1. Sintered silicon carbide: a new ceramic vessel material for microwave chemistry in single-mode reactors.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Obermayer, David; Reichart, Benedikt; Prekodravac, Bojana; Irfan, Muhammad; Kremsner, Jennifer M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2010-10-25

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a strongly microwave absorbing chemically inert ceramic material that can be utilized at extremely high temperatures due to its high melting point and very low thermal expansion coefficient. Microwave irradiation induces a flow of electrons in the semiconducting ceramic that heats the material very efficiently through resistance heating mechanisms. The use of SiC carbide reaction vessels in combination with a single-mode microwave reactor provides an almost complete shielding of the contents inside from the electromagnetic field. Therefore, such experiments do not involve electromagnetic field effects on the chemistry, since the semiconducting ceramic vial effectively prevents microwave irradiation from penetrating the reaction mixture. The involvement of electromagnetic field effects (specific/nonthermal microwave effects) on 21 selected chemical transformations was evaluated by comparing the results obtained in microwave-transparent Pyrex vials with experiments performed in SiC vials at the same reaction temperature. For most of the 21 reactions, the outcome in terms of conversion/purity/product yields using the two different vial types was virtually identical, indicating that the electromagnetic field had no direct influence on the reaction pathway. Due to the high chemical resistance of SiC, reactions involving corrosive reagents can be performed without degradation of the vessel material. Examples include high-temperature fluorine-chlorine exchange reactions using triethylamine trihydrofluoride, and the hydrolysis of nitriles with aqueous potassium hydroxide. The unique combination of high microwave absorptivity, thermal conductivity, and effusivity on the one hand, and excellent temperature, pressure and corrosion resistance on the other hand, makes this material ideal for the fabrication of reaction vessels for use in microwave reactors.

  2. Dual shell reactor vessel: A pressure-balanced system for high pressure and temperature reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.; Deverman, G.S.

    1995-03-01

    The main purpose of this work was to demonstrate the Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) as a safe and economical reactor for the hydrothermal water oxidation of hazardous wastes. Experimental tests proved that the pressure balancing piston and the leak detection concept designed for this project will work. The DSPBV was sized to process 10 gal/hr of hazardous waste at up to 399{degree}C (750{degree}F) and 5000 psia (34.5 MPa) with a residence time of 10 min. The first prototype reactor is a certified ASME pressure vessel. It was purchased by Innotek Corporation (licensee) and shipped to Pacific Northwest Laboratory for testing. Supporting equipment and instrumentation were, to a large extent, transported here from Battelle Columbus Division. A special air feed system and liquid pump were purchased to complete the package. The entire integrated demonstration system was assembled at PNL. During the activities conducted for this report, the leak detector design was tested on bench top equipment. Response to low levels of water in oil was considered adequate to ensure safety of the pressure vessel. Shakedown tests with water only were completed to prove the system could operate at 350{degree}C at pressures up to 3300 psia. Two demonstration tests with industrial waste streams were conducted, which showed that the DSPBV could be used for hydrothermal oxidation. In the first test with a metal plating waste, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and cyanide concentrations were reduced over 90%. In the second test with a munitions waste, the organics were reduced over 90% using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the oxidant.

  3. Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

    2005-06-01

    Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

  4. Probabilistic Safety Assessment of Tehran Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hadi; Nematollahi, Mohammad Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2004-07-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. In this paper the application of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment to the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is presented. The level 1 PSA application involved: Familiarization with the plant, selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantification, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development and dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is discussed with highlights from the selected results. Quantification of the constructed models is done using SAPHIRE software. This Study shows that the obtained core damage frequency for Tehran Research Reactor (8.368 E-6 per year) well meets the IAEA criterion for existing nuclear power plants (1E-4). But safety improvement suggestions are offered to decrease the most probable accidents. (authors)

  5. BWRSAR (Boiling Water Reactor Severe Accident Response) calculations of reactor vessel debris pours for Peach Bottom short-term station blackout

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.; Ott, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes recent analyses performed by the BWR Severe Accident Technology (BWRSAT) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to estimate the release of debris from the reactor vessel for the unmitigated short-term station blackout accident sequence. Calculations were performed with the BWR Severe Accident Response (BWRSAR) code and are based upon consideration of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The modeling strategies employed within BWRSAR for debris relocation within the reactor vessel are briefly discussed and the calculated events of the accident sequence, including details of the calculated debris pours, are presented. 4 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    PubMed

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  7. Irradiation Induced Defect Characterization in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yougn-Soo; Shin, Eun-Joo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Park, Duck-Gun

    The degradation of the mechanical properties of the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) steel during an irradiation in a nuclear power plant is closely related to the irradiation induced defects. The size of these defects is known to be a few nanometer, and the small angle neutron scattering technique is regarded as the best non destructive technique to characterize the nano sized inhomogeneities in bulk samples. The investigated the RPV steel has been used in YeongKwang nuclear power plant at Korea and the Cu content of the RPV steel is 0.06 wt%. The RPV steel was irradiated in the HANARO reactor at KAERI. The small angle neutron scattering experiments were performed by the SANS instrument in the HANARO reactor. The nano sized irradiation induced defects were quantitatively analyzed by SANS and the type of the irradiation induced defects was discussed in detail. The relation between irradiation induced defects and the yield strength was investigated. The characteristics of irradiation induced defects in low Cu containing RPV steel were discussed.

  8. Reactor pulse repeatability studies at the annular core research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, K.R.; Trinh, T.Q.; Luker, S. M.

    2011-07-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories is a water-moderated pool-type reactor designed for testing many types of objects in the pulse and steady-state mode of operations. Personnel at Sandia began working to improve the repeatability of pulse operations for experimenters in the facility. The ACRR has a unique UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel that makes the task of producing repeatable pulses difficult with the current operating procedure. The ACRR produces a significant quantity of photoneutrons through the {sup 9}Be({gamma}, n){sup 8}Be reaction in the fuel elements. The photoneutrons are the result of the gammas produced during fission and in fission product decay, so their production is very much dependent on the reactor power history and changes throughout the day/week of experiments in the facility. Because the photoneutrons interfere with the delayed-critical measurements required for accurate pulse reactivity prediction, a new operating procedure was created. The photoneutron effects at delayed critical are minimized when using the modified procedure. In addition, the pulse element removal time is standardized for all pulse operations with the modified procedure, and this produces less variation in reactivity removal times. (authors)

  9. Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Part one of this report gives the operating history for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of July. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories for the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Source Facility for the month of July. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

  10. Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

  11. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs.

  12. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  13. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  14. Reactor moderator, pressure vessel, and heat rejection system of an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyke, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-megawatt open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 196,600 newtons (44,200 lb) and a specific impulse of 4400 seconds. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel, and waste heat rejection system) were considered conceptually and were sized.

  15. Structural dynamic and thermal stress analysis of nuclear reactor vessel support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi-Diango, J.

    1972-01-01

    A nuclear reactor vessel is supported by a Z-ring and a box ring girder. The two proposed structural configurations to transmit the loads from the Z-ring and the box ring girder to the foundation are shown. The cantilever concrete ledge transmitting the load from the Z-ring and the box girder via the cavity wall to the foundation is shown, along with the loads being transmitted through one of the six steel columns. Both of these two supporting systems were analyzed by using rigid format 9 of NASTRAN for dynamic loads, and the thermal stresses were analyzed by AXISOL. The six column configuration was modeled by a combination of plate and bar elements, and the concrete cantilever ledge configuration was modeled by plate elements. Both configurations were found structurally satisfactory; however, nonstructural considerations favored the concrete cantilever ledge.

  16. Notch position in the HAZ specimen of reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Yoon, E. P.

    1998-12-01

    Variations in the notch toughness in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were investigated by positioning the Charpy V-notches along the line normal to the weld fusion line of a SA 508 Cl.3 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. In the notch position for common surveillance HAZ specimens, rather higher toughness values were acquired. The minimum properties were noted in the region of 4-5 mm apart from the fusion boundary, where the values of toughness and strength were both poorer than those of the other regions of the HAZ and the base metal. The causes for these variations were discussed with reference to the microstructures from the actual and the simulated welding processes.

  17. Method for coupled three-dimensional analysis of reactor vessel blowdowns with internal structures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.; Gross, M.B.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    The STEALTH 3D and WHAMSE 3D computer codes have been combined to perform three-dimensional coupled fluid/structure calculations of the blowdown response of a pressure vessel with internal structures typical of a pressurized water reactor. The fluid/structure coupling, which is performed cycle by cycle during a calculation, is described. The coupled fluid/structure code, STEALTH/WHAMSE 3D, has been used to simulate the decompression of test V31.1 from the HDR blowdown test series. Calculations of fluid pressure, differential fluid pressure and hoop strain compare favorably with the experimental data from test V31.1. The computed peak axial stain compares less favorably with the experimental data, probably due to coarseness of the structural grid. 14 refs.

  18. Detection of small-sized near-surface under-clad cracks for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.T.; Crawford, S.L.; Doctor, S.R.; Posakony, G.J.

    1983-02-01

    The analysis of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) shows it is necessary for nondestructive evaluation to demonstrate high probability of detecting evaluation to demonstrate high probability of detecting cracks 0.250 inches deep and deeper at the clad/base metal interface. Ultrasonic techniques developed and used in Europe are evaluated in this paper for their applicability to US reactor pressure vessels for detecting cracks of interest for PTS. Flaw detectability experiments were carried out by testing the inspection technique's ability to detect artificial flaws under several types of clad, including some Manual Metal Arc (MMA) clad. Both ground and unground clad surfaces were evaluated. Crack sizing tests of the inspection technique were made using a crack tip diffraction technique.

  19. A Unified Cohesive Zone Approach to Model Ductile Brittle Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a unified cohesive zone model has been proposed to predict, Ductile to Brittle Transition, DBT, in Reactor Pressure Vessel, RPV, steels. A general procedure is described to obtain the Cohesive Zone Model, CZM, parameters for the different temperatures and fracture probabilities. In order to establish the full master-curve, the procedure requires three calibration points with one at the upper-shelf for ductile fracture and two for the fracture probabilities, Pf, of 5% and 95% at the lower-shelf. In the current study, these calibrations were carried out by utilizing the experimental fracture toughness values and flow curves. After the calibration procedure, the simulations of fracture behavior (ranging from completely unstable to stable crack extension behavior) in one inch thick compact tension specimens at different temperatures yielded values that were comparable to the experimental fracture toughness values, indicating the viability of such unified modeling approach.

  20. Tool for removing split pin remnants from a nuclear reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Havoic-Conroy, S.M.

    1986-05-27

    A tool is described for removing from anchor bores in the upper core plate of a nuclear reactor vessel, anchor pin remnants which may be broken from guide tube assemblies upon withdrawal thereof from large seating apertures adjacent to the anchor bores in the upper core plate, the tool comprising: support means dimensioned to fit through a seating aperture, a pin driving member carried by the support means, means for lowering the support means through a seating aperture to a use position beneath the upper core plate with the pin driving member in registry with an adjacent anchor bore, and motive means for moving the pin driving member upwardly into the anchor bore to drive the anchor pin remnant therefrom.

  1. Marine transportation and burial of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel/neutron shield tank package

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) project for dismantling the Shippingport atomic power station. One of the more significant and challenging technical aspects of the project, which is being managed for DOE by General Electric-Nuclear Energy, is the marine transport of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its associated neutron shield tank (NST) to the government-owned Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Planning of the transport activity, barge transportation operations, and Hanford transportation operations, are discussed. This work will be the first use of barge transportation in the United States of a radioactive RPV package from a decommissioned land-based nuclear power plant. This extensive transportation operation has been accomplished in a timely, safe, and cost-effective manner.

  2. Examination of relocated fuel debris adjacent to the lower head of the TMI-2 reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.W.; Jensen, S.M.; Schuetz, B.K.

    1994-03-01

    As part of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project, funded by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, physical, metallurgical, and radiochemical examinations were performed on samples of previously molten material that had relocated to the lower plenum of the TMI-2 reactor during the accident of 28 March 1979. This report presents the results of those examinations and some limited analysis of these results as required for the interpretation of the data. Principal conclusions of the examinations are that the bulk lower head debris is homogeneous and composed primarily of (U,Zr)O{sub 2}. This molten material reached temperatures greater than 2,600 C and probably reached the lower head as a liquid or slurry at temperatures below the peak temperature. A debris bed was formed, which was composed of particular debris above a monolithic melt that solidified on the lower head.

  3. University research reactors and Internet communication

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.M.

    1994-12-31

    In July 1993, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) stunned nonprofit U.S. universities by eliminating the historical fee exemption for these entities. The fees would have devastating effects on university reactor operations and university by-product material usage. Faced with the prospect of eliminating their programs, the university research reactor (URR) community made a concerted response to reinstate the exemption. While the effort eventually proved successful, the need for fast and efficient communication became very apparent during the crisis. One outcome was an effort to enhance communications among the university reactors by using electronic mail (E-mail) on the Internet. This paper describes how the fee crisis demonstrated the need for enhanced communications and the results of the effort to provide it.

  4. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Hoffman, William; Sen, Sonat; Rabiti, Cristian; Dickson, Terry; Bass, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  5. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  6. JRQ and JPA irradiated and annealed reactor pressure vessel steels studied by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, Vladimír; Gokhman, Oleksandr; Pecko, Stanislav; Sojak, Stanislav; Bergner, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The paper is focused on a comprehensive study of JRQ and JPA reactor pressure vessel steels from the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) point of view. Based on our more than 20 years' experience with characterization of irradiated reactor steels, we confirmed that defects after irradiation start to grow and/or merge into bigger clusters. Experimental results shown that JPA steel is more sensitive to the creation of irradiation-induced defects than JRQ steel. It is most probably due to high copper content (0.29 wt.% in JPA) and copper precipitation has a major impact on neutron-induced defect creation at the beginning of the irradiation. Based on current PALS results, no large vacancy clusters were formed during irradiation, which could cause dangerous embrittlement concerning operation safety of nuclear power plant. The combined PALS, small angle neutron scattering and atomic probe tomography studies support the model for JRQ and JPA steels describing the structure of irradiation-induced clusters as agglomerations of vacancy clusters (consisting of 2-6 vacancies each) and are separated from each other by a distribution of atoms.

  7. Neutron scattering at the OPAL research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Garry J.; Holden, Peter J.

    2016-09-01

    The current suite of 14 neutron scattering instruments at the multipurpose OPAL research reactor is described. All instruments have been constructed following best practice, using state-of-the-art components and in close consultation with the regional user base. First results from the most recently commissioned instruments match their design performance parameters. Selected recent scientific highlights illustrate some unique combinations of instrumentation and the regional flavour of topical applications.

  8. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  9. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  10. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts' ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  11. Photon spectrum behind biological shielding of the LVR-15 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.; Vins, M.

    2011-07-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research reactor situated at the Research Centre Rez, near Prague. It operates as a multipurpose facility with a maximum thermal power of 10 MW. The reactor core usually contains from 28 to 32 fuel assemblies with a total mass of {sup 235}U of about 5 kg. Emitted radiation from the fuel caused by fission is shielded by moderating water, a steel reactor vessel, and heavy concrete. This paper deals with measurement and analysis of the gamma spectrum near the outer surface of the concrete wall, behind biological shielding, mainly in the 3- to 10-MeV energy range. A portable HPGe detector with a portable multichannel analyzer was used to measure gamma spectra. The origin of energy lines in gamma detector spectra was identified. (authors)

  12. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  13. New Experimental Results on the Interaction of Molten Corium with Reactor Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Granovsky, V.S.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Cognet, G.

    2004-07-01

    In order to justify the concept of in-vessel core melt retention, it is necessary to understand the thermal and physico-chemical phenomena. Especially the interaction of the molten pool with the reactor vessel during outside cooling needs to be understood. These phenomena are very complex, in particular, where interactions with the oxidic melt are concerned. In the early stages of the retention process, the oxidic corium and the vessel steel interact under the conditions of low oxygen potential in the melt. These conditions can be simulated by a molten corium having the composition UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}/Zr, where the degree of Zr-oxidation is in the range between 30 % (C-30) and 100 % (C-100). Corresponding experiments with prototypic melts at low oxygen potentials are being performed in the ISTC METCOR project 2. phase. These are: - MC 5 of corium composition 71w%UO{sub 2}-29w%ZrO{sub 2} (C-100) in neutral atmosphere (argon), - MC 6 of corium composition 76w%UO{sub 2}-9w%ZrO{sub 2}-15w%Zr (C{approx}30), also in argon. In test MC 5, the interaction of molten C-100 corium with a water-cooled steel specimen was studied for the following maximum temperatures at the specimen surface: 1075 deg. C, 1180 deg. C, 1315 deg. C and 1435 deg. C. The total duration of the experiment was {approx} 36 hours. The MC 5 test serves as a reference test for determining the characteristics of the interaction between oxidic melt and steel specimen under the conditions of minimum chemical interaction potential. To investigate the effect of substoichiometry, test No 6 was then performed with sub-oxidized molten corium C{approx}30. The maximum surface temperature of the cooled steel specimen was held at {approx} 1400 deg. C. The test duration was {approx} 10 hours. The ablation phenomena were found to differ significantly from those observed both in the reference test, as well as in former tests with oxidized melts, as they involved the formation of a low-melting metallic phase at the

  14. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs.

  15. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect

    Posivak, Edward; Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean

    2012-07-01

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  16. Neutron induced damage in reactor pressure vessel steel: An X-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Cammelli, S.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Gavillet, D.

    2009-03-01

    The radiation damage produced in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels during neutron irradiation is a long-standing problem of considerable practical interest. In this study, an extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been applied at Cu, Ni and Mn K-edges to systematically investigate neutron induced radiation damage to the metal-site bcc structure of RPV steels, irradiated with neutrons in the fluence range from 0.85 to 5.0 × 1019 cm-2. An overall similarity of Cu, Ni and Mn atomic environment in the iron matrix is observed. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), derived from EXAFS data have been found to evolve continuously as a function of neutron fluence describing the atomic-scale structural modifications in RPVs by neutron irradiations. From the pristine data, long range order beyond the first- and second-shell is apparent in the RDF spectra. In the irradiated specimens, all near-neighbour peaks are greatly reduced in magnitude, typical of damaged material. Prolonged annealing leads annihilation of point defects to give rise to an increase in the coordination numbers of near-neighbour atomic shells approaching values close to that of non-irradiated material, but does not suppress the formation of nano-sized Cu and/or Ni-rich-precipitates. Total amount of radiation damage under a given irradiation condition has been determined. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data are presented and discussed.

  17. Critical Heat Flux Experiments on the Reactor Vessel Wall Using 2-D Slice Test Section

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Baek, Won-Pil

    2005-11-15

    The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel outer wall was measured using the two-dimensional slice test section. The radius and the channel area of the test section were 2.5 m and 10 cm x 15 cm, respectively. The flow channel area and the heater width were smaller than those of the ULPU experiments, but the radius was greater than that of the ULPU. The CHF data under the inlet subcooling of 2 to 25 deg. C and the mass flux 0 to 300 kg/m{sup 2}.s had been acquired. The measured CHF value was generally slightly lower than that of the ULPU. The difference possibly comes from the difference of the test section material and the thickness. However, the general trend of CHF according to the mass flux was similar with that of the ULPU. The experimental CHF data were compared with the predicted values by SULTAN correlation. The SULTAN correlation predicted well this study's data only for the mass flux higher than 200 kg/m{sup 2}.s, and for the exit quality lower than 0.05. The local condition-based correlation was developed, and it showed good prediction capability for broad quality (-0.01 to 0.5) and mass flux (<300 kg/m{sup 2}.s) conditions with a root-mean-square error of 2.4%. There were increases in the CHF with trisodium phosphate-added water.

  18. A perspective on thermal annealing of reactor pressure vessel materials from the viewpoint of experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1996-04-01

    It is believed that in the next decade or so, several nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) may exceed the reference temperature limits set by the pressurized thermal shock screening criteria. One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on RPVs is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the annealing response, or ``recovery`` of several irradiated RPV steels. The fracture toughness is one of the important properties used in the evaluation of the integrity of RPVs. Optimally, the fracture toughness is measured directly by fracture toughness specimens, such as compact tension or precracked Charpy specimens, but is often inferred from the results of Charpy V-notch impact specimens. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of models for embrittlement recovery which have been developed by Eason et al. Some of the issues in annealing that still need to be resolved are discussed.

  19. Boric acid corrosion of light water reactor pressure vessel head materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Chopra, O. K.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Cullen, Jr.; W. H.; Energy Technology; USNRC

    2005-01-01

    This work presents experimental data on electrochemical potential and corrosion rates for the materials found in the reactor pressure vessel head and control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles in boric acid solutions of varying concentrations at temperatures of 95-316 C. Tests were conducted in (a) high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous solutions with a range of boric acid concentrations, (b) high-temperature (150-316 C)H-B-Osolutions at ambient pressure, in wet and dry conditions, and (c) low-temperature (95 C) saturated, aqueous, boric acid solutions. These correspond to the following situations: (a) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus plugged, (b) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus open, and (c) significant cooling due to high leakage and nozzle/head annulus open. The results showed significant corrosion only for the low-alloy steel and no corrosion for Alloy 600 or 308 stainless steel cladding. Also, corrosion rates were significant in saturated boric acid solutions, and no material loss was observed in H-B-O solution in the absence of moisture. The results are compared with the existing corrosion/wastage data in the literature.

  20. Decision process involved in preparing the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport

    SciTech Connect

    Murphie, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    The most significant part of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project was the one-piece removal and shipment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Implicit in the RPV transport was the task of qualifying the RPV as a waste package acceptable for shipment. Soon after physical decommissioning began on September 1985, questions regarding the packaging certification and transport of the RPV from Shippingport, Pennsylvania to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Waste Burial Site necessitated reexamination of several planning assumptions. A complete reassessment of the regulatory requirements governing the RPV shipment resulted in a programmatic decision to obtain a type B(U) Certificate of Compliance and abandon the originally planned US Department of Transportation (DOT) low specific activity (LSA) shipment. The decision process resulting in this conclusion was extensive and involved many organizations and agencies. Incidental to this process, several subtle certification issues were identified that required resolution. Some of these issues involved the definition of LSA material for large packages; interpretation and compliance with DOE, DOT and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations for the transport of radioactive material; incorporation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations by the Panama Canal; and DOE policy requiring advance notification to states of radioactive waste shipments. 2 figs.

  1. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. W.; Han, L. Z.; Luo, X. M.; Liu, Q. D.; Gu, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe3C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo2C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained.

  2. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  3. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  4. In vessel detection of delayed neutron emitters from clad failure in sodium cooled nuclear reactors: An estimation of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Chapoutier, N.; Jeannot, J.-P.; Jadot, F.; Batail, R.; Verrier, D.

    2014-04-01

    The detection of clad failures is mandatory in sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors in compliance with the "clean sodium" concept. An in-vessel detection system, sensitive to delayed neutrons from fission products released into the primary coolant by failures, partially tested in SUPERPHENIX, is foreseen in current SFR projects in order to reduce significantly the delay before an alarm is issued. In this paper, an estimation of the signal received by such a system in case of a failure is derived, taking the French project ASTRID as a working example. This failure induced signal is compared to that of the contribution of the neutrons from the core itself. The sensitivity of the system is defined in terms of minimal detectable surface of clad failure. Possible solutions to improve this sensitivity are discussed, involving either the sensor itself, or the hydraulic design of the vessel in the early stage of the reactor conception.

  5. TRIGA research reactor activities around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Chesworth, R.H.; Razvi, J.; Whittemore, W.L. )

    1991-11-01

    Recent activities at several overseas TRIGA installations are discussed in this paper, including reactor performance, research programs under way, and plans for future upgrades. The following installations are included: (1) 14,000-kW TRIGA at the Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti, Romania; (2) 2,000-kW TRIGA Mark II at the Institute of Nuclear Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh; (3) 3,000-kW TRIGA conversion, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City, Philippines; and (4) other ongoing installations, including a 1,500-kW TRIGA Mark II at Rabat, Morocco, and a 1,000-kW conversion/upgrade at the Institute Asunto Nucleares, Bogota, Columbia.

  6. Research reactor de-fueling and fuel shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, R.D.; Jawdeh, E.; Strydom, J.

    1998-08-01

    Planning for the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor operations during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games began in early 1995. Before any details could be outlined, several preliminary administrative decisions had to be agreed upon by state, city, and university officials. The two major administrative decisions involving the reactor were (1) the security level and requirements and (2) the fuel status of the reactor. The Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) was a heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with high-enriched uranium. The reactor was first licensed in 1964 with an engineered lifetime of thirty years. The reactor was intended for use in research applications and as a teaching facility for nuclear engineering students and reactor operators. Approximately one year prior to the olympics, the Georgia Tech administration decided that the GTRR fuel would be removed. In addition, a heightened, beyond regulatory requirements, security system was to be implemented. This report describes the scheduling, operations, and procedures.

  7. Dynamic Strain Aging in New Generation Cr-Mo-V Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new generation nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (CrMoV type) having compositional similarities with thick section 3Cr-Mo class of low alloy steels and adapted for nuclear applications was investigated for various manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA) using uniaxial tests. The steel investigated herein has undergone quenched and tempered treatment such that a tempered bainite microstructure with Cr-rich carbides was formed. The scope of the uniaxial experiments included tensile tests over a temperature range of 298 K to 873 K (25 °C to 600 °C) at two strain rates (10-3 and 10-4 s-1), as well as suitably designed transient strain rate change tests. The flow behavior displayed serrated flow, negative strain rate sensitivity, plateau behavior of yield, negative temperature ( T), and strain rate left( {dot{\\varepsilon }} right) dependence of flow stress over the temperature range of 523 K to 673 K (250 °C to 400 °C) and strain rate range of 5 × 10-3 s-1 to 3 × 10-6 s-1, respectively. While these trends attested to the presence of DSA, a lack of work hardening and near negligible impairment of ductility point to the fact that manifestations of embrittling features of DSA were significantly enervated in the new generation pressure vessel steel. In order to provide a mechanistic understanding of these unique combinations of manifestations of DSA in the steel, a new approach for evaluation of responsible solutes from strain rate change tests was adopted. From these experiments and calculation of activation energy by application of vacancy-based models, the solutes responsible for DSA were identified as carbon/nitrogen. The lack of embrittling features of DSA in the steel was rationalized as being due to the beneficial effects arising from the presence of dynamic recovery effects, presence of alloy carbides in the tempered bainitic structure, and formation of solute clusters, all of which hinder the possibilities for strong aging of dislocations.

  8. Reprocessing of research reactor fuel the Dounreay option

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, P.

    1997-08-01

    Reprocessing is a proven process for the treatment of spent U/Al Research Reactor fuel. At Dounreay 12679 elements have been reprocessed during the past 30 years. For reactors converting to LEU fuel the uranium recovered in reprocessing can be blended down to less than 20% U{sub 235}, enrichment and be fabricated into new elements. For reactors already converted to LEU it is technically possible to reprocess spent silicide fuel to reduce the U{sub 235} burden and present to a repository only stable conditioned waste. The main waste stream from reprocessing which contains the Fission products is collected in underground storage tanks where it is kept for a period of at least five years before being converted to a stable solid form for return to the country of origin for subsequent storage/disposal. Discharges to the environment from reprocessing are low and are limited to the radioactive gases contained in the spent fuel and a low level liquid waste steam. Both of these discharges are independently monitored, and controlled within strict discharge limits set by the UK Government`s Scottish Office. Transportation of spent fuel to Dounreay has been undertaken using many routes from mainland Europe and has utilised over the past few years both chartered and scheduled vessel services. Several different transport containers have been handled and are currently licensed in the UK. This paper provides a short history of MTR reprocessing at Dounreay, and provides information to show reprocessing can satisfy the needs of MTR operators, showing that reprocessing is a valuable asset in non-proliferation terms, offers a complete solution and is environmentally acceptable.

  9. 1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

  10. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of {approximately}12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by {approximately}43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150.

  12. Specialist meeting on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholome, G.; Bazant, E.; Wellein, R.

    1997-04-01

    A series of research projects sponsored by the Federal Minister for Education, Science, Research and Technology, Bonn are summarized and compared to utility, manufacturer, and vendor tests. The purpose of the evaluation was to experimentally verify Leak-before-Break behavior, confirm the postulation of fracture preclusion for piping (straight pipe, bends and branches), and quantify the safety margin against massive failure. The results are applicable to safety assessment of ferritic and austenitic piping in primary and secondary nuclear power plant circuits. Moreover, because of the wide range of the test parameters, they are also important for the design and assessment of piping in other technical plant. The test results provide justification for ruling out catastrophic fractures, even on pipes of dimensions corresponding to those of a main coolant pipe of a pressurized water reactor plant on the basis of a mechanical deterministic safety analysis in correspondence with the Basis Safety Concept (Principle of Fracture Exclusion).

  13. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill

  14. Status of reactor-shielding research in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Maienshein, F.C.

    1980-01-01

    While reactor programs change, shielding analysis methods are improved slowly. Version-V of ENDF/B provides improved data and Version-VI will be cost effective in advanced fission reactors are to be developed in the US. Benchmarks for data and methods validation are collected and distributed in the US in two series, one primarily for FBR-related experiments and one for LWR calculational methods. For LWR design, cavity streaming is now handled adequately, if with varying degrees of elegance. Investigations of improved detector response for LWRs rely upon transport methods. The great potential importance of pressure-vessel damage is dreflected in widespread studies to aid in the prediction of neutron fluences in vessels. For LMFBRS, the FFTF should give attenuation results on an operating reactor. For larger power reactors, the advantages of alternate shield materials appear compelling. A few other shielding studies appear to require experimental confirmation if LMFBRs are to be economically competitive. A coherent shielding program for the GCFR is nearing completion. For the fusion-reactor program, methods verification is under way, practical calculations are well advanced for test devices such as the TFTR and FMIT, and consideration is now given to shielding problems of large reactors, as in the ETF study.

  15. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... light water nuclear power reactors which result from exposure of these materials to neutron irradiation..., “Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels”; ASTM E 185-79, “Standard Practice for Conducting Surveillance Tests for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels”; and...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light water nuclear power reactors which result from exposure of these materials to neutron irradiation..., “Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels”; ASTM E 185-79, “Standard Practice for Conducting Surveillance Tests for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels”; and...

  17. 77 FR 23513 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft interim staff guidance; Request for public... Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001; telephone: 301-415-4029..., Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light water nuclear power reactors which result from exposure of these materials to neutron irradiation..., “Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels”; ASTM E 185-79, “Standard Practice for Conducting Surveillance Tests for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels”; and...

  19. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... light water nuclear power reactors which result from exposure of these materials to neutron irradiation..., “Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels”; ASTM E 185-79, “Standard Practice for Conducting Surveillance Tests for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels”; and...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... light water nuclear power reactors which result from exposure of these materials to neutron irradiation..., “Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels”; ASTM E 185-79, “Standard Practice for Conducting Surveillance Tests for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels”; and...

  1. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  2. Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Binford, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

  3. 77 FR 18254 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Research Vessel R/V SIKULIAQ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Research Vessel R/V SIKULIAQ AGENCY... Compliance was issued for the research vessel R/V SIKULIAQ as required by 33 U.S.C. 1605(c) and 33 CFR 81.18... to the docket, call Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone...

  4. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

    2011-07-18

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical

  5. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle. The

  6. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  7. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  8. Exchange Flow Characteristics in a Tokamak Vacuum Vessel of Fusion Reactor Under the Loss-of-Vacuum Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Seki, Yasushi

    1997-06-01

    When a Tokamak vacuum vessel of fusion reactor is broken, buoyancy-driven exchange flows will take place through breaches after the inside pressure of the vacuum vessel (VV) becomes equal to the outside pressure. The exchange flow may bring a mixture of activated dusts and tritium from the inside of the VV to the outside through the breaches. Moreover, the exchange flow may remove decay heat from the plasma-facing components. A preliminary LOVA (Loss Of VAcuum event) apparatus was constructed to investigate quantitative heat transfer characteristics of the exchange flows through the breaches under the LOVA conditions. The results of this study, the relationship between Froude numbers and breach locations in the VV was determined and empirical correlations for the average Froude numbers were derived.

  9. Assessment of Negligible Creep, Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of Gr91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Terry, Totemeier

    2006-10-01

    Two different topics of Grade 91 steel are investigated for Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel application. On the first topic, negligible creep of Grade 91 is investigated with the motivation to design the reactor pressure vessel in negligible creep regime and eliminate costly surveillance programs during the reactor operation. Available negligible creep criteria and creep strain laws are reviewed, and new data needs are evaluated. It is concluded that modifications of the existing criteria and laws, together with their associated parameters, are needed before they can be reliably applied to Grade 91 for negligible creep prediction and reactor pressure vessel design. On the second topic, effects of off-normal welding and heat treatment on creep behavior of Grade 91 are studied with the motivation to better define the control over the parameters in welding and heat treatment procedures. The study is focused on off-normal austenitizing temperatures and improper cooling after welding but prior to post-weld heat treatment.

  10. Korea Research Reactor -1 & 2 Decommissioning Project in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. K.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. J.; Park, J. H.

    2003-02-24

    Korea Research Reactor 1 (KRR-1), the first research reactor in Korea, has been operated since 1962, and the second one, Korea Research Reactor 2 (KRR-2) since 1972. The operation of both of them was phased out in 1995 due to their lifetime and operation of the new and more powerful research reactor, HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor; 30MW). Both are TRIGA Pool type reactors in which the cores are small self-contained units sitting in tanks filled with cooling water. The KRR-1 is a TRIGA Mark II, which could operate at a level of up to 250 kW. The second one, the KRR-2 is a TRIGA Mark III, which could operate at a level of up 2,000 kW. The decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) project of these two research reactors, the first D & D project in Korea, was started in January 1997 and will be completed to stage 3 by 2008. The aim of this decommissioning program is to decommission the KRR-1 & 2 reactors and to decontaminate the residual building structure s and the site to release them as unrestricted areas. KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) submitted the decommissioning plan and the environmental impact assessment reports to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) for the license in December 1998, and was approved in November 2000.

  11. Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2009-06-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

  12. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Itoh, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased. Comparing cluster IDs 2 and 6, embrittlement of high-Cu-bearing materials (<0.07 wt%) was larger than that of low-Cu-bearing (0.07 < wt.%) materials. This is attributed to irradiation-induced Cu-enriched clusters, as well as those that are irradiation-enhanced [4]. A similar feature is recognized for cluster IDs 5 and 8 in materials with a higher Ni content. A flux effect with a higher flux range was demonstrated for cluster ID 3 comprising MTR irradiation in a high flux region (≤1 × 1013 n/cm2/s) [44]. For cluster ID 10, classification is rendered based upon flux effect, where embrittlement is accelerated in high Cu-bearing materials irradiated at lower flux levels (less than 5 × 109 n/cm2·s). This is possibly due to increased thermal equilibrium vacancies [44,45]. Per all the above considerations, it was hence ascertained that data belonging to identical cluster ID

  13. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.; Lambert, J.; Hayes, S.; Sackett, J.; Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  14. Modeling the Ductile Brittle Fracture Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels using a Cohesive Zone Model based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behavior is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behavior, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behavior, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modeling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical.

  15. 78 FR 58575 - Review of Experiments for Research Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Review of Experiments for Research Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION..., by email at Alexander.Adams@nrc.gov , Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear...

  16. A Potential NASA Research Reactor to Support NTR Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, Michael; Gerrish, Harold; Hardin, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    In support of efforts for research into the design and development of a man rated Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engine, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is evaluating the potential for building a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed research reactor. The proposed reactor would be licensed by NASA and operated jointly by NASA and university partners. The purpose of this reactor would be to perform further research into the technologies and systems needed for a successful NTR project and promote nuclear training and education.

  17. Sea Education Association's sailing research vessels as innovative platforms for long-term research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, P.; Carruthers, E. A.; Engels, M.; Goodwin, D.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Lea, C.; Schell, J.; Siuda, A.; Witting, J.; Zettler, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sea Education Association's (SEA) two research vessels, the SSV Corwith Cramer and the SSV Robert C. Seamans are unique in the research world. Not only do these ships perform advanced research using state of the art equipment, they do so under sail with high school, undergraduate, and graduate students serving as both the science team and the crew. Because of SEA's educational mission and reliance on prevailing winds for sailing, the vessels have been studying repeated tracks for decades, providing valuable long-term data sets while educating future marine scientists. The Corwith Cramer has been collecting data in the North Atlantic between New England, the Sargasso Sea, Bermuda, and the Caribbean since 1987 while the Robert C. Seamans has been operating in the Eastern Pacific between the US West Coast, Hawaii, and French Polynesia since 2001. The ships collect continuous electronic data from hull mounted ADCP, chirp, and a clean flowing seawater system logging temperature, salinity, in-vivo chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, and beam attenuation. The ships also periodically collect data from profiling CTDs with chlorophyll and CDOM fluorometers, transmissometers, and dissolved oxygen and PAR sensors. In addition to electronic data, archived long term data sets include physical samples from net tows such as marine plastic debris and tar, and plankton including Halobates (a marine insect), leptocephali (eel larvae), and phyllosoma (spiny lobster larvae). Both vessels are 134' brigantine rig tall ships and are designated sailing school vessels (SSV) by the US Coast Guard, and both have received instrumentation grants from NSF to provide high quality, reliable data that is submitted to the NSF R2R archives. Students sailing on these ships spend time on shore at the SEA campus in Woods Hole, MA taking classes in oceanography, nautical science, maritime studies and public policy. Each student is required to write a proposal for their research before heading to sea, and

  18. A preliminary assessment of the effects of heat flux distribution and penetration on the creep rupture of a reactor vessel lower head

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.; Simpson, R.; Witt, R.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor vessel lower head due to thermal and pressure loads under severe accident conditions. The experiment is performed using 1/5-scale models of a typical PWR pressure vessel. Experiments are performed for various internal pressure and imposed heat flux distributions with and without instrumentation guide tube penetrations. The experimental program is complemented by a modest modeling program based on the application of vessel creep rupture codes developed in the TMI Vessel Investigation Project. The first three experiments under the LHF program investigated the creep rupture of simulated reactor pressure vessels without penetrations. The heat flux distributions for the three experiments are uniform (LHF-1), center-peaked (LHF-2), and side-peaked (LHF-3), respectively. For all the experiments, appreciable vessel deformation was observed to initiate at vessel wall temperatures above 900K and the vessel typically failed at approximately 1000K. The size of failure was always observed to be smaller than the heated region. For experiments with non-uniform heat flux distributions, failure typically occurs in the region of peak temperature. A brief discussion of the effect of penetration is also presented.

  19. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  20. 46 CFR 188.05-2 - Exemptions from inspection laws for oceanographic research vessels and terms and conditions which...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research vessels and terms and conditions which apply in lieu thereof. 188.05-2 Section 188.05-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 188.05-2 Exemptions from inspection laws for oceanographic research vessels...

  1. Research Vessel Meteorological and Oceanographic Systems Support Satellite and Model Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. R.; Lopez, N.; Bourassa, M. A.; Rolph, J.; Briggs, K.

    2012-12-01

    The research vessel data center at the Florida State University routinely acquires, quality controls, and distributes underway surface meteorological and oceanographic observations from vessels. The activities of the center are coordinated by the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) initiative in partnership with the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project. The data center evaluates the quality of the observations, collects essential metadata, provides data quality feedback to vessel operators, and ensures the long-term data preservation at the National Oceanographic Data Center. A description of the SAMOS data stewardship protocols will be provided, including dynamic web tools that ensure users can select the highest quality observations from over 30 vessels presently recruited to the SAMOS initiative. Research vessels provide underway observations at high-temporal frequency (1 min. sampling interval) that include navigational (position, course, heading, and speed), meteorological (air temperature, humidity, wind, surface pressure, radiation, rainfall), and oceanographic (surface sea temperature and salinity) samples. Recruited vessels collect a high concentration of data within the U.S. continental shelf and also frequently operate well outside routine shipping lanes, capturing observations in extreme ocean environments (Southern Ocean, Arctic, South Atlantic and Pacific). The unique quality and sampling locations of research vessel observations and there independence from many models and products (RV data are rarely distributed via normal marine weather reports) makes them ideal for validation studies. We will present comparisons between research vessel observations and model estimates of the sea surface temperature and salinity in the Gulf of Mexico. The analysis reveals an underestimation of the freshwater input to the Gulf from rivers, resulting in an overestimation of near coastal salinity in the model. Additional comparisons

  2. Debris dispersal in reactor material experiments on corium-water thermal interactions in ex-vessel geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Squarer, D.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis has been performed of corium sweepout behavior in the ANL/EPRI CWTI-series reactor material experiments involving the gas pressure-driven injection of molten corium into the reactor cavity region of a 1:30 scale mockup of a PWR containment. A computer model was developed to calculate the sweepout versus retention of corium and water from the cavity. The model consists of hydrodynamics and freezing calculations describing the pressure-driven two-phase flow of corium, water, steam and gas out of the cavity, freezing of corium upon structural surfaces, and levitation of corium within the cavity by the vessel blowdown gas jet. The model has had good success predicting the disposition of corium for the available CWTI tests, indicating retention in the cavity of between 40 and 70% of the injected corium masses. For conditions representative of the TMLB' sequence in the reactor system, the model predicts essentially complete sweepout of corium from the full-scale cavity region before the dispersive forces arising from the blowdown of the primary system have decayed. However, this large sweepout does not imply that the swept out material would deliver its energy directly to the containment atmosphere.

  3. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalandinov, A.; Tsofin, V.; Kochkin, V.; Panferov, P.; Timofeev, A.; Reshetnikov, A.; Makhotin, D.; Erak, D.; Voloschenko, A.

    2016-02-01

    Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  4. ITER vacuum vessel fabrication plan and cost study (D 68) for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    ITER Task No. 8, Vacuum Vessel Fabrication Plan and Cost Study (D68), was initiated to assess ITER vacuum vessel fabrication, assembly, and cost. The industrial team of Raytheon Engineers & Constructors and Chicago Bridge & Iron (Raytheon/CB&I) reviewed the current vessel basis and prepared a manufacturing plan, assembly plan, and cost estimate commensurate with the present design. The guidance for the Raytheon/CB&I assessment activities was prepared by the ITER Garching Work Site. This guidance provided in the form of work descriptions, sketches, drawings, and costing guidelines for each of the presently identified vacuum vessel Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) elements was compiled in ITER Garching Joint Work Site Memo (Draft No. 9 - G 15 MD 01 94-17-05 W 1). A copy of this document is provided as Appendix 1 to this report. Additional information and clarifications required for the Raytheon/CB&I assessments were coordinated through the US Home Team (USHT) and its technical representative. Design details considered essential to the Task 8 assessments but not available from the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) were generated by Raytheon/CB&I and documented accordingly.

  5. The effective management of medical isotope production in research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, D.T. )

    1993-01-01

    During the 50-yr history of the use of radioisotopes for medical applications, research reactors have played a pivotal role in the production of many if not most of the key products. The marriage between research reactors and production operations is subject to significant challenges on two fronts. The medical applications of the radioisotope products impose some unique constraints and requirements on the production process. In addition, the mandates and priorities of a research reactor are not always congruent with the demands of a production environment. This paper briefly reviews the historical development of medical isotope production, identifies the unique challenges facing this endeavor, and discusses the management of the relationship between the isotope producer and the research reactor operator. Finally, the key elements of a successful relationship are identified.

  6. Neutron spectrum effect on pressure vessel embrittlement: Dosimetry and qualification of irradiation locations in OSIRIS and SILOE reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alberman, A.; Bourdet, L.; Carcreff, H.; Beretz, D.

    1994-12-31

    Two irradiation experiments have been undertaken in OSIRIS (Saclay) and SILOE (Grenoble) reactors, in order to establish the correlation between the embrittlement of pressure vessel steels and neutron spectrum. Target fluence is 0.1 dpa for both experiments. This damage fluence corresponds to a fluence of 7.5 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} E > 1 MeV (7.5 10{sup 15} n.m{sup {minus}2}) in the case of a well moderated light water spectrum, but only 45 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} in the case of the specially designed SILOE irradiation location. One irradiation run is now completed, the second one is underway. This paper presents the experimental dosimetry data and irradiation parameters obtained in the preliminary qualification program, needed to assess this damage correlation.

  7. Influence of structural parameters on the tendency of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steel to temper embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Zabusov, O.; Fedotova, S.; Frolov, A.; Saltykov, M.; Maltsev, D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the influence of structural parameters on the tendency of steels to reversible temper embrittlement was studied for assessment of performance properties of reactor pressure vessel steels with extended service life. It is shown that the growth of prior austenite grain size leads to an increase of the critical embrittlement temperature in the initial state. An embrittlement heat treatment at the temperature of maximum manifestation of temper embrittlement (480 °C) shifts critical embrittlement temperature to higher values due to the increase of the phosphorus concentration on grain boundaries. There is a correlation between phosphorus concentration on boundaries of primary austenite grains and the share of brittle intergranular fracture (that, in turn, depends on impact test temperature) in the fracture surfaces of the tested Charpy specimens.

  8. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Pavinich, W.A.; Yoon, K.K.; Hour, K.Y.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1999-10-01

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  9. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Charles R.

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  10. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-07-01

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Design analysis of the molten core confinement within the reactor vessel in the case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with a reactor of the VVER type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvonaryov, Yu. A.; Budaev, M. A.; Volchek, A. M.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Kiselyov, N. P.; Kobzar', V. L.; Konobeev, A. V.; Tsurikov, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary design estimate of the behavior of the core melt in vessels of reactors of the VVER-600 and VVER-1300 types (a standard optimized and informative nuclear power unit based on VVER technology—VVER TOI) in the case of beyond-design-basis severe accidents. The basic processes determining the state of the core melt in the reactor vessel are analyzed. The concept of molten core confinement within the vessel based on the idea of outside cooling is discussed. Basic assumptions and models, as well as the results of calculation of the interaction between molten materials of the core and the wall of the reactor vessel performed by means of the SOCRAT severe accident code, are presented and discussed. On the basis of the data obtained, the requirements on the operation of the safety systems are determined, upon the fulfillment of which there will appear potential prerequisites for implementing the concept of the confinement of the core melt within the reactor in cases of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors.

  12. RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

    2012-03-18

    Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

  13. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffroni, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including -ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  14. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  15. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including -ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the backgroundmore » fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.« less

  16. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the backgroundmore » fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.« less

  17. An analysis of the hydrogen bubble concerns in the three-mile island unit-2 reactor vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, S.; Schmidt, K. H.; Honekamp, J. R.

    On 30 March 1979, two days after the accident at the Three-Mile Island Reactor near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, press reports appeared about a non-condensable bubble in the reactor vessel. This bubble was said to consist mainly of hydrogen, and to grow rapidly, possibly due to the development of oxygen. Danger of explosion was reported to be imminent. We analyzed all possible sources of non-condensable gases, including radiolysis, and determined that a continuing growth of the bubble during several days after the accident was not possible. Our main conclusions were the following: (1) Most of the initial hydrogen in the bubble was produced by the reaction of the Zircalloy cladding with the super-heated water. (2) During the first 16 hr after shutdown, when boiling of the primary coolant water took place, in the worst case stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen could have been produced by radiolysis, leading to a maximum amount of oxygen in the bubble, of 0.7% of the hydrogen, which is well below the explosion limit. (3) After this 16 hr period, when boiling had totally ceased, no further oxygen could have been produced by radiolysis of the primary cooling water. On the contrary, oxygen was recombined with hydrogen due to radiolysis at such a rate that the oxygen in the water was completely removed in less than five minutes. The subsequent rate of removal of oxygen from the bubble by dissolution and radiolysis depended essentially on the rate of dissolution.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the effects of biaxial loading on reactor pressure vessel structural-integrity-assessment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-04-01

    Effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness were studied to determine potential impact on structural integrity assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient loading and pressure-temperature (PT) loading produced by reactor heatup and cooldown transients. Biaxial shallow-flaw fracture-toughness tests results were also used to determine the parameter controlling fracture in the transition temperature range, and to develop a related dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation. Shallow-flaw and biaxial loading effects were found to reduce the conditional probability of crack initiation by a factor of nine when the shallow-flaw fracture-toughness K{sub Jc} data set, with biaxial-loading effects adjustments, was substituted in place of ASME Code K{sub Ic} data set in PTS analyses. Biaxial loading was found to reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV steel such that the lower-bound curve was located between ASME K{sub Ic} and K{sub IR} curves. This is relevant to future development of P-T curve analysis procedures. Fracture in shallow-flaw biaxial samples tested in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture.

  19. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April- June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-09-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL} from April1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory {INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  20. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  1. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  2. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  3. Development of an improved-contact liquid-level probe for pressurized reactor vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, P.V. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    Electrical-conductivity-based probes for liquid level sensing show promise for pressurized water reactor environments, but have exhibited frequent bond failures at the ceramic/metal interfaces. A program to characterize and improve the interface behavior has been completed successfully, and has provided data for optimizing fabrication parameters, as well as general information on glass-to-metal bonding in a superalloy/silicate-glass system. The materials studied were Inconel X-750 and a barium silicate glass containing minor amounts of TiO/sub 2/, CeO/sub 2/, As/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  4. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  5. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D. J.; Baek, J. S.; Hanson, A. L.; Cheng, L-Y; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering investigation of as-irradiated, annealed and reirradiated reactor pressure vessel weld material of decommissioned reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.; Bergner, F.; Viehrig, H.-W.; Keiderling, U.

    2011-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was applied to characterize the microstructure of weld material taken from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the decommissioned VVER440 (230)-type nuclear power plant (NPP) Greifswald, Units 1, 2 and 4. The welding seam of highest neutron exposure of Unit 1 was subject to a large-scale annealing treatment in 1988 after about 11.5 effective years of operation. The same type of annealing was applied to Unit 2 in 1990 after about 11 effective years of operation. After final decommissioning of NPP Greifswald in 1990, RPV material was left in the reirradiated condition (Unit 1), in the as-annealed condition (Unit 2) and in the as-irradiated condition (Unit 4). Trepans of material from the highly irradiated RPV welds of these Units have recently become available for examination. The results of the SANS investigation are reported and compared with published results obtained for as-irradiated, post-irradiation annealed and reirradiated surveillance material of the same type. A general agreement was found indicating in particular the formation of irradiation-induced Cu-enriched clusters and efficient recovery as a result of the large-scale annealing treatments. The only essential difference was observed for the ratio of magnetic and nuclear scattering indicating differences of the cluster composition for the RPV wall and surveillance material.

  7. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report January - March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. M

    1980-10-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  8. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April -June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-11-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  9. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July- September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-12-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  10. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S K

    1981-04-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NOE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  11. RADIATION DOSIMETRY AT THE BNL HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR AND MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    1999-09-10

    RADIATION DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS HAVE BEEN PERFORMED OVER A PERIOD OF MANY YEARS AT THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR (HFBR) AND THE MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR (BMRR) AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY TO PROVIDE INFORMATION ON THE ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEUTRON FLUX, NEUTRON DOSE RATES, GAMMA-RAY FLUXES AND GAMMA-RAY DOSE RATES. THE MCNP PARTICLE TRANSPORT CODE PROVIDED MONTE CARLO RESULTS TO COMPARE WITH VARIOUS DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED AT THE EXPERIMENTAL PORTS, AT THE TREATMENT ROOMS AND IN THE THIMBLES AT BOTH HFBR AND BMRR.

  12. An experimental study of external reactor vessel cooling strategy on the critical heat flux using the graphene oxide nano-fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR) of corium as a key severe accident management strategy can be achieved by flooding the reactor cavity during a severe accident. In this accident mitigation strategy, the decay heat removal capability depends on whether the imposed heat flux exceeds critical heat flux (CHF). To provide sufficient cooling for high-power reactors such as APR1400, there have been some R and D efforts to use the reactor vessel with micro-porous coating and nano-fluids boiling-induced coating. The dispersion stability of graphene-oxide nano-fluid in the chemical conditions of flooding water that includes boric acid, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was checked in terms of surface charge or zeta potential before the CHF experiments. Results showed that graphene-oxide nano-fluids were very stable under ERVC environment. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel external wall was measured using the small scale two-dimensional slide test section. The radius of the curvature is 0.1 m. The dimension of each part in the facility simulated the APR-1400. The heater was designed to produce the different heat flux. The magnitude of heat flux follows the one of the APR-1400 when the severe accident occurred. All tests were conducted under inlet subcooling 10 K. Graphene-oxide nano-fluids (concentration: 10 -4 V%) enhanced CHF limits up to about 20% at mass flux 50 kg/m{sup 2}s and 100 kg/m{sup 2}s in comparison with the results of the distilled water at same test condition. (authors)

  13. Warm PreStress effect on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; Vaille, C.; Wident, P.; Moinereau, D.; Landron, C.; Chapuliot, S.; Benhamou, C.; Tanguy, B.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the Warm Prestress (WPS) effect on 16MND5 (A508 Cl3) RPV steel, irradiated up to a fluence of 13 ·1023 n .m-2 (E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of 288 ° C, corresponding to more than 60 years of operations in a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Mechanical properties, including tensile tests with different strain rates and tension-compression tests on notched specimens, have been characterized at unirradiated and irradiated states and used to calibrate constitutive equations to describe the mechanical behavior as a function of temperature and fluence. Irradiation embrittlement has been determined based on Charpy V-notch impact tests and isothermal quasi-static toughness tests. Assessment of WPS effect has been done through various types of thermomechanical loadings performed on CT(0.5 T) specimens. All tests have confirmed the non-failure during the thermo-mechanical transients. Experimental data obtained in this study have been compared to both engineering-based models and to a local approach (Beremin) model for cleavage fracture. It is shown that both types of modeling give good predictions for the effective toughness after warm prestressing.

  14. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors. Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  15. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-21

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  16. Locating tritium sources in a research reactor building.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masami

    2005-10-01

    Despite renovation of the D2O facility, tritium concentrations in the condensates of reactor room air showed tens of Bq mL before venting resumption on July 1997. This suggested the presence of tritium sources in the research reactor-containment building. An investigation was therefore initiated to locate the source and determine the distribution of tritium in the containment building. Air monitoring in the working area using a dish of water placed in the building suggested that the source of tritium was near the reactor core. Monitoring exhaust air from the two facilities (a cold neutron source and a D(2)O tank) showed high specific activity on the order of 10 Bq mL(-1), suggesting the presence of tritium in condensates near the reactor core. The major concern was whether the leakage of liquid deuterium (4 L) and heavy water (2 x 10(3) L) used as a moderator had occurred. The concentration of tritium in condensates has not increased over the past few years in either the exhaust line or working area, and the deuterium itself has not been found in the surrounding environment. The concentration of tritium measured using an ionization chamber after Ar decay was dependent on the thermal output of the research reactor, indicating that the tritium was produced by the irradiation process within shielding/moderator materials or cover gas with neutrons.

  17. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  18. Characterisation of interfacial segregation to Cu-enriched precipitates in two thermally aged reactor pressure vessel steel welds.

    PubMed

    Styman, P D; Hyde, J M; Wilford, K; Parfitt, D; Riddle, N; Smith, G D W

    2015-12-01

    To understand the contribution of long term thermal ageing to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) embrittlement two high Cu steel welds with different Ni contents were thermally aged for times up to 100,000 h at 330 °C and 365 °C. Microstructural characterisation using Atom Probe Tomography was performed. Thermal ageing produced a high number density of nano-scale Cu-enriched precipitates. The precipitate-matrix interfaces were enriched in Ni, Mn and Si. The characterisation of these interfaces using a double cluster search approach is the subject of this work. The interface region around thermally-induced precipitates was found to be wider in steels with higher bulk Ni contents and where precipitates had larger core radii. The effect of ageing temperature on interface width was small when comparing precipitates of equal core radius. The narrower interface width in the lower Ni steels is reflected in the composition of the interface, which has a lower Ni content than in the higher Ni material. The reduction in interfacial energy due to the segregation of Ni, Mn and Si has been calculated and shows enhanced reductions in interfacial energy with increasing precipitate size, but no obvious effect of temperature. PMID:26051655

  19. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K.; Suzuki, M.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100-10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition.

  20. Characterisation of interfacial segregation to Cu-enriched precipitates in two thermally aged reactor pressure vessel steel welds.

    PubMed

    Styman, P D; Hyde, J M; Wilford, K; Parfitt, D; Riddle, N; Smith, G D W

    2015-12-01

    To understand the contribution of long term thermal ageing to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) embrittlement two high Cu steel welds with different Ni contents were thermally aged for times up to 100,000 h at 330 °C and 365 °C. Microstructural characterisation using Atom Probe Tomography was performed. Thermal ageing produced a high number density of nano-scale Cu-enriched precipitates. The precipitate-matrix interfaces were enriched in Ni, Mn and Si. The characterisation of these interfaces using a double cluster search approach is the subject of this work. The interface region around thermally-induced precipitates was found to be wider in steels with higher bulk Ni contents and where precipitates had larger core radii. The effect of ageing temperature on interface width was small when comparing precipitates of equal core radius. The narrower interface width in the lower Ni steels is reflected in the composition of the interface, which has a lower Ni content than in the higher Ni material. The reduction in interfacial energy due to the segregation of Ni, Mn and Si has been calculated and shows enhanced reductions in interfacial energy with increasing precipitate size, but no obvious effect of temperature.

  1. Iaea Activities Supporting the Applications of Research Reactors in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peld, Nathan D.; Ridikas, Danas

    2014-02-01

    As the underutilization of research reactors around the world persists as a primary topic of concern among facility owners and operators, the IAEA responded in 2013 with a broad range of activities to address the planning, execution and improvement of many experimental techniques. The revision of two critical documents for planning and diversifying a facility's portfolio of applications, TECDOC 1234 “The Applications of Research Reactors” and TECDOC 1212 “Strategic Planning for Research Reactors”, is in progress in order to keep this information relevant, corresponding to the dynamism of experimental techniques and research capabilities. Related to the latter TECDOC, the IAEA convened a meeting in 2013 for the expert review of a number of strategic plans submitted by research reactor operators in developing countries. A number of activities focusing on specific applications are either continuing or beginning as well. In neutron activation analysis, a joint round of inter-comparison proficiency testing sponsored by the IAEA Technical Cooperation Department will be completed, and facility progress in measurement accuracy is described. Also, a training workshop in neutron imaging and Coordinated Research Projects in reactor benchmarks, automation of neutron activation analysis and neutron beam techniques for material testing intend to advance these activities as more beneficial services to researchers and other users.

  2. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J.

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impurity precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.

  3. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  4. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  5. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  6. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded

  7. Evaluation of the recovery annealing of the reactor pressure vessel of NPP Nord (Greifswald) Units 1 and 2 by means of subsize impact specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrand, R.; Klausnitzer, E.N.; Leitz, C.; Lange, D.; Pastor, D.; Valo, M.

    1993-12-01

    In 1988 and 1990, the reactor pressure vessels of Units 1 and 2, respectively, of the Greifswald nuclear power station were subjected to heat treatment at 475 C for annealing of irradiation effects. To demonstrate the effect of annealing and to evaluate a new postannealing transition temperature of vessel base metal and weld metal, boat samples were removed by means of electric discharge machining (EDM) from the (unclad) inner surface of the vessel. From these samples, micronotched bar impact test specimens were fabricated and tested at different temperature. Transition curves were evaluated from the results. By means of correlation tests, the transition temperatures evaluated from the micro-specimen tests are converted to standard Charpy-5 transition temperatures. Results are available for the weld metal of Unit 1 after annealing. The transition temperature T{sub k} is lower than the value calculated by the designer of the plant. Specimens removed from Unit 2 before and after annealing are in preparation.

  8. The next generation of ship-to-shore networking from research vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S.; Coleman, D. F.; Berger, J.; Orcutt, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    As mobile satellite technology has slowly become more readily available over the last decade, an always-online culture aboard research vessels has expanded dramatically and been limited by cost. During the past few years, several science projects have funded additional bandwidth for real-time video outreach and bulk data exchanges between the research vessel and shore. These types of operations are becoming more common throughout the fleet, where nearly every cruise could benefit by having additional bandwidth. Increasing demands for Internet connectivity while at sea, whether for science operations, educational outreach, or other technical communications, will require changes to the research fleet's cyberinfrastructure. With the next generation of satellite technology poised to dramatically drop in price and increase in capacity, now is the time to shape ship-to-shore/shore-to-ship communications for the future.

  9. Research Vessel R/V Sikuliaq: Joining the UNOLS Fleet in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    The global class research vessel R/V Sikuliaq is being constructed on behalf of the NSF to support future scientific studies in high latitude waters. The 261 foot vessel will be capable of breaking 2.5 foot thick ice at 2 knots with an endurance of 45 days at sea and cruising at 11 knots. The R/V Sikuliaq has a beam of 52 feet and a draft of 18.9 feet that will carry 26 scientists and a crew of 20. Berthing accommodations are a combination of single/double rooms with one stateroom and the common areas of the vessel are designed for ADA access and accommodations. The total laboratory space (main, analytical, electronics, wet, upper, and Baltic room are 2100 square feet. The 4360 square foot working deck that is approximately 70 feet in length will accommodate 2-4 vans and multiple science operations. The vessel design strives to have the lowest possible environmental impact, including a low underwater-radiated noise signature. The science systems are prescribed to be state-of-the-art for bottom mapping, over-the-side 'hands free' gear handling, broad band communications and scientific walk-in freezer and environmental chamber. More details and photos of the construction progress are available on the website at www.sfos.uaf.edu/arrv. The vessel was launched in October 2012 and delivery to the University of Alaska Fairbanks is scheduled for November 2013. Scientific operations following testing and science sea trials are planned to start in summer of 2014. Questions about the science systems or vessel capabilities should be directed to Terry Whitledge (terry@ims.uaf.edu).

  10. Assessment of segregation kinetics in water-moderated reactors pressure vessel steels under long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Lavrukhina, Z. V.; Saltykov, M. A.; Fedotova, S. V.; Khodan, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    In reactor pressure vessel (RPV) bcc-lattice steels temper embrittlement is developed under the influence of both operating temperature of ∼300 °C and neutron irradiation. Segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) begin to play a special role in the assessment of the safe operation of the RPV in case of its lifetime extension up to 60 years or more. The most reliable information on the RPV material condition can be obtained by investigating the surveillance specimens (SS) that are exposed to operational factors simultaneously with the RPV itself. In this paper the GB composition in the specimens with different thermal exposure time at the RPV operating temperature as well as irradiated by fast neutrons (E ≥ 0.5 MeV) to different fluences (20-71)·1022 m-2 was studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) including both impurity and main alloying elements content. The data obtained allowed to trace the trend of the operating temperature and radiation-stimulated diffusion influence on the overall segregants level in GB. The revealed differences in the concentration levels of GB segregants in different steels, are due to the different chemical composition of the steels and also due to different grain boundary segregation levels in initial (unexposed) state. The data were used to estimate the RPV steels working capacity for 60 years. The estimation was carried out using both the well-known Langmuir-McLean model and the one specially developed for RPV steels, which takes into account the structure and phase composition of VVER-1000 RPV steels, as well as the long-term influence of operational factors.

  11. The effect of non-metallic inclusions on the fracture toughness master curve in high copper reactor pressure vessel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yong-Jun; Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    2002-03-01

    The fracture toughness of two high copper reactor pressure vessel welds having low upper shelf energy was evaluated in accordance with the master curve method of ASTM E1921. The resultant data were correlated to the metallurgical factors involved in the brittle fracture initiation to provide a metallurgical-based understanding of the master curve. The tests were performed using pre-cracked Charpy V-notched specimens and the master curve was made with an average of T0 values determined at different temperatures. In all specimens, the cleavage fracture initiated at non-metallic inclusion ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 μm in diameter showing a scatter with the specimens and testing temperatures. Temperature dependency of the triggering particle size was not found. The fracture toughness ( KJC) was inversely proportional to the square root of the triggering inclusion diameter ( di) at respective temperatures. From this relationship, we determined median KJC values which correspond to the average value of triggering inclusion diameter of all tested specimens and defined them as a modified median KJC ( K'JC(med) ). The obtained K'JC(med) values showed quite smaller deviation from the master curve at different temperatures than the experimental median KJC values. This suggests that the master curve is on the premise of a constant dimension of key microstructural factor in a material regardless of the testing temperature. But the inclusion size at trigger point played an important role in the absolute position of the master curve with temperature and the consequent T0 value.

  12. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Malerba, L.

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a "grey alloy" approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe-C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe-C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  13. Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 °C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 °C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment.

  14. A Research Reactor Concept to Support NTP Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, Michael J.; Blue, T. E.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Hardin, Leroy A.

    2014-01-01

    In support of efforts for research into the design and development of man rated Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is evaluating the potential for building a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed NTP based research reactor (NTPRR). The proposed NTPRR would be licensed by NASA and operated jointly by NASA and university partners. The purpose of the NTPRR would be used to perform further research into the technologies and systems needed for a successful NTP project and promote nuclear training and education.

  15. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety studies for the Division of Reactor Safety Research. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Conklin, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Development work continued on the accident dynamics simulation codes ORTAP, BLAST, and ORECA for the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor. New steam line and main steam bypass system models were developed and incorporated into ORTAP. An initial simulation of the FSV prestressed concrete reactor vessel and liner cooling system was developed and tested for use in the severe accident sequence analysis task.

  16. Use of Polycarbonate Vacuum Vessels in High-Temperature Fusion-Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, H. Feder, J. Gumbas, T. Franckowiak and S.A. Cohen

    2012-09-27

    Magnetic fusion energy (MFE) research requires ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, primarily to reduce plasma contamination by impurities. For radiofrequency (RF)-heated plasmas, a great benefit may accrue from a non-conducting vacuum vessel, allowing external RF antennas which avoids the complications and cost of internal antennas and high-voltage high-current feedthroughs. In this paper we describe these and other criteria, e.g., safety, availability, design flexibility, structural integrity, access, outgassing, transparency, and fabrication techniques that led to the selection and use of 25.4-cm OD, 1.6-cm wall polycarbonate pipe as the main vacuum vessel for an MFE research device whose plasmas are expected to reach keV energies for durations exceeding 0.1 s

  17. Research Vessel R/V Sikuliaq: A New Asset For The UNOLS Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The research vessel R/V Sikuliaq is currently being constructed on behalf of the NSF to support future scientific studies in high latitude waters. The 261 foot global class vessel will be capable of breaking 2.5 foot thick ice at 2 knots with an endurance of 45 days at sea and cruising at 11 knots. The R/V Sikuliaq will have a beam of 52 feet and a draft of 18.9 feet that will carry 26 scientists and a crew of 20. Berthing accommodations are a combination of single/double rooms with one stateroom and the common areas of the vessel are designed for ADA access and accommodations. The total laboratory space (main, analytical, electronics, wet, upper, and Baltic room will be 2100 square feet. The 4360 square foot working deck that is approximately 70 feet in length will accommodate 2-4 vans and multiple science operations. The vessel design strives to have the lowest possible environmental impact, including a low underwater-radiated noise signature. The science systems are prescribed to be state-of-the-art for bottom mapping, over-the-side "hands free" gear handling, broad band communications and scientific walk-in freezer and environmental chamber. More details and photos of the construction progress are available on the website at www.sfos.uaf.edu/arrv. The shipyard schedule has a launch date of October 2012 and delivery to the University of Alaska Fairbanks in July 2013. Scientific operations following trials and testing is planned to start in January 2014. Questions about the science systems or vessel capabilities should be directed to Terry Whitledge (terry@ims.uaf.edu).;

  18. Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    In a modular liquid-metal pool breeder reactor, a radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system is disclosed for removing the residual heat resulting from the shutdown of a reactor by a completely passive heat transfer system. A shell surrounds the reactor and containment vessel, separated from the containment vessel by an air passage. Natural circulation of air is provided by air vents at the lower and upper ends of the shell. Longitudinal, radial and inwardly extending fins extend from the shell into the air passage. The fins are heated by radiation from the containment vessel and convect the heat to the circulating air. Residual heat from the primary reactor vessel is transmitted from the reactor vessel through an inert gas plenum to a guard or containment vessel designed to contain any leaking coolant. The containment vessel is conventional and is surrounded by the shell.

  19. 75 FR 79423 - In the Matter of All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY... All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent Nuclear Fuel; Order... issued a specific license by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) authorizing...

  20. 75 FR 70042 - In the Matter of All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY... All Power Reactor Licensees and Research Reactor Licensees Who Transport Spent Nuclear Fuel; Order... been issued a specific license by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or...

  1. Personal neutron dosimetry at a research reactor facility.

    PubMed

    Kamenopoulou, V; Carinou, E; Stamatelatos, I E

    2001-01-01

    Individual neutron monitoring presents several difficulties due to the differences in energy response of the dosemeters. In the present study, an individual dosemeter (TLD) calibration approach is attempted for the personnel of a research reactor facility. The neutron energy response function of the dosemeter was derived using the MCNP code. The results were verified by measurements to three different neutron spectra and were found to be in good agreement. Three different calibration curves were defined for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons. At the different working positions around the reactor, neutron spectra were defined using the Monte Carlo technique and ambient dose rate measurements were performed. An estimation of the neutrons energy is provided by the ratio of the different TLD pellets of each dosemeter in combination with the information concerning the worker's position; then the dose equivalent is deduced according to the appropriate calibration curve.

  2. The design and performance of the research reactor fuel counter

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M.E.; Hsue, S.T.; Menlove, H.O.; Walton, G.; Holt, S.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes the design features, hardware specifications, and performance characteristics of the Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC) System. The system is an active mode neutron coincidence counter intended to assay material test reactor fuel assemblies under water. The RRFC contains 12 {sup 3}He tubes, each with its own preamplifier, and a single ion chamber. The neutron counting electronics are based on the Los Alamos Portable Shift Register (PSR) and the gamma readout is a manual-range pico-ammeter of Los Alamos design. The RRFC is connected to the surface by a 20-m-long cable bundle. The PSR is controlled by a portable IBM computer running a modified version of the Los Alamos neutron coincidence counting code also called RRFC. There is a manual that describes the RRFC software.

  3. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  4. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7more » × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain

  5. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn

  6. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m-2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ∼289 °C (∼552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m-3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m-3 of Ni-, Mn- Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m-3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m-3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain boundary in the low fluence

  7. Preliminary Measurements Supporting Reactor Vessel and Large Component Inspection Using X-Ray Backscatter Radiography by Selective Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Daniel; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.; Houssay, Laurent

    2006-07-01

    X-ray backscatter radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a field tested and innovative approach to non-destructive evaluation (NDE). RSD is an enhanced single-side x-ray Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique which selectively detects scatter components to improve image contrast and quality. Scatter component selection is accomplished through a set of specially designed detectors with fixed and movable collimators. Experimental results have shown that this NDE technique can be used to detect boric acid deposition on a metallic plate through steel foil reflective insulation commonly covering reactor pressure vessels. The current system is capable of detecting boric acid deposits with sub-millimeter resolution, through such insulating materials. Industrial systems have been built for Lockheed Martin Space Co. and NASA. Currently the x-ray backscatter RSD scanning systems developed by the University of Florida are being used to inspect the spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) used on the external tank of the space shuttle. RSD inspection techniques have found subsurface cracking in the SOFI thought to be responsible for the foam debris which separated from the external tank during the last shuttle launch. These industrial scanning systems can be customized for many applications, and a smaller, lighter, more compact unit design is being developed. The smaller design is approximately four inches wide, three inches high, and about 12 inches in length. This smaller RSD system can be used for NDE of areas that cannot be reached with larger equipment. X-ray backscatter RSD is a proven technology that has been tested on a wide variety of materials and applications. Currently the system has been used to inspect materials such as aluminum, plastics, honeycomb laminates, reinforced carbon composites, steel, and titanium. The focus of RSD is for one-sided detection for applications where conventional non-destructive examination methods either will not work or give poor

  8. 77 FR 26321 - Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... COMMISSION Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112 AGENCY..., Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD 20852. Telephone..., Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch, Division of Policy and Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear...

  9. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  10. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  11. New Dosimetric Interpretation of the DV50 Vessel-Steel Experiment Irradiated in the OSIRIS MTR Reactor Using the Monte-Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malouch, Fadhel

    2016-02-01

    An irradiation program DV50 was carried out from 2002 to 2006 in the OSIRIS material testing reactor (CEA-Saclay center) to assess the pressure vessel steel toughness curve for a fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) equivalent to a French 900-MWe PWR lifetime of 50 years. This program allowed the irradiation of 120 specimens out of vessel steel, subdivided in two successive irradiations DV50 n∘1 and DV50 n∘2. To measure the fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) received by specimens after each irradiation, sample holders were equipped with activation foils that were withdrawn at the end of irradiation for activity counting and processing. The fast effective cross-sections used in the dosimeter processing were determined with a specific calculation scheme based on the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-3 (and the nuclear data ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90). In order to put vessel-steel experiments at the same standard, a new dosimetric interpretation of the DV50 experiment has been performed by using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4 and more recent nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and IRDF-2002). This paper presents a comparison of previous and recent calculations performed for the DV50 vessel-steel experiment to assess the impact on the dosimetric interpretation.

  12. Design of a new portable fork detector for research reactor spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, S.T.; Menlove, H.O.; Rinard, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    There are many situations in nonproliferation and international safeguards when one needs to verify spent research-reactor fuel. Special inspections, a reactor coming under safeguards for the first time, and failed surveillance are prime examples. Several years ago, Los Alamos developed the FORK detector for the IAEA and EURATOM. This detector, together with the GRAND electronics package, is used routinely by inspectors to verify light-water-reactor spent fuels. Both the FORK detector and the GRAND electronics technologies have been transferred and are now commercially available. Recent incidents in the world indicate that research-reactor fuel is potentially a greater concern for proliferation than light-water-reactor fuels. A device similar to the FORK/GRAND should be developed to verify research-reactor spent fuels because the signals from light-water-reactor spent fuel are quite different than those from research-reactor fuels.

  13. Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Snoj, L.; Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J.; Boeck, H.

    2012-07-01

    The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

  14. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  15. A scaling law for the local CHF on the external bottom side of a fully submerged reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-02-01

    A scaling law for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water has been developed from the results of an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model for pool boiling on a downward facing curved heating surface. The scaling law accounts for the effects of the size of the vessel, the level of liquid subcooling, the intrinsic properties of the fluid, and the spatial variation of the local critical heat flux along the heating surface. It is found that for vessels with diameters considerably larger than the characteristic size of the vapor masses, the size effect on the local critical heat flux is limited almost entirely to the effect of subcooling associated with the local liquid head. When the subcooling effect is accounted for separately, the local CHF limit is nearly independent of the vessel size. Based upon the scaling law developed in this work, it is possible to merge, within the experimental uncertainties, all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes under both saturated and subcooled boiling conditions into a single curve. Applications of the scaling law to commercial-size vessels have been made for various system pressures and water levels above the heated vessel. Over the range of conditions explored in this study, the local CHF limit is found to increase by a factor of two or more from the bottom center to the upper edge of the vessel. Meanwhile, the critical heat flux at a given angular position of the heated vessel is also found to increase appreciably with the system pressure and the water level.

  16. Present status of liquid metal research for a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabarés, Francisco L.

    2016-01-01

    Although the use of solid materials as targets of divertor plasmas in magnetic fusion research is accepted as the standard solution for the very challenging issue of power and particle handling in a fusion reactor, a generalized feeling that the present options chosen for ITER will not represent the best choice for a reactor is growing up. The problems found for tungsten, the present selection for the divertor target of ITER, in laboratory tests and in hot plasma fusion devices suggest so. Even in the absence of the strong neutron irradiation expected in a reactor, issues like surface melting, droplet ejection, surface cracking, dust generation, etc., call for alternative solutions in a long pulse, high efficient fusion energy-producing continuous machine. Fortunately enough, decades of research on plasma facing materials based on liquid metals (LMs) have produced a wealth of appealing ideas that could find practical application in the route to the realization of a commercial fusion power plant. The options presently available, although in a different degree of maturity, range from full coverage of the inner wall of the device with liquid metals, so that power and particle exhaust together with neutron shielding could be provided, to more conservative combinations of liquid metal films and conventional solid targets basically representing a sort of high performance, evaporative coating for the alleviation of the surface degradation issues found so far. In this work, an updated review of worldwide activities on LM research is presented, together with some open issues still remaining and some proposals based on simple physical considerations leading to the optimization of the most conservative alternatives.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, C.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included.

  18. Some Tooling for Manufacturing Research Reactor Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-10-03

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment.

  19. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  20. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-18

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  1. A transgenic Prox1-Cre-tdTomato reporter mouse for lymphatic vessel research.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Roberta; Teijeira, Alvaro; Proulx, Steven T; Christiansen, Ailsa J; Seidel, Catharina D; Rülicke, Thomas; Mäkinen, Taija; Hägerling, René; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an active role in immune cell trafficking, inflammation and cancer spread. In order to provide an in vivo tool to improve our understanding of lymphatic vessel function in physiological and pathological conditions, we generated and characterized a tdTomato reporter mouse and crossed it with a mouse line expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the lymphatic specific promoter Prox1 in an inducible fashion. We found that the tdTomato fluorescent signal recapitulates the expression pattern of Prox1 in lymphatic vessels and other known Prox1-expressing organs. Importantly, tdTomato co-localized with the lymphatic markers Prox1, LYVE-1 and podoplanin as assessed by whole-mount immunofluorescence and FACS analysis. The tdTomato reporter was brighter than a previously established red fluorescent reporter line. We confirmed the applicability of this animal model to intravital microscopy of dendritic cell migration into and within lymphatic vessels, and to fluorescence-activated single cell analysis of lymphatic endothelial cells. Additionally, we were able to describe the early morphological changes of the lymphatic vasculature upon induction of skin inflammation. The Prox1-Cre-tdTomato reporter mouse thus shows great potential for lymphatic research.

  2. Radioisotope research, production, and processing at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Ja, Wei; Ma, D.; Zinn, K.; Lanigan, J.

    1995-12-31

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is a 10 MW, light-water-cooled and moderated research reactor which first achieved criticality in 1996 and is currently the highest powered university-owned research reactor in the U.S. For many years a major supplier of reactor-produced isotopes for research and commercial purposes, in the last 15 years MURR has concentrated on development of reactor-produced beta-particle emitters for experimental use in nuclear medicine therapy of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. MURR has played a major role in the development of bone cancer pain palliation with the agents {sup 153}Sm EDTMP and {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re HEDP, as well as in the use of {sup 186}Re, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 105}Rh for radioimmunotherapy and receptor-agent-guided radiotherapy. MURR is also responsible for the development of therapeutic, {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres for the treatment of liver tumors, a product ({sup 90}Y Therasphere{trademark}) which is currently an approved drug in Canada. MURR has also pioneered the development of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re and {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc gel generators, which make the use of low specific activity {sup 188}W and {sup 99}Mo practical for such isotope generators.

  3. Construction Progress and Science Planning for the New Research Vessel R/V Sikuliaq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    The research vessel R/V Sikuliaq (pronounced [see-KOO-lee-auk]) is currently being constructed on behalf of the NSF to support future scientific studies in high latitude waters. The 261 foot global class vessel will be capable of breaking 2.5 foot thick ice at 2 knots with an endurance of 45 days at sea and cruising at 11 knots. The R/V Sikuliaq will have a beam of 52 feet and a draft of 18.9 feet that will carry 26 scientists and a crew of 20. Berthing accommodations are a combination of single/double rooms with one stateroom and the common areas of the vessel are designed for ADA access and accommodations. The total laboratory space (main, analytical, electronics, wet, upper, and Baltic room will be 2100 square feet. The 4360 square foot working deck that is approximately 70 feet in length will accommodate 2-4 vans and multiple science operations. The vessel design strives to have the lowest possible environmental impact, including a low underwater-radiated noise signature. The science systems are prescribed to be state-of-the-art for bottom mapping, over-the-side "hands free" gear handling, broad band communications and scientific walk-in freezer and environmental chamber. More details and photos of the construction progress are available on the website at www.sfos.uaf.edu/arrv. The tentative shipyard schedule has a launch date of June 2012 and delivery to the University of Alaska Fairbanks in June 2013. Scientific operations following trials and testing is planned to start in January 2014. A Sikuliaq science planning workshop has been arranged for 18-19 February 2012 in Salt Lake City, UT just prior to the 2012 Ocean Sciences meeting. Interested participants should contact Terry Whitledge (terry@ims.uaf.edu).

  4. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  5. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  6. Reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Hista, J. C.

    1984-09-18

    Reactor building comprising a vessel shaft anchored in a slab which is peripherally locked. This reactor building comprises a confinement enclosure within which are positioned internal structures constituted by an internal structure floor, a vessel shaft, a slab being positioned between the general floor and the internal structure floor, the vesse

  7. Reactor physics calculations for {sup 99}Mo production at the annular core research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Isotope Production and Distribution Program at the U.S. Department of Energy has designated Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as the most appropriate facility for the production of {sup 99}Mo, a radioisotope whose daughter, {sup 99m}Tc, is used in more than 36,000 medical procedures per day in the United States and is considered to be a vital medical diagnostic and treatment tool. The isotope would be produced at SNL using the annular core research reactor (ACRR) facility and collocated hot cell facility. The {sup 99}Mo would be produced using the fission process by irradiating {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} coated with {sup 235}U in the form of highly enriched U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. After {approximately}7 days of continuous irradiation in the ACRR, a target would be re- moved from the reactor core for processing. The isotope would be extracted by chemically precipitating the molybdenum using the {open_quotes}Cintichem{close_quotes} process and would be shipped to the various pharmaceutical companies by commercial or chartered airline.

  8. Loss-of-Flow and Loss-of-Pressure Simulations of the BR2 Research Reactor with HEU and LEU Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, J.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Sikik, E.; Van den Branden, G.; Koonen, E.

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor core of BR2 is located inside a pressure vessel that contains 79 channels in a hyperboloid configuration (Figure 1). The core configuration is highly variable as each channel can contain a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Because of this variability, a representative core configuration (Figure 2), based on current reactor use, has been defined for the fuel conversion analyses [1]. The code RELAP5/Mod 3.3 [2] was used to perform the transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. The input model has been modernized relative to that historically used at BR2 taking into account the best modeling practices developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and BR2 engineers.

  9. Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew

    2000-07-01

    This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics · Economics · Proliferation resistance · Power conversion system modeling · Safety analysis · Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: · Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. · A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. · Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. · A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. · A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a master’s degree thesis. · Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. · Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. · PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for

  10. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  11. Nuclear reactor safety research since three mile island.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, F R

    1982-04-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially. PMID:17736229

  12. Unique educational opportunities at the Missouri University research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ketring, A.R.; Ross, F.K.; Spate, V.

    1997-12-01

    Since the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) went critical in 1966, it has been a center where students from many departments conduct their graduate research. In the past three decades, hundreds of graduate students from the MU departments of chemistry, physics, anthropology, nuclear engineering, etc., have received masters and doctoral degrees based on research using neutrons produced at MURR. More recently, the educational opportunities at MURR have been expanded to include undergraduate students and local high school students. Since 1989 MURR has participated in the National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. As part of this program, undergraduate students from universities and colleges throughout the United States come to MURR and get hands-on research experience during the summer. Another program, started in 1994 by the Nuclear Analysis Program at MURR, allows students from a local high school to conduct a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment. We also conduct tours of the center, where we describe the research and educational programs at MURR to groups of elementary school children, high school science teachers, state legislators, professional organizations, and many other groups.

  13. Opportunities for Materials Science and Biological Research at the OPAL Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, S. J.

    2008-03-17

    Neutron scattering techniques have evolved over more than 1/2 century into a powerful set of tools for determination of atomic and molecular structures. Modern facilities offer the possibility to determine complex structures over length scales from {approx}0.1 nm to {approx}500 nm. They can also provide information on atomic and molecular dynamics, on magnetic interactions and on the location and behaviour of hydrogen in a variety of materials. The OPAL Research Reactor is a 20 megawatt pool type reactor using low enriched uranium fuel, and cooled by water. OPAL is a multipurpose neutron factory with modern facilities for neutron beam research, radioisotope production and irradiation services. The neutron beam facility has been designed to compete with the best beam facilities in the world. After six years in construction, the reactor and neutron beam facilities are now being commissioned, and we will commence scientific experiments later this year. The presentation will include an outline of the strengths of neutron scattering and a description of the OPAL research reactor, with particular emphasis on it's scientific infrastructure. It will also provide an overview of the opportunities for research in materials science and biology that will be possible at OPAL, and mechanisms for accessing the facilities. The discussion will emphasize how researchers from around the world can utilize these exciting new facilities.

  14. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  15. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Diamond, D.; Xu, J.; Carew, J.; Rorer, D.

    2004-03-31

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the

  16. Sea surface temperature and salinity from French research vessels, 2001–2013

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Fabienne; Diverres, Denis; Jacquin, Stéphane; Gouriou, Yves; Grelet, Jacques; Le Menn, Marc; Tassel, Joelle; Reverdin, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    French Research vessels have been collecting thermo-salinometer (TSG) data since 1999 to contribute to the Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD) programme. The instruments are regularly calibrated and continuously monitored. Water samples are taken on a daily basis by the crew and later analysed in the laboratory. We present here the delayed mode processing of the 2001–2013 dataset and an overview of the resulting quality. Salinity measurement error was a few hundredths of a unit or less on the practical salinity scale (PSS), due to careful calibration and instrument maintenance, complemented with a rigorous adjustment on water samples. In a global comparison, these data show excellent agreement with an ARGO-based salinity gridded product. The Sea Surface Salinity and Temperature from French REsearch SHips (SSST-FRESH) dataset is very valuable for the ‘calibration and validation’ of the new satellite observations delivered by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Aquarius missions. PMID:26504523

  17. Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

    2008-06-23

    This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics

  18. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

    2003-01-01

    The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

  19. Mini neutron monitor measurements at the Neumayer III station and on the German research vessel Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, B.; Galsdorf, D.; Herbst, K.; Gieseler, J.; Labrenz, J.; Schwerdt, C.; Walter, M.; Benadé, G.; Fuchs, R.; Krüger, H.; Moraal, H.

    2015-08-01

    Neutron monitors (NMs) are ground-based devices to measure the variation of cosmic ray intensities, and although being reliable they have two disadvantages: their size as well as their weight. As consequence, [1] suggested the development of a portable, and thus much smaller and lighter, calibration neutron monitor that can be carried to any existing station around the world [see 2; 3]. But this mini neutron monitor, moreover, can also be installed as an autonomous station at any location that provides ’’office” conditions such as a) temperatures within the range of around 0 to less than 40 degree C as well as b) internet and c) power supply. However, the best location is when the material above the NM is minimized. In 2011 a mini Neutron Monitor was installed at the Neumayer III station in Antarctica as well as the German research vessel Polarstern, providing scientific data since January 2014 and October 2012, respectively. The Polarstern, which is in the possession of the Federal Republic of Germany represented by the Ministry of Education and Research and operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research and managed by the shipping company Laeisz, was specially designed for working in the polar seas and is currently one of the most sophisticated polar research vessels worldwide. It spends almost 310 days a year at sea usually being located in the waters of Antarctica between November and March while spending the northern summer months in Arctic waters. Therefore, the vessel scans the rigidity range below the atmospheric threshold and above 10 GV twice a year. In contrast to spacecraft measurements NM data are influenced by variations of the geomagnetic field as well as the atmospheric conditions. Thus, in order to interpret the data a detailed knowledge of the instrument sensitivity with geomagnetic latitude (rigidity) and atmospheric pressure is essential. In order to determine the atmospheric response data from the

  20. J-integral elastic plastic fracture mechanics evaluation of the stability of cracks in nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. P.; McMeeking, R. M.; Parks, D. M.

    1980-06-01

    Contributions were made toward developing a new methodology to assess the stability of cracks in pressure vessels made from materials that exhibit a significant increase in toughness during the early increments of crack growth. It has a wide range of validity from linear elastic to fully plastic behavior.

  1. AURORA BOREALIS - Icebreaking Deep-Sea Drilling Platform and Multi-Purpose Research Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembke-Jene, L.; Biebow, N.; Kunz-Pirrung, M.; Thiede, J.; Egerton, P.; Azzolini, R.

    2009-04-01

    Future breakthroughs in scientific deep-sea drilling critically depend on our ability to perform field expeditions with state-of-the-art technologies and modern infrastructures. This will require major investments, both in terms of generating new, as well as maintaining and renovating existing infrastructure. Diverse models for science operations are presently projected, also within the context of scientific needs after the current phase of the IODP will come to an end. In spite of its critical role in global climate and tectonic evolution, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most unexplored ocean basins of the world, its geologic and paleo-environmental history remaining largely unknown. Restricted by circulating sea ice, scientific drilling has been slow to arrive in the Arctic Ocean. This lack of data remains and represents one of the largest gaps of information in modern Earth Science. We here report on the finalised technical planning of a new European research icebreaker and deep-sea drilling vessel, the AURORA BOREALIS, designed with an all-season capability of endurance in permanently ice-covered waters. The icebreaker will be able to carry out deep-sea drilling in ice-covered deep-sea basins primarily during the more favorable summer seasons in order to fulfill the needs of the IODP or its eventual successor as a Mission-Specific Platform. AURORA BOREALIS will be the most advanced polar research vessel in the world with a multi-functional role of drilling in deep ocean basins and supporting climate and environmental research and decision support for stakeholder governments within the next 35-40 years. It will feature the highest attainable icebreaker classification, considerably surpassing in performance all currently operating research icebreakers. New technological features to be implemented include a novel hull design and specialized dynamic positioning systems for operations under closed sea-ice cover conditions with up to 2.5 m ice thickness, combined with

  2. The neutron texture diffractometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Tao; Tian, Geng-Fang; Gao, Jian-Bo; Yu, Zhou-Xiang; Li, Yu-Qing; Wu, Li-Qi; Yang, Lin-Feng; Sun, Kai; Wang, Hong-Li; Santisteban, J. r.; Chen, Dong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The first neutron texture diffractometer in China has been built at the China Advanced Research Reactor, due to strong demand for texture measurement with neutrons from the domestic user community. This neutron texture diffractometer has high neutron intensity, moderate resolution and is mainly applied to study texture in commonly used industrial materials and engineering components. In this paper, the design and characteristics of this instrument are described. The results for calibration with neutrons and quantitative texture analysis of zirconium alloy plate are presented. The comparison of texture measurements with the results obtained in HIPPO at LANSCE and Kowari at ANSTO illustrates the reliability of the texture diffractometer. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11105231, 11205248, 51327902) and International Atomic Energy Agency-TC program (CPR0012)

  3. Nuclear plant-aging research on reactor protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the rsults of a review of the Reactor Trip System (RTS) and the Engineered Safety Feature Actuating System (ESFAS) operating experiences reported in Licensee Event Reports (LER)s, the Nuclear Power Experience data base, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, and plant maintenance records. Our purpose is to evaluate the potential significance of aging, including cycling, trips, and testing as contributors to degradation of the RTS and ESFAS. Tables are presented that show the percentage of events for RTS and ESFAS classified by cause, components, and subcomponents for each of the Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors. A representative Babcock and Wilcox plant was selected for detailed study. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research guidelines were followed in performing the detailed study that identified materials susceptible to aging, stressors, environmental factors, and failure modes for the RTS and ESFAS as generic instrumentation and control systems. Functional indicators of degradation are listed, testing requirements evaluated, and regulatory issues discussed.

  4. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas; Wright, Art; Lambert, John; Hayes, Steven; Natesan, Ken; Ott, Larry J.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  5. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  6. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.; Hanson, A.; Xu, J.; Rorer, D.; Diamond, D.

    2003-08-26

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional MCNP Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model including the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core power transient is terminated

  7. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, Tanju; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R.; Wigeland, Roald; Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F.

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  8. Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors. ISPO C-50 Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Binford, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

  9. 75 FR 1723 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chiniak Gully Research Area for Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chiniak Gully Research Area for Vessels Using Trawl Gear AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Temporary rule. SUMMARY: NMFS is rescinding the trawl closure in the Chiniak Gully Research Area....

  10. A miniature research vessel: A small-scale ocean-exploration demonstration of geophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. M.; Boston, B.; Sleeper, J. D.; Cameron, M. E.; Togia, H.; Anderson, A.; Sigurdardottir, T. D.; Tree, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Graduate student members of the University of Hawaii Geophysical Society have designed a small-scale model research vessel (R/V) that uses sonar to create 3D maps of a model seafloor in real-time. A pilot project was presented to the public at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology's (SOEST) Biennial Open House weekend in 2013 and, with financial support from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists and National Science Foundation, was developed into a full exhibit for the same event in 2015. Nearly 8,000 people attended the two-day event, including children and teachers from Hawaii's schools, home school students, community groups, families, and science enthusiasts. Our exhibit demonstrates real-time sonar mapping of a cardboard volcano using a toy size research vessel on a programmable 2-dimensional model ship track suspended above a model seafloor. Ship waypoints were wirelessly sent from a Windows Surface tablet to a large-touchscreen PC that controlled the exhibit. Sound wave travel times were recorded using an ultrasonic emitter/receiver attached to an Arduino microcontroller platform and streamed through a USB connection to the control PC running MatLab, where a 3D model was updated as the ship collected data. Our exhibit demonstrates the practical use of complicated concepts, like wave physics, survey design, and data processing in a way that the youngest elementary students are able to understand. It provides an accessible avenue to learn about sonar mapping, and could easily be adapted to talk about bat and marine mammal echolocation by replacing the model ship and volcano. The exhibit received an overwhelmingly positive response from attendees and incited discussions that covered a broad range of earth science topics.

  11. A Dataset of Deep-Sea Fishes Surveyed by Research Vessels in the Waters around Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Jack; Yeh, Hsin-Ming; Lee, Mao-Yin; Chen, Lee-Sea; Lin, Hen-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The study of deep-sea fish fauna is hampered by a lack of data due to the difficulty and high cost incurred in its surveys and collections. Taiwan is situated along the edge of the Eurasia fig, at the junction of three Large Marine Ecosystems or Ecoregions of the East China Sea, South China Sea and the Philippines. As nearly two-thirds of its surrounding marine ecosystems are deep-sea environments, Taiwan is expected to hold a rich diversity of deep-sea fish. However, in the past, no research vessels were employed to collect fish data on site. Only specimens, caught by bottom trawl fishing in the waters hundreds of meters deep and missing precise locality information, were collected from Dasi and Donggang fishing harbors. Began in 2001, with the support of National Science Council, research vessels were made available to take on the task of systematically collecting deep-sea fish specimens and occurrence records in the waters surrounding Taiwan. By the end of 2006, a total of 3,653 specimens, belonging to 26 orders, 88 families, 198 genera and 366 species, were collected in addition to data such as sampling site geographical coordinates and water depth, and fish body length and weight. The information, all accessible from the “Database of Taiwan’s Deep-Sea Fauna and Its Distribution (http://deepsea.biodiv.tw/)” as part of the “Fish Database of Taiwan,” can benefit the study of temporal and spatial changes in distribution and abundance of fish fauna in the context of global deep-sea biodiversity. PMID:25610339

  12. A Dataset of Deep-Sea Fishes Surveyed by Research Vessels in the Waters around Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Jack; Yeh, Hsin-Ming; Lee, Mao-Yin; Chen, Lee-Sea; Lin, Hen-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The study of deep-sea fish fauna is hampered by a lack of data due to the difficulty and high cost incurred in its surveys and collections. Taiwan is situated along the edge of the Eurasia fig, at the junction of three Large Marine Ecosystems or Ecoregions of the East China Sea, South China Sea and the Philippines. As nearly two-thirds of its surrounding marine ecosystems are deep-sea environments, Taiwan is expected to hold a rich diversity of deep-sea fish. However, in the past, no research vessels were employed to collect fish data on site. Only specimens, caught by bottom trawl fishing in the waters hundreds of meters deep and missing precise locality information, were collected from Dasi and Donggang fishing harbors. Began in 2001, with the support of National Science Council, research vessels were made available to take on the task of systematically collecting deep-sea fish specimens and occurrence records in the waters surrounding Taiwan. By the end of 2006, a total of 3,653 specimens, belonging to 26 orders, 88 families, 198 genera and 366 species, were collected in addition to data such as sampling site geographical coordinates and water depth, and fish body length and weight. The information, all accessible from the "Database of Taiwan's Deep-Sea Fauna and Its Distribution (http://deepsea.biodiv.tw/)" as part of the "Fish Database of Taiwan," can benefit the study of temporal and spatial changes in distribution and abundance of fish fauna in the context of global deep-sea biodiversity.

  13. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  14. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  15. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Anthony A.

    2013-07-01

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  16. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  17. Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-06-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  18. Time-dependent temper embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel: Correlation between microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during tempering at 650 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanwei; Han, Lizhan; Yan, Guanghua; Liu, Qingdong; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng

    2016-11-01

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel and its effect on the mechanical properties during tempering at 650 °C were studied to reveal the time-dependent toughness and temper embrittlement. The results show that the toughening of the material should be attributed to the decomposition of the martensite/austenite constituents and uniform distribution of carbides. When the tempering duration was 5 h, the strength of the investigated steel decreased to strike a balance with the material impact toughness that reached a plateau. As the tempering duration was further increased, the material strength was slightly reduced but the material impact toughness deteriorated drastically. This time-dependent temper embrittlement is different from traditional temper embrittlement, and it can be partly attributed to the softening of the matrix and the broadening of the ferrite laths. Moreover, the dimensions and distribution of the grain carbides are the most important factors of the impact toughness.

  19. Analytical modeling of the effect of crack depth, specimen size, and biaxial stress on the fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yuh-Jin; Lam, Poh-Sang

    1995-02-01

    Fracture, toughness values for A533-B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel obtained from test programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and University of Kansas (KU) are interpreted using the J-A(sub 2) analytical model. The analytical model is based on the critical stress concept and takes into consideration the constraint effect using the second parameter A(sub 2) in addition to the generally accepted first parameter J which represents the loading level. It is demonstrated that with the constraint level included in the model effects of crack depth (shallow vs deep), specimen size (small vs. large), and loading type (uniaxial vs biaxial) on the fracture toughness from the test programs can be interpreted and predicted.

  20. Temper and neutron irradiation embrittlement in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels for pressure vessels of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.; Fukaya, K.; Kodaira, T.; Oku, T.

    1984-09-01

    A 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel is a promising candidate material for structural components of the pressure vessel of the experimental very high temperature gascooled reactor (VHTR) in Japan. Since the service temperature of such components is expected to be about 400/sup 0/C, the behavior of the temper and neutron irradiation embrittlements in these chromium-molybdenum steels should be confirmed from the viewpoint of structural integrity. The experimental verification on the degree of the embrittlement due to thermal aging, including the effect of applied stress and neutron irradiation, is described. Steel containing substantial amounts (about 100 ppm) of phosphorus atoms, which are believed to cause the temper embrittlement, showed that applied stress enhanced the embrittlement due to thermal aging. Embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation appears to be minimal in the case of the material containing <1000 ppm of copper as impurity with neutrons irradiated at about 400/sup 0/C.

  1. Analytical modeling of the effect of crack depth, specimen size, and biaxial stress on the fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Yuh-Jin; Lam, Poh-Sang

    1995-02-01

    Fracture, toughness values for A533-B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel obtained from test programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and University of Kansas (KU) are interpreted using the J-A{sub 2} analytical model. The analytical model is based on the critical stress concept and takes into consideration the constraint effect using the second parameter A{sub 2} in addition to the generally accepted first parameter J which represents the loading level. It is demonstrated that with the constraint level included in the model effects of crack depth (shallow vs deep), specimen size (small vs. large), and loading type (uniaxial vs biaxial) on the fracture toughness from the test programs can be interpreted and predicted.

  2. Influence of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.; Russell, K.F.; Stoller, R.E.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of unaged (as-fabricated) and long-term thermally aged ({approximately} 100,000 h at 280 C) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed. This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal-aging effects. This microstructural study focused on the quantification of the compositions of the matrix and carbides. The APFIM results indicate that there was no significant microstructural evolution after a long-term thermal exposure in weld, plate, or forging materials. The matrix depletion of copper that was observed in weld materials was consistent with the copper concentration in the matrix after the stress-relief heat treatment. The compositions of cementite carbides aged for 100,000 h were compared with the Thermocalc{trademark} prediction. The APFIM comparisons of materials under these conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties such as the Charpy transition temperature.

  3. Status of reduced enrichment programs for research reactors in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hedeaki; Shirai, Eiji; Oyamada, Rokuro; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1997-08-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) have been partially completed and are mostly still in progress under the Joint Study Programs with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JMTR and JRR-2 have been already converted to use MEU aluminide fuels in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The operation of the upgraded JRR-3(JRR-3M) has started in March 1990 with the LEU aluminide fuels. Since May 1992, the two elements have been inserted in the KUR. The safety review application for the full core conversion to use LEU silicide in the JMTR was approved in February 1992 and the conversion has been done in January 1994. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and in April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until 2001. Since March 1994, Kyoto University is continuing negotiation with UKAEA Dounreay on spent fuel reprocessing and blending down of recovered uranium, in addition to that with USDOE.

  4. Analysis of LOCA Scenarios in the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J. S.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D.

    2015-08-30

    An analysis has been done of hypothetical loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCAs) in the research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The purpose of the analysis is to determine if the peak clad temperature remains below the Safety Limit, which is the blister temperature for the fuel. The configuration of the NBSR considered in the analysis is that projected for the future when changes will be made so that shutdown pumps do not operate when a LOCA signal is detected. The analysis was done for the present core with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and with the proposed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel that would be used when the NBSR is converted from one to the other. The analysis consists of two parts. The first examines how the water would drain from the primary system following a break and the possibility for the loss of coolant from within the fuel element flow channels. This work is performed using the TRACE system thermal-hydraulic code. The second looks at the fuel clad temperature as a function of time given that the water may have drained from many of the flow channels and the water in the vessel is in a quasi-equilibrium state. The temperature behavior is investigated using the three-dimensional heat conduction code HEATING7.3. The results in all scenarios considered for both HEU and LEU fuel show that the peak clad temperature remains below the blister temperature.

  5. Modeling of operating history of the research nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naymushin, A.; Chertkov, Yu; Shchurovskaya, M.; Anikin, M.; Lebedev, I.

    2016-06-01

    The results of simulation of the IRT-T reactor operation history from 2012 to 2014 are presented. Calculations are performed using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCU-PTR. Comparison is made between calculation and experimental data for the critical reactor.

  6. Condensed matter research at the modernized IBR-2 reactor: from functional materials to nanobiotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Balagurov, A. M.; Kozlenko, D. P.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the main scientific areas of condensed matter research, which are extended with the use of the IBR-2 high-flux research reactor, is presented. It is demonstrated that the spectrometer facility of the upgraded reactor has great potential for studying the structural, magnetic, and dynamical properties of novel functional materials and nanobiosystems, which ensures the leading position of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in neutron research of condensed matter for the long-term prospect.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  8. Annealing behaviour of reactor pressure-vessel steels studied by positron-annihilation spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeǹ, V.; Segers, D.; de Bakker, P. M. A.; De Grave, E.; Magula, V.; Van Hoecke, T.; Van Waeyenberge, B.

    The annealing behaviour of commonly used reactor pressure-vessel steels was studied using positron-annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) (lifetime and Doppler broadening techniques), transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), integral low-energy electron MS (ILEEMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results of these methods applied to different types of steels are discussed. Some significant differences in the experimental results are observed between the Russian (3 types) and Western Europe (5 types) steels and between individual specimens within these two groups. All specimens were annealed in vacuum and studied after this thermal treatment. It was confirmed that the heat affected zone (HAZ) is the most sensitive region for thermal and neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement in the reactor. Positron-annihilation lifetime measurements on HAZ specimens annealed at successively higher temperatures show the drastic increase in the vacancy-type defect formation between 525°C and 600°C. Therefore these specimens were selected for further detailed studies by TEM.

  9. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  10. A new safety channel based on ¹⁷N detection in research reactors.

    PubMed

    Seyfi, Somayye; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    Tehran research reactor (TRR) is a representative of pool type research reactors using light water, as coolant and moderator. This reactor is chosen as a prototype to demonstrate and prove the feasibility of (17)N detection as a new redundant channel for reactor power measurement. In TRR, similar to other pool type reactors, neutron detectors are immersed in the pool around the core as the main power measuring devices. In the present article, a different approach, using out of water neutron detector, is employed to measure reactor power. This new method is based on (17)O (n,p) (17)N reaction taking place inside the core and subsequent measurement of delayed neutrons emitted due to (17)N disintegration. Count and measurement of neutrons around outlet water pipe provides a reliable redundant safety channel to measure reactor power. Results compared with other established channels indicate a good agreement and shows a linear interdependency with true thermal power. Safety of reactor operation is improved with installation & use of this new power measuring channel. The new approach may equally serve well as a redundant channel in all other types of reactors having coolant comprised of oxygen in its molecular constituents. Contrary to existing channels, this one is totally out of water and thus is an advantage over current instrumentations. It is proposed to employ the same idea on other reactors (nuclear power plants too) to improve safety criteria.

  11. A new safety channel based on ¹⁷N detection in research reactors.

    PubMed

    Seyfi, Somayye; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    Tehran research reactor (TRR) is a representative of pool type research reactors using light water, as coolant and moderator. This reactor is chosen as a prototype to demonstrate and prove the feasibility of (17)N detection as a new redundant channel for reactor power measurement. In TRR, similar to other pool type reactors, neutron detectors are immersed in the pool around the core as the main power measuring devices. In the present article, a different approach, using out of water neutron detector, is employed to measure reactor power. This new method is based on (17)O (n,p) (17)N reaction taking place inside the core and subsequent measurement of delayed neutrons emitted due to (17)N disintegration. Count and measurement of neutrons around outlet water pipe provides a reliable redundant safety channel to measure reactor power. Results compared with other established channels indicate a good agreement and shows a linear interdependency with true thermal power. Safety of reactor operation is improved with installation & use of this new power measuring channel. The new approach may equally serve well as a redundant channel in all other types of reactors having coolant comprised of oxygen in its molecular constituents. Contrary to existing channels, this one is totally out of water and thus is an advantage over current instrumentations. It is proposed to employ the same idea on other reactors (nuclear power plants too) to improve safety criteria. PMID:26123105

  12. Core conversion of the Portuguese research reactor to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, J.G.; Ramos, A.R.; Kocher, A.

    2008-07-15

    Core conversion of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) to LEU fuel is being performed within IAEA's Technical Cooperation project POR/4/016, with financial support from the US and Portugal. CERCA was selected as manufacturer of the LEU assemblies by the IAEA after an international call for bids. CERCA provided a comprehensive package to the RPI which included the mechanical verification of the design of the assemblies, their manufacture and arrangements for a joint inspection of the finished assemblies. The LEU fuel assemblies were manufactured within 8 months upon final approval of the design. The safety analyses for the core conversion to LEU fuel were made with the assistance of the RERTR program and were submitted for review by the IAEA and by Portuguese authorities in January 2007. Revised documents were submitted in June 2007 addressing the issues raised during review. Regulatory approval was received in early August and core conversion was done in early September. All measured safety parameters are within the defined acceptance limits. Operation at full power is expected by the end of October. (author)

  13. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Brian D.; Parma, Edward J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field - a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP) bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ) contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified) cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ) cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  14. Code System to Calculate Mixed Cores in TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor.

    2001-08-29

    Version 00 TRIGLAV is a computer program for reactor calculations of mixed cores in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It can be applied for fuel element burn-up calculations, for power and flux distributions calculations and for reactivity predictions. The TRIGLAV program requires the WIMS-D4 program with the original WIMS cross-section library extended for TRIGA reactor specific nuclides. This package includes the code TRIGAC, which is a new version of TRIGAP.

  15. Integration of improved decontamination and characterization technologies in the decommissioning of the CP-5 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.; Boing, L. E.

    2000-02-17

    The aging of research reactors worldwide has resulted in a heightened awareness in the international technical decommissioning community of the timeliness to review and address the needs of these research institutes in planning for and eventually performing the decommissioning of these facilities. By using the reactors already undergoing decommissioning as test beds for evaluating enhanced or new/innovative technologies for decommissioning, it is possible that new techniques could be made available for those future research reactor decommissioning projects. Potentially, the new technologies will result in: reduced radiation doses to the work force, larger safety margins in performing decommissioning and cost and schedule savings to the research institutes in performing the decommissioning of these facilities. Testing of these enhanced technologies for decontamination, dismantling, characterization, remote operations and worker protection are critical to furthering advancements in the technical specialty of decommissioning. Furthermore, regulatory acceptance and routine utilization for future research reactor decommissioning will be assured by testing and developing these technologies in realistically contaminated environments prior to use in the research reactors. The decommissioning of the CP-5 Research Reactor is currently in the final phase of dismantlement. In this paper the authors present results of work performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the development, testing and deployment of innovative and/or enhanced technologies for the decommissioning of research reactors.

  16. Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Smith, Cyrus M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Brenchley, David L.; Meyer, Ryan M.

    2013-04-16

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on systems, structures, and components is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e., service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enabled by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of systems, structures, and components degradation.

  17. Automated system for measurement, collection and processing of hydrometeorological data aboard scientific research vessels of the GUGMS (SIGMA-s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisenkov, Y. P.; Fedorov, O. M.

    1974-01-01

    A report is made on the automated system known as SIGMA-s for the measurement, collection, and processing of hydrometeorological data aboard scientific research vessels of the Hydrometeorological Service. The various components of the system and the interfacing between them are described, as well as the projects that the system is equipped to handle.

  18. An emerging reactor technology for chemical synthesis: surface acoustic wave-assisted closed-vessel Suzuki coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ketav; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of an energy-efficient surface acoustic wave (SAW) device for driving closed-vessel SAW-assisted (CVSAW), ligand-free Suzuki couplings in aqueous media. The reactions were carried out on a mmolar scale with low to ultra-low catalyst loadings. The reactions were driven by heating resulting from the penetration of acoustic energy derived from RF Raleigh waves generated by a piezoelectric chip via a renewable fluid coupling layer. The yields were uniformly high and the reactions could be executed without added ligand and in water. In terms of energy density this new technology was determined to be roughly as efficient as microwaves and superior to ultrasound.

  19. Crafting glass vessels: current research on the ancient glass collections in the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Alexander; McCarthy, Blythe; Bowe, Stacy

    Our knowledge of glass production in ancient Egypt has been well augmented by the publication of recently excavated materials and glass workshops, but also by more recent materials analysis, and experiments of modern glass-makers attempting to reconstruct the production process of thin-walled coreformed glass vessels. From the mounting of a prefabricated core to the final glass product our understanding of this profession has much improved. The small but well preserved glass collection of the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. is a valid tool for examining and studying the technology and production of ancient Egyptian core formed glass vessels. Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919) acquired most of the material from Giovanni Dattari in Cairo in 1909. Previously the glass had received only limited discussion, suggesting that most of these vessels were produced in the 18th Dynasty in the 15th and 14th centuries BCE, while others date from the Hellenistic period and later. In an ongoing project we conducted computed radiography in conjunction with qualitative x-ray fluorescence analysis on a selected group of vessels to understand further aspects of the ancient production process. This paper will provide an overview of our recent research and present our data-gathering process and preliminary results. How can the examinations of core formed glass vessels in the Freer Gallery contribute to our understanding of ancient glass production and technology? By focusing on new ways of looking at old assumptions using the Freer Gallery glass collections, we hope to increase understanding of the challenges of the production process of core-vessel technology as represented by these vessels.

  20. Graphite stored energy in the UCLA research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ashbaugh, C.E.; Ostrander, N.C.; Pearlman, H.

    1986-01-01

    One of several reactors of similar basic design built in the same time period, the UCLA reactor entered the relicensing process in 1980. A US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored generic safety analysis of such reactors included a brief evaluation of the energy stored in the graphite (Wigner Energy), and concluded that this was negligibly small. Shutdown of the UCLA reactor facility in 1984 provided an opportunity to measure the stored energy. Samples of graphite were taken at the following locations: immediately adjacent to the boxes; at the center of the graphite island (where the thermal flux peaks); and also from a stringer approx. 2 in. from the reactor core center. All samples were from nearly the same horizontal plane, at about mid-height of the core. Stored energy was measured by differential thermal calorimetry, on a Du Pont Thermal Analyzer Model 1090, with scanning temperatures up to 550/sup 0/C. The highest value found was 33.2 cal/g, next to the fuel boxes. At the island center, it was 19.2 cal/g. The stored energy is small, and further is confined to the graphite volume adjacent to the fuel boxes, which is a small fraction of the total volume of graphite in the reactor. The potential hazard from release of graphite stored energy is negligible.

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  2. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-03-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  3. 78 FR 26811 - Dow Chemical Company, Dow TRIGA Research Reactor; License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Dow Chemical Company, Dow TRIGA Research Reactor; License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Supplemental Information and Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor,'' to inform the public that the NRC is considering issuance of a...

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  5. AURORA BOREALIS - Icebreaker, Drilling Platform and Multi-Purpose Research Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Pirrung, M.; Biebow, N.; Lembke-Jene, L.; Thiede, J.; Egerton, P.

    2007-12-01

    In spite of the critical role of the Arctic Ocean in climate evolution, it is the only sub-basin of the world's oceans that has essentially not been sampled by the drill ships of the Deep-Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) or the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and its long-term environmental history and tectonic structure is therefore poorly known. Exceptions are the ODP Leg 151 and the more recent very successful ACEX-expedition of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). This lack of data represents one of the largest gaps of information in modern Earth Science. Therefore, the new research icebreaker AURORA BOREALIS will be equipped with drilling facilities to fulfil the needs of the IODP for a -Mission-Specific Platform- to drill in deep, permanently ice-covered ocean basins. This icebreaker must be also powerful enough to maintain station against the drifting sea-ice cover and will have to be equipped with a dynamic positioning system. This new icebreaker would be conceived as an optimized science platform from the keel up and will allow conducting long, international and interdisciplinary expeditions into the central Arctic Ocean during all seasons of the year. In a long-term perspective the AURORA BOREALIS will also be used to address Antarctic research targets, both in its mode as a regular research vessel as well as a polar drill ship. The construction of AURORA BOREALIS requires several new technical implementations, such as advanced dynamic positioning and deep-sea drilling under a closed sea-ice cover and two moon pools (7 x 7 m), and will provide an extended technical potential and knowledge for marine technology. The scientific and technical details will be presented.

  6. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project integration report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, J. R.; Rempe, J. L.; Stickler, L. A.; Korth, G. E.; Diercks, D. R.; Neimark, L. A.; Akers, D W; Schuetz, B. K.; Shearer, T L; Chavez, S. A.; Thinnes, G. L.; Witt, R. J.; Corradini, M L; Kos, J. A.

    1994-03-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) was an international effort that was sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The primary objectives of the VIP were to extract and examine samples from the lower head and to evaluate the potential modes of failure and the margin of structural integrity that remained in the TMI-2 reactor vessel during the accident. This report presents a summary of the major findings and conclusions that were developed from research during the VIP. Results from the various elements of the project are integrated to form a cohesive understanding of the vessel`s condition after the accident.

  7. Gas release driven dynamics in research reactors piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov; Roloff-Bock, Iris; Schlicht, Gerhard

    2006-07-01

    Analysis of the physical and chemical processes of radiolysis gas production, air absorption, diffusion controlled gas release and transport in the coolant cleaning system of the research reactor FRM II, which is now being in routine power operation in Munich, Germany, lead to the following conclusions: 1) The steady state pressure distribution in the siphon pipe allows that the horizontal part of the siphon pipe is filled with air. The air is isolated by about 1 m water column from the main pipe of the coolant cleaning system (CCS). This is a stable steady state. It has two positive impacts on the normal operation of the CCS: (a) there is effectively no bypass flow; (b) The air can not be transported through the pipe and therefore no deterioration of the pump performance is expected from the function of the siphon pipe. 2) Radiolysis gas production for coolant, that initially does not contain dissolved air, does not lead to any problem for the system. The gases are dissolved in the coolant at 2.2 bar and are not released for pressures reduction to about 1 bar, which is the minimum pressure in the CCS. 3) Assuming hypothetically a radiolysis gas production for coolant, which initially does contain dissolved air close to its saturation, leads to gas slug formation and its transport up to the pump. This could reduce the pump head and could lead to distortion of the normal operation. Systematic measurement of the hydrogen in the primary system at 100% power indicated, that this state is not realized in the system. The observed H{sub 2} concentration was between 0.016 e-6 and 0.380 e-6 which is of no concern at all. (authors)

  8. Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Raymond

    2006-06-01

    The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type — the tokamak — is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the "International Tokamak Experimental Reactor" project ITER.

  9. A neutron tomography facility at a low power research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerner, S.; Schillinger, B.; Vontobel, P.; Rauch, H.

    2001-09-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) provides a very efficient tool in the field of non-destructive testing as well as for many applications in fundamental research. A neutron beam penetrating a specimen is attenuated by the sample material and detected by a two-dimensional (2D) imaging device. The image contains information about materials and structure inside the sample because neutrons are attenuated according to the basic law of radiation attenuation. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, as for example, hydrogen and boron, but penetrate many heavy materials. Therefore, NR can yield important information not obtainable by more traditional methods. Nevertheless, there are many aspects of structure, both quantitative and qualitative, that are not accessible from 2D transmission images. Hence, there is an interest in three-dimensional neutron imaging. At the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Austria a neutron tomography facility has been installed. The neutron flux at this beam position is 1.3×10 5 neutrons/cm 2 s and the beam diameter is 8 cm. For a 3D tomographic reconstruction of the sample interior, transmission images of the object taken from different view angles are required. Therefore, a rotary table driven by a step motor connected to a computerized motion control system has been installed at the sample position. In parallel a suitable electronic imaging device based on a neutron sensitive scintillator screen and a CCD-camera has been designed. It can be controlled by a computer in order to synchronize the software of the detector and of the rotary table with the aim of an automation of measurements. Reasonable exposure times can get as low as 20 s per image. This means that a complete tomography of a sample can be performed within one working day. Calculation of the 3D voxel array is made by using the filtered backprojection algorithm.

  10. Neuroimaging standards for research into small vessel disease and its contribution to ageing and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Smith, Eric E; Biessels, Geert J; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fazekas, Franz; Frayne, Richard; Lindley, Richard I; O'Brien, John T; Barkhof, Frederik; Benavente, Oscar R; Black, Sandra E; Brayne, Carol; Breteler, Monique; Chabriat, Hugues; DeCarli, Charles; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Doubal, Fergus; Duering, Marco; Fox, Nick C; Greenberg, Steven; Hachinski, Vladimir; Kilimann, Ingo; Mok, Vincent; Oostenbrugge, Robert van; Pantoni, Leonardo; Speck, Oliver; Stephan, Blossom C M; Teipel, Stefan; Viswanathan, Anand; Werring, David; Chen, Christopher; Smith, Colin; van Buchem, Mark; Norrving, Bo; Gorelick, Philip B; Dichgans, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common accompaniment of ageing. Features seen on neuroimaging include recent small subcortical infarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. SVD can present as a stroke or cognitive decline, or can have few or no symptoms. SVD frequently coexists with neurodegenerative disease, and can exacerbate cognitive deficits, physical disabilities, and other symptoms of neurodegeneration. Terminology and definitions for imaging the features of SVD vary widely, which is also true for protocols for image acquisition and image analysis. This lack of consistency hampers progress in identifying the contribution of SVD to the pathophysiology and clinical features of common neurodegenerative diseases. We are an international working group from the Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration. We completed a structured process to develop definitions and imaging standards for markers and consequences of SVD. We aimed to achieve the following: first, to provide a common advisory about terms and definitions for features visible on MRI; second, to suggest minimum standards for image acquisition and analysis; third, to agree on standards for scientific reporting of changes related to SVD on neuroimaging; and fourth, to review emerging imaging methods for detection and quantification of preclinical manifestations of SVD. Our findings and recommendations apply to research studies, and can be used in the clinical setting to standardise image interpretation, acquisition, and reporting. This Position Paper summarises the main outcomes of this international effort to provide the STandards for ReportIng Vascular changes on nEuroimaging (STRIVE). PMID:23867200

  11. QFD-ANP Approach for the Conceptual Design of Research Vessels: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Subbaiah, Kambagowni; Yeshwanth Sai, Koneru; Suresh, Challa

    2016-06-01

    Conceptual design is a subset of concept art wherein a new idea of product is created instead of a visual representation which would directly be used in a final product. The purpose is to understand the needs of conceptual design which are being used in engineering designs and to clarify the current conceptual design practice. Quality function deployment (QFD) is a customer oriented design approach for developing new or improved products and services to enhance customer satisfaction. House of quality (HOQ) has been traditionally used as planning tool of QFD which translates customer requirements (CRs) into design requirements (DRs). Factor analysis is carried out in order to reduce the CR portions of HOQ. The analytical hierarchical process is employed to obtain the priority ratings of CR's which are used in constructing HOQ. This paper mainly discusses about the conceptual design of an oceanographic research vessel using analytical network process (ANP) technique. Finally the QFD-ANP integrated methodology helps to establish the importance ratings of DRs.

  12. Large-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Slezak, S.E.; Bentz, J.H.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents results of ex-vessel boiling experiments performed in the CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility. CYBL is a reactor-scale facility for confirmatory research of the flooded cavity concept for accident management. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner tank simulates the reactor vessel and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. Experiments with uniform and edge-peaked heat flux distributions up to 20 W/cm{sup 2} across the vessel bottom were performed. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling is mainly due to the gravity head which results from flooding the sides of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid/solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion (ejection). The results suggest that under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity in a passive pressurized water reactor like the AP-600 should be capable of cooling the reactor pressure vessel in the central region of the lower head that is addressed by these tests.

  13. Reactor safety research section probability of heat exchanger leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, D.S.; Shine, E.P.; Copeland, W.J.

    1992-02-01

    Three heat exchangers (HXs) were changed out after the December 1991 leak of Process Water to the Savannah River. This leaves 6 of the original 304 stainless steel heat exchangers which will remain in K-Reactor for restart. This report discusses SRS site specific data which were used to estimate the probability of a leak within a one-year period as a function of leak rate and root cause in these six heat exchangers in conjunction with six new heat exchangers presently in service in K-Reactor. Based on several assumptions and statistical models, SRS data indicate that the total probability of a leak occurring during a one-year period in K-Reactor with 6 original (304 stainless steel) and 6 new (316-L or SEA-CURE) heat exchangers, with a leak rate greater than 20, 40 or 90 pounds/hr, is 0.013, 0.004 or 0.0005, respectively.

  14. Integrated Decision-Making Tool to Develop Spent Fuel Strategies for Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, Randy L; Harrison, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    IAEA Member States operating or having previously operated a Research Reactor are responsible for the safe and sustainable management and disposal of associated radioactive waste, including research reactor spent nuclear fuel (RRSNF). This includes the safe disposal of RRSNF or the corresponding equivalent waste returned after spent fuel reprocessing. One key challenge to developing general recommendations lies in the diversity of spent fuel types, locations and national/regional circumstances rather than mass or volume alone. This is especially true given that RRSNF inventories are relatively small, and research reactors are rarely operated at a high power level or duration typical of commercial power plants. Presently, many countries lack an effective long-term policy for managing RRSNF. This paper presents results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) #T33001 on Options and Technologies for Managing the Back End of the Research Reactor Nuclear Fuel Cycle which includes an Integrated Decision Making Tool called BRIDE (Back-end Research reactor Integrated Decision Evaluation). This is a multi-attribute decision-making tool that combines the Total Estimated Cost of each life-cycle scenario with Non-economic factors such as public acceptance, technical maturity etc and ranks optional back-end scenarios specific to member states situations in order to develop a specific member state strategic plan with a preferred or recommended option for managing spent fuel from Research Reactors.

  15. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, W.E.; Kyger, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February, and March 1980 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development area covered is Transient Fuel Response and Fission-Product Release.

  16. The development of an on-line ERM system for the research reactors in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Lee, Wanno; Kim, Eun Han; Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo

    2007-08-01

    A real-time on-line environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) system for the research reactor sites of Daejeon and Seoul is established. In the Daejeon site, a radio communication method with a radiofrequency of 468.8 MHz is used between the main computer and the six posts inside the Daejeon research reactor site. A general telephone communication method by a dial modem is applied between the main computer and a comparison point with one post outside the Daejeon research reactor site. In the Seoul site, a null modem communication method is employed between a sub-computer and the three posts inside the Seoul research reactor site, and a high-speed communication network such as ADSL is used between the sub-computer in the Seoul site and the main computer in the Daejeon site. Consequently, the real-time data from a total of 10 places is displayed on-line on a screen and it is statistically treated.

  17. McCARD for Neutronics Design and Analysis of Research Reactor Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Park, Ho Jin; Kwon, Soonwoo; Seo, Geon Ho; Hyo Kim, Chang

    2014-06-01

    McCARD is a Monte Carlo (MC) neutron-photon transport simulation code developed exclusively for the neutronics design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores. McCARD is equipped with the hierarchical modeling and scripting functions, the CAD-based geometry processing module, the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter and source multiplication factor estimation modules as well as the burnup analysis capability for the neutronics design and analysis of both research and power reactor cores. This paper highlights applicability of McCARD for the research reactor core neutronics analysis, as demonstrated for Kyoto University Critical Assembly, HANARO, and YALINA.

  18. A Small-Animal Irradiation Facility for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the RA-3 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Marcelo Miller; Silvia I. Thorp; Amanda E. Schwint; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica A. Trivillin; Leandro Zarza; Guillermo Estryk

    2007-11-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has constructed a thermal neutron source for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CNEA have jointly conducted some initial neutronic characterization measurements for one particular configuration of this source. The RA-3 reactor (Figure 1) is an open pool type reactor, with 20% enriched uranium plate-type fuel and light water coolant. A graphite thermal column is situated on one side of the reactor as shown. A tunnel penetrating the graphite structure enables the insertion of samples while the reactor is in normal operation. Samples up to 14 cm height and 15 cm width are accommodated.

  19. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2-5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen.

  20. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Isnaeni, Muh Darwis

    2013-09-09

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of 'Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy' (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy and radiation synovectomy research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Nwanguma, C.I.; Wazer, D.E.; Saris, S.; Madoc-Jones, H. ); Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, current research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and radiation synovectomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor is reviewed. In the last few years, major emphasis has been placed on the development of BNCT primarily for treatment of brain tumors. This has required a concerted effort in epithermal beam design and construction as well as the development of analytical capabilities for {sup 10}B analysis and patient treatment planning. Prompt gamma analysis and high-resolution track-etch autoradiography have been developed to meet the needs, respectively, for accurate bulk analysis and for quantitative imaging of {sup 10}B in tissue at subcellular resolutions. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning codes have been developed to ensure optimized and individualized patient treatments. In addition, the development of radiation synovectomy as an alternative therapy to surgical intervention is joints that are affected by rheumatoid arthritis is described.

  2. The present situations and perspectives on utilization of research reactors in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongkum, Somporn

    2002-01-01

    The Thai Research Reactor 1/Modification 1, a TRIGA Mark III reactor, went critical on November 7, 1977. It has been playing a central role in the development of both Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) and nuclear application in Thailand. It has a maximum power of 2 MW (thermal) at steady state and a pulsing capacity of 2000 MW. The highest thermal neutron flux at a central thimber is 1×10 13 n/cm 2/s, which is extensively utilized for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis and neutron beam experiments, i.e. neutron scattering, prompt gamma analysis and neutron radiography. Following the nuclear technological development, the OAEP is in the process of establishing the Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC). The center is being built in Nakhon Nayok province, 60 km northeast of Bangkok. The centerpiece of the ONRC is a multipurpose 10 MW TRIGA research reactor. Facilities are included for the production of radioisotopes for medicine, industry and agriculture, neutron transmutation doping of silicon, and neutron capture therapy. The neutron beam facilities will also be utilized for applied research and technology development as well as training in reactor operations, performance of experiments and reactor physics. This paper describes a recent program of utilization as well as a new research reactor for enlarging the perspectives of its utilization in the future.

  3. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 106/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  4. PROSPECT Background Studies and Operation of Li-Loaded Liquid Scintillator Detectors at a Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Thomas; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near compact research reactors provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. PROSPECT is a phased experiment that will explore the favored reactor anomaly parameter space at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab. Measurements of the reactor correlated and ambient backgrounds will be presented, as well as a discussion of active and passive mitigation plans. A lithium-loaded liquid scintillator test detector is currently in operation at HFIR within a prototype shielding cave. Results from recent operation will be presented along with a discussion of their impact on PROSPECT. on behalf of the PROSPECT collaboration.

  5. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  6. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  7. 78 FR 35638 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the NOAA Research Vessel FSV-6 RUBEN LASKER, 9664988

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    .... 1605(c) and 33 CFR 81.18. DATES: The Certificate of Alternative Compliance was issued on December 20... 33 U.S.C. 1605(c) and 33 CFR 81.18, has been issued for the NOAA research vessel FSV-6 RUBEN LASKER...), and 33 CFR 81.18. Dated: May 10, 2013. S.E. Anderson, Commander, U.S. Coast Guard, Acting...

  8. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  9. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  10. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1984-04-01

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy, and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

  11. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1982-11-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  12. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1982-07-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  13. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L.; Moore, E.N.

    2013-07-01

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage to dry storage

  14. DISMANTLING OF THE UPPER RPV COMPONENTS OF THE KARLSRUHE MULTI-PURPOSE RESEARCH REACTOR (MZFR), GERMANY

    SciTech Connect

    Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.

    2003-02-27

    The Multi-purpose Research Reactor was a pressurized-water reactor cooled and moderated with heavy water. It was built from 1961 to 1966 and went critical for the first time on 29 September 1965. After nineteen years of successful operation, the reactor was de-activated on 3 May 1984. The reactor had a thermal output of 200 MW and an electrical output of 50 MW. The MZFR not only served to supply electrical power, but also as a test bed for: - research into various materials for reactor building (e. g. zirkaloy), - the manufacturing and operating industry to gain experience in erection and operation, - training scientific and technical reactor staff, and - power supply (first nuclear combined-heat-and-power system, 1979-1984). The experience gained in operating the MZFR was very helpful for the development and operation of power reactors. At first, safe containment and enclosure of the plant was planned, but then it was decided to dismantle the plant completely, step by step, in view o f the clear advantages of this approach. The decommissioning concept for the complete elimination of the plant down to a green-field site provides for eight steps. A separate decommissioning license is required for each step. As part of the dismantling, about 72,000 Mg [metric tons] of concrete and 7,200 Mg of metal (400 Mg RPV) must be removed. About 700 Mg of concrete (500 Mg biological shield) and 1300 Mg of metal must be classified as radioactive waste.

  15. Plant heat cycles, vessel internal arrangement, and auxiliary systems. Volume five

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume covers nuclear power plant heat cycles (type of nuclear power cycles, power cycle refinements, BWR/PWR power cycle, BWR/PWR reactor coolant system), reactor vessel internal arrangement (reactor vessel features, BWR/PWR reactor vessel and internals, BWR/PWR reactor core), reactor auxiliary systems (purpose of reactor auxiliary systems, PWR and BWR reactor auxiliary systems, PWR and BWR control rod drive mechanisms).

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning preparation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, R.L.; Anderson, G.E.; Finger, J.M.; Skipper, D.D.

    1994-12-31

    During the past seven years, four research reactors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been shut down by the US Department of Energy (DOE) because of a lack of funding and mission. Before the reactors are eligible to receive DOE funding for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), certain preparations are required, including resolution of significant environmental concerns. This paper describes the results of the D and D preparations for one of these four reactors, the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), with the emphasis on the environmental aspects. The three tasks that must be completed before a facility can be transferred to the D and D program are: Completion of environmental compliance, industrial safety, and radiological reviews; Removal of all spent fuel and nuclear material; and Assurance that buildings and support systems are structurally sound so as to permit deferred final decommissioning for up to five years.

  17. MITR-III: Upgrade and relicensing studies for the MIT Research Reactor. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Trosman, H.G.; Lanning, D.D.; Harling, O.K.

    1994-08-01

    The current operating license of the MIT research reactor will expire on May 7, 1996 or possibly a few years later if the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees that the license period can start with the date of initial reactor operation. Driven by the imminent expiration of the operating license, a team of nuclear engineering staff and students have begun a study of the future options for the MIT Research Reactor. These options have included the range from a major rebuilding of the reactor to its decommissioning. This document reports the results of a two year intensive activity which has been supported by a $148,000 grant from the USDOE contract Number DEFG0293ER75859, approximately $100,000 of internal MIT funds and Nuclear Engineering Department graduate student fellowships as well as assistance from international visiting scientists and engineers.

  18. Analysis of a link of embrittlement mechanisms and neutron flux effect as applied to reactor pressure vessel materials of WWER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Pirogova, N. E.; Brumovsky, M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on embrittlement of WWER RPV materials is analyzed for cases when different radiation defects prevail. Data bases on the ductile-brittle transition temperature shifts obtained in the surveillance specimens programs and the research programs are used. The material embrittlement mechanisms for which the flux effect is practically absent and for which the flux effect is remarkable are determined. For case when the phosphorus segregation mechanism dominates the theoretical justification of the absence of the flux effect is performed on the basis of the theory of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  19. Operational performance of the three bean salad control algorithm on the ACRR (Annular Core Research Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M.; Madaras, J.J. . Space and Defense Systems); Trowbridge, F.R. Jr.; Talley, D.G.; Parma, E.J. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Experimental tests on the Annular Core Research Reactor have confirmed that the Three-Bean-Salad'' control algorithm based on the Pontryagin maximum principle can change the power of a nuclear reactor many decades with a very fast startup rate and minimal overshoot. The paper describes the results of simulations and operations up to 25 MW and 87 decades per minute. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Quality management in BNCT at a nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Moss, Raymond; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Rassow, Jürgen; Wittig, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Each medical intervention must be performed respecting Health Protection directives, with special attention to Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC). This is the basis of safe and reliable treatments. BNCT must apply QA programs as required for performance and safety in (conventional) radiotherapy facilities, including regular testing of performance characteristics (QC). Furthermore, the well-established Quality Management (QM) system of the nuclear reactor used has to be followed. Organization of these complex QM procedures is offered by the international standard ISO 9001:2008.

  1. Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Germer, J.H.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes an improved radiant vessel passive cooling system for liquid-metal poor-type modular nuclear reactors having a reactor vessel and a surrounding containment vessel spaced apart from the reactor vessel to form a first interstitial region containing an inert gas, the improvement comprising: a shell spaced apart from and surrounding the containment vessel to form a second interstitial region comprising a circulatory air passage. The circulatory air passage has an air inlet at a first position and an air outlet at a second position which is vertically higher than the first position. The second interstitial region lies between the shell and the containment vessel; and surface area extension means in the shell is longitudinally disposed from the shell into the second interstitial region towards the containment vessel to receive thermal radiation from the containment vessel. The surface area extension means is spaced apart from the external surface of the containment vessel where heat radiated form the containment vessel is received at the surface extension means for convection, conduction and radiation to air in the circulatory passage.

  2. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

  3. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  4. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    DOEpatents

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  5. Research and Development of Automated Eddy Current Testing for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, Kyle L.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Nichols, Charles T.; Spencer, Paul R.; Lucero, Ralph E.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy current testing (ET) was used to scan bare metallic liners used in the fabrication of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) for flaws which could result in premature failure of the vessel. The main goal of the project was to make improvements in the areas of scan signal to noise ratio, sensitivity of flaw detection, and estimation of flaw dimensions. Scan settings were optimized resulting in an increased signal to noise ratio. Previously undiscovered flaw indications were observed and investigated. Threshold criteria were determined for the system software's flaw report and estimation of flaw dimensions were brought to an acceptable level of accuracy. Computer algorithms were written to import data for filtering and a numerical derivative filtering algorithm was evaluated.

  6. The Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Demolition of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, D.W.

    2008-07-01

    In September 2007, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition (D and D) of the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facility. The 50-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, the removal of a large amount of hazardous materials as well as issues associated with the removal and disposal of the 112-ton reactor vessel. Prior to commencing full scale D and D, hazardous constituents were removed including cadmium, PCB oils and electrical components, lead, asbestos and mercury among others. The reactor required isolation in order to be removed. Due to activated metal within the reactor vessel, dose rates in the core region were approximately 1100 R/hr. Subsequent dose rates outside the vessel varied from 60 mR to greater than 2 R. Due to the dose rates, the project team decided to fill the reactor vessel with grout to a level above the core region and below the discharge to the canal. To remove the reactor, access to the 17 mounting shoes was required. These shoes were encased in the high density concrete biological shield approximately 8 feet below grade. The project team used explosives to remove the biological shield. The demolition had to be controlled to prevent damaging the reactor vessel and to limit the seismic impact on a nearby operating reactor. Upon completion of the blast, the concrete was removed exposing the support shoes for the vessel. The reactor building was then demolished to accommodate the twin gantry system used to lift the reactor vessel. In September, the reactor vessel was lifted and placed onto a multi-axle trailer for transport to an onsite disposal facility. (authors)

  7. A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M. M.

    1998-10-14

    The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% {sup 235}U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and 3.8 gU/cm{sup 3} are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively.

  8. Research and development of an electrochemical biocide reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, G. G.; Bodo, C. A.; Glennon, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    An alternate disinfecting process to chemical agents, heat, or radiation in an aqueous media has been studied. The process is called an electrochemical biocide and employs cyclic, low-level voltages at chemically inert electrodes to pass alternating current through water and, in the process, to destroy microorganisms. The paper describes experimental hardware, methodology, and results with a tracer microorganism (Escherichia coli). The results presented show the effects on microorganism kill of operating parameters, including current density (15 to 55 mA/sq cm (14 to 51 ASF)), waveform of applied electrical signal (square, triangular, sine), frequency of applied electrical signal (0.5 to 1.5 Hz), process water flow rate (100 to 600 cc/min (1.6 to 9.5 gph)), and reactor resident time (0 to 4 min). Comparisons are made between the disinfecting property of the electrochemical biocide and chlorine, bromine, and iodine.

  9. Silicon doping system at the research reactor FRM II.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Gerstenberg, H; Neuhaus, I

    2009-01-01

    Silicon doping has being carried out at FRM II since 2 years. During the commissioning of our new reactor, a simple test rig was used to determine the neutron flux profile at the irradiation position and optimise a nickel absorber liner, which is equipped at the irradiation position for vertical smoothing of the neutron flux profile. MCNP-code was used during the design of the liner. The final automatic doping system is designed to allow the irradiation of cylindrical silicon single crystals 500mm high and up to 200mm in diameter. Silicon ingots are additionally rotated continuously about their own cylinder axis during irradiation. The neutron flux density is measured online by using self-powered-neutron (SPN) detectors. The necessary doping homogeneity of +/-5% is achieved. The doping procedure and doping quality of ingots with high target resistivity are also discussed. PMID:19324563

  10. Comprehensive Thermal Hydraulics Research of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; David Petti; Hyung Kang

    2010-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  11. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  12. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  13. Utilization of the Philippine Research Reactor as a training facility for nuclear power plant operators

    SciTech Connect

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Philippines has a 1-MW swimming-pool reactor facility operated by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). The reactor is light-water moderated and cooled, graphite reflected, and fueled with 90% enriched uranium. Since it became critical in 1963 it has been utilized for research, radioisotope production, and training. It was used initially in the training of PAEC personnel and other research institutions and universities. During the last few years, however, it has played a key role in training personnel for the Philippine Nuclear Power Project (PNPP).

  14. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

  15. China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR): A new reactor to be built in China for neutron scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chuntang

    This paper outlines the main features of the CARR, a 60 MW tank-in-pool inverse neutron trap-type research reactor, which will soon be built at China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing to meet the increasing demands of neutron scattering research as well as isotope production in China. According to the design, slightly pressurized light water will be used both as the moderator and the primary cooling water. The undermoderated core will be surrounded by heavy water reflector, where the maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux would be expected to be 8 × 10 14n/s cm 2 at 60 MW. Nine tangent horizontal beam tubes and some vertical tubes will be installed in the reflector. A cold source, a hot source and a 30 × 50 m 2 guide tube hall will be equipped. The CARR is due to come critical in the year of 2004.

  16. Initial verification and validation of RAZORBACK - A research reactor transient analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, Darren G.

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the work and results of the initial verification and validation (V&V) of the beta release of the Razorback code. Razorback is a computer code designed to simulate the operation of a research reactor (such as the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)) by a coupled numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations, the energy conservation equation for fuel element heat transfer, and the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for the water cooling of the fuel elements. This initial V&V effort was intended to confirm that the code work to-date shows good agreement between simulation and actual ACRR operations, indicating that the subsequent V&V effort for the official release of the code will be successful.

  17. Development of a Monolithic Research Reactor Fuel Type at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    2004-10-06

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been tasked with the conversion of research reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). To convert several high power reactors, monolithic fuel, a new fuel type, is being developed. This fuel type replaces the standard fuel dispersion with a fuel alloy foil, which allows for fuel densities far in excess of that found in dispersion fuel. The single-piece fuel foil also contains a significantly lower interface area between the fuel and the aluminum in the plate than the standard fuel type, limiting the amount of detrimental fuel-aluminum interaction that can occur. Implementation of monolithic fuel is dependant on the development of a suitable fabrication method as traditional roll-bonding techniques are inadequate.

  18. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Krista; Chantel Nowlen, K.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  19. Research Reactor Preparations for the Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium from Romania

    SciTech Connect

    K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin; C. Paunoiu; M. Ciocanescu

    2010-03-01

    In June 2009 two air shipments transported both unirradiated (fresh) and irradiated (spent) Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel from two research reactors in Romania to the Russian Federation for conversion to low enriched uranium. The Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti (SCN Pitesti) shipped 30.1 kg of HEU fresh fuel pellets to Dimitrovgrad, Russia and the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) shipped 23.7 kilograms of HEU spent fuel assemblies from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both HEU shipments were coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), were managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), and were conducted in cooperation with the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Both shipments were transported by truck to and from respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at secure nuclear facilities in Russia until the material is converted into low enriched uranium. These shipments resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the research reactor preparations and license approvals that were necessary to safely and securely complete these air shipments of nuclear fuel.

  20. Neutronic performance of the WWR-M research reactor in Ukraine.

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R. B.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Mahlers, Y.; Dyakov, A.; Technology Development; Kiev Inst. for Nuclear Research

    2002-01-01

    The 10 MW, WWR-M research reactor of the Kiev Institute for Nuclear Research is jointly studied with the Argonne National Laboratory to examine the feasibility of conversion from HEU (36%) to LEU (19.75%) fuel. A potential core configuration was chosen for comparison of analytical results with HEU fuel and candidate replacement LEU fuels. Core reactivity, fuel assembly power, experiment flux, fuel-cycle length, the number of fuel assemblies consumed per year, and shutdown margins are compared using HEU and LEU fuels. The reactor currently uses HEU (36%) WWR-M2 fuel assemblies (3 tubes, UO2-Al fuel meat with 1.1 gU/cm3 and 37.0 g {sup 235}U). Candidate LEU replacement fuel assemblies, which would result in the same fuel cycle length and the same annual fuel consumption as the HEU (36%) fuel are: LEU WWR-M2 (3 tubes, UO2-Al fuel meat with 2.3 gU/cm3 and 38.3 g 235U) and LEU WWR-MR (37 pins, U9Mo-Al fuel meat with 2.4 gU/cm3 and 38.1 g {sup 235}U). Five LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies with 41.7 g {sup 235}U per assembly, UO{sub 2}-Al fuel meat with 2.5 gU/cm3, and a fueled height of 50 cm have completed irradiation testing in the WWR-M reactor at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute in Gatchina to an average 235U burnup of over 70%. This LEU fuel is considered to be qualified for conversion of the WWR-M reactor in Kiev and other research reactors using HEU (36%) WWR-M2 fuel assemblies. For reactors using assemblies with a fueled height of 60 cm, the 235U content per assembly would be 50 g with the same fuel meat composition as the fuel assemblies that were tested in Gatchina. Two 37-pin LEU test assemblies - one with UO{sub 2}-Al fuel meat and about 48 g {sup 235}U and the other with U9Mo-Al fuel meat and about 96 g {sup 235}U are scheduled to begin irradiation testing in the WWR-M reactor in Gatchina before the end of 2002. If these tests (lasting about two years) are successful, LEU pin-type fuel assemblies with up to 96 g 235U would be candidate fuels for LEU

  1. Determination of the optimal positions for installing gamma ray detection systems at Tehran Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyah, A.; Rahmani, F.; Khalafi, H.

    2015-09-01

    Dosimetric instruments must constantly monitor radiation dose levels in different areas of nuclear reactor. Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has seven beam tubes for different research purposes. All the beam tubes extend from the reactor core to Beam Port Floor (BPF) of the reactor facility. During the reactor operation, the gamma rays exiting from each beam tube outlet produce a specific gamma dose rate field in the space of the BPF. To effectively monitor the gamma dose rates on the BPF, gamma ray detection systems must be installed in optimal positions. The selection of optimal positions is a compromise between two requirements. First, the installation positions must possess largest gamma dose rates and second, gamma ray detectors must not be saturated in these positions. In this study, calculations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the optimal positions of the gamma ray detection systems. Eight three dimensional models of the reactor core and related facilities corresponding to eight scenarios have been simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the gamma dose equivalent rate field in the space of the BPF. These facilities are beam tubes, thermal column, pool, BPF space filled with air, facilities such as neutron radiography facility, neutron powder diffraction facility embedded in the beam tubes as well as biological shields inserted into the unused beam tubes. According to the analysis results of the combined gamma dose rate field, three positions on the north side and two positions on the south side of the BPF have been recognized as optimal positions for installing the gamma ray detection systems. To ensure the consistency of the simulation data, experimental measurements were conducted using TLDs (600 and 700) pairs during the reactor operation at 4.5 MW.

  2. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Research activities are described concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; structural materials; HTGR graphite studies; HTR core evaluation; reactor physics; shielding; application and project assessments; and HTR Core Flow Test Loop studies.

  3. Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, April-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.

    1983-10-01

    This report documents progress made in Light Water Reactor Safety research conducted by Division 6441 in the period from April 1982 to September 1982. The programs conducted under investigation include Core Concrete Interactions, Core Melt-Coolant Interactions, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, the Hydrogen Program, and Combustible Gas in Containment Program. 50 references.

  4. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion.

    PubMed

    Marques, J G; Sousa, M; Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C

    2011-08-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  5. Neutron fluence depth profiles in water phantom on epithermal beam of LVR-15 research reactor.

    PubMed

    Viererbl, L; Klupak, V; Lahodova, Z; Marek, M; Burian, J

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal channel with epithermal neutron beam at the LVR-15 research reactor is used mainly for boron neutron capture therapy. Neutron fluence depth profiles in a water phantom characterise beam properties. The neutron fluence (approximated by reaction rates) depth profiles were measured with six different types of activation detectors. The profiles were determined for thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons.

  6. Sample Heat, Activity, Reactivity, and Dose Analysis for Safety Analysis of Irradiations in a Research Reactor.

    1987-12-01

    SHARDA is a program for assessing sample heating rates, activities produced and reactivity load caused while irradiating a small sample in a well thermalized research reactor like CIRUS. It estimates the sample cooling or lead shielding requirements to limit the gamma-ray dose rates due to the irradiated sample within permissible levels.

  7. Status of DOE efforts to renew acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Head, C.R.

    1997-08-01

    This presentation summarizes the efforts being made by the Department of Energy to renew acceptance of spent nuclear fuel shipments from foreign research reactors. The author reviews the actions undertaken in this process in a fairly chronological manner, through the present time, as well as the development of an environmental impact statement to support the proposed actions.

  8. Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    This document presents information concerning: analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU; changes to technical specifications mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; changes in the Safety Analysis Report mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; and copies of all changed pages of the SAR and the technical specifications.

  9. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  10. 75 FR 62892 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Correction In notice document 2010-24809 beginning on page 61220 in the issue of...

  11. Transition phase of the whole-core demonstration at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, R.W.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The transition from operation of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor with high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to operation with low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel is nearing completion. The systematics of the replacement of the HEU fuel with the LEU fuel are discussed. The results of the core physics measurements that have been conducted during the transition phase are described.

  12. Dissolver vessel bottom assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kilian, Douglas C.

    1976-01-01

    An improved bottom assembly is provided for a nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing dissolver vessel wherein fuel elements are dissolved as the initial step in recovering fissile material from spent fuel rods. A shock-absorbing crash plate with a convex upper surface is disposed at the bottom of the dissolver vessel so as to provide an annular space between the crash plate and the dissolver vessel wall. A sparging ring is disposed within the annular space to enable a fluid discharged from the sparging ring to agitate the solids which deposit on the bottom of the dissolver vessel and accumulate in the annular space. An inlet tangential to the annular space permits a fluid pumped into the annular space through the inlet to flush these solids from the dissolver vessel through tangential outlets oppositely facing the inlet. The sparging ring is protected against damage from the impact of fuel elements being charged to the dissolver vessel by making the crash plate of such a diameter that the width of the annular space between the crash plate and the vessel wall is less than the diameter of the fuel elements.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  14. Methods and codes for neutronic calculations of the MARIA research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.; Bretscher, M. M.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.

    2002-02-18

    The core of the MARIA high flux multipurpose research reactor is highly heterogeneous. It consists of beryllium blocks arranged in 6 x 8 matrix, tubular fuel assemblies, control rods and irradiation channels. The reflector is also heterogeneous and consists of graphite blocks clad with aluminum. Its structure is perturbed by the experimental beam tubes. This paper presents methods and codes used to calculate the MARIA reactor neutronics characteristics and experience gained thus far at IAE and ANL. At ANL the methods of MARIA calculations were developed in connection with the RERTR program. At IAE the package of programs was developed to help its operator in optimization of fuel utilization.

  15. Characterization of a New Continuous Air Monitoring System For the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqahtani, Mohammad Saad

    A continuous air monitor (CAM) is a critical piece of equipment to support radiation safety in nuclear facilities where the generation of airborne radioactivity is a possibility for either normal operations or accident scenarios. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor is planning to install a new CAM system manufactured by Canberra Industries for monitoring airborne radioactive particulates. In this study, the new CAM was evaluated to determine 1) baseline response, 2) response to high exposure rates, 3) appropriate background compensation, 4) detection limits, and 5) alarm settings. The results of this study will help to properly integrate the new CAM into the reactor radiation monitoring system.

  16. ReactorHealth Physics operations at the NIST center for neutron research.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Thomas P

    2015-02-01

    Performing health physics and radiation safety functions under a special nuclear material license and a research and test reactor license at a major government research and development laboratory encompasses many elements not encountered by industrial, general, or broad scope licenses. This article reviews elements of the health physics and radiation safety program at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, including the early history and discovery of the neutron, applications of neutron research, reactor overview, safety and security of radiation sources and radioactive material, and general health physics procedures. These comprise precautions and control of tritium, training program, neutron beam sample processing, laboratory audits, inventory and leak tests, meter calibration, repair and evaluation, radioactive waste management, and emergency response. In addition, the radiation monitoring systems will be reviewed including confinement building monitoring, ventilation filter radiation monitors, secondary coolant monitors, gaseous fission product monitors, gas monitors, ventilation tritium monitor, and the plant effluent monitor systems.

  17. ReactorHealth Physics operations at the NIST center for neutron research.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Thomas P

    2015-02-01

    Performing health physics and radiation safety functions under a special nuclear material license and a research and test reactor license at a major government research and development laboratory encompasses many elements not encountered by industrial, general, or broad scope licenses. This article reviews elements of the health physics and radiation safety program at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, including the early history and discovery of the neutron, applications of neutron research, reactor overview, safety and security of radiation sources and radioactive material, and general health physics procedures. These comprise precautions and control of tritium, training program, neutron beam sample processing, laboratory audits, inventory and leak tests, meter calibration, repair and evaluation, radioactive waste management, and emergency response. In addition, the radiation monitoring systems will be reviewed including confinement building monitoring, ventilation filter radiation monitors, secondary coolant monitors, gaseous fission product monitors, gas monitors, ventilation tritium monitor, and the plant effluent monitor systems. PMID:25551649

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  19. Model development experimental programs as part of the NRC reactor safety research

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.W.; Hsu, Y.Y.

    1982-07-01

    Experimental and model development programs have a key impact on the overall success of code calculational capabilities in addition to supporting regulatory and licensing decisions. The reactor safety research effort undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has as one of several objectives to obtain experimental data for model and code development and code assessment. This article highlights recent research sponsored under the thermal-hydraulic model-development experimental programs at NRC.

  20. Bright Flash Neutron Radiography at the McClellan Nuclear Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, M.; Tremsin, A. S.; Schillinger, B.

    The University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Research Center (MNRC) operates a 2 MW TRIGATM reactor, which is currently the highest power TRIGATM reactor in the United States. The Center was originally build by the US Air Force to detect hidden defects in aircraft structures using neutron radiography; the Center can accommodate samples as large as 10.00 m long, 3.65 m high, and weighing up to 2,270 kg. The MNRC reactor can be pulsed to 350 MW for about 30 ms (FWHM). The combination of a short neutron pulse with a fast microchannel plate based neutron detector enables high-resolution flash neutron radiography to complement conventional neutron radiography

  1. The Oak Ridge Research Reactor: safety analysis: Volume 2, supplement 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The Oak Ridge Research Reactor Safety Analysis was last updated via ORNL-4169, Vol. 2, Supplement 1, in May of 1978. Since that date, several changes have been effected through the change-memo system described below. While these changes have involved the cooling system, the electrical system, and the reactor instrumentation and controls, they have not, for the most part, presented new or unreviewed safety questions. However, some of the changes have been based on questions or recommendations stemming from safety reviews or from reactor events at other sites. This paper discusses those changes which were judged to be safety related and which include revisions to the syphon-break system and changes related to seismic considerations which were very recently completed. The maximum hypothetical accident postulated in the original safety analysis requires dynamic containment and filtered flow for compliance with 10CFR100 limits at the site boundary.

  2. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  4. Effective, Safe, and Inexpensive Microscale Ultrasonic Setup for Teaching and Research Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana, Angel M.; Grima, Pedro M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a homemade, safe, effective, and inexpensive reactor vessel for ultrasonic horns with applications in microscale experiments in teaching and research laboratories. The reactor vessel is designed for an ultrasonic probe that allows reactions to be run at the microscale level at a wide range of temperatures and under inert atmosphere.…

  5. Identification of Plume Signatures from the NOAA Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown during NEAQS-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, B. M.; Murphy, P. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J. A.; Williams, E. J.

    2003-12-01

    During the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS-2002) a large number of trace gas species were measured aboard the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown along the east coast of the U.S. Emissions from numerous sources were measured in the New York harbor area during a brief stop on the transit north. Urban emissions from the Boston area and from the New Hampshire/Maine coastal region, as well as emissions from biogenic sources, were frequently observed during the intensive study period in the southern Gulf of Maine. Moreover, numerous well-defined narrow plumes were sampled throughout the experiment, attributable to either marine vessel exhaust or point-source emissions from land-based sites at or near the coast. Measurements of SO2, NOy and CO2 mixing ratios in these plumes, along with back-trajectory analysis, were used to identify a number of these point-sources through comparison to emission inventory data available from the U.S. EPA. In this talk the types and characteristics of emissions source plumes encountered during the study will be presented. Part of the discussion will focus on the transport and transformation of these plumes within the marine boundary layer.

  6. Characterization and quantification of an in-core neutron irradiation facility at a TRIGA II research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, Sukesh; Charlton, William

    2006-07-01

    Experiments have been performed to characterize the neutron environment at an in-core TRIGA type nuclear research reactor. Steady-state thermal and epithermal neutron environment testing is important for many applications including, materials, electronics and biological cells. A well characterized neutron environment at a research reactor, including energy spectrum and spatial distribution, can be useful to many research communities and for educational research. This paper describes the characterization process and an application of exposing electronics to high neutron fluence.

  7. Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect

    K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

    2009-03-01

    The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

  8. Preliminary study on new configuration with LEU fuel assemblies for the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lam Pham; Vinh Vinh Le; Ton Nghiem Huynh; Ba Vien Luong; Kien Cuong Nguyen

    2008-07-15

    The fuel conversion of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is being realized. The DNRR is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed from the 250 kW TRIGA- MARK II reactor. The reconstructed reactor attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. According to the results of design and safety analyses performed by the joint study between RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC) the mixed core of irradiated HEU and new LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies will be created soon. This paper presents the results of preliminary study on new configuration with only LEU fuel assemblies for the DNRR. The codes MCNP, REBUS and VARI3D are used to calculate neutron flux performance in irradiation positions and kinetics parameters. The idea of change of Beryllium rod reloading enables to get working configuration assured shutdown margin, thermal-hydraulic safety and increase in thermal neutron flux in neutron trap at the center of DNRR active core. (author)

  9. Development of Regulatory Technical Requirements for the Advanced Integral Type Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the current status of the study on the development of regulatory technical requirements for the licensing review of an advanced integral type research reactor of which the license application is expected in a few years. According to the Atomic Energy Act of Korea, both research and education reactors are subject to the technical requirements for power reactors in the licensing review. But, some of the requirements may not be applicable or insufficient for the licensing reviews of reactors with unique design features. Thus it is necessary to identify which review topics or areas can not be addressed by the existing requirements and to develop the required ones newly or supplement appropriately. Through the study performed so far, it has been identified that the following requirements need to be developed newly for the licensing review of SMART-P: the use of proven technology, the interfacial facility, the non-safety systems, and the metallic fuels. The approach and basis for the development of each of the requirements are discussed. (authors)

  10. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    SciTech Connect

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2013-07-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  11. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  12. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  13. Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this strategic plan is to establish a framework that will allow the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear power industry to jointly plan the nuclear energy research and development (R&D) agenda important to achieving the Nation's energy goals. This strategic plan has been developed to focus on only those R&D areas that will benefit from a coordinated government/industry effort. Specifically, this plan focuses on safely sustaining and expanding the electricity output from currently operating nuclear power plants and expanding nuclear capacity through the deployment of new plants. By focusing on R&D that addresses the needs of both current and future nuclear plants, DOE and industry will be able to take advantage of the synergism between these two technology areas, thus improving coordination, enhancing efficiency, and further leveraging public and private sector resources. By working together under the framework of this strategic plan, DOE and the nuclear industry reinforce their joint commitment to the future use of nuclear power and the National Energy Policy's goal of expanding its use in the United States. The undersigned believe that a public-private partnership approach is the most efficient and effective way to develop and transfer new technologies to the marketplace to achieve this goal. This Strategic Plan is intended to be a living document that will be updated annually.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  15. Internal structure of ex-Typhoon Phanfone (2014) under an extratropical transition as observed by the research vessel Mirai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Masaki; Mori, Shuichi; Geng, Biao; Inoue, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The internal structure of Typhoon Phanfone (2014) undergoing "extratropical transition" over ocean was captured from the research vessel Mirai. The observed time series from world first shipboard polarimetric weather radar and frequent radiosonde launches revealed both dynamic and thermodynamic structure simultaneously in detail for four phases: cirrus shield, warm front, precipitation core, and western flank. To the east of the low-pressure center, a warm front developed along the midlatitude baroclinic zone. In the eastern vicinity of the center, remnants of the warm core worked to enhance precipitation through convergence and frontogenesis against cold ambient air. This frontogenesis and related latent heating/cooling are suggested to maintain/enhance convection in these phases. In contrast, the warm core suppressed convection in the northern/western vicinity of the low-pressure center.

  16. A comparison of FerryBox data vs. monitoring data from research vessels for near surface waters of the Baltic Sea and the Kattegat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlson, B.; Andersson, L. S.; Kaitala, S.; Kronsell, J.; Mohlin, M.; Seppälä, J.; Willstrand Wranne, A.

    2016-10-01

    The variability of near surface properties of the Baltic Sea and the Kattegat was investigated using data from research vessel sampling and data from a FerryBox system during the years 2010-2013. The FerryBox system was mounted on a cargo vessel with a route covering the Gulf of Bothnia, the Baltic proper and the Kattegat twice a week. Water samples from the FerryBox system were analysed from 2011 to 2013 to investigate the quality of the FerryBox-underway data. Salinity from water samples and underway measurements showed a strong correlation. Chlorophyll a samples collected in the Belt Sea and the Kattegat and corresponding in vivo fluorescence underway data showed a correlation (R2 = 0.75, p < 0.001). Temperature and salinity showed a strong correlation between the FerryBox-underway measurements and the research vessel based data. Oxygen was measured using an optode sensor in the FerryBox system. In general the results were well correlated with oxygen data from research vessels based on the Winkler method. Chlorophyll a data from water samples collected using research vessels in general had a weak consistency with the chlorophyll fluorescence data from the FerryBox system. The use of FerryBox systems for observations related to descriptors in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive is discussed.

  17. Corrosion Surveillance for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in Wet Basin Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.P.

    1998-10-16

    Foreign and domestic test and research reactor fuel is currently being shipped from locations over the world for storage in water filled basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The fuel was provided to many of the foreign countries as a part of the "Atoms for Peace" program in the early 1950's. In support of the wet storage of this fuel at the research reactor sites and at SRS, corrosion surveillance programs have been initiated. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) in 1996 on "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" and scientists from ten countries worldwide were invited to participate. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the IAEA sponsored CRP and provides the updated results from corrosion surveillance activities at SRS. In May 1998, a number of news articles around the world reported stories that microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was active on the aluminum-clad spent fuel stored in the RBOF basin at SRS. This assessment was found to be in error with details presented in this paper. A biofilm was found on aluminum coupons, but resulted in no corrosion. Cracks seen on the surface were not caused by corrosion, but by stresses from the volume expansion of the oxide formed during pre-conditioning autoclaving. There has been no pitting caused by MIC or any other corrosion mechanism seen in the RBOF basin since initiation of the SRS Corrosion Surveillance Program in 1993.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Instrumentation and Controls Technology Research for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, key DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements to their respective research portfolio. This article describes current ICHMI research to support the development of advanced small modular reactors.

  19. The key-role of instrumentation for the new generation of research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bignan, G.; Villard, J. F.; Destouches, C.; Baeten, P.; Vermeeren, L.; Michiels, S.

    2011-07-01

    Experimental reactors have been indispensable since the beginning of the use of nuclear energy to support many important fields of industry and research: safety, lifetime management and operation optimisation of nuclear power plants, development of new types of reactors with improved resources and fuel cycle management, medical applications, material development for fusion... Over the last decade, modifications of the operational needs and the ageing of the nuclear facilities have led to several closures and time is coming for new key European Experimental Reactors (EER) within a European and International Framework. Projects like MYRRHA and JHR are underway to define and implement a new consistent EER policy: - Meeting industry and public needs, keeping a high level of scientific expertise; - With a limited number of EER, specified within a rational compromise between specialisation, complementarities and back-up capacities; - To be put into effective operation in this or the next decade. These new projects will give to the scientific community high performances allowing innovative fields of R and D. A new generation of instrumentation to address new phenomena and that allows better on-line investigation of some key physical parameters is necessary to achieve these challenges. One initiative to progress in this direction is the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between CEA and SCK.CEN which has already given significant results and patents. Major scientific challenges to achieve in the field of instrumentation for this new generation of European Research Reactors have to be investigated and are described in this paper as well as a short description of the JHR and MYRRHA reactors that will be serving as flexible irradiation facilities for testing them. (authors)

  20. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672