Science.gov

Sample records for research training award

  1. Building Graduate Student Capacity as Future Researchers Through a Research and Training Award Program.

    PubMed

    Cepanec, Diane; Humphries, Amanda; Rieger, Kendra L; Marshall, Shelley; Londono, Yenly; Clarke, Diana

    2016-05-01

    With the global shortage of doctor of philosophy-prepared nursing faculty and an aging nursing professorate, the nursing profession is at risk of having fewer nurses doing research and fewer faculty to supervise the next generation of nurse researchers. A research training award for graduate nursing students was piloted with the intent of providing a research-intensive experiential learning opportunity that would contribute to graduate students' future roles as nurse researchers. This article describes the program design, implementation, and evaluation. The Graduate Student Research Training Awards afforded students an opportunity to develop research and methodologic skills and achieve student-centered outcomes. These awards build their capacity as future researchers by both empowering them and increasing their confidence in research. The input and evaluation from graduate students was integral to the success of the program. Graduate student research training awards can be a valuable experiential learning opportunity in research intensive graduate programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(5):284-287.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Administrative Report on Training Awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    During the tenure of this award, the recipient (David Harker) conducted areas of research which resulted in the award of a doctorate degree (August 1999) from the University of Wyoming. The primary science activity was investigation of silicate dust mineralogy in comets, particularly comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Determination of the dust mineralogy permits us to address an important astrophysical question of relevance to the origins and evolution of solar systems, "Do comets contain relic interstellar dust grains? Since, comets represent the frozen reservoirs of primitive proto-solar dust and ice, we can gain insight into the problem of understanding the formation of protoplanetesimals in the. early solar nebula. Mid-infrared spectrophotometry (7 - 14 micron, R approx. = 180 - 360) of Hale-Bopp was obtained with the NASA/Ames HIFOGS at four distinct epochs pre- and post- perihelion ion from 1996 October through 1997 June. These observations were conducted at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, and were supported by funds from this training grant. The emission at mid-IR wavelengths in cometary comae arises from carbon grains, and small silicate grains which produce resonance features. Hale-Bopp had the strongest silicate feature observed from any comet to date. Theoretical calculations utilizing Mie Scattering Theory were employed to construct Synthetic cometary spectra to fit with the observed HIFOGS 10 microns spectral feature of Hale-Bopp. Our analysis suggests that the observed spectra can be modeled with the Hanner grain size distribution peaked at alpha((sub p) = 0.2 microns of fractal porous grains with porosity parameter D = 2.5. This model spectrum also fits photometry points in the 3 - 5 microns region. Comparison with the ISO SWS spectrum of Hale-Bopp obtained 1996 October reveals that the crystalline olivine grains must be at it temperature hotter than computed from Mie theory.

  3. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    This award is given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. These contributions might include important research on education and training; the development of effective materials for instruction; the establishment of workshops, conferences, or networks of communication for education and training; achievement and leadership in administration that facilitates education and training; or activity in professional organizations that promote excellence. The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology recognizes a specific contribution to education and training. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. This year the Education and Training Awards Committee selected a psychologist for the Career designation. The 2016 recipients of the APA Education and Training Contributions Awards were selected by the 2015 Education and Training Awards Committee appointed by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). Members of the 2015 Education and Training Awards Committee were Sharon L. Berry, PhD (Chair); Arthur C. Graesser, PhD; and Thomas R. Kratochwill, PhD; Erica Wise, PhD (Chair-Elect); Ron Rozensky, PhD; and Jane Halonen, PhD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    PubMed Central

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  5. IRA Award-Winning Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes award-winning research produced by Andrew M.Hess, Sirkka-Liisa Rauramo, Richard L. Allington, Donna E. Alvermann and David A. Hayes, Lesley M. Morrow and Carol S. Weinstein, Taffy E. Raphael and Bonnie B. Armbruster, Nancy Nelson Spivey, and Courtney B. Cazden. (FL)

  6. IRA Award-Winning Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes award-winning research produced by Andrew M.Hess, Sirkka-Liisa Rauramo, Richard L. Allington, Donna E. Alvermann and David A. Hayes, Lesley M. Morrow and Carol S. Weinstein, Taffy E. Raphael and Bonnie B. Armbruster, Nancy Nelson Spivey, and Courtney B. Cazden. (FL)

  7. 76 FR 22084 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training AGENCY: Office of... Information: Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long- Term Training notice inviting applications for new... Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program (Training...

  8. Rodney K. Goodyear: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2015 recipient of this award is Rodney K. Goodyear "for his substantive, sustained, and enduring contributions to research and practice in the training and supervision of students and educators in professional psychology, and for his leadership in helping to establish competency standards in the area of clinical supervision both in the United States and internationally. Goodyear's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  9. 76 FR 82286 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) Projects AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice...

  10. The critical need for academic health centers to assess the training, support, and career development requirements of clinical research coordinators: recommendations from the Clinical and Translational Science Award Research Coordinator Taskforce.

    PubMed

    Speicher, Lisa A; Fromell, Gregg; Avery, Sue; Brassil, Donna; Carlson, Lori; Stevens, Erika; Toms, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Clinical Research Coordinators (CRCs) are a vital component of the clinical research enterprise providing a pivotal role in human subject protection through the numerous activities and responsibilities assigned to them. In 2006, the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Research resources (NCRR) implemented the Clinical and Translational Science Awards program (CTSA) to advance biomedical research. As a part of this endeavor, many workgroups were formed among the Consortium to support translational research. The Research Coordinator Taskforce was created as part of the Regulatory Knowledge group of the Clinical Research Innovation Key Function Committee, and focuses on enhancing CTSA capabilities to provide support and training for CRCs. In the spring of 2008, this taskforce conducted two surveys of the then 24 CTSA Consortium members to better understand the current expectations and responsibilities of research coordinators in addition to the mechanism for providing education, training, and support in order for CRCs to successfully meet the study responsibilities placed upon them. The results of these surveys are summarized in this article and provide context to the recommendations of the Research Coordinator Taskforce for institutional considerations, approaches, and best practices for providing education, training, and support the expanding role of CRCs in fulfilling their responsibilities delegated to them by investigators. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PATENTS § 650.6 Awards not primarily for research. (a) Awards not primarily intended to support scientific or engineering research need contain no patent provision. Examples of such awards are travel and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6...

  12. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PATENTS § 650.6 Awards not primarily for research. (a) Awards not primarily intended to support scientific or engineering research need contain no patent provision. Examples of such awards are travel and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6...

  13. Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training: Cindy Lee Juntunen.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training acknowledges psychologists who contribute to new teaching methods or solutions to learning problems through the use of research findings or evidence-based practices. The 2016 recipient is Cindy Lee Juntunen. She is recognized for "her steadfast commitment to the training of future counseling psychologists, for her leadership in key national organizations focused on education and training, and for her contributions to training competencies and practice guidelines within counseling psychology." Juntunen's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. District Awards for Teacher Excellence: Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008 Texas's District Awards for Teacher Excellence (D.A.T.E.) program has provided grants to districts for the implementation of locally designed incentive pay plans. The 2010-11 school year is the third year of the D.A.T.E. incentive pay plans with approximately $197 million in annual state funding. This research brief summarizes the key…

  15. District Awards for Teacher Excellence: Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008 Texas's District Awards for Teacher Excellence (D.A.T.E.) program has provided grants to districts for the implementation of locally designed incentive pay plans. The 2010-11 school year is the third year of the D.A.T.E. incentive pay plans with approximately $197 million in annual state funding. This research brief summarizes the key…

  16. Awarding Educational Credit for CETA Training: A Plan of Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullins, W. Robert; And Others

    A project was conducted to determine problems or barriers prohibiting awarding credit for Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) training in Virginia. Potential solutions and strategies for their implementation were to be identified. A variety of methods were used to obtain information required to produce a Plan of Action that presents…

  17. Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training and Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training awards are given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education…

  18. Productivity and career paths of previous recipients of Society for Academic Emergency Medicine research grant awards.

    PubMed

    Young, Kelly D

    2008-06-01

    The objective was to assess productivity of previous recipients of Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) grant awards. All previous recipients of SAEM Research Training Grants, Neuroscience Research Awards, Scholarly Sabbatical Awards, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Research Fellowship awards funded through 2004 were identified through SAEM's records and surveyed. Award categories assessed were those still offered by SAEM at the time of the survey and therefore excluded the Geriatric Research Award. The 2005-2006 SAEM Grants Committee developed a survey using previous publications assessing productivity of training grants and fellowship awards and refined it through consensus review and limited pilot testing. We assessed measures of academic productivity (numbers of publications and additional grants awarded), commitment to an academic career, satisfaction with the SAEM award, and basic demographic information. Overall response rate was 70%; usable data were returned by all seven Research Training Grant awardees, both Neuroscience awardees, four of five Scholarly Sabbatical awardees, and six of 14 EMS Research Fellowship awardees. Of those who gave demographic information, 78% (14/18) were male and 94% (16/17) were non-Hispanic white. All the respondents remained in academics, and 14 of 19 felt that they will definitely be in academics 5 years from the time of the survey. They have a median of 1.8 original research publications per year since the end of their grant period, and 74% (14/19) have received subsequent federal funding. All found the SAEM award to be helpful or very helpful to their careers. Previous recipients of the SAEM grant awards show evidence of academic productivity in the form of subsequent grant funding and research publications, and the majority remain committed to and satisfied with their academic research careers.

  19. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  20. Engaging Students in Aging Research through the Academic Research Enhancement Award Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Sandra S.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the R15, Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) mechanism available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for institutions that do not typically receive substantial NIH funding. Equipped with training received at the St. Scholastica National Institute on Social Work and Aging, I was able to secure AREA funding…

  1. Engaging Students in Aging Research through the Academic Research Enhancement Award Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Sandra S.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the R15, Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) mechanism available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for institutions that do not typically receive substantial NIH funding. Equipped with training received at the St. Scholastica National Institute on Social Work and Aging, I was able to secure AREA funding…

  2. 78 FR 38958 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation... Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers... purpose of the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program is to plan and conduct...

  3. Research Training in the Biomedical, Behavioral, and Clinical Research Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive research and a highly-trained workforce are essential for the improvement of health and health care both nationally and internationally. During the past 40 years the National Research Services Award (NRSA) Program has played a large role in training the workforce responsible for dramatic advances in the understanding of various…

  4. Research Training in the Biomedical, Behavioral, and Clinical Research Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive research and a highly-trained workforce are essential for the improvement of health and health care both nationally and internationally. During the past 40 years the National Research Services Award (NRSA) Program has played a large role in training the workforce responsible for dramatic advances in the understanding of various…

  5. NREL Electrochromic Window Research Wins Award

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Winners of the CO-LABS Governor's Award for High-Impact Research in Energy Efficiency, Dr. Satyen Deb at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that a small electrical charge can change the opacity of tungsten oxide from clear to tinted. He, Dr. Dane Gillaspie, and their fellow scientists at NREL then applied this knowledge to develop and transfer the technologies required to construct an electrochromic window, which can switch between clear and heavily tinted states. Electrochromic windows allow natural light in while adding tint to reduce summer heat and glare, and going clear to allow sunlight through in the winter. Broad adaptation of these windows could reduce US total energy use by four percent and reduce building cooling loads by 20%, much of this during expensive peak hours. Windows based on these discoveries are now being installed worldwide.

  6. Barbara L. Bonner: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training acknowledges psychologists who contribute to new teaching methods or solutions to learning problems through the use of research findings or evidence-based practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of psychological knowledge to improve learning in educational settings, including prekindergarten to Grade 12, or in communities. The 2014 recipient is Barbara L. Bonner. She is acknowledged for "her passionate determination to improve the lives of children throughout the world by training countless professionals to be leaders in the field of child maltreatment, for her leadership in establishing one of the most highly respected centers for the study of child maltreatment in the nation, and for directing an interdisciplinary training program on child maltreatment. Bonner's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  7. 78 FR 3885 - Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program AGENCY: Office of Special Education and... Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Research Fellowships Program. Notice inviting applications... Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Research Fellowships Program is to build...

  8. 76 FR 77505 - Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... seven or more years of research experience in subject areas, methods, or techniques relevant to... information regarding research methods, results, outputs, and outcomes. VII. Agency Contact FOR FURTHER... Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program AGENCY: Office of Special Education...

  9. PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society's Norman Cousins Award.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Rainer H. Straub, University Hospital, Regensburg, Germany, is the recipient of the 2015 Norman Cousins Award and will present the memorial lecture at the PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society (PNIRS) meeting, June 3–6, Seattle, WA. The Norman Cousins award is the highest honor bestowed by the PNIRS and recognizes sustained and outstanding research contributions in psychoneuroimmunology.

  10. C. Cybele Raver: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. C. Cybele Raver is a prolific and award-winning writer who has published widely and served as a reviewer on many high-quality journals. Her publications are well cited, and she has received support from numerous foundations and federal sources. One of the most highly respected scholars and investigators in developmental science, she studies the various factors that affect children's self-regulation and consequently their academic readiness. Her research has revealed effective new strategies for prevention and intervention at home and at school for the most educationally and economically challenged children. Raver's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Extramural Training and Career Opportunities in Aging Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The rapid growth of the older population heightens the urgency for training in aging research. This publication outlines the opportunities for extramural research training and career development that exist within the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The NIA supports research and research training primarily through the award of grants and…

  12. Research bioethics training in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rashid, H A

    2003-12-01

    The Bangladesh Medical Research Council is implementing a training program on research bioethics under International Bioethics Education and Career Development Award of Fogarty International Center of National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA. The ultimate goal of the program is to improve ethical practice in implementation of health research through capacity strengthening of the professionals involved in health research in Bangladesh. The duration of the program is 4 years and it has started from the year 2002. The first year (2002-2003) was assigned for curriculum development. Several workshops, focus group discussions and consultative meetings were organized during 2002-2003 and curriculum was developed. Under this training program every year 2 Certificate Courses on Research Bioethics (CCRB) with a duration of 10 weeks will be conducted for 40 participants (20 participants in each batch). Each year one Advance Course on Research Bioethics (ACRB) will be organized for 10 participants with a duration of 6 days. The courses are to be conducted during 2nd, 3rd and 4th year. The Certificate Course on Research Bioethics is intended for multidisciplinary participants having previous experience in research methodology while the Advance Course on Research Bioethics will target for training the members of Ethics Review Committees of the country. Through this program one hundred fifty Bangladeshi professionals will get adequate training on research bioethics. The training program will be implemented by national experts with technical assistance from distinguished international scientists in the field.

  13. Julio J. Ramirez: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2014 recipient of this award is Julio J. Ramirez, for "creating a national infrastructure to support education and training in behavioral neuroscience and biological psychology, for playing a seminal role in creating an undergraduate neuroscience education journal, and for creating a nationally recognized mentoring program for junior faculty in the neurosciences, particularly with underrepresented groups." Ramirez's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  14. Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is sponsored jointly by Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, and the APA. The award is presented annually to the psychology graduate student who submits the best research paper that was published or presented at a national, regional, or state psychological association conference during the past calendar year. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. Members of the 2016 Edwin B. Newman Award Committee were Shawn Carlton, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Christina Frederick-Recascino, PhD; John Norcross, PhD, APA representative; Karenna Malavanti, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Steven Kohn, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Warren Fass, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Chris Lovelace, PhD, Psi Chi representative; and Cathy Epkins, PhD, APA representative. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Resident research associateships. Postdoctoral and senior research awards: Opportunities for research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Opportunities for research as part of NASA-sponsored programs at the JPL cover: Earth and space sciences; systems; telecommunications science and engineering; control and energy conversion; applied mechanics; information systems; and observational systems. General information on applying for an award for tenure as a guest investigator, conditions, of the award, and details of the application procedure are provided.

  16. Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology: Roger P. Greenberg.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2016 recipient of this award is Roger P. Greenberg, whose "scholarship has generated important evidence on psychotherapy process and outcome, personality theories, psychosomatic conditions, and the comparative effectiveness of psychological and biological treatments for mental disorders." Greenberg's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. [Research Award providing funds for a tracking video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collett, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The award provided funds for a tracking video camera. The camera has been installed and the system calibrated. It has enabled us to follow in real time the tracks of individual wood ants (Formica rufa) within a 3m square arena as they navigate singly in-doors guided by visual cues. To date we have been using the system on two projects. The first is an analysis of the navigational strategies that ants use when guided by an extended landmark (a low wall) to a feeding site. After a brief training period, ants are able to keep a defined distance and angle from the wall, using their memory of the wall's height on the retina as a controlling parameter. By training with walls of one height and length and testing with walls of different heights and lengths, we can show that ants adjust their distance from the wall so as to keep the wall at the height that they learned during training. Thus, their distance from the base of a tall wall is further than it is from the training wall, and the distance is shorter when the wall is low. The stopping point of the trajectory is defined precisely by the angle that the far end of the wall makes with the trajectory. Thus, ants walk further if the wall is extended in length and not so far if the wall is shortened. These experiments represent the first case in which the controlling parameters of an extended trajectory can be defined with some certainty. It raises many questions for future research that we are now pursuing.

  18. [Research Award providing funds for a tracking video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collett, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The award provided funds for a tracking video camera. The camera has been installed and the system calibrated. It has enabled us to follow in real time the tracks of individual wood ants (Formica rufa) within a 3m square arena as they navigate singly in-doors guided by visual cues. To date we have been using the system on two projects. The first is an analysis of the navigational strategies that ants use when guided by an extended landmark (a low wall) to a feeding site. After a brief training period, ants are able to keep a defined distance and angle from the wall, using their memory of the wall's height on the retina as a controlling parameter. By training with walls of one height and length and testing with walls of different heights and lengths, we can show that ants adjust their distance from the wall so as to keep the wall at the height that they learned during training. Thus, their distance from the base of a tall wall is further than it is from the training wall, and the distance is shorter when the wall is low. The stopping point of the trajectory is defined precisely by the angle that the far end of the wall makes with the trajectory. Thus, ants walk further if the wall is extended in length and not so far if the wall is shortened. These experiments represent the first case in which the controlling parameters of an extended trajectory can be defined with some certainty. It raises many questions for future research that we are now pursuing.

  19. Career Track of Society of University Surgeons Resident Research Award Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Burhan; Bernstam, Elmer; Hines, Joe; Simeone, Diane M.; Weber, Sharon; Geller, David; Evers, B. Mark; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2015-01-01

    Background Society of University Surgeons (SUS) has an ongoing competitive funding program to support research training for residents. We sought to determine the career track of award recipients. Methods SUS resident awardees who completed awards from 1989-2007 were included in the study. Characteristics of awardees and their academic productivity were extracted from curriculum vitae provided by awardees (n=24), or from online sources (n=7). Results The awardees spent an average of 2.7 years (range 1-4) of dedicated research time during residency. Awardees averaged 9.8 publications (range 1-32) with 5.4 as first author (range 1-17) with their mentor within three years of award completion, with an average maximum impact factor of 5.7. Twenty-five residents (81%) pursued fellowships. At an average follow-up of 11.4 years (range 4-22) from end of the award, and 7.2 years (0-18) from end of their clinical training, the awardees had an h-index of 14.5 (2-48). At the time of the study, 26 awardees (84%) were in academic surgery. Of the 23 awardees that had completed surgical training three years earlier or more, 11 (48%) received independent research funding, of which 7 (30%) received R01 or equivalent funding. Conclusions The SUS resident research awardees had a very productive research experience. Although our retrospective study cannot determine causation, the SUS award mechanism delivers on its promise of supporting junior surgeon-scientists that pursue academic careers and establish independent research programs. Further studies are needed to determine how rates of subsequent independent research funding can be improved. PMID:23751805

  20. Description and Productivity of Emergency Medicine Researchers Receiving K23 or K08 Mentored Research Career Development Awards

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Yadav, Kabir; May, Larissa; Kraynov, Liliya; Courtney, D. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The primary individual research career development awards for emergency medicine (EM) investigators are the K08 and K23 awards. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, postaward productivity of EM K08 and K23 awardees has not been previously described. The objectives were to describe EM researchers who have received K08 or K23 awards and to evaluate their postaward federal funding and publications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study, conducted during January 2012, of clinician-scientists who previously completed EM residency or fellowship programs and have received K08 or K23 awards from National Institutes of Health (NIH) or Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) between fiscal years 2000 through 2011. Awardees were identified through the NIH reporting tool (NIH RePORTER). Postaward funding was abstracted, including R01-equivalent funding for K awardees who completed their K training by the end of the 2011 fiscal year. Postaward publications (with journal impact factor) were tabulated for all K awardees using PubMed and Journal Citation Reports. An e-mail survey was also conducted during September and October 2012 to describe the awardee characteristics (demographics and research background) of all EM K awardees using REDCap electronic data captures tools. Simple descriptive statistics are reported. Results Sixty-three EM awardees were identified; 24 (38%) were K08 awardees, and 39 (62%) were K23 awardees. Of the 38 (60%) awardees who completed their K training, 16 (42%) obtained subsequent federal funding, with six (16%) obtaining R01 funding (median time from end of K award to R01 award was 4.5 years). Overall, EM awardees published a mean (±SD) of 4.0 (±1.3) manuscripts per year (after the start of their K awards); the mean (±SD) impact factor of the journals in which these manuscripts were published was 4.5 (±5.7). Forty-five (71%) of EM K awardees responded to the survey. Respondents had a median age of 36 years (interquartile

  1. Description and productivity of emergency medicine researchers receiving K23 or K08 mentored research career development awards.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Yadav, Kabir; May, Larissa; Kraynov, Liliya; Courtney, D Mark

    2013-06-01

    The primary individual research career development awards for emergency medicine (EM) investigators are the K08 and K23 awards. To the best of the authors' knowledge, postaward productivity of EM K08 and K23 awardees has not been previously described. The objectives were to describe EM researchers who have received K08 or K23 awards and to evaluate their postaward federal funding and publications. This was a cross-sectional study, conducted during January 2012, of clinician-scientists who previously completed EM residency or fellowship programs and have received K08 or K23 awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) between fiscal years 2000 through 2011. Awardees were identified through the NIH reporting tool (NIH RePORTER). Postaward funding was abstracted, including R01-equivalent funding for K awardees who completed their K training by the end of the 2011 fiscal year. Postaward publications (with journal impact factor) were tabulated for all K awardees using PubMed and Journal Citation Reports. An e-mail survey was also conducted during September and October 2012 to describe the awardee characteristics (demographics and research background) of all EM K awardees using REDCap electronic data captures tools. Simple descriptive statistics are reported. Sixty-three EM awardees were identified; 24 (38%) were K08 awardees, and 39 (62%) were K23 awardees. Of the 38 (60%) awardees who completed their K training, 16 (42%) obtained subsequent federal funding, with six (16%) obtaining R01 funding (median time from end of K award to R01 award was 4.5 years). Overall, EM awardees published a mean (±SD) of 4.0 (±1.3) manuscripts per year (after the start of their K awards); the mean (±SD) impact factor of the journals in which these manuscripts were published was 4.5 (±5.7). Forty-five (71%) of EM K awardees responded to the survey. Respondents had a median age of 36 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 35 to 38

  2. C. Cybele Raver: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. C. Cybele Raver is a prolific and award-winning writer who has published widely and served as a reviewer on many high-quality journals. Her publications are well…

  3. C. Cybele Raver: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. C. Cybele Raver is a prolific and award-winning writer who has published widely and served as a reviewer on many high-quality journals. Her publications are well…

  4. 77 FR 13297 - Applications for New Awards; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... Applications for New Awards; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs AGENCY: Institute of Education Sciences. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Education Research and Special Education... Institute's FY 2013 competitions for grants to support ] education research and special education research...

  5. Division of Computer Research Summary of Awards. Fiscal Year 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    Provided in this report are summaries of grants awarded by the National Science Foundation Division of Computer Research in fiscal year 1984. Similar areas of research are grouped (for the purposes of this report only) into these major categories: (1) computational mathematics; (2) computer systems design; (3) intelligent systems; (4) software…

  6. Interdisciplinary Research Training in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Research Training program. Reportable Outcomes of Ms. Potter Dissertation * Potter, P. (2004) Breast Biopsy and Distress: Testing a Reiki Intervention...Scientific Sessions of the Eastern Nursing Research Society, Boston, MA. Presentations "* Presenter, " Reiki for Self-Healing," New Beginnings...of four 30 minute radio programs, " Reiki and Women’s Health," WMRD Radio, Middletown, CT. June to October 2003. Grants Awarded "* The Effects of Reiki

  7. 77 FR 17039 - Application for New Awards; Training for Realtime Writers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Application for New Awards; Training for Realtime Writers Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information Training for Realtime Writers Program Notice... institutions of higher education (IHEs) that meet certain qualifications, to promote training and placement...

  8. 78 FR 39717 - Reopening; Applications for New Awards; Training and Information for Parents of Children With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Reopening; Applications for New Awards; Training and Information for Parents of Children With Disabilities--Parent Training and Information Centers AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice reopens the FY 2013 Parent Training...

  9. 42 CFR 66.106 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards. 66.106 Section 66.106 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Direct Awards § 66.106 Awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available,...

  10. 42 CFR 66.106 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Awards. 66.106 Section 66.106 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Direct Awards § 66.106 Awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available,...

  11. 42 CFR 66.106 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Awards. 66.106 Section 66.106 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Direct Awards § 66.106 Awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available,...

  12. 42 CFR 66.106 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards. 66.106 Section 66.106 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Direct Awards § 66.106 Awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available,...

  13. 42 CFR 66.106 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Awards. 66.106 Section 66.106 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Direct Awards § 66.106 Awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available,...

  14. Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program Award

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...with the student during the 8 week summer session. The mentor also prepared a portfolio of articles covering the area of research the student...research in their laboratories covers a wide area of interest. The proposed mentors have extensive training experience at all levels; undergraduate

  15. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6 Section 650.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...: Intellectual Property Rights The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or...

  16. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6 Section 650.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...: Intellectual Property Rights The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or...

  17. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has supported much of Proton's technology development through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Awards and other non-SBIR funding.

  18. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6 Section 650.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...: Intellectual Property Rights The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or...

  19. Arthur C. Graesser: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Arthur C. Graesser as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. "As a multifaceted psychologist, cognitive engineer of useful education and training technologies, and mentor of new talent for the world of applied and translational cognitive science, Arthur C. Graesser is the perfect role model, showing how a strong scholar and intellect can shape both research and practice. His work is a mix of top-tier scholarship in psychology, education, intelligent systems, and computational linguistics. He combines cognitive science excellence with bold use of psychological knowledge and intelligent systems to design new generations of learning opportunities and to help lay the foundation for a translational science of learning." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Lasting Lessons: Following up with Recipients of the Forum's Undergraduate Research Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum on Education Abroad, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The annual Forum on Education Abroad Undergraduate Research Award showcases rigorous and significant undergraduate research that occurs as part of education abroad programs. Every year, the award recipients present their research at a plenary luncheon at the Forum's Annual Conference. The Forum granted the first Undergraduate Research Awards in…

  1. Lasting Lessons: Following up with Recipients of the Forum's Undergraduate Research Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum on Education Abroad, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The annual Forum on Education Abroad Undergraduate Research Award showcases rigorous and significant undergraduate research that occurs as part of education abroad programs. Every year, the award recipients present their research at a plenary luncheon at the Forum's Annual Conference. The Forum granted the first Undergraduate Research Awards in…

  2. Writing a competitive individual National Research Service Award (F31) application.

    PubMed

    Rawl, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are committed to increasing the number of PhD-prepared persons to meet the demand for well-trained behavioral, biological, and biobehavioral scientists. The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) individual Predoctoral Fellowship (F31) program provides financial support for full-time PhD students who are committed to research careers in scientific health-related fields relevant to the NIH. This article provides guidance for PhD nursing students who are preparing an individual NRSA application with emphasis on those being submitted to the National Institute of Nursing Research. The advantages of receiving this award are described along with the steps to complete the application. After careful self- and environmental assessments, the task of writing begins in close collaboration with research mentors. Essential components of NRSA applications are described along with strategies for making applications competitive and, ultimately, successful.

  3. Targeted research training: developing minority psychiatric investigators.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Harold; Guerra, Ernesto; Regier, Darrel

    2014-04-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to review the career outcomes of a research training program specifically targeted to young psychiatric researchers from minority populations underrepresented in psychiatry. The aims of the program were (1) to support psychiatric investigators from under-represented populations in the development and maintenance of research careers and (2) to identify the factors which influence successful research career development. Demographic data from 99 program participants were collected from an online survey as part of a systematic program evaluation, and through a follow-up internet search. Outcome measures included current academic position, number and types of post-training grants received, number of peer-reviewed publications, and comparison of post-training career outcomes with those from other highly regarded research training programs. Of the 99 psychiatrists accepted into the program, 55 responded to the online survey; additional information on non-responders was obtained through a follow-up internet search. Results indicated that 64% of program trainees identified their primary employment setting as academic/research; 70% reported publication of their research findings, and 64% reported the award of post-training research grants. The percentage of program graduates appointed to academic faculty positions and their receipt of R01 and/or K awards, exceeded that of two highly regarded national training programs. The study further identified major factors influencing successful research career development. Findings from this study strongly suggest that research training programs targeted to young minority psychiatrists can be successful in supporting the development and maintenance of their research careers. The decline in the availability of such programs does not portend well for increasing the numbers of underrepresented minority psychiatric researchers.

  4. [Critical analysis of awards in gastroenterology research. The Mexican experience].

    PubMed

    Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Téllez-Avila, Félix I; Hernández-Calleros, Jorge; López-Arce, Gustavo; Franco-Guzmán, Ada; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Mexican gastrointestinal research worldwide is limited and the outcome of the best research papers awarded by the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (AMG) is unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the publication pattern of the research work, awarded by the AMG and their impact in international journals. The abstracts accepted for the annual meeting of the AMG from 1998 to 2006 were reviewed. Those presented in a plenary session or awarded were included. Their abstracts were searched in electronic databases. When not found, the main author was contacted by e-mail. In those papers published in a journal with an impact factor, the times it was cited were assessed. 35 abstracts were identified, mainly in gastroenterology (57.1%) and hepatology (34.3). Only in 5.7% (n=2) some of the authors were members of the governing board of AMG. The awarded institutions were Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (48.6%), Universities (Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla) (31.4%), Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (8.6%), Fundación Clínica Médica Sur (5.7%), Hospital Juárez (2.9%), Private hospital (2.9%). Most of the papers were published within a year (73.7%). Only 2 papers had more than 10 citations in another international journal with impact factor, with a median for all paper of 5 citations (0-45). Considering all institutions, the rate of publication is 48%. Only half of the awarded works were published and mainly in journals of local distribution. The impact of these studies worldwide is limited.

  5. Small Business Innovation Research: Abstracts of Phase 1 awards, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed here, this publication describes the technical efforts for SBIR Phase 1 awards in 1994. It is intended for the educated layman, and may be of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities. Contained in this booklet are abstracts of the Phase 1 awards made in FY 1994 under the DOE SBIR program. The 212 Phase 1 projects described here were selected in a highly competitive process from a total of 2,276 grant applications received in response to the 1994 DOE annual SBIR Solicitation. The selections for awards were made on scientific and technical merit, as judged against the specific criteria listed in the Solicitation. Conclusions were reached on the basis of detailed reports returned by reviewers drawn from DOE laboratories, universities, private industry, and government. (Any discrepancies noted in prior DOE releases naming the firms selected for awards are due either to the firm changing its name after the award selection or to the firm not proceeding to a signed grant.) It is expected that between one-third and one-half of the Phase 1 projects will be continued into Phase 2. The work described in the abstracts is novel, high-risk research, but the benefits will also be potentially high if the objectives are met. Brief comments on the potential applications are given after each abstract. Individuals and organizations with an interest in the research described are encouraged to contact the appropriate small business directly.

  6. W. Gregory Keilin: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology. W. Gregory Keilin has spent the majority of his professional career providing training and administration for psychology doctoral internship programs as well as leadership service…

  7. 78 FR 23920 - Application for New Awards; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Application for New Awards; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs AGENCY: Institute of Education Sciences, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Education...

  8. Small business innovation research: Abstracts of 1984. Phase 1 awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    On September 27, 1984, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced the selection of Phase I projects for the Small Business Innovation Research Program. These awards resulted from the evaluation of proposals submitted in response to the 1984 Program Solicitation, SBIR 84-1. In order to make available information on the technical content of the Phase I projects supported by the NASA SBIR Program, the abstracts of those proposals which resulted in awards of contracts are given. In addition, the name and address of the firm performing the work are given for those who may desired additional information about the project. Propulsion, aerodynamics, computer techniques, exobiology and composite materials are among the areas covered.

  9. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology: Nadya A. Fouad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Nadya A. Fouad, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology, is cited for her role in the development and implementation of the Multicultural Guidelines, her commitment to social justice and equality, and her pioneering work in establishing benchmarks for trainee competency. Her contributions to…

  10. 78 FR 25292 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Office of Native American Programs Training and Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards; Office of Native American Programs Training and...)(C) of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989, this announcement notifies... (NHHBG) program, including the creation of decent housing, suitable living environments, and...

  11. INDUSTRIAL TRAINING RESEARCH REGISTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, London (England).

    IN THIS CLASSIFIED REGISTER OF CURRENT AND RECENTLY COMPLETED STUDIES OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING IN GREAT BRITAIN, INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS ARE ARRANGED BY THE ITEM NUMBER JUDGED MOST IMPORTANT, AND THE NUMBERS OF OTHER RELEVANT INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH PROJECTS ARE INSERTED AT THE END OF EACH SECTION TO PROVIDE CROSS REFERENCES. DESCRIPTIONS INCLUDE THE TITLE…

  12. Awards for University Teachers and Research Workers 1994-96. ACU Awards Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Moira, Ed.

    This is the 11th edition of a directory to funding sources for higher education faculty in the nations of the (British) Commonwealth of Nations and beyond for academic years 1994-95 and 1995-96. The entries are arranged in sections according to the country where the award may be held. The first "International" section lists awards held…

  13. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase I awards, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-01

    This booklet presents technical abstracts of Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 under the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. SBIR research explores innovative concepts in important technological and scientific areas that can lead to valuable new technology and products. The work described in the abstracts is novel, high-risk research, but the benefits will also be potentially high if the objectives are met. Brief comments on the potential applications, as described by the awardee, are given after each abstract. Individuals and organizations, including venture capital and larger industrial firms, with an interest in the research described in any of the abstracts are encouraged to contact the appropriate small business directly.

  14. NRAO Astronomer Wins Max-Planck Research Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dr. Christopher Carilli, a National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) astronomer in Socorro, New Mexico, has been chosen to receive the prestigious Max Planck Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society in Germany. Christopher Carilli Dr. Christopher Carilli Click on image for more photos CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Carilli, a radio astronomer, and German particle physicist Christof Wetterich are the 2005 recipients of the award, conferred on "one researcher working in Germany and one working abroad who have already gained an international reputation and who are expected to produce outstanding achievements in the framework of international collaboration," according to an announcement from the Humboldt Foundation. "This is a great honor for Chris, and we are proud to see him receive such important international recognition for the excellence of his research," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. Carilli's research has focused on studying very distant galaxies in the early Universe, and a quest to find the first luminous objects, such as stars or galaxies, to emerge. His most recent interests focus on unveiling the mysteries of what cosmologists call the "Epoch of Reionization," when the first stars and galaxies ionized the neutral hydrogen that pervaded the young Universe. Carilli and his research colleagues have used NRAO's Very Large Array and other radio telescopes to discover that the molecular raw material for star formation already was present in a galaxy seen as it was about 800 million years after the Big Bang, less than 1/16 the current age of the Universe. The Max Planck Research Award provides 750,000 Euros (currently about $900,000), to be used over five years, for research. The funding is provided by the German Ministry of Education and Research. Carilli will use the funding to support young researchers and to build scientific instrumentation, with a focus on fostering radio studies of cosmic reionization and the first

  15. Mark Roschewski awarded USPHS Research Physician of the Year | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Mark Roschewski, M.D., Staff Clinician in CCR’s Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, received the Research Physician of the Year award from the Physicians Professional Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. According to the website, this award “recognizes individual initiative, accomplishment, and accountability for actions that increase the overall effectiveness of the HHS through research.” Bill Dahut, M.D., CCR Scientific Director for Clinical Research, says, “He has the unusual ability to combine the unique sensitivity of clinical research and patient care, which has impacted patients with life-devastating lymphomas.”

  16. Livermore's 2004 R&D 100 Awards: Magnetically Levitated Train Takes Flight

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    the 1960s, transportation industry planners have sought an energy-efficient design for a train that can glide through air at speeds up to 500 kilometers per hour. This type of train, called a magnetically levitated (maglev) train, is thought to be a viable solution to meet the nation's growing need for intercity and urban transportation networks. However, despite some promising developments, unresolved concerns with the operation and safety of maglev trains has prevented the transition from demonstration model to commercial development. Inductrack, a maglev system originally conceived by Livermore physicist Richard Post, is designed to address these issues. Post's work on Inductrack began with funding from Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, and in 2003, the technology was licensed to General Atomics (GA) in San Diego for train and transit system applications. This year, members of the Livermore-GA team received an R&D 100 Award for Inductrack's development. Inductrack uses permanent magnets to produce the magnetic fields that levitate the train and provides economic and operational advantages over other maglev systems. It can be adapted to both high-speed and urban-speed environments. In the event of a power failure, the train slows gradually until it comes to rest on its auxiliary wheels. The maintenance requirements for Inductrack are also lower than they are for other systems, plus it has a short turning radius and is designed for quiet operation. Previous designs for maglev systems did not offer the energy efficiency or safety protections that are in the Inductrack design. Electromagnetic systems (EMS) use powered electromagnets to levitate the train. However, these systems are based on magnetic attraction rather than repulsion and thus are inherently unstable. In EMS trains, the levitation gap--the separation between the magnet pole faces and the iron rail--is only about 10 millimeters and, during operation, must be maintained to

  17. 78 FR 36755 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers AGENCY: Office... Information: National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability...

  18. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  19. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  20. Excellence in cell signaling research recognized with major new award.

    PubMed

    Feller, Stephan M

    2013-03-04

    The newly installed Life Sciences Breakthrough Prize (http://www.breakthroughprizeinlifesciences.org/), which comes with more than double the financial reward of the Nobel Prize, has been awarded to several world-leaders in the field of cancer-related cell signaling and therapy research: Lewis C. Cantley (PI3 kinase), Hans Clevers (Wnt signaling), Charles L. Sawyers (signaling-targeted cancer therapy), Bert Vogelstein (colorectal cancer signaling) and Robert Weinberg (Ras & other cancer-relevant genes). They have all made remarkable contributions to our understanding of cell communication and malignancies over the last decades. Needless to say that virtually all other awardees of the 11 scientists honored in 2013 have also, in one way or another, touched upon signaling molecules, highlighting the fundamental interdisciplinarity and significance of signal transduction for living cells in general. For example, Shinya Yamanaka's exciting work was built on the four transcriptional signaling proteins, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc.

  1. Resident research associateships. Postdoctoral and senior research awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Opportunities for research at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, and Systems Dynamics Laboratory are described. Information is provided for applicants desiring designation as a research associate and a list of laboratory directors and research advisors is provided.

  2. Developing a multidisciplinary model of comparative effectiveness research within a clinical and translational science award.

    PubMed

    Marantz, Paul R; Strelnick, A Hal; Currie, Brian; Bhalla, Rohit; Blank, Arthur E; Meissner, Paul; Selwyn, Peter A; Walker, Elizabeth A; Hsu, Daphne T; Shamoon, Harry

    2011-06-01

    The Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) were initiated to improve the conduct and impact of the National Institutes of Health's research portfolio, transforming training programs and research infrastructure at academic institutions and creating a nationwide consortium. They provide a model for translating research across disciplines and offer an efficient and powerful platform for comparative effectiveness research (CER), an effort that has long struggled but enjoys renewed hope under health care reform. CTSAs include study design and methods expertise, informatics, and regulatory support; programs in education, training, and career development in domains central to CER; and programs in community engagement.Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have entered a formal partnership that places their CTSA at a critical intersection for clinical and translational research. Their CTSA leaders were asked to develop a strategy for enhancing CER activities, and in 2010 they developed a model that encompasses four broadly defined "compartments" of research strength that must be coordinated for this enterprise to succeed: evaluation and health services research, biobehavioral research and prevention, efficacy studies and clinical trials, and social science and implementation research.This article provides historical context for CER, elucidates Einstein-Montefiore's CER model and strategic planning efforts, and illustrates how a CTSA can provide vision, leadership, coordination, and services to support an academic health center's collaborative efforts to develop a robust CER portfolio and thus contribute to the national effort to improve health and health care.

  3. 77 FR 40596 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects; Employment of Individuals With Disabilities AGENCY: Office of... Information National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)-- Disability and...

  4. 78 FR 34355 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation... of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

  5. 78 FR 69398 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    .... Another purpose of the FI Projects program is to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under... under Title II of the Act. NIDRR makes two types of awards under the FI Projects program: Research grants and development grants. The MSI FI Projects research grants will be awarded under CFDA...

  6. 78 FR 22864 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ...)--Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer Notice inviting applications for new awards for... Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer...

  7. 78 FR 29344 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and... Information National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and...)--Disability Statistics and Demographics Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2013...

  8. Guenther receives 2011 Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Alex B.

    2012-03-01

    Alex B. Guenther received the Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes "broad influence in atmospheric science through exceptional creativity, inspiration of younger scientists, mentoring, international collaborations, and unselfish cooperation in research.

  9. Guenther receives 2011 Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Alex B. Guenther received the Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes “broad influence in atmospheric science through exceptional creativity, inspiration of younger scientists, mentoring, international collaborations, and unselfish cooperation in research.”

  10. Mississippi CaP HBCU Undergraduate Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    accepted into Mercer’s Doctor of Pharmacy at Mercer University. Two (2) trainees are hired employees : Joshua Agee is a researcher coordinator at Open Arms...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0151 TITLE: Mississippi CaP HBCU Undergraduate Research Training Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christian Gomez...Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for

  11. Mentor training within academic health centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J; Richards, Boyd F; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-10-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only four AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent at the KL2 level, whereas formal face-to-face training was most prevalent at the institutional level. Despite differences in format usage, there was general consensus at both the KL2 and institutional level about the topics of focus of face-to-face training sessions. Lower-resource training formats utilized at the KL2 level may reveal a preference for preselection of qualified mentors, while institutional selection of resource-heavy formats may be an attempt to raise the mentoring qualifications of the academic community as a whole. The present work fits into the expanding landscape of academic mentoring literature and sets the framework for future longitudinal, outcome studies focused on identifying the most efficient strategies to develop effective mentors.

  12. Training Researchers To Commercialize Research Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Sijde, P. C.; Cuyvers, R.

    2003-01-01

    A training course was designed to prepare researchers for research commercialization for researchers. It introduces concepts involved in the publishing of knowledge such as protection of intellectual property, spin-off companies, and working with commercial companies. (JOW)

  13. Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program Award

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    this laboratory concentrates on the area of tumor i mmunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We ha ve constructed microbial vaccines to be used...to the tran sgene product induced by the vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the fo rm of clinical...trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in thes e trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to in duce

  14. 78 FR 69839 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Minority-Serving Institution Field- Initiated Projects...

  15. 77 FR 480 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), Department of Education. ACTION: Notice... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Field...

  16. Connor H. G. Patros: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). The 2015 recipient is Connor H. G Patros. Patros was chosen for "an excellent research paper that examines the complex relationship between working memory, choice-impulsivity, and the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) phenotype." Patros's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Lonnie R. Snowden Jr.: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy is given to a psychologist who has made a distinguished empirical and/or theoretical contribution to research in public policy, either through a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of work. The 2014 recipient of this award is Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. "Over the past several decades, Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. has systematically built a research agenda on the financing and organization of mental health services that has driven much of our current health policy reform efforts." Snowden Jr.'s award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society's Robert Ader New Investigator Award.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Aric A. Prather, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), is the recipient of the 2015 Robert Ader New Investigator Award and will present on his research at the PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society (PNIRS) meeting, June 3–6, Seattle, WA. The Robert Ader New Investigator Award is presented to an outstanding new research scientist who has made exciting basic science or clinical contributions to the field of psychoneuroimmunology.

  19. Industrial Training Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, R. A.; Sawzin, S. A.

    The study was an experimental comparison of the structured versus unstructed training of semiskilled production workers. The experiment was implemented using the following procedures, which are presented in detail: a representative semiskilled production job was selected, the two training programs were characterized and developed, trainees…

  20. Industrial Training Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, R. A.; Sawzin, S. A.

    The study was an experimental comparison of the structured versus unstructed training of semiskilled production workers. The experiment was implemented using the following procedures, which are presented in detail: a representative semiskilled production job was selected, the two training programs were characterized and developed, trainees…

  1. Research Diver Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Lee H.

    This publication provides a listing of the components of a specialized diver training program developed at the University of Michigan. Because of the demand for specialized diver training in the scientific community, a speciality diving course was developed to serve those in the various fields of marine and aquatic science and engineering. This…

  2. Engineering and Scientific Training Schemes, Including Industrial Awards for Degree Courses for Those Leaving School in 1972 and 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Joan, Ed.

    This revised edition of a 1955 publication is designed to help those who have chosen careers in engineering or science, and in particular, those who wish to pursue their technical training in some association with industry on leaving school. The introduction discusses: changes in this edition; trends in sandwich training; industrial awards; how to…

  3. Faculty Training in Aging Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of a research training program by 58 psychology faculty participants revealed four outcomes: improved knowledge of methodology, increased interest in aging research, expanded networking, and stronger undergraduate programs. Grant writing training resulted in 10 participants obtaining National Institute on Aging funding. (SK)

  4. 78 FR 35009 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and... of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview...

  5. Developing a Multidisciplinary Model of Comparative Effectiveness Research Within a Clinical and Translational Science Award

    PubMed Central

    Marantz, Paul R.; Strelnick, A. Hal; Currie, Brian; Bhalla, Rohit; Blank, Arthur E.; Meissner, Paul; Selwyn, Peter A.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Hsu, Daphne T.; Shamoon, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) were initiated to improve the conduct and impact of NIH's research portfolio, transforming training programs and research infrastructure at academic institutions and creating a nationwide consortium. They provide a model for translating research across disciplines and offer an efficient and powerful platform for comparative effectiveness research (CER), an effort that has long struggled but enjoys renewed hope under health care reform. CTSAs include study design and methods expertise, informatics, and regulatory support; programs in education, training, and career development in domains central to CER; and robust programs in community engagement, both of the general public and of clinical practice communities. Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have entered a formal partnership that places their CTSA at a critical intersection for clinical and translational research. Their CTSA leaders were asked to develop a strategy for enhancing CER activities, and in 2010 they developed a model that encompasses four broadly defined “compartments” of research strength that must be coordinated for this enterprise to succeed: evaluation and health services research, biobehavioral research and prevention, efficacy studies and clinical trials, and social science and implementation research. This article provides historical context for CER, elucidates Einstein-Montefiore’s CER model and strategic planning efforts, and illustrates how a CTSA can provide a vision, leadership, coordination, and services to support an academic health center’s collaborative efforts to develop a robust CER portfolio and thus contribute to the national effort to improve health and health care. PMID:21512360

  6. Mark D. Cunningham: award for distinguished contributions to research in public policy.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Presents a citation for Mark D. Cunningham, who received the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy "for his highly distinguished contributions to research on death-sentenced inmates, capital sentencing determinations, and law." Accompanying the citation are a brief profile and a selected bibliography, as well as Cunningham's award address, entitled Dangerousness and Death: A Nexus in Search of Science and Reason. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Hilary

    2013-09-01

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE- FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  8. Texas Tech Awarded EPA Grant to Research Chemical Contaminants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Aug. 11, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding $374,510 to Texas Tech University through EPA's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program. The university will develop a better approach to understand and predict in

  9. Bhartia Receives 2012 Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2013-11-01

    It was an honor and pleasure to receive the 2012 Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award from the Atmospheric Sciences Section of the American Geophysical Union. Yoram and I joined NASA around the same time and were colleagues at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center until his tragic death in 2006 in a bicycle accident inside the GSFC campus. The award named after him not only honors Yoram's life and work, but it is also one of the rare scientific awards given for collaboration and teamwork, in which Yoram excelled.

  10. Mapping MSW Research Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freymond, Nancy; Morgenshtern, Marina; Duffie, Mark; Hong, Liu; Bugeja-Freitas, Shirley; Eulenberg, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    The surge of interest in evidence-based interventions necessitates MSW graduates who will pursue research activities in the workplace. However, evidence suggests that social workers tend not to use their research skills after graduation. This study examined three constructs that inform students' relationships to research: (a) confidence in…

  11. Mapping MSW Research Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freymond, Nancy; Morgenshtern, Marina; Duffie, Mark; Hong, Liu; Bugeja-Freitas, Shirley; Eulenberg, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    The surge of interest in evidence-based interventions necessitates MSW graduates who will pursue research activities in the workplace. However, evidence suggests that social workers tend not to use their research skills after graduation. This study examined three constructs that inform students' relationships to research: (a) confidence in…

  12. Tips for writing successful patient-oriented research career development awards.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie J

    2010-01-01

    Preparing a career development award can be an immensely satisfying experience and a great boost to a research career if successful, or it can seem like a miserable waste of time if unsuccessful. This paper highlights tips for the preparation of patient-oriented career development awards and provides references for grant-writing guidance. Patient-oriented research is defined as "research conducted with human subjects (or on material of human origin such as tissues, specimens and cognitive phenomena) for which an investigator directly interacts with human subjects. This area of research includes: 1) mechanisms of human disease; 2) therapeutic interventions; 3) clinical trials, and; 4) the development of new technologies."

  13. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Luciano L'Abate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Luciano L'Abate, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research, contributed to applied research through the introduction of the laboratory method in clinical psychology assessment and intervention, leading to the development of the first automated playroom, linking play therapy with research in child…

  14. Building Research Partnerships with Health Care Organizations: The Scholar Award Model in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aroian, Karen J.; Robertson, Patricia; Allred, Kelly; Andrews, Diane; Waldrop, Julee

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of limited funding, researchers need strategic alliances to launch or sustain programs of research to significantly impact the nation's health. This article presents a collaborative model, the Scholar Award Model, which is based on a strategic alliance between a College of Nursing in a research-intensive university and a…

  15. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Research involving human... Provisions and Clauses 1352.235-73 Research involving human subjects—after initial contract award. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(d), insert the following clause: Research Involving Human...

  16. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Research involving human... Provisions and Clauses 1352.235-73 Research involving human subjects—after initial contract award. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(d), insert the following clause: Research Involving Human...

  17. Building Research Partnerships with Health Care Organizations: The Scholar Award Model in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aroian, Karen J.; Robertson, Patricia; Allred, Kelly; Andrews, Diane; Waldrop, Julee

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of limited funding, researchers need strategic alliances to launch or sustain programs of research to significantly impact the nation's health. This article presents a collaborative model, the Scholar Award Model, which is based on a strategic alliance between a College of Nursing in a research-intensive university and a…

  18. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Research involving human... Provisions and Clauses 1352.235-73 Research involving human subjects—after initial contract award. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(d), insert the following clause: Research Involving Human Subjects—After...

  19. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Laurence Steinberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Laurence Steinberg, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited for his extraordinary impact on policy in juvenile justice and child labor and on research into the role of parent and peer relationships in the development of children and adolescents. His groundbreaking research is marked by a…

  20. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Laurence Steinberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Laurence Steinberg, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited for his extraordinary impact on policy in juvenile justice and child labor and on research into the role of parent and peer relationships in the development of children and adolescents. His groundbreaking research is marked by a…

  1. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Luciano L'Abate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Luciano L'Abate, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research, contributed to applied research through the introduction of the laboratory method in clinical psychology assessment and intervention, leading to the development of the first automated playroom, linking play therapy with research in child…

  2. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Charlotte J. Patterson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Charlotte J. Patterson, winner of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, is cited as the world's expert on psychological research on children and youths raised by lesbian and gay parents. Her early analytic syntheses of the literature on the subject greatly influenced other researchers in child and family…

  3. 78 FR 27198 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Traumatic Brain... Program--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects--Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers... the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers Collaborative Research Projects is from the notice...

  4. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy: Dorothy L. Espelage.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    APA's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy is given to a psychologist who has made a distinguished empirical and/or theoretical contribution to research in public policy, either through a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of work. Dorothy L. Espelage is the 2016 recipient of this award for her exceptional work on bullying, gender, and school violence. "She is an outstanding rigorous researcher who uses the most sophisticated methods in assessing the effects of interventions designed to improve the social and emotional lives of children both within and outside of school." Espelage's citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Postgraduate Research Training: Some Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calma, Angelito

    2011-01-01

    This three-year study of research training policy and practice involved government and university executives, and university academics from the Philippines. A total of 53 participants were involved: two officials from the Commission on Higher Education, six directors of research centres, 28 university executives and 17 academic staff. Seven public…

  6. Postgraduate Research Training: Some Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calma, Angelito

    2011-01-01

    This three-year study of research training policy and practice involved government and university executives, and university academics from the Philippines. A total of 53 participants were involved: two officials from the Commission on Higher Education, six directors of research centres, 28 university executives and 17 academic staff. Seven public…

  7. Special Issue in Honor of Professor S. Ted Oyama: 2014 ACS Distinguished Researcher Award in Petroleum Chemistry and Storch Award in Fuel Science

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo-Suárez, Juan J.; Wang, Xianqin; Li, Wei; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-03-03

    This special issue of Topics in Catalysis honors Professor S. Ted Oyama for his Awards in Petroleum Chemistry and Fuel Science Research. These awards were celebrated at two American Chemical Society (ACS) symposia in 2014. First, the ACS’s Distinguished Research Award in Petroleum Chemistry Symposium, took place at the 247th ACS National Meeting in Dallas, TX, during March 17-19, 2014 and the second one, the ACS’s Storch Award in Fuel Science Symposium, took place at the 248th ACS National Meeting in San Francisco, CA, during August 10-12, 2014. Professor Oyama received the 2014 ACS Distinguished Research Award in Petroleum Chemistry ‘‘for his substantial contributions to the field of heterogeneous catalysis’’ including the discovery of highly active transition metal phosphide catalysts for hydrotreatment of petroleum and coal-derived feedstocks and biomass refining, the development of new compositions, and the understanding of their reaction mechanisms by in situ spectroscopic techniques at high temperatures and pressures of reaction. In light of this recognition, Professor Oyama was also awarded the 2014 ACS Storch Award in Fuel Science ‘‘for his broad contributions to the field of fuel science’’ including the production of hydrogen by catalytic reforming, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, biomass conversion, their reaction kinetics and mechanisms, and spectrokinetic methods to study catalysts in situ at reaction conditions and theory and application of inorganic membranes for separation of hydrogen and fuel-relevant gases. Finally, this special issue consists of contributions by catalysis researchers who participated in the two ACS symposia honoring Professor Oyama’s Awards.

  8. APA/Psi Chi Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award: Meghan H. Puglia.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). The 2016 recipient is Meghan H. Puglia, who was chosen for "an outstanding foundational research paper that establishes a relationship between a functional epigenetic modification to the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and neural response during social perception." Puglia's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through…

  10. Leslie S. Greenberg: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Leslie S. Greenberg is an exemplary scientist-practitioner whose pioneering work has significantly altered the landscape of the field of psychotherapy research and practice. His seminal…

  11. Dan Olweus: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. The 2012 winner is Dan Olweus for his rigorous scientific research on bullying among children and youth and his early and tireless attention to its public policy implications. Dan Olweus's…

  12. 1997 Hardwood Research Award Winner: "Automatic Color Sorting of Hardwood Edge-Glued Panel Parts"

    Treesearch

    D. Earl Kline; Richard Conners; Qiang Lu; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    The National Hardwood Lumber Association's 1997 Hardwood Research Award was presented to D. Earl Kline, Richard Conners, Qiang Lu and Philip Araman at the 25th Annual Hardwood Symposium for developing an automatic system for color sorting hardwood edge-glued panel parts. The researchers comprise a team from Virginia Tech University and the USDA Forest Service in...

  13. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through…

  14. Dan Olweus: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. The 2012 winner is Dan Olweus for his rigorous scientific research on bullying among children and youth and his early and tireless attention to its public policy implications. Dan Olweus's…

  15. 76 FR 33730 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)--Disability in the Family AGENCY: Office of Special Education and...

  16. Leslie S. Greenberg: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Leslie S. Greenberg is an exemplary scientist-practitioner whose pioneering work has significantly altered the landscape of the field of psychotherapy research and practice. His seminal…

  17. 77 FR 28577 - Applications for New Awards; Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... Applications for New Awards; Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowship Program... applications that meet this priority. This priority is: A research project that focuses on one or more of the...: Within this absolute priority, we give competitive preference to applications that address one or both of...

  18. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  19. Biomedical and Behavioral Research Scientists: Their Training and Supply. Volume 1: Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel.

    This is the first of three volumes which presents the Committee on Biomedical and Behavioral Research Personnel's examination of the educational process that leads to doctoral degrees in biomedical and behavioral science (and to postdoctoral study in some cases) and the role of the National Research Service Awards (NRSA) training programs in it.…

  20. "The Need to Know": 1994 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses issues related to music education research. Presents three criteria to guide selection of research topics. Concludes that the challenge for music researchers is to avoid research that merely supports a "favored" methodology. (ACM)

  1. Rheumatology Research Foundation Clinician Scholar Educator Award: Fifteen Years Promoting Rheumatology Educators and Education.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jessica R; O'Rourke, Kenneth S; Kolasinski, Sharon L; Aizer, Juliet; Wheatley, Mary J; Battistone, Michael J; Siaton, Bernadette C; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa; Pillinger, Michael H; Lazaro, Deana M

    2016-11-01

    The Rheumatology Research Foundation's Clinician Scholar Educator (CSE) award is a 3-year career development award supporting medical education research while providing opportunities for mentorship and collaboration. Our objective was to document the individual and institutional impact of the award since its inception, as well as its promise to strengthen the subspecialty of rheumatology. All 60 CSE Award recipients were surveyed periodically. Fifty-six of those 60 awardees (90%) responded to requests for survey information that included post-award activities, promotions, and further funding. Data were also collected from yearly written progress reports for each grant. Of the total CSE recipients to date, 48 of 60 (80%) are adult rheumatologists, 11 of 60 (18%) are pediatric rheumatologists, and 1 is an adult and pediatric rheumatologist. Two-thirds of survey respondents spend up to 30% of their total time in educational activities, and one-third spend greater than 30%. Thirty-one of the 60 CSE recipients (52%) have published a total of 86 medical education papers. Twenty-six of 52 (50%) had received an academic promotion following the award. Eleven awardees earned advanced degrees. We describe the creation and evolution of a grant program from a medical subspecialty society foundation and the impact on producing education research, individual identity formation, and ongoing support for educators. This community of rheumatology scholar educators now serves as an important resource at the national level for the American College of Rheumatology and its membership. We believe that this grant may serve as a model for other medical societies that want to promote education scholarship and leadership within their specialties. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Thomson Reuters innovation award research brief: the use of patent analytics in measuring innovation in India.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Bob

    2009-09-01

    There are six different factors that can be used to assess the inventiveness of an organization and to determine how efficiently they apply invention resources to innovate effectively. This research briefing describes the techniques used to measure certain aspects of patenting activity by Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) headquartered in India. The techniques are used to identify the most innovative SMEs in India in order to determine the winners of the Innovation Award 2009 from Thomson Reuters, awarded at InfoVision 2009 in Bangalore. Copyright 2009 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  3. 78 FR 26626 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Rehabilitation Research Projects--Inclusive Cloud and Web Computing AGENCY: Office of Special Education and...)--Inclusive Cloud and Web Computing Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2013...#DRRP . Priorities: Priority 1--DRRP on Inclusive Cloud and Web Computing-- is from the notice of final...

  4. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: FuelCell Energy Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-31

    This success story describes FuelCell Energy Inc., a small business that manufactures stationary fuel cells. In collaboration with Sustainable Innovations LLC, and with support from a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, FuelCell Energy Inc. has developed a highly efficient solid state electrochemical hydrogen compressor.

  5. Developing Teaching Self-Efficacy in Research Institutions: A Study of Award-Winning Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David B.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the sources of award-wining research professors' (six women; six men) teaching self-efficacy through the framework of Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory. Semi-structured interviews revealed that mastery experiences and social persuasions were particularly influential sources of self-efficacy and that…

  6. Developing Teaching Self-Efficacy in Research Institutions: A Study of Award-Winning Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David B.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the sources of award-wining research professors' (six women; six men) teaching self-efficacy through the framework of Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory. Semi-structured interviews revealed that mastery experiences and social persuasions were particularly influential sources of self-efficacy and that…

  7. 77 FR 33725 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; National Data and Statistical Center for the Burn Model Systems AGENCY: Office of Special Education and...

  8. $200,000 Grants Awarded to CCR Researchers for HIV/AIDS Studies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) awarded two, two-year grants of $200,000 each to Anu Puri, Ph.D., and Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., both of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Nanobiology Program, and to Eric Freed, Ph.D., of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, for their research on potential new treatments for HIV.

  9. $200,000 Grants Awarded to CCR Researchers for HIV/AIDS Studies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) awarded two, two-year grants of $200,000 each to Anu Puri, Ph.D., and Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., both of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Nanobiology Program, and to Eric Freed, Ph.D., of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, for their research on potential new treatments for HIV.

  10. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matthieu, Monica M; Bellamy, Jennifer L; Peña, Juan B; Scott, Lionel D

    2008-12-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this article describes the authors' perspectives regarding the considerations to accept postdocs, key elements in their training programs, lessons learned, and outcomes from training. To provide an overview of the funding mechanism and distribution of funds to institutes and centers relevant to social work, data were obtained from databases that list NIH training grants awarded each year. Study results showed a limited amount of variation in fellows' training plans. The majority of training time was spent building skill in manuscript preparation, grant development, and socialization to the NIH culture. Above all other themes, the desire for advanced research training was a critically important factor in accepting a postdoctoral training position. Finally, the outcomes of training may have a profound effect on professional development, yet the long-term trajectory of postdoctoral fellows in academic positions as compared with people without postdoctoral training in social work programs requires further study.

  11. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Peña, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this article describes the authors' perspectives regarding the considerations to accept postdocs, key elements in their training programs, lessons learned, and outcomes from training. To provide an overview of the funding mechanism and distribution of funds to institutes and centers relevant to social work, data were obtained from databases that list NIH training grants awarded each year. Study results showed a limited amount of variation in fellows' training plans. The majority of training time was spent building skill in manuscript preparation, grant development, and socialization to the NIH culture. Above all other themes, the desire for advanced research training was a critically important factor in accepting a postdoctoral training position. Finally, the outcomes of training may have a profound effect on professional development, yet the long-term trajectory of postdoctoral fellows in academic positions as compared with people without postdoctoral training in social work programs requires further study. PMID:28316462

  12. The Bok Award Presented for High School Astronomy Research at the Intel Science Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, Catharine D.

    2013-01-01

    The Priscilla and Bart Bok award, presented jointly by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) at the annual Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), recognizes excellent research in astronomy conducted by high school students. The award is named in honor of two well-known astronomers. Bart Bok was an outstanding research astronomer: much of his research was done with his wife, Priscilla Fairfield Bok. Since 1992, the ASP and the AAS have shared the responsibility of sending three judges to the annual Intel ISEF to select two Bok awardees. Funds for the prizes themselves are derived from an endowment in Bart Bok’s honor held at the ASP. The Intel ISEF is a massive event. In order to become a finalist and attend ISEF, a student must first compete, and win one of the top awards, in both their local and regional science fairs. In recent years, about 1,500 high-school students have attended. About 100 of these students present projects in the category physics: of these, less than 20 are astronomy projects. Winners of the award are invited to attend the winter AAS meeting, and this year both of the 2012 winners are expected to be in attendance. There are also previous winners who are actively in our midst. But there is an unanswered question: why are there so few student projects in astronomy?

  13. Michael K. Scullin: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Michael K. Scullin as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. "For an outstanding research paper that examines the relationship between prospective memory in executing a goal and various lapses of time from 20 minutes up to a 12- hour wake delay and a 12-hour sleep delay. The results suggest that consolidation processes active during sleep increase the probability of goal execution. The paper, titled 'Remembering to Execute a Goal: Sleep On It!' was published in Psychological Science in 2010 and was the basis for Michael K. Scullin's selection as the recipient of the 2011 Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. Mark A. McDaniel, PhD, served as faculty research advisor." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  15. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  16. Restrictions on Research Awards: Troublesome Clauses 2007/2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This joint report by the Association of American Universities (AAU) and the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR) is based on a survey of 20 U.S. research universities that conduct significant amounts of federal research. It follows up on a 2003/2004 survey of the same institutions. The new report shows that, despite the concerns and…

  17. CCR’s Douglas Lowy and John Schiller receive the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Douglas Lowy, M.D., and John Schiller, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Cellular Oncology have received the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their groundbreaking research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. The Lasker Awards are widely regarded as the country’s most prestigious biomedical research prizes.

  18. NCI Awards 18 Grants to Continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Biomarkers Effort | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has awarded 18 grants to continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), a national infrastructure that supports the integrated development, validation, and clinical application of biomarkers for the early detection of cancer. The awards fund 7 Biomarker Developmental Laboratories, 8 Clinical Validation Centers, 2 Biomarker Reference Laboratories, and a Data Management and Coordinating Center (DMCC). |

  19. Dan Olweus: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. The 2012 winner is Dan Olweus for his rigorous scientific research on bullying among children and youth and his early and tireless attention to its public policy implications. Dan Olweus's research on the nature, prevalence, and consequences of bullying and his work to develop and disseminate an evidence-based prevention program provide a model of excellence in the field. His work has played a vital role in the dramatic changes that have occurred in many countries in recent years-from viewing bullying as a normative and accepted part of life at school to recognizing bullying as a pressing public health issue. Olweus's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented.

  20. 77 FR 20802 - Applications for New Awards; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Families of Children with Disabilities 84.324B Special Education Research Training: Early Career July 19... and Early Learning in Special Education Reading, Writing, and Language Development Mathematics and... Development for Teachers and Related Services Providers Special Education Policy, Finance, and Systems...

  1. 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Cautious Optimism for the Future of Research in Music Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the transcript of Peter Webster's 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address. Webster comments on several big ideas in music education: (1) The consideration of teaching as a blend of constructivist approaches and direct instruction that values student-centered work primarily as evidence of learning; (2) The…

  2. 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Cautious Optimism for the Future of Research in Music Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the transcript of Peter Webster's 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address. Webster comments on several big ideas in music education: (1) The consideration of teaching as a blend of constructivist approaches and direct instruction that values student-centered work primarily as evidence of learning; (2) The…

  3. Reengineering the National Clinical and Translational Research Enterprise: The Strategic Plan of the National Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Steven E.; Berglund, Lars; Bernard, Gordon R.; Califf, Robert M.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Johnson, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in human health require the efficient and rapid translation of scientific discoveries into effective clinical treatments; this process in turn depends upon observational data gathered from patients, communities, and public-health research that can be used to guide basic scientific investigation. Such bidirectional translational science, however, faces unprecedented challenges due to the rapid pace of scientific and technological development, as well as the difficulties of negotiating increasingly complex regulatory and commercial environments that overlap the research domain. Further, numerous barriers to translational science have emerged among the nation’s academic research centers, including basic structural and cultural impediments to innovation and collaboration, shortages of trained investigators, and inadequate funding. To address these serious and systemic problems, in 2006, the National Institutes of Health created the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program, which aims to catalyze the transformation of biomedical research at a national level, speeding the discovery and development of therapies, fostering collaboration, engaging communities, and training succeeding generations of clinical and translational researchers. The authors report in detail on the planning process, begun in 2008, that was used to engage stakeholders and to identify, refine, and ultimately implement the CTSA program’s overarching strategic goals. They also discuss the implications and likely impact of this strategic planning process as it is applied among the nation’s academic health centers. PMID:20182119

  4. Small business innovation research. Abstracts of 1988 phase 1 awards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Non-proprietary proposal abstracts of Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects supported by NASA are presented. Projects in the fields of aeronautical propulsion, aerodynamics, acoustics, aircraft systems, materials and structures, teleoperators and robots, computer sciences, information systems, data processing, spacecraft propulsion, bioastronautics, satellite communication, and space processing are covered.

  5. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  6. Developing the Translational Research Workforce: A Pilot Study of Common Metrics for Evaluating the Clinical and Translational Award KL2 Program

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Lourdes; Jones, Lisa B.; Tong, Greg; Ireland, Christine; Dumbauld, Jill; Rainwater, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This pilot study describes the career development programs (i.e., NIH KL2 awards) across five Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) institutions within the University of California (UC) system, and examines the feasibility of a set of common metrics for evaluating early outcomes. Methods A survey of program administrators provided data related to the institutional environment within which each KL2 program was implemented. Application and progress report data yielded a combined data set that characterized KL2 awardees, their initial productivity, and early career outcomes. Results The pilot project demonstrated the feasibility of aggregating common metrics data across multiple institutions. The data indicated that KL2 awardees were an accomplished set of investigators, both before and after the award period, representing a wide variety of disciplines. Awardees that had completed their trainee period overwhelmingly remained active in translational research conducted within an academic setting. Early indications also suggest high rates of success with obtaining research funding subsequent to the KL2 award. Conclusion This project offers a model for how to collect and analyze common metrics related to the education and training function of the CTSA Consortium. Next steps call for expanding participation to other CTSA sites outside of the University of California system. PMID:26602332

  7. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through the use of a mock trial experiment, the research revealed that jurors discounted a juvenile's coerced confession and sometimes used intellectual disability as a mitigating factor. Attribution theory and the discounting principle were used to identify the psychological mechanisms underlying this effect. The paper, titled 'Understanding Jurors' Judgments in Cases Involving Juvenile Defendants,' was published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law in October 2011 and was the basis for Najdowski's selection as the recipient of the 2012 Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. Bette L. Bottoms, PhD, served as faculty supervisor. Najdowski's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Gischig receives 2011 Natural Hazards Focus Group Award for Graduate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    Valentin Gischig has been awarded the AGU Natural Hazards Focus Group Award for Graduate Research, given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for outstanding contributions to natural hazards research. Gischig's thesis is entitled “Kinematics and failure mechanisms of the Randa rock slope instability (Switzerland).” He presented an invited talk and was formally presented with the award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. Gischig received his M.Sc. in geophysics and glaciology at Eidgenössiche Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, in Switzerland, in 2007. In 2011 he attained a Ph.D. in engineering geology/rock mechanics/landslide analysis under the supervision of Simon Loew, Jeffrey R. Moore, Florian Amann, and Keith F. Evans at ETH Zürich. Gischig is currently conducting postdoctoral research at ETH Zürich. His research interests include landslides, induced seismicity in enhanced geothermal systems, and coupled processes in rock mechanics.

  9. Annual Report on Awards (1982). Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowships, Postdoctoral Research Associateships.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    research establishment is a na- understanding of the evaluation process and from time tional resource based on its graduate education system. to time ...of award recipients. At the same time , selection Program is also administered by the Office. Under this pro- criteria are evaluated periodically to...field for five-year periods from 1968 plicants who are citizens or nationals of the United States through 1982. as of the time of application. The

  10. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 1. Army Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    PROPOSED PHASE I RESEARCH WILL BUILD ON ALPHATECH’S COMBINED EXPERTISE IN MULTISENSOR DATA FUSION ALGORITHMS AND IN HUMAN ENGINEERING FOR COMMAND AND...IDENTIFICATION DATA TO HUMAN OPERATORS, AND TO DEVELOP A PLAN FOR TESTING HYPOTHESES ABOUT THE EFFECTIVE DISPLAY OF SUCH INFORMATION TO SUPPORT HUMAN ...then proceeds to 13 ARMY ABSTRACTS OF SBIR PHASE I AWARDS analyze the effect of the Digital Terrain Data upon the ability of the unit to perform each

  11. Application of Training Research Literature to Maintenance Performance Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    DTIC FILE COPY ) U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Report 1527 Application of Training Research...Literature to Maintenance Performance Training Angelo Mirabella, Douglas H. Macpherson, and Chavis A. Patterson U.S. Army Research Institute DTICS ELEC T...ESFEBO0 6 1990 D D June 1989 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 90 02 06 070 U.S. ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND

  12. Sümeyra Tosun: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). The 2014 recipient is Sümeyra Tosun. Tosun was chosen for "an outstanding research paper that examines the cognitive repercussions of obligatory versus optional marking of evidentiality, the linguistic coding of the source of information. In English, evidentiality is conveyed in the lexicon through the use of adverbs. In Turkish, evidentiality is coded in the grammar. In two experiments, it was found that English speakers were equally good at remembering and monitoring the source of firsthand information and the source of non-firsthand information. Turkish speakers were worse at remembering and monitoring non-firsthand information than firsthand information and were worse than English speakers at remembering and monitoring non-firsthand information." Tosun's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation Research and Fellowship Awards: A 26-Year Review at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

    PubMed

    Inverso, Gino; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Kaban, Leonard B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to review outcomes of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) Foundation's funding awards to members of the OMS department at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in terms of projects completed, abstracts presented, peer-reviewed publications, and career trajectories of recipients. Data were collected from MGH and OMS Foundation records and interviews with award recipients. Primary outcome variables included 1) number of awards and award types, 2) funding amount, 3) project completion, 4) number of presented abstracts, 5) conversion from abstracts to publications, 6) number of peer-reviewed publications, 7) career trajectories of awardees, and 8) additional extramural funding. Eleven Student Research Training Awards provided $135,000 for 39 projects conducted by 37 students. Of these, 34 (87.2%) were completed. There were 30 student abstracts presented, 21 peer-reviewed publications, and a publication conversion rate of 58.8%. Faculty research awards comprised $1,510,970 for 22 research projects by 12 faculty members and two research fellows. Of the 22 funded projects, 21 (95.5%) were completed. There were 110 faculty and research fellow abstracts presented and 113 peer-reviewed publications, for a publication conversion rate of 93.8%. In the student group, 17 of 37 (45.9%) are enrolled in or are applying for OMS residencies. Of the 10 students who have completed OMS training, 3 (30%) are in full-time academic positions. Of the 12 faculty recipients, 9 (75%) remain in OMS academic practice. During this time period, the department received $9.9 million of extramural foundation or National Institutes of Health funding directly or indirectly related to the OMS Foundation grants. The results of this study indicate that 90.2% of projects funded by the OMS Foundation have been completed. Most projects resulted in abstracts and publications in peer-reviewed journals. These grants encouraged students to pursue OMS careers and aided OMS

  14. Clemson University Awarded $1 Million Grant from EPA for Research to Respond to Water Scarcity, Drought and Extreme Events

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a $1 million award to Clemson University for research addressing extreme weather events and climate change which impact the frequency and severity of droughts, subsequent wildf

  15. Notification: Preliminary Research for EPA Cooperative Agreement No. 83388101 Awarded to the Association of Schools of Public Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    December 19, 2013. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Inspector General, plans to begin preliminary research for Cooperative Agreement (CA) No. 83388101 awarded to the Association of Schools of Public Health.

  16. Award 1 Title: Acoustic Communications 2011 Experiment: Deployment Support and Post Experiment Data Handling and Analysis. Award 2 Title: Exploiting Structured Dependencies in the Design of Adaptive Algorithms for Underwater Communication Award. 3 Title: Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Award #1 Title Acoustic Communications 2011 Experiment: Deployment Support and Post Experiment Data Handling and Analysis Award #2 Title...Exploiting Structured Dependencies in the Design of Adaptive Algorithms for Underwater Communication Award #3 Title Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics...and Signal Processing for theNext Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems James Preisig Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

  17. Effect of a Clinical and Translational Science Award institute on grant funding in a major research university.

    PubMed

    Kabo, Felichism W; Mashour, George A

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have examined the impact of Clinical and Translational Science Awards programs on other outcomes, but not on grant seeking. The authors examined the effects on grant seeking of the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR), a Clinical and Translational Science Awards institute at the University of Michigan. We assessed over 63,000 grant proposals submitted at the University of Michigan in the years 2002-2012 using data from the university and MICHR's Tracking Metrics and Reporting System. We used a retrospective, observational study of the dynamics of grant-seeking success and award funding. Heckman selection models were run to assess MICHR's relationship with a proposal's success (selection), and subsequently the award's size (outcome). Models were run for all proposals and for clinical and translational research (CTR) proposals alone. Other covariates included proposal classification, type of grant award, academic unit, and year. MICHR had a positive and statistically significant relationship with success for both proposal types. For all grants, MICHR was associated with a 29.6% increase in award size. For CTR grants, MICHR had a statistically nonsignificant relationship with award size. MICHR's infrastructure, created to enable and enhance CTR, has also created positive spillovers for a broader spectrum of research and grant seeking.

  18. 42 CFR 65a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Awards. 65a.7 Section 65a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS §...

  19. 42 CFR 65a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards. 65a.7 Section 65a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS §...

  20. 42 CFR 65a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Awards. 65a.7 Section 65a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS §...

  1. 42 CFR 65a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Awards. 65a.7 Section 65a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS §...

  2. 42 CFR 65a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards. 65a.7 Section 65a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS §...

  3. A REVIEW OF ELECTRONICS TRAINING RESEARCH LITERATURE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The review of electronics training literature is designed to augment and undate information obtained from a previous evaluative survey of military...and civilian electronics training programs. The review is based primarily on available research reports published during recent years and pertaining to...the training of electronics personnel in the military services. Five major areas of electronics training research are considered in the review

  4. Recovery Act: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Peter; Esposito, Richard; Theodorou, Konstantinos; Hannon, Michael; Lamplugh, Aaron; Ellison, Kirk

    2013-06-30

    Work under the project entitled "Geologic Sequestration Training and Research," was performed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Company from December 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013. The emphasis was on training of students and faculty through research on topics central to further development, demonstration, and commercialization of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The project had the following components: (1) establishment of a laboratory for measurement of rock properties, (2) evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks, (3) evaluation of porosity, permeability, and storage capacity of reservoirs, (4) simulation of CO{sub 2} migration and trapping in storage reservoirs and seepage through seal layers, (5) education and training of students through independent research on rock properties and reservoir simulation, and (6) development of an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Four graduate students and one undergraduate student participated in the project. Two were awarded Ph.D. degrees for their work, the first in December 2010 and the second in August 2013. A third graduate student has proposed research on an advanced technique for measurement of porosity and permeability, and has been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The fourth graduate student is preparing his proposal for research on CCUS and solid waste management. The undergraduate student performed experimental measurements on caprock and reservoir rock samples and received his B.S.M.E. degree in May 2012. The "Caprock Integrity Laboratory," established with support from the present project, is fully functional and equipped for measurement of porosity, permeability, minimum capillary displacement pressure, and effective permeability to gas in the presence of wetting phases. Measurements are made at ambient temperature and under reservoir conditions, including supercritical CO{sub 2

  5. Increasing Research Literacy: The Community Research Fellows Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Jacquelyn V.; Stafford, Jewel D.; Thompson, Vetta Sanders; Javois, Bethany Johnson; Goodman, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    The Community Research Fellows Training (CRFT) Program promotes the role of underserved populations in research by enhancing the capacity for community-based participatory research (CBPR). CRFT consists of 12 didactic training sessions and 3 experiential workshops intended to train community members in research methods and evidence-based public health. The training (a) promotes partnerships between community members and academic researchers, (b) enhances community knowledge of public health research, and (c) trains community members to become critical consumers of research. Fifty community members participated in training sessions taught by multidisciplinary faculty. Forty-five (90%) participants completed the program. Findings demonstrate that the training increased awareness of health disparities, research knowledge, and the capacity to use CBPR as a tool to address disparities. PMID:25742661

  6. Increasing research literacy: the community research fellows training program.

    PubMed

    Coats, Jacquelyn V; Stafford, Jewel D; Sanders Thompson, Vetta; Johnson Javois, Bethany; Goodman, Melody S

    2015-02-01

    The Community Research Fellows Training (CRFT) Program promotes the role of underserved populations in research by enhancing the capacity for community-based participatory research (CBPR). CRFT consists of 12 didactic training sessions and 3 experiential workshops intended to train community members in research methods and evidence-based public health. The training (a) promotes partnerships between community members and academic researchers, (b) enhances community knowledge of public health research, and (c) trains community members to become critical consumers of research. Fifty community members participated in training sessions taught by multidisciplinary faculty. Forty-five (90%) participants completed the program. Findings demonstrate that the training increased awareness of health disparities, research knowledge, and the capacity to use CBPR as a tool to address disparities.

  7. Hutchinson Award to Schindler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, W. John

    David William Schindler is the 1985 recipient of the Hutchinson Award, given annually by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. It is awarded to an active scientist in limnology and oceanography in recognition for outstanding research.

  8. Investments in sexually transmitted infection research, 1997-2013: a systematic analysis of funding awarded to UK institutions.

    PubMed

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cassell, Jackie A; Atun, Rifat

    2015-12-01

    We report the first study that analyses public and philanthropic investments awarded to UK institutions for research related to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We systematically searched award data from the major funders for information on all infectious disease research funding awarded in 1997-2013. The STI-related projects were identified and categorised by pathogen, disease and type of science along the research pipeline from preclinical to translational research. We identified 7393 infection-related awards with total investment of GBP 3.5 billion. Of these, 1238 awards (16.7%) covering funding of GBP 719.1 million (20.5%) were for STI research. HIV as an STI received GBP 465 million across 719 studies; non-HIV STIs received GBP 139 million across 378 studies. The Medical Research Council provided greatest investment (GBP 193 million for HIV, GBP 45 million for non-HIV STIs). Preclinical awards totalled GBP 233 million (37.1%), whilst translational research received GBP 286 million (39.7%). Substantial proportions of HIV investment addressed global health research (GBP 265 million), vaccinology (GBP 110 million) and therapeutics (GBP 202 million). For other STIs, investments focused on diagnostics (GBP 45 million) and global health (GBP 27 million). Human Papilloma Virus research received GBP 58 million and chlamydia GBP 24 million. Funding for non-HIV STIs has declined in the three most recent years of this data set. The investment for HIV research awarded to UK institutions correlates with the high global burden, but other STIs are relatively neglected, including gonorrhoea and syphilis. Future STI funding should be better aligned with burden while addressing the emerging risk of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and outbreaks of other pathogens.

  9. Investments in sexually transmitted infection research, 1997–2013: a systematic analysis of funding awarded to UK institutions

    PubMed Central

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Cassell, Jackie A; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    Background We report the first study that analyses public and philanthropic investments awarded to UK institutions for research related to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Methods We systematically searched award data from the major funders for information on all infectious disease research funding awarded in 1997–2013. The STI–related projects were identified and categorised by pathogen, disease and type of science along the research pipeline from preclinical to translational research. Findings We identified 7393 infection–related awards with total investment of GBP 3.5 billion. Of these, 1238 awards (16.7%) covering funding of GBP 719.1 million (20.5%) were for STI research. HIV as an STI received GBP 465 million across 719 studies; non–HIV STIs received GBP 139 million across 378 studies. The Medical Research Council provided greatest investment (GBP 193 million for HIV, GBP 45 million for non–HIV STIs). Preclinical awards totalled GBP 233 million (37.1%), whilst translational research received GBP 286 million (39.7%). Substantial proportions of HIV investment addressed global health research (GBP 265 million), vaccinology (GBP 110 million) and therapeutics (GBP 202 million). For other STIs, investments focused on diagnostics (GBP 45 million) and global health (GBP 27 million). Human Papilloma Virus research received GBP 58 million and chlamydia GBP 24 million. Funding for non–HIV STIs has declined in the three most recent years of this data set. Conclusions The investment for HIV research awarded to UK institutions correlates with the high global burden, but other STIs are relatively neglected, including gonorrhoea and syphilis. Future STI funding should be better aligned with burden while addressing the emerging risk of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and outbreaks of other pathogens. PMID:26322229

  10. 42 CFR 67.17 - Grant award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE POLICY AND RESEARCH GRANTS AND CONTRACTS Research Grants for Health Services Research... funds are being awarded. (c) Upon request from the grantee, Department grants policy permits...

  11. 42 CFR 67.17 - Grant award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE POLICY AND RESEARCH GRANTS AND CONTRACTS Research Grants for Health Services Research... funds are being awarded. (c) Upon request from the grantee, Department grants policy permits...

  12. 42 CFR 67.17 - Grant award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE POLICY AND RESEARCH GRANTS AND CONTRACTS Research Grants for Health Services Research... funds are being awarded. (c) Upon request from the grantee, Department grants policy permits...

  13. An Institutional Postdoctoral Research Training Program: Predictors of Publication Rate and Federal Funding Success of Its Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Randal G.; Greco-Sanders, Linda; Laudenslager, Mark; Reite, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute of Mental Health funds institutional National Research Service Awards (NRSA) to provide postdoctoral research training. While peer-reviewed publications are the most common outcome measure utilized, there has been little discussion of how publications should be counted or what factors impact the long-term…

  14. An Institutional Postdoctoral Research Training Program: Predictors of Publication Rate and Federal Funding Success of Its Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Randal G.; Greco-Sanders, Linda; Laudenslager, Mark; Reite, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute of Mental Health funds institutional National Research Service Awards (NRSA) to provide postdoctoral research training. While peer-reviewed publications are the most common outcome measure utilized, there has been little discussion of how publications should be counted or what factors impact the long-term…

  15. AERA Research Training Program 1969. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    This report describes and evaluates a training program for educational researchers conducted prior to and following the 1969 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The report's description of each of the program's 12 specific training sessions, which served a total of 542 educational researchers, includes the following…

  16. Leslie S. Greenberg: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Leslie S. Greenberg is an exemplary scientist-practitioner whose pioneering work has significantly altered the landscape of the field of psychotherapy research and practice. His seminal research program has addressed basic questions regarding the significance of empathy, the therapeutic alliance, and emotion in human functioning. Greenberg's sophisticated task-analytic research method, used to empirically test processes of change occurring within psychotherapy, has allowed researchers to build models of how people in individual therapy resolve self-criticism, let go of unresolved anger and hurt from past emotional injuries, and resolve conflict in marital therapy. Greenberg has made a substantial impact through the development of a new therapeutic approach called emotion-focused therapy, an evidence-based treatment for both depression and couples' distress. Greenberg's Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat; May, Robin C

    2014-01-09

    Fungal infections cause significant global morbidity and mortality. We have previously described the UK investments in global infectious disease research, and here our objective is to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for mycology research and outline potential funding gaps in the UK portfolio. Systematic analysis. UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. Primary outcome is the amount of funding and number of studies related to mycology research. Secondary outcomes are describing the investments made to specific fungal pathogens and diseases, and also the type of science along the R&D value chain. We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from public and philanthropic funding institutions awarded between 1997 and 2010, and highlighted the mycology-related projects. Of 6165 funded studies, we identified 171 studies related to mycology (total investment £48.4 million, 1.9% of all infection research, with mean annual funding £3.5 million). Studies related to global health represented 5.1% of this funding (£2.4 million, compared with 35.6% of all infectious diseases). Leading funders were the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (£14.8 million, 30.5%) and Wellcome Trust (£12.0 million, 24.7%). Preclinical studies received £42.2 million (87.3%), with clinical trials, intervention studies and implementation research in total receiving £6.2 million (12.7%). By institution, University of Aberdeen received most funding (£16.9 million, 35%). Studies investigating antifungal resistance received £1.5 million (3.2%). There is little translation of preclinical research into clinical trials or implementation research in spite of substantial disease burden globally, and there are few UK institutions that carry out significant quantities of mycology research of any type. In the context of global health and the burden of disease in low-income countries, more investment is

  18. Mineral and Rock Physics Focus Group Selects Kantor for 2008 Graduate Research Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Catherine

    2009-03-01

    The Mineral and Rock Physics focus group has selected Innokenty Kantor as the recipient of the 2008 Graduate Research Award. Kantor pursued his Ph.D. in high-pressure mineral physics at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, Germany, under the supervision of Leonid Dubrovinsky and Catherine McCammon, and he successfully defended his thesis, entitled “High-pressure and high-temperature structural and electronic properties of (Mg, Fe)O and FeO,” in July 2007. Kantor came to Germany with a strong theoretical background after gaining a master's diploma with honors at Moscow State University, Russia. At the University of Bayreuth, he developed experimental experience by mastering the challenging techniques of diamond anvil cell experimentation, Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Highlights of Kantor's thesis research include the discovery that the rhombohedral distortion in iron oxide (FeO) and magnesium iron oxide ((Mg, Fe)O) does not coincide with the magnetic ordering transition (contrary to what had been assumed for many years); a full description of spin crossover in (Mg, Fe)O above 50 gigapascals including the effect of short-range order; and a new high-pressure monoclinic modification of FeO that may change the interpretation of the B1 → B8 (rock salt to nickel arsenide structure) transition at high pressure and temperature. All of these results have had a significant impact on the research field and influenced models for the behavior of FeO and (Mg, Fe)O at high pressure. Kantor's achievements have been recognized by a number of other awards, most recently the E.ON Bayern Kulturpreis, awarded for one of the best doctoral theses in Bavaria across all research fields.

  19. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations Learner Manual Module 2: Assistance Agreement Awards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A large part of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s mission is to partner with American Indians and Native Alaskans to protect the environment and public health.The goals of this mission are accomplished by awarding federal funds to Tribal Nations.

  20. Data literacy training needs of biomedical researchers.

    PubMed

    Federer, Lisa M; Lu, Ya-Ling; Joubert, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    The research investigated topic priorities for data literacy training for biomedical researchers and staff. An electronic survey was used to assess researchers' level of knowledge related to data literacy skills and the relevance of these skills to their work. Most respondents did not have any formal training in data literacy. Respondents considered most tasks highly relevant to their work but rated their expertise in tasks lower. Among this group, researchers have diverse data literacy training needs. Librarians' expertise makes them well suited to provide such training.

  1. Data literacy training needs of biomedical researchers

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Lisa M.; Lu, Ya-Ling; Joubert, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research investigated topic priorities for data literacy training for biomedical researchers and staff. Methods An electronic survey was used to assess researchers' level of knowledge related to data literacy skills and the relevance of these skills to their work. Results Most respondents did not have any formal training in data literacy. Respondents considered most tasks highly relevant to their work but rated their expertise in tasks lower. Conclusion Among this group, researchers have diverse data literacy training needs. Librarians' expertise makes them well suited to provide such training. PMID:26807053

  2. Training Research: Practical Recommendations for Maximum Impact

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Koerner, Kelly; Weingardt, Kenneth R.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This review offers practical recommendations regarding research on training in evidence-based practices for mental health and substance abuse treatment. When designing training research, we recommend: (a) aligning with the larger dissemination and implementation literature to consider contextual variables and clearly defining terminology, (b) critically examining the implicit assumptions underlying the stage model of psychotherapy development, (c) incorporating research methods from other disciplines that embrace the principles of formative evaluation and iterative review, and (d) thinking about how technology can be used to take training to scale throughout all stages of a training research project. An example demonstrates the implementation of these recommendations. PMID:21380792

  3. Access to core facilities and other research resources provided by the Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Principal investigators who received Clinical and Translational Science Awards created academic homes for biomedical research. They developed program-supported websites to offer coordinated access to a range of core facilities and other research resources. Visitors to the 60 websites will find at least 170 generic services, which this review has categorized in the following seven areas: (1) core facilities, (2) biomedical informatics, (3) funding, (4) regulatory knowledge and support, (5) biostatistics, epidemiology, research design, and ethics, (6) participant and clinical interaction resources, and (7) community engagement. In addition, many websites facilitate access to resources with search engines, navigators, studios, project development teams, collaboration tools, communication systems, and teaching tools. Each of these websites may be accessed from a single site, http://www.CTSAcentral.org. The ability to access the research resources from 60 of the nation's academic health centers presents a novel opportunity for investigators engaged in clinical and translational research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Postdoctoral training in posttraumatic stress disorder research.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Denise M; Vogt, Dawne; Wisco, Blair E; Keane, Terence M

    2015-03-01

    Postdoctoral training is increasingly common in the field of psychology. Although many individuals pursue postdoctoral training in psychology, guidelines for research training programs at this level do not exist. The rapid advances in the field, particularly with respect to genetics, neuroimaging, and data analytic approaches, require clinical scientists to possess knowledge and expertise across a broad array of areas. Postdoctoral training is often needed to acquire such a skill set. This paper describes a postdoctoral training program designed for individuals pursuing academic careers in traumatic stress disorders research. In this paper, we describe the structure of our training program, challenges we have faced during the 15 years of its existence, and how we have addressed these challenges. We conclude with a presentation of outcome data for the training program and a discussion of how training programs in other settings might be structured. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. AGU awarded grant to establish program on engaging 2-year-college students in research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti; Adamec, Bethany Holm

    2012-03-01

    Students at 2-year colleges are a critical part of the future Earth and space science workforce, and undergraduate research experiences provide a hook to retain and ultimately to graduate students in the field. AGU was awarded a planning grant by the U.S. National Science Foundation Directorate for Geosciences (Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences award 1201578) to help launch a new initiative concerning these issues; education and public outreach staff are the principal investigators. This new initiative, titled Unique Research Experiences for Two-Year College Faculty and Students (URECAS), will begin with a planning workshop this summer (11-13 July). The workshop will bring together faculty from 2-year colleges, 4-year colleges and universities, and representatives from professional societies and federal organizations to learn more about how to support 2-year-college faculty and students engaged in Earth and space science research and to discuss the development of a program to strengthen the role of 2-year-college Earth and space science students in the future workforce

  6. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  7. Research Assistant Training Manual: Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This manual is a practical training guide for graduate and undergraduate research assistants (RAs) working in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary. It may also be applicable to research assistants working in other fields or institutions. The purpose of this manual is to train RAs on how to plan and conduct focus groups for…

  8. Policies, Activities and Structures Supporting Research Mentoring: A National Survey of Academic Health Centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, Robert E.; Jang, Susan; Abedin, Zainab; Richards, Boyd F.; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To document the frequency of policies and activities in support of mentoring practices at institutions receiving a U.S. National Institutes of Health’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Method The study consisted of a 69-item survey with questions about the inclusion (formal or informal) of policies, programs/activities and structures supporting mentoring within CTSA-sponsored research (i.e., KL2 programs) and, more broadly, in the CTSA’s home institution. The survey, conducted from November 2010 through January 2011, was sent to the 55 institutions awarded a CTSA at the time of the survey. Follow-up phone interviews were conducted to clarify responses as needed. Results Fifty-one of 55 (92%) institutions completed the survey for institutional programs and 53 of 55 (96%) for KL2 programs. Responses regarding policies and activities involving mentor criteria, mentor–mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluative mechanisms revealed considerable variability between KL2 and institutional programs in some areas, such as having mentor qualification criteria and processes to evaluate mentors The survey also identified areas, such as training and women and minority mentoring programs, where there was frequent sharing of activities between the institutional and KL2 programs. Conclusions KL2 programs and institutional programs tend to have different preferences for policies versus activities to optimize qualification of mentors, the mentor–mentee relationship, incentives and evaluation mechanisms. Frequently, these elements are informal. Individuals in charge of implementing and maintaining mentoring initiatives can use the results of the study to consider their current mentoring policies, structures, and activities by comparing them to national patterns within CTSA institutions. PMID:23165278

  9. Policies, activities, and structures supporting research mentoring: a national survey of academic health centers with clinical and translational science awards.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Robert E; Jang, Susan; Abedin, Zainab; Richards, Boyd F; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    To document the frequency of policies and activities in support of mentoring practices at institutions receiving a U.S. National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The study consisted of a 69-item survey with questions about the inclusion (formal or informal) of policies, activities, and structures supporting mentoring within CTSA-sponsored research (i.e., KL2 programs) and, more broadly, in the CTSA's home institution. The survey, conducted from November 2010 through January 2011, was sent to the 55 institutions awarded CTSAs at the time of the survey. Follow-up phone interviews were conducted to clarify responses as needed. Fifty-one of 55 (92%) institutions completed the survey for institutional programs and 53 of 55 (96%) for KL2 programs. Responses regarding policies and activities involving mentor criteria, mentor-mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluative mechanisms revealed considerable variability between KL2 and institutional programs in some areas, such as having mentor qualification criteria and processes to evaluate mentors. The survey also identified areas, such as training and women and minority mentoring programs, where there was frequent sharing of activities between the institutional and KL2 programs. KL2 programs and institutional programs tend to have different preferences for policies versus activities to optimize qualification of mentors, the mentor-mentee relationship, incentives, and evaluation mechanisms. Frequently, these elements are informal. Individuals in charge of implementing and maintaining mentoring initiatives can use the results of the study to consider their current mentoring policies, structures, and activities by comparing them with national patterns within CTSA institutions.

  10. Research jobs: how good is the training?

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Emma

    2004-12-01

    To determine if a period in a research job improves confidence in research skills and to assess the quality of research training. A questionnaire was designed and piloted to assess the content, structure and process of research training. All individuals who had passed MRCOG in the five years prior to 1999 and were residents of England or Wales. Confidence scores were compared between those with and those without research experience. The availability and value of differing strategies for research training were compared. Confidence in research skills and attitudes to training. Of the 532 usable questionnaires returned, 226 respondents had done or were doing research and these individuals had higher confidence on a variety of research skills than those with no experience of a formal research job. Confidence was patchy with less than 50% feeling confident at assessing bias in a case-controlled study, understanding the statistics used in a paper or assessing the power of a study. Of those who had done research, 50% or less felt their training had been good or excellent in any area. Self-directed learning and discussion with peers were felt to be the most useful strategies for research training. Short intensive courses were not available for many respondents, but were felt to be useful. The high levels of dissatisfaction with the training in key skills required for research suggests that there is a need for a system for recognition of research posts. Reform of training in the research job should build on the current strength of encouraging self-directed learning.

  11. A Research Mentor Training Curriculum for Clinical and Translational Researchers

    PubMed Central

    House, Stephanie; Spencer, Kimberly; Asquith, Pamela; Carney, Paula; Masters, Kristyn S.; McGee, Richard; Shanedling, Janet; Vecchiarelli, Stephanie; Fleming, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To design and evaluate a research mentor training curriculum for clinical and translational researchers. The resulting 8‐hour curriculum was implemented as part of a national mentor training trial. Method The mentor training curriculum was implemented with 144 mentors at 16 academic institutions. Facilitators of the curriculum participated in a train‐the‐trainer workshop to ensure uniform delivery. The data used for this report were collected from participants during the training sessions through reflective writing, and following the last training session via confidential survey with a 94% response rate. Results A total of 88% of respondents reported high levels of satisfaction with the training experience, and 90% noted they would recommend the training to a colleague. Participants also reported significant learning gains across six mentoring competencies as well as specific impacts of the training on their mentoring practice. Conclusions The data suggest the described research mentor training curriculum is an effective means of engaging research mentors to reflect upon and improve their research mentoring practices. The training resulted in high satisfaction, self‐reported skill gains as well as behavioral changes of clinical and translational research mentors. Given success across 16 diverse sites, this training may serve as a national model. Clin Trans Sci 2013; Volume 6: 26–33 PMID:23399086

  12. Attention theory and training research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, James G., Jr.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Lintern, Gavan; Harwood, Kelly

    1987-01-01

    This study used elements of attention theory as a methodological basis to decompose a complex training task in order to improve training efficiency. The complex task was a microcomputer flight simulation where subjects were required to control the stability of their own helicopter while acquiring and engaging enemy helicopers in a threat enviroment. Subjects were divided into whole-task, part-task, and part/open loop adaptive task groups in a transfer of training paradigm. The effect of reducing mental workload at the early stages of learning was examined with respect to the degree that subordinate elements of the complex task could be automated through practice of consistent, learnable stimulus-response relationships. Results revealed trends suggesting the benefit of isolating consistently mapped sub-tasks for part-task training and the presence of a time-sharing skill over and above the skill required for the separate subtasks.

  13. Attention theory and training research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, James G., Jr.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Lintern, Gavan; Harwood, Kelly

    1987-01-01

    This study used elements of attention theory as a methodological basis to decompose a complex training task in order to improve training efficiency. The complex task was a microcomputer flight simulation where subjects were required to control the stability of their own helicopter while acquiring and engaging enemy helicopers in a threat enviroment. Subjects were divided into whole-task, part-task, and part/open loop adaptive task groups in a transfer of training paradigm. The effect of reducing mental workload at the early stages of learning was examined with respect to the degree that subordinate elements of the complex task could be automated through practice of consistent, learnable stimulus-response relationships. Results revealed trends suggesting the benefit of isolating consistently mapped sub-tasks for part-task training and the presence of a time-sharing skill over and above the skill required for the separate subtasks.

  14. Ten-Year Publication Trajectories of Health Services Research Career Development Award Recipients: Collaboration, Awardee Characteristics, and Productivity Correlates.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, Max A; Finlay, Andrea K; Cronkite, Ruth C; Bi, Xiaoyu; Hayashi, Ko; Maisel, Natalya C; Amundson, Erin O'Rourke; Weitlauf, Julie C; Litt, Iris F; Owens, Douglas K; Timko, Christine; Cucciare, Michael A; Finney, John W

    2016-03-01

    This study's purpose was to identify distinct publishing trajectories among 442 participants in three prominent mentored health services research career development programs (Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, and Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality) in the 10 years after award receipt and to examine awardee characteristics associated with different trajectories. Curricula vitae (CVs) of researchers receiving awards between 1991 and 2010 were coded for publications, grants, and awardee characteristics. We found that awardees published at constant or increasing rates despite flat or decreasing rates of first-author publications. Senior-author publications rose concurrently with rates of overall publications. Higher overall publication trajectories were associated with receiving more grants, more citations as measured by the h-index, and more authors per article. Lower trajectory groups were older and had a greater proportion of female awardees. Career development awards supported researchers who generally published successfully, but trajectories varied across individual researchers. Researchers' collaborative efforts produced an increasing number of articles, whereas first author articles were written at a more consistent rate. Career development awards in health services research supported the careers of researchers who published at a high rate; future research should further examine reasons for variation in publishing among early career researchers.

  15. Overview of Athletic Training Education Research Publications

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the limited amount of peer-reviewed literature on athletic training education that has been published in athletic training journals. Publications that related specifically to the development of evaluation tools or specific addenda to the required athletic training curriculum were not included. Background: As education reform continues to unfold in athletic training, it is important for all certified athletic trainers to understand the research that undergirds the educational practices in athletic training. Many of the profession's educational practices have been taken from standards and methods developed by the discipline of education, with very little validation for applicability to the discipline of athletic training. A very limited number of comprehensive scientific investigations of the educational standards and practices in athletic training education have been carried out; however, for more research to be conducted, it is essential that the currently available research be reviewed. Description: The summaries of athletic training educational research in this article include the topics of learning styles, facilitation of learning and professional development, instructional methods, clinical instruction and supervision, predictors of success on the National Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Certification certification examination, program administration, and continuing education. The amount of research in athletic training education is limited when compared with the amount and quality of educational research available in other professions, such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. In this article, I attempt to describe the existing literature and identify what is needed to expand the breadth and depth of research in athletic training education. Clinical Advantages: This article is intended to help educators identify areas within athletic training education that require further

  16. A candidate's experience doing research during training.

    PubMed

    Hadge, Luke

    2012-10-01

    A psychoanalytic candidate explores his experience of participating in a research project at his institute during his training. The candidate has been a member of Sabrina Cherry's prospective study of psychoanalytic practice and professional development conducted at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. While much as been written about candidacy from numerous perspectives, there is little in the literature about how being engaged in research affects a candidate's overall training experience. In particular, attention is paid to understanding the benefits, synergies, conflicts, and tensions in combining research with such aspects of analytic training as the training analysis, control cases, supervision, classes, and institute life. A parallel is drawn between the listening and interpretive skills learned in order to practice analysis and the method of textual analysis employed in the research project. The author believes that his research training and the impact of the specific research topic have enriched and deepened his analytic training, while at the same time revealing certain anxieties in integrating research with the development of his analytic skills and identity.

  17. 76 FR 59718 - Announcement of Funding Awards Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities (CFCF...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... provide early childhood education adult education and/or job training programs for public housing.... Facility. the PHA will provide adult education early childhood education and job training. St. Louis.... Facility. the PHA will provide adult education early childhood education and job training....

  18. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  19. News Quantum physics: German Physical Society spring meeting Journal access: American Physical Society's online journals will be available for free in all US high schools Award: High-school physics teacher receives American award for excellence Teacher training: Fobinet offers coordination of teacher-training activities Astronomy: Astronomy fans see stars at Astrofest Conference: Delegates enjoy the workshops and activities at CPD conference Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Quantum physics: German Physical Society spring meeting Journal access: American Physical Society's online journals will be available for free in all US high schools Award: High-school physics teacher receives American award for excellence Teacher training: Fobinet offers coordination of teacher-training activities Astronomy: Astronomy fans see stars at Astrofest Conference: Delegates enjoy the workshops and activities at CPD conference Forthcoming events

  20. Training Lessons Learned and Confirmed from Military Training Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    important differences in individuals that could impact the learning process (Como & Snow, 1986; Gagne & Briggs, 1979). Involve trainers in the design...significant action. Other aspects of the situation do not need to be presented (Cronbach, 1963; Gagne , 1965). Our training observations and...military training research and development in R. C. Richey (Ed.) The legacy of Robert M. Gagn6 (pp. 221-227). Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University, ERIC

  1. Richard Rogers: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Richard Rogers as the 2001 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. "Richard Rogers casts a long shadow over the realm of psychological research with public policy implications. His achievements concerning criminal responsibility and malingering have been important and lasting, but his most uniquely impactful contribution to public policy is his enhancement of our understanding of the constitutional protections embodied in Miranda rights. His investigations have exploded the myth of a single, easily understood Miranda warning. The ramifications of this work are profound, especially for socially marginalized populations, and include its direct acknowledgment as the impetus for critical developments in American Bar Association policy on custodial interrogations." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat; May, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Fungal infections cause significant global morbidity and mortality. We have previously described the UK investments in global infectious disease research, and here our objective is to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for mycology research and outline potential funding gaps in the UK portfolio. Design Systematic analysis. Setting UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome is the amount of funding and number of studies related to mycology research. Secondary outcomes are describing the investments made to specific fungal pathogens and diseases, and also the type of science along the R&D value chain. Methods We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from public and philanthropic funding institutions awarded between 1997 and 2010, and highlighted the mycology-related projects. Results Of 6165 funded studies, we identified 171 studies related to mycology (total investment £48.4 million, 1.9% of all infection research, with mean annual funding £3.5 million). Studies related to global health represented 5.1% of this funding (£2.4 million, compared with 35.6% of all infectious diseases). Leading funders were the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (£14.8 million, 30.5%) and Wellcome Trust (£12.0 million, 24.7%). Preclinical studies received £42.2 million (87.3%), with clinical trials, intervention studies and implementation research in total receiving £6.2 million (12.7%). By institution, University of Aberdeen received most funding (£16.9 million, 35%). Studies investigating antifungal resistance received £1.5 million (3.2%). Conclusions There is little translation of preclinical research into clinical trials or implementation research in spite of substantial disease burden globally, and there are few UK institutions that carry out significant quantities of mycology research of any type. In the context

  3. TRAIN: Training through Research Application Italian iNitiative.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Claudio; Bottero, Sergio; d'Alessandro, Francesca; Giacomini, Mauro; Guderzo, Angela; Moretti, Franca; Marincola, Margherita; Pesce, Giorgia; Pierotti, Marco A; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Belardelli, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Training through Research Application Italian iNitiative (TRAIN) is a mobility program financed under the EU action called "Cofinancing of regional, national and international programs" (COFUND) of the European Commission Seventh Framework Program (FP7) - People, and has been designed to encourage the promotion and development of international programs of research through mobility at various stages of research careers. The aim of TRAIN is to improve translational skills in the field of cancer by promoting a three-year international mobility program assigning a total of 51 fellowships subdivided into incoming, outgoing and reintegration fellowships.?The TRAIN proposal has been submitted in February 2009 to the European Commission in reply to the 2008 FP7-PEOPLE-COFUND call and has been successfully evaluated. TRAIN is addressed to postdoctoral scientists or scientists who have at least four years' full-time equivalent research experience and who wish to improve their careers spending one year abroad. The mobility program is open also to non-Italian experienced scientists wishing to spend one year in an Italian research center or private company. Part of the scheme is targeted to experienced Italian scientists who have completed at least three years of research in a foreign country and are interested in returning to Italy.?TRAIN is part of an overall Italian strategy outlined by the International Program of the Italian Cancer Network "Alleanza Contro il Cancro" to promote Italian participation in the building of the European Area for translational cancer research and to enhance the interaction between academy and industry.

  4. Undergraduate Research Training and Graduate Recruitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towl, Michael; Senior, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Formal opportunities for psychology undergraduates to carry out research training are starting to emerge. In spite of the fact that such training programmes would have a high authentic learning component little is known of undergraduate expectations and attitudes towards such programmes. This paper aims to focus on the issues.…

  5. A Critical Review of Parent Training Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiese, Margaret R. Rogers

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed and evaluated parent training research conducted between 1975 and 1990. Analyzed 148 published studies regarding effectiveness of parent training as intervention. Case studies reviewed exhibited several methodological shortcomings. Group studies reviewed also did not routinely collect treatment integrity information, and 50 percent of…

  6. Undergraduate Research Training and Graduate Recruitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towl, Michael; Senior, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Formal opportunities for psychology undergraduates to carry out research training are starting to emerge. In spite of the fact that such training programmes would have a high authentic learning component little is known of undergraduate expectations and attitudes towards such programmes. This paper aims to focus on the issues.…

  7. BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Gail; Campbell, Coral

    2012-01-01

    The prestigious BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards are awarded annually to one teacher from each state of Australia. The awards recognise and value the time and effort that teachers give to the profession and to students conducting scientific research projects. This paper examines the Science Award scheme to identify the characteristics common to…

  8. BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Gail; Campbell, Coral

    2012-01-01

    The prestigious BHP Billiton Science Teacher Awards are awarded annually to one teacher from each state of Australia. The awards recognise and value the time and effort that teachers give to the profession and to students conducting scientific research projects. This paper examines the Science Award scheme to identify the characteristics common to…

  9. Return on Investment in Training: Research Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew, Ed.

    Following an introduction ("Return on Investment in Training" by Andrew Smith) that provides an overview and a synopsis of research findings, the following five chapters of this book present the results of five research projects funded by the National Research and Evaluation Committee in Australia in 1999-2000. The first four of these…

  10. Group Creativity Training for Children: Lessons Learned from Two Award-Winning Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Namin; Jang, Yeon-Ju

    2017-01-01

    The development of group creativity can be challenging for both young students and their teachers. This study examined the processes and learning outcomes of group creativity training from the perspectives of elementary school students and teachers while identifying critical factors that contributed to the success of the training. Data were…

  11. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 1. Army Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    1984 Program 0 Number of Proposals Phase I Phase II Tonics Received Awards Awards Army ill 758 81 35 Navy 146 859 99 52 Air Force 283 1208 162 73 S DARPA...17 107 15 7 DNA 8 80 12 _ 565 3012 369 168 % iii1-- ’ 0 FY 1985 Proctram Number of Proposals Phase I Phase II S Tonics Received Awards Awards Army...OFFICE: HDL CONTRACTOR WILL DEVELOP A LAGRANGIAN FORMULATION FOR THE ELECTRO- MAGNETIC RESPONSE OF A METALLIC ENCLOSURE WITH THIN, SLIGHTLY DIFFUSIVE

  12. Access to Core Facilities and Other Research Resources Provided by the Clinical and Translational Science Awards

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract  Principal investigators who received Clinical and Translational Science Awards created academic homes for biomedical research. They developed program‐supported websites to offer coordinated access to a range of core facilities and other research resources. Visitors to the 60 websites will find at least 170 generic services, which this review has categorized in the following seven areas: (1) core facilities, (2) biomedical informatics, (3) funding, (4) regulatory knowledge and support, (5) biostatistics, epidemiology, research design, and ethics, (6) participant and clinical interaction resources, and (7) community engagement. In addition, many websites facilitate access to resources with search engines, navigators, studios, project development teams, collaboration tools, communication systems, and teaching tools. Each of these websites may be accessed from a single site, http://www.CTSAcentral.org. The ability to access the research resources from 60 of the nation's academic health centers presents a novel opportunity for investigators engaged in clinical and translational research. Clin Trans Sci 2012; Volume #: 1–5 PMID:22376262

  13. Asian Communication: Research, Training, Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Daniel, Ed.

    A selection of eight papers on Asian communication is presented for the purpose of alerting communication researchers to significant work being done outside of the academic community. Topics include (1) a Malaysian experience in using commercial resources for audience research, (2) a content analysis model of the Pakistani press, (3) the…

  14. EPA awards nearly $200,000 to Fresno, Calif., for environmental job training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a $192,300 environmental workforce development grant to the Fresno Area Workforce Investment Corporation. Fresno will use the federal grant to train 70 students and place at le

  15. 77 FR 28360 - Applications for New Awards; Training Program for Federal TRIO Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... admissions policies and procedures; and proven strategies to improve the financial literacy and economic literacy of students, including topics such as basic personal finance information, household money... Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information Training Program for Federal TRIO...

  16. Organizational and Institutional Factors Associated with National Institutes of Health Research Grant Awards to Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Zlotnik, Joan; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and institutional factors that may be associated with the success of schools of social work (SOSWs) in securing research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and constituent agencies. Using data from the CRISP database on NIH grant funding, the Lombardi Program on Measuring University…

  17. Rodriguez Recognized as Recipient of the MSSS AACC Chair’s Inspirational Award | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Henry Rodriguez, director of the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, has been recognized as the recipient of the Chair’s Inspirational Award by the Mass Spectrometry and Separation Sciences for Laboratory Medicine Division (MSSS), American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC).

  18. Organizational and Institutional Factors Associated with National Institutes of Health Research Grant Awards to Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Zlotnik, Joan; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and institutional factors that may be associated with the success of schools of social work (SOSWs) in securing research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and constituent agencies. Using data from the CRISP database on NIH grant funding, the Lombardi Program on Measuring University…

  19. 13 CFR 306.2 - Award requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Local and National Technical Assistance § 306.2 Award requirements. EDA selects Projects for Local and National Technical Assistance Investments in... extent to which the Project: (a) Strengthens the capacity of local, State or national organizations and...

  20. 13 CFR 306.2 - Award requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Local and National Technical Assistance § 306.2 Award requirements. EDA selects Projects for Local and National Technical Assistance Investments in... extent to which the Project: (a) Strengthens the capacity of local, State or national organizations and...

  1. 13 CFR 306.2 - Award requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Local and National Technical Assistance § 306.2 Award requirements. EDA selects Projects for Local and National Technical Assistance Investments in... extent to which the Project: (a) Strengthens the capacity of local, State or national organizations and...

  2. 13 CFR 306.2 - Award requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Local and National Technical Assistance § 306.2 Award requirements. EDA selects Projects for Local and National Technical Assistance Investments in... extent to which the Project: (a) Strengthens the capacity of local, State or national organizations and...

  3. 13 CFR 306.2 - Award requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Local and National Technical Assistance § 306.2 Award requirements. EDA selects Projects for Local and National Technical Assistance Investments in... extent to which the Project: (a) Strengthens the capacity of local, State or national organizations and...

  4. Looking back at the John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship: the most prestigious research award of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Boult, Margaret; Babidge, Wendy; Pleass, Susan; Scott, David

    2015-10-01

    The John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship is a generous endowment made to the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) by the young neurosurgeon's family, following his death from a brain tumour. In this article, we examine the significance and legacy of the grant since its inception in 1979. This is the highest level of research fellowship awarded by the RACS recognizing early career excellence, as part of its significant research funding programme (over $1.7 million in 2015). John Mitchell Crouch recipients have been pioneers in various areas of medicine where they have developed new technologies, established research centres, improved patient safety and military surgery and embraced evidence-based medicine. The funds they received have directly contributed to research published in numerous highly respected peer-reviewed journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine; established new laboratories, helped fund clinical trials and allowed new directions of research to be pursued. Recipients of the John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship have been recognized with many awards including 11 Australian and New Zealand Honours to date. Many other significant research funds have been subsequently bestowed, including over 120 National Health Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants to Australian and New Zealand recipients subsequent to their Fellowship. This article also shows the range of disciplines in which the award has supported cutting-edge research leading to benefits for patients and health care.

  5. Youth Employability. Monographs on Research and Policy Studies. Five Award-Winning Monographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This document presents five winning entries in the second annual competition for papers reporting research and policy studies on the topic of youth employability. In their paper entitled "The Impact of Employment and Training Programs on the Work Attitudes of Disadvantaged Youth," Michael Forcier and Andrew Hahn review and synthesize the…

  6. Integrating Research Skills Training into Non--Research Methods Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Jules

    2014-01-01

    Research skills are a valued commodity by industry and university administrators. Despite the importance placed on these skills students typically dislike taking research method courses where these skills are learned. However, training in research skills does not necessarily have to be confined to these courses. In this study participants at a…

  7. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    this laboratory concentrates on the area of tumor immunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We have constructed microbial vaccines to be used...to the transgene product induced by the vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the form of clinical...trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to induce anti

  8. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    i mmunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We ha ve constructed microbial vaccines to be used for the investigation of gene and immunotherapy... vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the fo rm of clinical trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with...prostate cancer. Important in thes e trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to in duce anti-tumor immunity. We have recently completed

  9. 77 FR 20369 - Applications for New Awards; Centers for Independent Living-Training and Technical Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... within a local community by individuals with disabilities and that provides an array of independent... topics. The CILs T&TA Center must make available to all CILs a broad array of resources, training, and... by the CFDA number. Do not include ] the CFDA number's alpha suffix in your search (e.g., search...

  10. 77 FR 29681 - Announcement of Funding Awards, Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities (CFCF...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ..., adult education, and/or job training programs for public housing residents. More specifically, in... announced in this Notice were selected for funding in a competition posted on HUD's Web site on May 24, 2011. Applications were scored and selected for funding based on the selection criteria in that NOFA. These...

  11. Achieving Recognition as a World Class Airport through Education and Training. Sorenson Best Paper Award Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization has standards for airport certification that require education and training of personnel. The American Association of Airport Executives offers accreditation and certification in airport operations and safety that can meet the needs of world-class airports. (Contains 18 references.) (SK)

  12. Achieving Recognition as a World Class Airport through Education and Training. Sorenson Best Paper Award Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization has standards for airport certification that require education and training of personnel. The American Association of Airport Executives offers accreditation and certification in airport operations and safety that can meet the needs of world-class airports. (Contains 18 references.) (SK)

  13. 76 FR 65743 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities (CFCF...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... childhood education, adult education, and/or job training programs for public housing residents. More..., Facility. which the PHA will provide WA 98405-4037. adult education, early childhood education, and job... Development of a facility at Street, Newark, NJ 07102-3112. Facility. which the PHA will provide...

  14. EPA awards nearly $200,000 for environmental job training in Richmond, Calif.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a $192,300 environmental workforce development grant to RichmondBUILD, an environmental job training program in Richmond, Calif. RichmondBUILD will use the federal grant to tra

  15. Training and career development for comparative effectiveness research workforce development: CTSA Consortium Strategic Goal Committee on comparative effectiveness research workgroup on workforce development.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Kurt; Kapoor, Wishwa; Helfand, Mark; Meltzer, David O; McDonald, Mary Anne; Selker, Harry

    2010-10-01

    As comparative effectiveness research (CER) increasingly becomes a national priority, there are increased needs for training and workforce development in this area. Particularly important CER competencies include clinical epidemiology, biomedical informatics, economic analyses, systematic reviews, clinical practice guideline development, use of large databases and electronic health records for research, practice-based research, implementation and dissemination, health services research, and decision analysis. Institutions funded by Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) should be one of the central stakeholders in providing training and career development in CER. Survey results regarding the current CER capacity and needs of CTSAs are presented, and recommendations are provided. Volume 5: 258-262. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Building a research group of Space Physics at UAHuntsville -- the impact of an NSF career award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.

    2011-12-01

    G. Li (1,2) (1) Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville Huntsville, AL, 35899 (2) CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville Huntsville, AL, 35899 The author joined the faculty of the department of Physics at University of Alabama in Huntsville in August 2008. He was awarded the NSF Career award ATM-0847719 in 2009. To date, the Career award has provided partial supports to one postdoc, two graduate students and three undergraduate students for a variety of periods. Three publications came out as a result of the award (one of which is first authored by one undergraduate). Another two publications are in preparation. The award also helped the PI to be further recognized by the field of space plasma physics and cosmic ray physics. For example, in July 2009, the PI was awarded the Young Scientist Medal by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP); in April 2010, the PI won an Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) 2010 Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award. In short, the NSF CAREER has helped the PI to start his career at a level without which, will be impossible.

  17. Research in Accrediting Efforts (Project REA). An Assessment on the Awarding of Academic Credit for CETA Activities in Illinois. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanoff, Karen, Comp.; Klehm, Jeanette, Comp.

    Summaries are presented of 15 case studies conducted at Illinois Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) regions to determine the kind of credentialing mechanisms that exist for awarding academic credit or some other record of achievement to those eligible participants who complete CETA training programs. Introductory material describes…

  18. Developmental and environmental influences on physiology and behavior--2014 Alan N. Epstein Research Award.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2015-12-01

    Environmental factors acting during development of an individual may influence future health and disease susceptibility. Stressors, including altered diet, psychosocial stress, and immune challenge, during gestation can have negative consequences on the intrauterine environment and increase disease susceptibility of the developing fetus. The long-term effects on offspring have been observed in humans and include greater susceptibility to psychiatric disease, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and adverse metabolic conditions including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies in my laboratory use rodent models and incorporate a multilevel approach to determine the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological correlates of disease development as a consequence of early life stressors. The road I took in developing this research program was a rather circuitous one and navigating that path would not have been possible without the many mentors, colleagues, fellows and students who provided critical support. Although my name appears on the plaque of the Alan N. Epstein Research Award, I share this with all those I had the privilege of working with along that road, as briefly summarized in this article. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Developmental and Environmental Influences on Physiology and Behavior – 2014 Alan N. Epstein Research Award

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, Kellie L. K.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors acting during development of an individual may influence future health and disease susceptibility. Stressors, including altered diet, psychosocial stress, immune challenge, during gestation can have negative consequences on the intrauterine environment and increase disease susceptibility of the developing fetus. The long-term effects on offspring have been observed in humans and include greater susceptibility to psychiatric disease, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and adverse metabolic conditions including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies in my laboratory use rodent models and incorporate a multilevel approach to determine the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological correlates of disease development as a consequence of early life stressors. The road I took in developing this research program was a rather circuitous one and navigating that path would not have been possible without the many mentors, colleagues, fellows and students who provided critical support. Although my name appears on the plaque of the Alan N. Epstein Research Award, I share this with all those I had the privilege of working with along that road, as briefly summarized in this article. PMID:26291266

  20. Tracking the Impact of the National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Science Awards on Child Health Research: Developing and Evaluating a Measurement Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Huskins, W. Charles; Sullivan, Clare D.; Wang, Janey; Aitken, Mary; Alexander, Steven R.; Epstein, Leon; Hoberman, Alejandro; Neufeld, Ellis; Philipps, Anthony; Shanley, Thomas P.; Szilagyi, Peter; Purucker, Mary; Barkin, Shari L.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2006, the National Institutes of Health has provided institutional infrastructure grants, called Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs), to support adult and pediatric clinical and translational research in United States institutions. A CTSA Consortium Child Health Oversight Committee workgroup developed metrics to measure the impact of CTSAs on child health (CH) research. A cross-sectional survey to collect metric data was distributed to the 46 institutions that received CTSAs during 2006-09. Thirty-seven (80%) institutions responded to the survey. Data regarding 7 metrics were reported by >70% of responding institutions: the proportion of overall funding (median, interquartile range; 0.12, 0.06–0.19) and pilot grants (0.15, 0.11–0.21) supporting CH research; the proportion of active clinical research center studies involving children (0.23, 0.15–0.35); the proportion of IRB-approved (0.24, 0.16–0.30) and funded (0.22, 0.18–0.30) studies involving children; the proportion of mentored research training awards to CH investigators (0.18, 0.11–0.28); and, the proportion of CTSA leadership positions held by pediatricians (0.18, 0.12–0.28). CTSAs provide substantial support for CH research, although additional investment in CH research is needed to improve the health of children. These metrics provide an initial means to track the impact of CTSAs on CH research. PMID:22398699

  1. Processes and Outcomes from a Medical Student Research Training Program in Integrative, Complementary, and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dicianno, Brad E; Glick, Ronald M; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Boninger, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    In response to the growing need to train a new generation of clinician scientists, a research program was developed to train medical students in integrative, complementary, and alternative medicine (ICAM) research early in their careers. A total of 25 students (100%) successfully completed a 10-week program. Students reported significantly increased levels of knowledge in all 7 integrative, complementary, and alternative medicine topics at the conclusion of the program. All students presented their work at one or more local research symposia. In addition, the average number of quality research outputs, which included manuscripts, awards, and abstracts presented at national and international meetings, was 1.5 per student, which exceeded benchmarks based on prior program outcomes. Results from this program may be useful when planning larger or longer-term projects aimed at attracting physicians who will become our next generation of academicians, researchers, and healers.

  2. Preliminary Examination and Measurement of the Internship Research Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Julia C.; Szymanski, Dawn M.; Ozegovic, Jelena Jovanovic; Briggs-Phillips, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Consistent with C. J. Gelso's (1979, 1993, 1997) research training environment theory, the authors hypothesized that research training environments exist in predoctoral internships. The Internship Research Training Environment Scale (IRTES) was developed to assess research training environments found in predoctoral psychology internships.…

  3. MO-DE-BRA-04: The CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network: Training of New Generation Innovators

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, J; Collins, L; Devic, S; El Naqa, I; Nadeau, J; Reader, A; Beaulieu, L; Despres, P; Pike, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Over the past century, physicists have played a major role in transforming scientific discovery into everyday clinical applications. However, with the increasingly stringent requirements to regulate medical physics as a health profession, the role of physicists as scientists and innovators has become at serious risk of erosion. These challenges trigger the need for a new, revolutionized training program at the graduate level that respects scientific rigor, attention for medical physics-relevant developments in basic sciences, innovation and entrepreneurship. Methods: A grant proposal was funded by the Collaborative REsearch and Training Experience program (CREATE) of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. This enabled the creation of the Medical Physics Research Training Network (MPRTN) around two CAMPEP-accredited medical physics programs. Members of the network consist of medical device companies, government (research and regulatory) and academia. The MPRTN/CREATE program proposes a curriculum with three main themes: (1) radiation physics, (2) imaging & image processing and (3) radiation response, outcomes and modeling. Results: The MPRTN was created mid 2013 (mprtn.com) and features (1) four new basic Ph.D. courses; (2) industry participation in research projects; (3) formal job-readiness training with involvement of guest faculty from academia, government and industry. MPRTN activities since 2013 include 22 conferences; 7 workshops and 4 exchange travels. Three patents were filed or issued, nine awards/best papers were won. Fifteen journal publications were accepted/published, 102 conference abstracts. There are now 13 industry partners. Conclusion: A medical physics research training network has been set up with the goal to harness graduate student’s job-readiness for industry, government and academia in addition to the conventional clinical role. Two years after inception, significant successes have been booked

  4. ISS Microgravity Research Payload Training Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Geveden, Rex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Discipline has multiple categories of science payloads that are being planned and currently under development to operate on various ISS on-orbit increments. The current program includes six subdisciplines; Materials Science, Fluids Physics, Combustion Science, Fundamental Physics, Cellular Biology and Macromolecular Biotechnology. All of these experiment payloads will require the astronaut various degrees of crew interaction and science observation. With the current programs planning to build various facility class science racks, the crew will need to be trained on basic core operations as well as science background. In addition, many disciplines will use the Express Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to utilize the accommodations provided by these facilities for smaller and less complex type hardware. The Microgravity disciplines will be responsible to have a training program designed to maximize the experiment and hardware throughput as well as being prepared for various contingencies both with anomalies as well as unexpected experiment observations. The crewmembers will need various levels of training from simple tasks as power on and activate to extensive training on hardware mode change out to observing the cell growth of various types of tissue cultures. Sample replacement will be required for furnaces and combustion type modules. The Fundamental Physics program will need crew EVA support to provide module change out of experiment. Training will take place various research centers and hardware development locations. It is expected that onboard training through various methods and video/digital technology as well as limited telecommunication interaction. Since hardware will be designed to operate from a few weeks to multiple research increments, flexibility must be planned in the training approach and procedure skills to optimize the output as well as the equipment maintainability. Early increment lessons learned

  5. The Walter Munk Award for Distinguished Research in Oceanography Related to Sound and the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    Oceanography Society publicizes the call for nominations for the Walter Munk Award in relevant scientific publications , websites and e-mail lists. Nominations are solicited from the international oceanographic community.

  6. ASLO Presents Hutchinson Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence Richards Pomeroy, Alumni Foundation Distinguished Professor at the University o f Georgia, Athens, is the 1987 recipient of the Hutchinson Award, given annually by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO). The award is given in recognition o f outstanding past and current research in limnology and oceanography.Larry Pomeroy was trained in zoology at the University of Michigan, where he received his B.S. and M.S., and at Rutgers University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1959. In his very first published research, on phosphorus uptake by the American oyster, he began the interest in phosphorus and mineral cycling in natural waters that was to be a major research theme o f his for the next 20 years. His studies at the University of Georgia included measurements of estuaries, coral reefs, zooplankton excretion, salt marshes, and sediment-water exchange. The techniques and understanding that he developed and the publications he produced with a variety of coauthors made him a world leader in the biogeochemistry of phosphorus cycling.

  7. Models of interinstitutional partnerships between research intensive universities and minority serving institutions (MSI) across the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium.

    PubMed

    Ofili, Elizabeth O; Fair, Alecia; Norris, Keith; Verbalis, Joseph G; Poland, Russell; Bernard, Gordon; Stephens, David S; Dubinett, Steven M; Imperato-McGinley, Julianne; Dottin, Robert P; Pulley, Jill; West, Andrew; Brown, Arleen; Mellman, Thomas A

    2013-12-01

    Health disparities are an immense challenge to American society. Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) housed within the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) are designed to accelerate the translation of experimental findings into clinically meaningful practices and bring new therapies to the doorsteps of all patients. Research Centers at Minority Institutions (RCMI) program at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) are designed to build capacity for biomedical research and training at minority serving institutions. The CTSA created a mechanism fostering formal collaborations between research intensive universities and minority serving institutions (MSI) supported by the RCMI program. These consortium-level collaborations activate unique translational research approaches to reduce health disparities with credence to each academic institutions history and unique characteristics. Five formal partnerships between research intensive universities and MSI have formed as a result of the CTSA and RCMI programs. These partnerships present a multifocal approach; shifting cultural change and consciousness toward addressing health disparities, and training the next generation of minority scientists. This collaborative model is based on the respective strengths and contributions of the partnering institutions, allowing bidirectional interchange and leveraging NIH and institutional investments providing measurable benchmarks toward the elimination of health disparities.

  8. Models of Interinstitutional Partnerships between Research Intensive Universities and Minority Serving Institutions (MSI) across the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Alecia; Norris, Keith; Verbalis, Joseph G.; Poland, Russell; Bernard, Gordon; Stephens, David S.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Imperato‐McGinley, Julianne; Dottin, Robert P.; Pulley, Jill; West, Andrew; Brown, Arleen; Mellman, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Health disparities are an immense challenge to American society. Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) housed within the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) are designed to accelerate the translation of experimental findings into clinically meaningful practices and bring new therapies to the doorsteps of all patients. Research Centers at Minority Institutions (RCMI) program at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) are designed to build capacity for biomedical research and training at minority serving institutions. The CTSA created a mechanism fostering formal collaborations between research intensive universities and minority serving institutions (MSI) supported by the RCMI program. These consortium‐level collaborations activate unique translational research approaches to reduce health disparities with credence to each academic institutions history and unique characteristics. Five formal partnerships between research intensive universities and MSI have formed as a result of the CTSA and RCMI programs. These partnerships present a multifocal approach; shifting cultural change and consciousness toward addressing health disparities, and training the next generation of minority scientists. This collaborative model is based on the respective strengths and contributions of the partnering institutions, allowing bidirectional interchange and leveraging NIH and institutional investments providing measurable benchmarks toward the elimination of health disparities. PMID:24119157

  9. ISCB Ebola Award for Important Future Research on the Computational Biology of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Peter D.; Berger, Bonnie; Kovats, Diane; Lengauer, Thomas; Linial, Michal; Sabeti, Pardis; Hide, Winston; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Speed is of the essence in combating Ebola; thus, computational approaches should form a significant component of Ebola research. As for the development of any modern drug, computational biology is uniquely positioned to contribute through comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Ebola strains as well as 3-D protein modeling. Other computational approaches to Ebola may include large-scale docking studies of Ebola proteins with human proteins and with small-molecule libraries, computational modeling of the spread of the virus, computational mining of the Ebola literature, and creation of a curated Ebola database. Taken together, such computational efforts could significantly accelerate traditional scientific approaches. In recognition of the need for important and immediate solutions from the field of computational biology against Ebola, the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) announces a prize for an important computational advance in fighting the Ebola virus. ISCB will confer the ISCB Fight against Ebola Award, along with a prize of US$2,000, at its July 2016 annual meeting (ISCB Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology [ISMB] 2016, Orlando, Florida).

  10. ISCB Ebola Award for Important Future Research on the Computational Biology of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Peter D.; Berger, Bonnie; Kovats, Diane; Lengauer, Thomas; Linial, Michal; Sabeti, Pardis; Hide, Winston; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Speed is of the essence in combating Ebola; thus, computational approaches should form a significant component of Ebola research. As for the development of any modern drug, computational biology is uniquely positioned to contribute through comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Ebola strains as well as 3-D protein modeling. Other computational approaches to Ebola may include large-scale docking studies of Ebola proteins with human proteins and with small-molecule libraries, computational modeling of the spread of the virus, computational mining of the Ebola literature, and creation of a curated Ebola database. Taken together, such computational efforts could significantly accelerate traditional scientific approaches. In recognition of the need for important and immediate solutions from the field of computational biology against Ebola, the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) announces a prize for an important computational advance in fighting the Ebola virus. ISCB will confer the ISCB Fight against Ebola Award, along with a prize of US$2,000, at its July 2016 annual meeting (ISCB Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) 2016, Orlando, Florida). PMID:26097686

  11. ISCB Ebola Award for Important Future Research on the Computational Biology of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Karp, Peter D; Berger, Bonnie; Kovats, Diane; Lengauer, Thomas; Linial, Michal; Sabeti, Pardis; Hide, Winston; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Speed is of the essence in combating Ebola; thus, computational approaches should form a significant component of Ebola research. As for the development of any modern drug, computational biology is uniquely positioned to contribute through comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Ebola strains as well as 3-D protein modeling. Other computational approaches to Ebola may include large-scale docking studies of Ebola proteins with human proteins and with small-molecule libraries, computational modeling of the spread of the virus, computational mining of the Ebola literature, and creation of a curated Ebola database. Taken together, such computational efforts could significantly accelerate traditional scientific approaches. In recognition of the need for important and immediate solutions from the field of computational biology against Ebola, the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) announces a prize for an important computational advance in fighting the Ebola virus. ISCB will confer the ISCB Fight against Ebola Award, along with a prize of US$2,000, at its July 2016 annual meeting (ISCB Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) 2016, Orlando, Florida).

  12. Research in Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Research into Vocational Education and Training (VET) has undergone major developments in the last 60 years. This is particularly true of the last 30 years. The rising political, social and economic priority of VET has been principally responsible for this development. However, it is also true to say that some of the disciplines of education have…

  13. Contemporary Dissertation Research on Employment and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Peter S.

    This monograph summarizes 20 recently completed dissertations representative of research being done in employment and training. Each summary has this format: description of the framework into which the study fits, explanation of its purpose, summary of methodology and type of data, and author's findings and conclusions. Six studies in section I on…

  14. Research in Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Research into Vocational Education and Training (VET) has undergone major developments in the last 60 years. This is particularly true of the last 30 years. The rising political, social and economic priority of VET has been principally responsible for this development. However, it is also true to say that some of the disciplines of education have…

  15. Minority International Research Training Program: Global Collaboration in Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElmurry, Beverly J.; Misner, Susan J.; Buseh, Aaron G.

    2003-01-01

    The Minority International Research Training Program pairs minority nursing students with faculty mentors at international sites for short-term research. A total of 26 undergraduate, 22 graduate, and 6 postdoctoral students have participated. Challenges include recruitment, orientation, and preparation of students; identification and preparation…

  16. Organizational Policy Issues Affecting Interdisciplinary Educational Research and Research Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, Robert P.

    This paper is an attempt to pose some of the issues of organizational policy facing the university and its supporting agencies as it attempts to meet the problems of contemporary society, particularly as these problems focus on educational research and research training and demand interdisciplinarity in the process of their solution. Any…

  17. Minority International Research Training Program: Global Collaboration in Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElmurry, Beverly J.; Misner, Susan J.; Buseh, Aaron G.

    2003-01-01

    The Minority International Research Training Program pairs minority nursing students with faculty mentors at international sites for short-term research. A total of 26 undergraduate, 22 graduate, and 6 postdoctoral students have participated. Challenges include recruitment, orientation, and preparation of students; identification and preparation…

  18. The Lashley Award.

    PubMed

    Dewsbury, Donald A

    2006-06-01

    The Karl Spencer Lashley Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Neurosciences has been bestowed upon 50 of the world's leading neuroscientists of the last half century but is not well known. It originated in 1953 when Lashley accumulated excess stock holdings and established a Fund for Neurobiology with 52,000 dollars to provide small grants for neurobiological research. Several years later the assets were transferred to the American Philosophical Society to administer and convert to an award for achievement in neurobiology The nature, amount, and format of the award have evolved ever since. These changes in the award and the characteristics of its recipients are described.

  19. Qualitative Research Applications in Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Pitney, William A.; Parker, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explain the ethnographic, phenomenologic, and grounded theory approaches to qualitative research and to describe how these approaches can be applied to contemporary topics related to athletic training education. Background: Athletic training education has recently experienced an increase in the use of qualitative methods, and various qualitative approaches are viable for answering many questions related to athletic training education. Ethnography focuses on describing a culture or subculture. Phenomenology focuses on the meaning of lived human experience. Grounded theory focuses on developing theory related to social processes. Each approach is contextual and attempts to facilitate insight and understanding related to the human condition. Description: We provide an in-depth discussion of each of the selected qualitative approaches and explain the focus and unique data-collection and data-analysis strategies and identify the distinctive outcomes of each approach. Each research approach has a distinct purpose, and the specific application is driven by the questions asked. We also identify questions that are amenable to a specific method. Applications: To better understand the interactive nature of education and learning, athletic training researchers are beginning to ask questions that require information to be gathered about meaning, contexts, culture, and processes. Such questions are best answered through the use of qualitative research methods that most commonly include ethnography, phenomenology, and grounded theory. In order for athletic training professionals to gain the most from the research conducted, it is essential that they have an understanding of the theoretic underpinnings of these methods and when each should be used. PMID:12937540

  20. Promoting sustainable research partnerships: a mixed-method evaluation of a United Kingdom-Africa capacity strengthening award scheme.

    PubMed

    Dean, Laura; Njelesani, Janet; Smith, Helen; Bates, Imelda

    2015-12-23

    Research partnerships between high-income countries (HICs) and low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) are a leading model in research capacity strengthening activities. Although numerous frameworks and guiding principles for effective research partnerships exist, few include the perspective of the LMIC partner. This paper draws out lessons for establishing and maintaining successful research collaborations, based on partnership dynamics, from the perspectives of both HIC and LMIC stakeholders through the evaluation of a research capacity strengthening partnership award scheme. A mixed-method retrospective evaluation approach was used. Initially, a cross-sectional survey was administered to all award holders, which focused on partnership outputs and continuation. Fifty individuals were purposively selected to participate in interviews or focus group discussions from 12 different institutions in HICs and LMICs; the sample included the research investigators, research assistants, laboratory scientists and post-doctoral students. The evaluation collected data on critical elements of research partnership dynamics such as research outputs, nature of the partnership, future plans and research capacity. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively and qualitative data were analysed using an iterative framework approach. The majority of United Kingdom and African award holders stated they would like to pursue future collaborations together. Key aspects within partnerships that appeared to influence this were; the perceived benefits of the partnership at the individual and institutional level such as publication of papers or collaborative grants; ability to influence 'research culture' and instigate critical thinking among mid-career researchers; previous working relationships, for example supervisor-student relationships; and equity within partnerships linked to partnership formation and experience of United Kingdom partners within LMICs. Factors which may hinder

  1. Defining Translational Research: Implications for Training

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Doris McGartland; Schoenbaum, Ellie E.; Lee, Linda S.; Schteingart, David E.; Marantz, Paul R.; Anderson, Karl E.; Platt, Lauren Dewey; Baez, Adriana; Esposito, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Because translational research is not clearly defined, developers of translational research programs are struggling to articulate specific program objectives, delineate the knowledge and skills (competencies) that trainees are expected to develop, create an appropriate curriculum, and track outcomes to assess whether program objectives and competency requirements are being met. Members of the Evaluation Committee of the Association for Clinical Research Training (ACRT) reviewed current definitions of translational research and proposed an operational definition to use in the educational framework. In this article, the authors posit that translational research fosters the multidirectional and multidisciplinary integration of basic research, patient-oriented research, and population-based research, with the long-term aim of improving the health of the public. The authors argue that the approach to designing and evaluating the success of translational training programs must therefore be flexible enough to accommodate the needs of individual institutions and individual trainees within the institutions but that it must also be rigorous enough to document that the program is meeting its short-, intermediate-, and long-term objectives and that its trainees are meeting preestablished competency requirements. A logic model is proposed for the evaluation of translational research programs. PMID:20182120

  2. The effects of national cash awards for science teaching on recipients and their peers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weld, Jeffrey Donn

    Cash teaching awards available to science teachers in the U.S. have goals to improve science teaching. This study assessed the effectiveness of five national cash award programs at identifying exemplars and inspiring better science teaching. Award winning secondary science teachers provided their perceptions of the effects of an award on their own teaching and on the profession as a whole. Randomly selected secondary science teachers across the U.S. reported their perceptions of the effects of the existence of awards on their own teaching and on the profession. Program directors for the five national cash awards were interviewed to determine the intentions and strategies of their award programs. The criteria that guide the selection of award winners were found to align with research-supported exemplar characteristics, but the methods used for identifying outstanding teachers were found to be inadequate for that purpose. Award winning science teachers perceive awards to result from, rather than to inspire, good teaching. Their motivation derives from student achievement and a job well done. The valued effects of winning an award are the recognition and increased respect that follow. Award winners perceive awards as difficult to win, minimally motivating, and frequently causing of dissension among peers. In most respects award winners perceive increased intrinsic rewards to accompany recognition through cash awards. Randomly selected U.S. science teachers who have not won cash awards perceive them as poor motivational incentives because too few awards exist, the basis for recognition is unclear, and the award itself is not a valued outcome. Most science teachers consider themselves good teachers and would apply for an award despite doubts that they would win. Direct comparisons reveal that winners and nonwinners have widely divergent opinions of awards. Winners of lesser cash amounts have the same perceptions of awards as winners of greater cash amounts. Effective

  3. Advanced Research Training in Human Geography: The Scottish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwanzura-Ottemoeller, Fungisai; Hopkins, Peter; Lorimer, Hayden; Philip, Lorna J.

    2005-01-01

    Formal research training is integral to research degrees in human geography completed in UK higher education institutions today. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has been the driving force behind the formalization of research training. Arguably less well known among the ESRC research training recommendations is the stipulation that…

  4. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  5. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  6. Training Aide: Research and Guidance for Effective Training User Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    task difficulty sequencing, error prevention, scaffolding , learner control, and exploratory learning), as well as factors that moderate their...Effectiveness, Training Methods, Graphical User Interface, Part Task Training, Scaffolding , Transfer of Training SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF 19...58 Scaffolding

  7. Systematic analysis of funding awarded to institutions in the United Kingdom for infectious disease research, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Moore, David AJ; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This study aimed to assess the research investments made to UK institutions for all infectious disease research and identify the direction of spend by institution. Design Systematic analysis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on relevant studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Setting UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. Participants None. Main outcome measures Twenty academic institutions receiving greatest sum investments across infection are included here, also NHS sites, Sanger Institute, Health Protection Agency and the Medical Research Council. We measured total funding, median award size, disease areas and position of research along the R&D value chain. Results Included institutions accounted for £2.1 billion across 5003 studies. Imperial College and University of Oxford received the most investment. Imperial College led the most studies. The Liverpool and London Schools of Tropical Medicine had highest median award size, whereas the NHS sites combined had many smaller studies. Sum NHS funding appears to be declining over time, whilst university income is relatively stable. Several institutions concentrate almost exclusively on pre-clinical research. In some areas, there is clearly a leading institution, e.g. Aberdeen and mycology research or UCL and antimicrobial resistance. Conclusion UK institutions carry out research across a wide range of infectious disease areas. This analysis can identify centres of excellence and help inform future resource allocation for research priorities. Institutions can use this analysis for establishing expertise within their groups, identifying external collaborators and informing local research strategy. PMID:25893108

  8. 78 FR 22530 - Application for New Awards; Training for Realtime Writers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... preference priorities in this notice. Open educational resources (OER) means teaching, learning, and research... the requirements in section 872(c)(2) of the HEA); (3) distance learning; (4) further developing and..., money, or other resources while improving student learning or other educational outcomes (i.e., outcome...

  9. AWARD program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, Frank

    1998-07-01

    The All Weather ARrival and Departure (AWARD) program is supported by the European Commission under the Brite-EuRam III structure. Following the VERSATILE preparation program, it started on June 1996 and is planned to finish end of 1999. The program consortium consists of ten partners such as a major airline, aircraft and equipment manufacturers, research and tests centers, and an university. Contractors from France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy and The Netherlands are coordinated by Sextant Avionique. AWARD main objective is to demonstrate the efficiency of vision systems under adverse weather conditions. In order to evaluate the added benefits of these concepts within aircraft operations of approach, landing, taxi and takeoff, two applications are developed: (1) Enhanced Vision System (EVS) based on Head Up Display enhancement with Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) and Millimeter Wave Radar (MMWR) images. (2) Synthetic Vision System (SVS) displaying an overlaid symbology on a perspective presentation of the environment, thanks to the combination of database and accurate positioning systems. The evaluation of these two tests systems will focus on: (1) Performance and human acceptability aspects. They will be appreciated according to human factors criteria as well as an integration within realistic environments. The NLR Research Flight Simulator and the DLR ATTAS flight test aircraft will be used. (2) Reliability, integrity aspects thanks to a theoretical certification/system study which will propose guidelines for certification, and will address impact on the system architecture. The paper addresses the work structure of AWARD in order to show what are the keypoints addressed in this program.

  10. The development of clinical research training: past history and current trends in the United States.

    PubMed

    Teo, Alan R

    2009-04-01

    This article provides a brief account of the history of the development of training opportunities in clinical research in the United States. It highlights some developments in the clinical research enterprise since World War II and focuses examination on the involvement of the U.S. government and academic sector. Clinical research training is a relatively new academic field, and curricula in the design and conduct of clinical research have only emerged since the 1980s. The growing complexity of clinical trials and the emergence of evidence-based medicine in the last several decades created great demand for clinicians with knowledge of clinical epidemiology and biostatistics. Amidst alarm bells rung by physician-scientist leaders about the endangered species of clinical researchers, numerous proposals and solutions emerged to address these workforce and educational problems in the 1990s. Traditionally, physicians wishing to expand their education had to get a master's degree in public health or participate in unique programs such as the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. Since the 1990s, the National Institutes of Health, through K awards, the Roadmap Initiative, and other funding mechanisms, has furnished tremendous support for the development of clinical research training opportunities from predoctoral immersion programs to degree-granting graduate programs. The author discusses key components of successful clinical research training programs and concludes with empirical recommendations for promoting careers in clinical research.

  11. Characteristics of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design Programs in Institutions With Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Mohammad H; Dickerson, Aisha S; Ahn, Chul; Carter, Rickey E; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Lindsell, Christopher J; Nietert, Paul J; Oster, Robert A; Pollock, Brad H; Welty, Leah J

    2017-02-01

    To learn the size, composition, and scholarly output of biostatistics, epidemiology, and research design (BERD) units in U.S. academic health centers (AHCs). Each year for four years, the authors surveyed all BERD units in U.S. AHCs that were members of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium. In 2010, 46 BERD units were surveyed; in 2011, 55; in 2012, 60; and in 2013, 61. Response rates to the 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 surveys were 93.5%, 98.2%, 98.3%, and 86.9%, respectively. Overall, the size of BERD units ranged from 3 to 86 individuals. The median FTE in BERD units remained similar and ranged from 3.0 to 3.5 FTEs over the years. BERD units reported more availability of doctoral-level biostatisticians than doctoral-level epidemiologists. In 2011, 2012, and 2013, more than a third of BERD units provided consulting support on 101 to 200 projects. A majority of BERD units reported that between 25% and 75% (in 2011) and 31% to 70% (in 2012) of their consulting was to junior investigators. More than two-thirds of BERD units reported their contributions to the submission of 20 or more non-BERD grant or contract applications annually. Nearly half of BERD units reported 1 to 10 manuscripts submitted annually with a BERD practitioner as the first or corresponding author. The findings regarding BERD units provide a benchmark against which to compare BERD resources and may be particularly useful for institutions planning to develop new units to support programs such as the CTSA.

  12. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    research training; breast cancer; fatty acids and prevention ; nutrition and prevention ; alternative prevention 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...Asian mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, upon highly invasive breast cancer cells, on the role of omega-3 fatty acids in preventing and treating breast...role in inhibiting or preventing cancer. Epidemiologic evidence strongly links fish oil with low incidences of several cancers.1–4 The anticancer

  13. Module 2: Surveying the "Best of the Best"--A Seminar Based on Research Articles Nominated for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Work-Family Research. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This module offers students opportunities to examine the theories and research associated with a range of different disciplines that focus on relationships between family life and work life. The module is organized around articles that have been nominated for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Work-Family Research. This award process identifies…

  14. Scientific Management Training | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI intramural program is one of the largest centers for cancer research in the world, with approximately 200 principal investigators and 500 postdoctoral fellows. While outstanding scientific research is conducted at NCI, many of the scientists who go on to lead their own laboratories have few management skills. The Scientific Management Training course focuses on personnel and project management. In the “Art of Supervision” section, the emphasis is on the uniqueness of each person and how each staff member should be treated to achieve desired outcomes.

  15. Preserving a legacy for our patients: The bedside-to-bench award in translational research

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Translational Medicine is pleased to announce a prize to recognize outstanding contributions in the field of translational medicine. This year, the Bedside-to-Bench Award was provided by an anonymous donor and supported by the Journal of Translational Medicine Editorial Board. Applications should be submitted directly to the Journal of Translational Medicine [1].

  16. 78 FR 79413 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Number (TIN); b. Register both your DUNS number and TIN with the System for Award Management (SAM... your DUNS number and TIN on your application; and d. Maintain an active SAM registration with current... allow 2-5 weeks for your TIN to become active. The SAM registration process can take approximately...

  17. Demographic training and research in Africa.

    PubMed

    Igun, A A

    1976-09-01

    The state of demographic data in Africa is reviewed in this paper along with constraints affecting the collection of adequate demographic information. An evaluation is made of the present situation and efforts to rectify the shortage of demographic personnel in the UN sponsored subregional demographic institutes, including an outline of the course program. The effort and progress being made in similar training programs at the University of Ife, Nigeria, is also examined. Obstacles to the collection of demographic data are classified as physical difficulties; administrative and official problems and difficulties; technical and staff problems; and sociocultural problems. A consensus has been reached on the inadequacy of past efforts in data collection and analysis in Africa. Special attention must be paid to the training of demographers. A comparison is made between demographers in developed countries who have their data collected for them and the African demographer who must be his own statistician, sociologist, anthropologist, and geographer to understand the biases his data are subject to. Training for African demographers should emphasize problems in data collection, data manipulation, and innovation in solving methodological problems. Type of personnel needed include teachers of demography, high level professionals, middle level professionals and low level workers. The training programs given by the Regional Institutes for Population Studies are a postgraduate diploma course, lasting 1 year and a Master's degree course for those who obtain the diploma. Subjects covered include substantive demography; technical demography; family planning, its development and evaluation; auxiliary subjects including mathematics, statistics, sampling and research methods; and complementary subjects e.g., economics, sociology, national planning, physiology of reproduction, and genetics. Short term research projects and a major research report are an integral part of the programs

  18. Nobel Prize In Physics Awarded To Astronomer For NASA-Funded Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    Riccardo Giacconi, the "father of X-ray astronomy," has received the Nobel Prize in physics for "pioneering contributions to astrophysics," which have led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources. Giaconni, president of the Associated Universities Inc., in Washington, and Research Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, discovered the first X-ray stars and the X-ray background in the 1960s and conceived of and led the implementation of the Uhuru and High Energy Astronomy Observatory-2 (HEAO-2) X-ray observatories in the 1970s. With funding from NASA, he also detected sources of X-rays that most astronomers now consider to contain black holes. Giacconi said that receiving the award confirms the importance of X-ray astronomy. "I think I'm one of the first to get the Nobel prize for work with NASA, so that's good for NASA and I think it's also good for the field," he said. "It's also nice for all the other people who've worked in this field. I recognize that I was never alone. I'm happy for me personally, I'm happy for my family, and I'm happy for the field and for NASA," Giacconi added. In 1976, Giacconi along with Harvey Tananbaum of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass., submitted a proposal letter to NASA to initiate the study and design of a large X-ray telescope. In 1977 work began on the program, which was then known as the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and in 1998 renamed the Chandra X-ray Observatory. "Partnerships with universities and scientists are essential in our quest to answer the fundamental questions of the universe," said Dr. Ed Weiler, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science, Headquarters, Washington. "Dr. Giacconi's achievements are a brilliant example of this synergy among NASA, universities and their community of scientists and students," he said. Giacconi is Principal Investigator for the ultradeep survey with Chandra - the "Chandra Deep Field South" - that has

  19. Research Ethics with Undergraduates in Summer Research Training Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, I.; Yalcin, K.

    2016-02-01

    Many undergraduate research training programs incorporate research ethics into their programs and some are required. Engaging students in conversations around challenging topics such as conflict of interest, cultural and gender biases, what is science and what is normative science can difficult in newly formed student cohorts. In addition, discussing topics with more distant impacts such as science and policy, intellectual property and authorship, can be difficult for students in their first research experience that have more immediate concerns about plagiarism, data manipulation, and the student/faculty relationship. Oregon State University's Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) in Ocean Sciences: From Estuaries to the Deep Sea as one model for incorporating a research ethics component into summer undergraduate research training programs. Weaved into the 10-week REU program, undergraduate interns participate in a series of conversations and a faculty mentor panel focused on research ethics. Topics discussed are in a framework for sharing myths, knowledge and personal experiences on issues in research with ethical implications. The series follows guidelines and case studies outlined from the text, On Being A Scientist: Responsible Conduct In Research Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, National Academy of Sciences.

  20. Best practices in social and behavioral research: report from the Enhancing Clinical Research Professional's Training and Qualifications project.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan L; Byks-Jazayeri, Christine; Calvin-Naylor, Nancy; Divecha, Vic; Anderson, Elizabeth; Eakin, Brenda; Fair, Alecia; Denton, Laura

    2017-02-01

    This article discusses the process of defining competencies and development of a best practices training course for investigators and clinical research coordinators who conduct social and behavioral research. The first project phase established recommendations for training in Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and was done in conjunction with representatives from 62 Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) hubs. Diversity in behavioral clinical trials and differences in regulation of behavioral trials compared with clinical trials involving drugs, devices, or biologics necessitated a separate Social and Behavioral Work Group. This group worked with CTSA representatives to tailor competencies and fundamental GCP principles into best practices for social and behavioral research. Although concepts underlying GCP were deemed similar across all clinical trials, not all areas were equally applicable and the ways in which GCP would be enacted differ for behavioral trials. It was determined that suitable training in best practices for social and behavioral research was lacking. Based on the training need, an e-learning course for best practices is available to all CTSA sites. Each institution is able to track outcomes for its employees to help achieve standardized competency-based best practices for social and behavioral investigators and staff.

  1. Systematic Approach to Research Training: Benefits for Counseling Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughead, Teri A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Synthesizes developments concerning research training in graduate counselor education and presents a systematic approach for training master's and doctoral students in mental health counseling to assimilate, use, and perform research. Suggests diversity of research training strategies for implementation in counselor preparation programs.…

  2. Research Training Program in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-30

    AD GRANT NO: DAMD17-94-J-4204 TITLE: Research Training Program in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Daniel Medina CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Program in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4204 Dr. Daniel Medina S-:* , LiNG ORGANI-ZA FiON ;8A•E(Sj -’ r.,DE53(25) . :ERFOGMJNG ORGANIZATION Baylor: College...program is to produce highly qualified scientists for careers as independent investigators in the field of breast cancer . In the last 20 years, there has

  3. 42 CFR 66.206 - Grant awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grant awards. 66.206 Section 66.206 Public Health... NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Institutional Grants § 66.206 Grant awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available, the Secretary shall award grants to those applicants: (1) Whose applications have been reviewed...

  4. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  5. Stennis award

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-20

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (l) and NASA Small Business Programs Associate Administrator Glenn Delgado (r) present NASA's Small Business Administrator's Cup Award to Stennis Space Center in recognition of its stellar small business program for fiscal year 2011. Receiving the award April 20, 2012, are (l to r) Stennis Procurement Office personnel Michelle Stracener and Rob Harris, along with Stennis Space Center Director Patrick Scheuermann. Bolden and Delgado presented the award during an onsite visit April 20.

  6. An evaluation of postdoctoral research training and trainees supported by the National Institutes of Health in the Division of Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, C H; Scherbenske, M J

    1990-08-01

    The interest of young MDs and PhDs in research careers was assessed by determining the number of former trainees who applied for and (or) received research support from the Public Health Service. Thirty-two percent of trainees supported by Institutional Training Grants between 1977 and 1981 made a subsequent application. Seventy-six percent of all those who submitted applications to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research project support received awards. Examination of the success rate for individual applications submitted by former trainees showed that 56% of all applications submitted by MD scientists were awarded, and 57% of all applications submitted by PhD scientists were awarded. This compares to an NIH-wide average of 33.3% for the same period. The number of appointments made to Institutional Training Grants for a full year remained fairly constant over a 6-year period, as did the number appointed to individual fellowships over an 8-year period. The dollars expended on Institutional Training Grants increased 33% from 1982 to 1986 for a similar number of trainees, and increased 30% from 1981 to 1988 for a similar number of individual fellowships. The number of Research Career Development Award (RCDA) applications declined by 66% for MDs and by 53% for PhDs, accounting for a 32% reduction in the number of active RCDAs held by MDs and a 60% reduction in active RCDAs held by PhDs from 1985 to 1988. MD scientists submitted more applications, had higher award rates, and received more RCDA awards than did PhD scientists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Supporting public involvement in research design and grant development: a case study of a public involvement award scheme managed by a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Design Service (RDS).

    PubMed

    Boote, Jonathan D; Twiddy, Maureen; Baird, Wendy; Birks, Yvonne; Clarke, Clare; Beever, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    It is good practice for the public to be involved in developing health research. Resources should be available for researchers to fund the involvement of the public in the development of their grants. To describe a funding award scheme to support public involvement in grant development, managed by an NIHR Research Design Service (RDS). Case examples of how the award contributed to successful grant applications and findings from a recent evaluation of the scheme are presented. A case study of resource provision to support public involvement activities in one region of England. University and NHS-based researchers, and members of the public. Between 2009 and 2012, the RDS approved 45 public involvement funding awards (totalling nearly £19,000). These awards contributed to 27 submitted applications at the time of writing, of which 11 were successful (totalling over £7.5 million). The evaluation revealed difficulties encountered by some researchers when involving the public in grant development, which led to suggestions about how the scheme could be improved. This award scheme represents an efficient method of providing researchers with resources to involve the public in grant development and would appear to represent good value for money. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. 75 FR 62841 - Award of a Single-Source Program Expansion Supplement to Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... administrator of the FRIENDS National Resource Center for the Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention Program..., Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Ave., SW., 8111, Washington, DC 20024... HUMAN SERVICES Administration For Children and Families Award of a Single-Source Program...

  9. Research and Demonstration for Nurse' Aide Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rast, Robert

    A cooperative pilot project was conducted to determine the feasibility of training mentally retarded individuals to function in a hospital setting. The 3-month nurse aide training program included 1 month of formal classroom training at the college and 2 months of supervised training in a hospital. A total of 51 students entered four classes over…

  10. Abstracts of Research in Rehabilitation. The Top Twenty-One Research Selections by the 1970-1971 Research Awards Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozarth, Jerold D., Ed.; And Others

    This monograph was designed to disseminate the results of recent scientific research in rehabilitation counseling and related areas. The 21 abstracts reflect the research currently underway in universities, rehabilitation facilities, and rehabilitation research institutes throughout the country. Sample topics include: (1) "A Descriptive Study of…

  11. Research Misconduct in National Science Foundation Funded Research: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of 2007-2011 Research Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Research is an important aspect of academic institutions as it brings funding, reputation, and other benefits to the associated establishment. Research misconduct in the form of plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification can occur in association with research, along with subsequent penalties. The problem of the poorly established prevalence of the…

  12. Research Misconduct in National Science Foundation Funded Research: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of 2007-2011 Research Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Research is an important aspect of academic institutions as it brings funding, reputation, and other benefits to the associated establishment. Research misconduct in the form of plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification can occur in association with research, along with subsequent penalties. The problem of the poorly established prevalence of the…

  13. The Outstanding Investigator Award (R35)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Outstanding Investigator Award (R35) in 2014, for principal investigators who have achieved significant research accomplishments. This video features one of the first group of 62 researchers to receive the award.

  14. The Outstanding Investigator Award (R35)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Outstanding Investigator Award (R35) in 2015, for principal investigators who have achieved significant research accomplishments. This video features one of the first group of 62 researchers to receive the award.

  15. Teller Award Acceptance Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, Robert L.

    It is indeed an honor to receive an award named for such an accomplished and famous physicist who is present with us today, Dr. Edward Teller. In thinking over what to say on this occasion, I noted that the Teller Award was given for pioneering research in controlled fusion, in controlling fusion for the benefit of mankind. I think everyone in this audience certainly would agree that this lofty goal is truly one of the unconquered, grand challenges in applied physics.

  16. Women in Aerospace Awards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-26

    NASA's Langley Research Center Lesa Roe speaks after being given the Women in Aerospace's Leadership Award at the organization's annual awards ceremony and banquet held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010. Four current NASA leaders and one retiree were recognized for their work by Women in Aerospace. The event celebrates women's professional excellence in aerospace and honors women who have made outstanding contributions to the aerospace community. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Educator Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Association for Women Geoscientists Foundation is seeking nominations for its second Outstanding Educator Award, which will be given October 30, 1990, at the Geological Society of America meeting in Dallas, Tex.The award was established to honor college and university teachers who have demonstrated support for women students both inside and outside the classroom.

  18. Clinical and Translational Science Awards: can they increase the efficiency and speed of clinical and translational research?

    PubMed

    Heller, Caren; de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2009-04-01

    Most agree that the recent decades-long boom in biomedical research discoveries has not had a sufficient effect on the public's health. To overcome some of the barriers to speeding clinical and translational (C/T) research, the National Institutes of Health has established the Institutional Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). To explore whether the CTSA proposal addresses major C/T barriers and whether funded institutions offer adequate solutions, the authors reviewed the obstacles to C/T research described in the literature and examined the completeness of the solutions offered by the 12 initial CTSA awardees. Through an analysis of the literature, the authors categorized C/T barriers into three categories (research workforce, research operations, and organizational silos). They then analyzed each CTSA proposal regarding the types of programs offered to address these barriers. They found that, in general, institutions developed detailed programs to address research workforce and research operations barriers but had limited to no solutions for organizational silos. The authors suggest that differences in how barriers are addressed are consistent with the degree of control that CTSA centers have over these obstacles and solutions. They argue that although CTSA centers might have an important role in successfully addressing some of the barriers to C/T research, CTSA centers might ultimately have difficulties achieving their purported goal of facilitating and increasing the efficiency and speed of C/T research because of a lack of control over solutions to some important obstacles facing such research.

  19. Operational research training: the course and beyond.

    PubMed

    Bissell, K; Harries, A D; Reid, A J; Edginton, M; Hinderaker, S G; Satyanarayana, S; Enarson, D A; Zachariah, R

    2012-09-21

    Insufficient operational research (OR) is generated within programmes and health systems in low- and middle-income countries, partly due to limited capacity and skills to undertake and publish OR in peer-reviewed journals. To address this, a three-module course was piloted by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and Médecins Sans Frontières in 2009-2010, with 12 participants. Five received mentorship and financial support as OR Fellows. Eleven of 12 participants submitted a paper to a peer-reviewed journal within 4 weeks of the end of the course. Evaluation shows that participants continued OR activities beyond the course. During the subsequent year, they submitted and/or published 19 papers, made 10 posters and/or presentations, and many participated in training, mentoring and/or paper reviewing. Some described changes in policy and practice influenced by their research, and changes in their organisation's approach to OR. They provided recommendations for improving and expanding OR. We conclude that participants can, with certain enabling conditions, take research questions through to publication, use skills gained to undertake and promote OR thereafter and contribute to improvement in policy and practice. An internet-based network will provide participants and graduates with a platform for collection of course outcomes and ongoing mentor- and peer-based support, resources and incentives.

  20. Operational research training: the course and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Reid, A. J.; Edginton, M.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Satyanarayana, S.; Enarson, D. A.; Zachariah, R.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient operational research (OR) is generated within programmes and health systems in low- and middle-income countries, partly due to limited capacity and skills to undertake and publish OR in peer-reviewed journals. To address this, a three-module course was piloted by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and Médecins Sans Frontières in 2009–2010, with 12 participants. Five received mentorship and financial support as OR Fellows. Eleven of 12 participants submitted a paper to a peer-reviewed journal within 4 weeks of the end of the course. Evaluation shows that participants continued OR activities beyond the course. During the subsequent year, they submitted and/or published 19 papers, made 10 posters and/or presentations, and many participated in training, mentoring and/or paper reviewing. Some described changes in policy and practice influenced by their research, and changes in their organisation’s approach to OR. They provided recommendations for improving and expanding OR. We conclude that participants can, with certain enabling conditions, take research questions through to publication, use skills gained to undertake and promote OR thereafter and contribute to improvement in policy and practice. An internet-based network will provide participants and graduates with a platform for collection of course outcomes and ongoing mentor- and peer-based support, resources and incentives. PMID:26392960

  1. 1983 Robert E. Horton Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleson, Peter S.; Woolhiser, David A.

    The recipient of this year's American Geophysical Union Robert E. Horton Award is David A. Woolhiser of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service. Dr. Woolhiser is Supervisory Research Hydraulic Engineer and Research Leader for Watershed Hydrology at the Southwest Rangeland Watershed Research Center in Tucson, Arizona. His academic training was at the University of Wisconsin, where he received degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Philosophy, both in Civil Engineering, and at the University of Arizona, where he received an M.S., also in Civil Engineering.Dr. Woolhiser's career has spanned government and academia and his contributions to hydrology have ranged from theoretical developments to practical applications

  2. Clinician scientist training program: a proposal for training medical students in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Mark, A L; Kelch, R P

    2001-11-01

    There is national alarm about a decline in the number of clinician scientists. Most of the proposed solutions have focused on housestaff and junior faculty. We propose a new national program for training medical students in clinical research. This program, coined "Clinician Scientist Training Program" (CSTP), would consist of a combined degree program in medicine (MD) and clinical research (eg, masters in translational research or masters in clinical epidemiology). Students could enroll in the program at any stage during medical school. After 3 years of medical school, students would spend at least 2 years in a combined didactic and mentored clinical research training program and then complete medical school. Students could elect to pursue more prolonged clinical research training toward a combined PhD and MD. The CSTP is designed to meet six critical challenges: 1) engage students early in clinical research training; 2) provide a didactic clinical research curriculum; 3) expose students to several years of mentored clinical research training; 4) promote debt prevention by providing tuition payments during medical education and a stipend during clinical research training; 5) facilitate prolonged exposure to a community of peers and mentors in a program with national and institutional identity and respect; and 6) permit enrollment in the program as students enter medical school or at any stage during medical school. If the success of the Medical Scientist Training Program in training medical students in basic research is a guide, the CSTP could become a linchpin for training future generations of clinician scientists.

  3. A Community-Engaged Cardiovascular Health Disparities Research Training Curriculum: Implementation and Preliminary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Purnell, Tanjala; Halbert, Jennifer P.; Matens, Richard; Miller, Edgar R. “Pete”; Levine, David M.; Nguyen, Tam H.; Gudzune, Kimberly A.; Crews, Deidra C.; Mahlangu-Ngcobo, Mankekolo; Cooper, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    To overcome cardiovascular disease (CVD) disparities impacting high-risk populations, it is critical to train researchers and leaders in conducting community-engaged CVD disparities research. The authors summarize the key elements, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of the CVD Disparities Fellowship and Summer Internship Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Bloomberg School of Public Health. In 2010, program faculty and coordinators established a trans-disciplinary CVD disparities training and career development fellowship program for scientific investigators who desire to conduct community-engaged clinical and translational disparities research. The program was developed to enhance mentorship support and research training for faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and pre-doctoral students interested in conducting CVD disparities research. A CVD Disparities Summer Internship Program for undergraduate and pre-professional students was also created to provide a broad experience in public health and health disparities in Baltimore, Maryland, with a focus on CVD. Since 2010, 39 pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and faculty fellows have completed the program. Participating fellows have published disparities-related research and given presentations both nationally and internationally. Five research grant awards have been received by faculty fellows. Eight undergraduates, 1 post-baccalaureate, and 2 medical professional students representing seven universities have participated in the summer undergraduate internship. Over half of the undergraduate students are applying to or have been accepted into medical or graduate school. The tailored CVD health disparities training curriculum has been successful at equipping varying levels of trainees (from undergraduate students to faculty) with clinical research and public health expertise to conducting community-engaged CVD disparities research. PMID:25054421

  4. A community-engaged cardiovascular health disparities research training curriculum: implementation and preliminary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Purnell, Tanjala; Halbert, Jennifer P; Matens, Richard; Miller, Edgar R Pete; Levine, David M; Nguyen, Tam H; Gudzune, Kimberly A; Crews, Deidra C; Mahlangu-Ngcobo, Mankekolo; Cooper, Lisa A

    2014-10-01

    To overcome cardiovascular disease (CVD) disparities impacting high-risk populations, it is critical to train researchers and leaders in conducting community-engaged CVD disparities research. The authors summarize the key elements, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of the CVD Disparities Fellowship and Summer Internship Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Bloomberg School of Public Health. In 2010, program faculty and coordinators established a transdisciplinary CVD disparities training and career development fellowship program for scientific investigators who desire to conduct community-engaged clinical and translational disparities research. The program was developed to enhance mentorship support and research training for faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and predoctoral students interested in conducting CVD disparities research. A CVD Disparities Summer Internship Program for undergraduate and preprofessional students was also created to provide a broad experience in public health and health disparities in Baltimore, Maryland, with a focus on CVD. Since 2010, 39 predoctoral, postdoctoral, and faculty fellows have completed the program. Participating fellows have published disparities-related research and given presentations both nationally and internationally. Five research grant awards have been received by faculty fellows. Eight undergraduates, one postbaccalaureate, and two medical professional students representing seven universities have participated in the summer undergraduate internship. Over half of the undergraduate students are applying to or have been accepted into medical or graduate school. The tailored CVD health disparities training curriculum has been successful at equipping varying levels of trainees (from undergraduate students to faculty) with clinical research and public health expertise to conducting community-engaged CVD disparities research.

  5. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  6. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  7. Training chemistry students to ask research questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartford, Fred; Good, Ron

    In previous studies, science students have been trained to ask more and better questions through intensive instruction apart from the ongoing academic program. Cognitive strategies (such as questioning) are developed best, however, within the framework of an academic subject. In the current study, questioning skills were taught to high school chemistry students in the context of their laboratory experiments. Since both intellectual development and questioning skills are causally related to problem solving, the effect of intellectual development on the learning of questioning skills also was investigated. The Piagetian model of intellectual development was chosen for its demonstrated effects on many important aspects of science instruction. The number and quality of student research questions was measured by the Science Inquiry Assessment Instrument. The student's level of intellectual development was measured by the Classroom Test of Formal Operations. The twelve-week experimental treatment involved printed lessons which taught students to ask research questions in response to unanticipated observations in their regularly scheduled laboratory experiments. The pretest exaggerated the effect of this treatment. This effect, however, was significant among unpretested students, accounting for 14% of the post-test score variance. The level of intellectual development has no effect on these post-test scores. These important questioning skills can be acquired within the framework of the regularly scheduled classroom activities by high school chemistry students, irrespective of their level of Piagetian intellectual development.

  8. Minority international research training program: global collaboration in nursing research.

    PubMed

    McElmurry, Beverly J; Misner, Susan J; Buseh, Aaron G

    2003-01-01

    In the current century, nurses, along with other health professionals, require preparation for their roles in international health. For faculty and students to practice and learn in this global community, they also will want to have added knowledge of economics, business, and public policy. To gain an immersion experience in global health, nursing faculty and students will need to spend time abroad collaborating with nursing colleagues in other countries. This report describes an academic-research training program (Minority International Research Program [MIRT]) established 7 years ago to enhance the international health experience of minority nursing students. Qualified undergraduate and graduate nursing students are recruited and paired with faculty mentors to conduct short-term research abroad for a period of 10 to 14 weeks. The purpose of international research experiences for minority nursing students is to develop leaders in nursing science and to increase collaboration in the resolution of global health issues. To date, 26 undergraduate students, 22 graduate students, 6 postdoctoral trainees, and 11 faculty mentors have participated and completed the program through research immersion experiences in 9 countries. The program is described in terms of its strengths, challenges, and lessons learned, as well as opportunities for future activities. Copyright 2003 Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustaining the Clinical and Translational Research Workforce: Training and Empowering the Next Generation of Investigators.

    PubMed

    Yin, Helen L; Gabrilove, Janice; Jackson, Rebecca; Sweeney, Carol; Fair, Alecia M; Toto, Robert

    2015-07-01

    There is mounting concern that clinician-scientists are a vanishing species and that the pipeline for clinical and translational research (CTR) investigators is in jeopardy. For the majority of current junior CTR investigators, the career path involves first obtaining a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded K-type career development award, particularly K08 and K23, and subsequently an NIH R01. This transition, popularly referred to as K2R, is a major hurdle with a low success rate and gaps in funding. In this Perspective, the authors identify factors that facilitate K2R transition and important aspects of increasing and sustaining the pipeline of CTR investigators. They also highlight significant differences in success rates of women and those underrepresented in biomedical research. Early career exposure to research methodology, protected time, multidisciplinary mentoring, and institutional "culture shift" are important for fostering and rewarding team science. Mentoring is the single most important contributor to K2R success, and emerging evidence suggests that formal mentor training and team mentoring are effective. Leadership training can empower junior investigators to thrive as independent CTR investigators. Future research should focus on delineating the difference between essential and supplemental factors to achieve this transition, and mentoring methods that foster success, including those that promote K2R transition of women and those underrepresented in biomedical research. The Clinical and Translational Science Awards National Consortium is well positioned to test existing models aimed at shortening the time frame, increasing the rate of K2R transition, and identifying strategies that improve success.

  10. Sustaining the Clinical Translational Research Workforce: Training and Empowering the Next Generation of Investigators

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Helen L.; Gabrilove, Janice; Jackson, Rebecca; Sweeney, Carol; Fair, Alecia M.; Toto, Robert

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting concern that clinician scientists are a vanishing species, and that the pipeline for clinical translational research (CTR) investigators is in jeopardy. For the majority of current junior CTR investigators, the career path involves first obtaining a National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded K-type career development award, particularly K08 and K23, and subsequently an NIH R01. This transition, popularly referred to as K2R, is a major hurdle with a low success rate and gaps in funding. In this Perspective, the authors identify factors that facilitate K2R transition and important aspects of increasing and sustaining the pipeline of CTR investigators. They also highlight significant differences in success rates of women and those underrepresented in biomedical research. Early career exposure to research methodology, protected time, multidisciplinary mentoring, and institutional “culture shift” are important for fostering and rewarding team science. Mentoring is the single most important contributor to K2R success, and emerging evidence suggests that formal mentor training and team mentoring are effective. Leadership training can empower junior investigators to thrive as independent CTR investigators. Future research should focus on delineating the difference between essential and supplemental factors to achieve this transition, and mentoring methods that foster success, including those that promote K2R transition of women and those underrepresented in biomedical research. The Clinical Translational Science Awards National Consortium is well positioned to test existing models aimed at shortening the timeframe, increasing the rate of K2R transition, and identifying strategies that improve success. PMID:26414054

  11. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000-2013: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-04-20

    To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000-2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000-2013. Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded-the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies. Funding agencies and industry should openly document their research investments to

  12. The Relationship Between Attitudes and Training in Research. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefein, Naim A.

    This study attempted to relate the development of attitudes toward educational research with two variables in training: institutional setting and courses usually related to research training. The study compared the attitudes toward research between a) university and college faculty members, b) full-time and part-time graduate students, c)…

  13. Research on artistic gymnastics training guidance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Lin; Sun, Xianzhong

    2017-04-01

    Rhythmic gymnastics training guidance model, taking into consideration the features of artistic gymnastics training, is put forward to help gymnasts identify their deficiencies and unskilled technical movements and improve their training effects. The model is built on the foundation of both physical quality indicator model and artistic gymnastics training indicator model. Physical quality indicator model composed of bodily factor, flexibility-strength factor and speed-dexterity factor delivers an objective evaluation with reference to basic sport testing data. Training indicator model, based on physical fitness indicator, helps analyze the technical movements, through which the impact from each bodily factor on technical movements is revealed. AG training guidance model, in further combination with actual training data and in comparison with the data shown in the training indicator model, helps identify the problems in trainings, and thus improve the training effect. These three models when in combined use and in comparison with historical model data can check and verify the improvement in training effect over a certain period of time.

  14. Synergies and distinctions between computational disciplines in biomedical research: perspective from the Clinical andTranslational Science Award programs.

    PubMed

    Bernstam, Elmer V; Hersh, William R; Johnson, Stephen B; Chute, Christopher G; Nguyen, Hien; Sim, Ida; Nahm, Meredith; Weiner, Mark G; Miller, Perry; DiLaura, Robert P; Overcash, Marc; Lehmann, Harold P; Eichmann, David; Athey, Brian D; Scheuermann, Richard H; Anderson, Nick; Starren, Justin; Harris, Paul A; Smith, Jack W; Barbour, Ed; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Krusch, David A; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Becich, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Clinical and translational research increasingly requires computation. Projects may involve multiple computationally oriented groups including information technology (IT) professionals, computer scientists, and biomedical informaticians. However, many biomedical researchers are not aware of the distinctions among these complementary groups, leading to confusion, delays, and suboptimal results. Although written from the perspective of Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) programs within academic medical centers, this article addresses issues that extend beyond clinical and translational research. The authors describe the complementary but distinct roles of operational IT, research IT, computer science, and biomedical informatics using a clinical data warehouse as a running example. In general, IT professionals focus on technology. The authors distinguish between two types of IT groups within academic medical centers: central or administrative IT (supporting the administrative computing needs of large organizations) and research IT (supporting the computing needs of researchers). Computer scientists focus on general issues of computation such as designing faster computers or more efficient algorithms, rather than specific applications. In contrast, informaticians are concerned with data, information, and knowledge. Biomedical informaticians draw on a variety of tools, including but not limited to computers, to solve information problems in health care and biomedicine. The paper concludes with recommendations regarding administrative structures that can help to maximize the benefit of computation to biomedical research within academic health centers.

  15. Synergies and Distinctions between Computational Disciplines in Biomedical Research: Perspective from the Clinical and Translational Science Award Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bernstam, Elmer V.; Hersh, William R.; Johnson, Stephen B.; Chute, Christopher G.; Nguyen, Hien; Sim, Ida; Nahm, Meredith; Weiner, Mark; Miller, Perry; DiLaura, Robert P.; Overcash, Marc; Lehmann, Harold P.; Eichmann, David; Athey, Brian D.; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Anderson, Nick; Starren, Justin B.; Harris, Paul A.; Smith, Jack W.; Barbour, Ed; Silverstein, Jonathan C.; Krusch, David A.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Becich, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and translational research increasingly requires computation. Projects may involve multiple computationally-oriented groups including information technology (IT) professionals, computer scientists and biomedical informaticians. However, many biomedical researchers are not aware of the distinctions among these complementary groups, leading to confusion, delays and sub-optimal results. Although written from the perspective of clinical and translational science award (CTSA) programs within academic medical centers, the paper addresses issues that extend beyond clinical and translational research. The authors describe the complementary but distinct roles of operational IT, research IT, computer science and biomedical informatics using a clinical data warehouse as a running example. In general, IT professionals focus on technology. The authors distinguish between two types of IT groups within academic medical centers: central or administrative IT (supporting the administrative computing needs of large organizations) and research IT (supporting the computing needs of researchers). Computer scientists focus on general issues of computation such as designing faster computers or more efficient algorithms, rather than specific applications. In contrast, informaticians are concerned with data, information and knowledge. Biomedical informaticians draw on a variety of tools, including but not limited to computers, to solve information problems in health care and biomedicine. The paper concludes with recommendations regarding administrative structures that can help to maximize the benefit of computation to biomedical research within academic health centers. PMID:19550198

  16. Training and retaining of underrepresented minority physician scientists - a Hispanic perspective: NICHD-AAP workshop on research in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Valcarcel, M; Diaz, C; Santiago-Borrero, P J

    2006-07-01

    In a workshop organized by NICHD and the AAP in January 2004, we addressed and discussed issues related to a Hispanic perspective in Training and Retaining of underrepresented minority physician scientists in the United States. A review of the literature related to training of underrepresented minority physicians in the United States (US) was performed, giving emphasis to those related to the Hispanic population. Success and failure in training and retention of Hispanic physician scientists and trainees was examined. An underrepresentation of Hispanic minorities in medical research workforce was found. This fact has recently resulted in efforts to increase their recruitment and there is a mandate by the National Institute of Health (NIH) for their inclusion. The Hispanic population in the US has increased rapidly, with diversity among the Hispanics in their personal and professional behavior. Significant disparities in health, health risk factors and access to health care manifested by an increased burden of illness and death have been documented. There in an undersupply of academic Hispanic neonatologist. Factors such as availability of academic employment, limited research funding in pediatrics, managed care and large debt burden of the US medical graduates interfere with recruitment of Hispanic trainees and academic physician scientist. Possible solutions, including recognition research awards, revision of NIH policies in awarding funds for neonatology, establishing strategies to improve minorities' acceptance, participation in research and increase accrual of Hispanic population in clinical trials should be given priority.

  17. NIH Career Development Awards in Clinical and Translational Science Award institutions: distinguishing characteristics of top performing sites.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lourdes R; Nakazono, Terry; Davidson, Pamela L

    2014-12-01

    To identify and disseminate the organizational characteristics of "top performing" National Institute of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) institutions in regards to career development, using the number of new K awards received per year to rank institutions and comparing these with non-CTSA institutions. The authors analyzed the organizational characteristics of all 61 CTSA institutions from 2006 to 2013 using the American Association of Medical Colleges Organizational Characteristics Database and K Award funding details using NIH RePORT. Five of the "top 10 performing" institutions are in the western region, and six out of the ten are public schools. Three of the "top 10 performing" institutions receive most of their K awards through two funding mechanisms-the K08 (mentored clinical scientist research award) and K23 (mentored patient-oriented research career development awards). Notably, these three institutions lack a KL2 program. The CTSA network of institutions is committed to developing the next generation of physician scientists in order to meet the pressing health needs of society. Educators and evaluators within this network may need to provide training to junior investigators beyond the traditional KL2 programs in order to advance their career development as physician scientists and clinical translational researchers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. NIH Career Development Awards in Clinical and Translational Science Award Institutions: Distinguishing Characteristics of Top Performing Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nakazono, Terry; Davidson, Pamela L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To identify and disseminate the organizational characteristics of “top performing” National Institute of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) institutions in regards to career development, using the number of new K awards received per year to rank institutions and comparing these with non‐CTSA institutions. Methods The authors analyzed the organizational characteristics of all 61 CTSA institutions from 2006 to 2013 using the American Association of Medical Colleges Organizational Characteristics Database and K Award funding details using NIH RePORT. Results Five of the “top 10 performing” institutions are in the western region, and six out of the ten are public schools. Three of the “top 10 performing” institutions receive most of their K awards through two funding mechanisms—the K08 (mentored clinical scientist research award) and K23 (mentored patient‐oriented research career development awards). Notably, these three institutions lack a KL2 program. Conclusion The CTSA network of institutions is committed to developing the next generation of physician scientists in order to meet the pressing health needs of society. Educators and evaluators within this network may need to provide training to junior investigators beyond the traditional KL2 programs in order to advance their career development as physician scientists and clinical translational researchers. PMID:25044058

  19. Reasons for Training: Why Australian Employers Train Their Workers. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Eddie; Hill, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Analysing data from the 2005 National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) Survey of Employer Use and Views of the Vocational Education and Training (VET) System, this report looks at the reasons why employers train their workers. Four different types of training are focused on: vocational qualifications; the employment of apprentices…

  20. Four New SPORE Grants Awarded.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Despite an economic climate shaped by tight budgets, the NCI recently announced four new Specialized Program of Research Excellence awards that emphasize translation research. In total, the NCI doled out $106 million to fund these new awards and 48 renewed or continuing grants.

  1. Hutchinson Award to Eville Gorham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Scott W.

    Eville Gorham, Regents Professor of Ecology and Botany at the University of Minnesota, is the 1986 recipient of the Hutchinson Award. The medallion and certificate that constitute the award are given annually by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) in recognition of outstanding research. The award was presented to Gorham by G.E. Hutchinson (Yale University, New Haven, Conn.) at a banquet in Newport, R.I., during the ASLO summer meeting.

  2. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Nelson, David E; Izmirlian, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one's career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987-2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumni (n = 114), and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32) postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140) completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-7.69) and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04-4.90) were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20-0.82) or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.94) had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5-9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.87, respectively), as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11-0.98). These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors.

  3. Environmental training research project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Santa Fe Community College serves an area including the city and county of Santa Fe. The population has a high percentage of Hispanics and a Native American population of about 3%. The student body at the college generally reflects that of the service district. The college strives to recruit students from all segments of the population so there is representation among all ethnic and economic groups. The college strives to serve students and the community by offering educational opportunities that meet the needs of both elements and which will lead to gainful employment. Instruction is also offered to meets needs for retraining, upgrades, and personal enlightenment. The college started a hazardous materials management program in the fall of 1991 which has since been renamed environmental management. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for environmental careers, to provide required training such as OSHA HAZWOPER and refresher courses, and to provide educational opportunities that would make the public more environmentally aware. The program content needs to be studied to ensure we`re meeting the needs of the students and the business community. There had not been a significant opportunity to conduct this research.

  4. 42 CFR 64.6 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards. 64.6 Section 64.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.6 Awards. (a) Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  5. 42 CFR 64.6 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Awards. 64.6 Section 64.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.6 Awards. (a) Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  6. 42 CFR 64.6 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Awards. 64.6 Section 64.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.6 Awards. (a) Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  7. 42 CFR 63a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Awards. 63a.7 Section 63a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.7 Awards. Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  8. 42 CFR 63a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Awards. 63a.7 Section 63a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.7 Awards. Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  9. 42 CFR 63a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards. 63a.7 Section 63a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.7 Awards. Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  10. 42 CFR 63a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards. 63a.7 Section 63a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.7 Awards. Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  11. 42 CFR 63a.7 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Awards. 63a.7 Section 63a.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.7 Awards. Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  12. 42 CFR 64.6 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards. 64.6 Section 64.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.6 Awards. (a) Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  13. 42 CFR 64.6 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Awards. 64.6 Section 64.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.6 Awards. (a) Criteria. Within the limits of available funds,...

  14. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting. PMID:25146854

  15. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-03-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997-2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting.

  16. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs--the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott D; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-12-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient-oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collaboration, job and advancement opportunities, and promotion of work-life balance. The benefits of clinical research training programs need to be measured so that funders and society can judge if they are worth the investment in time and resources. Identification of elements that are important to program benefit is essential to measuring the benefit of the program as well as program planning. Future work should focus on the constructs which contribute to benefits of clinical research training programs such as CRTI.

  17. Bridging the gap: supporting translational research careers through an integrated research track within residency training.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Melissa R; Gordon, Joshua A; Pincus, Harold A; Oquendo, Maria A

    2013-06-01

    In the setting of traditional residency training programs, physician-scientists are often limited in their ability to pursue research training goals while meeting clinical training requirements. This creates a gap in research training at a critical developmental stage. In response, Columbia University Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry, in partnership with the New York State Psychiatric Institute, has created a formal Research Track Program (RTP) for psychiatry residents so that interested individuals can maintain their attention on research training during formative residency years. Clinical and research training are integrated through core clinical rotations on research units. With protected research time and clear developmental milestones for each year of training, the RTP allows research track residents to meet both clinical and research training goals while maintaining a healthy work-life balance. In coordination with existing postdoctoral research fellowship programs, research track residents can effectively jump-start fellowship training with advanced course work and consistent, continuous mentorship bridging residency and fellowship years. A key element of the program is its provision of core training in research literacy and extensive research opportunities for all residents, stimulating research interest across the whole residency program. Supported by the National Institutes of Health and a private foundation, this RTP capitalizes on a unique academic-private partnership to address many of the challenges facing physician-scientists. By integrating clinical and research exposures and offering protected research time, careful mentoring, and financial resources, the program aims to further the development of those most poised to establish careers in translational research.

  18. Surrogates for Future Force Warrior (FFW) Training Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Technical Report 1156 Surrogates for Future Force Warrior (FFW) Training Research Stephen C. Livingston James T. Root Ronald L. Mast Northrop Grumman...for Future Force Warrior (FFW) Training Research DASW01-99-D-0013 DO#34 5b. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 622785 6. AUTHOR(S) 5c. PROJECT NUMBER Stephen C...provide the ARI staff with a reach forward ability in training research. As the DoD Training Transformation (T2) gets underway, the Army is now working on

  19. Training: Who Needs It? Research Report 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood-Richardson, Stephen; And Others

    This report provides results of a study of training in the catering and hospitality industry in Great Britain in 1994-95. An executive summary presents 22 key recommendations for action to stimulate skills development in the industry and outlines key outcomes. Section 1 provides a broad overview of current training activity, based on interviews…

  20. THE TRANSCULTURAL RESEARCH AND TRAINING INSTITUTE (TCI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOUBERT, J. DANIEL

    MANY AMERICANS EMPLOYED OVERSEAS, ESPECIALLY NAVY AND MARINE PERSONNEL, NEED KNOWLEDGE OF THE CULTURES IN WHICH THEY LIVE. THERE IS CRITICISM OF TRADITIONAL WAYS OF SELECTING PERSONS AND TRAINING THEM. A NUMBER OF NEW TECHNIQUES, BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL TRAINING IN SIMULATION OF FOREIGN SOCIETIES, SEEM TO PROVIDE FOR OVERCOMING INTERNALIZATION…

  1. 7 CFR 3400.6 - Grant awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grant awards. 3400.6 Section 3400.6 Agriculture... RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM General § 3400.6 Grant awards. (a) General. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the awarding official shall make research project grants to those responsible, eligible...

  2. 7 CFR 3401.8 - Grant awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grant awards. 3401.8 Section 3401.8 Agriculture... RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM General § 3401.8 Grant awards. (a) General. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the awarding official shall make research project grants to those responsible, eligible...

  3. 7 CFR 3400.6 - Grant awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Grant awards. 3400.6 Section 3400.6 Agriculture... RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM General § 3400.6 Grant awards. (a) General. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the awarding official shall make research project grants to those responsible, eligible...

  4. 7 CFR 3401.8 - Grant awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Grant awards. 3401.8 Section 3401.8 Agriculture... RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM General § 3401.8 Grant awards. (a) General. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the awarding official shall make research project grants to those responsible, eligible...

  5. Sylvanus Albert Reed Award: Eastman N. Jacobs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1937-01-01

    Sylvanus Albert Reed Award - Eastman N. Jacobs: In 1937, Eastman N. Jacobs, one of Langley's most adventurous researchers, received the Sylvanus Albert Reed Award for his contributions to the aerodynamic improvement of airfoils.

  6. Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and National Institutes of Health R01 Research Awards: Is There Evidence of a Double Bind for Women of Color?

    PubMed

    Ginther, Donna K; Kahn, Shulamit; Schaffer, Walter T

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and the probability of being awarded an R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The authors used data from the NIH Information for Management, Planning, Analysis, and Coordination grants management database for the years 2000-2006 to examine gender differences and race/ethnicity-specific gender differences in the probability of receiving an R01 Type 1 award. The authors used descriptive statistics and probit models to determine the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, degree, investigator experience, and R01 award probability, controlling for a large set of observable characteristics. White women PhDs and MDs were as likely as white men to receive an R01 award. Compared with white women, Asian and black women PhDs and black women MDs were significantly less likely to receive funding. Women submitted fewer grant applications, and blacks and women who were new investigators were more likely to submit only one application between 2000 and 2006. Differences by race/ethnicity explain the NIH funding gap for women of color, as white women have a slight advantage over men in receiving Type 1 awards. Findings of a lower submission rate for women and an increased likelihood that they will submit only one proposal are consistent with research showing that women avoid competition. Policies designed to address the racial and ethnic diversity of the biomedical workforce have the potential to improve funding outcomes for women of color.

  7. Multicultural Counselor Training in a Single Course: Review of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Krista M.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to provide clarity and future direction in training and research practices, this article consolidates the literature related to outcomes from a single multicultural counseling course (e.g., a course of 15 to 17 weeks). A critique of the literature and implications for future research and training are included. (Contains 1 table.)

  8. Competency-Based Training and Assessment. Review of Research 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William

    Australian research into competency-based training and assessment is very thin and theoretical discussion is often superficial. One curious feature in the Australian debate is the belief by many that competency-based training is possible without competency-based assessment. Definitions are being debated. In a longitudinal study, researchers have…

  9. A Project for Research, Development, and Evaluation Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr, Chadwick; Porter, Bette C.

    This report summarizes and evaluates the 1969-70 Consortium Research Development (CORD) training and dissemination project conducted by Teaching Research, Oregon State System of Higher Education. The project provided a 2-week summer institute to train selected college and university staff from CORD institutions in the use of individualized,…

  10. Maryland's Special Populations Network. A model for cancer disparities research, education, and training.

    PubMed

    Baquet, Claudia R; Mack, Kelly M; Mishra, Shiraz I; Bramble, Joy; Deshields, Mary; Datcher, Delores; Savoy, Mervin; Brooks, Sandra E; Boykin-Brown, Stephanie; Hummel, Kery

    2006-10-15

    The unequal burden of cancer in minority and underserved communities nationally and in Maryland is a compelling crisis. The Maryland Special Populations Cancer Research Network (MSPN) developed an infrastructure covering Maryland's 23 jurisdictions and Baltimore City through formal partnerships between the University of Maryland School of Medicine, University of Maryland Statewide Health Network, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and community partners in Baltimore City, rural Eastern Shore, rural Western Maryland, rural Southern Maryland, and Piscataway Conoy Tribe and statewide American Indians. Guided by the community-based participatory framework, the MSPN undertook a comprehensive assessment (of needs, strengths, and resources available) that laid the foundation for programmatic efforts in community-initiated cancer awareness and education, research, and training. The MSPN infrastructure was used to implement successful and innovative community-based cancer education interventions and technological solutions; conduct education and promotion of clinical trials, cancer health disparities research, and minority faculty cancer research career development; and leverage additional resources for sustainability. MSPN engaged in informed advocacy among decision- and policymakers at state and national levels, and its community-based clinical trials program was recognized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as a Best Practice Award. The solutions to reduce and eliminate cancer health disparities are complex and require comprehensive and focused multidisciplinary cancer health disparities research, training, and education strategies implemented through robust community-academic partnerships. Cancer 2006. (c) American Cancer Society.

  11. Promoting mentorship in translational research: should we hope for Athena or train mentor?

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2014-05-01

    Despite consensus that mentorship is a critical determinant of career success, many academic health centers (AHCs) do not provide formal training for their mentors. In part, this problem arises from a lack of evidence-based mentorship training curricula. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Pfund and colleagues from 16 AHCs, including 15 Clinical Translational Science Award institutions report the results of a randomized, controlled trial that addressed this research gap. In their study, mentors randomized to undertake a formal mentoring curriculum reported significant gains in self-assessed competencies. These improvements were corroborated by the most critical and objective observers of mentorship skills: their own mentees.Evidence-based curricula will not transform research mentorship in isolation. An organization-wide culture of mentorship is necessary to meet the mentorship needs of all research trainees and faculty. The development of a culture of mentorship requires attention to structural issues such as the provision of protected time, physical resources, and targeted funding in addition to evidence-based curricula. Organizations must monitor the implementation of these structures in the day-to-day process of mentorship. Finally, institutions must develop measures to track outcomes for both mentors and mentees, and create incentives to achieve those outcomes. In the current environment of constrained research funding and competing demands from clinical and educational programs, a substantive organizational commitment to mentorship is necessary to ensure that the next generation of mentees achieves success in translational research.

  12. U.S. EPA Awards $700,000 to UC Irvine for Research on Protecting Air Quality in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO -Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded $701,304 to the University of California, Irvine to help answer the question of how to protect the air we breathe from the impacts of climate change. University researchers will

  13. U.S. EPA Awards $790,000 to UC Davis for Research on Protecting Air Quality in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO -Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded $790,000 to the University of California, Davis to help answer the question of how to protect the air we breathe from the impacts of climate change. University researchers will u

  14. From Data to Bonuses: A Case Study of the Issues Related to Awarding Teachers Pay on the Basis of Their Students' Progress. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "From Data to Bonuses: A Case Study of the Issues Related to Awarding Teachers Pay on the Basis of their Students' Progress"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Daniel McCaffrey, Bing Han, and J.R. Lockwood of the RAND Corporation discuss the complex process of…

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD): An Exemplar of Managing for Impact in Development Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Ofir, Zenda; Noordeloos, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this Exemplars case, the fifth and final under the direction of the current coeditors, the authors present a reflective account of an ongoing, complex, multiyear, multinational monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system conducted for African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD), an international development program. The…

  16. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published "Entering Mentoring" curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this…

  17. 75 FR 62838 - Award of a Single-Source Expansion Supplement to the Research Foundation of CUNY on Behalf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Award of a Single-Source Expansion Supplement to... Families (ACF), Children's Bureau (CB) announces the award of a single-source program expansion supplement... National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections (NRCPFC), which provides...

  18. Pre-Award Administrators Are from Pluto: Post-Award Administrators Are from Saturn, Or Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spina, Mary T.

    2000-01-01

    An experienced research administrator who has worked in both pre-award and post-award administrative roles offers her perspectives of both sides and suggests that a smooth relationship between pre-award and post-award research administrators is critical to the conduct of research. (DB)

  19. Pre-Award Administrators Are from Pluto: Post-Award Administrators Are from Saturn, Or Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spina, Mary T.

    2000-01-01

    An experienced research administrator who has worked in both pre-award and post-award administrative roles offers her perspectives of both sides and suggests that a smooth relationship between pre-award and post-award research administrators is critical to the conduct of research. (DB)

  20. Translational research education and training needs in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; Inouye, Jillian; Seto, Todd B; Braun, Kathryn L

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this needs assessment was to identify the translational research education and training needs of researchers and administrators working in Hawai'i's communities and to use the finding to develop an education and training plan. The assessment was led by a community advisory board with members from community health centers, social agencies, hospitals, and academia on O'ahu. The survey, developed with input of the community advisory board, was sent to 94 administrators and researchers involved or affiliated with research being conducted in Hawai'i. Forty-one respondents (43%) completed the survey. Respondents wanted education and training in research processes, specific research-related skills, and facilitating interactions between community and academic researchers. Sixty-one percent were interested in training related to community-engaged research and yearly seminars on "collaborative mentoring." Popular topics of interest were related to data monitoring, networking with different cultural groups, statistics, and human subjects review. A majority of respondents wanted to attend workshops, seminars, and presentations rather than take a class. Approximately 50% of the respondents wanted to gain information through on-line training. Findings guided the development of a translational research education and training plan for the University of Hawai'i National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Centers in Minority Institutions Multidisciplinary and Translational Research Infrastructure Expansion (RMATRIX) grant.

  1. Student views of research training programmes in medical schools.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Neilton A; Luz, Maurício R; Saraiva, Roberto M; Alves, Luiz A

    2011-07-01

    Research activity is not a mandatory component of medical education in many developing countries, including Brazil, although such experiences can have a positive impact on the quality of medical education. The interest and involvement of medical students in research and the barriers they face in accessing research training in developing countries have not been adequately addressed. We sought to assess the availability of scientific training programmes in Brazilian medical schools, the degree of involvement of medical students in these programmes, the main barriers to student involvement in research and possible reasons for the lack of scientific training programmes. This study examined 13 medical programmes conducted in six Brazilian states. A total of 1004 medical students were interviewed. We evaluated the availability of scientific training in the institutions attended by these students, the participation of the students in such activities and students' reasons for not joining such programmes based on student answers to our questionnaire. Although only 7% of the medical students expressed no interest in research, only 60% of them were involved in research training. Students regarded a lack of institutional incentive as the most significant barrier to their participation in research activities. Other significant barriers included defective infrastructure and insufficient time available for professors to mentor undergraduate students. According to the feedback from the students, eight of the 13 schools investigated featured structured programmes for scientific training. However, a mean of only 47% of students participated in scientific training programmes on their campuses and 13% of students were compelled to pursue such activities off-campus. Although scientific training during medical education in Brazil is still less frequent than expected, most of the students were interested in research activities. The barriers to undergraduate scientific training described

  2. Directory of Awards. FY 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Science and Engineering Education.

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides awards for education and research in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering. This publication contains information on fiscal year 1986 awards. An introductory section reviews the goals of NSF's education program and the long-range goals of the Directorate for Science and Engineering Education.…

  3. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for antimicrobial resistance research to institutions in the UK, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Head, Michael G.; Fitchett, Joseph R.; Cooke, Mary K.; Wurie, Fatima B.; Atun, Rifat; Hayward, Andrew C.; Holmes, Alison; Johnson, Alan P.; Woodford, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the level of research funding awarded to UK institutions specifically for antimicrobial resistance-related research and how closely the topics funded relate to the clinical and public health burden of resistance. Methods Databases and web sites were systematically searched for information on how infectious disease research studies were funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to antimicrobial resistance, including bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology research, were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen and disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. Results The overall dataset included 6165 studies receiving a total investment of £2.6 billion, of which £102 million was directed towards antimicrobial resistance research (5.5% of total studies, 3.9% of total spend). Of 337 resistance-related projects, 175 studies focused on bacteriology (40.2% of total resistance-related spending), 42 focused on antiviral resistance (17.2% of funding) and 51 focused on parasitology (27.4% of funding). Mean annual funding ranged from £1.9 million in 1997 to £22.1 million in 2009. Conclusions Despite the fact that the emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens our future ability to treat many infections, the proportion of the UK infection-research spend targeting this important area is small. There are encouraging signs of increased investment in this area, but it is important that this is sustained and targeted at areas of projected greatest burden. Two areas of particular concern requiring more investment are tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24038777

  4. Biases in grant proposal success rates, funding rates and award sizes affect the geographical distribution of funding for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Wahls, Wayne P

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the United States to most efficiently make breakthroughs on the biology, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases requires that physicians and scientists in each state have equal access to federal research grants and grant dollars. However, despite legislative and administrative efforts to ensure equal access, the majority of funding for biomedical research is concentrated in a minority of states. To gain insight into the causes of such disparity, funding metrics were examined for all NIH research project grants (RPGs) from 2004 to 2013. State-by-state differences in per application success rates, per investigator funding rates, and average award size each contributed significantly to vast disparities (greater than 100-fold range) in per capita RPG funding to individual states. To the extent tested, there was no significant association overall between scientific productivity and per capita funding, suggesting that the unbalanced allocation of funding is unrelated to the quality of scientists in each state. These findings reveal key sources of bias in, and new insight into the accuracy of, the funding process. They also support evidence-based recommendations for how the NIH could better utilize the scientific talent and capacity that is present throughout the United States.

  5. Biases in grant proposal success rates, funding rates and award sizes affect the geographical distribution of funding for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the United States to most efficiently make breakthroughs on the biology, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases requires that physicians and scientists in each state have equal access to federal research grants and grant dollars. However, despite legislative and administrative efforts to ensure equal access, the majority of funding for biomedical research is concentrated in a minority of states. To gain insight into the causes of such disparity, funding metrics were examined for all NIH research project grants (RPGs) from 2004 to 2013. State-by-state differences in per application success rates, per investigator funding rates, and average award size each contributed significantly to vast disparities (greater than 100-fold range) in per capita RPG funding to individual states. To the extent tested, there was no significant association overall between scientific productivity and per capita funding, suggesting that the unbalanced allocation of funding is unrelated to the quality of scientists in each state. These findings reveal key sources of bias in, and new insight into the accuracy of, the funding process. They also support evidence-based recommendations for how the NIH could better utilize the scientific talent and capacity that is present throughout the United States. PMID:27077009

  6. 77 FR 37007 - Applications for New Awards: National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...; Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs) AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative... authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Rehabilitation Act). Rehabilitation Engineering... under the Rehabilitation Act by conducting advanced engineering research on and development...

  7. 77 FR 8223 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Program--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)--Center on Knowledge Translation for... Absolute Priority 2--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR... Applications Applications for grants under the Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and...

  8. Research Ethics Training in Peru: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Lescano, A. Roxana; Blazes, David L.; Montano, Silvia M.; Moran, Zoe; Naquira, Cesar; Ramirez, Edwin; Lie, Reidar; Martin, Gregory J.; Lescano, Andres G.; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2008-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing number of health care professionals seeking international research experience, comes an urgent need for enhanced capacity of host country institutional review boards (IRB) to review research proposals and ensure research activities are both ethical and relevant to the host country customs and needs. A successful combination of distance learning, interactive courses and expert course instructors has been applied in Peru since 2004 through collaborations between the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, the University of Washington and the Department of Clinical Bioethics of the National Institutes of Health to provide training in ethical conduct of research to IRB members and researchers from Peru and other Latin American countries. All training activities were conducted under the auspices of the Peruvian National Institute of Health (INS), Ministry of Health. To date, 927 people from 12 different Latin American countries have participated in several of these training activities. In this article we describe our training model. PMID:18818763

  9. Research ethics training in Peru: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lescano, A Roxana; Blazes, David L; Montano, Silvia M; Moran, Zoe; Naquira, Cesar; Ramirez, Edwin; Lie, Reidar; Martin, Gregory J; Lescano, Andres G; Zunt, Joseph R

    2008-09-26

    With the rapidly increasing number of health care professionals seeking international research experience, comes an urgent need for enhanced capacity of host country institutional review boards (IRB) to review research proposals and ensure research activities are both ethical and relevant to the host country customs and needs. A successful combination of distance learning, interactive courses and expert course instructors has been applied in Peru since 2004 through collaborations between the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, the University of Washington and the Department of Clinical Bioethics of the National Institutes of Health to provide training in ethical conduct of research to IRB members and researchers from Peru and other Latin American countries. All training activities were conducted under the auspices of the Peruvian National Institute of Health (INS), Ministry of Health. To date, 927 people from 12 different Latin American countries have participated in several of these training activities. In this article we describe our training model.

  10. An institutional postdoctoral research training program: predictors of publication rate and federal funding success of its graduates.

    PubMed

    Ross, Randal G; Greco-Sanders, Linda; Laudenslager, Mark; Reite, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health funds institutional National Research Service Awards (NRSA) to provide postdoctoral research training. While peer-reviewed publications are the most common outcome measure utilized, there has been little discussion of how publications should be counted or what factors impact the long-term publication rates of trainees in these programs. The authors reviewed current curricula vitae from 92 graduates of an institutional NRSA and from the faculty mentors of that program to assess publications through 2005. Publications were weighted based on peer versus non-peer-reviewed and authorship position. Trainee and mentor factors were assessed for their impact on publication rates and on becoming principal investigators of larger scale federal grants such as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01. Weighted publication scores correlate with total publication rates at such a high rate that the two scores can be used interchangeably. Forty-three percent of graduates average at least one publication per year after completing the postdoctoral program; 20% were listed as an independent investigator on a larger federal grant. The number of publications published during postdoctoral training and additional funded training beyond that provided by the institutional NRSA are correlated with increased posttraining program publication rates; other factors including gender, terminal degree, number of publications prior to postdoctoral training, and mentor variables had no significant impact. Additional funded training, male gender, and increased time since completion of the training are associated with increased likelihood of larger grant federal funding. Weighting publications by whether they were peer-reviewed and by authorship position appears to have little benefit over a simple counting of the number of publications. Publication during research training and the pursuit of funding for additional individual research training may be appropriate

  11. Perspectives of anesthesia residents training in Canada on fellowship training, research, and future practice location.

    PubMed

    Khan, James; Gilbert, Jaclyn; Sharma, Abhinav; LeManach, Yannick; Yee, Doreen

    2015-09-01

    We conducted this study to determine the preferences of anesthesia residents training in Canada for fellowship training, research, and future practice location and to identify the factors that influence those preferences. Using a cross-sectional study design, a survey was sent to all anesthesia residents enrolled at an accredited Canadian anesthesiology residency program (N = 629). Data were collected on demographics and preferences for fellowship training, research, and future practice location. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine significant associations. Two hundred forty-four residents (39%) responded to the survey. Seventy percent of residents intended to pursue fellowship training. The top three fellowships they favoured were regional anesthesia, intensive care, and cardiac anesthesia. Male sex was positively associated with the decision to pursue fellowship training, whereas having an additional graduate degree was negatively associated with this choice. Among those pursuing fellowship training, the most influential factors were personal interest, enhancing employability, and an interest in an academic career. Fifty-seven percent of residents preferred to work at an academic hospital. Thirty-four percent of residents intended to incorporate research into their future practice, and personal interest, employability, and colleagues were most influential in their decision. Research activity and publishing in residency were associated with the desire to pursue future research initiatives. The majority of anesthesia residents training in Canada choose to pursue fellowship training and work at an academic hospital. Approximately one-third of residents have an interest in incorporating research into their future careers.

  12. University of Kansas Medical center Cancer Research Equipment Award Type: Construction Grant

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Jamie

    2016-12-09

    A major mechanism to strengthen the overall cancer focus of KUCC and expand specific research programs is through targeted recruitment of additional cancer researchers to increase the national and international status of the Cancer Center, enhance the number of NCI/cancer-related grants, fill critical research needs, and enable new collaborative projects. Over the last five years KUCC has demonstrated the ability to recruit nationally recognized basic, translational and clinical scientists to fill key leadership positions and strengthen our research programs. These researchers require new and renovated research facilities require state-of-the-art laboratory equipment. This includes standard equipment for the renovated laboratories and more specialized equipment as part of new investigator start-up packages. This funding is used to support recruitment, facilities, equipment, shared resources, administration, and patient care services. KUCC is committed to recruiting additional cancer researchers to increase the national and international status of the Cancer Center, enhance the number of NCI/cancer-related grants, fill critical research positions and build the four cancer research programs. Each purposeful hire aims to further the scientific vision, mission, and goals of the Cancer Center research programs. The funds requested will be used to supplement the recruitment packages of future cancer center recruits primarily through purchase of key equipment items.

  13. Development and interim results of a clinical research training fellowship.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S M; Dionne, R A

    2007-08-01

    While the ability to base clinical training and patient care on scientific evidence is highly dependent on the results of translational and clinical research, a shortage of trained clinical investigators delays advances upon which to base evidence-based therapeutics. In response to this perceived shortage, a clinical research training program was developed in the Division of Intramural Research at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a prototype for training health professionals in clinical research methodologies and their application to oral-craniofacial problems. All but one of the trainees initiated at least one clinical trial leading to a scientific publication. Of eleven fellows, ten completed the program with diverse outcomes: four trainees have entry-level academic or equivalent research positions; three trainees continued on to Ph.D. programs; one is completing a postdoctoral fellowship combined with clinical specialty training; one is completing a clinical residency; and two are in clinical practice. Six of the trainees received NIH funding, or the equivalent, in the NIH Intramural Research Program. These outcomes suggest that a program focused on translational and clinical research training is a successful strategy for improving the future supply of clinical researchers to support evidence-based practices and therapeutic innovation.

  14. 42 CFR 52.6 - Grant awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Grant awards. 52.6 Section 52.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR RESEARCH PROJECTS § 52.6 Grant awards. (a) Within the limits of funds available for that purpose, the Secretary will award...

  15. Sand training: a review of current research and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Binnie, Martyn John; Dawson, Brian; Pinnington, Hugh; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sand surfaces can offer a higher energy cost (EC) and lower impact training stimulus compared with firmer and more traditional team sport training venues such as grass. This review aims to summarise the existing research on sand training, with a specific focus on its application as a team sports training venue. Compared with grass, significant physiological and biomechanical differences are associated with sand exercise. However, evidence also exists to suggest that training adaptations unique to sand can positively influence firm-ground performance. Furthermore, the lower impact forces experienced on sand can limit muscle damage, muscle soreness, and decrements in performance capacity relative to exercise intensity. Therefore, using a sand training surface in team sports may allow greater training adaptations to be achieved, while reducing performance decrements and injuries that may arise from heavy training. Nevertheless, further research should investigate the effect of sand surfaces over a greater range of training types and performance outcomes, to increase the application of sand training for team sports.

  16. Clinical research training of Peruvian neurologists: a baseline assessment.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Chumbes, Gian Carlos; Montano-Torres, Silvia Margarita; Díaz-Vásquez, Alberto; Zunt, Joseph Raymond

    2010-06-21

    In Peru, despite a strong clinical research infrastructure in Lima, and Masters degree programs in epidemiology at three universities, few neurologists participate in clinical research. It was our objective to identify perceived needs and opportunities for increasing clinical research capacity and training opportunities for Peruvian neurologists. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Peruvian neurologists in Lima and Arequipa, Peru. Forty-eight neurologists completed written surveys and oral interviews. All neurologists reported interest in clinical research, but noted that lack of time and financial resources limited their ability to participate. Although most neurologists had received some training in epidemiology and research design as medical students or residents, the majority felt these topics were not adequately covered. Neurologists in Arequipa noted international funding for clinical research was uncommon outside the capital city of Lima. We concluded that clinical research is important to Peruvian neurologists. The three main barriers to increased participation in clinical research identified by neurologists were insufficient training in clinical research methodology, meager funding opportunities, and lack of dedicated time to participate in clinical research. Distance learning holds promise as a method for providing additional training in clinical research methodology, especially for neurologists who may have difficulty traveling to larger cities for additional training.

  17. Clinical research training of Peruvian neurologists: a baseline assessment

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Chumbes, Gian Carlos; Montano-Torres, Silvia Margarita; Díaz-Vásquez, Alberto; Zunt, Joseph Raymond

    2010-01-01

    In Peru, despite a strong clinical research infrastructure in Lima, and Masters degree programs in epidemiology at three universities, few neurologists participate in clinical research. It was our objective to identify perceived needs and opportunities for increasing clinical research capacity and training opportunities for Peruvian neurologists. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Peruvian neurologists in Lima and Arequipa, Peru. Forty-eight neurologists completed written surveys and oral interviews. All neurologists reported interest in clinical research, but noted that lack of time and financial resources limited their ability to participate. Although most neurologists had received some training in epidemiology and research design as medical students or residents, the majority felt these topics were not adequately covered. Neurologists in Arequipa noted international funding for clinical research was uncommon outside the capital city of Lima. We concluded that clinical research is important to Peruvian neurologists. The three main barriers to increased participation in clinical research identified by neurologists were insufficient training in clinical research methodology, meager funding opportunities, and lack of dedicated time to participate in clinical research. Distance learning holds promise as a method for providing additional training in clinical research methodology, especially for neurologists who may have difficulty traveling to larger cities for additional training. PMID:21577342

  18. Training for Certification: Demonstration & Research Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on agricultural pest control, this publication includes a full range of topics from uses of pesticides for agricultural animal pest control to the toxicity of common pesticides to fish and bees.…

  19. Research in Visual Training and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippner, Stanley

    Studies of the etiological factors in reading disability and approaches, generally visual-perceptual, to the problem are presented. Krippner's study presents 15 causes of reading disability and reveals poor visual-perceptual skills as the most common cause. The Olson-Mitchell-Westberg study attempts to determine the effects of visual training upon…

  20. Training for Certification: Demonstration & Research Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on agricultural pest control, this publication includes a full range of topics from uses of pesticides for agricultural animal pest control to the toxicity of common pesticides to fish and bees.…

  1. Training in Patient Navigation: A Review of the Research Literature.

    PubMed

    Ustjanauskas, Amy E; Bredice, Marissa; Nuhaily, Sumayah; Kath, Lisa; Wells, Kristen J

    2016-05-01

    Despite the proliferation of patient navigation programs designed to increase timely receipt of health care, little is known about the content and delivery of patient navigation training, or best practices in this arena. The current study begins to address these gaps in understanding, as it is the first study to comprehensively review descriptions of patient navigation training in the peer-reviewed research literature. Seventy-five patient navigation efficacy studies published since 1995, identified through PubMed and by the authors, were included in this narrative review. Fifty-nine of the included studies (79%) mentioned patient navigation training, and 55 of these studies additionally provided a description of training. Most studies did not thoroughly document patient navigation training practices. Additionally, several topics integral to the role of patient navigators, as well as components of training central to successful adult learning, were not commonly described in the research literature. Descriptions of training also varied widely across studies in terms of duration, location, format, learning strategies employed, occupation of trainer, and content. These findings demonstrate the need for established standards of navigator training as well as for future research on the optimal delivery and content of patient navigation training. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  2. Evaluating various areas of process improvement in an effort to improve clinical research: discussions from the 2012 Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Clinical Research Management workshop.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Jane E; Cola, Philip A; Rosenblum, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on assessing the efficiency of clinical and translational research as part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) goal to "improve human health." Improvements identified and implemented by individual organizations cannot address the research infrastructure needs of all clinical and translational research conducted. NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has brought together 61 Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) sites creating a virtual national laboratory that reflects the diversity and breadth of academic medical centers to collectively improve clinical and translational science. The annual Clinical Research Management workshop is organized by the CTSA consortium with participation from CTSA awardees, NIH, and others with an interest in clinical research management. The primary objective of the workshop is to disseminate information that improves clinical research management although the specific objectives of each workshop evolve within the consortium. The fifth annual workshop entitled "Learning by doing; applying evidence-based tools to re-engineer clinical research management" took place in June 2012. The primary objective of the 2012 workshop was to utilize data to evaluate, modify, and improve clinical research management. This report provides a brief summary of the workshop proceedings and the major themes discussed among the participants. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Involving Undergraduates in Aging Research at a University in Transition: An AREA Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Stacey

    2006-01-01

    Involving students in research with older adults at a university in transition has its unique challenges. The goal of this paper is to discuss some of the rewards and lessons learned in undertaking a research program involving undergraduates at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UC-CS). UC-CS is a regional university in transition from…

  4. EPA Awards $700,000+ Grant to Harvard for Research on Climate Impacts on Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A US EPA research grant of $719,780 will assist a Harvard researcher for a project to study how climate change will affect changes in dust and smoke on the Earth's surface over the next several decades, which can have significant impacts on air quality.

  5. Validation of the Training Benefit Forecasting Method: Geometric Dimension & Tolerance Training. Training and Development Research Center: Project Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.

    The validity of the University of Minnesota Skills Training Cost-Benefit Forecasting Model (STCBFM) in a corporate setting was studied. Research and related literature suggested that a model for forecasting the economic benefits of training should include facility to identify and summarize costs and provide an assessment of the value of the…

  6. 76 FR 37336 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center-Interventions To Promote...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... (PCP), Washington, DC 20202-2700. Telephone: (202) 245-7338 or by e-mail: Lynn.Medley@ed.gov . Marlene Spencer, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., room 5133, PCP, Washington, DC 20202-2700.... Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., room 5133, PCP, Washington, DC 20202-2700. FAX: (202) 245...

  7. 76 FR 41771 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center-Interventions To Promote...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    .... Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., room 5140, PCP, Washington, DC 20202-2700. Telephone: (202... Maryland Avenue, SW., room 5133, PCP, Washington, DC 20202-2700. Telephone: (202) 245- 7532 or by e-mail...., room 5075, PCP, Washington, DC 20202-2550. Telephone: (202) 245-7363. If you use a TDD, call the FRS...

  8. 77 FR 41387 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ..., and related activities, including international activities; to develop methods, procedures, and... only, with 1'' margins at the top, bottom, and both sides. Double space (no more than three lines per... application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, we notify you. 2. Administrative and National...

  9. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Cancer.gov

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  10. NSF graduate awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Of the 450 college students offered fellowships by the National Science Foundation (NSF) this year for graduate study in 1983-1984 in the natural and social sciences, mathematics, and engineering, 40 plan to pursue graduate studies in earth, ocean, or space sciences. None of the 50 science students awarded NSF minority graduate fellowship awards plans to study in the geophysics-related sciences.Each fellowship, awarded for 3 years of graduate study, provides a stipend of $6,900 per year for full-time graduate study. An annual cost-of-education allowance of $4,000 is provided by NSF in lieu of all tuition and fees to the institution selected by each fellow for graduate study. The fellowships may be used over 5 years to permit students to incorporate teaching or research assistantships into their education during periods in which they are not receiving their fellowship stipends.

  11. Returns on Investment in Training. Research at a Glance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    Recent Australian research provides a solid body of evidence that training investments can yield very high levels of returns for firms across a range of sectors. It highlights these important factors about returns on investment (ROI): ROI come in many forms; immediate ROI are highest when training is highly focused; measuring ROI is not always…

  12. Restructuring Military Education and Training. Lessons from RAND Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, John D.; Steinberg, Paul S.

    This report examines research on initiatives intended to restructure military training with a focus on specialized skill training in military schools. Chapter 1 addresses the status of restructuring initiatives. Chapter 2 focuses on a methodology to examine the effects of restructuring and consolidation. It discusses in detail the elements…

  13. Funding and Financing Vocational Education and Training. Research Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Katrina, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book of readings combines the results of a body of research on the funding and financing of vocational education and training (VET) in Australia. Funding arrangements, or how money is distributed, are described in the first section of this book and includes chapters on allocation of funding by state training authorities, the effects of market…

  14. Learner Strategy Training in the Classroom: An Action Research Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunan, David

    1996-01-01

    Reports on an action research project that involved strategy training for several groups of first-year undergraduate students at the University of Hong Kong. The strategy training was used to experiment with ways of making students more active participants in their language learning. (Author/CK)

  15. Returns on Investment in Training. Research at a Glance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    Recent Australian research provides a solid body of evidence that training investments can yield very high levels of returns for firms across a range of sectors. It highlights these important factors about returns on investment (ROI): ROI come in many forms; immediate ROI are highest when training is highly focused; measuring ROI is not always…

  16. 1990 Mary J. Nielubowicz Award winner. Observations on stress reactions as seen in Naval Reserve Fleet Hospital training evolutions.

    PubMed

    Milroy, R

    1991-04-01

    Intense field medical exercises, survival and weapons training are of vital importance to the Naval Reserve Fleet Hospital. This training is, of necessity, stressful and chaotic in order to simulate combat conditions. It must be planned that way to be realistic. We must do this to test our ability to function in abnormal situations. Yet, we must be sensitive to the needs of our shipmates. We need to provide support and understanding so that all can successfully carry the burdens placed upon them. Education, stress debriefings, and leadership skills may answer this need.

  17. Harvard School of Public Health Awarded $651K EPA Research Grant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The School of Public Health at Harvard University is one of six academic institutions receiving a grant targeted at studying the ecological impacts of manufactured chemicals. Harvard is receiving $651,708 for its research on this topic.

  18. Former NCI Researcher, George Vande Woude, Receives AAAS Fellowship Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s Note: This article was adapted from a press release and biographical information from the Van Andel Research Institute’s website: http://www.vai.org/en/NewsRoom/press-release-01-28-14.aspx.

  19. Former NCI Researcher, George Vande Woude, Receives AAAS Fellowship Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s Note: This article was adapted from a press release and biographical information from the Van Andel Research Institute’s website: http://www.vai.org/en/NewsRoom/press-release-01-28-14.aspx.

  20. 77 FR 34359 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Brain Injury Model Systems Centers AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services... and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRPs)-- Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers (TBIMS... Brain Injury Model Systems Centers priority is from the notice of final priority for this...

  1. EPA Awards $4 Million in Grants to Research the Impact of Drought on Water Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Washington -Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $4 million to four institutions to conduct research to combat the effects of drought and extreme events on water quality in watersheds and at drinking water utilities.

  2. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Abstracts of Phase 2 Awards. 1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    AFC PROPOSES AN INTENSIVE RESEARCH OF HOW TO GROW III- V EPITAXY FIL ON GLASS SUBSTRATE USING MBE (MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY) WITH SURFACE LASER ...NUMBER: FQ8671-8601298 DR CHARTER STINESPRING TITLE: LASER INDUCED SURFACE CHEMICAL EPITAXY TOPIC# 7 OFFICE: AFOSR/XOT THIS PROPOSAL DESCRIBES...RESEARCH WHICH WILL AID IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW THIN FILM DEPOSITION TECHNIQUE, LASER -INDUCED SURFACE CHEMICAL EPITAXY (LSCE). THIS TECHNIQUE UTILIZES

  3. Spacecraft software training needs assessment research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Shirley; Golas, Katharine

    1990-01-01

    The problems were identified, along with their causes and potential solutions, that the management analysts were encountering in performing their jobs. It was concluded that sophisticated training applications would provide the most effective solution to a substantial portion of the analysts' problems. The remainder could be alleviated through the introduction of tools that could help make retrieval of the needed information from the vast and complex information resources feasible.

  4. CRM Assessment: Determining the Generalization of Rater Calibration Training. Summary of Research Report: Gold Standards Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David P.

    2002-01-01

    The extent to which pilot instructors are trained to assess crew resource management (CRM) skills accurately during Line-Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) and Line Operational Evaluation (LOE) scenarios is critical. Pilot instructors must make accurate performance ratings to ensure that proper feedback is provided to flight crews and appropriate decisions are made regarding certification to fly the line. Furthermore, the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) requires that instructors be trained explicitly to evaluate both technical and CRM performance (i.e., rater training) and also requires that proficiency and standardization of instructors be verified periodically. To address the critical need for effective pilot instructor training, the American Institutes for Research (AIR) reviewed the relevant research on rater training and, based on "best practices" from this research, developed a new strategy for training pilot instructors to assess crew performance. In addition, we explored new statistical techniques for assessing the effectiveness of pilot instructor training. The results of our research are briefly summarized below. This summary is followed by abstracts of articles and book chapters published under this grant.

  5. Vocational Education and Training in SMEs: The Role of "Education+Training" in Promoting Quality Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlay, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a personal perspective, of a contributor and Guest Editor, on the impact of "Education + Training" on promoting quality research and dissemination in the area of vocational education and training (VET) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). It has been written specifically to…

  6. Research Training Program for College and University Students

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA-ORD seeks applications from eligible entities to enter into cooperative agreements with EPA that will provide training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students on-site at EPA-ORD research facilities located in Cincinnati, OH.

  7. Cooperative Training Partnership in Aquatic Toxicology and Ecosystem Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA-ORD seeks applications to enter into a cooperative agreement with EPA that will provide training opportunities for undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral trainees on-site at ORD’s Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED) research

  8. Pedagogical Training and Research in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    2008-01-01

    Ferment in engineering has focused increased attention on undergraduate engineering education, and has clarified the need for rigorous research in engineering education. This need has spawned the new research field of Engineering Education and greatly increased interest in earning Ph.D. degrees based on rigorous engineering education research.…

  9. Pedagogical Training and Research in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    2008-01-01

    Ferment in engineering has focused increased attention on undergraduate engineering education, and has clarified the need for rigorous research in engineering education. This need has spawned the new research field of Engineering Education and greatly increased interest in earning Ph.D. degrees based on rigorous engineering education research.…

  10. Readings in Australian Vocational Education and Training Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Chris, Ed.; Thomson, Peter, Ed.

    This volume synthesizes contemporary vocational education and training (VET) research reports and papers published in Australia in recent years. "An Overview of the Research and Evaluation Effort in VET" (Chris Robinson, Peter Thomson) introduces and discusses the 12 reviews of VET research literature. "Learning in the…

  11. Organisational and Technological Skills: The Overlooked Dimension of Research Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Renata; Fisher, Kath; Ellis, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Over the last three decades new technologies have emerged that have the capacity to considerably streamline the research and publication process and enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of research. This paper argues that to achieve high quality research training in the context of today's government and industry priorities, there must be a…

  12. Organisational and Technological Skills: The Overlooked Dimension of Research Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Renata; Fisher, Kath; Ellis, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Over the last three decades new technologies have emerged that have the capacity to considerably streamline the research and publication process and enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of research. This paper argues that to achieve high quality research training in the context of today's government and industry priorities, there must be a…

  13. Stylistics in Teacher Training: Research Programs and Future Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Ana Clara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyse and systematize the conceptual and empirical bases of the available literature on research approaches, objects of study, and future prospects in the field of stylistics, in order to encourage best practice in teacher training. Three research approaches are presented: the empiricist-behaviorist approach, the…

  14. Management Training Program for Educational Research Leaders. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Desmond L.

    To increase the expertise of leaders in educational research, a series of four 5-day training sessions were held between April 1968 and January 1969. Ninety-five persons from all parts of the nation attended the sessions, including directors of educational research and development programs, professors, administrators, and research associates. The…

  15. Readings in Australian Vocational Education and Training Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Chris, Ed.; Thomson, Peter, Ed.

    This volume synthesizes contemporary vocational education and training (VET) research reports and papers published in Australia in recent years. "An Overview of the Research and Evaluation Effort in VET" (Chris Robinson, Peter Thomson) introduces and discusses the 12 reviews of VET research literature. "Learning in the…

  16. Market Research Manual for Providers of Vocational Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamblyn, Annette; Shelton, Diane

    This manual, which is intended for vocational education and training (VET) providers, does the following: explains fundamental market research concepts; highlights situations where market research can help VET providers with their planning and policy development; and illustrates the uses of market research in VET institutions. The following topics…

  17. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Dedre Gentner.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2016 award winners is Dedre Gentner, who received this award for her "achievements in research and theory in cognitive psychology and cognitive development, especially for developing the structure-mapping theory of analogy and similarity." Her award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Message from the ISCB: ISCB Ebola award for important future research on the computational biology of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Karp, Peter D; Berger, Bonnie; Kovats, Diane; Lengauer, Thomas; Linial, Michal; Sabeti, Pardis; Hide, Winston; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-02-15

    Speed is of the essence in combating Ebola; thus, computational approaches should form a significant component of Ebola research. As for the development of any modern drug, computational biology is uniquely positioned to contribute through comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Ebola strains and three-dimensional protein modeling. Other computational approaches to Ebola may include large-scale docking studies of Ebola proteins with human proteins and with small-molecule libraries, computational modeling of the spread of the virus, computational mining of the Ebola literature and creation of a curated Ebola database. Taken together, such computational efforts could significantly accelerate traditional scientific approaches. In recognition of the need for important and immediate solutions from the field of computational biology against Ebola, the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) announces a prize for an important computational advance in fighting the Ebola virus. ISCB will confer the ISCB Fight against Ebola Award, along with a prize of US$2000, at its July 2016 annual meeting (ISCB Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology 2016, Orlando, FL). dkovats@iscb.org or rost@in.tum.de. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. 77 FR 13131 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request Post-Award Reporting Requirements Including New Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management... transition to the RPPR requires the maintenance of dual reporting processes for a period of time. Thus this... required to report annually. Affected Public: Universities and other research institutions; Business...

  20. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of... Protection of Human Subjects (the “Common Rule”), adopted by the Department of Commerce at 15 CFR part 27.... (e) Should research involving human subjects become necessary for carrying out this...

  1. U.S. EPA Awards $1 Million Grant to Research Impact of Drought on Water Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a $1 million grant to the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) to conduct research on the effects of drought and extreme weather on the state's water resources. The study will exami

  2. 77 FR 66449 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... Rehabilitation Research Projects--National Data and Statistical Center for the Burn Model Systems AGENCY: Office...)-- National Data and Statistical Center for the Burn Model Systems. Notice inviting applications for new... 25472). The priority titled ``National Data and Statistical Center for the Burn Model Systems'' is from...

  3. 78 FR 25705 - Applications for New Awards; Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, South Asia, the Near East, Central and Eastern Europe and... students from minority backgrounds in research abroad projects in foreign languages and international... in the fields of economics, engineering, international development, global education, mathematics...

  4. The NIH R03 Award: An Initial Funding Step for Social Work Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhorst, Diane M.; Svikis, Dace S.

    2007-01-01

    Social workers in academic and agency settings have the opportunity to do funded research using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R03 small grant mechanism designed for discrete, clearly defined projects that can be completed within a 1- to 2-year time period with limited funding. This article describes the R03 mechanism and provides a guide…

  5. From Archive to Awards Ceremony: An Approach for Engaging Students in Historical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erekson, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent literature on history teaching has emphasized "doing history"--whether as "active learning", cognitive science, or with simple photocopies of primary sources. This article extends the discussion of a "signature pedagogy" of history to include all aspects of the work of historians, from archival research through…

  6. Youth Employability: Monographs on Research & Policy Studies. Four Award-Winning Monographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiant, Allen, Ed.

    These four reports of recent research and policy studies are the four top-rated papers from a national competition open to graduate students enrolled in doctoral programs in various social disciplines or recipients of degrees in 1980. In the first monograph, "Job Skills and Youth Unemployment," historical and current evidence refuting…

  7. 75 FR 60781 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... under the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research (PD&R) administers this program. In... Institution, Address, Grant Amount and Name of Student Funded 1. The George Washington University, Mr. Anthony Yezer, The George Washington University, 2121 I Street, NW, Suite 601, Washington, DC 20052. Grant:...

  8. Bridging the Gap: Supporting Translational Research Careers Through an Integrated Research Track Within Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Pincus, Harold A.; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    In the setting of traditional residency training programs, physician–scientists are often limited in their ability to pursue research training goals while meeting clinical training requirements. This creates a gap in research training at a critical developmental stage. In response, Columbia University Medical Center’s Department of Psychiatry, in partnership with the New York State Psychiatric Institute, has created a formal Research Track Program (RTP) for psychiatry residents so that interested individuals can maintain their attention on research training during formative residency years. Clinical and research training are integrated through core clinical rotations on research units. With protected research time and clear developmental milestones for each year of training, the RTP allows research track residents to meet both clinical and research training goals while maintaining a healthy work–life balance. In coordination with existing postdoctoral research fellowship programs, research track residents can effectively jump-start fellowship training with advanced course work and consistent, continuous mentorship bridging residency and fellowship years. A key element of the program is its provision of core training in research literacy and extensive research opportunities for all residents, stimulating research interest across the whole residency program. Supported by the National Institutes of Health and a private foundation, this RTP capitalizes on a unique academic–private partnership to address many of the challenges facing physician–scientists. By integrating clinical and research exposures and offering protected research time, careful mentoring, and financial resources, the program aims to further the development of those most poised to establish careers in translational research. PMID:23619070

  9. Quantitative Research Attitudes and Research Training Perceptions among Master's-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Janeé M.; Rawls, Glinda J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored master's-level counseling students' (N = 804) perceptions of training in the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2009) Research and Program Evaluation standard, and their attitudes toward quantitative research. Training perceptions and quantitative research attitudes were low to moderate,…

  10. Quantitative Research Attitudes and Research Training Perceptions among Master's-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Janeé M.; Rawls, Glinda J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored master's-level counseling students' (N = 804) perceptions of training in the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2009) Research and Program Evaluation standard, and their attitudes toward quantitative research. Training perceptions and quantitative research attitudes were low to moderate,…

  11. Animating Research with Counseling Values: A Training Model to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kristi A.; Dewell, John A.; Holmes, Courtney M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistent research-to-practice gap poses a problem for counselor education. The gap may be caused by conflicts between the humanistic values that guide much of counseling and the values that guide research training. In this article, the authors address historical concerns regarding research training for students and the conducting of research…

  12. Outcomes following a dedicated period of research during surgical training.

    PubMed

    Stutchfield, B M; Harrison, E M; Wigmore, S J; Parks, R W; Garden, O J

    2011-11-01

    With recent 'working-time'-related changes to surgical training structure, the value of dedicated research during surgical training has been questioned. Online survey examining career and academic outcomes following a period of surgically related dedicated research at a Scottish University between 1972 and 2007. Of 58 individuals identified, contact details were available for 49 and 43 (88%) responded. Ninety-five percent (n = 41) of respondents continue to pursue a career in surgery and 41% (n = 17) are currently in academic positions. Ninety-one percent (n = 39) had published one or more first-author peer-reviewed articles directly related to their research, with 53% (n = 23) publishing three or more. Respondents with a clinical component to their research published significantly more papers than those with purely laboratory-based research (P = 0.04). Eighty-one percent (n = 35) thought that research was necessary for career progression, but only 42% (n = 18) felt research should be integral to training. In conclusion, the majority of surgical trainees completing a dedicated research period, published papers and continued to pursue a surgical career with a research interest. A period of dedicated research was thought necessary for career progression, but few thought dedicated research should be integral to surgical training.

  13. Reserve Manpower, Personnel, and Training Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    ucM) q 24 WWESWEEPMR (MCJ/M"𔃾 28 MOBLE NHORE UNDERSEA WAAR LHTS 4 ADPICIIA 94PS (LST/LSf) 22 CRAFT OF OPPORTIJT UNITS (COOP) 4 SALVAE SUPS (ARS) 4...Centers with the aid of computer technology . Once decentralized, personnel data would .- be captured, maintained, and reported at the local level. In... Technology Mr. Eugene R. Hall 202/696-4844 Novel Training Systems Center 305/646-4498 ,- CDR George Connor, USU Office of the CNO, Op-091 Dr. Stanley A

  14. The Charles F. Prentice award lecture 2009: Crystalline lens research and serendipity in science.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Jacob Gershon

    2010-09-01

    Whether it is called serendipity or creativity, the process of scientific discovery is not one that lends itself to advance planning or programming, nor does it lend itself to an emphasis solely on applied research, research with industrial partners, or large teams of researchers because researchers must rely on intuition and the capacity to move quickly in new directions. Studies in my laboratory began with efforts to relate lens embryonic development to lens optical performance in a variety of vertebrate species. The initial direction concerned the optics of the fish eye, a system in which a spherical lens is essentially the only refractive component of the eye and one in which accommodation takes place by means of lens movement. This in turn led to an interest in how amphibious animals cope with the refractive transition that takes place when moving from air to water and vice versa. The development of a super accommodative ability in some diving birds is one adaptation that was explored. These curiosity-driven efforts led in turn to the development of a scanning laser system that provided a tool that can be used to evaluate the process of cataract development, either on the basis of in vivo exposure to chemicals or electromagnetic radiation and subsequent analysis of the excised lens or to the in vitro study of the lens in long-term whole lens culture experiments. The same approach has also been used as an in vitro ocular toxicology assay to develop sensitive in vitro methods to reduce regulatory dependence on the use of live animals. Finally, these applied directions in turn created new basic knowledge concerning the morphology and physiology of eye tissue organelles, particularly the morphology, distribution, and dynamic properties of the mitochondria found in the lens and in the retinal pigment epithelium.

  15. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 1. Army Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    RESEARCH PROGRAM - PHASE I ARMY Solicitation 90.1 Program Manager: DR OLEH WERES Contract #: Title: DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM UTILIZING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE...THE CONTAMINATING AGENT BE KNOWN. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL INTERIOR SURFACES, VISIBLE AND HIDDEN, AS A CONDENSING VAPOR OR AEROSOL...UV LIGHT (ON VISIBLE SURFACES) AND APPROPRIATE CATALYTIC SURFACE COATINGS (ON HIDDEN SURFACES) WILL CONVERT HYDROGEN PEROXIDE TO EXTREMELY REACTIVE

  16. Elder Abuse: Research, Practice, and Health Policy. The 2012 GSA Maxwell Pollack Award Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xinqi

    2014-01-01

    Elder abuse, also called elder mistreatment or elder maltreatment, includes psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, neglect (caregiver neglect and self-neglect), and financial exploitation. Evidence suggests that 1 out of 10 older adults experiences some form of elder abuse, and only a fraction of cases are actually reported to social services agencies. At the same time, elder abuse is independently associated with significant morbidity and premature mortality. Despite these findings, there is a great paucity in research, practice, and policy dealing with this pervasive issue. In this paper, I review the epidemiology of elder abuse as well as key practical issues in dealing with the cases of elder abuse. Through my experiences as a Congressional Policy Fellow/National Health and Aging Policy Fellow, I highlight key previsions on 2 major federal legislations dealing with the issues of elder abuse: Older Americans Act (OAA) and Elder Justice Act (EJA). Lastly, I highlight major research gaps and future policy relevant research directions to advance the field of elder abuse. Interdisciplinary and community-based efforts are needed to devise effective strategies to detect, treat, and prevent elder abuse in our increasingly diverse aging populations. Collective advocacy and policy advances are needed to create a national infrastructure to protect the vulnerable older adults. PMID:24270215

  17. Elder abuse: research, practice, and health policy. The 2012 GSA Maxwell Pollack award lecture.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinqi

    2014-04-01

    Elder abuse, also called elder mistreatment or elder maltreatment, includes psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, neglect (caregiver neglect and self-neglect), and financial exploitation. Evidence suggests that 1 out of 10 older adults experiences some form of elder abuse, and only a fraction of cases are actually reported to social services agencies. At the same time, elder abuse is independently associated with significant morbidity and premature mortality. Despite these findings, there is a great paucity in research, practice, and policy dealing with this pervasive issue. In this paper, I review the epidemiology of elder abuse as well as key practical issues in dealing with the cases of elder abuse. Through my experiences as a Congressional Policy Fellow/National Health and Aging Policy Fellow, I highlight key previsions on 2 major federal legislations dealing with the issues of elder abuse: Older Americans Act (OAA) and Elder Justice Act (EJA). Lastly, I highlight major research gaps and future policy relevant research directions to advance the field of elder abuse. Interdisciplinary and community-based efforts are needed to devise effective strategies to detect, treat, and prevent elder abuse in our increasingly diverse aging populations. Collective advocacy and policy advances are needed to create a national infrastructure to protect the vulnerable older adults.

  18. 2015 JOSPT Awards: Back Pain and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Are a Continued Focus of Research and Clinical Attention in Physical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    During the American Physical Therapy Association's Combined Sections Meeting in Anaheim, California in February 2016, JOSPT recognized the authors of the most outstanding research and clinical practice manuscripts published in JOSPT during the 2015 calendar year. The 2015 JOSPT Excellence in Research Award was presented to Björn Aasa, Lars Berglund, Peter Michaelson, and Ulrika Aasa for their paper titled "Individualized Low-Load Motor Control Exercises and Education Versus a High-Load Lifting Exercise and Education to Improve Activity, Pain Intensity, and Physical Performance in Patients With Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial." The 2015 George J. Davies-James A. Gould Excellence in Clinical Inquiry Award was presented to Anne Benjaminse, Alli Gokeler, Bert Otten, Ariel V. Dowling, Avery Faigenbaum, Kevin R. Ford, Timothy E. Hewett, James A. Onate, and Gregory D. Myer for their work titled "Optimization of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Paradigm: Novel Feedback Techniques to Enhance Motor Learning and Reduce Injury Risk."

  19. Albatross awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Albatross Award was presented by the American Miscellaneous Society to Sir George Deacon at the Joint Oceanographic Assembly held in Halifax in August 1982. The presentation speech by Warren Wooster and acceptance speech by Sir George Deacon follow.I have been asked by the governing board of the American Miscellaneous Society to present the Albatross Award this evening. But I hasten to point out that the Board is certainly mythical, and there is even some doubt about the existence of the Society. We know that the American Miscellaneous Society, AMSOC, has had several important committees—the committee to greet visitors from outer space and the committee to teach animals their Latin names, for example—but we know little of their success. On the other hand, the triumphs of AMSOC's Project MOHOLE are al ready inscribed in history.

  20. The Impact of Training on Women's Micro-Enterprise Development. Education Research Paper. Knowledge & Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Fiona; Abdulla, Salwa; Appleton, Helen; el-Bushra, Judy; Cardenas, Nora; Kebede, Kibre; Lewis, Viv; Sitaram, Shashikala

    A study investigated the impact of training on women's micro-enterprise development in four programs in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Sudan. Research design was a series of case studies of projects and programs providing training in technical or business skills. Impact of training was measured against these four indicators: income, access to and…

  1. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Kevin M; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of scholarly productivity as measured by research output is a key component of decisions regarding appointment and advancement in academic otolaryngology. An increasing number of graduating residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships, and evaluation of research productivity among these subspecialists is important in determining their role in academic otolaryngology departments. The h-index is a reliable indicator of research productivity, as it takes into account both quantity and relevance of research contributions. Our objective was to evaluate and compare trends in research productivity among the various otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of research productivity trends among otolaryngology subspecialties using the h-index. Faculty members from 92 academic otolaryngology departments were organized by subspecialty and academic rank, and their research productivity, as measured by the h-index, was calculated using the Scopus database. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists in academic programs had higher h-indices than non-fellowship-trained otolaryngologists. Head and neck surgeons and otologists had significantly higher research productivity than their peers in other otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of the subspecialties of chairpersons indicated that 62% were either head and neck surgeons or otologists. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists had higher h-indices, and faculty members trained in the subspecialties with the highest research productivity were disproportionately represented in positions of leadership within academic otolaryngology, probably reflecting the importance of research contributions in the academic advancement process, although other factors, such as educational contributions and clinical performance, may also be important factors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. EUFAR training opportunities to advance European airborne research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusen, I.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Brown, P.; Wendish, M.

    2009-04-01

    EUFAR, EUropean Facilities for Airborne Research, is an FP7 project (http://www.eufar.net) funded by the European Commission with 33 partners that aims at providing and improving the access to European airborne facilities (i.e. aircraft, airborne instruments, data processing centres) for researchers in environmental and geo-sciences through Networking Activities, Transnational Access and Joint Research Activities. This paper reports on the training opportunities within EUFAR for European researchers. In EUFAR three types of training opportunities are offered: 1) Participate in training courses (ET-TC) 2) Join an existing field campaign (ET-EC) 3) Participate in the design of a new field campaign (ET-TA), in the frame of EUFAR Transnational Access and tutored by more experienced researchers. During the 4-year EUFAR project (2008-2012), 4 training courses covering the complete chain from acquisition to interpretation of airborne data and images will be organised during spring/summer for early-stage researchers as well as university lecturers (new in FP7 EUFAR) in airborne research. The training courses will have an equal focus on theory and practical training/demonstration and each training course will be accompanied by a "student" airborne field campaign. Participants will be trained by top-class scientists, aircraft and/or instrument operators and each participant will get the opportunity to design his/her own experiment and to participate to that flight experiment. Furthermore, researchers have the opportunity to join an existing field campaign and work with more experienced researchers, aircraft and/or instrument operators. The list of airborne field campaigns open to join and the eligibility criteria, can be consulted at the EUFAR website. Finally, researchers have the opportunity to participate in the design of a new field campaign in the frame of EUFAR Transnational Access (TA). TA provides access to either aircraft or instrumentation that are not otherwise

  3. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  4. PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN ELECTRONICS MAINTENANCE TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCLELLAND, WILLIAM A.

    TO ESTABLISH A FRAME OF REFERENCE FOR THE BRITISH AUDIENCE, THE AUTHOR BRIEFLY DESCRIBES THE DIRECTOR OF ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER'S STUDY PERIOD (1965) AT ARBORFIELD, ENGLAND, THE MISSION OF THE HUMAN RESOURCES RESEARCH OFFICE (HUMRRO) IN ARMY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, THE U.S. ARMY PERSONNEL AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEMS, AND A PROCEDURE FOR…

  5. Research: General Semantics Training: Pride or Prejudice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Bruce K.

    1978-01-01

    Argues that general semantics research into prejudice has made only minor contributions to an understanding of prejudice because of weak experimental designs. Suggests improvements in research methodology and urges that knowledge of the semantic world of minority groups be sought as a prerequisite to eliminating cultural bias in standardized…

  6. Research: General Semantics Training: Pride or Prejudice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Bruce K.

    1978-01-01

    Argues that general semantics research into prejudice has made only minor contributions to an understanding of prejudice because of weak experimental designs. Suggests improvements in research methodology and urges that knowledge of the semantic world of minority groups be sought as a prerequisite to eliminating cultural bias in standardized…

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN ELECTRONICS MAINTENANCE TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCLELLAND, WILLIAM A.

    TO ESTABLISH A FRAME OF REFERENCE FOR THE BRITISH AUDIENCE, THE AUTHOR BRIEFLY DESCRIBES THE DIRECTOR OF ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER'S STUDY PERIOD (1965) AT ARBORFIELD, ENGLAND, THE MISSION OF THE HUMAN RESOURCES RESEARCH OFFICE (HUMRRO) IN ARMY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, THE U.S. ARMY PERSONNEL AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEMS, AND A PROCEDURE FOR…

  8. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  9. CFC award

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-16

    U.S. Navy HT 2 Ryan Vinnedge (right) presents a Combined Federal Campaign award to Stennis Space Center Director Patrick Scheuermann during a May 16, 2012, ceremony. Stennis employees led the way in two categories in the 2011 Southern Mississippi CFC effort, ranking first in the number of Eagle Givers (more than $480 each) and in dollar increase of contributions. Stennis Space Center employees contributed $221,000 through the campaign.

  10. Evaluating an interdisciplinary undergraduate training program in health promotion research.

    PubMed

    Misra, Shalini; Harvey, Richard H; Stokols, Daniel; Pine, Kathleen H; Fuqua, Juliana; Shokair, Said M; Whiteley, John M

    2009-04-01

    The University of California at Irvine Interdisciplinary Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (ID-SURE) program had three objectives: (1) designing an interdisciplinary health promotion training curriculum for undergraduate research fellows; (2) developing measures for evaluating and assessing program-related educational processes and products; and (3) comparing these educational process and product measures between groups of students who did or did not receive the training. A total of 101 students participated in the ID-SURE program during 2005, 2006, and 2007. A longitudinal research design was employed whereby students' interdisciplinary attitudes and behaviors were assessed at the beginning and end of the training program. The interdisciplinary and intellectual qualities of students' academic and research products were assessed at the conclusion of the training activities. In addition, ID-SURE participants' interdisciplinary attitudes, behaviors, and research products were compared to those of 70 participants in another fellowship program that did not have an interdisciplinary training component. Exposing undergraduate research fellows to the interdisciplinary curriculum led to increased participation in, and positive attitudes about, interdisciplinary classroom and laboratory activities. Products, such as the integrative and interdisciplinary quality of student research projects, showed no differences when compared to those of undergraduates who were not exposed to the interdisciplinary curriculum. However, undergraduates exposed to the training engaged in more interdisciplinary behaviors at the end of the program than students who were not trained in interdisciplinary research techniques. The findings from this study offer evidence for the efficacy of the ID-SURE program for training undergraduate students in transdisciplinary concepts, methods, and skills that are needed for effective scientific collaboration. Additionally, this study makes two important

  11. Doctoral Counselor Education Students' Levels of Research Self-Efficacy, Perceptions of the Research Training Environment, and Interest in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Vaccaro, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Counselor educators are called to be effective researchers; however, limited study has investigated research constructs within counselor educators-in-training. This study investigated the levels of research self-efficacy (Greeley et al., 1989), perceptions of the research training environment (Gelso, Mallinckrodt, & Judge, 1996), and interest in…

  12. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Abstracts of Phase 2 Awards 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    CORP. Topic#: 90-259 l:’iI44 3201 Arch Street. 3rd Flocr Office: MICOM Philadelphia, PA 19104 Contract #: DAAII0tl-92-C-R2ot) Phone-. (215) 386-4884 PI...designing a trolley capable of traveling at speeds up to 550 knots on a 15.500 loot catenary cable stretched between two mountain peaks. Long length...solve many high speed trolley problems. The objective of continued research is ito maximize catenary reliability and life cycle. The unit level objective

  13. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Grace; Fang, Christina H; Lopez, Santiago A; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Langer, Paul D; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether scholarly impact of academic ophthalmologists, as measured using the h-index, is affected by fellowship training status and to further characterize differences in productivity among the various subspecialties and by departmental rank. A descriptive and correlational design was used. In total, 1440 academic ophthalmologists from 99 ophthalmology training programs were analyzed. The h-index data were obtained from the Scopus database. Faculty members were classified by academic rank and grouped into 10 categories based on fellowship training: anterior segment, corneal and external disease, glaucoma, uveitis and ocular immunology, vitreoretinal disease, ophthalmic plastic surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, ophthalmic pathology, and "other." A one-way analysis of variance or Student t test using Microsoft Excel and "R" statistical software were used for comparison of continuous variables, with significance set at p < 0.05. Faculty working in academic ophthalmology residency training programs in the United States whose information is stored in the American Medical Association's Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database. Fellowship-trained ophthalmologists had significantly higher research productivity, as measured using the h-index, than non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists in this study (p < 0.0005). Academic ophthalmologists trained in vitreoretinal disease or ophthalmic pathology had the highest scholarly productivity compared with those in other ophthalmology subspecialties (p < 0.05). There was a significant increase in scholarly productivity with increasing academic rank from Assistant Professor to Professor (p < 0.05). A significant difference in productivity between fellowship-trained and non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists existed individually only at the level of Assistant Professor (p < 0.0005). Academic ophthalmologists with fellowship training have significantly higher scholarly output than non-fellowship-trained

  14. Factors Associated With Success of Clinician-Researchers Receiving Career Development Awards From the National Institutes of Health: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A; Jones, Rochelle D; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the careers of recent career development awardees is essential to guide interventions to ensure gender equity and success in academic medicine. In 2010-2011 (T1) and 2014 (T2), 1,719 clinician-researchers who received new K08 and K23 awards in 2006-2009 were longitudinally surveyed. Multivariable analyses evaluated the influence of factors on success, including demographics, job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. Of 1,275 respondents at T1, 1,066 (493 women; 573 men) responded at T2. Men and women differed in job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. By T2, women had less funding (mean $780,000 vs. $1,120,000, P = .002) and published fewer papers (mean 33 vs. 45). Using a composite measure that considered funding, publications, or leadership to define success, 53.5% (264/493) of women and 67.0% (384/573) of men were successful. Gender differences in success persisted after accounting for other significant predictors-K award type, specialty, award year, work hours, funding institute tier, feeling responsible for participating in department/division administration, importance of publishing prolifically, feeling responsible for contributing to clinical care, importance of publishing high-quality research, collegiality of the mentoring relationship, adequacy of research equipment, and departmental climate. A significant interaction existed between K award type and gender; the gender difference in success was most pronounced among K23 researchers (among whom the odds ratio for females = 0.32). Men and women continue to have different experiences and career outcomes, with important implications for the design of interventions to promote equity and success.

  15. 1987 NRSSC Exemplary Program Awards Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Rural and Small Schools, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Identifies ten recipients of exemplary program awards and describes each program. Award categories include educational technology, cross-cultural services, preserve/inservice training, special education, family/school/community partnerships, innovative and creative programs, secondary curriculum and instruction, at-risk services, elementary…

  16. Excellence in Physics Education Award Talk: Promoting Incremental Research-based Instructional Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, David

    2009-05-01

    One guiding principle from the start of the Two Year College (TYC) Workshop project was that since, as the clich'e states, ``you teach as you were taught'' most instructors are not equipped to adopt newer techniques, especially those involving major changes in approach. Some of the TYC workshops and curricular materials were designed to address this difficulty by providing tools for instructors to make incremental changes to their teaching approaches. The research-based approaches and materials presented in the workshops were often ones that an instructor could incorporate as small changes in a single class period, or a single laboratory activity. This presentation will review some of the physics education research results indicating the need for change from traditional lecture and cookbook based laboratories, where students are focused on producing answers, to alternative approaches where students are focused on having the physics make sense to them. Then I will describe some of the materials, such as Ranking Tasks, What, if anything, is Wrong Tasks, and Working Backwards Tasks, developed in the project to help instructors construct sense-making learning environments for their students. I will also describe how these materials, while developed with TYC instructors, are flexible enough to be of use to any secondary or college instructors who wish to make incremental changes in their instructional approaches.

  17. Training Postbac JHU | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Johns Hopkins University and the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have partnered to create a new concentration in the Master of Science in Biotechnology program, called

  18. The Charles F. Prentice Award Lecture 2014: A 50-Year Research Journey: Giants and Great Collaborators.

    PubMed

    Holden, Brien A

    2015-07-01

    This article, an edited version of the 2014 Charles F. Prentice Medal presentation, recounts my 50-year journey in research, from graduation in 1965 to PhD to 2015. The most important lessons I have learned are that great people, "Giants" as I call them, are generous of spirit, creative, insightful, sharing, and caring, and second, that collaboration is really the only way to do what I want to get done. I have been very fortunate to have worked with many outstanding people. As someone said to me at the Prentice Medal presentation, "I don't like you very much but the people you work with are wonderful."My journey started with a PhD investigation into seeing if orthokeratology could control myopia at the City University London in 1966. It then moved to Australia where all aspects of contact lenses were researched to try to make contact lenses safer and more effective by understanding the cornea and anterior eye systems. That journey has now turned to making contact lenses the best they can be to slow the progress of myopia. An extremely high proportion of people who are involved with global eye care initiatives and ambitious projects to develop treatments and interventions for the major vision problems impacting the world are a joy to work with. Evidence-based systems for delivering vision to the more than 600 million people globally that are blind or vision impaired because of uncorrected refractive error have involved amazing people and collaborations. This article pays tribute to the generosity and humanity of my family and the Giants in and outside the field, and many more not so well known, and the people I work with, who have punctuated and greatly enriched this journey and made many of the scientific advances documented here possible.

  19. Teaching ethics of psychopharmacology research in psychiatric residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Beresin, Eugene V; Baldessarini, Ross J; Alpert, Jonathan; Rosenbaum, Jerrold

    2003-12-01

    American psychiatric residency training programs are now required to teach principles of research ethics. This task is especially pressing in light of evolving guidelines pertaining to human subjects, including psychiatric patients, especially when psychopharmacology is involved. Residents need to understand principles of research ethics and implications of roles of psychiatrists as investigators and clinicians. We consider major contemporary ethical issues in clinical psychiatric research, with an emphasis on psychopharmacology, and implications of addressing them within residency training programs. We reviewed recent literature on ethical issues in clinical research and on medical education in bioethics. This report considers: (1) an overview of current training; (2) perceived needs and rationales for training in research ethics, (3) recommended educational content and methods; (4) issues that require further study (including demonstration of acquired knowledge, practice issues, and the treatment versus-investigation misconception); and (5) conclusions. Recommended components of residency training programs include basic ethical principles; scientific merit and research design; assessment of risks and benefits; selection and informed consent of patient-subjects; and integrity of the clinical investigator, including definition of roles, conflicts-of-interest, and accountability. Evaluation of educational effectiveness for both trainees and faculty is a recommended component of such programs. We recommend that psychiatric training include education about ethical aspects of clinical research, with a particular emphasis on psychopharmacology. These activities can efficiently be incorporated into teaching of other aspects of bioethics, research methods, and psychopharmacology. Such education early in professional development should help to clarify roles of clinicians and investigators, improve the planning, conduct and reporting of research, and facilitate career

  20. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published Entering Mentoring curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this evidence-based training at their home institutions, we developed an extensive, interactive, multifaceted train-the-trainer workshop. The specific goals of these workshops are to 1) increase facilitator knowledge of an RMT curriculum, 2) increase facilitator confidence in implementing the curriculum, 3) provide a safe environment to practice facilitation of curricular activities, and 4) review implementation strategies and evaluation tools. Data indicate that our approach results in high satisfaction and significant confidence gains among attendees. Of the 195 diverse attendees trained in our workshops since Fall 2010, 44% report implementation at 39 different institutions, collectively training more than 500 mentors. Further, mentors who participated in the RMT sessions led by our trained facilitators report high facilitator effectiveness in guiding discussion. Implications and challenges to building the national capacity needed for improved research mentoring relationships are discussed. PMID:26033872

  1. Postdoctoral Clinical-Research Training in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Charles F.; Martin, Christopher; Brent, David; Ryan, Neal; Dahl, Ronald E.; Pilkonis, Paul; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kupfer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a model for teaching grant writing and other research survival skills to postdoctoral clinical-research fellows in psychiatry and for improving research mentoring. Over the past 4 years, the authors have developed a course on writing grant applications for postdoctoral clinical-research fellows, using peer-review processes modeled after a National Institutes of Health study section. At the same time, the authors have clarified expectations of mentors in ways designed to help fellows prepare “K” (Research Career Development) applications and to receive mentored practice in skills being taught in the course. Sixteen of 30 fellows have succeeded in receiving their first extramural support by the end of their two-year fellowship tenure or during the succeeding year. The authors conclude that by teaching grant-writing skills in a supportive peer environment, providing peer review of proposals, and sharpening expectations of mentors, it may be possible to reduce the time between the end of fellowship and the receipt of the first extramural grant. PMID:19617924

  2. For Researchers on Animals, Ethics Training Is Sparse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2008-01-01

    While the past several decades have brought federal regulations that are designed to make animal research more humane, ethics courses still form only a patchwork across colleges. The amount and types of ethical training available to students vary widely by program and the culture of an institution. Now discussions about animal-research ethics that…

  3. Prospects for European Research and Development in Training & Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the prospects for research and development in the education and training fields offered by the European Communities. The position of the EC is explained in relation to the existing and forthcoming Framework Programmes of research and development. The 1987-91 Framework Programme has committed most of its funding to existing…

  4. Recruiting and Training Undergraduate Research Assistants for Longitudinal Field Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Richard I.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a research training project for undergraduate psychology students in the development, administration, and evaluation of strategies to deter addictive smoking in adolescents. Students worked closely with faculty and graduate student researchers and became aware of the constraints of institutional regulations and logistical problems…

  5. Child Welfare Research and Training: A Response to David Stoesz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brenda D.; Vandiver, Vikki L.

    2016-01-01

    In this response to David Stoesz' critique, "The Child Welfare Cartel," the authors agree that child welfare research and training must be improved. The authors disagree, however, with Stoesz' critique of social work education, his assessment of the most-needed forms of child welfare research, and his depiction of the goals and…

  6. For Researchers on Animals, Ethics Training Is Sparse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2008-01-01

    While the past several decades have brought federal regulations that are designed to make animal research more humane, ethics courses still form only a patchwork across colleges. The amount and types of ethical training available to students vary widely by program and the culture of an institution. Now discussions about animal-research ethics that…

  7. TRAINING RESEARCH UTILIZING MAN-COMPUTER INTERACTIONS, PROMISE AND REALITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCLELLAND, WILLIAM A.

    THE PAPER WAS PRESENTED AS PART OF THE AVIONICS PANEL PROGRAM ON NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL LOGIC PROCESSORS, SPONSORED BY THE ADVISORY GROUP FOR AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, NATO. SEVERAL CONCEPTUAL PROPOSITIONS IN REGARD TO MAN AND THE COMPUTER ARE OFFERED. THE NATURE OF TRAINING RESEARCH IS EXAMINED. THERE IS ALSO A BRIEF CATEGORIZATION…

  8. Child Welfare Research and Training: A Response to David Stoesz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brenda D.; Vandiver, Vikki L.

    2016-01-01

    In this response to David Stoesz' critique, "The Child Welfare Cartel," the authors agree that child welfare research and training must be improved. The authors disagree, however, with Stoesz' critique of social work education, his assessment of the most-needed forms of child welfare research, and his depiction of the goals and…

  9. TRAINING RESEARCH UTILIZING MAN-COMPUTER INTERACTIONS, PROMISE AND REALITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCLELLAND, WILLIAM A.

    THE PAPER WAS PRESENTED AS PART OF THE AVIONICS PANEL PROGRAM ON NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL LOGIC PROCESSORS, SPONSORED BY THE ADVISORY GROUP FOR AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, NATO. SEVERAL CONCEPTUAL PROPOSITIONS IN REGARD TO MAN AND THE COMPUTER ARE OFFERED. THE NATURE OF TRAINING RESEARCH IS EXAMINED. THERE IS ALSO A BRIEF CATEGORIZATION…

  10. The Internationalisation of Vocational Education and Training. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter J.; Smith, Swee Noi

    This report presents a review and analysis of research on the internationalization of vocational education and training (VET) and provides an assessment of other research that needs to be conducted in this area. Globalization is the integration of economies worldwide through trade, trade agreements, finance, information networks, and movement of…

  11. Web-Based Research Ethics Training for Gerontologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scialfa, Charles T.; Lyndon, Jaci

    2008-01-01

    As part of a Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)-funded Strategic Training Grant, we have developed and delivered a brief course in research ethics directed toward postgraduate students in experimental gerontology. In this paper, we report on the initial offering, its content and delivery, and student reactions to the course. We…

  12. A Developmental Model for Enhancing Research Training during Psychiatry Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Tew, James D., Jr.; Reynolds, Charles F., III; Pincus, Harold A.; Ryan, Neal; Nash, Kenneth; Kupfer, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a developmental model for enhancing residency research training for careers in academic psychiatry. Over the past 10 years, the University of Pittsburgh Department of Psychiatry has developed a research track (RT) for its residents. While the Department's plan has been to address the critical need of training…

  13. Research and Training on White Dialectics: Some next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews and extends the contribution of Todd and Abrams (2011). Paradigmatic and methodological strengths of their study are highlighted, and future directions for research, training, and practice are presented. Counseling research anchored in critical theory and incorporating diverse methodologies is encouraged.

  14. Diabetes Research and Training Centers: Diabetes Education. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, Bethesda, MD.

    Established in 1977 by the Diabetes Research and Education Act, the six Diabetes Research and Training Centers (DRTCs) located throughout the country offer resources for diabetes educators and other health professionals involved in treating or counseling people with diabetes. DRTCs provide continuing education, seminars, and workshops in…

  15. Postgraduate research training: the PhD and MD thesis.

    PubMed

    Higginson, I; Corner, J

    1996-04-01

    Higher research degrees, such as the PhD, MPhil and MD, have existed within universities for 80 years or more, although the differences between the MD and PhD remain confused. A higher research degree training provides individuals with greater research knowledge and skills, and benefits the specialty. Concern exists about the levels of supervision sometimes provided, failure to complete degrees, and the variable levels of research knowledge and skills attained. We propose that higher research degrees in palliative care have four functions: extending personal scholarship, generating knowledge, training for the individual and contributing to the growth of the specialty. Such an approach may include: a formalised first year with taught components such as in research MSc programmes, formal supervision and progress assessment. In palliative care, clinical and academic approaches need greater integration. Multiprofessional learning is essential. To allow individuals to undertake higher research degree programmes, fellowships or specific funding are needed.

  16. 2016 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Developing Productive Researchers Through Mentoring, Rethinking Doctoral Dissertations, and Facilitating Positive Publishing Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    In her acceptance address, Wendy Sims provides a unique perspective based on thoughts and reflections resulting from her 8 years of service as the ninth Editor of the "Journal of Research in Music Education" ("JRME"). Specifically, she addresses how college-level music education researchers can promote positive attitudes toward…

  17. 2016 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Developing Productive Researchers Through Mentoring, Rethinking Doctoral Dissertations, and Facilitating Positive Publishing Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    In her acceptance address, Wendy Sims provides a unique perspective based on thoughts and reflections resulting from her 8 years of service as the ninth Editor of the "Journal of Research in Music Education" ("JRME"). Specifically, she addresses how college-level music education researchers can promote positive attitudes toward…

  18. Operational Alignment in Predator Training Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-21

    RESEARCH Noah P. Schill*, Leah J. Rowe†, Brian L. Gyovai‡, DeForest Q. Joralmon§, Andrew J. Schneck**, Darrin A. Woudstra†† The sixteen year old USAF...Performance Wing, Warfighter Readiness Research Division. ‡ Lt Col Brian L. Gyovai, OHANG, 178th Operations Support Squadron. § Dr. DeForest Q...Noah P. Schill, Leah J. Rowe, Brian L. Gyovai, DeForest Q. Joralmon, Andrew J. Schneck, Darrin A. Woudstra 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  19. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M.; Nelson, David E.; Izmirlian, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one’s career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987–2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumni (n = 114), and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32) postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140) completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07–7.69) and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04–4.90) were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20–0.82) or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17–0.94) had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5–9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15–0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16–0.87, respectively), as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11–0.98). These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors. PMID:28121985

  20. Spacecraft software training needs assessment research, appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Shirley; Golas, Katharine

    1990-01-01

    The appendices to the previously reported study are presented: statistical data from task rating worksheets; SSD references; survey forms; fourth generation language, a powerful, long-term solution to maintenance cost; task list; methodology; SwRI's instructional systems development model; relevant research; and references.