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Sample records for research varian associates

  1. Status of gyrotron developments at Varian Associates

    SciTech Connect

    Jory, H.

    1984-01-01

    The status of gyrotrons developed by Varian for fusion heating applications will be briefly reviewed. Development work started in 1976 with the goal of 200 kW CW at 28 GHz. A more recent program was to develop 200 kW CW at 60 GHz. Pulsed and CW tubes produced by these programs will be briefly described and the scaling of these designs to other frequencies including 53, 56 and 70 GHz will be discussed. A 35 GHz design will also be described. Future efforts for gyrotrons at 120 and 140 GHz will also be discussed.

  2. The Varian story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    This Perspective offers a personal view of the story of Varian NMR, a courageous initiative that began in the 1950s but came to an abrupt end some 60 years later. Without doubt, Varian leaves behind a priceless legacy, particularly in the field of structural chemistry. The highlights are set out in four main sections, named after the four seasons, but not necessarily in strict chronology. How did the accepted business practices influence the evolution, growth, and eventual demise of this exciting venture? How well did management handle an unconventional group of young scientific entrepreneurs? What does it all mean for the future of magnetic resonance? The subject can be viewed on two different levels, the Varian story itself, and the larger picture - the Silicon Valley phenomenon as a whole, with Varian considered as an interesting microcosm.

  3. Researching Teacher Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard; Kuchah, Kuchah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue not only for more research "into" English language teacher associations (TAs) but also for research to be carried out "by" and "within" TAs. That is, we advocate their becoming "Researching TAs" themselves. This suggestion derives from our recent collaborative work with/within the…

  4. Comparison of measured Varian Clinac 21EX and TrueBeam accelerator electron field characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Samantha A M; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Gagne, Isabelle M

    2015-07-08

    Dosimetric comparisons of radiation fields produced by Varian's newest linear accelerator, the TrueBeam, with those produced by older Varian accelerators are of interest from both practical and research standpoints. While photon fields have been compared in the literature, similar comparisons of electron fields have not yet been reported. In this work, electron fields produced by the TrueBeam are compared with those produced by Varian's Clinac 21EX accelerator. Diode measurements were taken of fields shaped with electron applicators and delivered at 100 cm SSD, as well as those shaped with photon MLCs without applicators and delivered at 70 cm SSD for field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 to 25 × 25 cm² at energies between 6 and 20 MeV. Additionally, EBT2 and EBT3 radio-chromic film measurements were taken of an MLC-shaped aperture with closed leaf pairs delivered at 70 cm SSD using 6 and 20 MeV electrons. The 6 MeV fields produced by the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX were found to be almost indistinguishable. At higher energies, TrueBeam fields shaped by electron applicators were generally flatter and had less photon contamination compared to the Clinac 21EX. Differences in PDDs and profiles fell within 3% and 3 mm for the majority of measurements. The most notable differences for open fields occurred in the profile shoulders for the largest applicator field sizes. In these cases, the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX data differed by as much as 8%. Our data indicate that an accurate electron beam model of the Clinac 21EX could be used as a starting point to simulate electron fields that are dosimetrically equivalent to those produced by the TrueBeam. Given that the Clinac 21EX shares head geometry with Varian's iX, Trilogy, and Novalis TX accelerators, our findings should also be applicable to these machines.

  5. Clinical implementation of electron energy changes of varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sean; Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Lindsay, Patricia; Prado, Karl; Sun, Tzouh-Liang; Steadham, Roy; Wang, Xiaochun; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gillin, Michael

    2009-10-27

    Modern dual photon energy linear accelerators often come with a few megavoltage electron beams. The megavoltage electron beam has limited range and relative sharp distal falloff in its depth dose curve compared to that of megavoltage photon beam. Its radiation dose is often delivered appositionally to cover the target volume to its distal 90% depth dose (d90), while avoiding the normal--sometimes critical--structure immediately distal to the target. Varian linear accelerators currently offer selected electron beams of 4, 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron beam energies. However, intermediate electron energy is often needed for optimal dose distribution. In this study we investigated electron beam characteristics and implemented two intermediate 7 and 11 MeV electron beams on Varian linear accelerators. Comprehensive tests and measurements indicated the new electron beams met all dosimetry parameter criteria and operational safety standards. Between the two new electron beams and the existing electron beams we were able to provide a choice of electron beams of 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron energies, which had d90 depth between 1.5 cm and 6.0 cm (from 1.5 cm to 4.0 cm in 0.5 cm increments) to meet our clinical needs.

  6. Association between Nurses' Education about Research and Their Research Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, Lynn; Brown, G. Ted

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 178 of 528 pediatric nurses showed that higher education levels or courses in research design and use were associated with positive attitudes toward research. Higher education levels were associated with self-reported research use; completing research-related courses was not independently associated with higher research use.…

  7. Determination of Initial Beam Parameters of Varian 2100 CD Linac for Various Therapeutic Electrons Using PRIMO.

    PubMed

    Maskani, Reza; Tahmasebibirgani, Mohammad Javad; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Fatahiasl, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to establish primary characteristics of electron beams for a Varian 2100C/D linear accelerator with recently developed PRIMO Monte Carlo software and to verify relations between electron energy and dose distribution. To maintain conformity of simulated and measured dose curves within 1%/1mm, mean energy, Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of energy and focal spot FWHM of initial beam were changed iteratively. Mean and most probable energies were extracted from validated phase spaces and compared with related empirical equation results. To explain the importance of correct estimation of primary energy on a clinical case, computed tomography images of a thorax phantom were imported in PRIMO. Dose distributions and dose volume histogram (DVH) curves were compared between validated and artificial cases with overestimated energy. Initial mean energies were obtained of 6.68, 9.73, 13.2 and 16.4 MeV for 6, 9, 12 and 15 nominal energies, respectively. Energy FWHM reduced with increase in energy. Three mm focal spot FWHM for 9 MeV and 4 mm for other energies made proper matches of simulated and measured profiles. In addition, the maximum difference of calculated mean electrons energy at the phantom surface with empirical equation was 2.2 percent. Finally, clear differences in DVH curves of validated and artificial energy were observed as heterogeneity indexes were 0.15 for 7.21 MeV and 0.25 for 6.68 MeV. The Monte Carlo model presented in PRIMO for Varian 2100 CD was precisely validated. IAEA polynomial equations estimated mean energy more accurately than a known linear one. Small displacement of R50 changed DVH curves and homogeneity indexes. PRIMO is a user-friendly software which has suitable capabilities to calculate dose distribution in water phantoms or computerized tomographic volumes accurately.

  8. Current status of the CBCT project at Varian Medical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsinos, Evangelos

    2005-04-01

    Tracking and targeting the tumors are simultaneous processes in the image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT); this is expected to boost the efficiency, the reliability, and the safety in the treatment. Varian Medical Systems (VMS) has already produced and installed the first IGRT machine; the device comprises the VMS Clinac equipped with the On-Board Imager (OBI) component. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging, one of the options of the OBI machine, aims at high-quality volumetric reconstruction. A number of calibrations are needed in order to operate our CT-imaging machines properly; they ensure that the machine components are properly aligned, the mechanical distortions are small, and yield important output that is used in the reconstruction of the actual scan data. The geometrical calibration is achieved by using a needle phantom. In order to increase the dynamic range of our imager (hence, to obtain reliable information simultaneously in the high- and the low-attenuation areas of the irradiated object), VMS has developed a dual-gain mode. Next on our agenda is the suppression of (ring, streak, and beam-hardening) artefacts in our reconstructed images and the further development of our detectors in order to remove patterns relating to lag and ghosting effects.

  9. NASA/OAI Research Associates program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The intent of this activity was the development of a cooperative program between the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center with the objective of better preparing recent university graduates for careers in government aerospace research laboratories. The selected individuals were given the title of research associate. To accomplish the aims of this effort: (1) the research associates were introduced to the NASA Lewis Research Center and its mission/programs, (2) the research associates directly participated in NASA research and development programs, and (3) the research associates were given continuing educational opportunities in specialized areas. A number of individuals participated in this project during the discourse of this cooperative agreement. Attached are the research summaries of eight of the research associates. These reports give a very good picture of the research activities that were conducted by the associates.

  10. Molecular Phylogeny, Laboratory Rearing, and Karyotype of the Bombycid Moth, Trilocha varians

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Takaaki; Yago, Masaya; Hsu, Yu-Feng; Fujii, Tsuguru; Nakajima, Yumiko; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Abe, Hiroaki; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the molecular phylogeny, laboratory rearing, and karyotype of a bombycid moth, Trilocha varians (F. Walker) (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), which feeds on leaves of Ficus spp. (Rosales: Moraceae). The larvae of this species were collected in Taipei city, Taiwan, and the Ryukyu Archipelago (Ishigaki and Okinawa Islands, Japan). Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that T. varians belongs to the subfamily Bombycinae, thus showing a close relationship to the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori (L.), a lepidopteran model insect. A laboratory method was developed for rearing T. varians and the time required for development from the embryo to adult was determined. From oviposition to adult emergence, the developmental zero was 10.47 °C and total effective temperature was 531.2 day—degrees, i.e., approximately 30 days for one generation when reared at 28 °C. The haploid of T. varians consisted of n = 26 chromosomes. In highly polyploid somatic nuclei, females showed a large heterochromatin body, indicating that the sex chromosome system in T. varians is WZ/ZZ (female/male). The results of the present study should facilitate the utilization of T. varians as a reference species for B. mori, thereby leading to a greater understanding of the ecology and evolution of bombycid moths. PMID:22963522

  11. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  12. Quality assurance methodology for Varian RapidArc treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Xiong, Li; Mower, Herbert W

    2010-09-01

    With the commercial introduction of the Varian RapidArc, a new modality for treatment planning and delivery, the need has arisen for consistent and efficient techniques for performing patient-specific quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper we present our methodology for a RapidArc treatment plan QA procedure. For our measurements we used a 2D diode array (MapCHECK) embedded at 5 cm water equivalent depth in MapPHAN 5 phantom and an Exradin A16 ion chamber placed in six different positions in a cylindrical homogeneous phantom (QUASAR). We also checked the MUs for the RapidArc plans by using independent software (RadCalc). The agreement between Eclipse calculations and MapCHECK/MapPHAN5 measurements was evaluated using both absolute distance-to-agreement (DTA) and gamma index with 10% dose threshold (TH), 3% dose difference (DD), and 3 mm DTA. The average agreement was 94.4% for the DTA approach and 96.3% for the gamma index approach. In high-dose areas, the discrepancy between calculations and ion chamber measurements using the QUASAR phantom was within 4.5% for prostate cases. For the RadCalc calculations, we used the average SSD along the arc; however, for some patients the agreement for the MUs obtained with RadCalc versus Eclipse was inadequate (discrepancy > 5%). In these cases, the plan was divided into partial arc plans so that RadCalc could perform a better estimation of the MUs. The discrepancy was further reduced to within ~4% using this approach. Regardless of the variation in prescribed dose and location of the treated areas, we obtained very good results for all patients studied in this paper.

  13. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy; Rhani, M. Fahdillah

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  14. WE-G-BRF-07: Non-Circular Scanning Trajectories with Varian Developer Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A; Pearson, E; Pan, X; Pelizzari, C

    2014-06-15

    testing these and other new scanning trajectories. Support was provided in part by the University of Chicago Research Computing Center, Varian Medical Systems, and NIH Grants 1RO1CA120540, T32EB002103, S10 RR021039 and P30 CA14599. The contents of this work are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the supporting organizations.

  15. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  16. Neutron contamination of Varian Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Tursinah, R.; Rhani, M. F.; Soh, R. C. X.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-03-01

    High energy medical accelerators are commonly used in radiotherapy to increase the effectiveness of treatments. As we know neutrons can be emitted from a medical accelerator if there is an incident of X-ray that hits any of its materials. This issue becomes a point of view of many researchers. The neutron contamination has caused many problems such as image resolution and radiation protection for patients and radio oncologists. This study concerns the simulation of neutron contamination emitted from Varian Clinac iX 10 MV using Monte Carlo code system. As neutron production process is very complex, Monte Carlo simulation with MCNPX code system was carried out to study this contamination. The design of this medical accelerator was modelled based on the actual materials and geometry. The maximum energy of photons and neutron in the scoring plane was 10.5 and 2.239 MeV, respectively. The number and energy of the particles produced depend on the depth and distance from beam axis. From these results, it is pointed out that the neutron produced by linac 10 MV photon beam in a typical treatment is not negligible.

  17. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  18. Basic dosimetric verification in water of the anisotropic analytical algorithm for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linacs.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Luca; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Glashörster, Marco; Schiefer, Hans; Fogliata, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Since early 2007 a new version of the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for photon dose calculations was released by Varian Medical Systems for clinical usage on Elekta linacs and also, with some restrictions, for Siemens linacs. Basic validation studies were performed and reported for three beams. 4,6 and 15 MV for an Elekta Synergy, 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus and, as a reference, for 6 and 15 MV from a Varian Clinac 2100C/D. Generally AAA calculations reproduced well measured data and small deviations were observed for open and wedged fields. PDD curves showed in average differences between calculation and measurement smaller than 1% or 1.2 mm for Elekta beams, 1% or 1.8 mm for Siemens beams and 1% or 1 mm for Varian beams. Profiles in the flattened region matched measurements with deviations smaller than 1% for Elekta and Varian beams, 2% for Siemens. Percentage differences in Output Factors were observed as small as 1% in average.

  19. Genome Sequence of Kocuria varians G6 Isolated from a Slaughterhouse in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathi, Prem K.; Herschend, Jakob; Røder, Henriette L.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria varians G6, which was isolated from a meat chopper at a small slaughterhouse in Denmark. The 2.90-Mb genome sequence consists of 95 contigs and contains 2,518 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:27034480

  20. Modification of the Varian XL-100 NMR spectrometer for submilligram natural abundance C-13 analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. M.; Olsen, R. W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Quadrature detection modifications and a microcell arrangement are described for the Varian XL-100 NMR spectrometer which routinely improve sensitivity in C-13 Fourier transform sample-limited studies by a factor of 4 to 5. The power requirement of the RF pulse amplifier is relaxed by a factor of 4. Previously attainable resolution is not affected.

  1. Studying Associations in Health Care Research.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Flannelly, Laura T; Jankowski, Katherine R B

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses some of the types of relationships observed in healthcare research and depicts them in graphic form. The article begins by explaining two basic associations observed in chemistry and physics (Boyles' Law and Charles' Law), and illustrates how these associations are similar to curvilinear and linear associations, respectively, found in healthcare. Graphs of curvilinear associations include morbidity curves and survival and mortality curves. Several examples of linear relationships are given and methods of testing linear relationships with interval and ratio data are introduced (i.e., correlation and ordinary least-squares regression). In addition, 2 × 2 contingency tables for testing the association between categorical (or nominal) data are described. Finally, Sir Austin Bradford Hill's eight criteria for assessing causality from research on associations between variables are presented and explained. Three appendices provide interested readers with opportunities to practice interpreting selected curvilinear and linear relationships.

  2. SU-E-T-498: A Preliminary Monte Carlo Simulation Study of the Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D; Chen, Y; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S

    2012-06-01

    To benchmark the quality of Monte Carlo simulation results with the commissioning data for a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. IAEA phase space files of a 6MV TrueBeam accelerator provided by Varian were implemented using GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. The present application consisted of upper and lower jaws and a cubic water phantom of 0.125 cubic meters in volume. Both radial and transverse dose profiles (in 5 different depths) and a central axis percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were recorded in the phantom. Field sizes of as small as 4×4 cm(2) and as large as 30×30 cm(2) were simulated with 2.0E9 incident particles each. The results were then compared with our commissioning data performed in a Wellhoffer Blue Phantom with a 0.13cc ion-chamber and a 0.8×0.8mm diode. The GEANT4 simulated PDD curve compared favorably within ∼2% against the measured ion-chamber PDD for all field sizes and against the measured diode PDD for all fields less then 20×20cm(2) . The simulated in-plane and cross-plane profiles compared well within 2 mm at the 50% level against the measured profiles for all field sizes. These results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing Monte-Carlo simulated beam data in the commissioning of a linear accelerator. The increasing speed and capability of the desktop computer will Result in the adoption of Monte- Carlo techniques for dosimetric calculations. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Data Research Associates: A System Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Richard

    1993-01-01

    This second in a two-part series on Data Research Associates, a vendor for turnkey automatic library systems, focuses on hardware and software. Highlights include the requirement for VAX hardware; software modules that relate to MARC records; the Library System menu structure; training opportunities; user comments; and future directions. (LRW)

  4. Singapore Meeting of Education Research Associations Sets the Stage for Establishing a World Education Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a meeting of education research associations from around the world which achieved a major goal toward establishing a World Education Research Association (WERA) in Singapore on November 24-25, 2008. At the meeting, representatives reaffirmed a commitment to establish WERA and finalized several key documents for its…

  5. Experimental validation of neutron activation simulation of a varian medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Morato, S; Juste, B; Miro, R; Verdu, G; Diez, S

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a Monte Carlo simulation using the last version of MCNP, v. 6.1.1, of a Varian CLinAc emitting a 15MeV photon beam. The main objective of the work is to estimate the photoneutron production and activated products inside the medical linear accelerator head. To that, the Varian LinAc head was modelled in detail using the manufacturer information, and the model was generated with a CAD software and exported as a mesh to be included in the particle transport simulation. The model includes the transport of photoneutrons generated by primary photons and the (n, γ) reactions which can result in activation products. The validation of this study was done using experimental measures. Activation products have been identified by in situ gamma spectroscopy placed at the jaws exit of the LinAc shortly after termination of a high energy photon beam irradiation. Comparison between experimental and simulation results shows good agreement.

  6. Analysis of output trends from Varian 2100C/D and 600C/D accelerators.

    PubMed

    Grattan, M W D; Hounsell, A R

    2011-01-07

    Analysis of Varian linear accelerator output trends is reported. Two groups, consisting of four matched Varian 2100C/D and four matched Varian 600C/D accelerators, with different designs of monitor chamber, have been investigated and the data acquired from regular calibrated ion chamber/electrometer measurements of the output performance of the eight accelerators analysed. The trend of machine output with time, having removed the effect of adjusting the monitor chamber response, was compared on a monthly and annual basis for monitor chambers with ages ranging between 1 year and 7 years. The results indicate that the response is generally consistent within each set of accelerators with different monitor chamber designs. Those used in a Varian 600C/D machine result in a reduction in measured output over time, with an average monthly reduction of 0.35 ± 0.09% over the course of the first 4 years of use. The chambers used in a 2100C/D accelerator result in an increase in measured output over time, with an average monthly increase of 0.26 ± 0.09% over the course of the first 4 years of use. The output increase then reduces towards the end of this period of time, with the average monthly change falling to -0.03 ± 0.02% for the following 3 years. The output response trend was similar for all clinical energies used on the 2100C/D accelerators--6, 15 MV x-ray beams, and 4, 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron beams. By tracking these changes it has been possible to predict the response over time to allow appropriate adjustments in monitor chamber response to maintain a measured accelerator output within tolerance and give confidence in performance. It has also provided data to indicate the need for planned preventative intervention and indicate if the monitor chamber response is behaving as expected.

  7. [Ethics in clinical research. World Medical Association].

    PubMed

    Villalobos, J J

    1990-07-01

    Ethics is the branch of Philosophy that treats the essential; the origin and the obligatory character of the moral, for that reason it relates with the man conscience; it deals with the knowledge and acceptation of the right and the rejection of the evil (wrong). This is subordinated to the will of the man who is free to decide between the right and the evil. The purpose of biomedical research involving human subjects must help to improve diagnostic, therapeutic and prophylactic procedures and to understand the aetiology and pathogenesis of a disease. In current medical practice most diagnostic, therapeutic or prophylactic procedures involve hazard. This applies especially to biomedical research. Medical progress is based on research which ultimately must rely in part on experimentation involving human subjects. The World Medical Association has prepared the recommendations described in this article as a guide to every physician in biomedical research involving human subjects.

  8. Dose distribution transfer from CyberKnife to Varian treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osewski, W.; Ślosarek, K.; Karaszewska, B.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to introduce one of the options of the locally developed DDcon.exe which gives the possibility to transfer the dose distribution from CyberKnife (Accuray) treatment planning system (CK TPS) to Varian treatment planning system (Eclipse TPS, Varian). DICOM format is known as a universal format for medical data. The dose distribution is stored as RTdose file in DICOM format, so there should be a possibility to transfer it between different treatment planning systems. Trying to transfer RTdose file from CK TPS to Eclipse TPS the error message occurs. That's because the RTdose file in CK TPS is connected with Structure_Set_Sequence against Eclipse TPS where it's connected with RT_Plan_Sequence. To make it transferable RTdose file from CK TPS have to be 'disconnected' from Structure_Set_Sequence and 'connected' with RT_Plan_Sequence. This is possible thanks DDcon software which creates new RTdose file by changing proper DICOM tags in original RTdose file. New homemade software gives us an opportunity to transfer dose distribution from CyberKnife TPS to TPS Eclipse. This method opens new possibilities to combine or compare different treatment techniques in Varian TPS.

  9. Countercontrols for the american educational research association

    PubMed Central

    Greer, R. Douglas

    1982-01-01

    Publications of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) maintain that years of research in education have failed to produce a useful technology for teachers. Little is said to be known about teaching children beyond the potential of new findings such as mastery learning, time on task, and features of an appropriate school climate. These latter conclusions are in stark contrast to the large body of useful findings in the behavior analysis literature. Several possible reasons are discussed for the discrepancy in views between behavior analysts and educational researchers. The lack of acknowledgement of behavior analysis is viewed as a serious problem because of the control that the educational research establishment exerts over federal funding of research and the training of teachers. There is a growing use of some of the aspects of behavior analysis by educational researchers; however, the derivation is not acknowledged and there is little enlightenment about radical behaviorism. It is suggested that ABA should countercontrol the influence of AERA by incorporating doctoral students in educational research as students of behavior analysis, teaching the complexity of behaviorism, teaching the positions of the opposing camp to behavior analysis students. ABA can take an aggressive role in countercontrolling AERA by forming committees to insure (a) quality of treatment, (b) funding representation in government, (c) protection and qualified review of untenured behavior analysts, (d) expansion of certification. PMID:22478558

  10. European Association of Echocardiography: Research Grant Programme.

    PubMed

    Gargani, Luna; Muraru, Denisa; Badano, Luigi P; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Sicari, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) offers a variety of grants/fellowships to help young professionals in the field of cardiological training or research activities throughout Europe. The number of grants has significantly increased in recent years with contributions from the Associations, Working Groups and Councils of the ESC. The European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) is a registered branch of the ESC and actively takes part in this initiative. One of the aims of EAE is to promote excellence in research in cardiovascular ultrasound and other imaging modalities in Europe. Therefore, since 2008, the EAE offers a Research Grant Programme to help young doctors to obtain research experience in a high standard academic centre (or similar institution oriented to clinical or pre-clinical research) in an ESC member country other than their own. This programme can be considered as a valorization of the geographical mobility as well as cultural exchanges and professional practice in the field of cardiovascular imaging. The programme has been very successful so far, therefore in 2012 the EAE has increased its offer to two grants of 25,000 euros per annum each.

  11. SU-E-J-235: Varian Portal Dosimetry Accuracy at Detecting Simulated Delivery Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J; Bellon, M; Barton, K; Gulam, M; Chetty, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To use receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to quantify the Varian Portal Dosimetry (VPD) application's ability to detect delivery errors in IMRT fields. Methods: EPID and VPD were calibrated/commissioned using vendor-recommended procedures. Five clinical plans comprising 56 modulated fields were analyzed using VPD. Treatment sites were: pelvis, prostate, brain, orbit, and base of tongue. Delivery was on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at 6MV using a Millenium120 multi-leaf collimator. Image pairs (VPD-predicted and measured) were exported in dicom format. Each detection test imported an image pair into Matlab, optionally inserted a simulated error (rectangular region with intensity raised or lowered) into the measured image, performed 3%/3mm gamma analysis, and saved the gamma distribution. For a given error, 56 negative tests (without error) were performed, one per 56 image pairs. Also, 560 positive tests (with error) with randomly selected image pairs and randomly selected in-field error location. Images were classified as errored (or error-free) if percent pixels with γ<κ was < (or ≥) τ. (Conventionally, κ=1 and τ=90%.) A ROC curve was generated from the 616 tests by varying τ. For a range of κ and τ, true/false positive/negative rates were calculated. This procedure was repeated for inserted errors of different sizes. VPD was considered to reliably detect an error if images were correctly classified as errored or error-free at least 95% of the time, for some κ+τ combination. Results: 20mm{sup 2} errors with intensity altered by ≥20% could be reliably detected, as could 10mm{sup 2} errors with intensity was altered by ≥50%. Errors with smaller size or intensity change could not be reliably detected. Conclusion: Varian Portal Dosimetry using 3%/3mm gamma analysis is capable of reliably detecting only those fluence errors that exceed the stated sizes. Images containing smaller errors can pass mathematical analysis, though

  12. The Implications of Temperature-Mediated Plasticity in Larval Instar Number for Development within a Marine Invertebrate, the Shrimp Palaemonetes varians

    PubMed Central

    Oliphant, Andrew; Hauton, Chris; Thatje, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Variations in larval instar number are common among arthropods. Here, we assess the implications of temperature-mediated variations in larval instar number for larval development time, larval growth rates, and juvenile dry weight within the palaemonid shrimp, Palaemonetes varians. In contrast with previous literature, which focuses on terrestrial arthropods, particularly model and pest species often of laboratory lines, we use wild shrimp, which differ in their life history from previous models. Newly-hatched P. varians larvae were first reared at 5, 10, 17, 25, and 30°C to assess their thermal scope for development. Larvae developed at 17, 25, and 30°C. At higher temperatures, larvae developed through fewer larval instars. Two dominant developmental pathways were observed; a short pathway of four instars and a long pathway of five instars. Longer developmental pathways of six to seven instars were rarely observed (mostly at lower temperatures) and consisted of additional instars as ‘repeat’ instars; i.e. little developmental advance over the preceding instar. To assess the implications of temperature-mediated variation in larval instar number, newly-hatched larvae were then reared at 15, 20, and 25°C. Again, the proportion of larvae developing through four instars increased with temperature. At all temperatures, larval development time and juvenile dry weight were greater for larvae developing through five instars. Importantly, because of the increasing proportion of larvae developing through four instars with increasing temperature, larval traits associated with this pathway (reduced development time and juvenile dry weight) became more dominant. As a consequence of increasing growth rate with temperature, and the shift in the proportion of larvae developing through four instars, juvenile dry weight was greatest at intermediate temperatures (20°C). We conclude that at settlement P. varians juveniles do not follow the temperature-size rule; this is of

  13. The implications of temperature-mediated plasticity in larval instar number for development within a marine invertebrate, the shrimp Palaemonetes varians.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Andrew; Hauton, Chris; Thatje, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Variations in larval instar number are common among arthropods. Here, we assess the implications of temperature-mediated variations in larval instar number for larval development time, larval growth rates, and juvenile dry weight within the palaemonid shrimp, Palaemonetes varians. In contrast with previous literature, which focuses on terrestrial arthropods, particularly model and pest species often of laboratory lines, we use wild shrimp, which differ in their life history from previous models. Newly-hatched P. varians larvae were first reared at 5, 10, 17, 25, and 30 °C to assess their thermal scope for development. Larvae developed at 17, 25, and 30 °C. At higher temperatures, larvae developed through fewer larval instars. Two dominant developmental pathways were observed; a short pathway of four instars and a long pathway of five instars. Longer developmental pathways of six to seven instars were rarely observed (mostly at lower temperatures) and consisted of additional instars as 'repeat' instars; i.e. little developmental advance over the preceding instar. To assess the implications of temperature-mediated variation in larval instar number, newly-hatched larvae were then reared at 15, 20, and 25 °C. Again, the proportion of larvae developing through four instars increased with temperature. At all temperatures, larval development time and juvenile dry weight were greater for larvae developing through five instars. Importantly, because of the increasing proportion of larvae developing through four instars with increasing temperature, larval traits associated with this pathway (reduced development time and juvenile dry weight) became more dominant. As a consequence of increasing growth rate with temperature, and the shift in the proportion of larvae developing through four instars, juvenile dry weight was greatest at intermediate temperatures (20 °C). We conclude that at settlement P. varians juveniles do not follow the temperature-size rule; this is of

  14. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  15. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  16. Optimal parameters for clinical implementation of breast cancer patient setup using Varian DTS software.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Jeung, Andrew; Mostafavi, Hassan; Hesser, Juergen; Bellon, Jennifer R; Wong, Julia S; Lyatskaya, Yulia

    2012-05-10

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) was evaluated as an alternative to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for patient setup. DTS is preferable when there are constraints with setup time, gantry-couch clearance, and imaging dose using CBCT. This study characterizes DTS data acquisition and registration parameters for the setup of breast cancer patients using nonclinical Varian DTS software. DTS images were reconstructed from CBCT projections acquired on phantoms and patients with surgical clips in the target volume. A shift-and-add algorithm was used for DTS volume reconstructions, while automated cross-correlation matches were performed within Varian DTS software. Triangulation on two short DTS arcs separated by various angular spread was done to improve 3D registration accuracy. Software performance was evaluated on two phantoms and ten breast cancer patients using the registration result as an accuracy measure; investigated parameters included arc lengths, arc orientations, angular separation between two arcs, reconstruction slice spacing, and number of arcs. The shifts determined from DTS-to-CT registration were compared to the shifts based on CBCT-to-CT registration. The difference between these shifts was used to evaluate the software accuracy. After findings were quantified, optimal parameters for the clinical use of DTS technique were determined. It was determined that at least two arcs were necessary for accurate 3D registration for patient setup. Registration accuracy of 2 mm was achieved when the reconstruction arc length was > 5° for clips with HU ≥ 1000; larger arc length (≥ 8°) was required for very low HU clips. An optimal arc separation was found to be ≥ 20° and optimal arc length was 10°. Registration accuracy did not depend on DTS slice spacing. DTS image reconstruction took 10-30 seconds and registration took less than 20 seconds. The performance of Varian DTS software was found suitable for the accurate setup of breast cancer patients

  17. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality for the Varian cone beam computed tomography system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Harry C Y; Wu, Vincent W C; Liu, Eva S F; Kwong, Dora L W

    2011-05-01

    To compare the image quality and dosimetry on the Varian cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system between software Version 1.4.13 and Version 1.4.11 (referred to as "new" and "old" protocols, respectively, in the following text). This study investigated organ absorbed dose, total effective dose, and image quality of the CBCT system for the head-and-neck and pelvic regions. A calibrated Farmer chamber and two standard cylindrical Perspex CT dosimetry phantoms with diameter of 16 cm (head phantom) and 32 cm (body phantom) were used to measure the weighted cone-beam computed tomography dose index (CBCTDIw) of the Varian CBCT system. The absorbed dose of different organs was measured in a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the total effective dose was estimated according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103. The dose measurement and image quality were studied for head-and-neck and pelvic regions, and comparison was made between the new and old protocols. The values of the new CBCTDIw head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 36.6 and 29.4 mGy, respectively. The total effective doses from the new head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 1.7 and 8.2 mSv, respectively. The absorbed doses of lens for the new 200° and old 360° head-and-neck protocols were 3.8 and 59.4 mGy, respectively. The additional secondary cancer risk from daily CBCT might be up to 2.8%. The new Varian CBCT provided volumetric information for image guidance with acceptable image quality and lower radiation dose. This imaging tool gave a better standard for patient daily setup verification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Trophic transfer of trace metals from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the polychaete N. virens and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Diet is an important exposure route for the uptake of trace metals by aquatic invertebrates, with trace metal trophic transfer depending on 2 stages - assimilation and subsequent accumulation by the predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of trace metals from the sediment-dwelling polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor from metal-rich estuarine sediments in southwestern UK to 2 predators - another polychaete N. virens (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe, Ag, As, Mn). N. virens showed net accumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from the prey; accumulation increased with increasing prey concentration, but a coefficient of trophic transfer decreased with increasing prey concentration, probably because a higher proportion of accumulated metal in the prey is bound in less trophically available (insoluble) detoxified forms. The trace metal accumulation patterns of P. varians apparently restricted significant net accumulation of metals from the diet of N. diversicolor to just Cd. There was significant mortality of the decapods fed on the diets of metal-rich worms. Metal-rich invertebrates that have accumulated metals from the rich historical store in the sediments of particular SW England estuaries can potentially pass these metals along food chains, with accumulation and total food chain transfer depending on the metal assimilation efficiencies and accumulation patterns of the animal at each trophic level. This trophic transfer may be significant enough to have ecotoxicological effects. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  19. Flatness characteristics for diagonal scans from Varian and Siemens linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J; Kahler, D; Gu, J; McDonald, B; Abrath, F; Kopecky, W

    1996-09-01

    The advent of 3D treatment planning systems whose algorithms utilize diagonal scan data to perform dose calculations has made the collection of diagonal profile data essential. Manufacturers' specifications (MS) on beam flatness and symmetry apply to both the radial and transverse axes of all square field sizes from 10 X 10 cm2 to the largest field available. Beam profile measurements were obtained for both diagonal axes over a range of field sizes and depths for two units, a Varian 2100C and a Siemens KD. In this note the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) flatness definition was used to characterize the diagonal flatness of each beam.

  20. Analytical representation for Varian EDW factors at off-center points

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, Vadim Y.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate a new analytical model for Varian enhanced dynamic wedge factors at off-center points. The new model was verified by comparing measured and calculated wedge factors for the standard set of wedge angles (i.e., 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg. and 60 deg.), different symmetric and asymmetric fields, and two different photon energies. The maximum difference between calculated and measured wedge factors is less than 2%. The average absolute difference is within 1%. The obtained results indicate that the suggested model can be useful for independent dose calculation with enhanced dynamic wedges.

  1. Inhomogeneity effect in Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using EGSnrc and Geant4 code system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Rhani, M. F.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-08-01

    Treatment fields consist of tissue other than water equivalent tissue (soft tissue, bones, lungs, etc.). The inhomogeneity effect can be investigated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. MC simulation of the radiation transport in an absorbing medium is the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneity phantom on dose calculations in photon beam radiotherapy obtained by different MC codes. MC code system EGSnrc and Geant4 was used in this study. Inhomogeneity phantom dimension is 39.5 × 30.5 × 30 cm3 and made of 4 material slices (12.5 cm water, 10 cm aluminium, 5 cm lung and 12.5 cm water). Simulations were performed for field size 4 × 4 cm2 at SSD 100 cm. The spectrum distribution Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV was used. Percent depth dose (PDD) and dose profile was investigated in this research. The effects of inhomogeneities on radiation dose distributions depend on the amount, density and atomic number of the inhomogeneity, as well as on the quality of the photon beam. Good agreement between dose distribution from EGSnrc and Geant4 code system in inhomogeneity phantom was observed, with dose differences around 5% and 7% for depth doses and dose profiles.

  2. Abundance of the reef-building Petaloconchus varians (Gastropoda: Vermetidae) on intertidal rocky shores at Ilha Grande Bay, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Breves, André; Széchy, Maria Teresa M DE; Lavrado, Helena P; Junqueira, Andrea O R

    2017-01-01

    The reef-building vermetid Petaloconchus varians occurs in the western Atlantic Ocean, from the Caribbean Sea to the southern coast of Brazil. The present study evaluated the abundance of P. varians on intertidal rocky shores in Ilha Grande Bay (Rio de Janeiro State), and characterized their reefs, describing the species density, besides the weight and the belt width of the reefs. Petaloconchus varians reefs were recorded at 25 sites, with rocky shores exposed to different wave action (very sheltered, sheltered, semi-exposed and exposed) and slopes (10° to 46°). Clusters of individuals constructed large reefs along the middle intertidal zone, creating a wide belt (38 cm to 2 m). The density of P. varians and the weight of the reefs ranged from 620 to 2,559 ind.100 cm-2 and from 100 to 1,500 g.100 cm-2, respectively. Considering that the species was last reported from the area in the mid-20th century, the present study suggests that P. varians reefs are becoming dominant in the intertidal zone of rocky shores in Ilha Grande Bay. This is a contribution to knowledge of this ecosystem in Ilha Grande Bay, in view of local or global ecological changes.

  3. Poster - Thur Eve - 45: Commissioning of the Varian ECLIPSE eMC algorithm for clinical electron treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Serban, M; Ruo, R; Sarfehnia, A; Parker, W; Evans, M

    2012-07-01

    Fast electron Monte Carlo systems have been developed commercially, and implemented for clinical practice in radiation therapy clinics. In this work the Varian eMC (electron Monte Carlo) algorithm was commissioned for clinical electron beams of energies between 6 MeV and 20 MeV. Beam outputs, PDDs and profiles were measured for 29 regular and irregular cutouts using the IC-10 (Wellhöfer) ionization chamber. Detailed percentage depth dose comparisons showed that the agreement between measurement and eMC for different characteristic points on the PDD are generally less than 1 mm and always less than 2 mm, with the eMC calculated values being lower than the measured values. Of the 145 measured output factors, 19 cases fail a ±2% agreement but only 8 cases fail a ±3% agreement between calculation and measurement. Comparison of central axis dose distributions for two electron energies (9, and 20 MeV) for a 10 × 10 cm(2) field, centrally shielded with Pb of width 0 cm (open), 1, 2 and 3 cm, shows agreement to within 3% except near the surface. Comparison of central axis dose distributions for 9 MeV in heterogeneous phantoms including bone and lung inserts showed agreement of 1 mm and 3 mm respectively with measured TLD data. The overall agreement between measurement and eMC calculation has enabled us to begin implementing this calculation model for clinical use. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Preliminary Determination of Activation Products for a Varian Truebeam Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Waller, Edward; Ram, Rohan; Steadman, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Medical linear accelerators used to treat various forms of cancers are operated at a number of different energies. A by-product of the high-energy photons produced by accelerators is activation of components within the machine itself and its surrounding bunker. The activation products pose radiological and regulatory challenges during the operation of the accelerator as well as when it is time for final decommissioning. The Varian TrueBeam is a new state-of-the-art linear accelerator now operating in the Canadian market. There is currently limited information on the production of its activation products and the resulting impacts on operation and decommissioning. In this paper, activation products in the Varian TrueBeam accelerator are experimentally determined by performing gamma spectroscopy using a portable high purity germanium detector. A total of 10 isotopes are identified for the conditions tested, which include Na, Al, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cu, Br, Sb, Sb, W. The half-lives of these isotopes range from 2.3 min to 60.2 d. These preliminary results indicate that a decommissioning case similar to other radiotherapy accelerators can be made.

  5. Uptake and depuration of PCB-153 in edible shrimp Palaemonetes varians and human health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Grilo, T F; Cardoso, P G; Pato, P; Duarte, A C; Pardal, M A

    2014-03-01

    A medium-term mesocosm exposure study was conducted to elucidate bioaccumulation and depuration of polychlorinated biphenyl congener 153 (PCB-153) in edible shrimp Palaemonetes varians. Over the 15-day exposure period, shrimp under different exposure concentrations exhibited a significant increase in PCB-153 concentration compared with control organisms. Distinct bioaccumulation patterns and uptake rates were observed depending on the exposure concentrations. For low PCB-153 exposure levels (0.25μgL(-1)), accumulation followed a saturation model, reaching an apparent steady state after fifteen days exposure. For intermediate (2.5μgL(-1)) and high PCB-153 levels (25μgL(-1)), accumulation was faster and linear. In addition, the bioaccumulation rate was not proportional to PCB-153 concentration, and the bioaccumulation was higher at intermediate exposure concentrations. Regarding the depuration phase, P. varians lost up to 30% of PCB-153 after 72h and levels continued slowly to decrease until the end of the 30-d experimental period. However, PCB-153 levels in shrimp did not reach background values, and those exposed to moderate and high PCB-153 concentrations presented contamination levels much higher than the regulatory limit for human food consumption (75ngg(-1) ww for Σ6 PCB). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Batten Disease Support and Research Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resource Corner Meet Batten Families Centers of Excellence Research Our Role In Research BDSRA Annual Funding Cycle Past Grant Awards Clinical Research and News Learn About Clinical Trials BDSRA Family ...

  7. Factors Associated with Research Wrongdoing in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Omokhoa A.; Adebamowo, Clement A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about research wrongdoing in biomedical research are growing in developing countries, where research ethics training and research regulatory systems are just emerging. In a first-time study in Africa, medical/dental researchers (N = 132) in two states in Nigeria were interviewed on a wide range of research wrongdoings and potential predictors. Using multivariate logistic regression, significant predictors of research wrongdoing were identified. Some 22.0% admitted to at least one of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism, the predictors of which were knowledge gaps in research ethics and pressure to publish enough papers for promotion. Acknowledging inadequate knowledge of research ethics was a predictor of admitting a wrongdoing. Systems that support ethical research, including skilled training and funding, are recommended. PMID:23324199

  8. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators.

    PubMed

    Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E; Followill, David S

    2009-09-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [gamma,n] reactions in high-Z material -7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements.

  9. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  10. Identical Quality Assurance for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Elekta and Varian Machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiazhou; Hu, Weigang; Peng, Jiayuan; Lu, Saiquan; Zhao, Jun; Xiao, Ying; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been adopted by many clinics for its higher delivery efficiency compared to conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Currently, the quality assurance (QA) has remained a challenge in that no identical tests are available for accelerators from different vendors. This study is the first attempt to design identical QA tests for the VMAT technique for Varian and Elekta machines. Identical procedures testing MLC positions and movements, dose rate variations, and gantry positions and movement were created for both machines. These included picket fence (PF), dose rate vs. gantry speed (DRGS) and MLC speed vs. dose rate (MLCDR) tests. Deliverable plans for these tests were made with in-house software that was deliverable for linacs from two vendors (Elekta Synergy and Varian Trilogy). The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for these tests. An automated analysis method was established and software was created to quantitatively evaluate the result. The systematic gap position and width errors from PF tests were within 0.5 mm. We evaluated the detectability of this program for introduced errors down to 0.2 mm. Linear relationships existed between the introduced errors and measured errors. In the DRGS test, 99.8% and 100.0% of the intensity deviations from expected profiles were less than 3% for the Synergy and Trilogy, respectively. For the MLCDR, the intensity deviations from expected profiles less than 3% were 100.0% for Synergy and 98.1% for Trilogy. Identical test series were created and implemented for VMAT accelerators from two vendors. Test results were reported from both accelerators. Comparable results were obtained from both vendors, enabling uniform criteria to be established for VMAT quality assurance.

  11. Identical Quality Assurance for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Elekta and Varian Machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hu, W; Peng, J; Lu, S; Zhao, J; Xiao, Y; Zhang, Z

    2014-03-17

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been adopted by many clinics for its higher delivery efficiency compared to conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Currently, the quality assurance (QA) has remained a challenge in that no identical tests are available for accelerators from different vendors. This study is the first attempt to design identical QA tests for the VMAT technique for Varian and Elekta machines. Identical procedures testing MLC positions and movements, dose rate variations, and gantry positions and movement were created for both machines. These included picket fence (PF), dose rate vs. gantry speed (DRGS) and MLC speed vs. dose rate (MLCDR) tests. Deliverable plans for these tests were made with in-house software that was deliverable for linacs from two vendors (Elekta Synergy and Varian Trilogy). The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for these tests. An automated analysis method was established and software was created to quantitatively evaluate the result. The systematic gap position and width errors from PF tests were within 0.5 mm. We evaluated the detectability of this program for introduced errors down to 0.2 mm. Linear relationships existed between the introduced errors and measured errors. In the DRGS test, 99.8% and 100.0% of the intensity deviations from expected profiles were less than 3% for the Synergy and Trilogy, respectively. For the MLCDR, the intensity deviations from expected profiles less than 3% were 100.0% for Synergy and 98.1% for Trilogy. Identical test series were created and implemented for VMAT accelerators from two vendors. Test results were reported from both accelerators. Comparable results were obtained from both vendors, enabling uniform criteria to be established for VMAT quality assurance.

  12. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E.; Followill, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [γ,n] reactions in high-Z material ∼7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements. PMID:19810475

  13. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  14. A novel technique for VMAT QA with EPID in cine mode on a Varian TrueBeam linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Adamson, Justus; Rodrigues, Anna; Zhou, Fugen; Yin, Fang-fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2013-10-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new treatment modality for dynamic photon radiation therapy. Pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) is necessary and many efforts have been made to apply electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based IMRT QA methods to VMAT. It is important to verify the gantry rotation speed during delivery as this is a new variable that is also modulated in VMAT. In this paper, we present a new technique to perform VMAT QA using an EPID. The method utilizes EPID cine mode and was tested on Varian TrueBeam in research mode. The cine images were acquired during delivery and converted to dose matrices after profile correction and dose calibration. A sub-arc corresponding to each cine image was extracted from the original plan and its portal image prediction was calculated. Several analyses were performed including 3D γ analysis (2D images + gantry angle axis), 2D γ analysis, and other statistical analyses. The method was applied to 21 VMAT photon plans of 3 photon energies. The accuracy of the cine image information was investigated. Furthermore, this method's sensitivity to machine delivery errors was studied. The pass rate (92.8 ± 1.4%) for 3D γ analysis was comparable to those from Delta4 system (99.9 ± 0.1%) under similar criteria (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold and 2° angle to agreement) at 6 MV. The recorded gantry angle and start/stop MUs were found to have sufficient accuracy for clinical QA. Machine delivery errors can be detected through combined analyses of 3D γ, gantry angle, and percentage dose difference. In summary, we have developed and validated a QA technique that can simultaneously verify the gantry angle and delivered MLC fluence for VMAT treatment.This technique is efficient and its accuracy is comparable to other QA methods.

  15. Implicit Measures of Association in Psychopathology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roefs, Anne; Huijding, Jorg; Smulders, Fren T. Y.; MacLeod, Colin M.; de Jong, Peter J.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Jansen, Anita T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Validity;Measures (Individuals);Studies obtaining implicit measures of associations in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) Axis I psychopathology are organized into three categories: (a) studies comparing groups having a disorder with controls, (b) experimental…

  16. Implicit Measures of Association in Psychopathology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roefs, Anne; Huijding, Jorg; Smulders, Fren T. Y.; MacLeod, Colin M.; de Jong, Peter J.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Jansen, Anita T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Validity;Measures (Individuals);Studies obtaining implicit measures of associations in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) Axis I psychopathology are organized into three categories: (a) studies comparing groups having a disorder with controls, (b) experimental…

  17. Clinical Research Associate II | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Prepares and presents technical reports, abstracts, manuscripts, and other scientific presentations Secures electronic file transmissions of medical records, tests (ECG, MRI, CT, etc.) through various portals that are provided by trial sponsors Develops Standard Operating Procedures, templates and flow diagrams to enhance workflow Monitors/prepares budget operating reports Provides project management support with planning and development of project schedules and deliverables Develops and tracks project timelines and milestones Prepares status reports and monitoring progress ensuring adherence to deadlines Assists the research nurses with queries from research sponsors Maintains relationships with Investigators, study site staff, network entities, Clinical Research Organizations (CROs) and field CRAs Provides assistance to the clinical investigators and teams to reinforce and enhance a GCP culture Assists other CRAs and Project Managers in the development of team processes and study-related documents

  18. Creation of an American Holistic Nurses Association research consultation program.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sue; Clingerman, Evelyn; Zahourek, Rothlyn P; Mariano, Carla; Lange, Bernadette

    2012-12-01

    A goal of the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA) Research Committee is to prepare holistic nurses to conduct holistic nursing research. This article describes the creation of a Research Consultation Program and how the knowledge gained from the program will contribute to the development of a formal research mentor program.

  19. SU-E-T-195: Commissioning the Neutron Production of a Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Irazola, L; Brualla, L; Rosello, J; Terron, JA; Sanchez-Nieto, B; Bedogni, R; Sanchez-Doblado, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is the characterization of a new Varian TrueBeam™ facility in terms of neutron production, in order to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments. Methods: The existing methodology [1] was used with the reference SRAMnd detector, calibrated in terms of thermal neutron fluence at the reference field operated by PTB (Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt) at the GeNF (Geesthacht-Neutron-Facility) with the GKSS reactor FRG-1 [2]. Thermal neutron fluence for the 5 available possibilities was evaluated: 15 MV and 10&6 MV with and without Flattening Filter (FF and FFF, respectively). Irradiation conditions are as described in [3]. In addition, three different collimator-MLC configurations were studied for 15 MV: (a) collimator of 10×10 cm{sup 2} and MLC fully retracted (reference), (b) field sizes of 20×20 cm{sup 2} and 10×10 cm{sup 2} for collimator and MLC respectively, and (c) collimator and MLC aperture of 10×10 cm{sup 2}. Results: Thermal fluence rate at the “reference point” [3], as a consequence of the neutron production, obtained for (a) conformation in 15 MV is (1.45±0.11) x10{sup 4} n•cm{sup 2}/MU. Configurations (b) and (c) gave fluences of 96.6% and 97.8% of the reference (a). Neutron production decreases up to 8.6% and 5.7% for the 10 MV FF and FFF beams, respectively. Finally, it decreases up to 2.8% and 0.1% for the 6 MV FF and FFF modes, respectively. Conclusion: This work evaluates thermal neutron production of Varian TrueBeam™ system for organ equivalent dose estimation. The small difference in collimator-MLC configuration shows the universality of the methodology [3]. A decrease in this production is shown when decreasing energy from 15 to 10 MV and an almost negligible production was found for 6 MV. Moreover, a lower neutron contribution is observed for the FFF modes.[1]Phys Med Biol,2012;57:6167–6191.[2]Radiat Meas,2010;45:1513–1517.[3]Med Phys,2015;42:276–281.

  20. Implicit measures of association in psychopathology research.

    PubMed

    Roefs, Anne; Huijding, Jorg; Smulders, Fren T Y; MacLeod, Colin M; de Jong, Peter J; Wiers, Reinout W; Jansen, Anita T M

    2011-01-01

    Studies obtaining implicit measures of associations in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) Axis I psychopathology are organized into three categories: (a) studies comparing groups having a disorder with controls, (b) experimental validity studies, and (c) incremental and predictive validity studies. In the first category, implicit measures of disorder-relevant associations were consistent with explicit beliefs for some disorders (e.g., specific phobia), but for other disorders evidence was either mixed (e.g., panic disorder) or inconsistent with explicit beliefs (e.g., pain disorder). For substance use disorders and overeating, expected positive and unexpected negative associations with craved substances were found consistently. Contrary to expectation, implicit measures of self-esteem were consistently positive for patients with depressive disorder, social phobia, and body dysmorphic disorder. In the second category, short-term manipulations of disorder-relevant states generally affected implicit measures as expected. Therapeutic interventions affected implicit measures for one type of specific phobia, social phobia, and panic disorder, but not for alcohol use disorders or obesity. In the third category, implicit measures had predictive value for certain psychopathological behaviors, sometimes moderated by the availability of cognitive resources (e.g., for alcohol and food, only when cognitive resources were limited). The strengths of implicit measures include (a) converging evidence for dysfunctional beliefs regarding certain disorders and consistent new insights for other disorders and (b) prediction of some psychopathological behaviors that explicit measures cannot explain. Weaknesses include (a) that findings were inconsistent for some disorders, raising doubts about the validity of the measures, and (b) that understanding of the concept "implicit" is incomplete.

  1. Student Science Research Associates (SSRA) 1996 Research Journal

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.

    1996-12-01

    The following student projects are reported: SSRA water research projects, various effects on polliwogs` growth and development, effects of Willow Park Golf Course on nitrate and phosphate levels in San Leandro Creek, water quality evaluation using color infrared photography, biochemical analysis of aquatic insects, effects of miracid/calcium chloride/liquid plant food on stringless bush beans, effects of vegetable oil on bean growth, effect of river water on lima beans, effect of storm water runoff on pH and phosphate levels of Dry Creek, acid rain in Modesto, use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to study Egeria Densa, and effect of marination on formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cooked chicken meat.

  2. A self-sufficient method for calibration of Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Goddu, Sreekrishna M.; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is currently used for dosimetric verification of IMRT fields and linac quality assurance (QA). It is critical to understand the dosimetric response and perform an accurate and robust calibration of EPID. We present the implementation of an efficient method for the calibration and the validation of a Varian EPID, which relies only on data collected with that specific device. The calibration method is based on images obtained with five shifts of EPID panel. With this method, the relative gain (sensitivity) of each element of a detector matrix is calculated and applied on top of the calibration determined with the flood-field procedure. The calibration procedure was verified using a physical wedge inserted in the beam line and the corrected profile shows consistent results with the measurements using a calibrated 2D array. This method does not rely on the beam profile used in the flood-field calibration process, which allows EPID calibration in 10 minutes with no additional equipment compared to at least 2 hours to obtain beam profile and scanning beam equipment requirement with the conventional method.

  3. Neutron source strength measurements for Varian, Siemens, Elekta, and General Electric linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Followill, David S; Stovall, Marilyn S; Kry, Stephen F; Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2003-01-01

    The shielding calculations for high energy (>10 MV) linear accelerators must include the photoneutron production within the head of the accelerator. Procedures have been described to calculate the treatment room door shielding based on the neutron source strength (Q value) for a specific accelerator and energy combination. Unfortunately, there is currently little data in the literature stating the neutron source strengths for the most widely used linear accelerators. In this study, the neutron fluence for 36 linear accelerators, including models from Varian, Siemens, Elekta/Philips, and General Electric, was measured using gold-foil activation. Several of the models and energy combinations had multiple measurements. The neutron fluence measured in the patient plane was independent of the surface area of the room, suggesting that neutron fluence is more dependent on the direct neutron fluence from the head of the accelerator than from room scatter. Neutron source strength, Q, was determined from the measured neutron fluences. As expected, Q increased with increasing photon energy. The Q values ranged from 0.02 for a 10 MV beam to 1.44(x10(12)) neutrons per photon Gy for a 25 MV beam. The most comprehensive set of neutron source strength values, Q, for the current accelerators in clinical use are presented for use in calculating room shielding.

  4. Monte Carlo modeling of a Novalis Tx Varian 6 MV with HD-120 multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Quino, Luis Alberto; Massingill, Brian; Shi, Chengyu; Gutierrez, Alonso; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2012-09-06

    A Monte Carlo model of the Novalis Tx linear accelerator equipped with high-definition multileaf collimator (HD-120 HD-MLC) was commissioned using ionization chamber measurements in water. All measurements in water were performed using a liquid filled ionization chamber. Film measurements were made using EDR2 film in solid water. Open rectangular fields defined by the jaws or the HD-MLC were used for comparison against measurements. Furthermore, inter- and intraleaf leakage calculated by the Monte Carlo model was compared against film measurements. The statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations was less than 1% for all simulations. Results for all regular field sizes show an excellent agreement with commissioning data (percent depth-dose curves and profiles), well within 1% of difference in the relative dose and 1 mm distance to agreement. The computed leakage through HD-MLCs shows good agreement with film measurements. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the new Novalis Tx Varian linac with HD-MLC and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations.

  5. Quality assurance of electron beams using a Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Heaton, R.; Norrlinger, B.; Islam, M.

    2013-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the quality assurance of electron beams was investigated. This work was conducted on a Varian 2100iX machine equipped with an amorphous silicon (aS1000) portal imager. The linearity of the imager pixel response as a function of exposed dose was first confirmed. The short-term reproducibility of the EPID response to electron beams was verified. Low (6 MeV), medium (12 MeV) and high (20 MeV) energies were tested, each along with small (6 × 6 cm2), medium (10 × 10 cm2) and large (20 × 20 cm2) applicators. Acquired EPID images were analyzed using an in-house MATLAB code for radiation field size, penumbra, symmetry and flatness. Field sizes and penumbra values agreed with those from film dosimetry to within 1 mm. Field symmetry and flatness constancies were measured over a period of three weeks. The results indicate that EPID can be used for routine quality assurance of electron beams.

  6. Organising Continuity and Quality of the European Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochems, Wim; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Research associations tend to be voluntary by nature and therefore unstable in character, and thus are subject to threat for their continuity. History has shown that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) is not an exception to this rule. Because EERA Council and the board members are volunteers with limited time, experience and…

  7. Robotized sampling device for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry slurry analysis with Varian SpectrAA instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenig, Michel; Cilissen, Anne

    1993-08-01

    There is a growing interest in the determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) of elements in solid samples without a dissolution stage, to avoid contamination and losses during the preparation of the sample. This approach may be particularly convenient when only small amounts of sample are available. Details of the above-mentioned program for the adaptation of the Gilson sample changer to Varian SpectrAA systems (X,Y,Z positions, timings etc.) are available on request.

  8. Neutron dose measurements of Varian and Elekta linacs by TLD600 and TLD700 dosimeters and comparison with MCNP calculations

    PubMed Central

    Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Darestani, Hoda; Banaee, Nooshin; Shagholi, Negin; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Shahvar, Arjang; Bayat, Esmaeel

    2014-01-01

    High-energy linacs produce secondary particles such as neutrons (photoneutron production). The neutrons have the important role during treatment with high energy photons in terms of protection and dose escalation. In this work, neutron dose equivalents of 18 MV Varian and Elekta accelerators are measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 600 and TLD700 detectors and compared with the Monte Carlo calculations. For neutron and photon dose discrimination, first TLDs were calibrated separately by gamma and neutron doses. Gamma calibration was carried out in two procedures; by standard 60Co source and by 18 MV linac photon beam. For neutron calibration by 241Am-Be source, irradiations were performed in several different time intervals. The Varian and Elekta linac heads and the phantom were simulated by the MCNPX code (v. 2.5). Neutron dose equivalent was calculated in the central axis, on the phantom surface and depths of 1, 2, 3.3, 4, 5, and 6 cm. The maximum photoneutron dose equivalents which calculated by the MCNPX code were 7.06 and 2.37 mSv.Gy-1 for Varian and Elekta accelerators, respectively, in comparison with 50 and 44 mSv.Gy-1 achieved by TLDs. All the results showed more photoneutron production in Varian accelerator compared to Elekta. According to the results, it seems that TLD600 and TLD700 pairs are not suitable dosimeters for neutron dosimetry inside the linac field due to high photon flux, while MCNPX code is an appropriate alternative for studying photoneutron production. PMID:24600167

  9. Neutron dose measurements of Varian and Elekta linacs by TLD600 and TLD700 dosimeters and comparison with MCNP calculations.

    PubMed

    Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Darestani, Hoda; Banaee, Nooshin; Shagholi, Negin; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Shahvar, Arjang; Bayat, Esmaeel

    2014-01-01

    High-energy linacs produce secondary particles such as neutrons (photoneutron production). The neutrons have the important role during treatment with high energy photons in terms of protection and dose escalation. In this work, neutron dose equivalents of 18 MV Varian and Elekta accelerators are measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 600 and TLD700 detectors and compared with the Monte Carlo calculations. For neutron and photon dose discrimination, first TLDs were calibrated separately by gamma and neutron doses. Gamma calibration was carried out in two procedures; by standard 60Co source and by 18 MV linac photon beam. For neutron calibration by (241)Am-Be source, irradiations were performed in several different time intervals. The Varian and Elekta linac heads and the phantom were simulated by the MCNPX code (v. 2.5). Neutron dose equivalent was calculated in the central axis, on the phantom surface and depths of 1, 2, 3.3, 4, 5, and 6 cm. The maximum photoneutron dose equivalents which calculated by the MCNPX code were 7.06 and 2.37 mSv.Gy(-1) for Varian and Elekta accelerators, respectively, in comparison with 50 and 44 mSv.Gy(-1) achieved by TLDs. All the results showed more photoneutron production in Varian accelerator compared to Elekta. According to the results, it seems that TLD600 and TLD700 pairs are not suitable dosimeters for neutron dosimetry inside the linac field due to high photon flux, while MCNPX code is an appropriate alternative for studying photoneutron production.

  10. Program of Research for Forests and Associated Rangelands

    Treesearch

    Nelson S. Loftus; Joseph G. Massey; [Compilers

    1978-01-01

    This research plan for the Southern Region is a companion publication to the National Program of Research for Forests and Associated Rangelands. While the national program reflects both regional and national priorities, this plan provides details on forestry research matters concerning the South. For the reader's convenience, background information on development...

  11. Research Administrator Salary: Association with Education, Experience, Credentials and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.; Triscari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Research Administrators Stress Perception Survey (2010 RASPerS) collected data from 1,131 research administrators on salary, years experience, educational level, Certified Research Administrator (CRA) status, and gender. Using these data, comparisons were made to show how salary levels are associated with each of these variables. Using…

  12. Research of Geochemical Associations of Nephelin Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulf, M.; Simonov, K.; Sazonov, A.

    The instant paper concerns research of distribution petrogenic chemical members in urtit ore body of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit. Rocks of the deposit are ore for producing alum earth. Actuality of the subject based on outlooks of detection noble metal ore-bearing (Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru) in alkaline rocks of Siberia, including rocks of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit (Kuznetsk Alatau). The main purpose of analysis of distribution of members is directed to detection of a non-uniformity of distribution of substance and segments enriched with alum earth and noble members. The basic solved problems are following: o Creation regression models of ore body; o Definition of cumulative distribution functions of members in a contour of ore body; o The analysis of the obtained outcomes in geologic terms. For construction regression models the full-scale data was used, which was presented by the results of the spectral and silicate analyses of gold and petrogenic members containing 130 assays arranged in ore body. A non-linear multiparameter model of the ore body based on components of nephelin ore using neural net approach was constructed. For each member the corresponding distribution function is produced. The model is constructed on the following members: Au, Al2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, R2O ((Na2O+K2O) -1) and losses of burning. The error of model forecasting membersS concentrations was from 0.02 up to 20%. Large errors basically connected with assays located near contact of ore body and ad- jacent strata or with very high concentrations of members; also they can be connected with different genesis of rocks or superposition of other processes. The analysis of concentrations of members and normalised absolute errors of the fore- cast has shown, that all members can be sectioned into two groups: first: Al2O3, SiO2, R2O, Fe2O3 and second: Au, losses of burning, CaO, MgO, SO3. The distribution of 1 gold is tightly connected with calcium and losses of burning and spatially linked with zones

  13. Comparison of characteristics of photon and electron beams generated by Philips/Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Song, Haijun; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M

    2002-06-01

    Commissioning data of the common energy of 6 MV photon beams are analyzed for seven Philips/ Elekta linacs of five different models: SL 75/5, SL 15, SL 25, SLi Precise, and SLi. The observed beam quality %dd(10)x of 67.7% +/- 0.3 agrees with the manufacturer's specification of 67.5% +/- 2% but with a much smaller variation, suggesting the possibility of a more accurate beam quality guideline for acceptance commissioning of these linac models. Field size factors are less uniform, especially for the biggest field size of 40 x 40 cm2, but all agree within 1.1% between the five models. These 6 MV photon beams are also shown to be 0.4 MV harder than the Varian 2100C model. For commissioning electron beams generated by the Philips/Elekta models SL 15, SLi Precise and SLi, guidelines can be found from this work for the following parameters: actual field size at 100 SSD (up to +/- 0.6%) (different from manufacturer specified values at 95 SSD), and virtual source distance (up to +/- 0.7%). Significant differences are seen for R50 (up to 3.7 mm), sigma-theta-x, effective source distance, and cone size factor. However, except for R50 where Varian 2100C datasets are not available for comparison, the differences between the different Philips/Elekta models are comparable to those between the same Varian 2100C model linacs measured by us and Watts.

  14. mARC prostate treatment planning with Varian Eclipse for flat vs. FFF beams.

    PubMed

    Bell, Katharina; Dzierma, Yvonne; Palm, Jan; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique as an alternative to VMAT is a rotational IMRT irradiation with burst mode delivery. Varian has recently implemented an option for mARC-planning into the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and so far mARC-planning with this TPS has not been evaluated systematically. Therefore, for prostate treatment with Eclipse we compare mARC with IMRT using flat (6MV) and flattening-filter-free (FFF, 7MV) beam energies. For ten prostate cancer patients standardized re-contouring and re-planning was performed with a prescription of 76Gy to the complete planning-target-volume (PTV). IMRT and mARC plans (6MV vs. FFF 7MV) were compared pairwise considering indices for plan quality. All plans were delivered on an anthromorphic phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure out-of-field dose and treatment times. Regarding PTV coverage, there was no marked preference for either technique or energy. The evaluation of organs at risk showed improved bladder sparing of the mARC plans up to about 75Gy; above this dose the IMRT plans achieved significant better sparing. The use of the FFF-beam-energy and mARC-technique resulted in a significant decrease in out-of-field dose. This combination also led to a drastic reduction of treatment time by factor of three in comparison with 6MV IMRT. While highly conformal treatment plans could be created by the use of all modalities, the combination of the high dose rate with mARC appears to be the preferable option as it benefits from a marked decrease in treatment time and out-of-field dose. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SU-E-T-111: An Iterative Approach to Modelling Dosimetric Properties of a Varian MLC

    SciTech Connect

    DiCostanzo, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In effort to efficiently and accurately model MLC parameters for use in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS), an iterative technique for characterizing the dosimetric properties of MLCs has been developed. Methods: The initial characterization of the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) and MLC transmission was performed using varied sizes of moving gaps and transmission measurements through central axis of the radiation beam. These values were determined during the initial data collection. After the initial values were determined and entered into the TPS, two plans were calculated to test the veracity of DLG and transmission independently. The plan used to determine the DLG has openings of varied sizes which are affected differently by the DLG. A large field uniform fluence that required a MLC carriage shift was used to determine the transmission value independent of DLG. After characterizing the dosimetric properties of the MLC independently, clinical IMRT plans were tested and used to tweak the final values. Results: This approach to modelling MLC dosimetric properties was employed for: standard 120 leaf MLC (SDMLC) and 120 leaf high definition MLC (HDMLC). Both types were successfully commissioned, tested, and approved for clinical use on 4 SDMLC machines and 2 HDMLC machines. The pass rate of clinical IMRT plans was 96.9% for 6MV and 98.3% for 10MV for SDMLC and 96.3% for 6MV, 96.5% for 6FFF, and 97.5% for 10FFF for HDMLCs using MapCheck2 with gamma analysis of 2%/2mm and 10% threshold. The final DLG and transmission parameters for 6X were 0.5mm and 0.01, and 1.35mm and 0.02 for HD and SD MLCs respectively. Conclusion: This iterative approach of determining dosimetric properties of MLCs is viable for both SDMLC and HDMLC and multiple energies. This approach accurately and efficiently determines the values needed for commissioning MLCs when they are employed for modulated therapies.

  16. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-05-08

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted.

  17. The Creation of the European Social Work Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian J.; Sharland, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    As the social work profession matures, the need for robust knowledge becomes more pressing. Greater coordination is required to develop the research community and an infrastructure to support this nationally and internationally. This article discusses the foundation, in 2014, of the European Social Work Research Association and its roots in the…

  18. Research on the History of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomison, Dennis

    A researcher on the history of the American Library Association (ALA) describes problems encountered on his project, important trends in ALA, weaknesses and benefits of ALA, and needs in the area of historical research. Some of the problems cited are the inadequacy of organization and housing of the ALA archives, the unevenness of the archival…

  19. The Creation of the European Social Work Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian J.; Sharland, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    As the social work profession matures, the need for robust knowledge becomes more pressing. Greater coordination is required to develop the research community and an infrastructure to support this nationally and internationally. This article discusses the foundation, in 2014, of the European Social Work Research Association and its roots in the…

  20. Maryland 2000: Journal of the Maryland Association for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This journal chronicles a sample of the papers and presentations delivered during previous annual meetings of the Maryland Association for Institutional Research on the fifth anniversary of that association. A first paper, one from the first annual meeting in 1987 titled "Environmental Scanning: Assessing Local Business Training Needs"…

  1. Distribution automation field research and planning at United Power Association

    SciTech Connect

    Lebakken, T.M.; Gasal, J.; Goodin, J.L.; Nikula, R.

    1995-12-31

    United Power Association (UPA) has undertaken three concurrent efforts to set direction and test distribution automation approaches at UPA and its fifteen member distribution cooperatives. The first is a distribution automation and communications research project funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), Rural Electric Research and United Power Association. The project advances innovative approaches to automation, such as the Utility Communications Architecture (UCA), through field implementation research. The research project goals include achieving greater plug and play between multi-vendor field devices, communication systems, databases and applications. The field research project examines and tests key concepts to lead two concurrent planning activities: a Distribution Automation Master Plan and a Telecommunications Plan. These plans will use the mid-1995 results of the research project to set the automation direction for UPA and its member cooperatives. The research project focuses on representative portions of the UPA system yet the planning studies cover the entire service territory from the Minneapolis/St. Paul suburbs to the Canadian border. This case study and panel discussion will review the implications of the research project and key aspects of the integrated automation planning projects. The panelists will reflect on their role in the projects and what other utilities may learn from these activities.

  2. Calculation of size specific dose estimates (SSDE) value at cylindrical phantom from CBCT Varian OBI v1.4 X-ray tube EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M.; Pratama, D.; Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to calculate Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) generated by the varian OBI CBCT v1.4 X-ray tube working at 100 kV using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code used in this simulation was divided into two parts. Phase space file data resulted by the first part simulation became an input to the second part. This research was performed with varying phantom diameters of 5 to 35 cm and varying phantom lengths of 10 to 25 cm. Dose distribution data were used to calculate SSDE values using trapezoidal rule (trapz) function in a Matlab program. SSDE obtained from this calculation was compared to that in AAPM report and experimental data. It was obtained that the normalization of SSDE value for each phantom diameter was between 1.00 and 3.19. The normalization of SSDE value for each phantom length was between 0.96 and 1.07. The statistical error in this simulation was 4.98% for varying phantom diameters and 5.20% for varying phantom lengths. This study demonstrated the accuracy of the Monte Carlo technique in simulating the dose calculation. In the future, the influence of cylindrical phantom material to SSDE would be studied.

  3. The American Counseling Association Practice Research Network (ACA-PRN): A New Research Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Sexton, Thomas L.; Smith, Howard B.

    2005-01-01

    This article features the American Counseling Association Practice Research Network (ACA-PRN). Without additional current and ongoing research data, ACA and the counseling profession are seriously hampered when they discuss counseling outcomes. Without a sound, dynamic research base that better articulates the characteristics of practicing…

  4. Commissioning of the Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator: A multi-institutional study

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Bellon, M.; Wen, N.; Zhao, B.; Chetty, I. J.; Foster, R.; Speiser, M.; Solberg, T.; Altunbas, C.; Westerly, D.; Miften, M.; Altman, M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Latest generation linear accelerators (linacs), i.e., TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and its stereotactic counterpart, TrueBeam STx, have several unique features, including high-dose-rate flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon modes, reengineered electron modes with new scattering foil geometries, updated imaging hardware/software, and a novel control system. An evaluation of five TrueBeam linacs at three different institutions has been performed and this work reports on the commissioning experience. Methods: Acceptance and commissioning data were analyzed for five TrueBeam linacs equipped with 120 leaf (5 mm width) MLCs at three different institutions. Dosimetric data and mechanical parameters were compared. These included measurements of photon beam profiles (6X, 6XFFF, 10X, 10XFFF, 15X), photon and electron percent depth dose (PDD) curves (6, 9, 12 MeV), relative photon output factors (Scp), electron cone factors, mechanical isocenter accuracy, MLC transmission, and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG). End-to-end testing and IMRT commissioning were also conducted. Results: Gantry/collimator isocentricity measurements were similar (0.27-0.28 mm), with overall couch/gantry/collimator values of 0.46-0.68 mm across the three institutions. Dosimetric data showed good agreement between machines. The average MLC DLGs for 6, 10, and 15 MV photons were 1.33 {+-} 0.23, 1.57 {+-} 0.24, and 1.61 {+-} 0.26 mm, respectively. 6XFFF and 10XFFF modes had average DLGs of 1.16 {+-} 0.22 and 1.44 {+-} 0.30 mm, respectively. MLC transmission showed minimal variation across the three institutions, with the standard deviation <0.2% for all linacs. Photon and electron PDDs were comparable for all energies. 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beam quality, %dd(10){sub x} varied less than 0.3% for all linacs. Output factors (Scp) and electron cone factors agreed within 0.27%, on average; largest variations were observed for small field sizes (1.2% coefficient of variation, 10 MV, 2

  5. SU-E-T-06: A Comparison of IMRT Treatment of Esophageal Carcinoma in Elekta-Precise and Varian23EX Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Fan, X; Qiu, R; Qiao, X; Zhang, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the characteristics of static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans designed on Elekta and Varian Linac in different esophageal cancer(EC), exploring advantages and disadvantages of different vendor Linac, thus can be better serve for clinical. Methods: Twenty-four patients with EC were selected, including 6 cases located in the cervical, upper, middle and the lower thorax, respectively. Two IMRT plans were generated with the Oncentra planning system: in Elekta and Varian Linac, prescription dose of 60Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs, spinal cord and heart, and additional Monitor units(MU), treatment time, Homogeneity index(HI), Conformity index(CI) and Gamma index comparisons were performed. Results: All plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations. The doses to PTV, HI and OAR in Elekta plans were not statistically different in comparison with Varian plans, with the following exceptions: in cervical, upper and lower thoracic EC the PTV's CI, and in middle thorax EC PTV's D2, D50, V105 and PTV-average were better in Elekta plans than in Varian plans. In the cervical, upper and the middle thorax EC, treatment time were significantly decreased in Varian plans as against Elekta plans, while in the lower thoracic EC treatment time were no striking difference. MUs and gamma index were similar between the two Linac plans. Conclusion: For the the middle thorax EC Varian plans is better than Elekta plans, not only in treatment time but in the PTV dose; while for the lower thorax EC Elekta plans is the first choice for better CI; for the other part of the EC usually Elekta plans can increase the CI, while Varian plans can reduce treatment time, can be selected according to the actual situation of the patient treatment.

  6. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-08-15

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm.

  7. Ability of Kocuria varians LTH 1540 To Degrade Putrescine: Identification and Characterization of a Novel Amine Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Sara; Sendra, Ramón; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2015-04-29

    This work describes the identification and characterization of an amine oxidase from Kocuria varians LTH 1540 (syn. Micrococcus varians) primarily acting on putrescine. Data from MALDI-TOF MS/MS and the identification of Δ(1)-pyrroline as degradation product from putrescine indicate that the enzyme is a flavin-dependent putrescine oxidase (PuO). Properties of partially purified enzyme have been determined. The enzyme oxidizes diamines, putrescine and cadaverine, and, to a lesser extent, polyamines, such as spermidine, but not monoamines. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) for the two major substrates were 94 ± 10 μM and 2.3 ± 0.1 μmol/min·mg for putrescine and 75 ± 5 μM and 0.15 ± 0.02 μmol/min·mg for cadaverine. Optimal temperature and pH were 45 °C and 8.5, respectively. Enzyme was stable until 50 °C. K. varians PuO is sensitive to human flavin-dependent amine oxidase inhibitors and carboxyl-modifying compounds. The new enzyme has been isolated from a bacterial starter used in the manufacture of fermented meat. One of the problems of fermented foods or beverages is the presence of toxic biogenic amines produced by bacteria. The importance of this works lies in the description of a new enzyme able to degrade two of the most abundant biogenic amines (putrescine and cadaverine), the use of which could be envisaged to diminish biogenic amines content in foods in the future.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling of a 6 and 18 MV Varian Clinac medical accelerator for in-field and out-of-field dose calculations: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-02-21

    There is a serious and growing concern about the increased risk of radiation-induced second cancers and late tissue injuries associated with radiation treatment. To better understand and to more accurately quantify non-target organ doses due to scatter and leakage radiation from medical accelerators, a detailed Monte Carlo model of the medical linear accelerator is needed. This paper describes the development and validation of a detailed accelerator model of the Varian Clinac operating at 6 and 18 MV beam energies. Over 100 accelerator components have been defined and integrated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A series of in-field and out-of-field dose validation studies were performed. In-field dose distributions calculated using the accelerator models were tuned to match measurement data that are considered the de facto 'gold standard' for the Varian Clinac accelerator provided by the manufacturer. Field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm, 20 cm x 20 cm and 40 cm x 40 cm were considered. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the percent depth dose curve was less than 2% for all locations. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the dose profile curve was less than 2% in the plateau region and less than 2 mm in the penumbra region for all locations. Out-of-field dose profiles were calculated and compared to measurement data for both beam energies for field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm and 20 cm x 20 cm. For all field sizes considered in this study, the average local difference between calculated and measured dose for the 6 and 18 MV beams was 14 and 16%, respectively. In addition, a method for determining neutron contamination in the 18 MV operating model was validated by comparing calculated in-air neutron fluence with reported calculations and measurements. The average difference between calculated and measured neutron fluence was 20%. As one of the most detailed accelerator models for both in-field and out

  9. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PACS number(s): 87

  10. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-08

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases.

  11. Monitor backscatter factors for the Varian 21EX and TrueBeam linear accelerators: measurements and Monte Carlo modelling.

    PubMed

    Zavgorodni, Sergei; Alhakeem, Eyad; Townson, Reid

    2014-02-21

    Linac backscattered radiation (BSR) into the monitor chamber affects the chamber's signal and has to be accounted for in radiotherapy dose calculations. In Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, the BSR can be modelled explicitly and accounted for in absolute dose. However, explicit modelling of the BSR becomes impossible if treatment head geometry is not available. In this study, monitor backscatter factors (MBSFs), defined as the ratio of the charge collected in the monitor chamber for a reference field to that of a given field, have been evaluated experimentally and incorporated into MC modelling of linacs with either known or unknown treatment head geometry. A telescopic technique similar to that by Kubo (1989 Med. Phys. 16 295-98) was used. However, instead of lead slits, a 1.8 mm diameter collimator and a small (2 mm diameter) detector positioned at extended source to detector distance were used. This setup provided a field of view to the source of less than 3.1 mm and allowed for MBSF measurements of open fields from 1 × 1 to 40 × 40 cm(2). For the fields with both X and Y dimensions exceeding 15 cm, a diode detector was used. A pinpoint ionization chamber was used for smaller fields. MBSFs were also explicitly modelled in MC calculations using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes for 6 and 18 MV beams of a Varian 21EX linac. A method for deriving the D(ch)(forward) values that are used in MC absolute dose calculations was demonstrated. These values were derived from measured MBSFs for two 21EX and four TrueBeam energies. MBSFs were measured for 6 and 18 MV beams from Varian 21EX, and for 6 MV, 10 MV-FFF, 10 MV, and 15 MV beams from Varian TrueBeam linacs. For the open field sizes modelled in this study for the 21EX, the measured MBSFs agreed with MC calculated values within combined statistical (0.4%) and experimental (0.2%) uncertainties. Variation of MBSFs across field sizes was about a factor of two smaller for the TrueBeam compared to 21EX Varian linacs. Measured

  12. Factors associated with using research evidence in national sport organisations.

    PubMed

    Holt, Nicholas L; Pankow, Kurtis; Camiré, Martin; Côté, Jean; Fraser-Thomas, Jessica; MacDonald, Dany J; Strachan, Leisha; Tamminen, Katherine A

    2017-07-25

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors associated with the use of research evidence in Canadian National Sport Organisations (NSOs). Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews with 21 representatives from Canadian NSOs. A qualitative description approach was used. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to an inductive-to-deductive thematic analysis. A research implementation framework (Rycroft-Malone, 2004) was used to organise inductively derived themes into the higher-order categories of evidence (use of evidence, disconnection between research and practice), context (lack of capacity, organisational structure), and facilitation (personal connections with researchers and sport scientists, formal meetings with stakeholders). Overall, NSO representatives did not have a clear understanding of evidence and lacked capacity to access and translate research. However, some context factors, along with internal and external facilitators, were in place and could be used to enhance research implementation.

  13. Comparison of 4 MV photon surface dose among Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linear accelerators for tangential breast treatment: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Karasawa, Kumiko; Furuya, Tomohisa; Fujita, Takayuki; Tutumi, Yutaka; Miura, Kohei; Takada, Takahiro; Ito, Kana; Ozawa, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    We have compared the differences in a 4-MV photon surface dose among Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linear accelerators (linacs) with wedges for tangential breast treatment. The wedge factor and the surface dose were measured using a solid water phantom and an ion chamber for each linear accelerator with various field sizes and wedge angles. A tangential treatment plan was applied to an elliptical hollow cylinder water phantom with a radiochromic film placed thereon. A dose was delivered to a simulated target in the phantom, and the resulting dose distribution was analyzed using a film scanner. Varian's wedges resulted in the highest wedge factors, ranging from 0.37 to 0.75 depending on the wedge angles. Varian's wedges led to the highest normalized skin doses, ranging between 0.40 and 0.73 depending on the wedge angles and field sizes. In the cylinder phantom test with two tangential beams, the Varian linac provided a nearly 20% higher maximum dose than the Siemens and Elekta linacs. The Varian linac resulted in the highest surface doses, and the Elekta linac led to the lowest for nearly all the measurement conditions we employed, including open beams.

  14. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program

    SciTech Connect

    Posey Eddy, F.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program (MURA) encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In this program, undergraduate students work with principal investigators at their universities to perform research projects on solar technology. Then, students are awarded summer internships in industry or at national laboratories, such as NREL, during the summer. Because of its success, the program has been expanded to include additional minority-serving colleges and universities and all solar energy technologies.

  15. [Research advances in association between pediatric obesity and bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lian; Xu, Zhi-Liang; Cheng, Yan-Yang

    2016-07-01

    This review article introduces the research advances in the pathophysiological mechanism of obesity in inducing pediatric bronchial asthma, including the role of leptin in obesity and asthma, the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with obesity and asthma, the association of adiponectin and interleukins with obesity and asthma, and the influence of neurotransmitter on asthma. In particular, this article introduces the latest research on the inhibition of allergic asthma through targeting at the nociceptor of dorsal root ganglion and blocking the signaling pathway of the nociceptor.

  16. Interactions between Lactobacillus sakei and CNC (Staphylococcus xylosus and Kocuria varians) and their influence on proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Tremonte, P; Reale, A; Di Renzo, T; Tipaldi, L; Di Luccia, A; Coppola, R; Sorrentino, E; Succi, M

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate interactions between Lactobacillus sakei and coagulase negative cocci (CNC) (Staphylococcus xylosus and Kocuria varians) and to investigate the influence of these interactions on their own proteolytic activity. Interactions occurring between strains of Lact. sakei and CNC were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis. The growth of 35 strains of Lact. sakei, used as indicators, was compared to that obtained combining the same strains with growing cells or cell-free supernatants of 20 CNC (18 Staph. xylosus and 2 K. varians). The proteolytic activity expressed by single strains or by their combinations was assessed on sarcoplasmic protein extracts by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results evidenced that interactions are able to affect not only the growth but also the in vitro proteolytic activity of Lact. sakei and CNC used in combination. A relationship between the presence of interactions among useful strains and the strength of technological characteristics, such as proteolysis, was defined. The study highlighted that CNC are able to stimulate the growth of some Lact. sakei strains. At the same time, this interaction positively influences the proteolytic activity of strains used in combination. Given the importance of proteolysis during the ripening of fermented meats, this phenomenon should be taken into account to select meat starter cultures. © 2010 The Authors. © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Children's understanding of the risks and benefits associated with research.

    PubMed

    Burke, T M; Abramovitch, R; Zlotkin, S

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the current study was to maximise the amount of information children and adolescents understand about the risks and benefits associated with participation in a biomedical research study. Participants were presented with one of six hypothetical research protocols describing how to fix a fractured thigh using either a "standard" cast or "new" pins procedure. Risks and benefits associated with each of the treatment options were manipulated so that for each one of the six protocols there was either a correct or ambiguous choice. Two hundred and fifty one children, ages 6-15 (53% boys), and 237 adults (30% men) were interviewed while waiting for a clinic appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children. Using standardised procedures and questionnaires, it was determined that most participants, regardless of age group, were able to understand the basic purpose and procedures involved in the research, and most were able to choose the "correct" operation. The younger children, however, showed an overall preference for a cast operation, whereas the older participants were more likely to choose the pins. By creating age appropriate modules of information, children as young as six years can understand potentially difficult and complex concepts such as the risks and benefits associated with participation in biomedical research. It appears, however, that different criteria were used for treatment preference, regardless of associated risks; older participants tended to opt for mobility (the pins procedure) whereas younger participants stayed with the more familiar cast operation.

  18. Visibility of Diversity within Association of Research Libraries Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mestre, Lori S.

    2011-01-01

    Libraries in the United States have worked towards developing more inclusive environments and programs. This inclusiveness should also extend to the online library presence. This article provides results of a web page scan of all Association of Research Libraries (ARL) in the United States to document the visibility of diversity on their pages. A…

  19. Provenance research: investigation of genetic diversity associated with geography

    Treesearch

    Robert Z. Callaham

    1963-01-01

    Provenance in forestry refers to the population of trees growing at n particular place of origin. Provenance research defines the genetic and environmental components of phenotypic variation associated with geographic source. Information on provenance is important in assuring sources of seed to give well-adapted, productive trees and in directing breeding of...

  20. Research Note--Online Dissemination of Research: Are Professional Associations Making the Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borah, Elisa Vinson; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and practical means of disseminating research to social workers are needed. The authors examined how 10 social work and 10 other helping profession association websites used their sites to disseminate research to their members. A rubric was used to rate the websites in 4 domains: (1) promotion, (2) accessibility, (3) dissemination, and…

  1. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  2. Research Note--Online Dissemination of Research: Are Professional Associations Making the Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borah, Elisa Vinson; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and practical means of disseminating research to social workers are needed. The authors examined how 10 social work and 10 other helping profession association websites used their sites to disseminate research to their members. A rubric was used to rate the websites in 4 domains: (1) promotion, (2) accessibility, (3) dissemination, and…

  3. Experiencing the Full Research Process at Sea Education Association (SEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.; Joyce, P.; Jaroslow, G.; Graziano, L.; Lea, C.; Witting, J.; Bower, A.

    2003-12-01

    While some undergraduate research experiences include only a small piece of the research process, students attending Sea Education Association's SEA Semester complete all aspects of oceanographic research in an intensive 12 week program that earns a full semester's credit. In the first half of the program, students read and discuss background literature on a subject, ask questions, pose hypotheses, and develop a written research proposal, which they defend orally. The second half of the course takes place at sea on one of SEA's state-of-the-art oceanographic research vessels where students carry out their sampling plans, analyze samples and data, write a final paper and present their results before the vessel reaches port, completing the course. At sea, students participate in sample collection and analysis for all student projects in addition to learning the general oceanography along their cruise track. This structure exposes students to the realities of research from start to finish and allows them to take full ownership of their projects. In addition to honing writing, public speaking, and problem-solving skills, students learn that research requires dedication, flexibility, and creativity, particularly when their results are unexpected or negate their hypothesis. SEA's undergraduate research program has been developing since 1971. Over that time, SEA has collected an extensive historical oceanographic database in the western Atlantic and Caribbean, plus Pacific data since 2001. This database is available to both students and outside research scientists. Collaborations with scientists outside SEA enhance the student experience and help facilitate oceanographic research by providing "ship-of-opportunity" sampling in remote locations. SEA Semester provides an excellent model for undergraduate research experiences with over 5000 alumni, about 30% of whom enter graduate school. About half the students in SEA's undergraduate programs are non-science majors. Although

  4. Nursing home research: the first International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG) research conference.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves; Resnick, Barbara; Katz, Paul R; Little, Milta O; Ouslander, Joseph G; Bonner, Alice; Geary, Carol R; Schumacher, Karen L; Thompson, Sarah; Martin, Finbarr C; Wilbers, Joachim; Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, D; Schwendimann, R; Schüssler, S; Dassen, Theo; Lohrmann, Christa; Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily; de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Dilles, Tinne; Azermai, Majda; Bourgeois, Jolyce; Orrell, Martin; Grossberg, George T; Kergoat, Hélène; Thomas, David R; Visschedijk, Jan; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Handajani, Yvonne S; Widjaja, Nelly T; Turana, Yuda; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Morley, John E

    2014-05-01

    The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics held its first conference on nursing home research in St Louis, MO, in November 2013. This article provides a summary of the presentations. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-E-T-362: Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Output Factors for Varian 2300CD and the Case for a Reference Database

    SciTech Connect

    Njeh, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose inhomogeneity in treatment planning can be compensated using physical wedges. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) were introduced by Varian to overcome some of the short comings of physical wedges. The objectives of this study were to measure EDW output factors for 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies for a Varian 2300CD. Secondly to review the literature in terms of published enhanced dynamic wedge output factors (EDWOF) for different Varian models and thereby adding credence to the case of the validity of reference databases. Methods: The enhanced dynamic wedge output factors were measured for the Varian 2300CD for both 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies. Twelve papers with published EDWOF for different Varian Linac models were found in the literature. Results: The EDWOF for 6 MV varied from 0.980 for a 5×5 cm 10 degree wedge to 0.424 for 20×20 cm 60 degree wedge. Similarly for 20 MV, the EDWOF varied from 0.986 for 5×5 cm 10 degree wedge to 0.529 for 20×20 cm 60 degree wedge. EDWOF are highly dependent on field size. Comparing our results with the published mean, we found an excellent agreement for 6 MV EDWOF with the percentage differences ranging from 0.01% to 0.57% with a mean of 0.03%. The coefficient of variation of published EDWOF ranged from 0.17% to 0.85% and 0.1% to 0.9% for the for 6 MV and 18MV photon energies respectively. This paper provides the first published EDWOF for 20 MV photon energy. In addition, we have provided the first compendium of EDWOFs for different Varian linac models. Conclusion: The consistency of EDWOF across models and institution provide further support that, a standard data set of basic photon and electron dosimetry could be established, as a guide for future commissioning, beam modeling and quality assurance purposes.

  6. 75 FR 27789 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate Program SUMMARY: In... Collection: Title: Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate Program. Type of Information... Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT) Program will use the applicant and referee information to award...

  7. Sharing detailed research data is associated with increased citation rate.

    PubMed

    Piwowar, Heather A; Day, Roger S; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2007-03-21

    Sharing research data provides benefit to the general scientific community, but the benefit is less obvious for the investigator who makes his or her data available. We examined the citation history of 85 cancer microarray clinical trial publications with respect to the availability of their data. The 48% of trials with publicly available microarray data received 85% of the aggregate citations. Publicly available data was significantly (p = 0.006) associated with a 69% increase in citations, independently of journal impact factor, date of publication, and author country of origin using linear regression. This correlation between publicly available data and increased literature impact may further motivate investigators to share their detailed research data.

  8. SU-E-T-386: A Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Framework for Electron Beams On Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Sawkey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The design of the linac head is different for TrueBeam than Clinac, and there are differences in measured dose distributions in water phantoms between TrueBeam and Clinac for electron beams. Therefore, MC models for Clinac may not be applied directly to the Truebeam linac. The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation framework for electron beams on Varian TrueBeam with phase space files provided by Varian. Methods: The particle histories from the phase space file were used as input for the down-stream simulation including jaws, applicators, and water phantom. MC packages BEAMnrc/DOSYXZnrc were used. The down-stream beam components were modeled according to manufacturer specifications and the dose distributions were compared with the measured data of standard cones. The measurements were performed in a water phantom with a p-type electron field diode (diameter 0.2cm) and ion chamber (CC13). Depth dose and orthogonal profiles at depths defined by R{sub 1} {sub 0} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, Rp were compared. Results: Preliminary results for a 16 MeV phase space and 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator are presented. Simulations were run for a statistical uncertainty of <2% at depth of maximum dose for a voxel resolution of 0.5x0.5x0.2cm{sup 2}. Dose and range differences for the PDD profiles were within 2% and 1 mm, respectively. Dose differences within the central 80% of the beam width for the orthogonal profiles at depth of maximum dose were less than 2% for the 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator, respectively. Conclusion: Varian electron phase space files simulations are in agreement with measured commissioning data. These phase space files can be used in the simulation of TrueBeam linacs, and will provide reproducibility across publications. Analyses for all electron energies and standard applicators are under way and results will be included in the presentation.

  9. SU-E-T-370: Measurement of Conical Cone Output Factors for the Varian Edge Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wang, S; Zhong, H; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of detector type, SSD/depth, and intermediate reference on conical cone output factor (OF) measurements for the Varian Edge linac. Methods: OF's for 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter cones relative to 10cmx10cm field were measured for the 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies, with jaws set to 5cmx5cm. Measurements were performed with an Edge diode (0.8mmx0.8mmx0.03mm WxLxT), stereotatic diode SFD, photon diode, CC01 and pinpoint chambers (2mm diameter for both). 95cm SSD/5cm depth were used in a water tank. For the measurement with diodes, OF's were cross-referred to CC13 ion chamber measurements with 3cmx3cm field, as recommended, to help mitigate the energy variation in diode response with field size. Results were compared to the representative data from Varian measured with Edge detector. With SFD, OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth and 90cm SSD/10cm depth were also measured. Results: OF's measured with the Edge detector matched within 1.3% (max diff) with the representative data from Varian. For the SFD, OF's matched within 1.3% for the 4, 5 and 17.5 mm cones and within 3.7% for the other cones. OF's with photon diode were within 1.3% except for the 4 and 5 mm cones where they were 8.1% and 3.7%, respectively. OF's for the CC01 and pinpoint chamber deviated up to 36% and 44%, respectively for the 4 mm cone. OF's after intermediate reference with 3cmx3cm field changed by 3.7% for SFD, 0.8% for photon diode, and 0.6% for Edge detector. OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 10.8% higher than that at 95cm SSD/5cm depth, and OF's at 90cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 7.5% lower. Conclusion: OF's measured with the Edge detector appear to be reliable. CC01 and pinpoint chambers do not appear suitable for measuring the small cone OF's. SSD/depth affects OF measurements significantly.

  10. Characterization of the radiation environment at the UNLV accelerator facility during operation of the Varian M6 linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, M.; Barzilov, A.; Chen, Y.; Lowe, D.

    2016-10-01

    The bremsstrahlung photon flux from the UNLV particle accelerator (Varian M6 model) was determined using MCNP5 code for 3 MeV and 6 MeV incident electrons. Human biological equivalent dose rates due to accelerator operation were evaluated using the photon flux with the flux-to-dose conversion factors. Dose rates were computed for the accelerator facility for M6 linac use under different operating conditions. The results showed that the use of collimators and linac internal shielding significantly reduced the dose rates throughout the facility. It was shown that the walls of the facility, in addition to the earthen berm enveloping the building, provide equivalent shielding to reduce dose rates outside to below the 2 mrem/h limit.

  11. Bioconcentration of the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in the marine shrimp Palaemonetes varians: a radiotracer study.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Florent; Warnau, Michel; Oberhänsli, François; Teyssié, Jean-Louis; Temara, Ali; Rouleau, Claude; Metian, Marc

    2014-08-15

    Uptake and depuration kinetics of dissolved [(14)C]C₁₂-6-linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) were determined in the shrimp Palaemonetes varians using environmentally relevant exposure concentration. The shrimp concentrated LAS from seawater with a mean BCF value of 120 L kg(-1) after a 7-day exposure. Uptake biokinetics were best described by a saturation model, with an estimated BCFss, of 159 ± 34 L kg(-1), reached after 11.5 days. Shrimp weight influenced significantly BCF value with smaller individuals presenting higher affinity to LAS. To the light of a whole body autoradiography, major accumulation of LAS occurred in the cephalothorax circulatory system (gills, heart, hepatopancreas) and ocular peduncle, but not in the flesh, limiting potential transfer to human consumers. LAS depuration rate constant value of the shrimp was 1.18 ± 0.08 d(-1) leading to less than 1% of remaining LAS in its tissues after 8 days of depuration.

  12. Engaging patients as partners in research: Factors associated with awareness, interest, and engagement as research partners

    PubMed Central

    Hearld, Kristine R; Hearld, Larry R; Hall, Allyson G

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There is growing interest in engaging patients in healthcare research, which raises important questions about the factors that may promote such engagement. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between patient characteristics and three aspects of patient engagement in the medical research process: awareness, interest, and actual participation. Methods: Cross-sectional, bivariate analyses were employed using the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey. Results: Analyses suggest modest levels of interest among respondents engaging as patient partners in the research process (37.7% of respondents), low level of awareness of what patient engagement in research was (15.3% of respondents), and a very low level of actual participation (2.7% of respondents). Respondents of higher socioeconomic status and with more positive patient attitudes regarding their health and healthcare were more likely to be interested in research. In comparison, relatively few patient characteristics were significantly associated with patient awareness and actual participation in research. Conclusion: Although it is promising that people are interested in being engaged in research, the results suggest that there is work to be done to raise awareness of these engagement opportunities. Likewise, the gap between awareness and participation highlights opportunities to identify why patients may be reluctant to participate even when they are aware of research opportunities. PMID:28228949

  13. SU-E-T-405: Evaluation of the Raystation Electron Monte Carlo Algorithm for Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sansourekidou, P; Allen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the Raystation v4.51 Electron Monte Carlo algorithm for Varian Trilogy, IX and 2100 series linear accelerators and commission for clinical use. Methods: Seventy two water and forty air scans were acquired with a water tank in the form of profiles and depth doses, as requested by vendor. Data was imported into Rayphysics beam modeling module. Energy spectrum was modeled using seven parameters. Contamination photons were modeled using five parameters. Source phase space was modeled using six parameters. Calculations were performed in clinical version 4.51 and percent depth dose curves and profiles were extracted to be compared to water tank measurements. Sensitivity tests were performed for all parameters. Grid size and particle histories were evaluated per energy for statistical uncertainty performance. Results: Model accuracy for air profiles is poor in the shoulder and penumbra region. However, model accuracy for water scans is acceptable. All energies and cones are within 2%/2mm for 90% of the points evaluated. Source phase space parameters have a cumulative effect. To achieve distributions with satisfactory smoothness level a 0.1cm grid and 3,000,000 particle histories were used for commissioning calculations. Calculation time was approximately 3 hours per energy. Conclusion: Raystation electron Monte Carlo is acceptable for clinical use for the Varian accelerators listed. Results are inferior to Elekta Electron Monte Carlo modeling. Known issues were reported to Raysearch and will be resolved in upcoming releases. Auto-modeling is limited to open cone depth dose curves and needs expansion.

  14. A Monte Carlo model for calculating out-of-field dose from a varian 6 MV beam.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Pönisch, Falk; Followill, David; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Mohan, Radhe; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2006-11-01

    Dose to the patient outside of the treatment field is important when evaluating the outcome of radiotherapy treatments. However, determining out-of-field doses for any particular treatment plan currently requires either time-consuming measurements or calculated estimations that may be highly uncertain. A Monte Carlo model may allow these doses to be determined quickly, accurately, and with a great degree of flexibility. MCNPX was used to create a Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator head operated at 6 MV. Simulations of the dose out-of-field were made and measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom and with an ion chamber in a water tank to validate the Monte Carlo model. Although local differences between the out-of-field doses calculated by the model and those measured did exceed 50% at some points far from the treatment field, the average local difference was only 16%. This included a range of doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose, and at distances in excess of 50 cm from the central axis of the treatment field. The out-of-field dose was found to vary with field size and distance from the central axis, but was almost independent of the depth in the phantom except where the dose increased substantially at depths less than dmax. The relationship between dose and kerma was also investigated, and kerma was found to be a good estimate of dose (within 3% on average) except near the surface and in the field penumbra. Our Monte Carlo model was found to well represent typical Varian 2100 accelerators operated at 6 MV.

  15. SU-E-T-245: Detection of the Photon Target Damage in Varian Linac Based On Periodical Quality Assurance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, S; Balter, P; Wang, X; Sadagopan, R; Pollard, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the best dosimetric metric measured by our routine QA devices for diagnosing photon target failure on a Varian C-series linac. Methods: We have retrospectively reviewed and analyzed the dosimetry data from a Varian linac with a target degradation that was undiagnosed for one year. A failure in the daily QA symmetry tests was the first indication of an issue. The beam was steered back to a symmetric shape and water scans indicated the beam energy had changed but stayed within the manufacturer’s specifications and agreed reasonably with our treatment planning system data. After the problem was identified and the target was replaced, we retrospectively analyzed our QA data including diagonals normalized flatness (F-DN) from the daily device (DQA3), profiles from an ionization chamber array (IC Profiler), as well as profiles and PDDs from a 3D water Scanner (3DS). These metrics were cross-compared to determine which was the best early indicator of target degradation. Results: A 3% change in FDN measured by the DQA3 was found to be an early indicator of target degradation. It is more sensitive than changes in output, symmetry, flatness or PDD. All beam shape metrics (flatness at dmax and 10 cm depth, and F-DN) indicated an energy increase while the PDD indicated an energy decrease. This disagreement between the beam-shape based energy metrics (F-DN and flatness) and PDD based energy metric may indicate target failure as opposed to an energy change resulting from changes in the incident electron energy. Conclusion: Photon target degradation has been identified as a failure mode for linacs. The manufacturer’s test for this condition is highly invasive and requires machine down time. We have demonstrated that the condition could be caught early based upon data acquired during routine QA activities, such as the F-DN.

  16. Affirming our commitment to research: the Medical Library Association's research policy statement: the process and findings.

    PubMed

    Grefsheim, Suzanne F; Rankin, Jocelyn A; Perry, Gerald J; McKibbon, K Ann

    2008-04-01

    Building on its 1995 research policy statement, the Medical Library Association (MLA) has issued a new research policy, The Research Imperative. This paper shares the background research that informed the new policy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifty-one key informants representing various library types, functions, geographic locations, ages, and ethnicities. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze the resulting textual database. Additionally, to gather input from the membership as a whole, two open forums were held at MLA annual meetings. Key informant data indicated that the policy should provide roles for MLA in leadership, advocacy, collaboration, services, education, publishing, and development of a research agenda. Evidence-based library and information practice was emphasized. Six themes emerged to center the new policy: creation of a research culture, challenges, domains of research, research skills set, roles of stakeholders, and measurement of progress. Reflecting the interests and beliefs of the membership, The Research Imperative challenges MLA members to build a supportive culture that values and contributes to a research base that is recognized as an essential tool for future practice.

  17. Affirming our commitment to research: the Medical Library Association's research policy statement: the process and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Grefsheim, Suzanne F.; Rankin, Jocelyn A.; Perry, Gerald J.; McKibbon, K. Ann

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Building on its 1995 research policy statement, the Medical Library Association (MLA) has issued a new research policy, The Research Imperative. This paper shares the background research that informed the new policy. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifty-one key informants representing various library types, functions, geographic locations, ages, and ethnicities. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze the resulting textual database. Additionally, to gather input from the membership as a whole, two open forums were held at MLA annual meetings. Results: Key informant data indicated that the policy should provide roles for MLA in leadership, advocacy, collaboration, services, education, publishing, and development of a research agenda. Evidence-based library and information practice was emphasized. Six themes emerged to center the new policy: creation of a research culture, challenges, domains of research, research skills set, roles of stakeholders, and measurement of progress. Conclusion: Reflecting the interests and beliefs of the membership, The Research Imperative challenges MLA members to build a supportive culture that values and contributes to a research base that is recognized as an essential tool for future practice. PMID:18379666

  18. Funding healthcare-associated infection research: a systematic analysis of UK research investments, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Holmes, A H; Atun, R

    2014-06-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) are a cause of high health and economic burden in the UK. The number of HCAI research studies funded in the UK, and the associated amount of investment, has not previously been analysed. To assess the level of research funding awarded to UK institutions for HCAI research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of HCAIs. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on how infectious disease research studies were funded for the period 1997-2010. Studies specifically related to HCAI research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease, and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall dataset included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £57.7 million was clearly directed towards HCAI research across 297 studies (2.2% of total spend, 2.1% of total studies). Of the HCAI-related projects, 45 studies had a specific focus on MRSA (£10.3 million), 14 towards Clostridium difficile (£10.7 million), two towards pneumonia (£0.3 million) and 103 studies related to surgical infections (£14.1 million). Mean and median study funding was £194,129 (standard deviation: £429,723) and £52,684 (interquartile range: £9,168 to £201,658) respectively. Award size ranged from £108 to £50.0 million. Research investment for HCAIs has gradually increased in the study period, but remains low due to the health, economic, and social burden of HCAI. Research for hospital-acquired pneumonia, behavioural interventions, economic analyses, and research on emerging pathogens exhibiting antimicrobial resistance remain underfunded. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Female sex pheromone and male behavioral responses of the bombycid moth Trilocha varians: comparison with those of the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimon, Takaaki; Fujii, Takeshi; Yago, Masaya; Hsu, Yu-Feng; Nakajima, Yumiko; Fujii, Tsuguru; Katsuma, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shimada, Toru

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of female sex pheromone components and subsequent field trap experiments demonstrated that the bombycid moth Trilocha varians uses a mixture of ( E, Z)-10,12-hexadecadienal (bombykal) and ( E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienyl acetate (bombykyl acetate) as a sex pheromone. Both of these components are derivatives of ( E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol), the sex pheromone of the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori. This finding prompted us to compare the antennal and behavioral responses of T. varians and B. mori to bombykol, bombykal, and bombykyl acetate in detail. The antennae of T. varians males responded to bombykal and bombykyl acetate but not to bombykol, and males were attracted only when lures contained both bombykal and bombykyl acetate. In contrast, the antennae of B. mori males responded to all the three components. Behavioral analysis showed that B. mori males responded to neither bombykal nor bombykyl acetate. Meanwhile, the wing fluttering response of B. mori males to bombykol was strongly inhibited by bombykal and bombykyl acetate, thereby indicating that bombykal and bombykyl acetate act as behavioral antagonists for B. mori males. T. varians would serve as a reference species for B. mori in future investigations into the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of sex pheromone communication systems in bombycid moths.

  20. Cancer and leukemia group B clinical research associates committee.

    PubMed

    Price, Kandie C; Barrett, Barbara K; Roark, Jean M

    2006-06-01

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B is dedicated to developing and implementing training programs that will enhance the skills and abilities of Clinical Research Associates (CRA) involved in all aspects of data collection and research. Training programs not only improve overall knowledge and professionalism but also improve the integrity of study data. The CRA roles and responsibilities include the following: collect, analyze, and monitor data; collaborate with other members of the health care team; insure regulatory mandates are followed; manage the care of research participants; assist in the recruitment and enrollment of human subjects; protect subjects rights by adhering to Institutional Review Board guidelines, the Code of Federal Regulations; prepare and submit timely adverse event experience reports; maintain case report forms and drug accountability records; educate other health care professionals, patients, and families regarding clinical trials; participate in research audits; and function as a team member with the research team. In addition, CRAs may also be responsible for writing reports, grant, and budget development and the development of protocols, forms, and informed consent documents.

  1. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    hours). The scripting also allowed for creation of the files in advance without requiring access to TPS. The API scripting functionality enabled efficient creation/mining of TPS data. Finally, automation reduces the potential for human error in entering linac values at the machine console,and the script provides a log of measurements acquired for each session. This research was supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.

  2. Benefits associated with nutrigenomics research and their reporting in the scientific literature: researchers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stenne, R; Hurlimann, T; Godard, B

    2013-01-01

    Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics (NGx) are fields of research that have raised significant expectations about their potential benefits. This article presents empirical data from an online survey seeking the opinions of NGx researchers (n=126) regarding the achievability of the potential benefits of NGx, the time envisioned for their realization, the motives that may lead to their explicit mention in scientific peer-reviewed articles and the audience(s) targeted by NGx researchers when reporting their results in such articles. Results show that caution should be taken to avoid the risks associated with biohype and the premature dissemination of the potential benefits of NGx among various audiences.

  3. Safe bunker designing for the 18 MV Varian 2100 Clinac: a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation based upon data and new protocol recommendations.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Manije; Afarande, Fatemeh; Ghiasi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two bunkers designed by only protocols recommendations and Monte Carlo (MC) based upon data derived for an 18 MV Varian 2100Clinac accelerator. High energy radiation therapy is associated with fast and thermal photoneutrons. Adequate shielding against the contaminant neutron has been recommended by IAEA and NCRP new protocols. The latest protocols released by the IAEA (safety report No. 47) and NCRP report No. 151 were used for the bunker designing calculations. MC method based upon data was also derived. Two bunkers using protocols and MC upon data were designed and discussed. From designed door's thickness, the door designed by the MC simulation and Wu-McGinley analytical method was closer in both BPE and lead thickness. In the case of the primary and secondary barriers, MC simulation resulted in 440.11 mm for the ordinary concrete, total concrete thickness of 1709 mm was required. Calculating the same parameters value with the recommended analytical methods resulted in 1762 mm for the required thickness using 445 mm as recommended by TVL for the concrete. Additionally, for the secondary barrier the thickness of 752.05 mm was obtained. Our results showed MC simulation and the followed protocols recommendations in dose calculation are in good agreement in the radiation contamination dose calculation. Difference between the two analytical and MC simulation methods revealed that the application of only one method for the bunker design may lead to underestimation or overestimation in dose and shielding calculations.

  4. Safe bunker designing for the 18 MV Varian 2100 Clinac: a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation based upon data and new protocol recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Manije; Afarande, Fatemeh; Ghiasi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to compare two bunkers designed by only protocols recommendations and Monte Carlo (MC) based upon data derived for an 18 MV Varian 2100Clinac accelerator. Background High energy radiation therapy is associated with fast and thermal photoneutrons. Adequate shielding against the contaminant neutron has been recommended by IAEA and NCRP new protocols. Materials and methods The latest protocols released by the IAEA (safety report No. 47) and NCRP report No. 151 were used for the bunker designing calculations. MC method based upon data was also derived. Two bunkers using protocols and MC upon data were designed and discussed. Results From designed door's thickness, the door designed by the MC simulation and Wu–McGinley analytical method was closer in both BPE and lead thickness. In the case of the primary and secondary barriers, MC simulation resulted in 440.11 mm for the ordinary concrete, total concrete thickness of 1709 mm was required. Calculating the same parameters value with the recommended analytical methods resulted in 1762 mm for the required thickness using 445 mm as recommended by TVL for the concrete. Additionally, for the secondary barrier the thickness of 752.05 mm was obtained. Conclusion Our results showed MC simulation and the followed protocols recommendations in dose calculation are in good agreement in the radiation contamination dose calculation. Difference between the two analytical and MC simulation methods revealed that the application of only one method for the bunker design may lead to underestimation or overestimation in dose and shielding calculations. PMID:26900357

  5. Efficacy evaluation of retrospectively applying the Varian normal breathing predictive filter for volume definition and artifact reduction in 4D CT lung patients.

    PubMed

    Malone, Ciaran; Rock, Luke; Skourou, Christina

    2014-05-08

    Phase-based sorting of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) datasets is prone to image artifacts due to patient's breathing irregularities that occur during the image acquisition. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the Varian normal breathing predictive filter (NBPF) as a retrospective phase-sorting parameter in 4D CT. Ten 4D CT lung cancer datasets were obtained. The volumes of all tumors present, as well as the total lung volume, were calculated on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images as well as each individual phase image. The NBPF was varied retrospectively within the available range, and changes in volume and image quality were recorded. The patients' breathing trace was analysed and the magnitude and location of any breathing irregularities were correlated to the behavior of the NBPF. The NBPF was found to have a considerable effect on the quality of the images in MIP and single-phase datasets. When used appropriately, the NBPF is shown to have the ability to account for and correct image artifacts. However, when turned off (0%) or set above a critical level (approximately 40%), it resulted in erroneous volume reconstructions with variations in tumor volume up to 26.6%. Those phases associated with peak inspiration were found to be more susceptible to changes in the NBPF. The NBPF settings selected prior to exporting the breathing trace for patients evaluated using 4D CT directly affect the accuracy of the targeting and volume estimation of lung tumors. Recommendations are made to address potential errors in patient anatomy introduced by breathing irregularities, specifically deep breath or cough irregularities, by implementing the proper settings and use of this tool.

  6. Sharing Detailed Research Data Is Associated with Increased Citation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.; Day, Roger S.; Fridsma, Douglas B.

    2007-01-01

    Background Sharing research data provides benefit to the general scientific community, but the benefit is less obvious for the investigator who makes his or her data available. Principal Findings We examined the citation history of 85 cancer microarray clinical trial publications with respect to the availability of their data. The 48% of trials with publicly available microarray data received 85% of the aggregate citations. Publicly available data was significantly (p = 0.006) associated with a 69% increase in citations, independently of journal impact factor, date of publication, and author country of origin using linear regression. Significance This correlation between publicly available data and increased literature impact may further motivate investigators to share their detailed research data. PMID:17375194

  7. The International Permafrost Association: current initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Lewkowicz, Antoni G.; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Lantuit, Hugues; Schrott, Lothar; Sergeev, Dimitry; Wei, Ma

    2015-04-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details the IPA core products, achievements and activities as well as current projects in cryospheric research. One of the most important core products is the circumpolar permafrost map. The IPA also fosters and supports the activities of the Global Terrestrial Network on Permafrost (GTN-P) sponsored by the Global Terrestrial Observing System, GTOS, and the Global Climate Observing System, GCOS, whose long-term goal is to obtain a comprehensive view of the spatial structure, trends, and variability of changes in the active layer thickness and permafrost temperature. A further important initiative of the IPA are the biannually competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Current IPA Action Groups are working on highly topical and interdisciplinary issues, such as the development of a regional Palaeo-map of Permafrost in Eurasia, the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge about the use of thermokarst and permafrost

  8. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John W.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2002-01-01

    This section includes reports from the American Library Association, Association of American Publishers, American Booksellers Association, Association of Research Libraries, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and Council on Library and Information Resources. (LRW)

  9. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John W.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2002-01-01

    This section includes reports from the American Library Association, Association of American Publishers, American Booksellers Association, Association of Research Libraries, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and Council on Library and Information Resources. (LRW)

  10. Association of a Biweekly Research Workgroup With Enhanced Resident Research Productivity.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Melissa; Reynolds, R Kevin; Uppal, Shitanshu; McLean, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Almost all residency programs require a resident research project, yet teaching and mentoring of the required skills are often lacking. We established an every-other-week gynecologic oncology research workgroup at our institution for obstetrics and gynecology faculty, fellows, and residents with the goal of increasing resident research education, involvement, and productivity. An informal, discussion-style format was adopted as a forum for brainstorming research ideas, formulating study protocols, and collaborating on institutional review board submissions. Additional aims included editorial feedback on abstracts and manuscripts as well as oral presentation preparation. The academic productivity of trainees mentored by the gynecologic oncology division was queried for 27 months before and 27 months after workgroup initiation, specifically assessing resident involvement in institutional review board submission, abstract presentation, and manuscript preparation. Institution of our workgroup was associated with a dramatic increase in resident research output, including manuscript preparation and presentations at national meetings. We describe our experience because it may benefit other residency programs wishing to improve both resident research education and productivity.

  11. A Varian DynaLog file-based procedure for patient dose-volume histogram-based IMRT QA.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ortega, Juan F; Teke, Tony; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, we describe a method based on the analysis of the dynamic MLC log files (DynaLog) generated by the controller of a Varian linear accelerator in order to perform patient-specific IMRT QA. The DynaLog files of a Varian Millennium MLC, recorded during an IMRT treatment, can be processed using a MATLAB-based code in order to generate the actual fluence for each beam and so recalculate the actual patient dose distribution using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The accuracy of the DynaLog-based dose reconstruction procedure was assessed by introducing ten intended errors to perturb the fluence of the beams of a reference plan such that ten subsequent erroneous plans were generated. In-phantom measurements with an ionization chamber (ion chamber) and planar dose measurements using an EPID system were performed to investigate the correlation between the measured dose changes and the expected ones detected by the reconstructed plans for the ten intended erroneous cases. Moreover, the method was applied to 20 cases of clinical plans for different locations (prostate, lung, breast, and head and neck). A dose-volume histogram (DVH) metric was used to evaluate the impact of the delivery errors in terms of dose to the patient. The ionometric measurements revealed a significant positive correlation (R2=0.9993) between the variations of the dose induced in the erroneous plans with respect to the reference plan and the corresponding changes indicated by the DynaLog-based reconstructed plans. The EPID measurements showed that the accuracy of the DynaLog-based method to reconstruct the beam fluence was comparable with the dosimetric resolution of the portal dosimetry used in this work (3%/3 mm). The DynaLog-based reconstruction method described in this study is a suitable tool to perform a patient-specific IMRT QA. This method allows us to perform patient-specific IMRT QA by evaluating the result based on the DVH metric of the planning CT image (patient

  12. A Varian DynaLog file-based procedure for patient dose-volume histogram-based IMRT QA.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ortega, Juan F; Teke, Tony; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals-Farran, Joan

    2014-03-06

    In the present study, we describe a method based on the analysis of the dynamic MLC log files (DynaLog) generated by the controller of a Varian linear accelerator in order to perform patient-specific IMRT QA. The DynaLog files of a Varian Millennium MLC, recorded during an IMRT treatment, can be processed using a MATLAB-based code in order to generate the actual fluence for each beam and so recalculate the actual patient dose distribution using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The accuracy of the DynaLog-based dose reconstruction procedure was assessed by introducing ten intended errors to perturb the fluence of the beams of a reference plan such that ten subsequent erroneous plans were generated. In-phantom measurements with an ionization chamber (ion chamber) and planar dose measurements using an EPID system were performed to investigate the correlation between the measured dose changes and the expected ones detected by the reconstructed plans for the ten intended erroneous cases. Moreover, the method was applied to 20 cases of clinical plans for different locations (prostate, lung, breast, and head and neck). A dose-volume histogram (DVH) metric was used to evaluate the impact of the delivery errors in terms of dose to the patient. The ionometric measurements revealed a significant positive correlation (R² = 0.9993) between the variations of the dose induced in the erroneous plans with respect to the reference plan and the corresponding changes indicated by the DynaLog-based reconstructed plans. The EPID measurements showed that the accuracy of the DynaLog-based method to reconstruct the beam fluence was comparable with the dosimetric resolution of the portal dosimetry used in this work (3%/3 mm). The DynaLog-based reconstruction method described in this study is a suitable tool to perform a patient-specific IMRT QA. This method allows us to perform patient-specific IMRT QA by evaluating the result based on the DVH metric of the planning CT image (patient

  13. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  14. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  15. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data.

    PubMed

    Kerns, James R; Followill, David S; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A; Stingo, Francesco C; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student's t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist's acquired values. Acquired values that are well outside the expected distribution should be

  16. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  17. Public sharing of research datasets: a pilot study of associations

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.; Chapman, Wendy W.

    2010-01-01

    The public sharing of primary research datasets potentially benefits the research community but is not yet common practice. In this pilot study, we analyzed whether data sharing frequency was associated with funder and publisher requirements, journal impact factor, or investigator experience and impact. Across 397 recent biomedical microarray studies, we found investigators were more likely to publicly share their raw dataset when their study was published in a high-impact journal and when the first or last authors had high levels of career experience and impact. We estimate the USA’s National Institutes of Health (NIH) data sharing policy applied to 19% of the studies in our cohort; being subject to the NIH data sharing plan requirement was not found to correlate with increased data sharing behavior in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Studies published in journals that required a database submission accession number as a condition of publication were more likely to share their data, but this trend was not statistically significant. These early results will inform our ongoing larger analysis, and hopefully contribute to the development of more effective data sharing initiatives. PMID:21339841

  18. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. P.; Thatje, S.; Cottin, D.; Oliphant, A.; Brown, A.; Shillito, B.; Ravaux, J.; Hauton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms’ thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts PMID:26716003

  19. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians.

    PubMed

    Morris, J P; Thatje, S; Cottin, D; Oliphant, A; Brown, A; Shillito, B; Ravaux, J; Hauton, C

    2015-11-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms' thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts.

  20. Improvement of Varian a-Si EPID dosimetry measurements using a lead-shielded support-arm

    SciTech Connect

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-07-01

    Dosimetry measurements with Varian amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) are affected by the backscattered radiation from the EPID support arm. In this study, the nonuniform backscatter from an E-type support arm was reduced by fixing a thick (12.2 Multiplication-Sign 10.5 Multiplication-Sign 0.5 cm{sup 3}) piece of lead on top of the arm, and the remaining backscatter was modeled and included in an existing dose prediction algorithm. The applied backscatter kernel was the average of kernels on different regions of the EPID over the arm. The lead-shielded arm reduced the nonuniform backscatter component by about 50% for field sizes ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 to 30 Multiplication-Sign 30 cm{sup 2} and the field symmetry improved for medium to large fields up to 3%. Gamma evaluation of the measured and modeled doses (2%, 2-mm criteria) showed that using the lead-shielded arm in the model increased the number of points with Gamma index <1 by 5.7% and decreased the mean Gamma by 0.201. Even using the lead alone (no modeling) could increase the number of points with Gamma index <1 by 4.7% and decrease the mean Gamma by 0.153. This is a simple and easy method to decrease the nonuniform arm backscatter and improve the accuracy of dosimetry measurements with the existing EPIDs used for clinical applications.

  1. Varian 2100C/D Clinac 18 MV photon phase space file characterization and modeling by using MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, Ahad Ollah

    2015-07-01

    Multiple points and a spatial mesh based surface source model (MPSMBSS) was generated for 18MV Varian 2100 C/D Clinac phase space file (PSF) and implemented in MCNP code. The generated source model (SM) was benchmarked against PSF and measurements. PDDs and profiles were calculated using the SM and original PSF for different field sizes from 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm2. Agreement was within 2% of the maximum dose at 100cm SSD for beam profiles at the depths of 4cm and 15cm with respect to the original PSF. Differences between measured and calculated points were less than 2% of the maximum dose or 2mm distance to agreement (DTA) at 100 cm SSD. Thus it can be concluded that the modified MCNP code can be used for radiotherapy calculations including multiple source model (MSM) and using the source biasing capability of MPSMBSS can increase the simulation speed up to 3600 for field sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm2.

  2. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  3. Supporting medical education research quality: the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical Education Research Certificate program.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D; Yoder, Ernie; Frye, Ann; Perkowski, Linda C; Mavis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the medical education research (MER) reported in the literature has been frequently criticized. Numerous reasons have been provided for these shortcomings, including the level of research training and experience of many medical school faculty. The faculty development required to improve MER can take various forms. This article describes the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program, a national faculty development program that focuses exclusively on MER. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and led by a committee of established medical education researchers from across the United States, the MERC program is built on a set of 11 interactive workshops offered at various times and places across the United States. MERC participants can customize the program by selecting six workshops from this set to fulfill requirements for certification. This article describes the history, operations, current organization, and evaluation of the program. Key elements of the program's success include alignment of program content and focus with needs identified by prospective users, flexibility in program organization and logistics to fit participant schedules, an emphasis on practical application of MER principles in the context of the participants' activities and interests, consistency in program content and format to ensure standards of quality, and a sustainable financial model. The relationship between the national MERC program and local faculty development initiatives is also described. The success of the MERC program suggests that it may be a possible model for nationally disseminated faculty development programs in other domains.

  4. Validation of Monte Carlo simulation of 6 MV photon beam produced by Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator using BEAMnrc code and DOSXYZnrc code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, Mohamed; Maghnouj, Abdelmajid; Tajmouati, Jaouad; Didi, Abdessamad; Ezzati, Ahad Olah

    2017-09-01

    The Monte Carlo model for the photon-beam output from the Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator was validated to compare the calculated to measured PDD and beam dose profiles The Monte Carlo calculation method is considered to be the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to build a Monte Carlo geometry of Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator as realistically as possible. The Monte Carlo codes used in this work were the BEAMnrc code to simulate the photons beam and the DOSXYZnrc code to examinate the absorbed dose in the water phantom. We have calculated percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles of the 6 MV photon beam for the 6 × 6 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field sizes. We have used the gamma index technique for the quantitative evaluation to compare the measured and calculated distributions. Good agreement was found between calculated PDD and beam profile compared to measured data. The comparison was evaluated using the gamma index method and the criterions were 3% for dose difference and 3 mm for distance to agreement. The gamma index acceptance rate was more than 97% of both distribution comparisons PDDs and dose profiles and our results were more developed and accurate. The Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator was accurately modeled using Monte Carlo codes: BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes package.

  5. Factors associated with survey response in hand surgery research.

    PubMed

    Bot, Arjan G J; Anderson, Jade A; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ring, David

    2013-10-01

    A low response rate is believed to decrease the validity of survey studies. Factors associated with nonresponse to surveys are poorly characterized in orthopaedic research. This study addressed whether (1) psychologic factors; (2) demographics; (3) illness-related factors; and (4) pain are predictors of a lower likelihood of a patient returning a mailed survey. One hundred four adult, new or return patients completed questionnaires including the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression scale, Short Health Anxiety Index, demographics, and a pain scale (0-10) during a routine visit to a hand and upper extremity surgeon. Of these patients, 38% had undergone surgery and the remainder was seen for various other conditions. Six months after their visit, patients were mailed the DASH questionnaire and a scale to rate their satisfaction with the visit (0-10). Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine risk factors for being a nonresponder to the followup of this study. The cohort consisted of 57 women and 47 men with a mean age of 51 years with various diagnoses. Thirty-five patients (34%) returned the questionnaire. Responders were satisfied with their visit (mean satisfaction, 8.7) and had a DASH score of 9.6. Compared with patients who returned the questionnaires, nonresponders had higher pain catastrophizing scores, were younger, more frequently male, and had more pain at enrollment. In logistic regression, male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.6), pain (OR, 1.3), and younger age (OR, 1.03) were associated with not returning the questionnaire. Survey studies should be interpreted in light of the fact that patients who do not return questionnaires in a hand surgery practice differ from patients who do return them. Hand surgery studies that rely on questionnaire evaluation remote from study enrollment should include tactics to improve the response of younger, male patients with more pain. Level II, prognostic study. See

  6. Landfalling Tropical Cyclones: Forecast Problems and Associated Research Opportunities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, F.D.; Shay, L.K.; Barnes, G.; Black, P.; Demaria, M.; McCaul, B.; Mounari, J.; Montgomery, M.; Powell, M.; Smith, J.D.; Tuleya, B.; Tripoli, G.; Xie, Lingtian; Zehr, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Fifth Prospectus Development Team of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged to identify and delineate emerging research opportunities relevant to the prediction of local weather, flooding, and coastal ocean currents associated with landfalling U.S. hurricanes specifically, and tropical cyclones in general. Central to this theme are basic and applied research topics, including rapid intensity change, initialization of and parameterization in dynamical models, coupling of atmospheric and oceanic models, quantitative use of satellite information, and mobile observing strategies to acquire observations to evaluate and validate predictive models. To improve the necessary understanding of physical processes and provide the initial conditions for realistic predictions, a focused, comprehensive mobile observing system in a translating storm-coordinate system is required. Given the development of proven instrumentation and improvement of existing systems, three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic datasets need to be acquired whenever major hurricanes threaten the United States. The spatial context of these focused three-dimensional datasets over the storm scales is provided by satellites, aircraft, expendable probes released from aircraft, and coastal (both fixed and mobile), moored, and drifting surface platforms. To take full advantage of these new observations, techniques need to be developed to objectively analyze these observations, and initialize models aimed at improving prediction of hurricane track and intensity from global-scale to mesoscale dynamical models. Multinested models allow prediction of all scales from the global, which determine long- term hurricane motion to the convective scale, which affect intensity. Development of an integrated analysis and model forecast system optimizing the use of three-dimensional observations and providing the necessary forecast skill on all relevant spatial scales is required. Detailed diagnostic analyses of these

  7. SU-F-BRE-10: Methods to Simulate and Measure the Attenuation for Modeling a Couch Top with Rails for FFF Treatment Delivery On the Varian Edge Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gulam, M; Gardner, S; Zhao, B; Snyder, K; Song, K; Li, H; Gordon, J; Wen, N; Chetty, I; Kearns, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To measure attenuation for modelling of the KVue Couchtop for 6X and 10X FFF SRS/SBRT treatment Methods: Treatment planning simulation studies were done using 6X FFF beams to estimate the dosimetric impact of KVue couchtops (including the Q-Fix IGRT [carbon fiber] and Calypso [nonconductive Kevlar material]) with a structure model obtained from a research workstation (Eclipse, advanced planning interface (API) v13). Prior to installation on the Varian Edge linac, the couchtop along with (Kevlar) rails were CT scanned with the rails at various positions. An additional scan with the couchtop 15cm above the CT table top was obtained with 20cm solid water to facilitate precised/indexed data acquisition. Measurements for attenuation were obtained for field sizes of 2, 4 and 10 cm{sup 2} at 42 gantry angles including 6 pairs of opposing fields and other angles for oblique delivery where the beams traversed the couchtop and or rails. The delivery was fully automated with xml scripts running in developer mode. The results were then used to determine an accurate structure model for AAA (Eclipse v11) planning of IMRT and RapidArc delivery. Results: The planning simulation relative dose attenuation for oblique entry was not significantly different than the Exact IGRT or BrainLab iBeam couch except that the rails added 6% additional attenuation. The relative attenuation measurements for PA, PA (rails: inner position), oblique, oblique (rails: outer position), oblique (rails: inner position) were: −2.0%, −2.5%, −15.6%, −2.5%, −5.0% for 6X FFF and −1.4%, −1.5%, −12.2%, − 2.5%, −5.0% for 10X FFF with slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. A Couch structure model (with HU values) was developed. Calculation compared to measurement showed good agreement except for oblique (rails: outer position) where differences approached a magnitude of 6%. Conclusion: A model of the couch structures has been developed accounting for attenuation for FFF

  8. 15 CFR 256.6 - Information concerning the Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Information concerning the Research... Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.6 Information concerning the Research...

  9. 15 CFR 256.6 - Information concerning the Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information concerning the Research... Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.6 Information concerning the Research...

  10. 15 CFR 256.6 - Information concerning the Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Information concerning the Research... Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.6 Information concerning the Research...

  11. 15 CFR 256.6 - Information concerning the Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Information concerning the Research... Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.6 Information concerning the Research...

  12. 15 CFR 256.6 - Information concerning the Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Information concerning the Research... Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.6 Information concerning the Research...

  13. SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, P; Wui Ann, W; Lim, Y

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In general, the linear accelerator is gated using respiratory signal obtained by way of external sensors to account for the breathing motion during radiotherapy. One of the commonly used gating devices is the Varian RPM device. Calypso system that uses electromagnetic tracking of implanted or surface transponders could also be used for gating. The aim of this study is to compare the gating efficiency of RPM device and the calypso system by phantom studies. Methods: An ArcCheck insert was used as the phantom with a Gafchromic film placed in its holder. The ArcCheck insert was placed on a Motion Sim platform and moved in the longitudinal direction simulating a respiratory motion with a period of 5 seconds and amplitude of ±6mm. The Gafchromic film was exposed to a 2 × 2cm{sup 2} field, i) with the phantom static, ii) phantom moving but ungated iii) gated with gating window of 2mm and 3mm. This was repeated with Calypso system using surface transponders with the same gating window. The Gafchromic films were read with an EPSON 11000 flatbed scanner and analysed with ‘Medphysto’ software. Results: The full width at half maximum (FWHM) as measured with film at the level of the film holder was 1.65cm when the phantom was static. FWHM measured with phantom moving and without gating was 1.16 cm and penumbra was 7 mm (80–20%) on both sides. When the beam was gated with 2 mm gating window the FWHM was 1.8 cm with RPM device and 1.9 cm with Calypso. Similarly, when the beam was gated with 3 mm window, the FWHM was 1.9cm with RPM device and 2cm with Calypso. Conclusion: This work suggests that the gating efficiency of RPM device is better than that of the Calypso with surface transponder, with reference to the latency in gating.

  14. SU-F-P-34: Commission of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge of Varian Truebeam Linac System with Feature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K; Able, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate an Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) as part of machine commission process with feature study. Methods: The EDW system in this study was from a Truebeam, which is the Linear accelerator manufactured by Varian Medical Systems. The EDW feature vectors includes selected elements. These elements were dosimetric output spots check, field size, wedge angles, dose rate, collimator orientation, and different energy settings. Point dose measurement was done by a PTW farmer chamber, and profiles were measured by Gafchromic EBT2 films positing at different depths of the Solidwater based on the study elements. The output spot measurements were done with PTW farmer chamber with Solidwater setting for all orientation and wedge angles in the EDW system. The profiles comparisons were done by IMRT measurement function in RIT software at version 6.3. And the films were scanned by Vidar scanner. Dosimetry calculation were done by using the same Solidwater scanned by GE LightSpeed CT in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS). Then measurements were compared to simulation results in TPS. Results: The energy average percentage difference between chamber measurement and TPS was 0.16% with standard deviation (SD) at 0.93%. For selected features, the average percentage difference between film measurement and computation was 0.93% with SD at 1.55% in horizontal profiles, and 1.18% with SD at 0.98% at vertical profiles. The average gamma difference for film measurement and TPS computing results was at 0.924 with SD at 0.314. Conclusion: A feature vector was developed to describe the commission of EDW, and developing a complete set of features for sufficiency of commission of a LINAC function could provide optimal commission instance with acceptable confident level of clinical application of the machine. Given the institution specific vector pattern and big data process, it could provide wide range clinical outcome comparison information in application of EDW.

  15. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the Research...

  16. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the Research...

  17. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the Research...

  18. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the Research...

  19. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the Research...

  20. Sea Education Association's sailing research vessels as innovative platforms for long-term research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, P.; Carruthers, E. A.; Engels, M.; Goodwin, D.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Lea, C.; Schell, J.; Siuda, A.; Witting, J.; Zettler, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sea Education Association's (SEA) two research vessels, the SSV Corwith Cramer and the SSV Robert C. Seamans are unique in the research world. Not only do these ships perform advanced research using state of the art equipment, they do so under sail with high school, undergraduate, and graduate students serving as both the science team and the crew. Because of SEA's educational mission and reliance on prevailing winds for sailing, the vessels have been studying repeated tracks for decades, providing valuable long-term data sets while educating future marine scientists. The Corwith Cramer has been collecting data in the North Atlantic between New England, the Sargasso Sea, Bermuda, and the Caribbean since 1987 while the Robert C. Seamans has been operating in the Eastern Pacific between the US West Coast, Hawaii, and French Polynesia since 2001. The ships collect continuous electronic data from hull mounted ADCP, chirp, and a clean flowing seawater system logging temperature, salinity, in-vivo chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, and beam attenuation. The ships also periodically collect data from profiling CTDs with chlorophyll and CDOM fluorometers, transmissometers, and dissolved oxygen and PAR sensors. In addition to electronic data, archived long term data sets include physical samples from net tows such as marine plastic debris and tar, and plankton including Halobates (a marine insect), leptocephali (eel larvae), and phyllosoma (spiny lobster larvae). Both vessels are 134' brigantine rig tall ships and are designated sailing school vessels (SSV) by the US Coast Guard, and both have received instrumentation grants from NSF to provide high quality, reliable data that is submitted to the NSF R2R archives. Students sailing on these ships spend time on shore at the SEA campus in Woods Hole, MA taking classes in oceanography, nautical science, maritime studies and public policy. Each student is required to write a proposal for their research before heading to sea, and

  1. Book Review: The history of the Quaternary Research Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    This is a book that should be in the library of every member of the QRA as well as their institutions. This volume is a celebration of 50 years of the Quaternary Studies Field Group (1964), which was renamed the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) in 1969. What follows is a combination of a review with some further information based on the recollection of someone who was there. In examining the origins of the QSFG due credit is paid to Richard Hey and Richard West, but an inexplicable omission is the earlier discussion between Hey, Allan Straw and others during the field meeting of the Yorkshire Geological Society in September 1962 (Worsley, 2014). It is said that history is always written by the victors, or in modern parlance by those who write the minutes! But, in the writing of history there are only degrees of unsuccess. In Chapter 2 John Catt comments on the less than perfect early archival records of the QRA. So it is to his credit that 50 years of archival material has been diligently sifted and edited. In this he was assisted by memories of some named QRA members who are thanked. Wider consultation may have filled some of the gaps. At earlier meetings it was always a pleasure to greet long retired colleagues, such as Archie Lamont at the Carlops glacial drainage system when being demonstrated by Brian Sissons in 1966, or Tony Farringdon at Ballycotton Bay in 1968, or Hallam Movius in 1971 at a London discussion meeting. Similarly, who can forget the field meeting at Canterbury in 1967 when Alec Skempton demonstrated the Sevenoaks by-pass late-glacial slope failures, and John Hutchinson's use of Pomatias elegans for dating the Folkestone Warren landslips? Jan Mangerud's first QRA meeting on the Isle of Man (1971) was notable for his prescient recognition of glaciomarine deposits.

  2. A treatment planning study comparing Elekta VMAT and fixed field IMRT using the varian treatment planning system eclipse.

    PubMed

    Peters, Samuel; Schiefer, Hans; Plasswilm, Ludwig

    2014-07-10

    The newest release of the Eclipse (Varian) treatment planning system (TPS) includes an optimizing engine for Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this new algorithm and to compare it to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for various disease sites by creating single- and double-arc VMAT plans. A total of 162 plans were evaluated in this study, including 38 endometrial, 57 head and neck, 12 brain, 10 breast and 45 prostate cancer cases. The real-life IMRT plans were developed during routine clinical cases using the TPS Eclipse. VMAT plans were generated using a preclinical version of Eclipse with tumor-region-specific optimizing templates without interference of the operator: with one full arc (1A) and with two full arcs (2A), and with partial arcs for breast and prostate with hip implant cases. All plans were evaluated based on target coverage, homogeneity and conformity. The organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed according to plan objectives, such as the mean and maximum doses. If one or more objectives were exceeded, the plan was considered clinically unacceptable, and a second VMAT plan was created by adapting the optimization penalties once. Compared to IMRT, single- and double-arc VMAT plans showed comparable or better results concerning the target coverage: the maximum dose in the target for 1A is the same as that for IMRT; for 2A, an average reduction of 1.3% over all plans was observed. The conformity showed a statistically significant improvement for both 1A (+3%) and 2A (+6%). The mean total body dose was statistically significant lower for the considered arc techniques (IMRT: 16.0 Gy, VMAT: 15.3 Gy, p < 0.001). However, the sparing of OARs shows individual behavior that depends strongly on the different tumor regions. A clear difference is found in the number of monitor units (MUs) per plan: VMAT shows a reduction of 31%. These findings demonstrate that based on optimizing

  3. The site of the Varian Temple of Elagabal in Rome: topographical and astronomical approach to the question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arrizabalaga y Prado, L.; de La Fuente Marcos, R.

    2005-03-01

    Ancient historians refer to a temple in Rome, dedicated to the Syrian sun god Elagabal, by his high priest, the Roman emperor called Varius (204-222AD, commonly called Elagabalus or Heliogabalus). On the basis of their texts, it has been thought that Varius either built a new temple, or rededicated an existing one, expropriated from some other deity, in order to house his god's principal cult object: a large black meteorite, or baetyl, which Varius brought from its temple at Emesa, in Syria, to Rome. In this paper we analyze the hypothesis that the site of the Varian Temple of Elagabal may have been that now known as the Vigna Barberini. A stratigraphic analysis shows that the Vigna Barberini is an artificial platform, built on the rubble of earlier hillside structures, dating from prehistoric times to the Julio-Claudian period. The platform, with more or less its present shape, is of Flavian date, and at that time contained a portico surrounding a central garden. On top of these, a Severan level corresponds to the base of the foundations of a temple that are very solid and go very deep. The azimuth of the temple wall oriented south-east is about 113°. Using a computer program, we have thoroughly scan ned the night sky in AD 1-250, looking for celestial objects that may have been worshipped in the temple. After taking into account the effects of precession, the main candidate for a celestial body worshipped from this site appears to be the star Sirius. In several Mediterranean cultures, the heliacal ortus, or earliest pre-dawn sighting of Sirius (when Sirius again rises into visibility after being hidden by the Sun's light for about 70 days) was thought to have astrological significance. We have compiled the relevant astronomical data for the heliacal ortus of Sirius in the time span 0-250 AD. During that period of time, it falls between 18th and 20th July. The azimuth angle of Sirius, when rising on the heliacal ortus day ci rca 150 AD, is about 111°. Being

  4. a Research on Spatial Topological Association Rules Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, P.; Sha, Z.

    2012-07-01

    Spatial association rules mining is a process of acquiring information and knowledge from large databases. Due to the nature of geographic space and the complexity of spatial objects and relations, the classical association rule mining methods are not suitable for the spatial association rule mining. Classical association rule mining treats all input data as independent, while spatial association rules often show high autocorrelation among nearby objects. The contiguous, adjacent and neighboring relations between spatial objects are important topological relations. In this paper a new approach based on topological predictions to discover spatial association rules is presented. First, we develop a fast method to get the topological relationship of spatial data with its algebraic structure. Then the interested spatial objects are selected. To find the interested spatial objects, topological relations combining with distance were used. In this step, the frequent topological predications are gained. Next, the attribute datasets of the selected interested spatial objects are mined with Apriori algorithm. Last, get the spatial topological association rules. The presented approach has been implemented and tested by the data of GDP per capita, railroads and roads in China in the year of 2005 at county level. The results of the experiments show that the approach is effective and valid.

  5. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-04: An Evaluation of Out-Of-Field Doses for Electron Beams From Modern Varian and Elekta Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, C; Nitsch, P; Kudchadker, R; Howell, R; Kry, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurately determining out-of-field doses when using electron beam radiotherapy is of importance when treating pregnant patients or patients with implanted electronic devices. Scattered doses outside of the applicator field in electron beams have not been broadly investigated, especially since manufacturers have taken different approaches in applicator designs. Methods: In this study, doses outside of the applicator field were measured for electron beams produced by a 10×10 applicator on two Varian 21iXs operating at 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, a Varian TrueBeam operating at 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV. Peripheral dose profiles and percent depth doses were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom at 100 cm SSD with a Farmer ion chamber. Doses were compared to peripheral photon doses from AAPM’s Task Group #36 report. Results: Doses were highest for the highest electron energies. Doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. Substantial dose differences were observed between different accelerators; the Elekta accelerator had much higher doses than any Varian unit examined. Surprisingly, doses were often similar to, and could be much higher than, doses from photon therapy. Doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that proper shielding may be very important when utilizing electron beams, particularly on a Versa HD, while treating pregnant patients or those with implanted electronic devices. Applying a water equivalent bolus of Emax(MeV)/4 thickness (cm) on the patient would reduce fetal dose drastically for all clinical energies and is a practical solution to manage the potentially high peripheral doses seen from modern electron beams. Funding from NIH Grant number: #CA180803.

  6. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-08

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations.

  7. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PACS number(s): 87.55.k, 87.55.Qr.

  8. [Research advances in association between childhood obesity and gut microbiota].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Lin; Wan, Chao-Min

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, more and more studies have noted the close association between gut microbiota and the development and progression of obesity. Gut microbiota may act on obesity by increasing energy intake, affecting the secretion of intestinal hormones, inducing chronic systemic inflammation, and producing insulin resistance. This article reviews the association between childhood obesity and gut microbiota, as well as possible mechanisms, in an attempt to provide a reference for the etiology, prevention and treatment of childhood obesity.

  9. Production of 5′ Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kamekura, Masahiro; Yokoi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takekazu

    1988-01-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5′ nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5′ nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO4 · 7H2O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5′ nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5′-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor. PMID:16347767

  10. About the Associate Director for Health of EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dr. Ronald Hines serves as Associate Director for Health for the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development (ORD).

  11. Postdoctoral Research Associates as an Educational Resource: Opportunities and Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kianian, Shahryar F.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides a description of a method of updating biology curricula by using postdoctoral scientists to convey knowledge of biotechniques to broaden students' understanding of modern biological research. Describes the data collection methods used during the two-year project to assess its effectiveness. (DDR)

  12. Faculty Research Productivity: Some Moderators of Associated Stressors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; Bently, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    A study with 894 college faculty investigated the effects of certain stress variables on different kinds of faculty research activity; psychological and organizational variables thought to moderate stress; and the effects of stressors and moderators for gender, institution type, and discipline (humanities, social sciences, natural sciences)…

  13. Comparison of build-up dose between Elekta and Varian linear accelerators for high-energy photon beams using radiochromic film and clinical implications for IMRT head and neck treatments.

    PubMed

    Paelinck, L; De Wagter, C; Van Esch, A; Duthoy, W; Depuydt, T; De Neve, W

    2005-02-07

    Skin toxicity has been reported for IMRT of head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose in the build-up region delivered by a 6 MV treatment plan for which important skin toxicity was observed. We also investigated if the different designs of the treatment head of an Elekta and a Varian linear accelerator, especially the lower position of the Varian multi-leaf collimator, give rise to different build-up doses. For regular square open beams, the build-up dose along the central beam axis is higher for the Varian machine than for the Elekta machine, both for 6 MV and 18 MV. At the Elekta machine at 18 MV, the superficial dose of a diamond shaped 10 x 10 cm2 field is 3.6% lower than the superficial dose of a regular 10 x 10 cm2 field. This effect is not seen at 6 MV. At the Varian machine, the superficial dose of the diamond shaped field is respectively 3.5 and 14.2% higher than the superficial dose of the regular 10 x 10 cm2 field for 6 MV and 18 MV. Despite the differences measured in build-up dose for single beams between the Elekta and the Varian linear accelerator, there were no measurable differences in superficial dose when a typical IMRT dose plan of 6 MV for a head and neck tumour is executed at the two machines.

  14. Defining Educational Research: A Perspective of/on Presidential Addresses and the Australian Association for Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Gale, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the definition of the field of educational research and the changing and developing role of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) in representing and constituting this field. The evidence for the argument is derived from AARE Presidential Addresses across its 40-year history. The paper documents…

  15. The Practice of Institutional Research. Proceedings of a Joint Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Charlotte, North Carolina, October 29-30, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary P., Ed.; Staman, E. Michael, Ed.

    Proceedings of a 1981 joint conference sponsored by the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research are presented. The conference theme was the practice of institutional research. Contents include preconference workshop reports, speeches, abstracts of papers, and reports of…

  16. The Practice of Institutional Research. Proceedings of a Joint Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Charlotte, North Carolina, October 29-30, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary P., Ed.; Staman, E. Michael, Ed.

    Proceedings of a 1981 joint conference sponsored by the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research are presented. The conference theme was the practice of institutional research. Contents include preconference workshop reports, speeches, abstracts of papers, and reports of…

  17. HIV research productivity and structural factors associated with HIV research output in European Union countries: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Uusküla, A; Toompere, K; Laisaar, K T; Rosenthal, M; Pürjer, M L; Knellwolf, A; Läärä, E; Des Jarlais, D C

    2015-02-03

    To assess HIV/AIDS research productivity in the 27 countries of the European Union (EU), and the structural level factors associated with levels of HIV/AIDS research productivity. A bibliometric analysis was conducted with systematic search methods used to locate HIV/AIDS research publications (period of 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011; search databases: MEDLINE (Ovid, PubMed), EMBASE, ISI-Thomson Web of Science; no language restrictions). The publication rate (number of HIV/AIDS research publications per million population in 10 years) and the rate of articles published in HIV/AIDS journals and selected journals with moderate to very high (IF ≥3) 5-year impact factors were used as markers for HIV research productivity. A negative binomial regression model was fitted to assess the impact of structural level factors (sociodemographic, health, HIV prevalence and research/development indicators) associated with the variation in HIV research productivity. The total numbers of HIV/AIDS research publications in 2002-2011 by country ranged from 7 to 9128 (median 319). The median publication rate (per million population in 10 years) was 45 (range 5-150) for all publications. Across all countries, 16% of the HIV/AIDS research was published in HIV/AIDS journals and 7% in selected journals with IF ≥3. Indicators describing economic (gross domestic product), demographic (size of the population) and epidemiological (HIV prevalence) conditions as well as overall scientific activity (total research output) in a country were positively associated with HIV research productivity. HIV research productivity varies noticeably across EU countries, and this variation is associated with recognisable structural factors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. HIV research productivity and structural factors associated with HIV research output in European Union countries: a bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uusküla, A; Toompere, K; Laisaar, K T; Rosenthal, M; Pürjer, M L; Knellwolf, A; Läärä, E; Des Jarlais, D C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess HIV/AIDS research productivity in the 27 countries of the European Union (EU), and the structural level factors associated with levels of HIV/AIDS research productivity. Methods A bibliometric analysis was conducted with systematic search methods used to locate HIV/AIDS research publications (period of 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011; search databases: MEDLINE (Ovid, PubMed), EMBASE, ISI-Thomson Web of Science; no language restrictions). The publication rate (number of HIV/AIDS research publications per million population in 10 years) and the rate of articles published in HIV/AIDS journals and selected journals with moderate to very high (IF ≥3) 5-year impact factors were used as markers for HIV research productivity. A negative binomial regression model was fitted to assess the impact of structural level factors (sociodemographic, health, HIV prevalence and research/development indicators) associated with the variation in HIV research productivity. Results The total numbers of HIV/AIDS research publications in 2002–2011 by country ranged from 7 to 9128 (median 319). The median publication rate (per million population in 10 years) was 45 (range 5–150) for all publications. Across all countries, 16% of the HIV/AIDS research was published in HIV/AIDS journals and 7% in selected journals with IF ≥3. Indicators describing economic (gross domestic product), demographic (size of the population) and epidemiological (HIV prevalence) conditions as well as overall scientific activity (total research output) in a country were positively associated with HIV research productivity. Conclusions HIV research productivity varies noticeably across EU countries, and this variation is associated with recognisable structural factors. PMID:25649212

  19. Association of Learning Styles with Research Self‐Efficacy: Study of Short‐Term Research Training Program for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A.; Winegarden, Babbi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short‐term research training programs, were associated with research self‐efficacy, a potential predictor of research career success. Method Seventy‐five first‐year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH‐supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self‐efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual‐verbal, sequential‐global, sensing‐intuitive, and active‐reflective) with students’ gender, ranking of medical school, and research self‐efficacy. Results Research self‐efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self‐efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self‐efficacy from baseline to posttraining. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students’ gender or ranking of their medical school. Conclusions Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician‐scientists. PMID:25079678

  20. Association of learning styles with research self-efficacy: study of short-term research training program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A; Winegarden, Babbi; Jeste, Dilip V

    2014-12-01

    With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short-term research training programs, were associated with research self-efficacy, a potential predictor of research career success. Seventy-five first-year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH-supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self-efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual-verbal, sequential-global, sensing-intuitive, and active-reflective) with students' gender, ranking of medical school, and research self-efficacy. Research self-efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self-efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self-efficacy from baseline to posttraining. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students' gender or ranking of their medical school. Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician-scientists. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Retrospective Appraisal of 15 Years' Proceedings of the Hungarian Research Student Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Tamas; Olah, Mate

    2013-01-01

    In 1996 the Hungarian Research Student Association (HRSA) was founded. Since then more than 6000 young, talented researchers have belonged to the Association. The founders set two principal aims: (1) to support the gifted and the most promising high school students and (2) to establish an active community. The movement has grown through the work…

  2. Transforming Catholic Education through Research: The American Educational Research Association Catholic Education Special Interest Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Catholic schools in the United States and abroad face numerous financial, cultural, and structural challenges due to contemporary education policies and economic trends. Within this climate, research about Catholic education is often conducted and leveraged in efforts to serve schools' most immediate needs. To be certain, research aimed at finding…

  3. Becoming a Researcher: Forms of Capital Associated with "Research Capacity" Trajectories of Young British Social Anthropologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The paper privileges the "voices" of British social anthropologists examining their perceptions of how their research expertise was acquired. Reference is made to the case of education research in Britain, which, by comparison with social anthropology, reveals limited capacity as measured through performance audits of scientific research…

  4. Becoming a Researcher: Forms of Capital Associated with "Research Capacity" Trajectories of Young British Social Anthropologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The paper privileges the "voices" of British social anthropologists examining their perceptions of how their research expertise was acquired. Reference is made to the case of education research in Britain, which, by comparison with social anthropology, reveals limited capacity as measured through performance audits of scientific research…

  5. First reported fatalities associated with the 'research chemical' 2-methoxydiphenidine.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon P; Brandt, Simon D; Wallach, Jason; Morris, Hamilton; Kavanagh, Pierce V

    2015-05-01

    2-Methoxydiphenidine, i.e. 1-[1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl]piperidine, also known as 'MXP' or '2-MeO-diphenidine' (or 2-MXP), has been available as a 'research chemical' since 2013 as a purported alternative to the 'dissociative anesthetics' methoxetamine and ketamine. Three deaths which involved the detection of 2-MXP in post-mortem blood and urine were encountered in forensic casework. The 2-, 3- and 4-methoxyphenyl positional isomers were synthesized to confirm the identity and concentration of 2-MXP. The 2-MXP femoral blood concentrations in the cases were found to be 24.0, 2.0 and 1.36 mg/L (the latter with an alternative cause of death). Some additional prescription drugs were encountered at therapeutic concentrations in all three cases. Analysis of the biofluids allowed the detection and characterization of various metabolites, including the suggested presence of hydroxy-2-MXP as the main metabolite with the hydroxyl group located on the piperidine rather than the phenyl or benzyl moiety. Additional metabolites included O-desmethyl-2-MXP and hydroxylated O-desmethyl-2-MXP. Diphenidine and hydroxy-diphenidine, also showing the presence of the hydroxyl group on the piperidine ring, were also detected. It was not possible to identify whether these arose from 2-MXP biotransformation or whether they represented the presence of diphenidine as a separate substance. These are the first published fatalities involving 2-MXP and presents analytical data to assist analytical toxicologists with future casework.

  6. 76 FR 23537 - Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations and Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations... Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order)(7 CFR part 1219). The Order is authorized under the Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7801-7813). The Order covers...

  7. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  8. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  9. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  10. Maryland 2000. Journal of the Maryland Association for Institutional Research, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This volume presents five papers on higher education institutional research in Maryland, all of which were originally presented at annual meetings of the Maryland Association for Institutional Research from 1993 through 1995. The first paper is "A Day in the Life of an Institutional Researcher: Past, Present and Future" (Merill…

  11. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  12. The Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with criticism of the NIH Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Crowley, William; Courtney, John; Jameson, Larry; Pardes, Herbert; Moskowitz, Jay; Orringer, Eugene; Rubenstein, Arthur; Wood, Alastair; Rettig, Richard; Ausiello, Dennis; Brenner, David; Collins, Francis; Elias, Jack; Greene, Warner; Horowitz, Ralph; Jameson, Larry; Kieff, Elliott; Thompson, Craig; Swain, Judith L

    2006-08-01

    As representatives of 50 leading academic medical centers focusing on clinical research and many of academic medicine's scientific leaders, the Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with the JCI's recent editorials on the NIH Roadmap, Elias Zerhouni's leadership, and the future directions of biomedical research.

  13. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  14. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  15. Canadian Association for Immunization Research and Evaluation (CAIRE) guidelines for industry-sponsored clinical trial and epidemiology contract research.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Scott A; Scheifele, David; Duval, Bernard; Law, Barbara; Ward, Brian; Bjornson, Gordean; Halperin, Beth; Skowronski, Danuta; King, Arlene; Hammond, Greg; Dobson, Simon; Tamblyn, Susan; Wang, Elaine; Lavigne, Pierre; Danzig, Lisa; Elrick, Donald; Carnan, Elspeth; Mansi, James; Bertrand, Francoise; Palkonyay, Laszlo; Clements, Gail; Maresky, Neil; Wortzman, David

    2005-01-01

    In response to concerns about interactions of academic and public health investigators with industry, the Canadian Association for Immunization Research and Evaluation (CAIRE), in collaboration with six major vaccine manufacturers, developed guidelines for participation in industry-sponsored clinical trial and epidemiology contract research within Canada. Topics addressed include definition of investigators, data ownership, protocol development, data management, data analysis, producing a study report and publication of the results of the study.

  16. Evaluation of IsoCal geometric calibration system for Varian linacs equipped with on-board imager and electronic portal imaging device imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Du, Weiliang; Balter, Peter; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the IsoCal geometric calibration system for kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imagers on Varian C-series linear accelerators (linacs). IsoCal calibration starts by imaging a phantom and collimator plate using MV images with different collimator angles, as well as MV and kV images at different gantry angles. The software then identifies objects on the collimator plate and in the phantom to determine the location of the treatment isocenter and its relation to the MV and kV imager centers. It calculates offsets between the positions of the imaging panels and the treatment isocenter as a function of gantry angle and writes a correction file that can be applied to MV and kV systems to correct for those offsets in the position of the panels. We performed IsoCal calibration three times on each of five Varian C-series linacs, each time with an independent setup. We then compared the IsoCal calibrations with a simplified Winston-Lutz (WL)-based system and with a Varian cubic phantom (VC)-based system. The maximum IsoCal corrections ranged from 0.7 mm to 1.5 mm for MV and 0.9 mm to 1.8 mm for kV imagers across the five linacs. The variations in the three calibrations for each linac were less than 0.2 mm. Without IsoCal correction, the WL results showed discrepancies between the treatment isocenter and the imager center of 0.9 mm to 1.6 mm (for the MV imager) and 0.5 mm to 1.1 mm (for the kV imager); with IsoCal corrections applied, the differences were reduced to 0.2 mm to 0.6 mm (MV) and 0.3 mm to 0.6 mm (kV) across the five linacs. The VC system was not as precise as the WL system, but showed similar results, with discrepancies of less than 1.0 mm when the IsoCal corrections were applied. We conclude that IsoCal is an accurate and consistent method for calibration and periodic quality assurance of MV and kV imaging systems.

  17. Optical Research and Field Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Planning, were prepared and delivered. 15 The initial project under Task Order #23 continued efforts to secure basic research (6.1) funding from the Air...1.314nm pulsed laser was delivered and the IR experiment lab set-up was basically completed. Rhesus subjects were screened in preparation for the first...method for calibration of the Varian Cary 5 spectrophotometer was assessed. This procedure will potentially provide a method for certifying the accuracy of

  18. Recent researches of bioactive metabolites in marine organisms-associated microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qianqun; Lu, Jia; Cui, Chengbin; Zhu, Tianjiao; Fang, Yuchun; Liu, Hongbing; Zhu, Weiming

    2004-10-01

    Recent researches have shown that some compounds isolated from marine organisms have striking structural similarities with the metabolites from known microorganisms. It is inferred from the researches that the symbiotic or associated marine microorganisms may be the true sources of those compounds or at least involved in the biosynthesizing process. This view has been further evidenced by the researches for many sponges and sponge-associated microorganisms. Importantly, growing evidence has highlighted that the symbiotic or associated marine microorganisms live in the microenvironment within the hosts, and they also produce secondary metabolites which are new and original in structure and unique in activity. All these suggest that the microorganisms associated with marine organisms are the sources with very high potential to be new natural bioactive agents. This article reviews briefly the research advances in the study of new bioactive metabolites from marine organisms-associated microorganisms since 2000.

  19. Integrating Human Resources and Technology. Proceedings of the Association for Institutional Research Forum (Toronto, Canada, May 23-26, 1983). Association for Institutional Research 1983-1984 Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Daniel R., Ed.

    Abstracts and four papers from the 1983 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum on integrating human resources and technology are presented. AIR membership and organizational information are also provided. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "It Ain't All Bad" (Dean F. Berkley); "Technological Innovation and…

  20. Investigation of restriction-modification enzymes from M. varians RFL19 with a new type of specificity toward modification of substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Butkus, V; Klimasauskas, S; Kersulyte, D; Vaitkevicius, D; Lebionka, A; Janulaitis, A

    1985-01-01

    The characterization of MvaI restriction-modification enzymes, isolated from Micrococcus varians RFL19, is reported. Both enzymes recognize the 5'CC decreases (A/T)GG nucleotide sequence. The endonuclease cleaves the sequence at the position indicated by the arrow, whereas the methylase modifies the internal cytosine, yielding N4-methylcytosine. This type of modification protects the substrate from R.MvaI cleavage. 5-Methylcytosine in the same position of the recognition sequence does not protect the substrate from R.MvaI cleavage. R.MvaI proved to be the first example of a restriction endonuclease differentiating the position of the methyl group in the heterocyclic ring of cytosine, located in the same site of the recognition sequence. M.MvaI modifies DNA dcm+ in vitro yielding N4,5-dimethylcytosine. N4-methylcytosine cannot be differentiated from cytosine using the Maxam-Gilbert DNA sequencing procedure. Images PMID:2994011

  1. Understanding factors associated with the translation of cardiovascular research: a multinational case study approach.

    PubMed

    Wooding, Steven; Hanney, Stephen R; Pollitt, Alexandra; Grant, Jonathan; Buxton, Martin J

    2014-04-21

    Funders of health research increasingly seek to understand how best to allocate resources in order to achieve maximum value from their funding. We built an international consortium and developed a multinational case study approach to assess benefits arising from health research. We used that to facilitate analysis of factors in the production of research that might be associated with translating research findings into wider impacts, and the complexities involved. We built on the Payback Framework and expanded its application through conducting co-ordinated case studies on the payback from cardiovascular and stroke research in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. We selected a stratified random sample of projects from leading medical research funders. We devised a series of innovative steps to: minimize the effect of researcher bias; rate the level of impacts identified in the case studies; and interrogate case study narratives to identify factors that correlated with achieving high or low levels of impact. Twenty-nine detailed case studies produced many and diverse impacts. Over the 15 to 20 years examined, basic biomedical research has a greater impact than clinical research in terms of academic impacts such as knowledge production and research capacity building. Clinical research has greater levels of wider impact on health policies, practice, and generating health gains. There was no correlation between knowledge production and wider impacts. We identified various factors associated with high impact. Interaction between researchers and practitioners and the public is associated with achieving high academic impact and translation into wider impacts, as is basic research conducted with a clinical focus. Strategic thinking by clinical researchers, in terms of thinking through pathways by which research could potentially be translated into practice, is associated with high wider impact. Finally, we identified the complexity of factors behind research

  2. Understanding factors associated with the translation of cardiovascular research: a multinational case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Funders of health research increasingly seek to understand how best to allocate resources in order to achieve maximum value from their funding. We built an international consortium and developed a multinational case study approach to assess benefits arising from health research. We used that to facilitate analysis of factors in the production of research that might be associated with translating research findings into wider impacts, and the complexities involved. Methods We built on the Payback Framework and expanded its application through conducting co-ordinated case studies on the payback from cardiovascular and stroke research in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. We selected a stratified random sample of projects from leading medical research funders. We devised a series of innovative steps to: minimize the effect of researcher bias; rate the level of impacts identified in the case studies; and interrogate case study narratives to identify factors that correlated with achieving high or low levels of impact. Results Twenty-nine detailed case studies produced many and diverse impacts. Over the 15 to 20 years examined, basic biomedical research has a greater impact than clinical research in terms of academic impacts such as knowledge production and research capacity building. Clinical research has greater levels of wider impact on health policies, practice, and generating health gains. There was no correlation between knowledge production and wider impacts. We identified various factors associated with high impact. Interaction between researchers and practitioners and the public is associated with achieving high academic impact and translation into wider impacts, as is basic research conducted with a clinical focus. Strategic thinking by clinical researchers, in terms of thinking through pathways by which research could potentially be translated into practice, is associated with high wider impact. Finally, we identified the complexity of

  3. Salt-dependent thermo-reversible α-amylase: cloning and characterization of halophilic α-amylase from moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians, was found to produce active α-amylase (K. varians α-amylase (KVA)). We have observed at least six different forms of α-amylase secreted by this bacterium into the culture medium. Characterization of these KVA forms and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that KVA comprises pre-pro-precursor form of α-amylase catalytic domain followed by the tandem repeats, which show high similarity to each other and to the starch binding domain (SBD) of other α-amylases. The observed six forms were most likely derived by various processing of the protein product. Recombinant KVA protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified with affinity chromatography after cleavage from fusion partner. The highly acidic amino acid composition of KVA and the highly negative electrostatic potential surface map of the modeled structure strongly suggested its halophilic nature. Indeed, KVA showed distinct salt- and time-dependent thermal reversibility: when α-amylase was heat denatured at 85°C for 3 min in the presence of 2 M NaCl, the activity was recovered upon incubation on ice (50% recovery after 15 min incubation). Conversely, KVA denatured in 0.1 M NaCl was not refolded at all, even after prolonged incubation. KVA activity was inhibited by proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitor from Streptomyces nitrosporeus, which had been implicated to inhibit only animal α-amylases. KVA with putative SBD regions was found to digest raw starch.

  4. Poster — Thur Eve — 36: Implementation of constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma on Varian 23EX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruohui; Fan, Xiaomei; Bai, Wenwen; Han, Chun

    2014-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative planning approach for VMAT using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) implementation on conventional Linac Varian 23EX and used IMRT as a benchmark to evaluate the performance. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who were previously treated with IMRT on Varian 23EX were retrospectively planned for CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. Dose prescription was set to 60 Gy to PTVs in 30 fractions. The planning objectives for PTVs and OAR were corresponding with the IMRT plans. Dose to the PTVs and OAR were compared to IMRT with respect to plan quality, MU, treatment time and delivery accuracy. Results: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans led to equivalent or superior plan quality as compared to IMRT, PTV's CI relative increased 16.2%, while small deviations were observed on minimum dose for PTV. Volumes in the cord receiving 40Gy were increased from 3.6% with IMRT to 7.0%. Treatment times were reduced significantly with CDR-CAS-IMAT(mean 85.7s vs. 232.1s, p < .05), however, MU increased by a factor of 1.3 and lung V10/5/3.5/aver were relative increase 6.7%,12%,17.9%,4.2%, respectively. And increased the E-P low dose area volume decreased the hight dose area. There were no significant difference in Delta4 measurements results between both planning techniques. Conclusion: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans can be implemented smoothly and quickly into a busy cancer center, which improved PTV CI and reduces treatment time but increased the MU and low dose irradiated area. An evaluation of weight loss must be performed during treatment for CDR-CAS-IMAT patients.

  5. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. SUMMARY:...

  6. Molecules discovered that block cancer-associated microRNAs | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the Center for Cancer Research have identified a new class of compounds that block the action of a microRNA associated with the development of human cancers, cardiovascular diseases and immune disorders.  Read more...

  7. Self-Regulation of a Chiropractic Association through Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Lorraine A.; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Crowe, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) can be used in the health professions to redefine their roles. This study investigated a small health professional group, the members of The Chiropractic Association Singapore (TCAS), by using a PAR method; researchers and participants gained insights into the self-regulation of a health profession. A…

  8. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Education Research Association.

    This document contains 14 research paper presentations and 5 "mini-tips" from the 1998 American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The first section includes three papers on international and distance education: "Determining Success of Vocational Students Enrolled in Distance Education Courses"…

  9. Longitudinal Associations among Undergraduates' Research Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robnett, Rachael D.; Chemers, Martin M.; Zurbriggen, Eileen L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that undergraduates tend to identify more strongly with the field of science after participating in scientific research. However, mediators that might account for this association are not well understood. In the current study, we propose that science self-efficacy may serve this mediational function. Specifically, data from a…

  10. Longitudinal Associations among Undergraduates' Research Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robnett, Rachael D.; Chemers, Martin M.; Zurbriggen, Eileen L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that undergraduates tend to identify more strongly with the field of science after participating in scientific research. However, mediators that might account for this association are not well understood. In the current study, we propose that science self-efficacy may serve this mediational function. Specifically, data from a…

  11. Personality Traits Are Associated with Research Misbehavior in Dutch Scientists: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Tijdink, Joeri K.; Bouter, Lex M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Wicherts, Jelte M.; Smulders, Yvo M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Personality influences decision making and ethical considerations. Its influence on the occurrence of research misbehavior has never been studied. This study aims to determine the association between personality traits and self-reported questionable research practices and research misconduct. We hypothesized that narcissistic, Machiavellianistic and psychopathic traits as well as self-esteem are associated with research misbehavior. Methods Included in this cross-sectional study design were 535 Dutch biomedical scientists (response rate 65%) from all hierarchical layers of 4 university medical centers in the Netherlands. We used validated personality questionnaires such as the Dark Triad (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism), Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, the Publication Pressure Questionnaire (PPQ), and also demographic and job-specific characteristics to investigate the association of personality traits with a composite research misbehavior severity score. Findings Machiavellianism was positively associated (beta 1.28, CI 1.06–1.53) with self-reported research misbehavior, while narcissism, psychopathy and self-esteem were not. Exploratory analysis revealed that narcissism and research misconduct were more severe among persons in higher academic ranks (i.e., professors) (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively), and self-esteem scores and publication pressure were lower (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively) as compared to postgraduate PhD fellows. Conclusions Machiavellianism may be a risk factor for research misbehaviour. Narcissism and research misbehaviour were more prevalent among biomedical scientists in higher academic positions. These results suggest that personality has an impact on research behavior and should be taken into account in fostering responsible conduct of research. PMID:27684371

  12. Peer Review Practices for Evaluating Biomedical Research Grants: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Lucy; Freedman, Jane E; Becker, Lance B; Mehta, Nehal N; Liscum, Laura

    2017-08-04

    The biomedical research enterprise depends on the fair and objective peer review of research grants, leading to the distribution of resources through efficient and robust competitive methods. In the United States, federal funding agencies and foundations collectively distribute billions of dollars annually to support biomedical research. For the American Heart Association, a Peer Review Subcommittee is charged with establishing the highest standards for peer review. This scientific statement reviews the current literature on peer review practices, describes the current American Heart Association peer review process and those of other agencies, analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of American Heart Association peer review practices, and recommends best practices for the future. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. [The first official organization of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China-TCM Improvement Research Association].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Zhang, P F

    2016-07-28

    In modern China, most of the mass organizations of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) were civilian and established by the individuals with self support financially.The TCM Improvement Research Association of Shanxi Province was the first official TCM organization in modern China. For the purpose of ruling and recognition of TCM, Yan Xishan, the chief executive of Shanxi province, gave a full support to its creation, development, and operation of the Association with the military and political officials in the government served as part-time staff members of a few of important position in the Association. The Association was given funding and policy support by official ways. The local administrative departments cooperated with the Association affairs actively. Because of the stable organization and the abundant fund, the TCM Improvement Research Association developed quickly and steadily. As a result, the Association had been playing an important and increasing role in academic research, TCM education, medical and epidemic prevention and so on. It had become one of the great national TCM academic societies with prolonged existence. As an official Association, it was characterized with a dual property: a better foundation for development and little independency.

  14. From Genome-Wide Association Study to Phenome-Wide Association Study: New Paradigms in Obesity Research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-P; Zhang, Y-Y; Duan, D D

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a condition in which excess body fat has accumulated over an extent that increases the risk of many chronic diseases. The current clinical classification of obesity is based on measurement of body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, and body fat percentage. However, these measurements do not account for the wide individual variations in fat distribution, degree of fatness or health risks, and genetic variants identified in the genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In this review, we will address this important issue with the introduction of phenome, phenomics, and phenome-wide association study (PheWAS). We will discuss the new paradigm shift from GWAS to PheWAS in obesity research. In the era of precision medicine, phenomics and PheWAS provide the required approaches to better definition and classification of obesity according to the association of obese phenome with their unique molecular makeup, lifestyle, and environmental impact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective manner. The program began on June 1, 1980 with funding to support several Research Associates each year. 113 awards, plus 1 from an independently supported minority component were made for the Research Associates program. The program was changed from a one year award with a possibility for renewal to a two year award. In 1999, the decision was made by NASA to discontinue the program due to development of new priorities for funding. This grant was discontinued because of the move of the Program Director to a new institution; a new grant was provided to that new institution to allow completion of the training of the remaining 2 research associates in 1999. After 1999, the program will be discontinued.

  16. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective manner. The program began on June 1, 1980 with funding to support several Research Associates each year. 113 awards, plus 1 from an independently supported minority component were made for the Research Associates program. The program was changed from a one year award with a possibility for renewal to a two year award. In 1999, the decision was made by NASA to discontinue the program due to development of new priorities for funding. This grant was discontinued because of the move of the Program Director to a new institution; a new grant was provided to that new institution to allow completion of the training of the remaining 2 research associates in 1999. After 1999, the program will be discontinued.

  17. A survey of the barriers associated with academic-based cancer research commercialization.

    PubMed

    Vanderford, Nathan L; Weiss, L Todd; Weiss, Heidi L

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization within the academic setting is associated with many challenges and barriers. Previous studies investigating these challenges/barriers have, in general, broadly focused on multiple disciplines and, oftentimes, several institutions simultaneously. The goal of the study presented here was to analyze a range of barriers that may be broadly associated with commercializing academic-based cancer research. This goal was addressed via a study of the barriers associated with cancer research commercialization at the University of Kentucky (UK). To this end, a research instrument in the form of an electronic survey was developed. General demographic information was collected on study participants and two research questions were addressed: 1) What are the general barriers inhibiting cancer research commercialization at UK? and 2) Would mitigation of the barriers potentially enhance faculty engagement in commercialization activities? Descriptive and statistical analysis of the data reveal that multiple barriers likely inhibit cancer research commercialization at UK with expense, time, infrastructure, and lack of industry partnerships being among the most commonly cited factors. The potential alleviation of these factors in addition to revised University policies/procedures, risk mitigation, more emphasis on commercialization by academia research field, and increased information on how to commercialize significantly correlated with the potential for increased commercialization activity. Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that research commercialization would incrementally increase as barriers to the process are removed and that PhD-holding respondents and respondents in commercialization-supportive research fields would be more likely to commercialize their research upon barrier removal. Overall, as with other disciplines, these data suggest that for innovations derived from academic cancer-research to move more effectively and

  18. A Survey of the Barriers Associated with Academic-based Cancer Research Commercialization

    PubMed Central

    Vanderford, Nathan L.; Weiss, L. Todd; Weiss, Heidi L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization within the academic setting is associated with many challenges and barriers. Previous studies investigating these challenges/barriers have, in general, broadly focused on multiple disciplines and, oftentimes, several institutions simultaneously. The goal of the study presented here was to analyze a range of barriers that may be broadly associated with commercializing academic-based cancer research. This goal was addressed via a study of the barriers associated with cancer research commercialization at the University of Kentucky (UK). To this end, a research instrument in the form of an electronic survey was developed. General demographic information was collected on study participants and two research questions were addressed: 1) What are the general barriers inhibiting cancer research commercialization at UK? and 2) Would mitigation of the barriers potentially enhance faculty engagement in commercialization activities? Descriptive and statistical analysis of the data reveal that multiple barriers likely inhibit cancer research commercialization at UK with expense, time, infrastructure, and lack of industry partnerships being among the most commonly cited factors. The potential alleviation of these factors in addition to revised University policies/procedures, risk mitigation, more emphasis on commercialization by academia research field, and increased information on how to commercialize significantly correlated with the potential for increased commercialization activity. Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that research commercialization would incrementally increase as barriers to the process are removed and that PhD-holding respondents and respondents in commercialization-supportive research fields would be more likely to commercialize their research upon barrier removal. Overall, as with other disciplines, these data suggest that for innovations derived from academic cancer-research to move more effectively and

  19. Misconduct in research: a descriptive survey of attitudes, perceptions and associated factors in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Okonta, Patrick I; Rossouw, Theresa

    2014-03-25

    Misconduct in research tarnishes the reputation, credibility and integrity of research institutions. Studies on research or scientific misconduct are still novel in developing countries. In this study, we report on the attitudes, perceptions and factors related to the work environment thought to be associated with research misconduct in a group of researchers in Nigeria - a developing country. A survey of researchers attending a scientific conference was done using an adapted Scientific Misconduct Questionnaire-Revised (SMQ-R). Initial descriptive analysis of individual items using frequencies and proportions for all quantitative data was performed. Thereafter, Likert scale responses were transformed into dichotomous responses. Fisher exact test was performed for associations as appropriate. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was accepted as significant. Half of the respondents (50.4%) were aware of a colleague who had committed misconduct, defined as "non-adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms". Over 88% of the researchers were concerned about the perceived amount of misconduct prevalent in their institution and 96.2% believed that one or more forms of scientific misconduct had occurred in their workplace. More than half (52.7%) rated the severity of penalties for scientific misconduct in their work environment as low. Furthermore¸ the majority (56.1%) were of the view that the chance of getting caught for scientific misconduct in their work environment was low. Researchers in Nigeria perceive that scientific misconduct is commonplace in their institutions, but are however worried about the negative effects of scientific misconduct on the credibility of scientific research. We recommend that researchers be empowered with the knowledge and virtues necessary for self-regulation that advance research integrity. Research institutions should however also step into their role of fostering a responsible

  20. Misconduct in research: a descriptive survey of attitudes, perceptions and associated factors in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Misconduct in research tarnishes the reputation, credibility and integrity of research institutions. Studies on research or scientific misconduct are still novel in developing countries. In this study, we report on the attitudes, perceptions and factors related to the work environment thought to be associated with research misconduct in a group of researchers in Nigeria - a developing country. Method A survey of researchers attending a scientific conference was done using an adapted Scientific Misconduct Questionnaire-Revised (SMQ-R). Initial descriptive analysis of individual items using frequencies and proportions for all quantitative data was performed. Thereafter, Likert scale responses were transformed into dichotomous responses. Fisher exact test was performed for associations as appropriate. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was accepted as significant. Result Half of the respondents (50.4%) were aware of a colleague who had committed misconduct, defined as “non-adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms”. Over 88% of the researchers were concerned about the perceived amount of misconduct prevalent in their institution and 96.2% believed that one or more forms of scientific misconduct had occurred in their workplace. More than half (52.7%) rated the severity of penalties for scientific misconduct in their work environment as low. Furthermore¸ the majority (56.1%) were of the view that the chance of getting caught for scientific misconduct in their work environment was low. Conclusion Researchers in Nigeria perceive that scientific misconduct is commonplace in their institutions, but are however worried about the negative effects of scientific misconduct on the credibility of scientific research. We recommend that researchers be empowered with the knowledge and virtues necessary for self-regulation that advance research integrity. Research institutions should however also step into their

  1. Proceedings from the 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Zachary S; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary F; Cillo, Joseph E; Hale, Robert G; Le, Anh D; Lee, Janice S; Kademani, Deepak

    2014-02-01

    The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, and the International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons sponsored the fifth research summit, which convened on May 2 and 3 in Rosemont, Illinois. The Research Summits are convened biennially to facilitate the discussion and collaboration of oral and maxillofacial surgeons with clinical and basic science researchers in fields affecting the specialty. The goal is to advance the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery through exposure and education in topics that ultimately benefit the oral and maxillofacial surgical patient. This edition of the research summit included the topics of robotic surgery and antiresorptive-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (ARONJ). Most importantly, this research summit saw the development of research interest groups (RIGs) in the fields of anesthesia, maxillofacial oncology and reconstructive surgery, obstructive sleep apnea and orthognathic surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, and trauma. These RIGs developed specific research goals with a plan to continue working on potential projects at the AAOMS Clinical Trials Course on May 7 to 9, 2013 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The summit program was developed by the AAOMS Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment. The charge of the committee is to encourage and promote research within the specialty and to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration. The research summit serves as a platform for oral and maxillofacial surgeons to lead the goal of advancement of research relevant to the specialty. This article provides an overview of the presentations that were made in the sessions on robotic surgery and ARONJ. The research summit keynote address and two additional presentations on patient registries are summarized and updates from the RIGs that were formed at the 2013 research summit are highlighted.

  2. Unpacking capacity to utilize research: A tale of the Burkina Faso public health association.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Nadia; Schrecker, Ted

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in addressing global health is for institutions to monitor and use research in policy-making. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), civil society organizations such as health professional associations can be key contributors to effective national health systems. However, there is little empirical data on their capacity to use research. This case study was used to gain insight into the factors that affect the knowledge translation performance of health professional associations in LMICs by describing the organizational elements and processes constituting capacity to use research, and examining the potential determinants of this capacity. Case study methodology was chosen for its flexibility to capture the multiple and often tacit processes within organizational routines. The Burkina Faso Public Health Association (ABSP) was studied, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews and key documents review. Five key dimensions that affect the association's capacity to use research to influence health policy emerged: organizational motivation; catalysts; organizational capacity to acquire and organizational capacity to transform research findings; moderating organizational factors. Also examined were the dissemination strategies used by ABSP and its abilities to enhance its capacity through networking, to advocate for more relevant research and to develop its potential role as knowledge broker, as well as limitations due to scarce resources. We conclude that a better understanding of the organizational capacity to use research of health professional associations in LMICs is needed to assess, improve and reinforce such capacity. Increased knowledge translation potential may leverage research resources and promote knowledge-sharing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of TrueBeam flattening-filter-free beams using Varian phase-space files: Comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Belosi, Maria F.; Fogliata, Antonella E-mail: afc@iosi.ch; Cozzi, Luca; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Krauss, Harald; Khamphan, Catherine; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Puxeu, Josep; Fedele, David; Mancosu, Pietro; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-space files for Monte Carlo simulation of the Varian TrueBeam beams have been made available by Varian. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the distributed phase-space files for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, against experimental measurements from ten TrueBeam Linacs. Methods: The phase-space files have been used as input in PRIMO, a recently released Monte Carlo program based on thePENELOPE code. Simulations of 6 and 10 MV FFF were computed in a virtual water phantom for field sizes 3 × 3, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} using 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} voxels and for 20 × 20 and 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} with 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3} voxels. The particles contained in the initial phase-space files were transported downstream to a plane just above the phantom surface, where a subsequent phase-space file was tallied. Particles were transported downstream this second phase-space file to the water phantom. Experimental data consisted of depth doses and profiles at five different depths acquired at SSD = 100 cm (seven datasets) and SSD = 90 cm (three datasets). Simulations and experimental data were compared in terms of dose difference. Gamma analysis was also performed using 1%, 1 mm and 2%, 2 mm criteria of dose-difference and distance-to-agreement, respectively. Additionally, the parameters characterizing the dose profiles of unflattened beams were evaluated for both measurements and simulations. Results: Analysis of depth dose curves showed that dose differences increased with increasing field size and depth; this effect might be partly motivated due to an underestimation of the primary beam energy used to compute the phase-space files. Average dose differences reached 1% for the largest field size. Lateral profiles presented dose differences well within 1% for fields up to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, while the discrepancy increased toward 2% in the 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} cases. Gamma analysis resulted in an agreement of 100% when a 2%, 2 mm criterion

  4. Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory as a framework for research on personality-psychopathology associations.

    PubMed

    Bijttebier, Patricia; Beck, Ilse; Claes, Laurence; Vandereycken, Walter

    2009-07-01

    Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) presupposes individual differences in the sensitivity of basic brain systems that respond to punishing and reinforcing stimuli. These differences are thought to underlie the personality dimensions of anxiety and impulsivity, and to have relevance for psychopathology. The present article aims at reviewing RST-based research on personality-psychopathology associations. First, RST and its revisions are described and the link between RST systems and personality dimensions is discussed. Second, studies investigating associations between RST systems and specific types of psychopathology are summarized. Although the available research yields a rather consistent picture with respect to constellations of BIS/BAS sensitivity that are associated with specific types of psychopathology, it also provides a clear indication that much work remains to be done. The discussion section highlights several topics that deserve future research attention.

  5. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  6. SU-E-T-403: Evaluation of the Beam Performance of a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator Under External Device-Based Gated Delivery Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobulnicky, K; Pawlak, D; Purwar, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the beam performance of a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator under external device-based gated delivery conditions. Methods: Six gating cycles were used to evaluate the gating performance of a standard production TrueBeam system that was not specially tuned in any way. The system was equipped with a factory installed external gating interface (EXGI). An in-house EXGI tester box was used to simulate the input gating signals. The gating cycles were selected based on long beam-on and short beam-off times, short beam-on and long beam-off times, or equal beam on and off times to check linac performance. The beam latencies were measured as the time difference between the logic high gating signal and the first or last target pulses with an oscilloscope. Tissue-Phantom Ratio, beam flatness, and dose distributions from 5 different plans were measured using the 6 different gating durations and the un-gated irradiation. A PTW 729 2-D array was used to compare 5 plans versus the un-gated delivery with a 1%/1mm gamma index passing criteria. Results: The beam latencies of the linac were based off of 20 samples for beam-on and beam-off, for each gating cycle. The average beam-on delays were measured to be between 57 and 66msec, with a maximum of 88 msec. The beam off latencies averaged between 19 and 26msec, with a maximum of 48 msec. TPR20,10 measurements showed beam energy stability within 0.5% of the un-gated delivery. Beam flatness was better than 2.5% for all gated cycles. All but two deliveries, the open field with 4 seconds on, 1 second off, and a five field IMRT plan with 0.5 seconds on, 2.5 seconds off, had >90% passing rate. Conclusion: TrueBeam demonstrates excellent beam stability with minimal beam latencies under external device-based gated operations. Dosimetric measurements show minimal variation in beam energy, flatness, and plan delivery. Authors are employees of Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  7. WE-AB-BRB-07: Alanine and Monte Carlo Determined Beam Quality Corrections for Nonstandard Fields of the Varian TrueBeam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, M; DeWerd, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine beam quality correction factors for flattened and unflattened beams of the Varian TrueBeam™ accelerator using alanine measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods: Measurements were performed using L-α-alanine pellets encased in Virtual Water™ paddles. These were irradiated in liquid water using various field sizes of the 6MV and 10MV beam energies of the TrueBeam™, with both flattening-filter-free (FFF) and flattened beam modes. Measurements were also performed in a 10×10 cm{sup 2} {sup 60}Co field. Pellets were read out by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, Teddington, UK) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry, and results were corrected for energy dependence using graphite calorimetry. Beam quality correction factors (k{sub Q}, k{sub Q}msr,Q, and k{sub Q}clin,Q{sub msr}) were determined for three ionization chambers: an Exradin A12 Farmer-type chamber, an Exradin A1SL scanning chamber, and an Exradin A26 microchamber. All chambers were modeled in the egs-chamber user code of EGSnrc. Sources were created using Varian-supplied IAEA-compliant phase spaces and the BEAMnrc user code, and were validated by comparing measured and simulated dose profiles. Results: Measured and calculated k{sub Q} values agreed within uncertainties, showing the chamber models to be reliable. A comparison of measured and calculated k{sub Q}msr,Q results with TG-51-based values showed that TG-51 adequately accounts for variations in beam quality between flattened and unflattened 10×10 cm{sup 2} fields. Small field corrections, k{sub Q}clin,Q{sub msr}, were determined to be up to 5%, referenced to a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field of the same energy and mode. Conclusion: Beam quality corrections were determined for several beam energies of the TrueBeam™ accelerator using Monte Carlo calculations and were validated using measurements with alanine. Values of k{sub Q} determined using TG-51 were found to be adequate for FFF reference fields

  8. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    DOE PAGES

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; ...

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  9. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  10. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2015 Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Joseph E; Basi, David; Peacock, Zachary; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Biennial Research Summit of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois on May 6 and 7, 2015. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the most recent clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. The proceedings of the events of that summit are presented in this report.

  11. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses: Seventy-Five Years of Education, Practice, and Research.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Joy E

    2017-04-01

    For the past 75 years, the American Association of Industrial Nurses, and later the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, has advocated for occupational and environmental health nurses by supporting quality undergraduate and graduate education in the specialty and certification through the American Board of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., and providing funding for and dissemination of occupational health nursing research as well as by developing occupational health nursing practice standards, competencies, and code of ethics.

  12. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective model.

  13. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective model.

  14. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. Contribution of IADR This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. Conclusions IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease. PMID:26391001

  15. Vision and Creation of the American Heart Association Pharmaceutical Roundtable Outcomes Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eric D.; Spertus, John A.; Cohen, David J.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Go, Alan S.; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Hinton, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The field of outcomes research seeks to define optimal treatment in practice and to promote the rapid, full adoption of efficacious therapies into routine clinical care. The American Heart Association (AHA) formed the AHA Pharmaceutical Roundtable (PRT) Outcomes Research Centers Network to accelerate attainment of these goals. Participating centers were intended to carry out state-of-the-art outcomes research in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, to train the next generation of investigators, and to support the formation of a collaborative research network. Program After a competitive application process, four AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers were selected: Duke Clinical Research Institute; Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute; Stanford University-Kaiser Permanente of Northern California; and University of California, Los Angeles. Each center proposed between one and three projects organized around a single theme in CVD or stroke. Additionally, each center will select and train up to six post-doctoral fellows over the next four years, and will participate in cross-collaborative activities among the centers. Conclusions The AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers Network is designed to further strengthen the field of CVD and stroke outcomes research by fostering innovative research, supporting high quality training, and encouraging center-to-center collaborations. PMID:20031906

  16. Vision and creation of the American Heart Association pharmaceutical roundtable outcomes research centers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric D; Spertus, John A; Cohen, David J; Hlatky, Mark A; Go, Alan S; Vickrey, Barbara G; Saver, Jeffrey L; Hinton, Patricia C

    2009-11-01

    The field of outcomes research seeks to define optimal treatment in practice and to promote the rapid full adoption of efficacious therapies into routine clinical care. The American Heart Association (AHA) formed the AHA Pharmaceutical Roundtable (PRT) Outcomes Research Centers Network to accelerate attainment of these goals. Participating centers were intended to carry out state-of-the-art outcomes research in cardiovascular disease and stroke, to train the next generation of investigators, and to support the formation of a collaborative research network. After a competitive application process, 4 AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers were selected: Duke Clinical Research Institute; Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute; Stanford University-Kaiser Permanente of Northern California; and University of California, Los Angeles. Each center proposed between 1 and 3 projects organized around a single theme in cardiovascular disease or stroke. Additionally, each center will select and train up to 6 postdoctoral fellows over the next 4 years, and will participate in cross-collaborative activities among the centers. The AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers Network is designed to further strengthen the field of cardiovascular disease and stroke outcomes research by fostering innovative research, supporting high quality training, and encouraging center-to-center collaborations.

  17. Imperatives for continuing research education: results of a Medical Library Association survey.

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, P W; Dahlen, K H; Stoddart, J

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey assessing the interest of Medical Library Association (MLA) members in acquiring or improving research skills through continuing education (CE). It describes respondents' educational preparation for research and selected research activities, reviews MLA's experiences with offering CE courses on research topics, and discusses MLA's role in providing education to prepare members for research. The paper includes recommendations for improving research skills through CE and other professional activities. Topics of greatest interest to MLA members were survey development, problem identification, evaluation and cost studies, survey methodology, and methods of data collection. Many respondents preferred local courses. Academic health sciences librarians, as a group, were found to be more productive publishers than hospital librarians. Many respondents reported the availability of free or subsidized research-support services, but more than half did not. More than 90% of respondents indicated that MLA should actively encourage, require, or offer research education. A comprehensive plan for obtaining research skills through CE, along with individual self-assessment and counseling, is recommended. PMID:1525614

  18. CvL, a lectin from the marine sponge Cliona varians: Isolation, characterization and its effects on pathogenic bacteria and Leishmania promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Moura, Raniere M; Queiroz, Alexandre F S; Fook, Jacy M S L L; Dias, Anny S F; Monteiro, Norberto K V; Ribeiro, Jannisson K C; Moura, Gioconda E D D; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Santos, Elizeu A; Sales, Maurício P

    2006-12-01

    CvL, a lectin from the marine sponge Cliona varians was purified by acetone fractionation followed by Sepharose CL 4B affinity chromatography. CvL agglutinated papainized treated human erythrocytes with preference for type A erythrocytes. The lectin was strongly inhibited by monosaccharide d-galactose and disaccharide sucrose. CvL is a tetrameric glycoprotein of 28 kDa subunits linked by disulphide bridges with a molecular mass of 106 kDa by SDS-PAGE and 114 kDa by Sephacryl S300 gel filtration. The lectin was Ca2+ dependent, stable up to 60 degrees C for 60 min, with optimum pH of 7.5. CvL displays a cytotoxic effect on gram positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. However, CvL did not affect gram negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Leishmania chagasi promastigotes were agglutinated by CvL up to 2(8) titer. These findings are indicative of the physiological defense roles of CvL and its possible use in the antibiosis of bacteria and protozoa pathogenic.

  19. A Research on the Association of Pavement Surface Damages Using Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Tsung; Chang, Jia-Ray; Chen, Jian-Da; Chou, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Huang

    The association of pavement surface damages used to rely on the judgments of the experts. However, with the accumulation of data in the pavement surface maintenance database and the improvement of Data Mining, there are more and more methods available to explore the association of pavement surface damages. This research adopts Apriori algorithm to conduct association analysis on pavement surface damages. From the experience of experts, it has been believed that the association of road damages is complicated. However, through case studies, it has been found that pavement surface damages are caused among longitudinal cracking, alligator cracking and pen-holes, and they are unidirectional influence. In addition, with the help of association rules, it has been learned that, in pavement surface preventative maintenance, the top priority should be the repair of longitudinal cracking and alligator cracking, which can greatly reduce the occurrence of pen-holes and the risk of state compensations.

  20. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  1. 78 FR 44135 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Application for the Postdoctoral Research Associate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... data collection projects, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office... for the Postdoctoral Research Associate Program SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section...

  2. The Dominance of Associative Theorizing in Implicit Attitude Research: Propositional and Behavioral Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Sean; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; De Houwer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In the present article we re-examine one of the most deeply entrenched assumptions in modern attitude research, namely, that implicit social cognition is a product of associations between mental representations. More precisely, we argue that the analysis of implicit social cognition in psychology is curtailed by the widespread adoption of the…

  3. Comparing Service Priorities between Staff and Users in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Member Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Damon E.; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Duffy, Jocelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Using the results for participating Association of Research Libraries from the 2006 LibQUAL+[R] library service quality survey, we examine the service priorities of library staff (for example, whether desired scores for each survey item are above or below average) and the extent to which they are aligned with the priorities of undergraduates,…

  4. Development of a research platform for dissecting phenotype-genotype associations in rice (Oryza spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We present an overview of a research platform that provides essential germplasm, genotypic and phenotypic data and analytical tools for dissecting phenotye-genotype associations in rice. These resources include a diversity panel of 400 O. sativa and 100 O. rufipogon accessions that have been purifie...

  5. Comparing Service Priorities between Staff and Users in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Member Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Damon E.; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Duffy, Jocelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Using the results for participating Association of Research Libraries from the 2006 LibQUAL+[R] library service quality survey, we examine the service priorities of library staff (for example, whether desired scores for each survey item are above or below average) and the extent to which they are aligned with the priorities of undergraduates,…

  6. Balancing Needs and Resources. The Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum Proceedings No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staskey, Paul J., Ed.

    The abbreviated proceedings of the 18th Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research on balancing needs and resources are presented. Three of the five major addresses are presented in their entirety; the other two are summarized. The invited general session addresses included: "Talent for the 1980's" (Russell Edgerton); "If You Don't…

  7. The Dominance of Associative Theorizing in Implicit Attitude Research: Propositional and Behavioral Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Sean; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; De Houwer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In the present article we re-examine one of the most deeply entrenched assumptions in modern attitude research, namely, that implicit social cognition is a product of associations between mental representations. More precisely, we argue that the analysis of implicit social cognition in psychology is curtailed by the widespread adoption of the…

  8. Factors Associated with Research Anxiety of University Human Resource Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chadwick C.; Kotrlik, Joe W.

    2006-01-01

    Factors associated with research anxiety of university faculty members in human resource educations fields were examined. Most of the participating faculty members were male and half were full professors. The mean age was 52 and all but one held a doctorate. Relationships between selected demographic characteristics and The Higgins-Kotrlik…

  9. The Human Ecology of the American Educational Research Association. Report No. 261.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, James M., Jr.

    The concepts and methods of human ecology are applied to the geographic distribution of members of the American Educational Research Association. State characteristics are measured by five factors: (1) large-scale agriculture; (2) population size; (3) affluence-urbanization; (4) white predominance; (5) emphasis on specialized agriculture. City…

  10. Governing by Network in Europe: Associations, Educational Research and Social Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The coincident arrival of a European policy space in education and a European Educational Research Association [EERA], and their subsequent relation, will be the subject of this paper. EERA is a hybrid organization--it supports scientific networking, it is a social partner in EU policy, it is a first level social space for networking, and…

  11. National Association for Research in Science Teaching. 50th Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication provides abstracts of papers presented at the 50th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching held in Cincinnati, Ohio March 22-24, 1977. The entries represent a wide range of topics in the field of science education. Topics include instruction, teacher education, learning, enrollments, concept…

  12. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated with Community-Based Research in a Mexican-Origin Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.; Trejo, Laura; Miranda, Jeanne; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Quiter, Elaine S.; Mangione, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the recruitment strategies and personnel and materials costs associated with two community-based research studies in a Mexican-origin population. We also highlight the role that academic-community partnerships played in the outreach and recruitment process for our studies. We reviewed study documents using case study…

  13. Balancing Needs and Resources. The Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum Proceedings No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staskey, Paul J., Ed.

    The abbreviated proceedings of the 18th Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research on balancing needs and resources are presented. Three of the five major addresses are presented in their entirety; the other two are summarized. The invited general session addresses included: "Talent for the 1980's" (Russell Edgerton); "If You Don't…

  14. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  15. American Educational Research Association Abstracts of Papers, Fiftieth Anniversary Meeting 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educational Research Association, Washington, DC.

    This document contains abstracts of 53 papers presented at the 1966 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. A sampling of the varied subjects covered includes: teacher training, behavior, and evaluation; student aptitudes, attitudes, motivation, and achievement; education of disadvantaged; statistical methods and theory;…

  16. National Association for Research in Science Teaching 47th Annual meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This publication was produced by the ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education in cooperation with the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) to provide abstracts of most of the papers presented at the NARST annual conference in Chicago, Illinois, on April 15-18, 1974. The…

  17. Expanding the Epistemological Terrain: Increasing Equity and Diversity within the American Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s, the quest for civil rights by African Americans and other groups of color reverberated throughout the United States and the world, including within educational professional and research organizations, such as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Council of…

  18. Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Guidelines for Research Mentorship: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Chang, Catherine Y.; Hays, Danica G.; Pepperell, Jennifer; Spurgeon, Shawn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe guidelines endorsed by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision for research mentorship, including characteristics of mentors and mentees. Suggestions for implementing the guidelines at the individual, program, institution, and professional levels are focused on enhancing mentoring relationships as well as…

  19. Expanding the Epistemological Terrain: Increasing Equity and Diversity within the American Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s, the quest for civil rights by African Americans and other groups of color reverberated throughout the United States and the world, including within educational professional and research organizations, such as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Council of…

  20. AERA 2010 Web Communications Survey Report: "American Educational Research Association" January 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is intended to provide information to facilitate revision of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) website. All AERA members were invited to participate in an electronic survey to respond to questions about their assessments of the current website and their use of technology to access it. This report presents findings…

  1. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated with Community-Based Research in a Mexican-Origin Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.; Trejo, Laura; Miranda, Jeanne; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Quiter, Elaine S.; Mangione, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the recruitment strategies and personnel and materials costs associated with two community-based research studies in a Mexican-origin population. We also highlight the role that academic-community partnerships played in the outreach and recruitment process for our studies. We reviewed study documents using case study…

  2. A Report on the Peace Education Commission Program, International Peace Research Association Conference 2010, Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Swee-Hin

    2010-01-01

    From July 6th to 10th, 2010, International Peace Research Association (IPRA) held its biennial conference at the University of Sydney in Australia. Hosted by the University's Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies and coordinated by Jake Lynch and a team of dedicated staff and volunteers, the conference featured seven plenary panels and many…

  3. Towards a database for genotype-phenotype association research: mining data from encyclopaedia.

    PubMed

    Pajić, Vesna S; Pavloviç-Lazetić, Gordana M; Beljanski, Milos V; Brandt, Bernd W; Pajić, Milos B

    2013-01-01

    To associate phenotypic characteristics of an organism to molecules encoded by its genome, there is a need for well-structured genotype and phenotype data. We use a novel method for extracting data on phenotype and genotype characteristics of microorganisms from text. As a resource, we use an encyclopedia of microorganisms, which holds phenotypic and genotypic data and create a structured, flexible data resource, which can be exported to a range of database formats, containing genotype and phenotype data for 2412 species and 873 genera of microbes. This data source has great potential as a resource for future biological research on genotype-phenotype associations. In this paper, we focus on describing the structure and content of the resulting database and on evaluating the method used for extracting the data. We conclude that the resulting database can be used as a reliable complementary resource for research into genotype-phenotype association.

  4. A new species of Euricrium Enderlein from southern Brazil, new records for E. varians (Lane), a new combination, and a key for the Neotropical species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Dalton DE Souza; Schühli, Guilherme Schnell E

    2017-02-12

    A new species of the genus Euricrium is described-Euricrium edwardsi sp. n.-from the State of Paraná, southern Brazil. Additional material of E. varians is identified and illustrated, expanding the known distribution of the species. E. unimacula (Lane), n.com. is redescribed based on the female holotype and illustrated, and formally transferred to Euricrium. A key for the Neotropical species of Euricrium is presented and comments are made on the known diversity of the genus.

  5. Policy recommendations for addressing privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increased use of human biological material for cell-based research and clinical interventions poses risks to the privacy of patients and donors, including the possibility of re-identification of individuals from anonymized cell lines and associated genetic data. These risks will increase as technologies and databases used for re-identification become affordable and more sophisticated. Policies that require ongoing linkage of cell lines to donors’ clinical information for research and regulatory purposes, and existing practices that limit research participants’ ability to control what is done with their genetic data, amplify the privacy concerns. Discussion To date, the privacy issues associated with cell-based research and interventions have not received much attention in the academic and policymaking contexts. This paper, arising out of a multi-disciplinary workshop, aims to rectify this by outlining the issues, proposing novel governance strategies and policy recommendations, and identifying areas where further evidence is required to make sound policy decisions. The authors of this paper take the position that existing rules and norms can be reasonably extended to address privacy risks in this context without compromising emerging developments in the research environment, and that exceptions from such rules should be justified using a case-by-case approach. In developing new policies, the broader framework of regulations governing cell-based research and related areas must be taken into account, as well as the views of impacted groups, including scientists, research participants and the general public. Summary This paper outlines deliberations at a policy development workshop focusing on privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions. The paper provides an overview of these challenges, followed by a discussion of key themes and recommendations that emerged from discussions at the workshop. The paper concludes that

  6. The Suborbital Research Association: Using Suborbital Platforms for Scientific and Student Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, V.; Migeotte, P. F.; Legros, J. C.; Deneyer, B.; Caron, R.

    2016-10-01

    The Suborbital Research Association (SRA), created in Brussels in June 2013, seeks to raise the awareness of the scientific community to the possibilities for scientific and technological research purposes offered by long suborbital trajectories, yielding several minutes of continuous microgravity at an attractive cost. The SRA, which is open to all forms of cooperation, has set its objectives: " to encourage, to assist, to facilitate and to promote suborbital scientific research; to give the necessary assistance, within the possibilities of the Association, to the practical realization of fundamental and applied scientific research in the suborbital environment, independently and in a complementary manner to existing structures; to organize or to participate in the organization of promotion events of scientific research in suborbital flights to the general public, the youth and the students." The first on-going project of the SRA is to organize a first scientific flight with the XCOR Lynx suborbital spaceplane in 2016 or 2017 to perform scientific and student experiments. A SRA Selection Committee evaluated 17 experiment proposals from six European countries and recommended ten experiments for this first flight: five scientific and technological experiments from European Scientists, a historical promotional experiment, and four student experiments from Belgian secondary schools. Further flights will be organised as soon as possible. The paper presents the SRA and put in context the proposed use of suborbital platforms for microgravity research. The selected experiments are further introduced.

  7. Defining the Medical Library Association research agenda: methodology and final results from a consensus process

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.; Harris, Martha R.; Ascher, Marie T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Using a group consensus methodology, the research sought to generate a list of the twelve to fifteen most important and answerable research questions in health sciences librarianship as part of a broader effort to implement the new Medical Library Association (MLA) research policy. Methods: The delphi method was used. The committee distributed a brief survey to all estimated 827 MLA leaders and 237 MLA Research Section members, requesting they submit what they considered to be the most important and answerable research questions facing the profession. The submitted questions were then subjected to 2 rounds of voting to produce a short list of top-ranked questions. Results: The survey produced 62 questions from 54 MLA leaders and MLA Research Section members, who responded from an estimated potential population of 1,064 targeted colleagues. These questions were considered by the process participants to be the most important and answerable research questions facing the profession. Through 2 rounds of voting, these 62 questions were reduced to the final 12 highest priority questions. Conclusion: The modified delphi method accomplished its desired survey and consensus goals. Future survey and consensus processes will be revised to generate more initial questions and to distill a larger number of ranked prioritized research questions. PMID:19626143

  8. Global Dental Research Productivity and Its Association With Human Development, Gross National Income, and Political Stability.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P; Elangovan, Satheesh

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the associations between country level factors (such as human development, economic productivity, and political stability) and their dental research productivity. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of bibliometric data from Scopus search engine. Human Development Index (HDI), Gross National Income per capita (GNI), and Failed State Index measures were the independent variables. Outcomes were "Total number of publications (articles or articles in press) in the field of dentistry" and "Total number of publications in the field of dentistry per million population." Non-parametric tests were used to examine the association between the independent and outcome variables. During the year 2013, a total of 11,952 dental research articles were published across the world. The top 5 publishing countries were United States, Brazil, India, Japan, and United Kingdom. "Very High" HDI countries had significantly higher number of total dental research articles and dental research articles per million population when compared to the "High HDI," "Medium HDI," and "Low HDI" countries (p < 0.0001). There was a significant linear relationship between the GNI quartile income levels and outcome metrics (p ≤ 0.007). Countries which were highly politically stable were associated with significantly higher dental research productivity (p < 0.0001). There appears to be a regional concentration of articles with just five countries contributing to over 50% of all articles. The human development and economic development of a country are linearly correlated with dental research productivity. Dental research productivity also increases with increasing political stability of a country. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Learning More About Learning. Papers from the Third ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) Research Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Alexander, Ed.

    This booklet contains five papers and reports from the Third Curriculum Research Institute of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development of the National Education Association (Chicago, May 3-7, 1958). The focus of the Institute was upon "Learning: An Area in Need of Study and Research"; its purpose was to draw on research findings…

  10. US Department of Energy Teacher Research Associates Program: Profile and survey of 1990--1991 participants

    SciTech Connect

    Vivio, F.M.; Stevenson, W.L.

    1992-11-01

    Through its laboratories, facilities, and technology centers, the United States Department of Energy supports the development and training of scientists and engineers to meet the nation`s future human resource needs in energy science and technology. This mission is accomplished, in part, through summer programs of active participation by precollege teachers in laboratory research. Since 1989, the Teacher Research Associates (TRAC) program has provided outstanding 7th- through 12th-grade science, mathematics, and technology teachers from across the nation the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects at DOE laboratories. The TRAC program encourages participants, upon returning to their home institution, to share with their students and colleagues the experience and knowledge gained through their research endeavors.

  11. Issues of data governance associated with data mining in medical research: experiences from an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Jesmin; Imam, Tasadduq; Tickle, Kevin S; Garcia-Alonso, Debora

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is a review of data mining techniques used in medical research. It will cover the existing applications of these techniques in the identification of diseases, and also present the authors' research experiences in medical disease diagnosis and analysis. A computational diagnosis approach can have a significant impact on accurate diagnosis and result in time and cost effective solutions. The chapter will begin with an overview of computational intelligence concepts, followed by details on different classification algorithms. Use of association learning, a well recognised data mining procedure, will also be discussed. Many of the datasets considered in existing medical data mining research are imbalanced, and the chapter focuses on this issue as well. Lastly, the chapter outlines the need of data governance in this research domain.

  12. Visualization of heat transfer in material for varians of boundary value with Relaxation Iteration Gauss-Seidel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Imam; Cari; Suparmi

    2017-01-01

    The research was aimed to know the effect of initial boundary value to the heat propagation rate pattern using iterations over Gauss-Seidel relaxation method and to analyze the exact value of each node descritization profile of test material. This study was an analytical study to fine analytical an numerical solution. Result from this study is that the pattern of variation of the boundary or initial conditions of a material with regard conductivity value remains at steady state the exact value of the smallest are in the same iteration value. The indicates that the value of the thermal equilibrium tend to be at the same iteration. Result from study showed that the pattern of initial boundary values that causes steady state of heat propagation of test material that has smallest exact similar to the iteration value.

  13. Motivation to Work: How to Sustain a Research Career in Higher Education: A Summary of the 2011 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. James R. Austin, Professor of Music Education and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder, was the guest speaker for the 2011 Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee's Graduate Research Forum held in conjunction with the annual OMEA Professional Development Conference. During his…

  14. Motivation to Work: How to Sustain a Research Career in Higher Education: A Summary of the 2011 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. James R. Austin, Professor of Music Education and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder, was the guest speaker for the 2011 Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee's Graduate Research Forum held in conjunction with the annual OMEA Professional Development Conference. During his…

  15. Assessing the impact of defining a global priority research agenda to address HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Odone, Anna; Matteelli, Alberto; Chiesa, Valentina; Cella, Paola; Ferrari, Antonio; Pezzetti, Federica; Signorelli, Carlo; Getahun, Haileyesus

    2016-11-01

    In 2010, the WHO issued 77 priority research questions (PRQs) to address HIV-associated TB. Objective of the this study was to assess the impact of defining the research agenda in stimulating and directing research around priority research questions. We used number and type of scientific publications as a proxy to quantitatively assess the impact of research agenda setting. We conducted 77 single systematic reviews - one for every PRQ - building 77 different search strategies using PRQs' keywords. Multivariate logistic regression models were applied to assess the quantity and quality of research produced over time and accounting for selected covariates. In 2009-2015, PRQs were addressed by 1631 publications (median: 11 studies published per PRQ, range 1-96). The most published area was 'Intensified TB case finding' (median: 23 studies/PRQ, range: 2-74). The majority (62.1%, n = 1013) were published as original studies, and more than half (58%, n = 585) were conducted in the African region. Original studies' publication increased over the study period (P trend = <0.001). They focused more on the 'Intensified TB case finding' (OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.56-2.93) and 'Drug-resistant TB and HIV infection' (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.47-3.06) areas than non-original studies. Original studies were published in journals of lower impact factor and received a smaller number of citations than non-original studies (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.42-0.69). The generation of evidence to address PRQs has increased over time particularly in selected fields. Setting a priority research agenda for HIV-associated TB might have positively influenced the direction and the conduct of research and contributed to the global response to such a major threat to health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Promising and Established Investigators' Experiences Participating in the National Athletic Trainers' Association Foundation Research Mentor Program.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Sara L; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Barrett, Jessica L

    2017-04-01

      Mentorship is a helpful resource for individuals who transition from doctoral student to tenure-track faculty member. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Research & Education Foundation offers a Research Mentor Program to provide mentorship to promising investigators, particularly as they work to establish independent lines of research.   To gain the perspectives of promising and established investigators on their participation in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program.   Qualitative, phenomenological research.   Higher education institutions.   Seven promising investigators (5 women, 2 men) and 7 established investigators (2 women, 5 men), all of whom had completed the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Data Collection and Analysis We developed and piloted intervi: ew guides designed to gain participants' perspectives on their experiences participating in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Semistructured telephone interviews were completed with each individual and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach, and saturation was obtained. Trustworthiness was established with the use of member checking, multiple-analyst triangulation, and data-source triangulation.   Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) motivation, (2) collaboration, and (3) resources. Participants were motivated to become involved because they saw the value of mentorship, and mentees desired guidance in their research. Participants believed that collaboration on a project contributed to a positive relationship, and they also desired additional program and professional resources to support novice faculty.   Promising and established investigators should be encouraged to engage in mentoring relationships to facilitate mentees' research agendas and professional development. The NATA Foundation and athletic training profession may consider providing additional resources for novice faculty, such as training on

  17. The West End Revitalization Association's community-owned and -managed research model: development, implementation, and action.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Christopher D; Wilson, Sacoby M; Wilson, Omega R

    2007-01-01

    Principal investigators (PIs) of community-based projects are predominantly university faculty who partner with community-based organizations (CBOs) to find a place to conduct research in communities that will cooperate with their research objectives. University-managed research models (UMRMs) are not always beneficial for CBOs because the university usually manages the study, collects and owns the data, and leverages control at each stage of research, without priority to resolution of problems impacting the quality of life of participating communities. We present the principles of community-owned and -managed research (COMR), as a new community-driven research model developed by the West End Revitalization Association (WERA), a CBO in Mebane, North Carolina. We describe WERA's development of COMR, compare the power hierarchies of COMR with traditional UMRMs, distinguish COMR partnerships from UMRM partnerships, discuss disbursement of funds, and control/ownership of data. As the PI of research activities, WERA drafted Memoranda of Agreement (MOAs) for all partners, including academic researchers, implemented quality assurance and control procedures, submitted community research protocols for institutional review, and retained data ownership for action, activism, and problem solving. COMR methods encouraged corrective action of environmental justice (EJ) problems in affected communities, including provision of public, regulated drinking water and sewer services. COMR promotes CBOs with demonstrated organizational capacity to PI and project manager. The COMR model goes beyond UMRMs and CBPR because it emphasized the credibility and capacity of CBOs to develop, own, manage, foster, and sustain viable research agendas to address ongoing environmental hazards and related threats to health and quality of life.

  18. [Progress in research of association between myopia and sunlight exposure in children].

    PubMed

    Zhai, L L; Wu, X Y; Xu, S J; Tao, F B

    2016-11-10

    Myopia has become a major health problem on global scale due to its increasing high prevalence in the past few decades and gradual younger onset age. Accumulated epidemiological surveys have shown that decreased time of exposure to sunlight would be an inducement for the development of myopia. Increasing time spent outdoors and exposure to sunlight might be the most cost-effective and effective measure for children to prevent myopia. This paper summarizes the progress in research of the association between sunlight exposure and myopia in children and its mechanisms to provide new clues for the research on myopia prevention and control.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Root Traits in the Context of Plant Hormone Research.

    PubMed

    Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) mapping is a powerful method for the identification of alleles that underlie quantitative traits. It enables one to understand how genetic variation translates into phenotypic variation. In particular, plant hormone signaling pathways play a key role in shaping phenotypes. This chapter presents a protocol for genome-wide association mapping of root traits of Arabidopsis thaliana in the context of hormone research. We describe a specific protocol for acquiring primary and lateral root trait data that is appropriate for GWA studies using FIJI (ImageJ), and subsequent GWA mapping using a user-friendly Internet application.

  20. Institutional Research: New Challenges to an Evolving Role. Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (13th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 26-28, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Bayard, Comp.

    New challenges facing the institutional research profession are covered in these 1986 conference proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Paper titles and authors include: "Institutional Research at Mercer County Community College: The Changing Role in the Eighties" (F. L. Edwards); "Course Placement and Academic…

  1. Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors--A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented By Dr. Wendy Sims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatt, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee annually hosts a Graduate Research Forum in conjunction with the OMEA's Professional Development Conference. In 2009, the guest speaker was Dr. Wendy Sims, Director of Music Education at the University of Missouri--Columbia and Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. An…

  2. Resources for Research Libraries. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (98th, New York, New York, May 7-8, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    The management of research libraries and national resources for the funding of research library activities were the major topics addressed by the speakers and discussion sessions at this meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Included are transcripts of the addresses and discussions on higher education's turbulent environment,…

  3. Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors--A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented By Dr. Wendy Sims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatt, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee annually hosts a Graduate Research Forum in conjunction with the OMEA's Professional Development Conference. In 2009, the guest speaker was Dr. Wendy Sims, Director of Music Education at the University of Missouri--Columbia and Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. An…

  4. Facilitation roles and characteristics associated with research use by healthcare professionals: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cranley, Lisa A; Cummings, Greta G; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; Toth, Ferenc; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2017-08-11

    Implementing research findings into practice is a complex process that is not well understood. Facilitation has been described as a key component of getting research findings into practice. The literature on facilitation as a practice innovation is growing. This review aimed to identify facilitator roles and to describe characteristics of facilitation that may be associated with successful research use by healthcare professionals. We searched 10 electronic databases up to December 2016 and used predefined criteria to select articles. We included conceptual papers and empirical studies that described facilitator roles, facilitation processes or interventions, and that focused on healthcare professionals and research use. We used content and thematic analysis to summarise data. Rogers' five main attributes of an innovation guided our synthesis of facilitation characteristics. Of the 38 488 articles identified from our online and manual search, we included 195 predominantly research studies. We identified nine facilitator roles: opinion leaders, coaches, champions, research facilitators, clinical/practice facilitators, outreach facilitators, linking agents, knowledge brokers and external-internal facilitators. Fifteen facilitation characteristics were associated with research use, which we grouped into five categories using Rogers' innovation attributes: relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability and observability. We found a diverse and broad literature on the concept of facilitation that can expand our current thinking about facilitation as an innovation and its potential to support an integrated, collaborative approach to improving healthcare delivery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. An evaluation of the stability of image-quality parameters of Varian on-board imaging (OBI) and EPID imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dennis N; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Gutierrez, Alonso N

    2015-03-08

    Quality assurance (QA) of the image quality for image-guided localization systems is crucial to ensure accurate visualization and localization of regions of interest within the patient. In this study, the temporal stability of selected image parameters was assessed and evaluated for kV CBCT mode, planar radiographic kV, and MV modes. The motivation of the study was to better characterize the temporal variability in specific image-quality parameters. The CATPHAN, QckV-1, and QC-3 phantoms were used to evaluate the image-quality parameters of the imaging systems on a Varian Novalis Tx linear accelerator. The planar radiographic images were analyzed in PIPSpro with high-contrast spatial resolution (f30, f40,f50 lp/mm) being recorded. For OBI kV CBCT, high-quality head full-fan acquisition and pelvis half-fan acquisition modes were evaluated for uniformity, noise, spatial resolution, HU constancy, and geometric distortion. Dose and X-ray energy for the OBI were recorded using the Unfors RaySafe Xi system with the R/F High Detector for kV planar radiographic and the CT detector for kV CBCT. Dose for the MV EPID was recorded using a PTW975 Semiflex ion chamber, PTW UNIDOS electrometer, and CNMC Plastic Water. For each image-quality parameter, values were normalized to the mean, and the normalized standard deviations were recorded to evaluate the parameter's temporal variability. For planar radiographic modes, the normalized standard deviations of the spatial resolution (f30, f40, & f50) were 0.015, 0.008, 0.004 lp/mm and 0.006, 0.009, 0.018 lp/mm for the kV and MV, respectively. The normalized standard deviation of dose for kV and MV were 0.010 mGy and 0.005mGy, respectively. The standard deviations for full- and half-fan kV CBCT modes were averaged together. The following normalized standard deviations for each kV CBCT parameter were: 0.075 HU (uniformity), 0.071 HU (noise), 0.006mm (AP-geometric distortion), 0.005 mm (LAT-geometric distortion), 0.058mm (slice thickness

  6. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients.

  7. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  8. Utility of genome-wide association study findings: prostate cancer as a translational research paradigm.

    PubMed

    Turner, A R; Kader, A K; Xu, J

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of consistently replicated associations between genetic markers and complex disease risk, including cancers. Alone, these markers have limited utility in risk prediction; however, when several of these markers are used in combination, the predictive performance appears to be similar to that of many currently available clinical predictors. Despite this, there are divergent views regarding the clinical validity and utility of these genetic markers in risk prediction. There are valid concerns, thus providing a direction for new lines of research. Herein, we outline the debate and use the example of prostate cancer to highlight emerging evidence from studies that aim to address potential concerns. We also describe a translational framework that could be used to guide the development of a new generation of comprehensive research studies aimed at capitalizing on these exciting new discoveries.

  9. Energy spectra, angular spread, fluence profiles and dose distributions of 6 and 18 MV photon beams: results of monte carlo simulations for a varian 2100EX accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ding, George X

    2002-04-07

    The purpose of this study is to provide detailed characteristics of incident photon beams for different field sizes and beam energies. This information is critical to the future development of accurate treatment planning systems. It also enhances our knowledge of radiotherapy photon beams. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code, BEAM, has been used to simulate 6 and 18 MV photon beams from a Varian Clinac-2100EX accelerator. A simulated realistic beam is stored in a phase space data file, which contains details of each particle's complete history including where it has been and where it has interacted. The phase space files are analysed to obtain energy spectra, angular distribution, fluence profile and mean energy profiles at the phantom surface for particles separated according to their charge and history. The accuracy of a simulated beam is validated by the excellent agreement between the Monte Carlo calculated and measured dose distributions. Measured depth-dose curves are obtained from depth-ionization curves by accounting for newly introduced chamber fluence corrections and the stopping-power ratios for realistic beams. The study presents calculated depth-dose components from different particles as well as calculated surface dose and contribution from different particles to surface dose across the field. It is shown that the increase of surface dose with the increase of the field size is mainly due to the increase of incident contaminant charged particles. At 6 MV, the incident charged particles contribute 7% to 21% of maximum dose at the surface when the field size increases from 10 x 10 to 40 x 40 cm2. At 18 MV, their contributions are up to 11% and 29% of maximum dose at the surface for 10 x 10 cm2 and 40 x 40 cm2 fields respectively. However, the fluence of these incident charged particles is less than 1% of incident photon fluence in all cases.

  10. SU-E-J-11: Measurement of Eye Lens Dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with Different CBCT Acquisition Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Dhote, D; Kumar, R; Thakur, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens doses were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT.

  11. SU-E-T-317: The Development of a DIBH Technique for Left Sided Breast Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Utilizing Varians RPM System in a Community Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Hasson, B; Young, M; Workie, D; Geraghty, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a Deep Inhalation Breath Hold program (DIBH) for treatment of patients with Left-sided breast cancer in a community hospital. Methods: All patients with left sided breast cancer underwent a screening free breathing CT. Evaluation of the conventional tangent treatment fields and the heart was conducted. If the heart would not be excluded using tangents, the patient then received DIBH breathe coaching. The patients returned for a 4D CT simulation. The patients breathing cycle was monitored using the Varian Real-Time position ManagementTM (RPM) system to assess duration of DIBH, amplitude, phase and recovery time to normal breathing. Then a DIBH CT was obtained at the desired amplitude. Duplicate plans were developed for both free breathing and DIBH on the Eclipse planning system and comparison DVH's were created. The plan that provided the prescribed treatment coverage and the least doses to the OAR (heart, Lt. Lung) was determined. Those patients selected to receive treatment with DIBH were set up for treatment, and breathing was monitored using the RPM system. Practice trials were used to confirm that the amplitude, phase and recovery were consistent with findings from simulation. Results: 10 patients have been treated using the DIBH procedure in our clinic. The DIBH patients had an average increase of 80% lung volume on DIBH, decreased lung volume receiving 50% of the dose, and decreases in the V20 dose. Significant reduction in the maximum and mean dose to the heart, as well as the dose to 1CC of the volume for the DIBH plans. Conclusion: Using the RPM system already available in the clinic, staff training, and patient coaching a simple DIBH program was setup. The use of DIBH has shown promise in reducing doses to the critical organs while maintaining PTV coverage for left sided breast treatments.

  12. Experimental validation of a Monte Carlo-based kV x-ray projection model for the Varian linac-mounted cone-beam CT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Pokhrel, Damodar; Su, Zhong; Lu, Jun; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2008-03-01

    Fast and accurate modeling of cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projection data can improve CBCT image quality either by linearizing projection data for each patient prior to image reconstruction (thereby mitigating detector blur/lag, spectral hardening, and scatter artifacts) or indirectly by supporting rigorous comparative simulation studies of competing image reconstruction and processing algorithms. In this study, we compare Monte Carlo-computed x-ray projections with projections experimentally acquired from our Varian Trilogy CBCT imaging system for phantoms of known design. Our recently developed Monte Carlo photon-transport code, PTRAN, was used to compute primary and scatter projections for cylindrical phantom of known diameter (NA model 76-410) with and without bow-tie filter and antiscatter grid for both full- and half-fan geometries. These simulations were based upon measured 120 kVp spectra, beam profiles, and flat-panel detector (4030CB) point-spread function. Compound Poisson- process noise was simulated based upon measured beam output. Computed projections were compared to flat- and dark-field corrected 4030CB images where scatter profiles were estimated by subtracting narrow axial-from full axial width 4030CB profiles. In agreement with the literature, the difference between simulated and measured projection data is of the order of 6-8%. The measurement of the scatter profiles is affected by the long tails of the detector PSF. Higher accuracy can be achieved mainly by improving the beam modeling and correcting the non linearities induced by the detector PSF.

  13. Effects of tertiary MLC configuration on secondary neutron spectra from 18 MV x-ray beams for the Varian 21EX linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.; Burgett, Eric; Followill, David; Hertel, Nolan E.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the jaw configuration and the presence and configuration of the tertiary multileaf collimator (MLC) on the secondary neutron spectra for an 18 MV Varian 21EX linear accelerator (linac) is investigated in detail. The authors report the measured spectra for four collimator (jaw-and-MLC) configurations. These configurations represent the extreme settings of the jaws and MLC and should therefore describe the range of possible fluence and spectra that may be encountered during use of this linac. In addition to measurements, a Monte Carlo model was used to simulate the four collimator configurations and calculate the energy spectra and fluence at the same location as it was measured. The Monte Carlo model was also used to calculate the sources of neutron production in the linac head for each collimator configuration. They found that photoneutron production in the linac treatment head is dominated by the order in which the primary photon beam intercepts the high-Z material. The primary collimator, which has the highest position in the linac head (in a fixed location), is the largest source of secondary neutrons. Thereafter, the collimator configuration plays a role in where the neutrons originate. For instance, if the jaws are closed, they intercept the beam and contribute substantially to the secondary neutron production. Conversely, if the jaws are open, the MLC plays a larger role in neutron production (assuming, of course, that it intercepts the beam). They found that different collimator configurations make up to a factor of 2 difference in the ambient dose equivalent. PMID:19810476

  14. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - Developing a Continuum of Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2600 members from approximately 74 countries, APECS represents a body of students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach opportunities for young polar researchers. APECS core programs that include career development workshops and panels (including several associated

  15. Conference Scene: The great debate: genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research, good or bad?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2010-03-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) 'work' for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held--appropriately--at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics.

  16. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA): Online Research Data, Tools, and References

    PubMed Central

    Finke, Roger; Adamczyk, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) currently archives over 400 local, national, and international data files, and offers a wide range of research tools to build surveys, preview data on-line, develop customized maps and reports of U.S. church membership, and examine religion differences across nations and regions of the world. The ARDA also supports reference and teaching tools that draw on the rich data archive. This research note offers a brief introduction to the quantitative data available for exploration or download, and a few of the website features most useful for research and teaching. Supported by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, the Pennsylvania State University, and the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion, all data downloads and online services are free of charge. PMID:25484914

  17. [HPV-associated head and neck cancer. The basics of molecular and translational research].

    PubMed

    Wittekindt, C; Wagner, S; Klussmann, J P

    2011-09-01

    Translational research refers to the interfaces between preclinical research and targeted short- and medium-term developments through to clinical standards. There are two distinct groups of oropharyngeal malignancies: those caused by tobacco and alcohol abuse and those caused by HPV infection. Although the prognosis of patients in the latter group is significantly better, this is not taken into consideration in the choice of treatment. However, less intensive use of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or surgery, as well as targeted multimodal therapeutic approaches, is under research. This article summarizes the main events in the HPV life cycle, with emphasis on carcinogenic mechanisms and potential new molecular targets. Identifying distinct tumor entities of the oropharynx enables the design and development of new preventive and therapeutic strategies to reduce the incidence and mortality of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancers in the near future.

  18. Developing a clinical research associate training program at Dillard University: the impact of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Charlotte; Dennis, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 Dillard University and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans collaborated to secure a five year-grant from the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health to establish a Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Center (MHHDRC) located on the campus of Dillard University. The MHHDRC is the first Federally funded Center of Excellence in the state of Louisiana. Three cores of the Center operate to achieve its mission. One core includes a clinical research associate (CRA) training program. The major goal of the program is to increase the number of minority CRAs in the state of Louisiana, especially in New Orleans and, ultimately promote greater participation and retention of minorities in clinical trials research. This article discusses the initiation of the CRA training program, its planning, community outreach, implementation, integration of multiple resources and role of collaboration in the development of the MHHDRC including accomplishments, challenges and future plans.

  19. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA): Online Research Data, Tools, and References.

    PubMed

    Finke, Roger; Adamczyk, Amy

    2008-12-01

    The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) currently archives over 400 local, national, and international data files, and offers a wide range of research tools to build surveys, preview data on-line, develop customized maps and reports of U.S. church membership, and examine religion differences across nations and regions of the world. The ARDA also supports reference and teaching tools that draw on the rich data archive. This research note offers a brief introduction to the quantitative data available for exploration or download, and a few of the website features most useful for research and teaching. Supported by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, the Pennsylvania State University, and the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion, all data downloads and online services are free of charge.

  20. Historical Research: A Thematic Analysis of Convention and Conference Themes for Selected Professional Health Education Associations from 1975 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jill M.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    2009-01-01

    Many professional organizations and associations hold conventions and conferences on an annual basis. Health Education professional associations take part in this process. Using a historical research perspective, this article delineates conference themes for four prominent professional Health Education associations: the American Association for…

  1. Organization as Information Processing Systems. Toward a Model of the Research Factors Associated with Significant Research Outcomes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    twelve categories (Davis, 1971). Other research that has evaluated research outcomes has found that perceived quality of published research is positively ...eminence, adequate physical facilities, and an internal climate that supports research productivity (Mants, 1951; Pelz and Andrews, 1976). Positive ...include positive instituitional conditions, diverse idea sources and widespread * communications, a goal of theoretical understanding, a relevant research

  2. Association vs. causality in transfusion medicine: understanding multivariable analysis in prediction vs. etiologic research.

    PubMed

    Zalpuri, Saurabh; Middelburg, Rutger A; van de Watering, Leo; Vamvakas, Eleftherios; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-04-01

    In the current medical literature, etiologic and prediction research aims are frequently confused. Investigators tend to use principles from prediction research for their etiologic research questions, which results in misleading interpretation of risk factor findings at hand. We used a questionnaire-based survey to quantify the proportion of International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) 2012, Cancun, visitors who felt confident with a causal interpretation of a stepwise logistic regression model. We designed and distributed a short online questionnaire survey addressing questions about a constructed abstract entitled "Association of transfusion and clinical outcomes in a large cohort" among the participants of ISBT 2012, Cancun. In addition to asking questions about the demographics (age, sex, country of employment, and highest education level) of the participants, we designed 7 statements representing possible interpretations of the findings presented in the abstract and asked the participants to mark Agree, Disagree, or Do Not Know for each statement. Based on the responses to these statements, we quantified the proportion of participants who inferred causality from stepwise multivariable models built to examine a question of association (or prediction).Thirty percent to 40% of the respondents agreed that a stepwise model was a valid method to adjust for confounding, and 60% of them agreed to a causal interpretation of a model built for prediction purposes. These findings suggest that a large proportion of ISBT visitors confuse etiology with prediction in the published transfusion medicine research. Using the results as a platform, we aim to delineate the distinction between etiologic and prediction research, issues of confounding accompanying these research aims and how a multivariable model deals with confounding.

  3. Biological measures to minimize the risk of radiotherapy-associated second cancer: A research perspective.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Doi, Kazutaka; Daino, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Tagami, Keiko; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Morioka, Takamitsu; Hosoki, Ayaka; Takabatake, Masaru; Yoshinaga, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Second cancers are among the most serious sequelae for cancer survivors who receive radiotherapy. This article aims to review current knowledge regarding how the risk of radiotherapy-associated second cancer can be minimized by biological measures and to discuss relevant research needs. Results The risk of second cancer can be reduced not only by physical measures to decrease the radiation dose to normal tissues but also by biological means that interfere with the critical determinants of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Requirements for such biological means include the targeting of tumor types relevant to radiotherapy-associated risk, concrete safety and efficacy evidence and feasibility and minimal invasiveness. Mechanistic insights into the process of radiation carcinogenesis provide rational approaches to minimize the risk. Five mechanism-based strategies are proposed herein based on the current state of knowledge. Epidemiological studies on the joint effects of radiation and lifestyle or other factors can provide evidence for factors that modify radiation-associated risks if deliberately controlled. Conclusions Mechanistic and epidemiological evidence indicates that it is possible to develop interventional measures to minimize the second cancer risk associated with radiotherapy. Research is needed regarding the critical determinants of radiation-induced carcinogenesis available for intervention and joint effects of radiation and controllable factors.

  4. Publication: Presentation rate in the Latin American region of the International Association for Dental Research.

    PubMed

    Jara-Tracchia, Lilian; Aromando, Romina F; Itoiz, María E

    2010-01-01

    Most research conducted by the dental scientific community is presented at the Annual Meetings of the different Divisions and Sections of IADR. This research acquires real value when the results are published in peer-reviewed journals. A useful indicator of the publication efficiency of research work is the rate of publication (PR), i.e., the ratio between the quantity of presentations and subsequent publications in peer-reviewed journals. The aim of this study was to analyze the PR of the presentations at the Sections and Divisions of the Latin American Region of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). We considered the presentations at the Annual Meetings of Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru held in 2002 and 2003 and their corresponding publications indexed in PubMed from 2002 to 2009. For Venezuela, we analyzed the meetings held in 2002 and 2005, because they did not hold consecutive annual meetings. Presentation periods were selected based on previous data that report an interval of up to five years between presentation and publication. The number of presentations and the PR are related to the number of years that Sections and Divisions have existed. In Brazil and Argentina, PR (expressed as 1 publication: x presentations) is 1:3. The amount of research in Brazil is almost 8 times higher than in Argentina. Newer Sections and Divisions have produced fewer presentations, and the PR is also lower. We hope that this type of analysis will encourage the promotion of dental research at the different institutions and in the different vacancy areas of research, and facilitate exchange among researchers in the Region, enabling greater use to be made of their scientific activities.

  5. [Involvement of researchers with patient associations: what is the role of their opinions, their clinical activity and their nature?].

    PubMed

    Demagny, Lise; Bungener, Martine; Faurisson, François

    2015-11-01

    Although the involvement of patient associations in biomedical research is well known, conversely, researchers' views and perceptions of these associations have remained unknown. For this reason, Inserm's Patients' Association Liaison Group (GRAM) launched the CAIRNET survey in 2012, based on questionnaires and interviews conducted with researchers working at Inserm. The variety of their opinions made it possible to distinguish four profiles, the committed, the pragmatic, the reticent and the distant. Thus 41 % of respondents reported ongoing relationships with at least one association, 72 % for the committed and 16 % for the distant. Although these relationships are formed more easily among researchers involved in clinical activity, they also encourage collaborations between clinicians and basic researchers. The apparently lower degree of involvement of female researchers proved to be associated with a lower level of clinical activity, limited permanent recruitment, and a lower hierarchical status.

  6. The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Damianakis, Thecla; Kröger, Edeltraut; Wagner, Laura M; Dawson, Deirdre R; Binns, Malcolm A; Bernstein, Syrelle; Caspi, Eilon; Cook, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify lifestyle activities that reduce functional decline and dementia associated with population aging. The goals of this article are to review critically the evidence on the benefits associated with formal volunteering among older adults, propose a theoretical model of how volunteering may reduce functional limitations and dementia risk, and offer recommendations for future research. Database searches identified 113 papers on volunteering benefits in older adults, of which 73 were included. Data from descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective cohort studies, along with 1 randomized controlled trial, most consistently reveal that volunteering is associated with reduced symptoms of depression, better self-reported health, fewer functional limitations, and lower mortality. The extant evidence provides the basis for a model proposing that volunteering increases social, physical, and cognitive activity (to varying degrees depending on characteristics of the volunteer placement) which, through biological and psychological mechanisms, leads to improved functioning; we further propose that these volunteering-related functional improvements should be associated with reduced dementia risk. Recommendations for future research are that studies (a) include more objective measures of psychosocial, physical, and cognitive functioning; (b) integrate qualitative and quantitative methods in prospective study designs; (c) explore further individual differences in the benefits associated with volunteering; (d) include occupational analyses of volunteers' specific jobs in order to identify their social, physical, and cognitive complexity; (e) investigate the independent versus interactive health benefits associated with volunteering relative to engagement in other forms of activity; and (f) examine the relationship between volunteering and dementia risk. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Association between pharmaceutical support and basic science research on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L; Lai, Stephen Y; Henke, Michael; Barnato, Sara E; Armitage, James O; Sartor, Oliver

    2010-09-13

    To our knowledge, no prior research has evaluated the association between pharmaceutical industry funding and basic science research results. When erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were licensed to treat chemotherapy-associated anemia, basic science concerns related to potential cancer stimulation were raised. We evaluated associations between pharmaceutical industry support and reported findings evaluating ESA effects on cancer cells. Articles identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1988-2008) investigating basic science findings related to ESA administration in the solid tumor setting were reviewed. Outcomes included information on erythropoietin receptors (EpoRs), Epo-induced signaling events, cellular function, and qualitative conclusions. Information on study funding (academic investigators with no reported funding from ESA manufacturers [64 studies], academic investigators with grant funding from ESA manufacturers [7 studies], and investigators employed by the ESA manufacturers [3 studies]) was evaluated. Some studies did not include information on each outcome. Investigators without funding from ESA manufacturers were more likely than academic investigators with such funding or investigators employed by ESA manufacturers to identify EpoRs on solid tumor cells (100%, 60%, and 67%, respectively; P = .009), Epo-induced signaling events (94%, 0%, and 0%, respectively; P = .001), or changes in cellular function (57%, 0%, and 0%, respectively; P = .007) and to conclude that ESAs had potentially harmful effects on cancer cells (57%, 0%, and 0%, respectively; P = .008). Researchers who do not have pharmaceutical industry support are more likely than those with pharmaceutical support to identify detrimental in vitro effects of ESAs. The potential for conflicts of interest to affect basic science research should be considered.

  8. Growth of a species, an association, a science: 80 years of growth and development research.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Richard J; Duren, Dana L

    2013-01-01

    Physical anthropological research was codified in the United States with the creation of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) in 1929. That same year, a study began in yellow springs, Ohio, with a goal of identifying "what makes people different." The approach used to answer that question was to study the growth and development of Homo sapiens. The resulting study, the Fels Longitudinal Study, is currently the longest continuous study of human growth and development in the world. Although the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study have existed as separate entities for more than 80 years now, it is not surprising, given the relationship between anatomical and developmental research, there has been considerable overlap between the two. As the field of physical anthropology has blossomed to include subdisciplines such as forensics, genetics, primatology, as well as sophisticated statistical methodologies, the importance of growth and development research has escalated. Although current Fels Longitudinal Study research is largely directed at biomedical questions, virtually all findings are relevant to physical anthropology, providing insights into basic biological processes and life history parameters. Some key milestones from the early years of the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study are highlighted here that address growth and development research in physical anthropology. These are still held as fundamental concepts that underscore the importance of this line of inquiry, not only across the subdisciplines of physical anthropology, but also among anthropological, biological, and biomedical inquiries.

  9. Growth of a Species, an Association, a Science: 80 Years of Growth and Development Research

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Richard J.; Duren, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    Physical anthropological research was codified in the United States with the creation of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) in 1929. That same year, a study began in yellow springs, Ohio, with a goal of identifying “what makes people different.” The approach used to answer that question was to study the growth and development of Homo sapiens. The resulting study, the Fels Longitudinal Study, is currently the longest continuous study of human growth and development in the world. Although the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study have existed as separate entities for more than 80 years now, it is not surprising, given the relationship between anatomical and developmental research, there has been considerable overlap between the two. As the field of physical anthropology has blossomed to include subdisciplines such as forensics, genetics, primatology, as well as sophisticated statistical methodologies, the importance of growth and development research has escalated. Although current Fels Longitudinal Study research is largely directed at biomedical questions, virtually all findings are relevant to physical anthropology, providing insights into basic biological processes and life history parameters. Some key milestones from the early years of the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study are highlighted here that address growth and development research in physical anthropology. These are still held as fundamental concepts that underscore the importance of this line of inquiry, not only across the subdisciplines of physical anthropology, but also among anthropological, biological, and biomedical inquiries. PMID:23283658

  10. Translating Health Care–Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention Research into Practice via the Bladder Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Saint, Sanjay; Olmsted, Russell N.; Fakih, Mohamad G.; Kowalski, Christine P.; Watson, Sam R.; Sales, Anne E.; Krein, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), a frequent health care–associated infection (HAI), is a costly and common condition resulting in patient discomfort, activity restriction, and hospital discharge delays. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) no longer reimburses hospitals for the extra cost of caring for patients who develop CAUTI. The Michigan Health and Hospital Association (MHA) Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality has initiated a statewide initiative, MHA Keystone HAI, to help ameliorate the burden of disease associated with indwelling catheterization. In addition, a long-term research project is being conducted to evaluate the current initiative and to identify practical strategies to ensure the effective use of proven infection prevention and patient safety practices. Overview of the Bladder Bundle Initiative in Michigan: The bladder bundle as conceived by MHA Keystone HAI focuses on preventing CAUTI by optimizing the use of urinary catheters with a specific emphasis on continual assessment and catheter removal as soon as possible, especially for patients without a clear indication. Collaboration Between Researchers and State wide Patient Safety Organizations: A synergistic collaboration between patient safety researchers and a statewide patient safety organization is aimed at identifying effective strategies to move evidence from peer-reviewed literature to the bedside. Practical strategies that facilitate implementation of the bundle will be developed and tested using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Discussion: Simply disseminating scientific evidence is often ineffective in changing clinical practice. Therefore, learning how to implement these findings is critically important to promoting high-quality care and a safe health care environment. PMID:19769204

  11. Genome wide association for substance dependence: convergent results from epidemiologic and research volunteer samples

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Catherine; Drgon, Tomas; Liu, Qing-Rong; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Walther, Donna; Li, Chuan-Yun; Anthony, James C; Ding, Yulan; Eaton, William W; Uhl, George R

    2008-01-01

    Background Dependences on addictive substances are substantially-heritable complex disorders whose molecular genetic bases have been partially elucidated by studies that have largely focused on research volunteers, including those recruited in Baltimore. Maryland. Subjects recruited from the Baltimore site of the Epidemiological Catchment Area (ECA) study provide a potentially-useful comparison group for possible confounding features that might arise from selecting research volunteer samples of substance dependent and control individuals. We now report novel SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genome wide association (GWA) results for vulnerability to substance dependence in ECA participants, who were initially ascertained as members of a probability sample from Baltimore, and compare the results to those from ethnically-matched Baltimore research volunteers. Results We identify substantial overlap between the home address zip codes reported by members of these two samples. We find overlapping clusters of SNPs whose allele frequencies differ with nominal significance between substance dependent vs control individuals in both samples. These overlapping clusters of nominally-positive SNPs identify 172 genes in ways that are never found by chance in Monte Carlo simulation studies. Comparison with data from human expressed sequence tags suggests that these genes are expressed in brain, especially in hippocampus and amygdala, to extents that are greater than chance. Conclusion The convergent results from these probability sample and research volunteer sample datasets support prior genome wide association results. They fail to support the idea that large portions of the molecular genetic results for vulnerability to substance dependence derive from factors that are limited to research volunteers. PMID:19094236

  12. [Publishing and its associated factors in teachers of scientific research in schools of medicine in Peru].

    PubMed

    Pereyra-Elías, Reneé; Huaccho-Rojas, Juan Jesús; Taype-Rondan, Álvaro; Mejia, Christian R; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of publication and its associated factors by professors of scientific research in medical schools in Peru. This was a cross-sectional study. We included all teachers of research courses from the 32 medical schools in Peru in 2011. The publication search was conducted using Google Scholar, Scopus and Medline. Both the crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated with confidence intervals at 95% using simple and multiple Poisson regression with robust variance. Of the 201 university teachers, 43.8% had never published an article in a journal, 26.9% had an original article published in a journal indexed in Medline and 16.4% did so in the past two years. Only 3% had been corresponding authors in non-Peruvian, indexed journals Factors associated with having an original article published in Medline in the past two years were: being under 40 years of age (aPR 2.97, 95% CI: 1.21-7.32), being a professor at a university where a final thesis is required for graduation (aPR 8.84, 95% CI: 2.60-30.12) and working for a highly productive university (aPR 3.24, 95% CI: 1.03-10.20). The frequency of publication of research faculty in medical schools in Peru is low. Young university teachers and those working at scientifically productive universities were more likely to publish in an indexed journal.

  13. Images of illness: how causal claims and racial associations influence public preferences toward diabetes research spending.

    PubMed

    Gollust, Sarah E; Lantz, Paula M; Ubel, Peter A

    2010-12-01

    Despite the salience of health disparities in media and policy discourse, little previous research has investigated if imagery associating an illness with a certain racial group influences public perceptions. This study evaluated the influence of the media's presentation of the causes of type 2 diabetes and its implicit racial associations on attitudes toward people with diabetes and preferences toward research spending. Survey participants who viewed an article on genetic causation or social determinants of diabetes were more likely to support increased government spending on research than those viewing an article with no causal language, while participants viewing an article on behavioral choices were more likely to attribute negative stereotypes to people with diabetes. Participants who viewed a photo of a black woman accompanying the article were less likely to endorse negative stereotypes than those viewing a photo of a white woman, but those who viewed a photo of a glucose-testing device expressed the lowest negative stereotypes. The effect of social determinants language was significantly different for blacks and whites, lowering stereotypes only among blacks. Emphasizing the behavioral causes of diabetes, as is common in media coverage, may perpetuate negative stereotypes. While drawing attention to the social determinants that shape these behaviors could mitigate stereotypes, this strategy is unlikely to influence the public uniformly.

  14. Images of Illness: How Causal Claims and Racial Associations Influence Public Preferences toward Diabetes Research Spending

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Lantz, Paula M.; Ubel, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the salience of health disparities in media and policy discourse, little previous research has investigated if imagery associating an illness with a certain racial group influences public perceptions. This study evaluated the influence of the media’s presentation of the causes of type 2 diabetes and its implicit racial associations on attitudes toward people with diabetes and preferences toward research spending. Survey participants who viewed an article on genetic causation or social determinants of diabetes were more likely to support increased government spending on research than those viewing an article with no causal language, while participants viewing an article on behavioral choices were more likely to attribute negative stereotypes to people with diabetes. Participants who viewed a photo of a black woman accompanying the article were less likely to endorse negative stereotypes than those viewing a photo of a white woman, but those who viewed a photo of a glucose-testing device expressed the lowest negative stereotypes. The effect of social determinants language was significantly different for blacks and whites, lowering stereotypes only among blacks. Emphasizing the behavioral causes of diabetes, as is common in media coverage, may perpetuate negative stereotypes. While drawing attention to the social determinants that shape these behaviors could mitigate stereotypes, this strategy is unlikely to influence the public uniformly. PMID:21451158

  15. Federated Search and the Library Web Site: A Study of Association of Research Libraries Member Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how federated search engines are incorporated into the Web sites of libraries in the Association of Research Libraries. In 2009, information was gathered for each library in the Association of Research Libraries with a federated search engine. This included the name of the federated search service and…

  16. Navigating the Thin Line between Education and Incarceration: An Action Research Case Study on Gang-Associated Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines data collected from an ethnographic research project conducted with 56 gang-associated Latino youths ages 15 to 21 from 2007 to 2009. The objectives of the study were to examine how poor Latino gang-associated youths perceived schooling and policing and to find out if the research process could promote educational aspirations…

  17. Federated Search and the Library Web Site: A Study of Association of Research Libraries Member Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how federated search engines are incorporated into the Web sites of libraries in the Association of Research Libraries. In 2009, information was gathered for each library in the Association of Research Libraries with a federated search engine. This included the name of the federated search service and…

  18. Navigating the Thin Line between Education and Incarceration: An Action Research Case Study on Gang-Associated Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines data collected from an ethnographic research project conducted with 56 gang-associated Latino youths ages 15 to 21 from 2007 to 2009. The objectives of the study were to examine how poor Latino gang-associated youths perceived schooling and policing and to find out if the research process could promote educational aspirations…

  19. Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON): A Network of Consortia for Post-Genome Wide Association (Post-GWA) Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology's (GAME-ON) overall goal is to foster an intra-disciplinary and collaborative approach to the translation of promising research leads deriving from the initial wave of cancer GWAS.

  20. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and Its Associated Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large-scale research effort conducted by the National Cancer Institute. PLCO offers an example of coordinated research by both the extramural and intramural communities of the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of this article is to describe the PLCO research resource and how it is managed and to assess the productivity and the costs associated with this resource. Such an in-depth analysis of a single large-scale project can shed light on questions such as how large-scale projects should be managed, what metrics should be used to assess productivity, and how costs can be compared with productivity metrics. A comprehensive publication analysis identified 335 primary research publications resulting from research using PLCO data and biospecimens from 2000 to 2012. By the end of 2012, a total of 9679 citations (excluding self-citations) have resulted from this body of research publications, with an average of 29.7 citations per article, and an h index of 45, which is comparable with other large-scale studies, such as the Nurses’ Health Study. In terms of impact on public health, PLCO trial results have been used by the US Preventive Services Task Force in making recommendations concerning prostate and ovarian cancer screening. The overall cost of PLCO was $454 million over 20 years, adjusted to 2011 dollars, with approximately $37 million for the collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens, including blood samples, buccal cells, and pathology tissues. PMID:24115361

  1. Factors associated with past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M; Williams, Mark L; Vidrine, Damon J; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, "trigger" influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified "other" as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a 'guinea pig' showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model 'age' and level of certainty regarding 'keeping yourself from being a guinea pig' showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants.

  2. Factors Associated with Past Research Participation Among Low-Income Persons Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M.; Williams, Mark L.; Vidrine, Damon J.; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, “trigger” influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified “other” as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a ‘guinea pig’ showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model ‘age’ and level of certainty regarding ‘keeping yourself from being a guinea pig’ showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants. PMID:22686261

  3. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Published research in English-language journals are increasingly required to carry a statement that the study has been approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board in conformance with 45 CFR 46 standards if the study was conducted in the United States. Alternative language attesting conformity with the Helsinki Declaration is often included when the research was conducted in Europe or elsewhere. The Helsinki Declaration was created by the World Medical Association in 1964 (ten years before the Belmont Report) and has been amended several times. The Helsinki Declaration differs from its American version in several respects, the most significant of which is that it was developed by and for physicians. The term "patient" appears in many places where we would expect to see "subject." It is stated in several places that physicians must either conduct or have supervisory control of the research. The dual role of the physician-researcher is acknowledged, but it is made clear that the role of healer takes precedence over that of scientist. In the United States, the federal government developed and enforces regulations on researcher; in the rest of the world, the profession, or a significant part of it, took the initiative in defining and promoting good research practice, and governments in many countries have worked to harmonize their standards along these lines. The Helsinki Declaration is based less on key philosophical principles and more on prescriptive statements. Although there is significant overlap between the Belmont and the Helsinki guidelines, the latter extends much further into research design and publication. Elements in a research protocol, use of placebos, and obligation to enroll trials in public registries (to ensure that negative findings are not buried), and requirements to share findings with the research and professional communities are included in the Helsinki Declaration. As a practical matter, these are often part of the work of American

  4. American Diabetes Association--70th scientific sessions--research on novel therapeutics: part 1.

    PubMed

    Croasdell, Gary

    2010-09-01

    The American Diabetes Association 70th Scientific Sessions, held in Orlando, FL, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of diabetes research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on new research with novel agents. Investigational drugs discussed include the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist taspoglutide (Roche Holding AG/Teijin Ltd/ Chugai Pharmaceutical Co Ltd), the GLP-1 analog SKL-18287 (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co Ltd), the sodium glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor ASP-1941 (Astellas Pharma Inc/Kotobuki Pharmaceutical Co Ltd), the dual SGLT2/1 inhibitor LX-4211 (Lexicon Pharmaceuticals Inc), and the selective PPARgamma modulator INT-131 (InteKrin Therapeutics Inc).

  5. Fundamental Cardiovascular Research: Returns on Societal Investment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joseph A; Ardehali, Reza; Clarke, Kimberli Taylor; Del Zoppo, Gregory J; Eckhardt, Lee L; Griendling, Kathy K; Libby, Peter; Roden, Dan M; Sadek, Hesham A; Seidman, Christine E; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2017-07-21

    Recent decades have witnessed robust successes in conquering the acutely lethal manifestations of heart and vascular diseases. Many patients who previously would have died now survive. Lifesaving successes like these provide a tremendous and easily recognized benefit to individuals and society. Although cardiovascular mortality has declined, the devastating impact of chronic heart disease and comorbidities on quality of life and healthcare resources continues unabated. Future strides, extending those made in recent decades, will require continued research into mechanisms underlying disease prevention, pathogenesis, progression, and therapeutic intervention. However, severe financial constraints currently jeopardize these efforts. To chart a path for the future, this report analyzes the challenges and opportunities we face in continuing the battle against cardiovascular disease and highlights the return on societal investment afforded by fundamental cardiovascular research. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides: a scientometric approach visualizing worldwide research activity.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Alexander; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David; Bundschuh, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    To provide a critical evaluation of quality and quantity regarding scientific efforts on antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) during the past 20 years. Scientometric benchmark procedures, density-equalizing mapping and large-scale data analysis were used to visualize bi- and multilateral research cooperation and institutional collaborations, and to identify the most successful countries, institutions, authors and journals concerned with AAV. The USA are the most productive supplier and have established their position as center of international cooperation with 22.5% of all publications, followed by Germany, the United Kingdom, France and Japan, respectively. The most successful international cooperation proved to be the one between the USA, Germany and the UK. A distinct global pattern of research productivity and citation activity was revealed, with the USA and Germany holding both the highest h-index and the highest number of total citations, but Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands leading with regards to the citation rate. Some large and productive countries such as Japan, China and Turkey show only a few international cooperations. The present study represents the first detailed scientometric analysis and visualization of research quality and quantity on 'ANCA- associated vasculitides'. It was shown that scientometric indicators such as h-index, citation rate and impact factor, commonly used for assessment of scientific quality, have to be seen critically due to distortion by self-citation, co-authorship and language bias. Countries with considerable numbers of patients should enhance international collaboration behavior for the benefit of international scientific and clinical progress. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. An Integrative Review of Factors Associated with Telomere Length and Implications for Biobehavioral Research

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela R.; Alhaeeri, Areej A.; Montpetit, Alison; Brumelle, Jenni; Filler, Kristin; Montpetit, Marty; Mohanraj, Lathika; Lyon, Debra E.; Jackson-Cook, Colleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although telomere shortening occurs as a natural part of aging, there is now a robust body of research that suggests that there is a relationship between psychosocial, environmental, and behavioral factors and changes in telomere length. These factors need to be considered when integrating telomere measurement in biobehavioral research studies. Objectives This article provides a brief summary of the known facts about telomere biology and an integrative review of current human research studies that assessed relationships between psychosocial, environmental, or behavioral factors and telomere length. Methods An integrative review was conducted to examine human research studies that focused on psychosocial, environmental, and behavioral factors affecting telomere length and telomerase activity using the electronic databases PubMed/Medline and CINAHL from 2003 to the present. In addition to the known individual factors that are associated with telomere length, the results of the integrative review suggest that perceived stress, childhood adversities, major depressive disorder, educational attainment, physical activity, and sleep duration should also be measured. Discussion Multiple factors have been shown to affect telomere length. To advance understanding of the role of telomere length in health and disease risk, it will be important to further elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to telomere shortening. PMID:24335912

  8. The American Association of Variable Star Observers: Serving the Research Community in 2010 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.; Henden, A. A.; Davis, K.; Kinne, R.; Watson, C.; Saladyga, M.; Waagen, E.; Beck, S.; Menali, G.; Price, A.; Turner, R.

    2010-05-01

    The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) holds the largest single online database of variable star data in the world, collected from thousands of amateur and professional observers during the past century. One of our core missions is to preserve and distribute these data to the research community in service to the science of variable star astronomy. But as an organization, the AAVSO is much more than a data archive. Our services to the research community include: monitoring for and announcement of major astronomical events like novae and supernovae; organization and management of observing campaigns; support for satellite and other TOO observing programs by the professional community; creation of comparison star sequences and generation of charts for the observer community; and observational and other support for the amateur, professional, and educator communities in all things related to variable stars. As we begin a new century of variable star astronomy we invite you to take advantage of the services the AAVSO can provide, and to become a part of our organization yourselves. In this poster, we highlight some of the most important services the AAVSO can provide to the professional research community, as well as suggest ways in which your research may be enhanced with support from the AAVSO.

  9. Factors Associated With First-Time NCLEX-RN Success: A Descriptive Research Study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tanya; Sanderson, Bonnie; Wang, Chih-Hsuan; Parker, Francine

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify variables associated with scores achieved on the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) exit examination and successful first-time NCLEX-RN(®) pass rates. A retrospective descriptive study examined the administrative data of 211 baccalaureate nursing students. Students who completed the program in sequence and scored higher in certain HESI course examinations were more likely to have a better performance on the HESI exit examination. The higher the scores students achieved on the HESI exit examination, the more likely they were to pass the NCLEX-RN on their first attempt. These findings add to the growing body of literature seeking to identify variables associated with success in first-time NCLEX-RN success. Further research is needed to identify strategies that can be implemented to ensure timely progression, program completion, and licensure examination success. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(9):542-545.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Assessment of Capacity to Consent to Research Among Psychiatric Outpatients: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Morán-Sánchez, Inés; Luna, Aurelio; Pérez-Cárceles, Maria D

    2016-03-01

    Mental capacity is an emerging ethical legal concept in psychiatric settings but its relation to clinical parameters remains yet uncertain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between capacity to consent research and different psychiatric disorders and to characterize predictors of impairments in research decision-making capacity across diagnostic groups in a cross-sectional study. 139 consecutively referred outpatients with DSM-IV TR diagnoses of psychotic, mood and anxiety disorders were interviewed and a binary judgment of incapacity was made guided by the MacArthur competence assessment tool for consent research (MacCAT-CR). Demographics and clinical information were assessed by cases notes. Patients with anxiety disorders performed the best on the MacCAT-CR, and patients with psychotic disorders had the worst performance, however, there was considerable heterogeneity within each group. Cognitive impairment and global functioning were strongly correlated with MacCAT-CR subscales scores. 30.6% participants lacked research-related decisional capacity. Low Understanding score OR 0.07 (IC 95% 0.01-0.32) and Low Reasoning score OR 0.30 (IC 95% 0.11-0.82) were the factors most closely associated with lack of capacity. No absolute statements about decisional capacity can be driven merely due to the diagnosis. We found several risk factors which may be considered to decide which populations may require more thorough capacity assessments. The issues under consideration in the present study are by no means unique to people with psychiatric conditions. Ignoring this caveat, risks further inappropriate stigmatization of those with serious mental illness.

  11. Analysing researchers' outreach efforts and the association with publication metrics: A case study of Kudos.

    PubMed

    Erdt, Mojisola; Aung, Htet Htet; Aw, Ashley Sara; Rapple, Charlie; Theng, Yin-Leng

    2017-01-01

    With the growth of scholarly collaboration networks and social communication platforms, members of the scholarly community are experimenting with their approach to disseminating research outputs, in an effort to increase their audience and outreach. However, from a researcher's point of view, it is difficult to determine whether efforts to make work more visible are worthwhile (in terms of the association with publication metrics) and within that, difficult to assess which platform or network is most effective for sharing work and connecting to a wider audience. We undertook a case study of Kudos (https://www.growkudos.com), a web-based service that claims to help researchers increase the outreach of their publications, to examine the most effective tools for sharing publications online, and to investigate which actions are associated with improved metrics. We extracted a dataset from Kudos of 830,565 unique publications claimed by authors, for which 20,775 had actions taken to explain or share via Kudos, and for 4,867 of these full text download data from publishers was available. Findings show that researchers are most likely to share their work on Facebook, but links shared on Twitter are more likely to be clicked on. A Mann-Whitney U test revealed that a treatment group (publications having actions in Kudos) had a significantly higher median average of 149 full text downloads (23.1% more) per publication as compared to a control group (having no actions in Kudos) with a median average of 121 full text downloads per publication. These findings suggest that performing actions on publications, such as sharing, explaining, or enriching, could help to increase the number of full text downloads of a publication.

  12. Pseudocapillaria tomentosa, a nematode pathogen, and associated neoplasms of zebrafish (Danio rerio) kept in research colonies.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael L; Bishop-Stewart, Janell K; Matthews, Jennifer L; Spitsbergen, Jan M

    2002-08-01

    Infections with capillarid nematodes were observed in zebrafish (Danio rerio) kept at several research facilities and in a large carcinogen exposure study previously conducted at Oregon State University. We report a morphologic description that identifies the worm as Pseudocapillaria tomentosa, a common nematode of cyprinid and other fishes. Pathologic lesions associated with the infection ranged from inflammatory changes to aggressive neoplasms of the intestine (i.e., intestinal carcinomas and mixed malignant neoplasms). Capillarid nematodes may have intermediate or paratenic hosts. Using a laboratory transmission study, we confirmed that the parasite has a direct life cycle.

  13. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  14. SU-E-J-155: Utilizing Varian TrueBeam Developer Mode for the Quantification of Mechanical Limits and the Simulation of 4D Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, D; Dave, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use Varian TrueBeam Developer mode to quantify the mechanical limits of the couch and to simulate 4D respiratory motion. Methods: An in-house MATLAB based GUI was created to make the BEAM XML files. The couch was moved in a triangular wave in the S/I direction with varying amplitudes (1mm, 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm) and periods (3s, 6s, and 9s). The periods were determined by specifying the speed. The theoretical positions were compared to the values recorded by the machine at 50 Hz. HD videos were taken for certain tests as external validation. 4D Respiratory motion was simulated by an A/P MV beam being delivered while the couch moved in an elliptical manner. The ellipse had a major axis of 2 cm (S/I) and a minor axis of 1 cm (A/P). Results: The path planned by the TrueBeam deviated from the theoretical triangular form as the speed increased. Deviations were noticed starting at a speed of 3.33 cm/s (50mm amplitude, 6s period). The greatest deviation occurred in the 50mm- 3s sequence with a correlation value of −0.13 and a 27% time increase; the plan essentially became out of phase. Excluding these two, the plans had correlation values of 0.99. The elliptical sequence effectively simulated a respiratory pattern with a period of 6s. The period could be controlled by changing the speeds or the dose rate. Conclusion: The work first shows the quantification of the mechanical limits of the couch and the speeds at which the proposed plans begin to deviate. These limits must be kept in mind when programming other couch sequences. The methodology can be used to quantify the limits of other axes. Furthermore, the work shows the possibility of creating 4D respiratory simulations without using specialized phantoms or motion-platforms. This can be further developed to program patient-specific breathing patterns.

  15. SU-E-J-28: Gantry Speed Significantly Affects Image Quality and Imaging Dose for 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography On the Varian Edge Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, A; Song, K; Gardner, S; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CBCT facilitates assessment of tumor motion at treatment position. We investigated the effect of gantry speed on 4D-CBCT image quality and dose using the Varian Edge On-Board Imager (OBI). Methods: A thoracic protocol was designed using a 125 kVp spectrum. Image quality parameters were obtained via 4D acquisition using a Catphan phantom with a gating system. A sinusoidal waveform was executed with a five second period and superior-inferior motion. 4D-CBCT scans were sorted into 4 and 10 phases. Image quality metrics included spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), uniformity index (UI), Hounsfield unit (HU) sensitivity, and RMS error (RMSE) of motion amplitude. Dosimetry was accomplished using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films within a CIRS Thorax phantom. This was placed on the gating phantom using the same motion waveform. Results: High contrast resolution decreased linearly from 5.93 to 4.18 lp/cm, 6.54 to 4.18 lp/cm, and 5.19 to 3.91 lp/cm for averaged, 4 phase, and 10 phase 4DCBCT volumes respectively as gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. CNRs decreased linearly from 4.80 to 1.82 as the gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec, respectively. No significant variations in UIs, HU sensitivities, or RMSEs were observed with variable gantry speed. Ion chamber measurements compared to film yielded small percent differences in plastic water regions (0.1–9.6%), larger percent differences in lung equivalent regions (7.5–34.8%), and significantly larger percent differences in bone equivalent regions (119.1–137.3%). Ion chamber measurements decreased from 17.29 to 2.89 cGy with increasing gantry speed from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. Conclusion: Maintaining technique factors while changing gantry speed changes the number of projections used for reconstruction. Increasing the number of projections by decreasing gantry speed decreases noise, however, dose is increased. The future of 4DCBCT’s clinical utility relies on further

  16. SU-E-J-24: An Evaluation of the Stability of Image Quality Parameters of Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) and EPID Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D; Papanikolaou, N; Gutierrez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance of the image quality for image guided localization systems is crucial to ensure accurate visualization and localization of target volumes. In this study, the long term stability of selected image parameters was assessed and evaluated for CBCT mode, planar radiographic kV mode and the radiographic MV EPID mode. Methods: The CATPHAN, QckV-1 and QC-3 phantoms were used to evaluate the image quality parameters. The planar radiographic images were analyzed in PIPSpro™ with spatial resolution (f30, f40, f50) being recorded. For OBI CBCT, High quality head Full-Fan acquisition and Pelvis Half-Fan acquisition modes were evaluated for Uniformity, Noise, Spatial Resolution, HU constancy and geometric distortion. Dose and kVp for the OBI were recorded using the Unfors RaySafe Xi system with the R/F High Detector for planar kV and the CT detector for CBCT. Dose for the MV EPID was recorded using a PTW975 Semiflex Ion Chamber, PTW Unidos electrometer and SolidWater™. Results: For each metric, values were normalized to the mean and the standard deviations were recorded. For the planar radiographic spatial resolution the f30, f40, f50 were 0.015, 0.008, 0.004 and 0.006, 0.009, 0.018 for the kV and MV, respectively. The standard deviation of the dose for kV was 0.010 and 0.005 for the MV. The standard deviations for Full and half fan were averaged together and the following standard deviations for each metric were recorded: 0.075(uniformity), 0.071(noise), 0.006(AP-Geometric Distortion), 0.005(LAT-Geometric Distortion), 0.058(mean slice thickness), 0.098(f30),0.101(f40),0.124(f50), 0.031(Lung/PMP-HU constancy), 0.063(Water/poly-HU constancy), 0.015(Bone/Derlin-HU constancy),0.006(Dose-Center), 0.004(Dose-Periphery). Using these, tolerances can be reported as a warning and action threshold of 1σ and 2σ. Conclusion: A study was performed to assess the stability of the basic image quality parameters recommended by TG-142 for the Varian OBI and EPID

  17. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  18. Monte Carlo modeling of HD120 multileaf collimator on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator for verification of 6X and 6X FFF VMAT SABR treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Alanah M; Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl; Teke, Tony

    2014-05-08

    A Monte Carlo (MC) validation of the vendor-supplied Varian TrueBeam 6 MV flattened (6X) phase-space file and the first implementation of the Siebers-Keall MC MLC model as applied to the HD120 MLC (for 6X flat and 6X flattening filter-free (6X FFF) beams) are described. The MC model is validated in the context of VMAT patient-specific quality assurance. The Monte Carlo commissioning process involves: 1) validating the calculated open-field percentage depth doses (PDDs), profiles, and output factors (OF), 2) adapting the Siebers-Keall MLC model to match the new HD120-MLC geometry and material composition, 3) determining the absolute dose conversion factor for the MC calculation, and 4) validating this entire linac/MLC in the context of dose calculation verification for clinical VMAT plans. MC PDDs for the 6X beams agree with the measured data to within 2.0% for field sizes ranging from 2 × 2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Measured and MC profiles show agreement in the 50% field width and the 80%-20% penumbra region to within 1.3 mm for all square field sizes. MC OFs for the 2 to 40 cm2 square fields agree with measurement to within 1.6%. Verification of VMAT SABR lung, liver, and vertebra plans demonstrate that measured and MC ion chamber doses agree within 0.6% for the 6X beam and within 2.0% for the 6X FFF beam. A 3D gamma factor analysis demonstrates that for the 6X beam, > 99% of voxels meet the pass criteria (3%/3 mm). For the 6X FFF beam, > 94% of voxels meet this criteria. The TrueBeam accelerator delivering 6X and 6X FFF beams with the HD120 MLC can be modeled in Monte Carlo to provide an independent 3D dose calculation for clinical VMAT plans. This quality assurance tool has been used clinically to verify over 140 6X and 16 6X FFF TrueBeam treatment plans.

  19. Reference photon dosimetry data and reference phase space data for the 6 MV photon beam from Varian Clinac 2100 series linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sang Hyun; Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Lee, Seungsoo; Liu, H. Helen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Mohan, Radhe

    2005-01-01

    The current study presents the reference photon dosimetry data (RPDD) and reference phase space data (RPSD) for the 6 MV photon beam from Varian 2100 series linear accelerators. The RPDD provide the basic photon dosimetry data, typically collected during the initial commissioning of a new linear accelerator, including output factors, depth dose data, and beam profile data in air and in water. The RPSD provide the full phase space information, such as position, direction, and energy for each particle generated inside the head of any particular linear accelerator in question. The dosimetric characteristics of the 6 MV photon beam from the majority of the aforementioned accelerators, which are unaltered from the manufacturer's original specifications, can be fully described with these two data sets within a clinically acceptable uncertainty ({approx}{+-}2%). The current study also presents a detailed procedure to establish the RPDD and RPSD using measured data and Monte Carlo calculations. The RPDD were constructed by compiling our own measured data and the average data based on the analysis of more than 50 sets of measured data from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) and 10 sets of clinical dosimetry data obtained from 10 different institutions participating in the RPC's quality assurance monitoring program. All the measured data from the RPC and the RPC-monitored institutions were found to be within a statistically tight range (i.e., 1{sigma}{approx_equal}1% or less) for each dosimetric quantity. The manufacturer's standard data, except for in-air off-axis factors that are available only from the current study, were compared with the RPDD, showing that the manufacturer's standard data could also be used as the RPDD for the photon beam studied in this study. The RPSD were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code system with 6.2 MeV (a spread of 3% full width at half maximum) and 1.0 mm full width at half maximum as the values of the

  20. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  1. The Future of Institutional Research. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Orlando, Florida, October 24-26, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D., Ed.; And Others

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) are presented. The conference theme was the future of institutional research. Contents include reports of preconference workshops, speeches, panel reports, abstracts of papers, and reports pertaining to the affairs of the SAIR. Documents and authors…

  2. Research in Science Education, Volume 1990. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (21st, Perth, Western Australia, July 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains selected refereed papers from the 21st Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association. The papers are as follows: "A Learning Model for Science Education: Developing Teaching Strategies" (Appleton); "Researching Balance between Cognition and Affect in Science Teaching" (Baird et…

  3. Issues/Higher Education/Institutional Research. NCAIR Proceedings. Fifth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Asheville, North Carolina, November 2-3, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings from the fifth annual meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) focus on issues affecting higher education and the relationship of these issues to the institutional research function. Included are general session addresses by Charles A. Lyons and Dick Robinson that discuss the implications of Judge…

  4. The Future of Institutional Research. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Orlando, Florida, October 24-26, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D., Ed.; And Others

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) are presented. The conference theme was the future of institutional research. Contents include reports of preconference workshops, speeches, panel reports, abstracts of papers, and reports pertaining to the affairs of the SAIR. Documents and authors…

  5. Issues/Higher Education/Institutional Research. NCAIR Proceedings. Fifth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Asheville, North Carolina, November 2-3, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings from the fifth annual meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) focus on issues affecting higher education and the relationship of these issues to the institutional research function. Included are general session addresses by Charles A. Lyons and Dick Robinson that discuss the implications of Judge…

  6. Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (28th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 17-20, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The theme of the 2001 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research was Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. These proceedings represent the intellectual content and insights shared during the conference. The papers are: (1) The Rocky Road to Graduation: An Academic Career Flow Model for Tracking…

  7. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  8. Arts and Learning Research, 1995. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, April 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    The papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1995 meeting of the American Educational Research Association; many were part of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group programs. Papers in the volume explore a range of research interests and conceptualizations for the arts. Following an editorial, papers are: "Beyond the Public…

  9. Research Libraries: Measurement, Management, Marketing. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (108th, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 1-2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    Program presentations on issues related to the use of statistics by research libraries and business meeting minutes are combined in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The full text is provided for the three papers on the program theme that were presented at the meeting: (1) "Information to Manage--The Economics of…

  10. Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) Hispanic Higher Education Research Collective (H3ERC) Research Agenda: Impacting Education and Changing Lives through Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With support from the Lumina Foundation, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has launched HACU's Hispanic Higher Education Research Collective (H3ERC). The first major task of this virtual gathering of researchers and practitioners in Hispanic higher education has been to assess the state of our knowledge of the key issues…

  11. Institutional Research and Creative Change. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (6th, Cooperstown, New York, October 14-16, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Papers from the 1979 annual meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research are presented. The theme of the conference was institutional research and creative change. Part One, Budget/Cost Analysis, contains papers on academic income-cost models for institutional planning, a budget incentive factor within declining enrollments,…

  12. SU-E-T-109: Development of An End-To-End Test for the Varian TrueBeamtm with a Novel Multiple-Dosimetric Modality H and N Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zakjevskii, V; Knill, C; Rakowski, J; Snyder, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Methods: The initial end-to-end test and custom H and N phantom were designed to yield maximum information in anatomical regions significant to H and N plans with respect to: i) geometric accuracy, ii) dosimetric accuracy, and iii) treatment reproducibility. The phantom was designed in collaboration with Integrated Medical Technologies. A CT image was taken with a 1mm slice thickness. The CT was imported into Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system, where OARs and the PTV were contoured. A clinical template was used to create an eight field static gantry angle IMRT plan. After optimization, dose was calculated using the Analytic Anisotropic Algorithm with inhomogeneity correction. Plans were delivered with a TrueBeam equipped with a high definition MLC. Preliminary end-to-end results were measured using film and ion chambers. Ion chamber dose measurements were compared to the TPS. Films were analyzed with FilmQAPro using composite gamma index. Results: Film analysis for the initial end-to-end plan with a geometrically simple PTV showed average gamma pass rates >99% with a passing criterion of 3% / 3mm. Film analysis of a plan with a more realistic, ie. complex, PTV yielded pass rates >99% in clinically important regions containing the PTV, spinal cord and parotid glands. Ion chamber measurements were on average within 1.21% of calculated dose for both plans. Conclusion: trials have demonstrated that our end-to-end testing methods provide baseline values for the dosimetric and geometric accuracy of Varian's TrueBeam system.

  13. A Content Analysis of College Reading Association/Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers Teacher Education Publications: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumm, Jeanne Shay; Lewis-Spector, Jill; Price, Debra; Doorn, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a content analysis of the publications of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER), previously known as College Reading Association (CRA), in the area of preservice teacher education in literacy. As a service to the organization, 71 articles published in ALER's flagship…

  14. An Examination of Perceptions of the Use of Virtual Conferences in Organizations: The Organizational Systems Research Association (OSRA) and the Association for Business Communication (ABC) Members Speak Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Kelly L.; Hemby, K. Virginia

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 183 members of the Association for Business Communication and 33 members of the Organizational Systems Research Association found that, although virtual conferences reduce costs, professional isolation and lack of human contact are disadvantages. They should supplement but not replace traditional conferences. (Contains 18 references.)…

  15. The Undergraduate-Postgraduate-Faculty Triad: Unique Functions and Tensions Associated with Undergraduate Research Experiences at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Erin L.; Johnson, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of how undergraduates' involvement in research influences postgraduates (i.e., graduate and postdoctoral researchers) and faculty. We used a qualitative approach to examine the relationships among undergraduates, postgraduates, and the faculty head in a research group. In this group, undergraduates viewed…

  16. 2014 Australian Association for Research in Education Presidential Address: Educational Research and the Tree of Knowledge in a Post Human Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Julianne

    2016-01-01

    The 2014, 41st Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) presidential address is both inspired and guided by the discursive genres of presidential addresses and the role of the president in a member association such as AARE. In the address, typically the president speaks to the members on an issue or issues that are to shape or…

  17. 2014 Australian Association for Research in Education Presidential Address: Educational Research and the Tree of Knowledge in a Post Human Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Julianne

    2016-01-01

    The 2014, 41st Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) presidential address is both inspired and guided by the discursive genres of presidential addresses and the role of the president in a member association such as AARE. In the address, typically the president speaks to the members on an issue or issues that are to shape or…

  18. Human Toxocariasis: Prevalence and Factors Associated with Biosafety in Research Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Gabriela Torres; Santos, Paula Costa Dos; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-12-07

    Human toxocariasis is a neglected parasitic disease worldwide. Researchers studying this disease use infectious strains of Toxocara for experiments. Health workers are at risk in the course of their daily routine and must adhere to biosafety standards while carrying out the activities. Researchers on biosafety concerning working with these parasites are insufficient. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of seroprevalence of Toxocara species among health-care research laboratory workers (professors, technicians, and students), and to investigate the risk factors of Toxocara infection associated with laboratory practices. This cross-sectional study involved 74 researchers at two federal universities in southern Brazil from February 2014 to February 2015; 29 researchers manipulated infective strains of Toxocara canis (test group) and 45 did not (control group). Serum samples were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Epidemiological data were obtained via a questionnaire containing information about laboratory routine, eating behavior, and contact with dogs. The seroprevalence of anti-T. canis IgG was 14.9% (11/74; 13.8% [4/29] in the test group and 15.6% [7/45] in the control group). Most individuals in the test group correctly understood the primary mode of infection; however, 13.8% did not use gloves while manipulating T. canis eggs. Knowledge of biosafety must be well understood by health-care professionals doing laboratory work with biological agents. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the rate of seroprevalence of IgG against Toxocara spp. among professionals and students who handle infective forms of the nematode T. canis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Contribution of Large Animals to Translational Research on Prenatal Programming of Obesity and Associated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2017-08-11

    The awareness of factors causing obesity and associated disorders has grown up in the last years from genome to a more complicated concept (developmental programming) in which prenatal and early-postnatal conditions markedly modify the phenotype and homeostasis of the individuals and determine juvenile growth, life-time fitness/obesity and disease risks. Experimentation in human beings is impeded by ethical issues plus inherent high variability and confounding factors (genetics, lifestyle and socioeconomic heterogeneity) and preclinical studies in adequate translational animal models are therefore decisive. Most of the studies have been performed in rodents, whilst the use of large animals is scarce. Having in mind body-size, handling-easiness and cost-efficiency, the main large animal species for use in biomedical research are rabbits, sheep and swine. The choice of the model depends on the research objectives. To outline the main features of the use of rabbits, sheep and swine and their contributions as translational models in prenatal programming of obesity and associated disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Clinical-histological associations in gastroparesis: Results from the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular changes associated with diabetic (DG) and idiopathic gastroparesis (IG) have recently been described from patients enrolled in the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium. The association of these cellular changes with gastroparesis symptoms and gastric emptying is unknown. Aim Relate cellular changes to symptoms and gastric emptying in patients with gastroparesis. Methods Earlier, using full thickness gastric body biopsies from 20 DG, 20 IG and 20 matched controls, we found decreased interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and enteric nerves and an increase in immune cells in both DG and IG. Here, demographic, symptoms (gastroparesis cardinal symptom index score), and gastric emptying were related to cellular alterations using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results ICC counts inversely correlated with 4 hours gastric retention in DG but not in IG (r=−0.6, p=0.008, DG, r=0.2, p=0.4, IG). There was also a significant correlation between loss of ICC and enteric nerves in DG but not in IG (r=0.5, p=0.03 for DG, r=0.3, p=0.16, IG). IG with a myenteric immune infiltrate scored higher on the average GCSI (3.6±0.7 vs 2.7±0.9, p=0.05) and nausea score (3.8±0.9 vs 2.6±1.0, p=0.02) as compared to those without an infiltrate. Conclusions In DG, loss of ICC is associated with delayed gastric emptying. ICC or enteric nerve loss did not correlate with symptom severity. Overall clinical severity and nausea in IG is associated with a myenteric immune infiltrate. Thus, full thickness gastric biopsies can help define specific cellular abnormalities in gastroparesis, some of which are associated with physiological and clinical characteristics of gastroparesis. PMID:22339929

  1. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K.; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E. Yoko; Mis, Frederick W.; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution’s admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  2. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges.

  3. Genome-Wide Association for Nicotine Dependence and Smoking Cessation Success in NIH Research Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomas; Montoya, Ivan; Johnson, Catherine; Liu, Qing-Rong; Walther, Donna; Hamer, Dean; Uhl, George R

    2009-01-01

    Phenotypes related to both nicotine dependence and ability to successfully quit smoking display substantial heritabilities in classical and molecular genetic studies. Twin studies suggest that some genetic components for dependence overlap with genetic components of ability to quit, but that many components do not overlap. Initial genome-wide association (GWA) studies have demonstrated haplotypes that distinguish nicotine-dependent from nondependent smokers. These haplotypes overlap partially with those that distinguish individuals who successfully quit smoking from those who were not able to quit smoking in clinical trials for smoking cessation. We now report novel genome-wide association results from National Institutes of Health research volunteers who reported smoking histories, symptoms of nicotine dependence, and ability to successfully quit smoking outside the context of a clinical trial. These results buttress data from several prior GWA studies. The data from these volunteers support the idea that previously reported studies of genes associated with smoking cessation success in clinical trial participants may also apply to smokers who are more or less able to initiate and sustain abstinence outside of clinical trial settings. PMID:19009022

  4. [Recent advances in research and application of associated nitrogen-fixation with graminaceous plants].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limei; Fang, Ping; Zhu, Riqing

    2004-09-01

    The category, characteristic of diazotrophs isolated from inside and/or rhizosphere of graminaceous plants in recent year and the mechanism of the promoting effects on their host plant were reviewed in this paper. The current status of application of associative nitrogen-fixation inoculants and the problems in inoculation were discussed. It was indicated that the main factors influencing the effects of inoculants include the competition of indigenous micro-organism with inoculants for nutritions and energy, difference of host plant genotypes in associative relationship, and variance of environmental conditions such as the concentration of ammonium in soil solution and the oxygen partial pressure in soil air. The trends of future research in this field were prospected, for example, to isolate and identify the high nitrogen fixing efficiency strains with wider environmental adaptability, to create associative nitrogen fixing bacteria strain which is able to bear or endure higher concentration of ammonium by gene engineering technique, to induce graminaceous plant forming root nodule for nitrogen fixation and to exert the predominance of endophytic diazotrophs.

  5. Music genetics research: Association with musicality of a polymorphism in the AVPR1A gene.

    PubMed

    Mariath, Luiza Monteavaro; Silva, Alexandre Mauat da; Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Gattino, Gustavo Schulz; Araujo, Gustavo Andrade de; Figueiredo, Felipe Grahl; Tagliani-Ribeiro, Alice; Roman, Tatiana; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Schuch, Jaqueline Bohrer

    2017-01-01

    Musicality is defined as a natural tendency, sensibility, knowledge, or talent to create, perceive, and play music. Musical abilities involve a great range of social and cognitive behaviors, which are influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Although a number of studies have yielded insights into music genetics research, genes and biological pathways related to these traits are not fully understood. Our hypothesis in the current study is that genes associated with different behaviors could also influence the musical phenotype. Our aim was to investigate whether polymorphisms in six genes (AVPR1A, SLC6A4, ITGB3, COMT, DRD2 and DRD4) related to social and cognitive traits are associated with musicality in a sample of children. Musicality was assessed through an individualized music therapy assessment profile (IMTAP) which has been validated in Brazil to measure musical ability. We show here that the RS1 microsatellite of the AVPR1A gene is nominally associated with musicality, corroborating previous results linking AVPR1A with musical activity. This study is one of the first to investigate musicality in a comprehensive way, and it contributes to better understand the genetic basis underlying musical ability.

  6. The Undergraduate–Postgraduate–Faculty Triad: Unique Functions and Tensions Associated with Undergraduate Research Experiences at Research Universities

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of how undergraduates' involvement in research influences postgraduates (i.e., graduate and postdoctoral researchers) and faculty. We used a qualitative approach to examine the relationships among undergraduates, postgraduates, and the faculty head in a research group. In this group, undergraduates viewed postgraduates as more approachable than the faculty head both literally and figuratively. Mentorship by postgraduates presented unique challenges for undergraduates, including unrealistic expectations and varying abilities to mentor. The postgraduates and faculty head concurred that undergraduates contributed to the group's success and served as a source of frustration. Postgraduates appreciated the opportunity to observe multiple approaches to mentoring as they saw the faculty head and other postgraduates interact with undergraduates. The faculty head viewed undergraduate research as important for propagating the research community and for gaining insights into undergraduates and their postgraduate mentors. These results highlight how the involvement of undergraduates and postgraduates in research can limit and enhance the research experiences of members of the undergraduate–postgraduate–faculty triad. A number of tensions emerge that we hypothesize are intrinsic to undergraduate research experiences at research universities. Future studies can focus on determining the generalizability of these findings to other groups and disciplines. PMID:21123701

  7. Who shares? Who doesn't? Factors associated with openly archiving raw research data.

    PubMed

    Piwowar, Heather A

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%-35% in 2007-2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output.

  8. Who Shares? Who Doesn't? Factors Associated with Openly Archiving Raw Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%–35% in 2007–2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output. PMID:21765886

  9. Association of Race, Ethnicity and Language with Participation in Mental Health Research Among Adult Patients in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Chang, Trina E; Brill, Charlotte D; Traeger, Lara; Bedoya, C Andres; Inamori, Aya; Hagan, Patrick N; Flaherty, Katherine; Hails, Katherine; Yeung, Albert; Trinh, Nhi-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in clinical psychiatric research, but the reasons are not fully understood and may vary widely between minority groups. We used the Z-test of independent proportions and binary logistic regression to examine the relationship between race, ethnicity or primary language and participation in screening as well as interest in further research participation among primary care patients being screened for a depression study. Minorities were less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to complete the initial screening survey. Latinos and Blacks were more likely to agree to be contacted for research than non-Hispanic Whites. Among Latinos, primary language was associated with willingness to be contacted for research. Associations between research participation and race, ethnicity and language are complex and vary across different enrollment steps. Future research should consider stages of the research enrollment process separately to better understand barriers and identify targets for intervention.

  10. Beyond Data Points and Research Contributions: The Personal Meaning and Value Associated with Public Participation in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    As public participation in scientific research (PPSR) initiatives have expanded rapidly among private, public, and non-profit science research communities over the past decade, program managers and scholars regularly promote, evaluate, and manage such programs with a focus on the value and impact of PPSR efforts on the practice and relevancy of…

  11. Beyond Data Points and Research Contributions: The Personal Meaning and Value Associated with Public Participation in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    As public participation in scientific research (PPSR) initiatives have expanded rapidly among private, public, and non-profit science research communities over the past decade, program managers and scholars regularly promote, evaluate, and manage such programs with a focus on the value and impact of PPSR efforts on the practice and relevancy of…

  12. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  13. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Annual Research Meeting in Conjunction with the Annual Convention of the Association for Career and Technical Education. Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, December 11-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G., Ed.

    This document contains 14 research papers presented at the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The following papers are included: "Factors that Influence Students to Attend 4-Year Automotive Programs" (Gregory G. Belcher, Robert L. Frisbee); "The Training Needs of Vocational Teachers for…

  14. The real-time learning mechanism of the Scientific Research Associates Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific research associates advanced robotic system (SRAARS) is an intelligent robotic system which has autonomous learning capability in geometric reasoning. The system is equipped with one global intelligence center (GIC) and eight local intelligence centers (LICs). It controls mainly sixteen links with fourteen active joints, which constitute two articulated arms, an extensible lower body, a vision system with two CCD cameras and a mobile base. The on-board knowledge-based system supports the learning controller with model representations of both the robot and the working environment. By consecutive verifying and planning procedures, hypothesis-and-test routines and learning-by-analogy paradigm, the system would autonomously build up its own understanding of the relationship between itself (i.e., the robot) and the focused environment for the purposes of collision avoidance, motion analysis and object manipulation. The intelligence of SRAARS presents a valuable technical advantage to implement robotic systems for space exploration and space station operations.

  15. The association of chiropractic colleges educational conference and research agenda conference: 17 years of scholarship and collaboration.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Claire; Green, Bart

    2010-01-01

    This editorial presents a brief description of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference and Research Agenda Conference, the components of the conference, and long range goals of the peer-review committee.

  16. Notification: Preliminary Research for EPA Cooperative Agreement No. 83388101 Awarded to the Association of Schools of Public Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    December 19, 2013. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Inspector General, plans to begin preliminary research for Cooperative Agreement (CA) No. 83388101 awarded to the Association of Schools of Public Health.

  17. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between True

  18. Trends in health sciences library and information science research: an analysis of research publications in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1991 to 2007*

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Sally A.; Nordberg, Judith M.; Palmer, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed trends in research activity as represented in the published research in the leading peer-reviewed professional journal for health sciences librarianship. Methodology: Research articles were identified from the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association (1991–2007). Using content analysis and bibliometric techniques, data were collected for each article on the (1) subject, (2) research method, (3) analytical technique used, (4) number of authors, (5) number of citations, (6) first author affiliation, and (7) funding source. The results were compared to a previous study, covering the period 1966 to 1990, to identify changes over time. Results: Of the 930 articles examined, 474 (51%) were identified as research articles. Survey (n = 174, 37.1%) was the most common methodology employed, quantitative descriptive statistics (n = 298, 63.5%) the most used analytical technique, and applied topics (n = 332, 70%) the most common type of subject studied. The majority of first authors were associated with an academic health sciences library (n = 264, 55.7%). Only 27.4% (n = 130) of studies identified a funding source. Conclusion: This study's findings demonstrate that progress is being made in health sciences librarianship research. There is, however, room for improvement in terms of research methodologies used, proportion of applied versus theoretical research, and elimination of barriers to conducting research for practicing librarians. PMID:19626146

  19. Trends in health sciences library and information science research: an analysis of research publications in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1991 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Gore, Sally A; Nordberg, Judith M; Palmer, Lisa A; Piorun, Mary E

    2009-07-01

    This study analyzed trends in research activity as represented in the published research in the leading peer-reviewed professional journal for health sciences librarianship. Research articles were identified from the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association (1991-2007). Using content analysis and bibliometric techniques, data were collected for each article on the (1) subject, (2) research method, (3) analytical technique used, (4) number of authors, (5) number of citations, (6) first author affiliation, and (7) funding source. The results were compared to a previous study, covering the period 1966 to 1990, to identify changes over time. Of the 930 articles examined, 474 (51%) were identified as research articles. Survey (n = 174, 37.1%) was the most common methodology employed, quantitative descriptive statistics (n = 298, 63.5%) the most used analytical technique, and applied topics (n = 332, 70%) the most common type of subject studied. The majority of first authors were associated with an academic health sciences library (n = 264, 55.7%). Only 27.4% (n = 130) of studies identified a funding source. This study's findings demonstrate that progress is being made in health sciences librarianship research. There is, however, room for improvement in terms of research methodologies used, proportion of applied versus theoretical research, and elimination of barriers to conducting research for practicing librarians.

  20. A Roadmap to Promote Clinical and Translational Research in Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tracy J.; Lee, Joyce S.; Dellaripa, Paul F.; Lederer, James A.; Matteson, Eric L.; Fischer, Aryeh; Ascherman, Dana P.; Glassberg, Marilyn K.; Ryu, Jay H.; Danoff, Sonye K.; Brown, Kevin K.; Collard, Harold R.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting approximately 1.3 million adults in the United States. Approximately 10% of these individuals with RA have clinically evident interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD), and an additional one-third demonstrate subclinical ILD on chest CT scan. The risk of death for individuals with RA-ILD is three times higher than for patients with RA without ILD, with a median survival after ILD diagnosis of only 2.6 years. Despite the high prevalence and mortality of RA-ILD, little is known about its molecular features and its natural history. At present, we lack a standard validated approach to the definition, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of RA-ILD. In this perspective, we discuss the importance of clinical and translational research and how ongoing research efforts can address important gaps in our knowledge over the next few years. Furthermore, recommendations are made to design multicenter collaborative studies that will expedite the development of clinical trials designed to decrease the significant morbidity and mortality associated with RA-ILD. PMID:24590021

  1. The Remote Observatories of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; Oswalt, Terry; Mack, Peter; Henson, Gary; Hillwig, Todd; Batcheldor, Daniel; Berrington, Robert; De Pree, Chris; Hartmann, Dieter; Leake, Martha; Licandro, Javier; Murphy, Brian; Webb, James; Wood, Matt A.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the remote facilities operated by the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) , a consortium of colleges and universities in the US partnered with Lowell Observatory, the Chilean National Telescope Allocation Committee, and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. SARA observatories comprise a 0.96 m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona; one of 0.6 m aperture on Cerro Tololo, Chile; and the 1 m Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain. All are operated using standard VNC or Radmin protocols communicating with on-site PCs. Remote operation offers considerable flexibility in scheduling, allowing long-term observational cadences difficult to achieve with classical observing at remote facilities, as well as obvious travel savings. Multiple observers at different locations can share a telescope for training, educational use, or collaborative research programs. Each telescope has a CCD system for optical imaging, using thermoelectric cooling to avoid the need for frequent local service, and a second CCD for offset guiding. The Arizona and Chile telescopes also have fiber-fed echelle spectrographs. Switching between imaging and spectroscopy is very rapid, so a night can easily accommodate mixed observing modes. We present some sample observational programs. For the benefit of other groups organizing similar consortia, we describe the operating structure and principles of SARA, as well as some lessons learned from almost 20 years of remote operations.

  2. Research agenda for understanding Alzheimer disease in diverse populations: work group on cultural diversity, Alzheimer's association.

    PubMed

    Shadlen, Marie-Florence; McCormick, Wayne C; Larson, Eric B

    2002-01-01

    The emerging evidence of ethnic variations in apolipoprotein polymorphism and Alzheimer disease risk shows that one cannot generalize findings based on a single cultural group too broadly ( Tang et al., 2001). Presence of one apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele is a stronger risk factor for Alzheimer disease in whites and Asians than in blacks ( Farrer et al., 1997). Environmental or genetic cofactors may modulate the effects of epsilon 4 on beta-amyloid metabolism differently in different subpopulations ( Shadlen, 1998). Recognizing this, the Alzheimer's Association has extended its goals to strengthen the scientific information base on the interactions of population diversity and Alzheimer disease heterogeneity ( NIA, 1998). This new focus is timely since minority elderly are the most rapidly increasing segment of the elderly population ( Lilienfeld and Perl, 1994, Brookmeyer et al., 1998). In this article, the authors highlight recent progress in research on Alzheimer disease among culturally diverse populations with a special emphasis on gaps in the knowledge base. The authors recommend four priorities for future Alzheimer disease research: (1) determine whether genetic causative factors interact differently in different populations; (2) reexamine the nature and role of cerebral ischemia and infarction and variations in symptom severity of Alzheimer disease; (3) explore the interaction of genes and environmental influences that are protective against Alzheimer disease; and (4) recruit and enroll ethnically diverse subjects in Alzheimer disease clinical trials.

  3. Opportunities in multi dimensional trace metal imaging: Taking copper associated disease research to the next level

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Stefan; Ralle, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Copper plays an important role in numerous biological processes across all living systems predominantly because of its versatile redox behavior. Cellular copper homeostasis is tightly regulated and disturbances lead to severe disorders such as Wilson disease (WD) and Menkes disease. Age related changes of copper metabolism have been implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The role of copper in these diseases has been topic of mostly bioinorganic research efforts for more than a decade, metal-protein interactions have been characterized and cellular copper pathways have been described. Despite these efforts, crucial aspects of how copper is associated with AD, for example, is still only poorly understood. To take metal related disease research to the next level, emerging multi dimensional imaging techniques are now revealing the copper metallome as the basis to better understand disease mechanisms. This review will describe how recent advances in X-ray fluorescence microscopy and fluorescent copper probes have started to contribute to this field specifically WD and AD. It furthermore provides an overview of current developments and future applications in X-ray microscopic methodologies. PMID:23079951

  4. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A.; Ratner, Robert E.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    From 27–29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled “Diabetes and the Microbiome,” jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion. Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host—including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome—the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology—specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present

  5. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  6. Association between research sponsorship and study outcome in plastic surgery literature.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Arash; Becker, Axel; Bannasch, Holger; Antes, Gerd; Blümle, Anette; Stark, G Björn

    2009-12-01

    Financial and other competing interests have recently received increasing attention. In particular clinical research in plastic surgery attracts for-profit organizations, thus, explaining the increasing number of financial sponsorships. However, research articles often lack sufficient description of study design as well as disclosure of the source of funding. Furthermore, debate exists whether industry funding influences research findings and is leading to pro-industry results. A hand search was conducted identifying all randomized controlled (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT) in 4 plastic surgery journals (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, British Journal of Plastic Surgery, Annals of Plastic Surgery, and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery) between 1990 and 2005. Subsequently, the influence of financial support on study outcome was analyzed. A total of 10,476 original articles were analyzed, resulting in the identification of 346 clinical trials which meet the Cochrane criteria for RCTs and CCTs. One hundred eighty-three trials and 163 studies were found to be RCTs and CCTs, respectively. Hereof, only 70 trials (20.2%) reported on grant support. Of these, 42 trials (60%) were supported by the industry. Depending on the topic addressed marked differences were detected regarding grant support. Studies with a focus on reconstructive plastic surgery were supported by the industry and by public institutions in almost equal shares (18 trials vs. 15 trials), whereas aesthetic surgical topics were predominantly funded by the industry (13 trials vs. 6 trials). Industry-funded trials reported more often statistically significant differences between treatment arms (28 trials vs. 16 trials). Authors' conclusions were found to be positively associated with financial competing interests. However, trial funding is rarely declared in the plastic surgery literature. Thus, the quality of reporting needs to be improved to be able to investigate these relationships in greater detail

  7. Midwest Surgical Association research in the next 50 years: Newton, Bacon, or Jefferson approach?

    PubMed

    Senagore, Anthony J

    2008-03-01

    In addition to serving as your president this past year, I have the significant honor and challenge of addressing you at the 50th Anniversary of the Midwest Surgical Association. Milestones like this allow us the opportunity to reflect on past joys and ponder future opportunities. The three powers possessed by a guild/profession are: control over association; control over the workplace; and control over the market. We have experienced loss of power in each area, beginning with the passage of the Medicare-Medicaid Act in 1965. There are opportunities for a response, and efforts should be made to save our profession. To thrive in the future and regain our status in the debate over how health care will be delivered will require a more expansive view of research and the skills required. As I hope I have demonstrated, to regain our position as the true advocates for our patients we will need to develop the requisite skills and knowledge to convey our medical care successes. This must be done within a context that will be acceptable to our patients, our hospitals, our payers, and our government watch dogs. The buzz word for the foreseeable future will be quality.

  8. Original Research: ACE2 activator associated with physical exercise potentiates the reduction of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Prata, Luana O; Rodrigues, Carolina R; Martins, Jéssica M; Vasconcelos, Paula C; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus S; Ferreira, Anderson J; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria da Glória

    2016-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases are poorly understood and there are currently no studies evaluating the association of physical exercise with an ACE2 activator (DIZE) as a possible treatment for this group of diseases. We evaluate the effects of pharmacological treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator drug, associated with exercise, on the pulmonary lesions induced by bleomycin. From the 96 male Balb/c mice used in the experiment, only 49 received 8 U/kg of bleomycin (BLM, intratracheally). The mice were divided into control (C) and bleomycin (BLM) groups, sedentary and trained (C-SED, C-EXE, BLM-SED, BLM-EXE), control and bleomycin and also sedentary and trained treated with diminazene (C-SED/E, C-EXE/E, BLM-SED/E, BLM-EXE/E). The animals were trained five days/week, 1 h/day with 60% of the maximum load obtained in a functional capacity test, for four weeks. Diminazene groups were treated (1 mg/kg, by gavage) daily until the end of the experiment. The lungs were collected 48 h after the training program, set in buffered formalin and investigated by Gomori’s trichrome, immunohistochemistry of collagen type I, TGF-β1, beta-prolyl-4-hydroxylase, MMP-1 and -2. The BLM-EXE/E group obtained a significant increase in functional capacity, reduced amount of fibrosis and type I collagen, decreased expression of TGF-β1 and beta-prolyl-4-hydroxylase and an increase of metalloproteinase −1, −2 when compared with the other groups. The present research shows, for the first time, that exercise training associated with the activation of ACE2 potentially reduces pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27550926

  9. Original Research: ACE2 activator associated with physical exercise potentiates the reduction of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Prata, Luana O; Rodrigues, Carolina R; Martins, Jéssica M; Vasconcelos, Paula C; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus S; Ferreira, Anderson J; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria da Glória; Caliari, Marcelo V

    2017-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases are poorly understood and there are currently no studies evaluating the association of physical exercise with an ACE2 activator (DIZE) as a possible treatment for this group of diseases. We evaluate the effects of pharmacological treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator drug, associated with exercise, on the pulmonary lesions induced by bleomycin. From the 96 male Balb/c mice used in the experiment, only 49 received 8 U/kg of bleomycin (BLM, intratracheally). The mice were divided into control (C) and bleomycin (BLM) groups, sedentary and trained (C-SED, C-EXE, BLM-SED, BLM-EXE), control and bleomycin and also sedentary and trained treated with diminazene (C-SED/E, C-EXE/E, BLM-SED/E, BLM-EXE/E). The animals were trained five days/week, 1 h/day with 60% of the maximum load obtained in a functional capacity test, for four weeks. Diminazene groups were treated (1 mg/kg, by gavage) daily until the end of the experiment. The lungs were collected 48 h after the training program, set in buffered formalin and investigated by Gomori's trichrome, immunohistochemistry of collagen type I, TGF-β1, beta-prolyl-4-hydroxylase, MMP-1 and -2. The BLM-EXE/E group obtained a significant increase in functional capacity, reduced amount of fibrosis and type I collagen, decreased expression of TGF-β1 and beta-prolyl-4-hydroxylase and an increase of metalloproteinase -1, -2 when compared with the other groups. The present research shows, for the first time, that exercise training associated with the activation of ACE2 potentially reduces pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association

  11. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (29th, Annapolis, Maryland, November 16-19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 2002 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research, a meeting devoted to assessment in the 21st century and the challenges that face institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Putting Community College Enrollment Trends in Perspective by the Use of Census Data and Market…

  12. ARL Preservation Statistics, 1997-98: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.; Hipps, Kaylyn, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; O'Connor, Michael, Comp.

    This document presents data from 118 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1997-98 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  13. ARL Preservation Statistics, 2005-06. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    This document presents data from 123 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2005-2006 fiscal year. Since 1987-1988, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown 66 to as many as 80 in more recent years, with 77 in 2005-2006. Shifting…

  14. ARL Preservation Statistics, 2004-05. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    This document presents data from 123 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2004-2005 fiscal year. Since 1987-1988, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown 66 to as many as 80 in more recent years, with 74 in 2004-2005. Shifting…

  15. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad

  16. Clinical Research Abstracts of the British Equine Veterinary Association Congress 2015.

    PubMed

    Bowden, A; Brennan, M L; England, G C W; Burford, J H; Freeman, S L

    2015-09-01

    research. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham. The questionnaire was conducted in accordance with the 1998 Data Protection Act, and the British Educational Research Association's Revised Ethical Guidelines for Educational Research (2004). Adelle Bowden's studentship is funded by the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham. Competing interests: None declared. © 2015 The Author(s). Equine Veterinary Journal © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Potential Selection Bias Associated With Using Geocoded Birth Records for Epidemiological Research

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sandie; Hu, Hui; Mao, Liang; Roussos-Ross, Dikea; Roth, Jeffrey; Xu, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is an increasing use of geocoded birth registry data in environmental epidemiology research. Ungeocoded records are routinely excluded. Methods We used classification and regression tree analysis (CART) and logistic regression to investigate potential selection bias associated with this exclusion among all singleton Florida births in 2009 (N=210,285). Results The rate of unsuccessful geocoding was 11.5% (n=24,171). This ranged between 0% to 100% across zip codes. Living in a rural zip code was the strongest predictor of being ungeocoded. Other predictors for geocoding status varied with urbanity status. In urban areas, maternal race [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) ranging between 1.08 for Hispanic to 1.18 for Black compared to White], maternal age [aOR: 1.16 (1.10-1.23) for ages 20-34 compared to <20], maternal nativity [aOR: 1.20 (1.15, 1.25) for Non-US vs. US born], delivery at a birth center [aOR: 1.72(1.49, 2.00 compared to hospital delivery)], multiparity [aOR: 0.91 (0.88, 0.94)], maternal smoking [aOR: 0.82 (0.76-0.88)] and having non-private insurance [aOR: 1.25 (1.20-1.30) for Medicaid vs. private insurance] were significantly associated with being ungeocoded. In rural areas, births delivered at birth center [aOR: 2.91(1.80-4.73)] or home [aOR: 1.94(1.28-2.95) had increased odds compared to hospital births. The characteristics predictive of being ungeocoded were also significantly associated with adverse birth outcomes such as low birthweight and preterm delivery, and the association for maternal age was different when ungeocoded births were included and excluded. Conclusions Geocoding status is not random. Women with certain exposure-outcome characteristics may be more likely to be ungeocoded and excluded, indicating potential selection bias. PMID:26907541

  18. Potential selection bias associated with using geocoded birth records for epidemiologic research.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sandie; Hu, Hui; Mao, Liang; Roussos-Ross, Dikea; Roth, Jeffrey; Xu, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing use of geocoded birth registry data in environmental epidemiology research. Ungeocoded records are routinely excluded. We used classification and regression tree analysis and logistic regression to investigate potential selection bias associated with this exclusion among all singleton Florida births in 2009 (n = 210,285). The rate of unsuccessful geocoding was 11.5% (n = 24,171). This ranged between 0% and 100% across zip codes. Living in a rural zip code was the strongest predictor of being ungeocoded. Other predictors for geocoding status varied with urbanity status. In urban areas, maternal race (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] ranging between 1.08 for Hispanic and 1.18 for black compared to white), maternal age [aOR: 1.16 (1.10-1.23) for ages 20-34 compared to <20], maternal nativity [aOR: 1.20 (1.15-1.25) for non-US versus US born], delivery at a birth center [aOR: 1.72 (1.49-2.00) compared to hospital delivery], multiparity [aOR: 0.91 (0.88-0.94)], maternal smoking [aOR: 0.82 (0.76-0.88)], and having nonprivate insurance [aOR: 1.25 (1.20-1.30) for Medicaid versus private insurance] were significantly associated with being ungeocoded. In rural areas, births delivered at birth center [aOR: 2.91 (1.80-4.73)] or home [aOR: 1.94 (1.28-2.95)] had increased odds compared to hospital births. The characteristics predictive of being ungeocoded were also significantly associated with adverse birth outcomes such as low birth weight and preterm delivery, and the association for maternal age was different when ungeocoded births were included and excluded. Geocoding status is not random. Women with certain exposure-outcome characteristics may be more likely to be ungeocoded and excluded, indicating potential selection bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stress- and PTSD-associated obesity and metabolic dysfunction: A growing problem requiring further research and novel treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Sloan, Denise M.; Keane, Terence M.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a growing public health concern. More recently, evidence has indicated that PTSD leads to obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction. Possible mechanisms of this link are through dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and related moderation of appetite hormones and neural activity, leading to changes in consumptive behaviors. Although research has been examining associations between PTSD and obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, future research should delineate potential mechanisms for these associations and develop targeted treatments to reduce these metabolic outcomes. PMID:25267015

  20. From brain to neuro: the brain research association and the making of British neuroscience, 1965-1996.

    PubMed

    Abi-Rached, Joelle M

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the short history of "neuroscience" as a discipline in its own right as opposed to the much longer past of the brain sciences. It focuses on one historical moment, the formation of the first British "neuroscience" society, the Brain Research Association (BRA), renamed in 1996 to the British Neuroscience Association (BNA). It outlines the new thinking brought about by this new science of brain, mind, and behavior, it sketches the beginnings of the BRA and the institutionalization of neuroscience in the British context, and it further explores the ambiguous relation the association had towards some of the ethical, social, and political implications of this new area of research.

  1. Agitation in cognitive disorders: International Psychogeriatric Association provisional consensus clinical and research definition.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Mintzer, Jacobo; Brodaty, Henry; Sano, Mary; Banerjee, Sube; Devanand, D P; Gauthier, Serge; Howard, Robert; Lanctôt, Krista; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Peskind, Elaine; Porsteinsson, Anton P; Reich, Edgardo; Sampaio, Cristina; Steffens, David; Wortmann, Marc; Zhong, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Agitation is common across neuropsychiatric disorders and contributes to disability, institutionalization, and diminished quality of life for patients and their caregivers. There is no consensus definition of agitation and no widespread agreement on what elements should be included in the syndrome. The International Psychogeriatric Association formed an Agitation Definition Work Group (ADWG) to develop a provisional consensus definition of agitation in patients with cognitive disorders that can be applied in epidemiologic, non-interventional clinical, pharmacologic, non-pharmacologic interventional, and neurobiological studies. A consensus definition will facilitate communication and cross-study comparison and may have regulatory applications in drug development programs. The ADWG developed a transparent process using a combination of electronic, face-to-face, and survey-based strategies to develop a consensus based on agreement of a majority of participants. Nine-hundred twenty-eight respondents participated in the different phases of the process. Agitation was defined broadly as: (1) occurring in patients with a cognitive impairment or dementia syndrome; (2) exhibiting behavior consistent with emotional distress; (3) manifesting excessive motor activity, verbal aggression, or physical aggression; and (4) evidencing behaviors that cause excess disability and are not solely attributable to another disorder (psychiatric, medical, or substance-related). A majority of the respondents rated all surveyed elements of the definition as "strongly agree" or "somewhat agree" (68-88% across elements). A majority of the respondents agreed that the definition is appropriate for clinical and research applications. A provisional consensus definition of agitation has been developed. This definition can be used to advance interventional and non-interventional research of agitation in patients with cognitive impairment.

  2. Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. Ann; Kamineni, D. Choudari; Sawicki, Jerzy A.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. Images PMID:16349374

  3. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites.

  4. ceRNAs in plants: computational approaches and associated challenges for target mimic research.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Alexandre Rossi; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Stadler, Peter F

    2017-05-30

    The competing endogenous RNA hypothesis has gained increasing attention as a potential global regulatory mechanism of microRNAs (miRNAs), and as a powerful tool to predict the function of many noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs themselves. Most studies have been focused on animals, although target mimic (TMs) discovery as well as important computational and experimental advances has been developed in plants over the past decade. Thus, our contribution summarizes recent progresses in computational approaches for research of miRNA:TM interactions. We divided this article in three main contributions. First, a general overview of research on TMs in plants is presented with practical descriptions of the available literature, tools, data, databases and computational reports. Second, we describe a common protocol for the computational and experimental analyses of TM. Third, we provide a bioinformatics approach for the prediction of TM motifs potentially cross-targeting both members within the same or from different miRNA families, based on the identification of consensus miRNA-binding sites from known TMs across sequenced genomes, transcriptomes and known miRNAs. This computational approach is promising because, in contrast to animals, miRNA families in plants are large with identical or similar members, several of which are also highly conserved. From the three consensus TM motifs found with our approach: MIM166, MIM171 and MIM159/319, the last one has found strong support on the recent experimental work by Reichel and Millar [Specificity of plant microRNA TMs: cross-targeting of mir159 and mir319. J Plant Physiol 2015;180:45-8]. Finally, we stress the discussion on the major computational and associated experimental challenges that have to be faced in future ceRNA studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Arts and Learning Research, 1997-1998. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, Illinois, March 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Sheri R., Ed.; Jeffers, Carol S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the 1997 meeting of the American Educational Research Association; many were presented as part of Arts and Learning programs. The papers gathered in the volume explore in a variety of ways the notions of space: artistic, cultural, domestic, personal, political, public, private, and virtual and how spaces…

  6. Bridges to the Future: Building Linkages for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (27th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 4-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This document contains papers, summaries of panel presentations, and work share meetings from the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "The Influence of Personality Traits, Pre-College Characteristics, and Co-Curricular Experiences on College Outcomes" (Karen W. Bauer); (2)…

  7. Arts and Learning Research, 1998-1999. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, Illinois, April 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Liora, Ed.; Ellis, Nancy C., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This volume highlights thought-provoking issues in visual arts, drama, and music education presented at the 1998 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Following a message from the Special Interest Group Chair, Larry Kantner, and an editorial, articles in section 1 are: "Art Beginnings" (L. A. Kantner); "Teachers'…

  8. Tobacco and cancer: an American Association for Cancer Research policy statement.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Herbst, Roy S; Land, Stephanie R; Leischow, Scott J; Shields, Peter G

    2010-05-01

    The evidence against tobacco use is clear, incontrovertible, and convincing; so is the need for urgent and immediate action to stem the global tide of tobacco-related death and suffering and to improve public health. The American Association for Cancer Research makes an unequivocal call to all who are concerned about public health to take the following immediate steps:Increase the investment in tobacco-related research, commensurate with the enormous toll that tobacco use takes on human health, to provide the scientific evidence to drive the development of effective policies and treatments necessary to dramatically reduce tobacco use and attendant disease. Develop new evidence-based strategies to more effectively prevent the initiation of tobacco use, especially for youth and young adults. Promote the further development of evidence-based treatments for tobacco cessation, including individualized therapies, and ensure coverage of and access to evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological treatments. Develop evidence-based strategies for more effective public communication to prevent, reduce, and eliminate tobacco use and to guide health policies and clinical practice. Develop effective, evidence-based policies to reduce disparities across the tobacco continuum among social groups and developed and developing nations. Implement to the fullest extent existing evidence-based, systems-wide tobacco control programs to prevent initiation and foster cessation. Adapt and implement appropriate approaches to reduce the growing burden of tobacco use in the developing world. Enhance and coordinate surveillance efforts, both in the United States and globally, to monitor tobacco products, tobacco use, and tobacco-related disease, including tobacco use in oncology clinical trials. Establish a comprehensive, science-based regulatory framework to evaluate tobacco products and manufacturers' claims. Promote research that addresses the following: the potential harms of current and

  9. Factors Associated with Research Productivity among Oral Healthcare Educators in an Asian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Bernardo E., Jr.; Clerigo, Maria Eloisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Research writing confidence and organizational support toward research activities are two essential factors that may affect research productivity among higher educational institutions. This study investigated the possible relationships of these two factors to research productivity among faculty members of the College of Dentistry at Lyceum of the…

  10. The role of Water Resources Users Associations in hydrological research: experiences from Lake Naivasha Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agol, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper is based on recent studies in Lake Naivasha Basin that explored the ways in which locally based institutions namely the Water Resources Users Associations (WRUAs) are contributing to hydrological knowledge for decision-making processes. Lake Naivasha is a shallow freshwater body which is situated on the floor of Kenya's Rift Valley. It covers approximately 140 Km2 and supports a rich diversity of plants and animals. The Lake Naivasha Basin faces several challenges associated with over- population, urbanization and intensive agricultural activities. For example, the large-scale floricultural and horticultural export industries around the Lake have attracted thousands of migrants from different parts of Kenya who have settled around the Lake and exert a lot of pressure on its resources. The Lake Naivasha is one of the best examples in Kenya where the WRUAs development process has shown some progress. There are 12 WRUAS across the Lake Basin representing its various sub-catchments. In recent years, the role of WRUAs in the Lake has changed rapidly as they are no longer restricted to just resolving conflicts and fostering cooperation between water users. They now have an additional responsibility of collecting hydrological data within their respective sub-catchments. The majority of WRUA officials have been trained on how to collect data such as reading rain gauges, measuring stream flows, turbidity and sediment loads. The data collected are sent to the relevant government authorities for validation and interpretation and the information derived from this process is used to formulate important strategies such as water allocation plans. Using secondary data analysis, interviews and focus group discussions the study investigated how this new role of the WRUAs is changing the water resource management landscape in the Lake Naivasha Basin. In particular it presents key challenges and opportunities associated with attempts to build capacities of lower level

  11. Factors associated with hepatitis B vaccination among men who have sex with men: a systematic review of published research.

    PubMed

    Vet, Raymond; de Wit, John Bf; Das, Enny

    2017-05-01

    This systematic review identified and synthesised evidence from published research regarding personal and environmental factors associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination uptake among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in low prevalence, high-income countries. A systematic literature search identified 18 eligible papers that addressed factors potentially associated with HBV vaccination uptake among MSM, of which 16 reported research conducted in the US. Studies assessed possible associations between HBV vaccination among MSM and socio-demographic characteristics, behavioural and social-cognitive factors and indicators of health service access. Converging evidence was found for associations between HBV vaccination and younger age, gay self-identification, and not using alcohol and drugs; evidence suggests a lack of association between HBV vaccination and ethnicity. There was converging evidence for associations between HBV vaccination and social-cognitive factors, in particular knowledge, perceived vulnerability and perceived severity regarding HBV infection, and perceived barriers to HBV vaccination. Evidence further supported associations between HBV vaccination and indicators of health service access. While research regarding factors associated with HBV vaccination among MSM remains limited, the identified correlates of HBV vaccination among MSM provide important guidance for the development of health promotion interventions to effectively increase coverage of HBV vaccination among MSM.

  12. On use of ZPR research reactors and associated instrumentation and measurement methods for reactor physics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, J.P.; Blaise, P.; Lyoussi, A.

    2015-07-01

    The French atomic and alternative energies -CEA- is strongly involved in research and development programs concerning the use of nuclear energy as a clean and reliable source of energy and consequently is working on the present and future generation of reactors on various topics such as ageing plant management, optimization of the plutonium stockpile, waste management and innovative systems exploration. Core physics studies are an essential part of this comprehensive R and D effort. In particular, the Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) of CEA: EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA play an important role in the validation of neutron (as well photon) physics calculation tools (codes and nuclear data). The experimental programs defined in the CEA's ZPR facilities aim at improving the calculation routes by reducing the uncertainties of the experimental databases. They also provide accurate data on innovative systems in terms of new materials (moderating and decoupling materials) and new concepts (ADS, ABWR, new MTR (e.g. JHR), GENIV) involving new fuels, absorbers and coolant materials. Conducting such interesting experimental R and D programs is based on determining and measuring main parameters of phenomena of interest to qualify calculation tools and nuclear data 'libraries'. Determining these parameters relies on the use of numerous and different experimental techniques using specific and appropriate instrumentation and detection tools. Main ZPR experimental programs at CEA, their objectives and challenges will be presented and discussed. Future development and perspectives regarding ZPR reactors and associated programs will be also presented. (authors)

  13. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  14. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M; Fuller, Mark R; Kie, John G; Bates, Kirk K

    2010-07-27

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  15. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  16. Future Research, Research Futures. Proceedings of the National Conference of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) (3rd, Canberra, Australia, March 23-24, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria.

    These proceedings consist of 66 conference papers on these themes: changing nature of work; emerging technologies; internationalization of vocational education and training (VET); enterprise and educational innovation; flexible delivery approaches; and research and technology and using technology in research. The papers are "Training Needs of…

  17. The International Permafrost Association: new structure and initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, I.; Lewkowicz, A. G.; Christiansen, H.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Lantuit, H.; Schrott, L.; Sergeev, D.; Wei, M.

    2012-12-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details recent and ongoing changes in the functioning of the IPA that will influence the way cryospheric research is conducted under its auspices. One of the most important is the development of competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Since the first call, four proposals have been accepted by the Executive Committee and the teams are currently working on high topical issues, such as the assessment of the deep permafrost organic carbon pools and the mapping of subsea permafrost, as well as fundamental questions such as the extent of permafrost during the Last Permafrost Maximum. The IPA also decided to put additional effort into facilitating the study of the significance of permafrost to the global climate systems, with human aspects playing a very important role. To achieve this goal, the IPA will encourage and assist the climate modeling community in improving the representation of perennially frozen ground

  18. The association between lower urinary tract symptoms and falls: Forming a theoretical model for a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William; Hunter, Kathleen F; Camicioli, Richard; Booth, Joanne; Skelton, Dawn A; Dumoulin, Chantale; Paul, Lorna; Wagg, Adrian

    2017-05-04

    There is a well-recognised association between falls and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in older adults, with estimates of odd ratios for falls in the presence of LUTS ranging between 1.5 and 2.3. Falls and LUTS are both highly prevalent among older people and both are markers of frailty, with significant associated morbidity, mortality, and healthcare resource cost. This association is not well examined or explained in the literature. We aimed to outline current knowledge of the association between falls and lower urinary tract symptoms and suggest a research program to further investigate this. A consensus conference of experts in the field was convened to review the current literature and brainstorm potential future investigative avenues. Despite the recognition of this association, there has been little research to examine its potential causes, and no intervention trial has established if reducing LUTS or urinary incontinence can reduce the risk of falls. The commonly held assumption that urgency causes falls through rushing to the toilet is likely incorrect. Falls and LUTS are both symptoms of frailty and have many common causes. Gait, balance, and continence are all processes requiring cognitive input, and the concept of dual tasking may be a further link. The significant association between lower urinary tract symptoms and falls is currently unexplained, and further research into the potential causes of this association is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Severe anaemia associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in children: consequences for additional blood sampling for research.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Laura Maria Francisca; Maltha, Jessica; Guiraud, Issa; Kaboré, Bérenger; Lompo, Palpouguini; Devlieger, Hugo; Van Geet, Chris; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan

    2016-06-02

    Plasmodium falciparum infection may cause severe anaemia, particularly in children. When planning a diagnostic study on children suspected of severe malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, it was questioned how much blood could be safely sampled; intended blood volumes (blood cultures and EDTA blood) were 6 mL (children aged <6 years) and 10 mL (6-12 years). A previous review [Bull World Health Organ. 89: 46-53. 2011] recommended not to exceed 3.8 % of total blood volume (TBV). In a simulation exercise using data of children previously enrolled in a study about severe malaria and bacteraemia in Burkina Faso, the impact of this 3.8 % safety guideline was evaluated. For a total of 666 children aged >2 months to <12 years, data of age, weight and haemoglobin value (Hb) were available. For each child, the estimated TBV (TBVe) (mL) was calculated by multiplying the body weight (kg) by the factor 80 (ml/kg). Next, TBVe was corrected for the degree of anaemia to obtain the functional TBV (TBVf). The correction factor consisted of the rate 'Hb of the child divided by the reference Hb'; both the lowest ('best case') and highest ('worst case') reference Hb values were used. Next, the exact volume that a 3.8 % proportion of this TBVf would present was calculated and this volume was compared to the blood volumes that were intended to be sampled. When applied to the Burkina Faso cohort, the simulation exercise pointed out that in 5.3 % (best case) and 11.4 % (worst case) of children the blood volume intended to be sampled would exceed the volume as defined by the 3.8 % safety guideline. Highest proportions would be in the age groups 2-6 months (19.0 %; worst scenario) and 6 months-2 years (15.7 %; worst case scenario). A positive rapid diagnostic test for P. falciparum was associated with an increased risk of violating the safety guideline in the worst case scenario (p = 0.016). Blood sampling in children for research in P. falciparum endemic settings may easily violate

  20. Factors associated with biosafety level-2 research workers' laboratory exit handwashing behaviors and glove removal compliance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Merrill, Ray M; Zimmerman, Grant C; Collingwood, Scott C; Reading, James C

    2016-01-01

    Biosafety level-2 laboratories are designated for work with human-derived samples or moderate-risk microorganisms that transmit primarily by direct contact exposures. Many laboratory procedures generate unseen droplets that contaminate workers' hands, equipment, and work surfaces. Workers' strict adherence to glove removal and handwashing is required prior to laboratory exit to prevent inadvertent transmission of pathogens to self or others. However, little is known about biosafety level-2 workers' compliance with these behaviors. In this article, glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were measured by direct observation of 93 biosafety level-2 research workers from 21 university laboratories. Participants completed a 41-item survey measuring social cognitive theory-based variables related to handwashing, self-reported compliance, and demographic factors. Survey items, observed exit frequency, and laboratory characteristics were evaluated for associations with handwashing compliance. Overall, observed glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were 43.0% (Standard Error [SE] = 2.3%), and 8.2% (SE = 1.2%), respectively, while workers' self-reported glove removal and handwashing compliance were 73.7% (SE = 3.6%) and 35.5% (SE = 4.1%), respectively. The average number of observed laboratory exits per hour was 2.8 for workers with any handwashing compliance vs. 5.4 for workers with no handwashing compliance (p = 0.0013). Among the cognitive variables, behavioral modeling by supervisors and coworkers had the strongest association with workers' compliance (slope = 3.5, SE = 1.3, p = 0.0113). Workers in laboratories with a written handwashing policy had higher compliance (Mean = 14.1%, SE = 5.9%) than workers in laboratories with no written policy (Mean = 1.1%, SE = 1.0%; p = 0.0488). Multi-faceted interventions that encourage modeling of the behavior by supervisors and coworkers, implementation of written handwashing policies

  1. Latest discoveries and trends in translational cancer research: highlights of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Cho, William C S

    2008-08-01

    The Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world's largest and most comprehensive gathering of cancer researchers. At the 2008 AACR Annual Meeting, innovative research approaches, novel technologies, potentially life-saving therapies in the pipeline, late-breaking clinical trial findings, and new approaches to cancer prevention were presented by top scientists. Reflecting the global state of cancer research with an eye toward future trends, several areas of great science and discovery in the cancer field were shared in this report, which include cancer biomarkers, the role of microRNAs in cancer research, cancer stem cells, tumor microenvironment, targeted therapy, and cancer prevention. This article presents an overview of hot topics discussed at the 2008 AACR Annual Meeting and recapitulates some scientific sessions geared toward new technologies, recent progress, and current challenges reported by cancer researchers. For those who did not attend the meeting, this report may serve as a highlight of this important international cancer research meeting.

  2. Entertainers or Education Researchers? The Challenges Associated with Presenting While Black

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Ebony O.; Kazembe, Lasana

    2016-01-01

    How black faculty experience presenting their research in educational venues within the context of historical objectification of black people as sources of entertainment is an underexplored topic in higher education research. Presenting research has far-reaching implications for black academics' advancement, such as future employment and…

  3. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  4. Poster — Thur Eve — 12: Implementation of a Clinical Lung Tumour High Dose Containment Verification Procedure using Respiratory Cone-Beam CT (4DCBCT) on a Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, J.; Bergman, A.

    2014-08-15

    Lung tumours move due to respiratory motion. This is managed during planning by acquiring a 4DCT and capturing the excursion of the GTV (gross tumour volume) throughout the breathing cycle within an IGTV (Internal Gross Tumour Volume) contour. Patients undergo a verification cone-beam CT (CBCT) scan immediately prior to treatment. 3D reconstructed images do not consider tumour motion, resulting in image artefacts, such as blurring. This may lead to difficulty in identifying the tumour on reconstructed images. It would be valuable to create a 4DCBCT reconstruction of the tumour motion to confirm that does indeed remain within the planned IGTV. CBCT projections of a Quasar Respiratory Motion Phantom are acquired in Treatment mode (half-fan scan) on a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. This phantom contains a mobile, low-density lung insert with an embedded 3cm diameter tumour object. It is programmed to create a 15s periodic, 2cm (sup/inf) displacement. A Varian Real-time Position Management (RPM) tracking-box is placed on the phantom breathing platform. Breathing phase information is automatically integrated into the projection image files. Using in-house Matlab programs and RTK (Reconstruction Tool Kit) open-source toolboxes, the projections are re-binned into 10 phases and a 4DCBCT scan reconstructed. The planning IGTV is registered to the 4DCBCT and the tumour excursion is verified to remain within the planned contour. This technique successfully reconstructs 4DCBCT images using clinical modes for a breathing phantom. UBC-BCCA ethics approval has been obtained to perform 4DCBCT reconstructions on lung patients (REB#H12-00192). Clinical images will be accrued starting April 2014.

  5. The "Promise" of Three Methods of Word Association Analysis to L2 Lexical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zareva, Alla; Wolter, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to empirically test and compare the results of three methods of word association (WA) analysis. Two of the methods--namely, associative commonality and nativelikeness, and lexico-syntactic patterns of associative organization--have been traditionally used in both first language (L1) and second language (L2)…

  6. Overview of research activities associated with the World Health Organization: results of a survey covering 2006/07

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper presents the first comprehensive effort to provide an overview of the research associated with the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in 2006/07. Methods Information was obtained by questionnaire and interviews with senior staff operating at WHO headquarters in Geneva. Research type, purpose and resources (both financial and staff) were defined and compared for each of the 37 departments identified and a comparative analysis was made with the global burden of disease as expressed by Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY). Results Research expenditure in 2006/07 was estimated at US$215 million. WHO is involved in more than 60 research networks/partnerships and often WHO itself is the network host. Using the DALY model, 84% of the funding WHO allocates to research goes to DALY Type I diseases (communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional diseases) which represents 40% of DALY. 4% is allocated to Daly Type II (non-communicable diseases) which contributes to 48% of DALY. 45% of WHO permanent staff are involved with health research and the WHO's approach to research is predominantly focused on policy, advocacy, health systems and population based research. The Organization principally undertakes secondary research using published data and commissions others to conduct this work through contracts or research grants. This approach is broadly in line with the stated strategy of the Organization. Conclusions The difficulty in undertaking this survey highlights the complexity of obtaining an Organization-wide assessment of research activity in the absence of common standards for research classification, methods for priority setting and a mechanism across WHO, or within the governance of global health research more generally, for managing a research portfolio. This paper presents a strategic birds-eye view of the WHO research portfolio using methodologies that, with further development, may provide the strategic information required if

  7. State Library Agencies and Member Libraries of the Association of Research Libraries. Final Report of Two Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobot, Mary C.

    State Library Agencies (SLAs) and library members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) were surveyed to collect data from potential audiences for American Memory products to assist the planners for this Library of Congress (LC) project. This summary report briefly explains the purpose of the surveys; describes the survey methodology and…

  8. Tomorrow's Imperatives Today. Proceedings of the 13th Annual Forum, Vancouver, British Columbia, The Association for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Robert G., Ed.

    Prepared from addresses and papers selected from those presented at the 13th Annual Association for Institutional Research Forum in May 1973, this collection deals both with the broad national issues facing postsecondary education, and with matters that are directly related to campus functions, such as computer simulation models. The tone of these…

  9. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  10. Research among Learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language. Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph Series. Volume IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Michael E., Ed.; Shen, Helen H., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Cutting-edge in its approach and international in its authorship, this fourth monograph in a series sponsored by the Chinese Language Teachers Association features eight research studies that explore a variety of themes, topics, and perspectives important to a variety of stakeholders in the Chinese language learning community. Employing a wide…

  11. Organizational and Institutional Factors Associated with National Institutes of Health Research Grant Awards to Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Zlotnik, Joan; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and institutional factors that may be associated with the success of schools of social work (SOSWs) in securing research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and constituent agencies. Using data from the CRISP database on NIH grant funding, the Lombardi Program on Measuring University…

  12. ARL Supplementary Statistics, 2001-02. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents statistics on how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries spend money on electronic resources. This report indicates that expenditures for electronic resources account for 19.6%, on average, of ARL institutions' library materials budgets. ARL libraries reported spending more than $171 million on electronic…

  13. Literacy Promises. The Thirty-Third Yearbook: A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Timothy, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    For its 54th annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers met in Omaha, Nebraska at the Hilton Omaha. This year's conference theme was "Literacy Promises", which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 33. This organization has long been the home of some of the nation's most notable literacy experts. At the…

  14. Organizational and Institutional Factors Associated with National Institutes of Health Research Grant Awards to Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Zlotnik, Joan; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and institutional factors that may be associated with the success of schools of social work (SOSWs) in securing research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and constituent agencies. Using data from the CRISP database on NIH grant funding, the Lombardi Program on Measuring University…

  15. Statement of the American Sociological Association on the Importance of Collecting Data and Doing Social Scientific Research on Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC.

    This statement describes the basis for the American Sociological Association's (ASA) position regarding scientific research on race, illustrating the importance of such data to further scientific investigation and inform public policy. Race is a complex, sensitive, and controversial topic in scientific discourse and public policy. The controversy…

  16. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  17. Benefits, Challenges, and Dynamism of Positionalities Associated with Mixed Methods Research in Developing Countries: Evidence from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teye, Joseph Kofi

    2012-01-01

    Although mixed methods designs have gained visibility in recent years, most of the publications on this methodological strategy have been written by scholars in the developed world. Consequently, the practical challenges associated with mixed methods research in developing countries have not been adequately discussed in the literature. Relying on…

  18. A Test of the Association of Class Size to Students' Attitudes Toward Science. Research Paper No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, William H.

    Analysis of data, collected by the Minnesota Research and Evaluation Project during 1972, on high school biology, chemistry, and physics classes from 12 states in 3 regions of the United States showed no association between class size and student attitude toward science. Potential effects of teachers' attitudes toward science and students'…

  19. Benefits, Challenges, and Dynamism of Positionalities Associated with Mixed Methods Research in Developing Countries: Evidence from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teye, Joseph Kofi

    2012-01-01

    Although mixed methods designs have gained visibility in recent years, most of the publications on this methodological strategy have been written by scholars in the developed world. Consequently, the practical challenges associated with mixed methods research in developing countries have not been adequately discussed in the literature. Relying on…

  20. Performance Assessment & KERA. Proceedings of a Conference of the Kentucky Educational Research Association (Lexington, Kentucky, April 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Center for Professional Development.

    In April 1991, members of the Kentucky Educational Research Association (KERA), held a conference to discuss performance assessment and its use in Kentucky schools. The following papers from the conference are included: (1) "Our Conference and the Performance Assessment Committee" (S. Kifer); (2) "Performance Assessment: A National…

  1. Research among Learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language. Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph Series. Volume IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Michael E., Ed.; Shen, Helen H., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Cutting-edge in its approach and international in its authorship, this fourth monograph in a series sponsored by the Chinese Language Teachers Association features eight research studies that explore a variety of themes, topics, and perspectives important to a variety of stakeholders in the Chinese language learning community. Employing a wide…

  2. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Maurice J.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2003-01-01

    Includes six reports from national associations and organizations. Highlights include annual meetings; government affairs; copyright; administration; diversity; new technologies; international programs; scholarly communication; information policy; access to information; preservation; statistics and measurement; digital libraries; economics of…

  3. Metasynthesis of In-Service Professional Development Research: Features Associated with Positive Educator and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Bruder, Mary Beth; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    Findings from a metasynthesis of 15 research reviews of in service professional development to improve or change teacher content knowledge and practice and student/child knowledge and behavior are described. The research reviews included 550 studies of more than 50,000 early intervention, preschool, elementary, and secondary education teachers,…

  4. Dealing with Data: Science Librarians' Participation in Data Management at Association of Research Libraries Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Jody Bales; Turner, Jaymie; Shults, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As long as empirical research has existed, researchers have been doing "data management" in one form or another. However, funding agency mandates for doing formal data management are relatively recent, and academic libraries' involvement has been concentrated mainly in the last few years. The National Science Foundation implemented a new…

  5. Dealing with Data: Science Librarians' Participation in Data Management at Association of Research Libraries Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Jody Bales; Turner, Jaymie; Shults, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As long as empirical research has existed, researchers have been doing "data management" in one form or another. However, funding agency mandates for doing formal data management are relatively recent, and academic libraries' involvement has been concentrated mainly in the last few years. The National Science Foundation implemented a new…

  6. Relationships Matter: Some Benefits, Challenges and Tensions Associated with Forming a Collaborative Educational Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sandie; Murray, E.; Rivalland, C.; Monk, H.; Piazza-McFarland, L.; Daniel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Growing recognition of the complexity of children's lives has led to strong advocacy in education research literature for greater collaboration between researchers from different paradigms to address the "wicked" problems that face contemporary children and families. There is little literature, however, exploring how collaboration works…

  7. Association of Research Libraries [ARL], Office of University Library Management Studies Sixth Annual Report, December 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Univ. Library Management Studies.

    Some of the conditions in research libraries which have shaped the Office of University Library Management Studies' (OMS) approach to library management studies are outlined, OMS activities during 1976 are described, as well as priorities for 1977. OMS work with member libraries in 1976 indicated that research libraries are primarily concerned…

  8. Directory of Human Sciences Research Organizations and Professional Associations in South Africa. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Berg, Henda, Ed.; Prinsloo, Roelf, Ed.; Pienaar, Drienie, Ed.

    This directory is intended to be a comprehensive reference source for identifying research organizations and institutions, and for promoting research cooperation and facilitating networking. This second edition provides a broad background to the development of the human sciences as well as an overview of existing and emerging science and…

  9. "L"-Bivariate and "L"-Multivariate Association Coefficients. Research Report. ETS RR-08-40

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Nan; Lewis, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Given a system of multiple random variables, a new measure called the "L"-multivariate association coefficient is defined using (conditional) entropy. Unlike traditional correlation measures, the L-multivariate association coefficient measures the multiassociations or multirelations among the multiple variables in the given system; that…

  10. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists: a model for experiential learning in professional development for students and early career researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. C.; Hindshaw, R. S.; Fugmann, G.; Mariash, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists was established by early career researchers during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year as an organization for early career researchers in the polar and cryospheric sciences. APECS works to promote early career researchers through soft-skills training in both research and outreach activities, through advocating for including early career researchers in all levels of the scientific process and scientific management, and through supporting a world-wide network of researchers in varied fields. APECS is lead by early career researchers; this self-driven model has proved to be an effective means for developing the leadership, management, and communication skills that are essential in the sciences, and has shown to be sustainable even in a community where frequent turn-over is inherent to the members. Since its inception, APECS has reached over 5,500 members in more than 80 countries, and we have placed more than 50 early career researchers on working groups and steering committees with organizations around the world in the last two years alone. The close partnerships that APECS has with national and international organizations exposes members to both academic and alternative career paths, including those at the science-policy interface. This paper describes APECS's approach to experiential learning in professional development and the best practices identified over our nearly ten years as an organization.

  11. Ethical issues associated with the use of animal experimentation in behavioral neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Frauke; Meijboom, Franck

    2015-01-01

    This chapter briefly explores whether there are distinct characteristics in the field of Behavioral Neuroscience that demand specific ethical reflection. We argue that although the ethical issues in animal-based Behavioral Neuroscience are not necessarily distinct from those in other research disciplines using animal experimentation, this field of endeavor makes a number of specific, ethically relevant, questions more explicit and, as a result, may expose to discussion a series of ethical issues that have relevance beyond this field of science. We suggest that innovative research, by its very definition, demands out-of-the-box thinking. At the same time, standardization of animal models and test procedures for the sake of comparability across experiments inhibits the potential and willingness to leave well-established tracks of thinking, and leaves us wondering how open minded research is and whether it is the researcher's established perspective that drives the research rather than the research that drives the researcher's perspective. The chapter finishes by introducing subsequent chapters of this book volume on Ethical Issues in Behavioral Neuroscience.

  12. CONSIDER - Core Outcome Set in IAD Research: study protocol for establishing a core set of outcomes and measurements in incontinence-associated dermatitis research.

    PubMed

    Van den Bussche, Karen; De Meyer, Dorien; Van Damme, Nele; Kottner, Jan; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2017-10-01

    This study protocol describes the methodology for the development of a core set of outcomes and a core set of measurements for incontinence-associated dermatitis. Incontinence is a widespread disorder with an important impact on quality of life. One of the most common complications is incontinence-associated dermatitis, resulting from chemical and physical irritation of the skin barrier, triggering inflammation and skin damage. Managing incontinence-associated dermatitis is an important challenge for nurses. Several interventions have been assessed in clinical trials, but heterogeneity in study outcomes complicates the comparability and standardization. To overcome this challenge, the development of a core outcome set, a minimum set of outcomes and measurements to be assessed in clinical research, is needed. A project team, International Steering Committee and panelists will be involved to guide the development of the core outcome set. The framework of the Harmonizing Outcomes Measures for Eczema roadmap endorsed by Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcomes Set Initiative, is used to inform the project design. A systematic literature review, interviews to integrate the patients' perspective and a consensus study with healthcare researchers and providers using the Delphi procedure will be performed. The project was approved by the Ethics review Committee (April 2016). This is the first project that will identify a core outcome set of outcomes and measurements for incontinence-associated dermatitis research. A core outcome set will reduce possible reporting bias, allow results comparisons and statistical pooling across trials and strengthen evidence-based practice and decision-making. This project has been registered in the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) database and is part of the Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcomes Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle. PMID:27357278

  14. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangdi; De Clercq, Erik

    2016-09-01

    The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle.

  15. A Research Synthesis of the Associations between Socioeconomic Background, Inequality, School Climate, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Ruth; Moore, Hadass; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Educational researchers and practitioners assert that supportive school and classroom climates can positively influence the academic outcomes of students, thus potentially reducing academic achievement gaps between students and schools of different socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Nonetheless, scientific evidence establishing directional…

  16. Joint Professional Military Education: Opportunities Exist for Greater Oversight and Coordination of Associated Research Institutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    concepts and technologies and critical areas of emerging technologies such as directed energy, biotechnology , nanotechnology, and cyber technologies, among...center conducted research on capabilities studies, evaluating transatlantic bargain and dialogue, and, NATO– Russia relations, and NATO’s countering

  17. US Department of Energy Teacher Research Associates Program: Profile and survey of 1990--1991 participants. [Contains a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Vivio, F.M. ); Stevenson, W.L. )

    1992-11-01

    Through its laboratories, facilities, and technology centers, the United States Department of Energy supports the development and training of scientists and engineers to meet the nation's future human resource needs in energy science and technology. This mission is accomplished, in part, through summer programs of active participation by precollege teachers in laboratory research. Since 1989, the Teacher Research Associates (TRAC) program has provided outstanding 7th- through 12th-grade science, mathematics, and technology teachers from across the nation the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects at DOE laboratories. The TRAC program encourages participants, upon returning to their home institution, to share with their students and colleagues the experience and knowledge gained through their research endeavors.

  18. Future research needs associated with the assessment of potential human health risks from exposure to toxic ambient air pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Möller, L; Schuetzle, D; Autrup, H

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents key conclusions and future research needs from a Workshop on the Risk Assessment of Urban Air, Emissions, Exposure, Risk Identification, and Quantification, which was held in Stockholm during June 1992 by 41 participants from 13 countries. Research is recommended in the areas of identification and quantification of toxics in source emissions and ambient air, atmospheric transport and chemistry, exposure level assessment, the development of improved in vitro bioassays, biomarker development, the development of more accurate epidemiological methodologies, and risk quantification techniques. Studies are described that will be necessary to assess and reduce the level of uncertainties associated with each step of the risk assessment process. International collaborative research efforts between industry and government organizations are recommended as the most effective way to carry out this research. PMID:7529703

  19. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  20. An Associative Memory Model for Integration of Fragmented Research Data and Identification of Treatment Correlations in Breast Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Khan, Mridul; Higgins, John; Giani, Annarita; Das, Amar K.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in advancing scientific discoveries using data-driven clinical research is the fragmentation of relevant data among multiple information systems. This fragmentation requires significant data-engineering work before correlations can be found among data attributes in multiple systems. In this paper, we focus on integrating information on breast cancer care, and present a novel computational approach to identify correlations between administered drugs captured in an electronic medical records and biological factors obtained from a tumor registry through rapid data aggregation and analysis. We use an associative memory (AM) model to encode all existing associations among the data attributes from both systems in a high-dimensional vector space. The AM model stores highly associated data items in neighboring memory locations to enable efficient querying operations. The results of applying AM to a set of integrated data on tumor markers and drug administrations discovered anomalies between clinical recommendations and derived associations. PMID:26958161

  1. Behavioral Outcomes of Supervisory Education in the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education: A Qualitative Research Study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Orme-Rogers, Charles; Bush, Johnny C; Stowman, Sheryl Lyndes; Seeger, Rodney W

    2016-03-01

    This study advances the work of developing a theory for educating Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Supervisors by describing the behaviors which result from the successful completion of CPE supervisory education. Twenty-eight Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) Certification Commissioners were interviewed to identify the behaviors demonstrated by Supervisory Education Students (Candidates) which influenced the decision to certify them at the level of Associate Supervisor. Specific behavioral descriptors are listed for each ACPE supervisory competency.

  2. The American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Foundation Scholars Program: additional data on research-related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pion, Georgine M; Hammond, Charles B

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the progress of recipients of research training in obstetrics and gynecology in establishing an active research career in academic medicine. Existing data were used to examine the extent to which 41 individuals who had received American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Foundation (AAOGF) fellowships had achieved outcomes indicative of a career in academic medicine. Outcomes included employment as a full-time faculty member, receipt of NIH research funding, number of publications, the types of journals in which these articles had appeared, and the type of research (eg, basic vs patient-oriented). Among individuals who were awarded their fellowship between 1984 and 1997, 88% held faculty appointments, and 40% of these positions were in institutions that were more research-intensive that the medical degree-granting institutions of fellows. Slightly more than half of former fellows had successfully competed for NIH research funding, with 22% being awarded at least one R01 grant. Overall, fellows produced a total of 878 articles, one third of which appeared in clinical journals, 18% were in basic biomedical research journals, and 48% were in journals that published both types of research. Previous AAOGF scholars have actively pursued research careers in academic obstetrics and gynecology. Their performance compares favorably with those of individuals receiving research training in other clinical specialties. A more complete understanding of their performance and the value added by the program would be possible if a core set of data on outcomes were available from other types of training efforts in both obstetrics and gynecology and other relevant disciplines.

  3. Charting the Future of Cancer Health Disparities Research: A Position Statement from the American Association of Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the National Cancer Institute

    Cancer.gov

    The American Association for Cancer Research, American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and NCI present a unified strategy to promote cooperation in all areas of the cancer health disparities research community.

  4. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)--2010 Annual Meeting. For Sight: The Future of Eye and Vision Research--part 2.

    PubMed

    Hookes, Livia

    2010-07-01

    The 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), held in Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of eye and vision research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of OT-440 (Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc) for the potential treatment of glaucoma, an extended-release implant of brimonidine (pSivida Corp) for ocular hypertension, AR-12286 (Aerie Pharmaceuticals Inc) for ocular hypertension or glaucoma, AC-8 (Calmune Corp/RiboVax Biotechnologies SA) for ocular diseases following HSV infection, and fidarestat (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co Ltd) and the recombinant proteins NOV and NOVCter (INSERM/University Rene Descartes) for corneal neovascularization.

  5. A Report on the Activities, Publications, and Pending Research of DHS/DOD Sponsored Post-doctoral Research Associate at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Floyd E.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-04-26

    Since beginning at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February of 2012, I have been working as a DHS./DNDO Postdoctoral Research Associate under the mentorship of Lav Tandon and Khalil Spencer (NA-22 and mass spectrometry). The focus of my efforts, in addition to pursuing needed training and qualifications, has been the application of various instrumental approaches (e.g. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry; TIMS) to a range of systems of interest in materials characterization and nuclear forensics. Research to be pursued in the coming months shall include the continued use of such approaches to advance current methods for: modified total evaporation, monitoring critical minor isotope systems, and chronometry. Each of the above points will be discussed.

  6. Estimates of Arab world research productivity associated with groundwater: a bibliometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyoud, Shaher H.; Fuchs-Hanusch, Daniela

    2016-12-01

    The sustainable management of groundwater resources is a pressing necessity for most countries. As most of the Arab world is facing severe water scarcity, threats of depletion of non-renewable groundwater, and problems of pollution and salt-water intrusions into groundwater aquifers, much effort should be devoted to eliminate these dangers in advance. This work was devoted to bring up insights into Arab world research activities in groundwater, which is a crucial task to identify their status and can help in shaping up and improving future research activities. A bibliometric analysis has been conducted to track these activities. The study identified 1417 documents which represent 3.3% of global research productivity. Egypt was the most productive country (313; 22.1%), followed by Saudi Arabia (254; 17.9%). Total citations were 9720 with an average of 6.9. The h-index of the retrieved documents was 39, and the highest one was 22 for Egypt. The most common subject category was Environmental Science, and the most productive journal was Arabian Journal of Geosciences (99; 7.0%). In international research collaboration, France was the most collaborated country with Arab world (125; 8.8%), followed by the United States (113; 8.0%). The most productive institution was King Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia (66; 4.7%). The outcomes shows remarkable improvements in groundwater research activities originated from the Arab world. Even though, constructive efforts should be pursued vigorously to bridge the gaps in groundwater-based research. Moreover, promotion of better evaluation tools to assess the risks arising from the mismanagement of groundwater resources is required urgently.

  7. Estimates of Arab world research productivity associated with groundwater: a bibliometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyoud, Shaher H.; Fuchs-Hanusch, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    The sustainable management of groundwater resources is a pressing necessity for most countries. As most of the Arab world is facing severe water scarcity, threats of depletion of non-renewable groundwater, and problems of pollution and salt-water intrusions into groundwater aquifers, much effort should be devoted to eliminate these dangers in advance. This work was devoted to bring up insights into Arab world research activities in groundwater, which is a crucial task to identify their status and can help in shaping up and improving future research activities. A bibliometric analysis has been conducted to track these activities. The study identified 1417 documents which represent 3.3% of global research productivity. Egypt was the most productive country (313; 22.1%), followed by Saudi Arabia (254; 17.9%). Total citations were 9720 with an average of 6.9. The h-index of the retrieved documents was 39, and the highest one was 22 for Egypt. The most common subject category was Environmental Science, and the most productive journal was Arabian Journal of Geosciences (99; 7.0%). In international research collaboration, France was the most collaborated country with Arab world (125; 8.8%), followed by the United States (113; 8.0%). The most productive institution was King Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia (66; 4.7%). The outcomes shows remarkable improvements in groundwater research activities originated from the Arab world. Even though, constructive efforts should be pursued vigorously to bridge the gaps in groundwater-based research. Moreover, promotion of better evaluation tools to assess the risks arising from the mismanagement of groundwater resources is required urgently.

  8. The dysregulated cluster in personality profiling research: Longitudinal stability and associations with bulimic behaviors and correlates

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Jennifer D.; Klump, Kelly L.; Donnellan, M. Brent; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Among cluster analytic studies of the personality profiles associated with bulimia nervosa, a group of individuals characterized by emotional lability and behavioral dysregulation (i.e., a dysregulated cluster) has emerged most consistently. However, previous studies have all been cross-sectional and mostly used clinical samples. This study aimed to replicate associations between the dysregulated personality cluster and bulimic symptoms and related characteristics using a longitudinal, population-based sample. Participants were females assessed at ages 17 and 25 from the Minnesota Twin Family Study, clustered based on their personality traits. The Dysregulated cluster was successfully identified at both time points and was more stable across time than either the Resilient or Sensation Seeking clusters. Rates of bulimic symptoms and related behaviors (e.g., alcohol use problems) were also highest in the dysregulated group. Findings suggest that the dysregulated cluster is a relatively stable and robust profile that is associated with bulimic symptoms. PMID:23398096

  9. Size and characteristics of the biomedical research workforce associated with U.S. National Institutes of Health extramural grants

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Lindsay R.; Wagner, Robin M.; Scott, Lindsey L.; RoyChowdhury, Deepshikha; Berhane, Rediet; Wu, Charles; Pearson, Katrina; Sutton, Jennifer A.; Schaffer, Walter T.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) annually invests approximately $22 billion in biomedical research through its extramural grant programs. Since fiscal year (FY) 2010, all persons involved in research during the previous project year have been required to be listed on the annual grant progress report. These new data have enabled the production of the first-ever census of the NIH-funded extramural research workforce. Data were extracted from All Personnel Reports submitted for NIH grants funded in FY 2009, including position title, months of effort, academic degrees obtained, and personal identifiers. Data were de-duplicated to determine a unique person count. Person-years of effort (PYE) on NIH grants were computed. In FY 2009, NIH funded 50,885 grant projects, which created 313,049 full- and part-time positions spanning all job functions involved in biomedical research. These positions were staffed by 247,457 people at 2,604 institutions. These persons devoted 121,465 PYE to NIH grant-supported research. Research project grants each supported 6 full- or part-time positions, on average. Over 20% of positions were occupied by postdoctoral researchers and graduate and undergraduate students. These baseline data were used to project workforce estimates for FYs 2010–2014 and will serve as a foundation for future research.—Pool, L. R., Wagner, R. M., Scott, L. L., RoyChowdhury, D., Berhane, R., Wu, C., Pearson, K., Sutton, J. A., Schaffer, W. T. Size and characteristics of the biomedical research workforce associated with U.S. National Institutes of Health extramural grants. PMID:26625903

  10. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Maryland 2000. Journal of the Maryland Association for Institutional Research, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A., Ed.; Huntington, Robin B., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This volume offers nine papers on higher education research in Maryland all of which were presented at annual meetings from 1990 through 1993. The following papers are included: (1) "The Geo-Demographic Approach to Student Recruitment: The PG-TRAK90" Lifestyle Cluster System" (Karl Boughan); (2) "Evaluating College Services: A…

  12. Education, Science, and the Politics of Knowledge: The American Educational Research Association, 1915-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershon, Sherie; Schlossman, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, a new alliance formed between university-based scholars who dedicated themselves to the scientific study of education and public school officials. This alliance centered on the proposition that applied research could advance the professionalization of schooling and become a prestigious academic specialty in its own…

  13. Faculty Identity through Spheres of Teaching and Research Activity and Associated Genres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallego, Liliana; Castelló, Montserrat; Badia, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to understand how faculty identity development is related to a differential use of writing genres in the teaching and research spheres of activity and whether this development follows different paths, on the bases of faculty perceptions regarding what they consider their main goal at university and their preferred sphere of…

  14. Research and Teaching: Association of Summer Bridge Program Outcomes with STEM Retention of Targeted Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasko, David L.; Ridgway, Judith S.; Waller, Rocquel J.; Olesik, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major has been studied for four cohorts participating in a summer bridge program supported by the National Science Foundation. Students participated in a 6-week program prior to their first term of enrollment at a research-intensive land grant university. Comparisons…

  15. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Treatment Integrity in Psychotherapy Research: Analysis of the Studies and Examination of the Associated Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Treat, Teresa A.; Kazdin, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment integrity refers to the degree to which an intervention is delivered as intended. Two studies evaluated the adequacy of treatment integrity procedures (including establishing, assessing, evaluating, and reporting integrity; therapist treatment adherence; and therapist competence) implemented in psychotherapy research, as well as…

  17. A Research Based Method by Which a State or Regional Association May Select Its Outstanding Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E.

    Presented is a research based method by which a state or regional professional organization may select the outstanding paper from those submitted for consideration. The procedure is conducted in three steps: submission, initial review, and final selection. During the initial review process the selection committee (four or more members) reviews all…

  18. American Vocational Education Research Association Proceedings (Cincinnati, Ohio, December 5-8, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmann, Donna H., Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Research and Teaching from the Web/Multimedia" (Swan); "Vocational Teachers' Attitude toward, Knowledge of, and Use of National Skill Standards" (Belcher, McCaslin); "Predicting the Leadership Effectiveness of Vocational Education Administrators" (Daughtry, Finch); "Coping…

  19. Characteristics of urban parks associated with park use and physical activity: a review of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Gavin R; Rock, Melanie; Toohey, Ann M; Hignell, Danica

    2010-07-01

    Given that recent literature reviews on physical activity in urban parks deliberately excluded qualitative findings, we reviewed qualitative research on this topic informed by a published classification scheme based on quantitative research. Twenty-one studies met our inclusion criteria. These studies relied mainly on semi-structured interviews with individuals or in focus groups; only five studies involved in situ observation. Our synthesis aligns with previous quantitative research showing that attributes including safety, aesthetics, amenities, maintenance, and proximity are important for encouraging park use. Furthermore, our synthesis of qualitative research suggests that perceptions of the social environment entwine inextricably with perceptions of the physical environment. If so, physical attributes of parks as well as perceptions of these attributes (formed in relation to broader social contexts) may influence physical activity patterns. Both qualitative and quantitative methods provide useful information for interpreting such patterns, and in particular, when designing and assessing interventions intended to improve the amount and intensity of physical activity. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  1. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  2. Cross-Sector Research Associated with Nutrition: Comparison of Private and Public Schools on Health Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Marco A.

    Healthy People 2010 is the initiative that defines the U.S. health agenda and guides policy. The initiative provides direction for individuals to change personal behaviors and for organizations and communities to support good health through health promotion policies. The objective of this research was to compare public and private schools on…

  3. Research and Teaching: Association of Summer Bridge Program Outcomes with STEM Retention of Targeted Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasko, David L.; Ridgway, Judith S.; Waller, Rocquel J.; Olesik, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major has been studied for four cohorts participating in a summer bridge program supported by the National Science Foundation. Students participated in a 6-week program prior to their first term of enrollment at a research-intensive land grant university. Comparisons…

  4. Chaparral and associated ecosystems management: a 5-year research and development program

    Treesearch

    C. Eugene Conrad; George A. Roby; Serena C. Hunter

    1986-01-01

    Chaparral is the dominant vegetation in the wildlands of central and southern California. It has evolved fire adaptions that make it flammable and trigger postfire regeneration, thereby ensuring plant community rejuvenation. To provide a framework for chaparral-related research and accelerate development and demonstration of urgently needed management techniques, the...

  5. Revisit Frequency and Its Association with Quality of Care among Diabetic Patients: Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; McEwen, Laura N.; Crosson, Jesse C.; Waitzfelder, Beth; Herman, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe patient and provider characteristics associated with outpatient revisit frequency and to examine the associations between the revisit frequency and the processes and intermediate outcomes of diabetes care. Research Design and Methods We analyzed data from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective, multicenter, observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Results Our analysis included 6,040 eligible adult participants with type 2 diabetes (42.6% ≥ 65 years of age, 54.1% female) whose primary care providers were the main provider of the participants’ diabetes care. The median (interquartile range) revisit frequency was 4.0 (3.7, 6.0) visits per year. Being female, having lower education, lower income, more complex diabetes treatment, cardiovascular disease, higher Charlson comorbidity index, and impaired mobility were associated with higher revisit frequency. The proportion of participants who had annual assessments of HbA1c and LDL-cholesterol, foot examinations, advised or documented aspirin use, and influenza immunizations were higher for those with higher revisit frequency. The proportion of participants who met HbA1c (<9.5%) and LDL-cholesterol (<130 mg/dL) treatment goals was higher for those with a higher revisit frequency. The predicted probabilities of achieving more aggressive goals, HbA1c <8.5%, LDL-cholesterol <100 mg/dL, and blood pressure <130/85 or even <140/90 mmHg were not associated with higher revisit frequency. Conclusions Revisit frequency was highly variable and was associated with both sociodemographic characteristics and disease severity. A higher revisit frequency was associated with better processes of diabetes care, but the association with intermediate outcomes was less clear. PMID:25044233

  6. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was also evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF

  7. Genomewide Association Studies in Pharmacogenomics: Meeting Report of the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network-RIKEN (PGRN-RIKEN) Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Sook Wah; Momozawa, Yukihide; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Ratain, Mark J.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Kubo, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Genomewide association studies (GWAS) have resulted in the identification of many heritable genetic factors that underlie risk for human disease or variation in physiologic traits. In contrast, there are fewer GWAS of drug response phenotypes, despite extensive unexplained interindividual variability. To address this urgent need, the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) and the Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) at RIKEN support a collaboration, PGRN-RIKEN, with the goal of accelerating GWAS of drug response phenotypes. PMID:27256705

  8. Clinical trial tests drug for tumors associated with Krebs-cycle dysfunction | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Krebs cycle is part of the complex process where cells turn food into energy. One of the elements of the Krebs cycle is succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Loss of SDH activity in cells has been linked to tumor formation. This new trial is studying guadecitabine for tumors associated with Krebs cycle dysfunction. Learn more...

  9. The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Rio Hondo College: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Joseph

    During 1975-76, an evaluation of the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Rio Hondo College was undertaken which involved: (1) surveying all nursing graduates in the classes of 1973, 1974, and 1975, and all fourth semester students currently enrolled in the program; (2) surveying or interviewing all instructional staff for the ADN program;…

  10. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...) credits for SoCRA CE and continuing nurse education (CNE). SoCRA designates this live activity for a... Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. CNE for nurses: SoCRA is an approved provider of CNE by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association (PSNA), an accredited approver by the...

  11. Is preeclampsia associated with fetal malformation? A review and report of original research

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David B.; Chalak, Lina F.; McIntire, Donald D.; Leveno, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine fetal malformations in mother–infant pairs with and without pregnancy-related hypertension. Methods This was an observational, population-based study of women delivering a singleton at our hospital. Specific fetal malformations identified in women with gestational hypertension or preeclampsia were compared to those without pregnancy-related hypertension. Women with chronic hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia on chronic hypertension and pregestational diabetes were excluded. Results Between March 2002 and December 2012, a total of 151 997 women delivered, and 10 492 (7%) had preeclampsia, 4282 (3%) had gestational hypertension and 137 223 (90%) were referent normotensive controls. Women with preeclampsia were significantly more likely to deliver infants with malformations when compared to normotensive controls (2.5% versus 1.6%, p < 0.001), whereas women with gestational hypertension were not (1.9% versus 1.6%, p = 0.16). The overall risk for fetal malformation associated with preeclampsia remained significant following logistic regression for age, race, parity and maternal body-habitus (adjusted OR 1.5; 95% CI: 1.3–1.7). Only single-organ system malformations – microcephaly and hypospadias – remained associated with preeclampsia (p < 0.001), and fetal growth restriction was a co-factor for both. Conclusions Preeclampsia was associated with increased rates of fetal malformations when compared to normotensive women – specifically microcephaly and hypospadias. These associations appear predominantly as a consequence of impaired fetal growth. PMID:25354285

  12. Job Satisfaction Characteristics of Selected Associate Degree Graduates. Vocational-Technical Education Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillie, Angelo C., Sr.; Mann, Edward

    Summarized is a followup to a larger study concerning job satisfaction characteristics of associate degree graduates of technology programs at Pennsylvania State University. Involving students graduating during the period from 1955 through 1971, the study sought to determine: (1) the present status of the graduates, (2) job information about the…

  13. Mapping the Association of College and Research Libraries information literacy framework and nursing professional standards onto an assessment rubric

    PubMed Central

    Willson, Gloria; Angell, Katelyn

    2017-01-01

    Objective The authors developed a rubric for assessing undergraduate nursing research papers for information literacy skills critical to their development as researchers and health professionals. Methods We developed a rubric mapping six American Nurses Association professional standards onto six related concepts of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. We used this rubric to evaluate fifty student research papers and assess inter-rater reliability. Results Students tended to score highest on the “Information Has Value” dimension and lowest on the “Scholarship as Conversation” dimension. However, we found a discrepancy between the grading patterns of the two investigators, with inter-rater reliability being “fair” or “poor” for all six rubric dimensions. Conclusions The development of a rubric that dually assesses information literacy skills and maps relevant disciplinary competencies holds potential. This study offers a template for a rubric inspired by the ACRL Framework and outside professional standards. However, the overall low inter-rater reliability demands further calibration of the rubric. Following additional norming, this rubric can be used to help students identify the key information literacy competencies that they need in order to succeed as college students and future nurses. These skills include developing an authoritative voice, determining the scope of their information needs, and understanding the ramifications of their information choices. PMID:28377678

  14. Study sponsorship and the nutrition research agenda: analysis of cohort studies examining the association between nutrition and obesity.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Alice; Chartres, Nicholas; Bero, Lisa A

    2017-08-30

    To categorize the research topics covered by a sample of cohort studies exploring the association between nutrition and obesity; to describe their funding sources; and to explore the association between funding sources and research topics. Cross-sectional study. Cohort studies retrieved from MEDLINE and PubMed published between 2010 and 2016. One hundred and twenty-one studies were included. Funding source and conflicts of interest were disclosed in 95·0 and 90·1 % of the studies, respectively. Food industry sponsorship was disclosed in 8·3 % of the studies. Half of the studies analysed the consumption of a single food or food groups, 18·2 % included an analysis of dietary patterns and 17·4 % focused on specific nutrients. Highly processed foods were considered in 48·8 % of the studies and 27·3 % considered dietary behaviours (e.g. eating away from home). No statistically significant differences in research topics were observed between industry- and non-industry-funded studies. Cohort studies focused on more complex exposures (e.g. food or dietary patterns) rather than single nutrients. No significant differences in the research agenda by funding sources were observed. The analysis was limited by the low proportion of studies with disclosed food industry sponsorship.

  15. Mapping the Association of College and Research Libraries information literacy framework and nursing professional standards onto an assessment rubric.

    PubMed

    Willson, Gloria; Angell, Katelyn

    2017-04-01

    The authors developed a rubric for assessing undergraduate nursing research papers for information literacy skills critical to their development as researchers and health professionals. We developed a rubric mapping six American Nurses Association professional standards onto six related concepts of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. We used this rubric to evaluate fifty student research papers and assess inter-rater reliability. Students tended to score highest on the "Information Has Value" dimension and lowest on the "Scholarship as Conversation" dimension. However, we found a discrepancy between the grading patterns of the two investigators, with inter-rater reliability being "fair" or "poor" for all six rubric dimensions. The development of a rubric that dually assesses information literacy skills and maps relevant disciplinary competencies holds potential. This study offers a template for a rubric inspired by the ACRL Framework and outside professional standards. However, the overall low inter-rater reliability demands further calibration of the rubric. Following additional norming, this rubric can be used to help students identify the key information literacy competencies that they need in order to succeed as college students and future nurses. These skills include developing an authoritative voice, determining the scope of their information needs, and understanding the ramifications of their information choices.

  16. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. A Scientometric Study of Research Papers Published by Visiting Associates of IUCAA, Pune, India during 2003-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, V. K.; Senger, K. P. S.; Pathak, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    The Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) is set up by the University Grants Commission (UGC) to promote the development and growth of active groups in astronomy and astrophysics at Indian universities. To highlight the IUCAA Associates program and associates' output during their tenure in the program, we decided to study the academic scientific output of IUCAA associates from 2003 to 2013. This paper is an Informetric analysis of 1009 papers published by IUCAA associates from 2003 to 2013, compiled and downloaded from the institute's website, annual reports, and the ADS. There is no doubt that collaboration is a common phenomenon in research. This paper examines the collaborative strength and patterns of authorship among IUCAA associates, covering a period of 10 years. The results of the data were analyzed based on the number of articles published per year, patterns of authorship, and the degree and strength of collaboration of authors. Further, the study investigated highly prolific authors and highly preferred journals by the IUCAA associates during the study period.

  18. Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF)

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Brunner, Edgar; Hildenbrand, Sibylle; Loew, Thomas H.; Raupach, Tobias; Spies, Claudia; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here. Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third-party funds and the

  19. The opinion and response of health professionals associated with academics about the research design and methods: A study

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to survey the opinions and responses of health professionals in academics about their interest and experience in research, knowledge over study designs, and application of a common study design to find out the objectives behind any research study. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire containing three variables with 15 questions were sent to 300 health professionals associated with academics in the category of Bachelor/Master/Doctorate working at Al-Farabi Colleges campuses located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected manually, descriptive frequencies were generated and the variables were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. The knowledge scores between the qualification and gender were carried out using ANOVA and t-test. The final response rate was in conjuction to the statistician to exclude the uncompleted responses from the statistical analysis. Results: The results showed a discrepancy in the participation; of 95 health professionals, (40) were females and (55) were males. Bachelor (16), Masters (61) and Doctorate holders (18) gave their opinion. For the first variable (research experience), all the surveyed categories showed the same response. However, for the second variable (study design and research criteria) bachelor holders showed poor, but equal performance was reported to the master and doctorate holders. In the third variable (objectives and common designs), bachelor holders showed a poor response in contrast to the master and doctorate holders whose have mixed opinions. For knowledge scores, no significance was present between the master and doctorate holders. Conclusion: There is a lack of understanding of the research objectives and common designs frequently used in research studies particularly among the bachelor holders. Additional postgraduate education on research methods is recommended to improve the knowledge and practices of research. PMID:27114956

  20. The opinion and response of health professionals associated with academics about the research design and methods: A study.

    PubMed

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to survey the opinions and responses of health professionals in academics about their interest and experience in research, knowledge over study designs, and application of a common study design to find out the objectives behind any research study. A semi-structured questionnaire containing three variables with 15 questions were sent to 300 health professionals associated with academics in the category of Bachelor/Master/Doctorate working at Al-Farabi Colleges campuses located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected manually, descriptive frequencies were generated and the variables were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. The knowledge scores between the qualification and gender were carried out using ANOVA and t-test. The final response rate was in conjuction to the statistician to exclude the uncompleted responses from the statistical analysis. The results showed a discrepancy in the participation; of 95 health professionals, (40) were females and (55) were males. Bachelor (16), Masters (61) and Doctorate holders (18) gave their opinion. For the first variable (research experience), all the surveyed categories showed the same response. However, for the second variable (study design and research criteria) bachelor holders showed poor, but equal performance was reported to the master and doctorate holders. In the third variable (objectives and common designs), bachelor holders showed a poor response in contrast to the master and doctorate holders whose have mixed opinions. For knowledge scores, no significance was present between the master and doctorate holders. There is a lack of understanding of the research objectives and common designs frequently used in research studies particularly among the bachelor holders. Additional postgraduate education on research methods is recommended to improve the knowledge and practices of research.