Science.gov

Sample records for reservoir pressure reduction

  1. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  2. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  3. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  4. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  5. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  6. Interpreting isotopic analyses of microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, C. G.; Engelbrektson, A. L.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Li, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Coates, J. D.; Conrad, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs is often associated with secondary production of oil where seawater (28 mM sulfate) is commonly injected to maintain reservoir pressure and displace oil. The hydrogen sulfide produced can cause a suite of operating problems including corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks and additional processing costs. We propose that monitoring of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate can be used as early indicators that microbial sulfate reduction is occurring, as this process is well known to cause substantial isotopic fractionation. This approach relies on the idea that reactions with reservoir (iron) minerals can remove dissolved sulfide, thereby delaying the transport of the sulfide through the reservoir relative to the sulfate in the injected water. Changes in the sulfate isotopes due to microbial sulfate reduction may therefore be measurable in the produced water before sulfide is detected. However, turning this approach into a predictive tool requires (i) an understanding of appropriate fractionation factors for oil reservoirs, (ii) incorporation of isotopic data into reservoir flow and reactive transport models. We present here the results of preliminary batch experiments aimed at determining fractionation factors using relevant electron donors (e.g. crude oil and volatile fatty acids), reservoir microbial communities and reservoir environmental conditions (pressure, temperature). We further explore modeling options for integrating isotope data and discuss whether single fractionation factors are appropriate to model complex environments with dynamic hydrology, geochemistry, temperature and microbiology gradients.

  7. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  8. Different pressure grids for reservoir simulation in heterogeneous reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Guerillot, D.R.; Verdiere, S.

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum reservoirs are made of highly heterogeneous rocks. These reservoirs could be described by geostatistical models composed of millions of cells. Currently, fluid flow simulations performed within these media need upscaling (or averaging) techniques. Hence, their results are given by averaging on cells which are much larger than the geological model cells. To overcome this problem, the Dual Mesh Method is proposed here, whose purpose is to solve the pressure equation on a low resolution grid, and then to interpolate pressure over the fine mesh by taking into account small scale heterogeneities of the mediums. The aim of this paper is the interpolation step; its implementation is presented and illustrated in a five-spot pattern for three different rock characteristics.

  9. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  10. Transient pressure analysis in composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, R.W.K.; Brigham, W.E.

    1982-08-01

    The problem of fluid flow in a radially composite reservoir is discussed. Recently published was the most general analytic solution available thus far. That analytic solution is analyzed, and the results are presented. The solution is dependent upon the following dimensionless parameters (if well-bore storage and skin effect are neglected): (1) dimensionless time based on the discontinuity radius, (2) the dimensionless discontinuity radius, (3) the mobility ratio, and (4) the diffusivity ratio. The range of parameters used in generating the results include dimensionless radius time of 0.01 t

  11. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Burnett, J. E.; Felder, S. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    An intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system is described and data are presented covering performance in: (1) reducing intraocular pressure to a preselected value, (2) maintaining a set minimum intraocular pressure, and (3) reducing the dynamic increases in intraocular pressure resulting from external loads applied to the eye.

  12. Pressure test data reveal reservoir barriers/faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, J.D.

    1984-07-30

    A review of transient pressure test data from an oil reservoir in Libya indicated not only the suspected fault barriers, but also the non-sealing portions of the faults. Extensive seismic data indicated much faulting, and directional trends had been interpreted to be generally northwest-southeast. The reservoir is a heterogeneous dolomite with average permeability of 40 to 50 md and contains neither natural fractures not stratification. Vertical displacement (throw) of each fault block is indicated to be within the range of the dolomite thickness, i.e., 40 to 180 ft. Therefore, when the fault throw is greater than reservoir thickness there is sealing, and when the throw is less than reservoir thickness the faults are non-sealing.

  13. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    System designed to reduce intraocular pressure hydraulically to any level desired by physician over set time and in controlled manner has number of uses in ophthalmology. Device may be most immediately useful in treatment of glaucoma.

  14. Aortic reservoir function, estimated myocardial demand and coronary perfusion pressure following steady-state and interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Lane, A D; Heffernan, K S; Rossow, L M; Fahs, C A; Ranadive, S M; Yan, H; Baynard, T; Wilund, K; Fernhall, B

    2012-09-01

    Aortic reservoir function is a measure of the aorta's ability to distribute blood during diastole, attenuating the pulsatility of blood flow, and is important in balancing cardiac flow. Effects of acute high versus moderate exercise intensity on reservoir function and cardiac energetics is unknown. Eighteen athletes completed a interval (INT) and steady-state (SS) cycling bout at 60% of VO(2) peak. Reservoir function was calculated as the ratio of diastolic run-off to stroke volume and expressed as a percentage. Coronary perfusion pressure was derived from tissue Doppler imaging and echocardiography. Systolic tension-time integral (TTI) from the aortic pressure waveform served as a measure of myocardial oxygen consumption. All measures were made at rest, 30-min postexercise and 60-min postexercise. Average reservoir function before SS was 76%, which was reduced to 62% 30-min post-SS and 67% 60-min post-SS (P<0.05). Significantly greater reductions in reservoir function were seen following INT (from 71% pre-INT to 45% 30-min post-INT and 53% 60-min INT, P<0.05). Estimated coronary perfusion pressure was reduced 30 min following INT but not SS; both bouts reduced coronary perfusion pressure at 60-min postexercise (P<0.05). TTI increased following both INT and SS at 30- and 60-min postexercise with greater increases following INT (P<0.05). Following exercise, reservoir function was associated with TTI (P<0.05), but not coronary perfusion pressure (P>0.05). We conclude that reservoir function is attenuated following acute SS and INT, but these reductions were greater post-INT, suggesting that exercise intensity affects reservoir function. Reduction of reservoir function following exercise is related to TTI, a reflection of myocardial oxygen consumption but apparently not associated with coronary perfusion pressure.

  15. Reservoir transport and poroelastic properties from oscillating pore pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Azar K.

    Hydraulic transport properties of reservoir rocks, permeability and storage capacity are traditionally defined as rock properties, responsible for the passage of fluids through the porous rock sample, as well as their storage. The evaluation of both is an important part of any reservoir characterization workflow. Moreover, permeability and storage capacity are main inputs into any reservoir simulation study, routinely performed by reservoir engineers on almost any major oil and gas field in the world. An accurate reservoir simulation is essential for production forecast and economic analysis, hence the transport properties directly control the profitability of the petroleum reservoir and their estimation is vital for oil and gas industry. This thesis is devoted to an integrated study of reservoir rocks' hydraulic, streaming potential and poroelastic properties as measured with the oscillating pore pressure experiment. The oscillating pore pressure method is traditionally used to measure hydraulic transport properties. We modified the method and built an experimental setup, capable of measuring all aforementioned rock properties simultaneously. The measurements were carried out for four conventional reservoir-rock quality samples at a range of oscillation frequencies and effective stresses. An apparent frequency dependence of permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient was observed. Measured frequency dispersion of drained poroelastic properties indicates an intrinsically inelastic nature of the porous mineral rock frame. Standard Linear Model demonstrated the best fit to the experimental dispersion data. Pore collapse and grain crushing effects took place during hydrostatic loading of the dolomitic sample and were observed in permeability, coupling coefficient and poroelastic measurements simultaneously. I established that hydraulically-measured storage capacities are overestimated by almost one order of magnitude when compared to elastically

  16. Drag reduction in reservoir rock surface: Hydrophobic modification by SiO2 nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong-Li; Cui, Ming-Yue; Jiang, Wei-Dong; He, An-Le; Liang, Chong

    2017-02-01

    Based on the adsorption behavior of modified silica nanoparticles in the sandstone core surface, the hydrophobic surface was constructed, which consists of micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure. This modified core surface presents a property of drag reduction and meets the challenge of high injection pressure and low injection rate in low or ultra-low permeability reservoir. The modification effects on the surface of silica nanoparticles and reservoir cores, mainly concerning hydrophobicity and fine structure, were determined by measurements of contact angle and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results indicate that after successful modification, the contact angle of silica nanoparticles varies from 19.5° to 141.7°, exhibiting remarkable hydrophobic properties. These modified hydrophobic silica nanoparticles display a good adsorption behavior at the core surface to form micro-nanobinary structure. As for the wettability of these modified core surfaces, a reversal has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic and its contact angle increases from 59.1° to 105.9°. The core displacement experiments show that the relative permeability for water has significantly increased by an average of 40.3% via core surface modification, with the effects of reducing injection pressure and improving injection performance of water flooding. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of drag reduction and improving water injection operation induced from the modified core surface were uncovered. The present study will establish a fundamental understanding on the drag reduction at the core surface modified by nanofluids and its applications in more industries.

  17. Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Griffin, Mr. Bob; Wright, Anthony L

    2006-01-01

    Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

  18. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  19. Major influencing factors of water flooding in abnormally high-pressure carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingying, Hou; Kaiyuan, Chen; Zifei, Fan; Libing, Fu; Yefei, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The higher pressure coefficient is the major characteristics of the abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoirs, which the pressure coefficient generally exceeds 1.2 and the initial formation pressure is higher than normal sandstone reservoirs. Due to the large pressure difference between initial formation and saturated pressure, oil wells are capable to production with high flow rate by the natural energy at early production stage. When the formation pressure drops to the saturation pressure, the water or gas is usually injected to stabilize the well productivity and sustain the formation pressure. Based on the characteristics of Kenkiak oilfield, a typical abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoir, a well group model is designed to simulate and analyze the influence factors on water flooding. The conclusion is that permeability, interlayer difference and reserve abundance are the main three factors on the water flooding development in these reservoirs.

  20. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum

  1. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

  2. Improving multi-objective reservoir operation optimization with sensitivity-informed dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J.; Zhang, C.; Fu, G.; Li, Y.; Zhou, H.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a sensitivity-informed method for multi-objective operation of reservoir systems, which uses global sensitivity analysis as a screening tool to reduce computational demands. Sobol's method is used to screen insensitive decision variables and guide the formulation of the optimization problems with a significantly reduced number of decision variables. This sensitivity-informed method dramatically reduces the computational demands required for attaining high-quality approximations of optimal trade-off relationships between conflicting design objectives. The search results obtained from the reduced complexity multi-objective reservoir operation problems are then used to pre-condition the full search of the original optimization problem. In two case studies, the Dahuofang reservoir and the inter-basin multi-reservoir system in Liaoning province, China, sensitivity analysis results show that reservoir performance is strongly controlled by a small proportion of decision variables. Sensitivity-informed dimension reduction and pre-conditioning are evaluated in their ability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary optimization. Overall, this study illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the sensitivity-informed method and the use of global sensitivity analysis to inform dimension reduction of optimization problems when solving complex multi-objective reservoir operation problems.

  3. Reduction of Orifice-Induced Pressure Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, Elizabeth B.; Gloss, Blair B.; Eves, John W.; Stack, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Use of porous-plug orifice reduces or eliminates errors, induced by orifice itself, in measuring static pressure on airfoil surface in wind-tunnel experiments. Piece of sintered metal press-fitted into static-pressure orifice so it matches surface contour of model. Porous material reduces orifice-induced pressure error associated with conventional orifice of same or smaller diameter. Also reduces or eliminates additional errors in pressure measurement caused by orifice imperfections. Provides more accurate measurements in regions with very thin boundary layers.

  4. Pressure reduction with a hospitalized population using a mattress overlay.

    PubMed

    Suarez, C H; Reynolds, A

    1995-01-01

    Billions of dollars are spent each year on treating pressure ulcers. With healthcare costs climbing and reform the order of the day, it is essential for researchers to identify a device which reduces pressure, is easy to use and is cost effective. This study used a Mini-Tipe pressure sensor to measure pressure readings over the sacral and trochanter areas of 17 subjects identified as being at risk for skin breakdown. Pressures were compared on a standard hospital mattress and an anatomically contoured mattress overlay. There was a 48 percent reduction in mean pressures over the sacral area and a 23 percent reduction over the trochanter. No correlations between pressures and demographic data were identified. Further research is warranted to determine the effects of variables found in an "at risk" population on pressure reduction with various products.

  5. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO₂ storage reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO₂ storage that combines CO₂ injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO₂. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO₂ injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO₂ injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO₂ storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be used directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.

  6. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO₂ storage reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; ...

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO₂ storage that combines CO₂ injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO₂. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO₂ injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO₂ injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO₂ storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be usedmore » directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.« less

  7. Pressurization Risk Assessment of CO2 Reservoirs Utilizing Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyant, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Park, E.; Han, K.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of pressure buildup can provide explicit information on reservoir integrity and is an appealing tool, however pressure variation is dependent on a variety of factors causing high uncertainty in pressure predictions. This work evaluated pressurization of a reservoir system in the presence of leakage pathways as well as exploring the effects of compartmentalization of the reservoir utilizing design of experiments (Definitive Screening, Box Behnken, Central Composite, and Latin Hypercube designs) and response surface methods. Two models were developed, 1) an idealized injection scenario in order to evaluate the performance of multiple designs, and 2) a complex injection scenario implementing the best performing design to investigate pressurization of the reservoir system. A holistic evaluation of scenario 1, determined that the Central Composite design would be used for the complex injection scenario. The complex scenario evaluated 5 risk factors: reservoir, seal, leakage pathway and fault permeabilities, and horizontal position of the pathway. A total of 60 response surface models (RSM) were developed for the complex scenario with an average R2 of 0.95 and a NRMSE of 0.067. Sensitivity to the input factors was dynamic through space and time; at the earliest time (0.05 years) the reservoir permeability was dominant, and for later times (>0.5 years) the fault permeability became dominant for all locations. The RSM's were then used to conduct a Monte Carlo Analysis to further analyze pressurization risks, identifying the P10, P50, P90 values. This identified the in zone (lower) P90 values as 2.16, 1.77, and 1.53 MPa and above zone values of 1.35, 1.23, 1.09 MPa for monitoring locations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In summary, the design of experiments and response surface methods allowed for an efficient sensitivity and uncertainty analysis to be conducted permitting a complete evaluation of the pressurization across the entire parameter space.

  8. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla

    2004-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. To this end it has commissioned several small consulting studies to technically support its effort to secure a partner. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and has written a thesis describing his research (titled ''Stimulating enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in west Texas light oil reservoir''). We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, it will be necessary to request

  9. Layer definition and pressure buildup case histories in a carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Vadgama, U.N.; Arifi, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents case histories of pressure buildup analysis in a layered carbonate reservoir (Zella/Aswad Fields in the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiria). The productive formation consists of several dolomite and limestone layers separated by thin tight streaks. Lack of pressure communication between layers has been determined by pressure measurements in the individual layers using the Repeat Formation Tester (RFT). Results of the two-dimensional radial model simulated pressure buildup performance are compared to the actual measured pressure buildup data. 14 refs.

  10. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel

    2006-02-01

    The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus felt confident that funds could be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it would have been necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study. A project extension was granted but it appears Goldrus will have difficulty securing funds. We Bureau of Economic Geology are investigating a new approach on how to fulfill our initial objectives of promoting high-pressure air injection of Ellenburger reservoirs.

  11. Rapid reduction of blood pressure with acute oral labetalol.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, A B; Bala Subramanian, V; Gould, B; Raftery, E B

    1982-01-01

    1 The effect of acute oral administration of labetalol on intra-arterial pressures in a group of ten hypertensive patients has been evaluated. 2 A single dose of 200 mg labetalol produced a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic pressures within 1 h of administration. 3 Within 24 h of initial administration, 200 mg three times daily produced a significant reduction in ambulant arterial levels of systolic pressure for 21 h and diastolic pressure for 14 h in the day. 4 Acute therapy lowered resting levels but there was no significant reduction in systolic pressure during either isometric or dynamic exercise. 5 Acute therapy was not associated with any significant postural hypotension. PMID:7082539

  12. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  13. Pressure losses in fracture-dominated reservoirs: the wellbore constriction effect

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.

    1980-01-01

    Improved energy production from many types of energy reservoirs such as hot dry rock geothermal as well as hydraulically fractured oil, gas, and other geothermal reservoirs requires a better understanding of the fluid mechanics in the vicinity of the fracture-wellbore intersection. Typically, the aperture (smallest dimension) of a hydraulic fracture is only of the order of 1 mm (0.04 in.) so that reasonable energy production rates from geothermal systems require fairly large flow velocities within the fractures, particularly so as the wellbore-fracture intersection is approached. The high velocities and accelerations result in non-Darcian, often turbulent, flow and increased pressure losses. These flow phenomena were investigated experimentally for the simple case where the fracture plane and the wellbore drilling axis are orthogonal and the implication of these experimental results are examined by investigating the pressure losses in a hot dry rock reservoir.

  14. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson

    2005-01-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and his thesis was reported on in the last semi-annual report. We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, we requested and received an extension of the project to September 30, 2005. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project by the end of the extension data. We strongly believe that the results of

  15. Pressure-velocity relations in reservoir rocks: Modified MacBeth's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana, Dario

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the saturation and pressure effects on elastic properties is a key factor in reservoir monitoring. The relation between saturation changes and velocity variations is well known in rock physics and at seismic frequency it can be satisfactorily described by Gassmann's equations. The pressure effect still requires deeper investigations in order to be included in rock physics models for 4D studies. Theoretical models of velocity-pressure relations often do not match lab measurements, or contain empirical constants or theoretical parameters that are difficult to calibrate or do not have a precise physical meaning. In this work, I present a new model to describe the pressure sensitivity of elastic moduli for clastic rocks. The proposed model is an extension of MacBeth's relations. These equations are then integrated within a complete rock physics model to describe the relation between rock properties (porosity and clay content), dynamic attributes (saturation and pressure) and elastic properties. The proposed model is calibrated with laboratory measurements of dry samples over a wide range of pressure variations and then applied to well data to simulate different production scenarios. The complete rock physics model can then be used in time-lapse inversion to predict the distribution of dynamic property changes in the reservoir within an inversion workflow for reservoir monitoring.

  16. Transient-pressure analysis in geothermal steam reservoirs with an immobile vaporizing liquid phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Atkinson, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-difference model for the radial horizontal flow of steam through a porous medium is used to evaluate transient-pressure behavior in the presence of an immobile vaporizing or condensing liquid phase. Graphs of pressure drawdown and buildup in terms of dimensionless pressure and time are obtained for a well discharging steam at a constant mass flow rate for a specified time. The assumptions are made that the steam is in local thermal equilibrium with the reservoir rocks, that temperature changes are due only to phase change, and that effects of vapor-pressure lowering are negligible. Computations show that when a vaporizing liquid phase is present the pressure drawdown exhibits behavior similar to that observed in noncondensable gas reservoirs, but delayed in time. A theoretical analysis allows for the computation of this delay and demonstrates that it is independent of flow geometry. The response that occurs upon pressure buildup is markedly different from that in a noncondensable gas system. This result may provide a diagnostic tool for establishing the existence of phase-change phenomena within a reservoir. ?? 1979.

  17. HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-12-10

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

  18. 3-D Modeling of Pore Pressure Diffusion Beneath Koyna and Warna Reservoirs, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amrita; Gahalaut, Kalpna; Purnachandra Rao, N.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism of reservoir-triggered seismicity is well-understood and explains the earthquake occurrence at different reservoir sites. It can be attributed to the stresses due to water loading and to changes in fluid pressure in pores within the rock matrix. In the present study a 3-D fluid flow numerical model is used to investigate the pore pressure diffusion as a cause for continued seismicity in the Koyna-Warna region in western India. It is shown that reservoir water level fluctuations are sufficient to trigger earthquakes at the seismogenic depths in the region. Our numerical model suggests that a vertical fault with hydraulic conductivity in the range 2-6 m/day facilitates the diffusion of pressure at focal depths of earthquakes in the Koyna-Warna region. Also, for triggering of earthquakes a higher vertical conductivity is required for the Warna region than for the Koyna region. A lag of two months period is found between the maximum water level and the significant hydraulic head required to trigger earthquakes at the focal depth using the appropriate hydraulic conductivity for both the reservoirs.

  19. Reduction of digital plantar pressure by debridement and silicone orthosis.

    PubMed

    Slater, R A; Hershkowitz, I; Ramot, Y; Buchs, A; Rapoport, M J

    2006-12-01

    The lesser digits are frequent sites of elevated plantar pressure and ulceration in the diabetic foot. We sought to determine whether debridement of callus and the wearing of a custom molded digital orthosis could significantly reduce digital plantar pressure. Fourteen patients with distal digital callus were studied. For each patient, the toe with the highest plantar pressure was selected. A computerized pressure mat was used to record the plantar pressure before and after debridement with and without a moldable silicone digital orthosis. Mean peak plantar digital pressures before treatment were 2.80+/-0.7 kg/cm2 for the entire group. The digital orthosis alone reduced plantar pressure to a mean of 1.95+/-0.65 kg/cm2 p < 0.05. Treatment by debridement similarly reduced pressure to 1.99+/-0.76 kg/cm2 p < 0.05. The most effective reduction of pressure for all patients, as well as the most statistically significant, occurred when both treatments were given, with mean peak plantar pressure falling to 1.28+/-0.61 kg/cm2 p < 0.01. Debridement and custom molded digital orthoses alleviate distal digital plantar pressure. Since elevated plantar pressure increases the risk of neuropathic ulceration, these treatments should be considered in the prophylactic care of appropriate patients.

  20. Equation of state density models for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-10-01

    The necessity of exploring ultradeep reservoirs requires the accurate prediction of hydrocarbon density data at extreme temperatures and pressures. In this study, three equations of state (EoS) models, Peng-Robinson (PR), high-temperature high-pressure volume-translated PR (HTHP VT-PR), and perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS are used to predict the density data for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at temperatures to 523 K and pressures to 275 MPa. The calculated values are compared with experimental data. The results show that the HTHP VT-PR EoS and PC-SAFT EoS always perform better than the regular PR EoS for all the investigated hydrocarbons.

  1. Microbial iron reduction under deep subsurface pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Hazemann, J.; Oger, P.

    2009-12-01

    The deep subsurface is characterized by hostile conditions in terms of temperature, pressure and nutrient availability. Our current view of the biosphere extension is restricted to depths shallower than the isotherm associated to the highest observed temperature for life, i.e. 122°C. At this temperature, depending on the geological setting, pressure varies between ambient pressure at geothermal springs and 350 MPa in cold subduction zones. In this high-pressure biosphere, biological iron reduction is an important process linked to carbon oxidation. Among the factors governing reaction rates and yields in the deep subsurface, pressure could be of importance due its effects on kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The understanding and modelling of Fe reduction in natural environments, especially in the subsurface, can be first comprehended thanks to studies of Fe reduction in pure cultures; indeed the study of the effects of high pressure on Fe-reducing bacteria in pure cultures can serve as a basic model for the effects of pressure on Fe reduction in the subsurface. We investigated the effects of pressure on the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. This strain is a mesophilic and piezosensitive counterpart of the psychrophilic and piezophilic Shewanella representatives that have been frequently isolated from deep-sea environments. Kinetics of Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) were monitored in situ by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) in an appropriate pressure vessel dedicated to in situ XAS measurements (Testemale et al. 2005). Measurements were performed at the BM30B beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilty (Grenoble, France). Experiments were conducted from 0.1 MPa to 100 MPa at MR-1 optimal temperature (30°C). Iron reduction was monitored until 100 MPa in cultures of MR-1 at a concentration of 10e8 cells/ml. This shows that the metabolic activity of a piezosensitive microbe extends far beyond its pressure

  2. [Diffusion flux of partial pressure of dissolved carbon dioxide in Wan'an reservoir in spring].

    PubMed

    Mei, Hang-Yuan; Wang, Fu-Shun; Yao, Chen-Chen; Wang, Bao-Li

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the emission of greenhouse gases (CO2) from the river-type reservoir, this study investigated the partial pressure of CO2 [p(CO2)], in the surface water, inflow waters, outflow waters of the Wan'an reservoir in China in the May 2009. p(CO2) in the inflow water, outflow water were calculated from titration method, and the surface water p(CO2) was measured underway using a continuous measurement system (equilibrator-NDIR system). Results showed that the inflow water from the Zhangshui, Meijiang, Taojiang have higher p(CO2) than atmosphere level, with the values of 211.5, 91.7, 259.7 Pa respectively. p(CO2) in the surface water of the incoming section of Wan'an reservoir was between 180-210 Pa, and in the middle section and central section near the dam, p(CO2) in the surface water were about 140-180 Pa and 70-110 Pa. In the outflow waters, p(CO2) reached to 176.2 Pa, higher than that in central section. As a result, it can be concluded that the surface water, inflow waters, outflow waters in the Wan'an reservoir are all the source to CO2. However there is clear evidence showing that the reservoir indeed has a role in mitigating the CO2 emission in this case.

  3. Influences of porous reservoir Laplace pressure on emissions from passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Daniel G. Shea, Herbert

    2015-09-07

    Passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources are capable of efficiently emitting a variety of ion beams with promising applications to spacecraft propulsion and as focused ion beams. Practical devices will require integrated or coupled ionic liquid reservoirs; the effects of which have not been explored in detail. Porous reservoirs are a simple, scalable solution. However, we have shown that their pore size can dramatically alter the beam composition. Emitting the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(triflouromethylsulfonyl)amide, the same device was shown to yield either an ion or droplet dominated beam when using reservoirs of small or large pore size, respectively; with the latter having a mass flow in excess of 15 times larger than the former at negative polarity. Another source, emitting nearly purely ionic beams of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, was similarly shown to emit a significant droplet population when coupled to reservoirs of large (>100 μm) pores; constituting a reduction in propulsive efficiency from greater than 70% to less than 30%. Furthermore, we show that reservoir selection can alter the voltage required to obtain and sustain emission, increasing with smaller pore size.

  4. Lava lake level as a gauge of magma reservoir pressure and eruptive hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity relies fundamentally on tracking magma pressure through the use of proxies, such as ground surface deformation and earthquake rates. Lava lakes at open-vent basaltic volcanoes provide a window into the uppermost magma system for gauging reservoir pressure changes more directly. At Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaiʻi, USA) the surface height of the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater fluctuates with surface deformation over short (hours to days) and long (weeks to months) time scales. This correlation implies that the lake behaves as a simple piezometer of the subsurface magma reservoir. Changes in lava level and summit deformation scale with (and shortly precede) changes in eruption rate from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, indicating that summit lava level can be used for short-term forecasting of rift zone activity and associated hazards at Kīlauea.

  5. Compaction bands in high temperature/pressure diagenetically altered unconventional shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Veveakis, M.; Poulet, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy and mineral resources are typically trapped in a low porosity/permeability environment and are difficult to produce. An extreme end-member is the shale gas reservoir in the Cooper Basin (Australia) that is located at 3500-4000 m depth and ambient temperature conditions around 200oC. Shales of lacustrine origin (with high clay content) are diagenetically altered. Diagenesis involves fluid release mineral reactions of the general type Asolid ↔ Bsolid +Cfluid and switches on suddenly in the diagenetic window between 100-200oC. Diagenetic reactions can involve concentrations of smectite, aqueous silica compound, illite, potassium ions, aqueous silica, quartz, feldspar, kerogen, water and gas . In classical petroleum engineering such interlayer water/gas release reactions are considered to cause cementation and significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Yet in contradiction to the expected permeability reduction gas is successfully being produced. We propose that the success is based on the ductile equivalent of classical compaction bands in solid mechanics. The difference being that that the rate of the volumetric compaction is controlled by the diagenetic reactions. Ductile compaction bands are forming high porosity fluid channels rather than low porosity crushed grains in the solid mechanical equivalent. We show that this new type of volumetric instability appears in rate-dependent heterogenous materials as Cnoidal waves. These are nonlinear and exact periodic stationary waves, well known in the shallow water theory of fluid mechanics. Their distance is a direct function of the hydromechanical diffusivities. These instabilities only emerge in low permeability environment where the fluid diffusivity is about an order of magnitude lower than the mechanical loading. The instabilities are expected to be of the type as shown in the image below. The image shows a CT-scan of a laboratory experiment kindly provided by Papamichos (pers

  6. Noise reduction in solid-state lasers using a SHG-based buffer reservoir.

    PubMed

    El Amili, Abdelkrim; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-04-01

    The cancellation of resonant intensity noise, from a few kHz up to several GHz, is reported using a second-harmonic generation (SHG) buffer reservoir in a Nd:YAG solid-state laser. This approach is shown to be well suited and easily optimizable for reducing the excess noise lying at the laser relaxation oscillations as well as that originating from the beating between the lasing mode and nonlasing adjacent longitudinal modes. A thorough analysis of noise spectra of both laser and SHG signals confirms definitely that noise reduction is a consequence of a deep laser dynamics modification rather than noise evacuation mechanism.

  7. Use of betaxolol in the reduction of elevated intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1983-06-01

    Forty eyes in 20 patients with elevated intraocular pressure were treated with either a 0.125% betaxolol ophthalmic solution or a placebo. After 2, 4, and 6 weeks of twice-daily therapy, the eyes receiving the betaxolol had a mean percent reduction in IOP greater than that in the eyes treated only with the drug vehicle (placebo). Both solutions were well tolerated.

  8. Flexible Decision Variables in Short-term Operation of Reservoirs Using Dimension Reduction Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; Chen, D.; Leon, A.; Gibson, N. L.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a multi-objective optimization model to find flexible decision variables (e.g., turbine flows) in reservoir operation. Flexible decision variables could give the decision maker a range of options instead of single deterministic optimal solutions. In our formulation, each decision variable is modeled by a random variable, and the eventual decision will be but one realization. The optimal probability distribution is found by maximizing the expected value of the objective. Finding flexible decision variables can be computationally intensive especially for multi-reservoir systems. To increase the computational speed of the optimization, a dimension reduction method is used, namely the Karhunen Loe`ve (KL) expansion. KL expansion is closely related to Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and can be used to efficiently represent the random processes by only a few random variables. When using this method, deterministic optimal Pareto solutions are used as the initial population for the optimization. The Grand Coulee reservoir, located in the Columbia River, is used as the test case. The results show that the decision space can be represented with very few random variables and the computational time can therefore be drastically reduced.

  9. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  10. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  11. High Pressure Reduction of Selenite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Letard, I.; Bleuet, P.; Cardon, H.; Oger, P.

    2007-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes comprise cold deep-sea environments, hydrothermal vents, and deep subsurface or deep-sea sediments. The latter are less studied, due to the technical difficulties to sample at great depths without contamination. Nevertheless, microbial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis have been found to be spatially distributed in deep deep-sea sediments (1), and sulfate reduction has been shown to be actually more efficient under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in some sediments (2). Sulfate-reducing bacteria obtained from the Japan Sea are characterized by an increased sulfide production under pressure (3,4). Unfortunately, investigations of microbial metabolic activity as a function of pressure are extremely scarce due to the experimental difficulty of such measurements at high hydrostatic pressure. We were able to measure the reduction of selenite Se(IV) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a function of pressure, to 150 MPa using two different high-pressure reactors that allow in situ X-ray spectroscopy measurements on a synchrotron source. A first series of measurements was carried out in a low-pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) of our own design (5) at ID22 beamline at ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); a second one was performed in an autoclave (6) at the BM30B beamline at ESRF. Selenite reduction by strain MR-17 was monitored from ambient pressure to 150 MPa over 25 hours at 30 deg C by XANES spectroscopy (X-ray Analysis of Near Edge Structure). Spectra were recorded hourly in order to quantify the evolution of the oxidation state of selenium with time. Stationary-phase bacteria were inoculated at a high concentration into fresh growth medium containing 5 or 10 M of sodium selenite and 20 mM sodium lactate. Kinetic parameters of the Se (IV) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 could be extracted from the data, as a function of pressure. They show 1) that the rate constant k of the reaction is decreased by a half at high pressure

  12. Practical application of fractal pressure-transient analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Acuna, J.A.; Ershaghi, I.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1995-09-01

    Pressure-transient tests in naturally fractured reservoirs often exhibit nonuniform responses. Various models explain such nonuniformity; however, their relevance is often not justified on a geologic basis. Fractal geometry provides a method to account for a great variety of such transients under the assumption that the network of fractures is fractal. This paper presents an application to real well test in various fractured reservoirs. The physical meaning of the fractal parameters is presented in the context of well testing. Examples showing a behavior similar to the finite-conductivity fracture model or the spherical flow are presented and explained by the alternative of fractal networks. A behavior that can be mistakenly interpreted as a double-porosity case is also analyzed.

  13. Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf D.; Thiel, Matthew P.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

  14. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  15. Reservoir Modeling for Production Management

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1989-03-21

    For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

  16. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Redox Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teesdale, Justin; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Ma, Yingzhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a noninnocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M 1s 1 at an applied potential of 2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that are not typically observed for fac- ReI(CO)3 complexes.

  17. Designing cyclic pressure pulsing in naturally fractured reservoirs using an inverse looking recurrent neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, E.; Ertekin, T.; Watson, R.; Miller, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an inverse looking approach is presented to efficiently design cyclic pressure pulsing (huff 'n' puff) with N 2 and CO 2, which is an effective improved oil recovery method in naturally fractured reservoirs. A numerical flow simulation model with compositional, dual-porosity formulation is constructed. The model characteristics are from the Big Andy Field, which is a depleted, naturally fractured oil reservoir in Kentucky. A set of cyclic pulsing design scenarios is created and run using this model. These scenarios and corresponding performance indicators are fed into the recurrent neural network for training. In order to capture the cyclic, time-dependent behavior of the process, recurrent neural networks are used to develop proxy models that can mimic the reservoir simulation model in an inverse looking manner. Two separate inverse looking proxy models for N 2 and CO 2 injections are constructed to predict the corresponding design scenarios, given a set of desired performance characteristics. Predictive capabilities of developed proxy models are evaluated by comparing simulation outputs with neural-network outputs. It is observed that networks are able to accurately predict the design parameters, such as the injection rate and the duration of injection, soaking and production periods.

  18. Intensifying Antiretroviral Therapy With Raltegravir and Maraviroc During Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Does Not Accelerate HIV Reservoir Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Mario; Benko, Erika; Yue, Feng Yun; Kim, Connie J.; Huibner, Sanja; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Pankovich, Jim; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Kaul, Rupert; Kandel, Gabor; Kovacs, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Persistent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) within the CD4+ T-cell reservoir is an obstacle to eradication. We hypothesized that adding raltegravir and maraviroc to standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) during early HIV infection could substantially reduce viral reservoirs as a step towards eradication. Methods. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot trial enrolled 32 participants with documented early (<6 months) HIV infection to either standard cART (emtricitabine/tenofovir/lopinavir/ritonavir) or intensive cART (standard regimen + raltegravir/maraviroc). Human immunodeficiency virus reservoirs were assessed at baseline and at 48 weeks by (1) proviral DNA, (2) cell-associated RNA, and (3) replication-competent virus, all from purified blood CD4+ T cells, and (4) gut proviral DNA. A multiassay algorithm (MAA) on baseline sera estimated timing of infection. Results. Thirty individuals completed the study to the 48-week endpoint. The reduction in blood proviral burden was −1.03 log DNA copies/106 CD4+ T cells versus −.84 log in the standard and intensive groups, respectively (P = .056). Overall, there was no significant difference in the rate of decline of HIV-associated RNA, replication-competent virus in blood CD4+ T cells, nor proviral gut HIV DNA to 48 weeks. Individuals who presented with more recent HIV infection had significantly lower virus reservoirs, and cART tended to reduce their reservoirs to a greater extent. Conclusions. Intensive cART led to no additional reduction in the blood virus reservoir at 48 weeks compared with standard cART. Human immunodeficiency virus reservoir size is smaller earlier in HIV infection. Other novel treatment strategies in combination with early cART will be needed to eliminate the HIV latent reservoir. PMID:26512359

  19. Intensifying Antiretroviral Therapy With Raltegravir and Maraviroc During Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Does Not Accelerate HIV Reservoir Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Mario; Benko, Erika; Yue, Feng Yun; Kim, Connie J; Huibner, Sanja; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Pankovich, Jim; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Kaul, Rupert; Kandel, Gabor; Kovacs, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Persistent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) within the CD4(+) T-cell reservoir is an obstacle to eradication. We hypothesized that adding raltegravir and maraviroc to standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) during early HIV infection could substantially reduce viral reservoirs as a step towards eradication. Methods.  A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot trial enrolled 32 participants with documented early (<6 months) HIV infection to either standard cART (emtricitabine/tenofovir/lopinavir/ritonavir) or intensive cART (standard regimen + raltegravir/maraviroc). Human immunodeficiency virus reservoirs were assessed at baseline and at 48 weeks by (1) proviral DNA, (2) cell-associated RNA, and (3) replication-competent virus, all from purified blood CD4(+) T cells, and (4) gut proviral DNA. A multiassay algorithm (MAA) on baseline sera estimated timing of infection. Results.  Thirty individuals completed the study to the 48-week endpoint. The reduction in blood proviral burden was -1.03 log DNA copies/10(6) CD4(+) T cells versus -.84 log in the standard and intensive groups, respectively (P = .056). Overall, there was no significant difference in the rate of decline of HIV-associated RNA, replication-competent virus in blood CD4(+) T cells, nor proviral gut HIV DNA to 48 weeks. Individuals who presented with more recent HIV infection had significantly lower virus reservoirs, and cART tended to reduce their reservoirs to a greater extent. Conclusions.  Intensive cART led to no additional reduction in the blood virus reservoir at 48 weeks compared with standard cART. Human immunodeficiency virus reservoir size is smaller earlier in HIV infection. Other novel treatment strategies in combination with early cART will be needed to eliminate the HIV latent reservoir.

  20. Seismically induced pressure transients at geothermal reservoirs in the eastern Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Wang, Rongjiang; Caka, Deniz; Irmak, T. Serkan; Tunc, Berna; Luehr, Birger-G.; Baris, Serif

    2014-05-01

    The potential role of fluids in processes related to the triggering of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions is frequently emphasized. Here, we focus on the response of hydrogeological systems to earthquakes, specifically on seismically induced pore-pressure variations in geothermal areas located in the eastern Marmara region. At a 500 m deep artesian geothermal well the pressure is continuously being monitored at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. A seismometer is co-located close to the well-head and the data are recorded by the same digitizer. Hydro-seismograms were recorded in relation to local and distant earthquakes. The ML=5.2 Manyas earthquake which occurred on 20 October 2006 at a distance of 77 km led to a dynamic response of the pore pressure of the order of 4 mbar triggered upon the arrival of the S-wave. Four days later, the ML=5.2 Gemlik earthquake at a distance of 20 km led to a dynamic pore pressure response of the order of 15 mbar triggered upon the arrival of the P-wave. In both cases the peak amplitude of the ground velocity was about 2 mm/s. Weak oscillations of the pore pressure were observed during the passage of surface waves generated by remote earthquakes at distances of up to 9,000 km. Additionally to the dynamic response, a small persistent pressure increase of 1 and 2 mbar had been recorded after both local earthquakes. According to preliminary results, the observed pressure increase is opposite to the static pressure decrease predicted by Okada's model. At the present stage we conclude that the response of the Armutlu geothermal system to earthquakes is likely caused by a dynamic interaction of passing seismic waves (P-, S-, and surface waves) with the fluid reservoir in case a threshold of the ground shaking is exceeded.

  1. Prostaglandin Pathway Gene Therapy for Sustained Reduction of Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Barraza, Román A; McLaren, Jay W; Poeschla, Eric M

    2009-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis. In the eye, loss of COX-2 expression in aqueous humor–secreting cells has been associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main treatment goal in this disease. We used lentiviral vectors to stably express COX-2 and other PG biosynthesis and response transgenes in the ciliary body epithelium and trabecular meshwork (TM), the ocular suborgans that produce aqueous humor and regulate its outflow, respectively. We show that robust ectopic COX-2 expression and PG production require COX-2 complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence optimization. When COX-2 expression was coupled with a similarly optimized synthetic PGF2α receptor transgene to enable downstream signaling, gene therapy produced substantial and sustained reductions in IOP in a large animal model, the domestic cat. This study provides the first gene therapy for correcting the main cause of glaucoma. PMID:19953083

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics with a classical pressure reservoir: simulation of pressure-induced amorphization in a Si35H36 cluster

    PubMed

    Martonak; Molteni; Parrinello

    2000-01-24

    We present a new constant-pressure ab initio molecular dynamics method suitable for studying, e.g., pressure-induced structural transformations in finite nonperiodic systems such as clusters. We immerse an ab initio treated cluster into a model classical liquid, described by a soft-sphere potential, which acts as a pressure reservoir. The pressure is varied by tuning the parameter of the liquid potential. We apply the method to a Si35H36 cluster, which undergoes a pressure-induced amorphization at approximately 35 GPa, and remains in a disordered state even upon pressure release.

  3. Hornblende phenocrysts record a pressure gradient in and contamination of the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.; Wittke, J. ); Duffield, W. ); Davis, A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwestern New Mexico comprises 20 coeval porphyritic lava domes erupted from a large vertically zoned reservoir of silicic magma. The rhyolite is high-silica, subalkaline, and is nearly constant in major-element composition. Trace elements and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr[sub i] (0.705 to 0.713) define vertical zoning that records a downward-decreasing imprint of minor (<1 wt%) partial assimilation of Proterozoic roof rocks. Consistent with the major-element homogeneity, electron-microprobe analyses of hornblende phenocrysts show little or no measurable variation in principal constituents. The hornblende is edenite whose mean composition and standard deviation of 110 analyses are SiO[sub 2], 44.66 [+-] 0.64; TiO[sub g], 1.27 [+-] 0.13; Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], 6.80 [+-] 0.31; FeO, 21.00 [+-] 1.60; MnO, 1.19 [+-] 0.16; MgO, 9.94 [+-] 1.09; CaO, 10.51 [+-] 0.22; Na[sub 2]O, 2.22 [+-] 0.13; K[sup 2]O, 0.98 [+-] 0.08; F, 2.04 [+-] 0.35; Cl, 0.20 [+-] 0.03. Except for FeO, MnO, and MgO, compositional variations are non systematic and mostly within analytical uncertainty. FeO and Mno exhibit strong negative correlation with MgO. Individual hornblende crystals are zoned to relatively MgO-rich and FeO-MnO-poor rims, opposite what might be expected if the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir evolved chemically isolated from its surroundings. Hornblende with rims richest in MgO occurs in domes fed from the uppermost part of the reservoir. Calculated pressures based on Al in hornblende range from 1.6 to 2.0 kb, [+-] 0.5 kb. Though the range of calculated P is encompassed within the uncertainty, the lowest hornblende pressure is for a dome fed from, or near, the top of the reservoir, whereas the chemically defined vertical zoning.

  4. Blood pressure reduction following accumulated physical activity in prehypertensive

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Yogesh; Gupta, Rani; Moinuddin, Arsalan; Narwal, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Context: Accumulated moderate physical activity (PA) for 30 min in a day is the only recommended treatment of prehypertension. Objective: We investigated autonomic modulation as a possible mechanism for the decrease in blood pressure (BP) during the rest periods in each 10 min session of PA. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted a single-blind randomized multi-arm control trial on 40 prehypertensive (pre-HT) young male adults. Methods: Participants were randomly divided by using random number table into four groups. Control (no intervention); Group 1 (walking at 50% of predicted VO2 peak); Group 2 (walking at 60% of predicted VO2 peak); Group 3 (walking at 70% of predicted VO2 peak). BP, heart rate variability (HRV), and heart rate recovery 1 min (HRR 1 min) were measured at baseline and during the rest period after each session of 10 min over 30 min of accumulated physical activity (PAcumm). Results: Significant diastolic BP (DBP) reduction (P < 0.001) was observed during the rest period after each session of PAcumm in intervention groups. An average reduction in DBP was more in pre-HT undertaking PAcumm at 70% of predicted VO2 Peak. Decrease in the mean value of low-frequency (LF) and LF/high-frequency ratio was observed following PAcumm in all intervention groups irrespective of the intensity of PA. No significant association of reduction of BP with HRV and HRR 1 s was observed. Conclusion: Reduction in BP was observed during the rest period after each 10 min session of PAcumm irrespective of the intensity of PA. Autonomic modulation does not seem to be the possible mechanism for the reduction in BP during the sessions. PMID:27843840

  5. A method for determining transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores by radial pressure pulse decay measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zehao; Dong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Shaojie; Gong, Houjian; Li, Yajun; Long, Feifei

    2016-10-01

    A transverse pressure pulse decay (TPPD) method is presented to measure transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores in a cell with finite volume. Given appropriate assumptions, a mathematical model based on the specially designed experiment is formulated, and its general solution is proposed. Early-time and late-time techniques are further presented for convenient postprocessing applications of experimental data. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis of TPPD method is given. It is found that a good TPPD experimental principle can be obtained by adjusting test gas, experimental pressure, dimension of core sample, and volume ratio (λ). The volume ratio error (λerror) analysis reveals the following: (1) a larger λerror results in increased transverse permeability error (kerror); (2) the volume ratio (λ) is better not very close to 0.754; (3) when λ is equal to or greater than 1, the kerror resulting from λerror is monotonic decreasing as the volume ratio increases. In practice, λ is usually equal to or greater than 1 due to the very small pore volume of a tight core. But this does not mean that the volume ratio should be as large as possible. The reason for this is that a pressure transducer with higher resolution is needed to record pressure change. That means experimental apparatus is much more costly. And such a TPPD experiment requires a much longer time to attain the late-time straight line behavior. The best choice is to find an optimal balance point among experimental cost, time, and accuracy.

  6. Pressure transient behavior of dilatant non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Okpobiri, G.A.; Ikoku, C.U.

    1983-11-01

    This study investigates pressure falloff testing in non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs. The non-Newtonian fluids of interest exhibit dilatant behavior. Initial water saturation is accounted for. Application of non-Newtonian well test analysis techniques and conventional Horner (Newtonian) techniques is investigated. The effects of different injection times before shut-in, external radii, flow behavior indexes and non-Newtonian fluid consistencies on the pressure transient behavior constitute the salient features of this work. It is shown that early time falloff pressure data can be analyzed by non-Newtonian techniques while the late shut-in data, under certain conditions, can be analyzed by the conventional Horner method. The time when the Newtonian fluid starts influencing the non-Newtonian falloff curves and the location of the non-Newtonian fluid front can be estimated by using the radius of investigation equation for power-law fluids and volumetric balance equation respectively. Rheological consideration is made to illustrate the pressure transient behavior.

  7. Evaluation of membrane oxygenators and reservoirs in terms of capturing gaseous microemboli and pressure drops.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yulong; Palanzo, David; Kunselman, Allen; Undar, Akif

    2009-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence points to cerebral embolization during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) as the principal etiologic factor of neurologic complications. In this study, the capability of capturing and classification of gaseous emboli and pressure drop of three different membrane oxygenators (Sorin Apex, Terumo Capiox SX25, Maquet QUADROX) were measured in a simulated adult model of CPB using a novel ultrasound detection and classification quantifier system. The circuit was primed with 1000 mL heparinized human packed red blood cells and 1000 mL lactated Ringer's solution (total volume 2000 mL, corrected hematocrit 26-28%). After the injection of 5 mL air into the venous line, an Emboli Detection and Classification Quantifier was used to simultaneously record microemboli counts at post-pump, post-oxygenator, and post-arterial filter sites. Trials were conducted at normothermic (35 degrees C) and hypothermic (25 degrees C) conditions. Pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator pressure were recorded in real time and pressure drop was calculated. Maquet QUADROX membrane oxygenator has the lowest pressure drops compared to the other two oxygenators (P < 0.001). The comparison among the three oxygenators indicated better capability of capturing gaseous emboli with the Maquet QUADROX and Terumo Capiox SX25 membrane oxygenator and more emboli may pass through the Sorin Apex membrane oxygenator. Microemboli counts uniformly increased with hypothermic perfusion (25 degrees C). Different types of oxygenators and reservoirs have different capability of capturing gaseous emboli and transmembrane pressure drop. Based on this investigation, Maquet QUADROX membrane oxygenator has the lowest pressure drop and better capability for capturing gaseous microemboli.

  8. Ambient pressure oxygen reservoir apparatus for use during one-lung anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, J; Peacock, M J; Daniels, B W

    1999-05-01

    An ambient pressure oxygen reservoir bag apparatus for connecting to the nonventilated lung as soon as single-lung ventilation is initiated is described. The theoretical benefits are the facilitation of collapse of the lung on the side of surgery and a reduced likelihood of arterial desaturation. Although these main benefits are yet to be proven, the authors believe that the weight of theoretical argument and practical observation serves to justify the use of the apparatus while the outcome of suitably designed clinical trials is awaited. It can be used for all one-lung anaesthetics and is especially recommended for thoracoscopic surgery, where temporary re-expansion of the nonventilated lung is either counter-productive or contraindicated, and where there is a possibility that lung collapse may be delayed.

  9. Carbon dioxide reduction in low-pressure ICP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudin, Stanislav; Dakhov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    This work experimentally investigates the efficiency of carbon dioxide dissociation in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) at low gas pressure. The plasma source operates at 13.56 MHz in the RF power range of 100-500 W. Pure CO2 is fed into the plasma while the output gas composition is measured by a mass spectrometer. The pressure range inside the source was changed in the range of 1-200 mTorr. Excitation processes in the plasma are studied by means of optical emission spectroscopy, and the plasma density along with the electron temperature are monitored using a Langmuir probe. Experimental results have shown that the conversion efficiency of CO2 to CO and O2 increases with the RF and reaches the values more than 50%. A theoretical treatment of the dissociation pathway is also given allowing estimation of the mean dissociation length of the carbon dioxide molecule in plasma. The plasma parameters necessary for efficient CO2 reduction are discussed.

  10. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  11. Thermodynamic Constraints on Sulfate Reduction and Methanogenesis in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Marquart, K. A.; Wilson, B. H.; Flynn, T. M.; Vinson, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we consider how commercial natural gas production could affect sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in coal-bearing sediments of the Cherokee Basin, Kansas, USA. Controls on the activity of these two groups of microbes are important to understand because their activity and interactions may influence methane formation and retention in unconventional reservoirs. During November 2013, we collected water and gas samples from 16 commercial gas wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. Results indicate that methane in the coalbeds formed biologically and that both methanogens and sulfate reducers are present. Gas samples consisted almost entirely of methane (C1/(C2+C3) = 2638 on avg.) and the δD and δ13C of methane averaged -222‰ VSMOW and -61‰ VPDB, respectively. Archaeal sequences in our samples were nearly all classified within groups of methanogens (avg. 91%) and cultivable methanogens were present in all water samples. On average, 6% of the bacterial sequences from our samples were classified in groups of sulfate reducers and sulfate available to support their activity ranged up to 110 μM in concentration. Any interaction that occurs between these groups may be influenced by the energetics of their metabolic reactions. Thermodynamic calculations show that methanogens hold an energy advantage over sulfate reducers if dissolved methane concentrations are low. Under current conditions, methanogens see between 12 and 16 kJ mol-1 more usable free energy than sulfate reducers, if we assume a minimal methane concentration (1 μM). However, usable energy for methanogens would equal that available to sulfate reducers at methane concentrations ranging between 144 and 831 μM, well below saturation levels. Production activities that hold methane concentration below these levels, therefore, would help maintain an energy advantage for methanogens. In contrast, if production activities cause sulfate concentrations to increase, sulfate reducers would

  12. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  13. Effect of Salinity on Effective CO2 Permeability in Reservoir Rock Determined by Pressure Transient Methods: an Experimental Study on Hawkesbury Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnaweera, T. D.; Ranjith, P. G.; Perera, M. S. A.

    2015-09-01

    The determination of effective carbon dioxide (CO2) permeability in reservoir rock and its variation is of great interest in the process of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers, as CO2 sequestration-induced permeability alternations appear to create major problems during the CO2 injection process. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of salinity on the effective CO2 permeability of reservoir rock under different injection pressures. A series of high-pressure tri-axial experiments was, therefore, performed to investigate the effect of salinity on effective CO2 permeability in Hawkesbury sandstone under various brine concentrations. The selected brine concentrations were 0, 10, 20, and 30 % sodium chloride (NaCl) by weight and the experiments were conducted for a range of CO2 injection pressures (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 MPa) at a constant confinement of 20 MPa and a temperature of 35 °C, respectively. According to the results, the degree of salinity of the aquifer's pore fluid plays a vital role in the effective CO2 permeability variation which occurs with CO2 injection, and the effective permeability decreases with increasing salinity in the range of 0-30 % of NaCl. Interestingly, in dry reservoir rock samples, the phase transition of the injection of CO2 from gas to super-critical condition caused a sudden reduction of CO2 permeability, related to the slip flow effect which occurs in gas CO2. Transfer into vapor or super-critical CO2 causes this slip flow to be largely reduced, reducing the reservoir permeability for CO2 movement in dry reservoir rock samples. However, this behavior was not observed for water- and brine-saturated samples, and an increasing trend of effective CO2 permeability was observed with increasing injection pressure. A detailed chemical analysis was then conducted to understand the physical phenomenon causing the salinity effect on effective CO2 permeability using scanning electron microscopy analyses. Such

  14. Superposition well-test method for reservoir characterization and pressure management during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    As a significant fraction of a carbon storage project's budget is devoted to site characterization and monitoring, there has been an intense drive in recent years to both lower cost and improve the quality of data obtained. Two data streams that are cheap and always available are pressure and flow rate measurements from the injection well. Falloff testing, in which the well is shut-in for some period of time and the pressure decline curve measured, is often used to probe the storage zone and look for indications of hydraulic barriers, fracture-dominated flow, and other reservoir characteristics. These tests can be used to monitor many hydromechanical processes of interest, including hydraulic fracturing and fault reactivation. Unfortunately, the length of the shut-in period controls how far away from the injector information may be obtained. For operational reasons these tests are typically kept short and infrequent, limiting their usefulness. In this work, we present a new analysis method in which ongoing injection data is used to reconstruct an equivalent falloff test, without shutting in the well. The entire history of injection may therefore be used as a stand in for a very long test. The method relies upon a simple superposition principle to transform a multi-rate injection sequence into an equivalent single-rate process. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method using injection data from the Snøhvit storage project. We also explore its utility in an active pressure management scenario. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Reduction of particulate carryover from a pressurized fluidized bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A bench scale fluidized bed combustor was constructed with a conical shape so that the enlarged upper part of the combustor would also serve as a granular bed filter. The combustor was fed coal and limestone. Ninety-nine tests of about four hours each were conducted over a range of conditions. Coal-to-air ratio varied from 0.033 to 0.098 (all lean). Limestone-to-coal ratio varied from 0.06 to 0.36. Bed depth varied from 3.66 to 8.07 feet. Temperature varied from 1447 to 1905 F. Pressure varied from 40 to 82 psia. Heat transfer area had the range zero to 2.72 ft squared. Two cone angles were used. The average particulate carry over of 2.5 grains/SCF was appreciably less than cylindrical fluidized bed combustors. The carry over was correlated by multiple regression analysis to yield the dependence on bed depth and hence the collection efficiency, which was 20%. A comparison with a model indicated that the exhaust port may be below the transport disengaging height for most of the tests, indicating that further reduction in carry over and increase in collection efficiency could be affected by increasing the freeboard and height of the exhaust port above the bed.

  16. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  17. Effects of pressure drawdown and recovery on the Cerro Prieto beta reservoir in the CP-III area

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1998-02-01

    The production characteristics of wells in the northwestern Cerro Prieto III area changed greatly when the Cp-III power plant went on line in 1986. Fluid extraction in the field more than doubled and reservoir-wide boiling started immediately, greatly increasing the enthalpy of produced fluids. Some well fluids showed a decrease in chloride due to adiabatic steam condensation in the well and separator, and others were enriched in chloride due to boiling. As reservoir drawdown increased, entrance of cooler and more dilute groundwaters into the reservoir became evident (i.e., condensation stopped, and there was a decrease in enthalpy and chloride in produced fluids). Although some groundwater inflow was from the leaky western margin of the reservoir, the majority is in the northeast, inferred to be local and downward, possibly through more permeable zones associated with the normal fault H. This natural recharge and some reinjection have slowed and possibly reversed pressure drawdown throughout CP-III. Enthalpy has decreased and liquid saturation has increased as the steam-rich zone in the upper part of the reservoir has either disappeared or become thinner.

  18. Long-Term Reduction in Peripheral Blood HIV Type 1 Reservoirs Following Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hu, Zixin; Li, Jonathan Z.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Busch, Michael P.; Keating, Sheila M.; Gallien, Sebastien; Lin, Nina H.; Giguel, Francoise F.; Lavoie, Laura; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Soiffer, Robert J.; Sagar, Manish; LaCasce, Ann S.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The long-term impact of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoirs in patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is largely unknown. Methods. We studied the effects of a reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic HSCT from donors with wild-type–CCR5+ cells on HIV-1 peripheral blood reservoirs in 2 patients heterozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation. In-depth analyses of the HIV-1 reservoir size in peripheral blood, coreceptor use, and specific antibody responses were performed on samples obtained before and up to 3.5 years after HSCT receipt. Results. Although HIV-1 DNA was readily detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before and 2–3 months after HSCT receipt, HIV-1 DNA and RNA were undetectable in PBMCs, CD4+ T cells, or plasma up to 21 and 42 months after HSCT. The loss of detectable HIV-1 correlated temporally with full donor chimerism, development of graft-versus-host disease, and decreases in HIV-specific antibody levels. Conclusions. The ability of donor cells to engraft without evidence of ongoing HIV-1 infection suggests that HIV-1 replication may be fully suppressed during cART and does not contribute to maintenance of viral reservoirs in peripheral blood in our patients. HSCTs with wild-type–CCR5+ donor cells can lead to a sustained reduction in the size of the peripheral reservoir of HIV-1. PMID:23460751

  19. Light oil recovery from cyclic CO sub 2 injection; Influence of low pressures, impure CO sub 2 , and reservoir gas

    SciTech Connect

    Monger, T.G.; Ramos, J.C.; Thomas, J. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper is a laboratory and field investigation of the CO{sub 2} huff n puff process for the enhanced recovery of light crude oil. Cyclic CO{sub 2} displacement results with live and dead oils in watered-out Berea cores are presented. Sixty-five single-well cyclic CO{sub 2} field tests conducted in a pressure-depleted reservoir are evaluated.

  20. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Compaction and Permeability Reduction of Castlegate Sandstone under Pore Pressure Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate time-dependent compaction and permeability changes by cycling pore pressure with application to compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a reservoir. Preliminary experiments capture the impacts of hydrostatic stress, pore water pressure, pore pressure cycling, chemical, and time-dependent considerations near a borehole in a CAES reservoir analog. CAES involves creating an air bubble in a reservoir. The high pressure bubble serves as a mechanical battery to store potential energy. When there is excess grid energy, bubble pressure is increased by air compression, and when there is energy needed on the grid, stored air pressure is released through turbines to generate electricity. The analog conditions considered are depth ~1 km, overburden stress ~20 MPa and a pore pressure ~10MPa. Pore pressure is cycled daily or more frequently between ~10 MPa and 6 MPa, consistent with operations of a CAES facility at this depth and may continue for operational lifetime (25 years). The rock can vary from initially fully-to-partially saturated. Pore pressure cycling changes the effective stress.Jacketed, room temperature tap water-saturated samples of Castlegate Sandstone are hydrostatically confined (20 MPa) and subjected to a pore pressure resulting in an effective pressure of ~10 MPa. Pore pressure is cycled between 6 to 10 MPa. Sample displacement measurements yielded determinations of volumetric strain and from water flow measurements permeability was determined. Experiments ran for two to four weeks, with 2 to 3 pore pressure cycles per day. The Castlegate is a fluvial high porosity (>20%) primarily quartz sandstone, loosely calcite cemented, containing a small amount of clay.Pore pressure cycling induces compaction (~.1%) and permeability decreases (~20%). The results imply that time-dependent compactive processes are operative. The load path, of increasing and decreasing pore pressure, may facilitate local loosening and grain readjustments that results in the

  2. The use of wireline pressure measurements to refine reservoir description, Main Body B waterflood, Elk Hills oil field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. ); Love, C. ); Fishburn, M. ); Humphrey, M. )

    1991-02-01

    The Main Body B, one of five large Stevens sand reservoirs at Elk Hills, occupies the eastern half of the 31S anticline. Early in the production history of this reservoir, the Elk Hills unit initiated peripheral water injection to maintain reservoir pressure. Water injection has proceeded at a rate approximately equal to the voidage created by oil and gas production and has moved water upstructure creating an oil bank. Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., the current unit operator, drills five to ten new wells each year to fully exploit this oil bank. In 1985, the unit added wireline pressure measurements to the open-hole logging programs of these infill wells for the purpose of evaluating the net effect of injection into and production from the Main Body B reservoir. A typical well provides the opportunity to obtain 8-10 pressures from the Main Body B. To date, the Unit has measured wireline pressures in more than two dozen wells. The wireline measurements have shown a broader than expected range of formation pressures (1,600 {plus minus} psi to 4,200 {plus minus} psi). The pressures show that this is a layered reservoir with little vertical pressure communication between some of the layers. In some parts of the reservoir, wireline pressures indicate horizontal continuity of the layers between wells and in other areas pressure differences between adjacent wells may indicate faults or cementation barriers. Permeabilities calculated from the sampling drawdown are the same order of magnitude as brine permeabilities obtained from core and show that higher-pressured layers of the reservoir have lower permeability. These observations fundamentally alter performance evaluation of the Main Body B waterflood.

  3. Pore Pressure prediction in shale gas reservoirs using neural network and fuzzy logic with an application to Barnett Shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the proposed idea is to use the artificial intelligence such as the neural network and fuzzy logic to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Pore pressure is a very important parameter that will be used or estimation of effective stress. This last is used to resolve well-bore stability problems, failure plan identification from Mohr-Coulomb circle and sweet spots identification. Many models have been proposed to estimate the pore pressure from well-logs data; we can cite for example the equivalent depth model, the horizontal model for undercompaction called the Eaton's model…etc. All these models require a continuous measurement of the slowness of the primary wave, some thing that is not easy during well-logs data acquisition in shale gas formtions. Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic and the multilayer perceptron neural network to predict the pore pressure in two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale formation. The first horizontal well is used for the training of the fuzzy set and the multilayer perecptron, the input is the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the compression and shear wave, however the desired output is the estimated pore pressure using Eaton's model. Data of another horizontal well are used for generalization. Obtained results clearly show the power of the fuzzy logic system than the multilayer perceptron neural network machine to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Keywords: artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, pore pressure, multilayer perecptron, Barnett shale.

  4. Implications of Limited Thermophilicity of Nitrite Reduction for Control of Sulfide Production in Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Chen, Chuan; Okpala, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate reduction to nitrite in oil fields appears to be more thermophilic than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. Concentrated microbial consortia from oil fields reduced both nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but only nitrate at and above 50°C. The abundance of the nirS gene correlated with mesophilic nitrite reduction activity. Thauera and Pseudomonas were the dominant mesophilic nitrate-reducing bacteria (mNRB), whereas Petrobacter and Geobacillus were the dominant thermophilic NRB (tNRB) in these consortia. The mNRB Thauera sp. strain TK001, isolated in this study, reduced nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but not at 50°C, whereas the tNRB Petrobacter sp. strain TK002 and Geobacillus sp. strain TK003 reduced nitrate to nitrite but did not reduce nitrite further from 50 to 70°C. Testing of 12 deposited pure cultures of tNRB with 4 electron donors indicated reduction of nitrate in 40 of 48 and reduction of nitrite in only 9 of 48 incubations. Nitrate is injected into high-temperature oil fields to prevent sulfide formation (souring) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. Injection of cold seawater to produce oil creates mesothermic zones. Our results suggest that preventing the temperature of these zones from dropping below 50°C will limit the reduction of nitrite, allowing more effective souring control. IMPORTANCE Nitrite can accumulate at temperatures of 50 to 70°C, because nitrate reduction extends to higher temperatures than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. This is important for understanding the fundamentals of thermophilicity and for the control of souring in oil fields catalyzed by SRB, which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. PMID:27208132

  5. Reduction of Ammonia and Tar in Pressurized Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Olofsson, G.

    2002-09-19

    The present paper intended to present the results of parametric study of the formation of ammonia and tar under pressurized gasification conditions. By the use of multivariate data analysis, the effects of operating parameters were determined and their influences could be quantified. In order to deal with cases in which high levels of ammonia and tar were produced, study of catalytic hot gas cleaning was performed, aiming to discuss the removal efficiency and test catalysts.

  6. Biomechanics of Schlemm's canal endothelium and intraocular pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Stamer, W Daniel; Braakman, Sietse T; Zhou, Enhua H; Ethier, C Ross; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Overby, Darryl R; Johnson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ocular hypertension in glaucoma develops due to age-related cellular dysfunction in the conventional outflow tract, resulting in increased resistance to aqueous humor outflow. Two cell types, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal (SC) endothelia, interact in the juxtacanalicular tissue (JCT) region of the conventional outflow tract to regulate outflow resistance. Unlike endothelial cells lining the systemic vasculature, endothelial cells lining the inner wall of SC support a transcellular pressure gradient in the basal to apical direction, thus acting to push the cells off their basal lamina. The resulting biomechanical strain in SC cells is quite large and is likely to be an important determinant of endothelial barrier function, outflow resistance and intraocular pressure. This review summarizes recent work demonstrating how biomechanical properties of SC cells impact glaucoma. SC cells are highly contractile, and such contraction greatly increases cell stiffness. Elevated cell stiffness in glaucoma may reduce the strain experienced by SC cells, decrease the propensity of SC cells to form pores, and thus impair the egress of aqueous humor from the eye. Furthermore, SC cells are sensitive to the stiffness of their local mechanical microenvironment, altering their own cell stiffness and modulating gene expression in response. Significantly, glaucomatous SC cells appear to be hyper-responsive to substrate stiffness. Thus, evidence suggests that targeting the material properties of SC cells will have therapeutic benefits for lowering intraocular pressure in glaucoma.

  7. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability.

  8. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 104 s−1 at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  9. Water quality change in dam reservoir and shallow aquifer: analysis on trend, seasonal variability and data reduction.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Al-Zahrani, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Change of water quality in dam reservoir and aquifer complicates safe drinking water supply. Few parameters are monitored to control water quality in these sources. Adequate knowledge on the correlation structure, interaction effect, trends and seasonal variability of these parameters is essential to control water quality. This study applied time series and multivariate analyses on 15 water quality parameters, collected from the King Fahd dam reservoir (L1) and aquifer (L2) in Saudi Arabia during April 2010 to February 2012. Moderate to strong correlations were observed between sulfate, hardness, fluoride, chloride, magnesium, conductivity, turbidity and total dissolved solids (TDS), while separate clusters were visible for TDS-chloride-magnesium-conductivity; fluoride-turbidity; chloride-hardness; ammonia-nitrate; and calcium-magnesium-hardness. Four major principal components explained 81.1% and 83.2% of the overall variances in L1 and L2, respectively. The factor analysis showed that 53% and 67% of the data were necessary to explain 81.3% and 83.2% of total variances for L1 and L2, respectively, indicating the possibility of data reduction. Possible degradation of water quality in these sources was highlighted, while such degradation may require enhanced treatment for producing drinking water in future.

  10. Reduction of ventricular size after shunting for normal pressure hydrocephalus related to CSF dynamics before shunting.

    PubMed Central

    Tans, J T; Poortvliet, D C

    1988-01-01

    Reduction of ventricular size was determined by repeated computed tomography in 30 adult patients shunted for normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and related to the pressure-volume index (PVI) and resistance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid (Rcsf) measured before shunting. Rapid and marked reduction of ventricular size (n = 10) was associated with a significantly lower PVI than slow and moderate to marked (n = 13) or minimal to mild reduction (n = 7). Otherwise no relationship could be found between the reduction of ventricular size and PVI or Rcsf. It is concluded that both rate and magnitude of reduction of ventricular size after shunting for NPH are extremely variable. High brain elasticity seems to be the best predictor of rapid and marked reduction. PMID:3379425

  11. Finite element analysis of land subsidence above depleted reservoirs with pore pressure gradient and total stress formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambolati, Giuseppe; Ferronato, Massimiliano; Teatini, Pietro; Deidda, Roberto; Lecca, Giuditta

    2001-04-01

    The solution of the poroelastic equations for predicting land subsidence above productive gas/oil fields may be addressed by the principle of virtual works using either the effective intergranular stress, with the pore pressure gradient regarded as a distributed body force, or the total stress incorporating the pore pressure. In the finite element (FE) method both approaches prove equivalent at the global assembled level. However, at the element level apparently the equivalence does not hold, and the strength source related to the pore pressure seems to generate different local forces on the element nodes. The two formulations are briefly reviewed and discussed for triangular and tetrahedral finite elements. They are shown to yield different results at the global level as well in a three-dimensional axisymmetric porous medium if the FE integration is performed using the average element-wise radius. A modification to both formulations is suggested which allows to correctly solve the problem of a finite reservoir with an infinite pressure gradient, i.e. with a pore pressure discontinuity on its boundary.

  12. Reduction of disinfection by-product precursors in reservoir water by coagulation and ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Baoyu; Ma, Defang; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Ruihua; Wang, Qianwen

    2016-11-01

    In this study, reservoir water intended for drinking water supply was treated by (i) ultrafiltration (UF) (ii) coagulation (CW) (iii) coagulation combined with ultrafiltration (CW-UF). To probe the influences of three treatment processes on disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors in source water, the changes of dissolved organic matter (DOM) amounts and physicochemical properties, and disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation characteristics during chlorine disinfection were investigated. Both carbonaceous DBP (C-DBP) and nitrogenous DBP (N-DBP) formation and speciation were analyzed. The influence of chlorine dose, contact time on DBP formation and speciation were also studied to optimize the disinfection conditions to minimize the DBP formation. Compared with UF and CW alone, CW-UF improved the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal from about 20 % to 59 %. The three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy analysis showed that CW-UF had high removal efficiency in microbial products (Region IV), fulvic acid-like (Region III) and humic acid-like (Region V). The total C-DBP was determined by the formation of trihalomethanes and trichloromethane was the most abundant species (40 %). The most abundant N-DBP species was dichloroacetonitrile (32.5 %), followed by trichloroactetonitrile. CW-UF effectively reduced the risk of DBPs in drinking water supply by reducing 30.8 % and 16.9 % DBPs formation potential compared with UF and CW alone. Increasing contact time improved the yields of both C-DBPs and N-DBPs. Chlorine dosage had slight influence on DBP yield in this study.

  13. Multifunctional Low Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and NOx Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Acosta, Waldo

    2013-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of the induced synthetic jet is key, and is still TBD. center dot Available LPT vane volume is sufficient for tens of resonators per span-wise hole spacing, so physically feasible. center dot Determination of acoustic attenuation requires accurate model of vane, resonator locations, flow field and incident waves. (TBD) center dot Determination of NOx reduction is also TBD.

  14. An experimental model of episodic gas release through fracture of fluid confined within a pressurized elastic reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Stefano; Woods, Andrew W.; Harrington, Jon; Norris, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We present new experiments that identify a mechanism for episodic release of gas from a pressurized, deformable reservoir confined by a clay seal, as a result of the transition from bulk deformation to channel growth through the clay. Air is injected into the center of a thin cylindrical cell initially filled with a mixture of bentonite clay and water. For sufficiently dry mixtures, the pressure initially increases with little volume change. On reaching the yield stress of the clay-water mixture, the lid of the cell then deforms elastically and an air-filled void forms in the center of the cell as the clay is driven radially outward. With continued supply of air, the pressure continues to increase until reaching the fracture strength of the clay. A fracture-like channel then forms and migrates to the outer edge of the cell, enabling the air to escape. The pressure then falls, and the clay flows back toward the center of the cell and seals the channel so the cycle can repeat. The phenomena may be relevant at mud volcanoes.

  15. Phospholipids fatty acids of drinking water reservoir sedimentary microbial community: Structure and function responses to hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bei-Bei; Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Li, Ya-Jiao

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities in three drinking water reservoirs, with different depth in Xi'an city, were quantified by phospholipids fatty acids analysis and multivariate statistical analysis was employed to interpret their response to different hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties of sediment and overlying water. Principle component analyses of sediment characteristics parameters showed that hydrostatic pressure was the most important effect factor to differentiate the overlying water quality from three drinking water reservoirs from each other. NH4+ content in overlying water was positive by related to hydrostatic pressure, while DO in water-sediment interface and sediment OC in sediment were negative by related with it. Three drinking water reservoir sediments were characterized by microbial communities dominated by common and facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, as well as, by sulfur oxidizing bacteria. Hydrostatic pressure and physico-chemical properties of sediments (such as sediment OC, sediment TN and sediment TP) were important effect factors to microbial community structure, especially hydrostatic pressure. It is also suggested that high hydrostatic pressure and low dissolved oxygen concentration stimulated Gram-positive and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bacterial population in drinking water reservoir sediment. This research supplied a successful application of phospholipids fatty acids and multivariate analysis to investigate microbial community composition response to different environmental factors. Thus, few physico-chemical factors can be used to estimate composition microbial of community as reflected by phospholipids fatty acids, which is difficult to detect.

  16. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten capillary pressure curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum; Soltanian, Mohamadreza; Ritzi, Robert, Jr.; Dominic, David

    2015-04-01

    Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs [1, 2]. Previously we showed how the dynamics of a CO2 plume, during and after injection, is influenced by the hierarchical and multi-scale stratal architecture in such reservoirs [3]. The results strongly suggest that representing these small scales (few cm in vertical direction and few meters in horizontal direction) features and representing how they are organized within a hierarchy of larger-scale features, is critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. The results also demonstrated the importance of using separate capillary pressure and relative permeability relationships for different textural facies types. Here we present the result of simulation of CO2 trapping in deep saline aquifers using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, to capillary pressure. We showed that capillary trapping as well as dissolution rates are very different for the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches if reservoir consists from various species with different capillary pressure and relative permeability curves. We also found a dramatic difference in simulation time; using the van Genuchten approach improves convergence and thus reduces calculation time by one-two orders of magnitude. [1] Bridge, J.S. (2006), Fluvial facies models: Recent developments, in Facies Models Revisited, SEPM Spec. Publ., 84, edited by H. W. Posamentier and R. G. Walker, pp. 85-170, Soc. for Sediment. Geol. (SEPM), Tulsa, Okla [2] Ramanathan, R., A. Guin, R.W. Ritzi, D.F. Dominic, V.L. Freedman, T.D. Scheibe, and I.A. Lunt (2010), Simulating the heterogeneity in channel belt deposits: Part 1. A geometric-based methodology and code, Water Resources

  17. Fast low-temperature plasma reduction of monolayer graphene oxide at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Bodik, Michal; Zahoranova, Anna; Micusik, Matej; Bugarova, Nikola; Spitalsky, Zdenko; Omastova, Maria; Majkova, Eva; Jergel, Matej; Siffalovic, Peter

    2017-04-07

    We report on an ultrafast plasma-based graphene oxide reduction method superior to conventional vacuum thermal annealing and/or chemical reduction. The method is based on the effect of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma generated by the diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in proximity of the graphene oxide layer. As the reduction time is in the order of seconds, the presented method is applicable to the large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide layers. The short reduction times are achieved by the high-volume power density of plasma, which is of the order of 100 W cm(-3). Monolayers of graphene oxide on silicon substrate were prepared by a modified Langmuir-Schaefer method and the efficient and rapid reduction by methane and/or hydrogen plasma was demonstrated. The best results were obtained for the graphene oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma, as verified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Fast low-temperature plasma reduction of monolayer graphene oxide at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodik, Michal; Zahoranova, Anna; Micusik, Matej; Bugarova, Nikola; Spitalsky, Zdenko; Omastova, Maria; Majkova, Eva; Jergel, Matej; Siffalovic, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ultrafast plasma-based graphene oxide reduction method superior to conventional vacuum thermal annealing and/or chemical reduction. The method is based on the effect of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma generated by the diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in proximity of the graphene oxide layer. As the reduction time is in the order of seconds, the presented method is applicable to the large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide layers. The short reduction times are achieved by the high-volume power density of plasma, which is of the order of 100 W cm‑3. Monolayers of graphene oxide on silicon substrate were prepared by a modified Langmuir–Schaefer method and the efficient and rapid reduction by methane and/or hydrogen plasma was demonstrated. The best results were obtained for the graphene oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma, as verified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Fluid Pressure Variation in a Sedimentary Geothermal Reservoir in the North German Basin: Case Study Groß Schönebeck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenges, Ernst; Trautwein, Ute; Legarth, Björn; Zimmermann, Günter

    2006-10-01

    The Rotliegend of the North German basin is the target reservoir of an interdisciplinary investigation program to develop a technology for the generation of geothermal electricity from low-enthalpy reservoirs. An in situ downhole laboratory was established in the 4.3 km deep well Groβ Schönebeck with the purpose of developing appropriate stimulation methods to increase permeability of deep aquifers by enhancing or creating secondary porosity and flow paths. The goal is to learn how to enhance the inflow performance of a well from a variety of rock types in low permeable geothermal reservoirs. A change in effective stress due to fluid pressure was observed to be one of the key parameters influencing flow properties both downhole and in laboratory experiments on reservoir rocks. Fluid pressure variation was induced using proppant-gel-frac techniques as well as waterfrac techniques in several different new experiments in the borehole. A pressure step test indicates generation and extension of multiple fractures with closure pressures between 6 and 8.4 MPa above formation pressure. In a 24-hour production test 859 m3 water was produced from depth indicating an increase of productivity in comparison with former tests. Different depth sections and transmissibility values were observed in the borehole depending on fluid pressure. In addition, laboratory experiments were performed on core samples from the sandstone reservoir under uniaxial strain conditions, i.e., no lateral strain, constant axial load. The experiments on the borehole and the laboratory scale were realized on the same rock types under comparable stress conditions with similar pore pressure variations. Nevertheless, stress dependences of permeability are not easy to compare from scale to scale. Laboratory investigations reflect permeability variations due to microstructural heterogeneities and the behavior in the borehole is dominated by the generation of connections to large-scale structural patterns.

  20. High H2S contents and other effects of thermochemical sulfate reduction in deeply buried carbonate reservoirs: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöth, S.

    The accumulation of high H2S concentrations in oil and gas fields is usually associated with deeply buried high-temperature carbonate reservoirs and is attributed to the abiological oxidation of hydrocarbons by sulfate - thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). This review aims at providing an overview of the literature and assessing existing uncertainties in the current understanding of TSR processes and their geological significance. Reaction pathways, various reaction products, the autocatalytic nature of TSR, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Furthermore, various criteria for recognizing TSR effects, such as petrographic/diagenetic alterations and stable isotope geochemistry of the inorganic as well as the organic reactants, are summarized and evaluated. There is overwhelming geological evidence of TSR taking place at a minimum temperature of 110-140°C, but the temperature discrepancy between experimental data and nature still exists. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of catalysts which influence TSR are not known. Local H2S variations may reflect steady-state conditions dominated by H2S buildups and flux out of the system. The latter is controlled by lithological and geological factors.

  1. [Reduction effects of agricultural management practices on non-point source pollution in a watershed in Three Gorges Reservoir Area].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Lin; Tian, Yao-Wu; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Liu, Zhi-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Taking a typical watershed in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) as test object, the AnnAGNPS model was used to evaluate the reduction effects of different cropping, different fertilization level, conservation tillage practice (CTP), conservation reserve program (CRP), and conversion of cropland into forestland program (CCFP) on the output of agricultural non-point source pollution (NPS) in the watershed. The simulation results showed that different cropping had no significant difference in the effect of reducing sediment yield, but had significant difference in the effect of reducing phosphorus output. Fertilization level had significant effects on the outputs of total nitrogen and total phosphorus. CTP decreased the sediment yield significantly but increased the nutrient output. CRP reduced sediment yield, but had less effect in reducing nutrient output. CCFP reduced both sediment yield and nutrient output significantly. After the implementation of CCFP, the sediment yield output on the croplands with a slope greater than 10 degrees was less than 5 t x hm(-2) and the nutrient output was within the permissible limit.

  2. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during methane dependent sulfate reduction in high pressure continuous incubation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, C.; Brunner, B.; Holler, T.; Widdel, F.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction in marine sediments is an important sink in the global methane budget. However, many aspects of methane dependent sulfate reduction are not fully understood. We developed a novel high pressure biotechnical system to simulate marine conditions with high concentrations of dissolved gases, e.g. at gas seeps and gas hydrate systems. The system allows for batch, fed-batch and continuous gas-phase free incubation. We employ this system to study the kinetics and isotope fractionation during AOM at varying methane partial pressures up to 10 MPa. We present the results of long-term continuous and fed-batch incubations with highly active naturally enriched biomass from microbial mats from the Black Sea. During these experiments the methane partial pressure was increased stepwise from 0.1 to 10 MPa. The methane dependent sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.1 mmol/l/d to 3.5 mmol/l/d resulting from the increase in methane concentration and microbial growth. Sulfate reduction was negligible in the absence of methane. The sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction was strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved methane. Sulfur isotope fractionation was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations. Relative to sulfate reduction rates, oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations.

  3. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  4. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pastouret, Alan; Gooijer, Frans; Overton, Bob; Jonker, Jan; Curley, Jim; Constantine, Walter; Waterman, Kendall Miller

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High

  5. Temperature-pressure conditions in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin: Implications for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pashin, J.C.; McIntyre, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of gas onto coal is sensitive to pressure and temperature, and carbon dioxide can be a potentially volatile supercritical fluid in coalbed methane reservoirs. More than 5000 wells have been drilled in the coalbed methane fields of the Black Warrior basin in west-central Alabama, and the hydrologic and geothermic information from geophysical well logs provides a robust database that can be used to assess the potential for carbon sequestration in coal-bearing strata.Reservoir temperature within the coalbed methane target zone generally ranges from 80 to 125 ??F (27-52 ??C), and geothermal gradient ranges from 6.0 to 19.9 ??F/1000 ft (10.9-36.2 ??C/km). Geothermal gradient data have a strong central tendency about a mean of 9.0 ??F/1000 ft (16.4 ??C/km). Hydrostatic pressure gradients in the coalbed methane fields range from normal (0.43 psi/ft) to extremely underpressured (<0.05 psi/ft). Pressure-depth plots establish a bimodal regime in which 70% of the wells have pressure gradients greater than 0.30 psi/ft, and 20% have pressure gradients lower than 0.10 psi/ft. Pockets of underpressure are developed around deep longwall coal mines and in areas distal to the main hydrologic recharge zone, which is developed in structurally upturned strata along the southeastern margin of the basin.Geothermal gradients within the coalbed methane fields are high enough that reservoirs never cross the gas-liquid condensation line for carbon dioxide. However, reservoirs have potential for supercritical fluid conditions beyond a depth of 2480 ft (756 m) under normally pressured conditions. All target coal beds are subcritically pressured in the northeastern half of the coalbed methane exploration fairway, whereas those same beds were in the supercritical phase window prior to gas production in the southwestern half of the fairway. Although mature reservoirs are dewatered and thus are in the carbon dioxide gas window, supercritical conditions may develop as reservoirs

  6. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  7. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  8. Understanding CO2 Plume Behavior and Basin-Scale Pressure Changes during Sequestration Projects through the use of Reservoir Fluid Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.; Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Mehnert, E.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Jordan, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Large scale geologic sequestration tests are in the planning stages around the world. The liability and safety issues of the migration of CO2 away from the primary injection site and/or reservoir are of significant concerns for these sequestration tests. Reservoir models for simulating single or multi-phase fluid flow are used to understand the migration of CO2 in the subsurface. These models can also help evaluate concerns related to brine migration and basin-scale pressure increases that occur due to the injection of additional fluid volumes into the subsurface. The current paper presents different modeling examples addressing these issues, ranging from simple geometric models to more complex reservoir fluid models with single-site and basin-scale applications. Simple geometric models assuming a homogeneous geologic reservoir and piston-like displacement have been used for understanding pressure changes and fluid migration around each CO2 storage site. These geometric models are useful only as broad approximations because they do not account for the variation in porosity, permeability, asymmetry of the reservoir, and dip of the beds. In addition, these simple models are not capable of predicting the interference between different injection sites within the same reservoir. A more realistic model of CO2 plume behavior can be produced using reservoir fluid models. Reservoir simulation of natural gas storage reservoirs in the Illinois Basin Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone suggest that reservoir heterogeneity will be an important factor for evaluating storage capacity. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is a thick sandstone that underlies many significant coal fired power plants (emitting at least 1 million tonnes per year) in the midwestern United States including the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio. The initial commercial sequestration sites are expected to inject 1 to 2 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Depending on the geologic structure and

  9. Iron reduction and mineralization of deep-sea iron reducing bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 at elevated hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Wu, W F; Wang, F P; Li, J H; Yang, X W; Xiao, X; Pan, Y X

    2013-11-01

    In this study, iron reduction and concomitant biomineralization of a deep-sea iron reducing bacterium (IRB), Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, were systematically examined at different hydrostatic pressures (0.1, 5, 20, and 50 MPa). Our results indicate that bacterial iron reduction and induced biomineralization are influenced by hydrostatic pressure. Specifically, the iron reduction rate and extent consistently decreases with the increase in hydrostatic pressure. By extrapolation, the iron reduction rate should drop to zero by ~68 MPa, which suggests a possible shut-off of enzymatic iron reduction of WP3 at this pressure. Nano-sized superparamagnetic magnetite minerals are formed under all the experimental pressures; nevertheless, even as magnetite production decreases, the crystallinity and grain size of magnetite minerals increase at higher pressure. These results imply that IRB may play an important role in iron reduction, biomineralization, and biogeochemical cycling in deep-sea environments.

  10. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency.

  11. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation.

  12. Reduction of titanium dioxide to metallic titanium conducted under the autogenic pressure of the reactants.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Michal; Irzh, Alexander; Gedanken, Aharon

    2009-08-03

    We report on a reaction to convert titanium dioxide to titanium. The reduction reaction was done under the autogenic pressure of the reactants at 750 degrees C for 5 h. The MgO, a by-product, was removed by acids to obtain pure metallic titanium.

  13. Natriuresis and blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus: the NESTOR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Agnoletti, Davide; Wang, Ji-Guang; Xu, Yawei; Safar, Michel E

    2015-01-01

    The antihypertensive effect of indapamide has never been clearly understood, particularly in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. A total of 565 patients were randomly selected to receive either indapamide 1.5 mg or enalapril 10 mg daily for 12 months. Brachial blood pressure (BP) and plasma and urinary electrolytes were measured at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Sodium and potassium levels and excretion rates were measured in overnight urine collections. After 12 months' treatment, similar significant reductions were observed in systolic and diastolic BP and pulse pressure levels in both treatment arms (P < .001). However, age, body mass index, diabetes duration, and plasma sodium reductions were shown to be major, independent factors influencing BP reduction with indapamide, but not with enalapril. Regression coefficients were positive for age and plasma sodium reductions (P ≤ .009) but negative for body mass index and diabetes duration (P ≤ .008). Similar findings were observed for pulse pressure. These results were more notable in elderly patients, did not differ regardless of whether BP reduction was measured in absolute or percent values, and were associated with increased sodium and potassium excretion rates.Indapamide is more effective than enalapril at reducing BP in elderly diabetic hypertensives with marked sodium retention.

  14. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten type capillary pressure curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Ritzi, Robert W., Jr.; Dominic, David F.; Mehnert, Edward; Okwen, Roland T.

    2016-10-01

    Geological heterogeneities affect the dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) plumes in subsurface environments in important ways. Previously, we showed how the dynamics of CO2 plumes are influenced by the multiscaled sedimentary architecture in deep brine fluvial-type reservoirs. The results confirm that representing small-scale features and the corresponding heterogeneity in saturation functions, along with hysteresis in saturation functions, are all critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. Here, we show that when heterogeneity and hysteresis are represented, the two conventional approaches for defining saturation functions, Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, represent fundamentally different physical systems. The Brooks-Corey approach represents heterogeneity in entry pressures, and leads to trapping by capillary pinning. The van Genuchten approach represents a network of pores transporting the nonwetting fluid, across rock types, with negligible capillary entry pressure, and leads to capillary retardation. These differences significantly affect the large-scale characteristics of CO2 plumes (i.e., their mass, shape, and position).

  15. Hyperbaric reservoir fluids: High-pressure phase behavior of asymmetric methane + n-alkane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flöten, E.; de Loos, Th. W.; de Swaan Arons, J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, experimental three-phase equilibrium (solid n-alkane + liquid + vapor) data for binary methane + n-alkane systems are presented. For the binary system methane + tetracosane, the three-phase curve was determined based on two phase equilibrium measurements in a composition range from x c24 = 0.0027 to x c24 = 1.0. The second critical endpoint of this system was found at p = (1114.7 ± 0.5) M Pa. T = (322.6 ± 0.25) K, and a mole fraction of tetracosane in the critical fluidphase of x c24 = 0.0415 ± 0.0015. The second critical endpoint occurs where solid tetracosane is in equilibrium with a critical fluid phase ( S c24 + L = V). For the binary systems of methane with the n-alkanes tetradecane, triacontane, tetracontane, and pentacontane, only the coordinates of the second critical endpoints were measured. The second critical endpoint temperature is found close to the atmospheric melting point temperature of the n-alkane. The pressures at the second critical endpoints do not exceed 200 MPa. Based on these experimental data and data from the literature, correlations for the pressure. temperature, and fluid phase composition at the second critical endpoint of binary methane + n-alkane systems with n-alkanes between octane and pentacontane were developed.

  16. Pressure-vessel-damage fluence reduction by low-leakage fuel management. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.; Aronson, A.L.; Carew, J.F.; Kohut, P.; Todosow, M.; Lois, L.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of neutron-induced radiation damage to the pressure vessel and of an increased concern that in a PWR transient the pressure vessel may be subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS), detailed analyses have been undertaken to determine the levels of neutron fluence accumulation at the pressure vessels of selected PWR's. In addition, various methods intended to limit vessel damage by reducing the vessel fluence have been investigated. This paper presents results of the fluence analysis and the evaluation of the low-leakage fuel management fluence reduction method. The calculations were performed with DOT-3.5 in an octant of the core/shield/vessel configuration using a 120 x 43 (r, theta) mesh structure.

  17. Effect of the Reservoir Volume on the Discharge Pressures in the Injection System of the N.A.C.A. Spray Photography Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Lee, D W

    1932-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effect of the reservoir volume on the discharge pressures in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. spray photography equipment. The data obtained are applicable to the design of a common rail fuel-injection system. The data show that an injection system of the type described can be designed so that not more than full load fuel quantity can be injected into the engine cylinders, and so that the fuel spray characteristics remain constant over a large range of engine speeds. Formulas are presented for computing the volume of the reservoir and the diameter of the discharge orifice.

  18. Pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen in triangular and circular pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Kurose, Kizuku; Okuyama, Jun; Saito, Yutaro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are characterized by superior properties as functional thermal fluids due to their density and heat of fusion. In addition to allowing efficient hydrogen transport and storage, slush hydrogen can serve as a refrigerant for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) equipment using MgB2, with the potential for synergistic effects. In this study, pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration experiments were performed on slush nitrogen flowing in a horizontal triangular pipe with sides of 20 mm under the conditions of three different cross-sectional orientations. Experimental conditions consisted of flow velocity (0.3-4.2 m/s), solid fraction (0-25 wt.%), and heat flux (0, 10, and 20 kW/m2). Pressure drop reduction became apparent at flow velocities exceeding about 1.3-1.8 m/s, representing a maximum amount of reduction of 16-19% in comparison with liquid nitrogen, regardless of heating. Heat transfer deterioration was seen at flow velocities of over 1.2-1.8 m/s, for a maximum amount of deterioration of 13-16%. The authors of the current study compared the results for pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration in triangular pipe with those obtained previously for circular and square pipes, clarifying differences in flow and heat transfer properties. Also, a correlation equation was obtained between the slush Reynolds number and the pipe friction factor, which is important in the estimation of pressure drop in unheated triangular pipe. Furthermore, a second correlation equation was derived between the modified slush Reynolds number and the pipe friction factor, enabling the integrated prediction of pressure drop in both unheated triangular and circular pipes.

  19. Differences in mechanisms between weight loss-sensitive and -resistant blood pressure reduction in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Masuo, K; Mikami, H; Ogihara, T; Tuck, M L

    2001-07-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the mechanisms involved in the sensitivity for blood pressure (BP) reduction in response to weight loss. In particular, we focused on the contributions of sympathetic nervous system activity and fasting plasma leptin and insulin levels to BP levels during weight loss in obese subjects with weight loss-sensitive and -resistant BP reduction. Sixty-one young, obese untreated hypertensive men (HT) and 52 obese normotensive men (NT) were enrolled in a weight loss program consisting of a low caloric diet and aerobic exercise over a 24-week period. At entry and at week 24, body mass index (BMI), BP, plasma norepinephrine (NE), leptin and insulin were measured. Successful weight loss and BP reduction were respectively defined as a more than a 10% reduction in BMI or mean BP from baseline at week 24. More than 60% of subjects in either group successfully achieved weight loss by this definition. The percentage of subjects who successfully achieved BP reduction was higher (64%) among those subjects who achieved weight loss than among those who did not (22%). Plasma NE level at entry in subjects who failed to achieve BP reduction despite weight loss was significantly higher than that in subjects who succeeded in BP reduction. Plasma leptin and insulin levels were similar between subjects with and without BP reduction. In addition, the absolute decrement and percent decrement in plasma NE in subjects who succeeded in BP reduction were significantly greater than those in subjects who failed to reduce their BP. Absolute and percent decrements in plasma leptin and insulin were similar in both groups. These results suggest that individuals who are resistant to weight loss-induced BP reduction have more sympathetic overactivity both at the outset of and during weight loss.

  20. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after nasal fracture reduction in an obese female patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunkyung; Yi, Junggu; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is a rare, but well-known life-threatening complication of acute upper airway obstruction (UAO) which develops after general anesthesia. The pronounced inspiratory efforts following UAO lead to excessive negative inspiratory pressure, which may cause acute pulmonary edema. Early recognition and prompt treatment of NPPE is necessary to prevent patient morbidity and mortality. In addition, the physician should carefully manage the patient who has risk factors of UAO to prevent this situation. We experienced a case of NPPE following laryngospasm after tracheal extubation in an obese patient who underwent open reduction of orbital wall and nasal bone surgery. PMID:26316826

  1. Acquisition and reduction of blade-mounted pressure transducer data from a Low Aspect Ratio Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russler, Patrick M.

    1995-02-01

    This report details the acquisition and reduction of blade-mounted, high-response, pressure transducer data. These data were acquired during the Augmented Damping of Low Aspect Ratio Fans (ADLARF) test conducted at the Compressor Research Facility (CRF) located at Wright-Patterson A.F.B. , Ohio. This report, which is exclusively concerned with the acquisition and digitizing of the blade-mounted data, is intended to compliment other related reports by documenting the data acquisition and reduction procedures. The primary goal of this work is to detail the methodology by which unsteady blade forces and momentum can he determined using blade-mounted pressure transducer data. The secondary goal is to use these data to show how inlet distortion and resulting unsteady forces affect the blade resonance of high-speed fans. By achieving the primary goal in this report, it is hoped that the secondary goal can be better achieved using data from future tests.

  2. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and chemical reduction on the emulsification properties of gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Bell, Alan E; Davis, Fred J; Chai, Yunxi

    2015-04-15

    Gum arabic is widely used in the food industry as an additive, both as a thickener and an emulsifier. This study has compared the emulsification properties of two types of gums, KLTA (Acacia senegal) and GCA (Acacia seyal), both in their native/untreated forms and after exposure to high pressure (800 MPa). Further studies were undertaken to chemically modify the disulphide linkages present and to investigate the effects of their reduction on the diffusion of the carbohydrate materials. The emulsification properties of the gum samples were examined by determining the droplet size distribution in a "model" oil-in-water system. Results showed that high pressure treatment and chemical reduction of gums changed the emulsification properties of both gums. The high molecular weight component in arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP/GP), and more "branched" carbohydrates present in gum arabic, may be responsible for the emulsification properties of GCA gum, indicating that the emulsification mechanisms for KLTA and GCA were different.

  3. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces.

  4. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  5. Thermal conductivity reduction of crystalline silicon by high-pressure torsion.

    PubMed

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Tabara, Mitsuru; Ikoma, Yoshifumi; Horita, Zenji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Cahill, David G; Kohno, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk crystalline silicon when subjected to intense plastic strain under a pressure of 24 GPa using high-pressure torsion (HPT). Thermal conductivity of the HPT-processed samples were measured using picosecond time domain thermoreflectance. Thermal conductivity measurements show that the HPT-processed samples have a lattice thermal conductivity reduction by a factor of approximately 20 (from intrinsic single crystalline value of 142 Wm(-1) K(-1) to approximately 7.6 Wm(-1) K(-1)). Thermal conductivity reduction in HPT-processed silicon is attributed to the formation of nanograin boundaries and metastable Si-III/XII phases which act as phonon scattering sites, and because of a large density of lattice defects introduced by HPT processing. Annealing the samples at 873 K increases the thermal conductivity due to the reduction in the density of secondary phases and lattice defects.

  6. Description of coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer by model reduction of the surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Gregory William

    The flow of coherent turbulent structures into a wind turbine is associated with vibrational blade excitation. Successful forecasting of such turbulent events for control system input would increase the lifetime of turbine components. The coherence of these features suggests description by model reduction. To this end, an array of pressure transducers was deployed on the ground at Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, Texas, and the pressure fluctuations were recorded over nearly two diurnal cycles. A program for computation of the dynamic mode decomposition was developed with special consideration for the case of a non-stationary, nonlinear system. A simulated surface-pressure perturbation was first decomposed, to inform the interpretation of experimental data. Several sets of surface-pressure data were decomposed for various meteorological conditions. The resulting dynamic modes and eigenvalues describe the spatial and temporal coherence of local features in the atmospheric boundary layer. In each case, modes were identified that can be associated with wave-like pressure fluctuations that propagate either at convective or acoustic speeds.

  7. Modified pressure distribution patterns in walking following reduction of plantar sensation.

    PubMed

    Eils, Eric; Nolte, Stefan; Tewes, Markus; Thorwesten, Lothar; Völker, Klaus; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of reduced plantar sensation on pressure distribution patterns during gait of 40 healthy subjects (25.3+/-3.3 yr, 70.8+/-10.6 kg and 176.5+/-7.8 cm) with no history of sensory disorders. Plantar sensation in the subjects was reduced by using an ice immersion approach, and reduced sensitivity was tested with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. All subjects performed six trials of barefoot walking over a pressure distribution platform under normal as well as iced conditions. Plantar cutaneous sensation was significantly reduced after the cooling procedure (p<0.0001). Pressure distribution analysis showed substantially modified plantar pressure distribution patterns during the roll-over process (ROP) under iced conditions. Analysis of peak pressures revealed significant reductions under the toes and under the heel (p<0.001). The contact time and the relative impulse for the whole foot did not change significantly between the two conditions. For the different areas, a significant load shift from the heel and toes towards the central and lateral forefoot and the lateral midfoot was observed. The results indicate the strong influence of reduced afferent information of the sole of the foot on the ROP in walking.

  8. Controlling Eutrophication in A Mediterranean Shallow Reservoir by Phosphorus Loading Reduction: The Need for an Integrated Management Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragüeta, Mikel; Acebes, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Increased nutrient enrichment in Mediterranean standing waters has enhanced the risk of being affected by cyanobacterial blooms. Because phosphorus abatement is shaped as a crucial strategy for controlling eutrophication, this study introduces a structural thinking, experiential learning laboratory with animation dynamic model elaborated for Cazalegas Reservoir (Spain) to assess the feasibility of implementing a set of internal and external control measures and hydromorphological adjustments to meet the goal of oligotrophication. This shallow reservoir is another case where recurrent eutrophication has led to reach annual mean total phosphorus concentrations (0.16 ± 0.08 mg total phosphorus/L) over the threshold of current water policies, triggering cyanobacterial growth up to undesirable levels in summer time (approximately 50,000 cells/mL). Modeling results showed that (i) after upgrading water treatment in the main tributary, (ii) applying a lanthanum-modified bentonite into the water column and sediment, and (iii) increasing reservoir water level, in-lake P concentrations and cyanobacterial abundance decreased in an 88% (below 0.01 mg total phosphorus/L) and 84% (below 6000 cells/mL), respectively in the most critical periods. However, the constraints of the proposed management strategies are associated with their costs of implementation and the time span for a stable trophic recovery of the reservoir. In that end, integrated management approaches are aimed to be adopted by water managers to reach adequate ecological status of freshwater bodies.

  9. Controlling Eutrophication in A Mediterranean Shallow Reservoir by Phosphorus Loading Reduction: The Need for an Integrated Management Approach.

    PubMed

    Zaragüeta, Mikel; Acebes, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Increased nutrient enrichment in Mediterranean standing waters has enhanced the risk of being affected by cyanobacterial blooms. Because phosphorus abatement is shaped as a crucial strategy for controlling eutrophication, this study introduces a structural thinking, experiential learning laboratory with animation dynamic model elaborated for Cazalegas Reservoir (Spain) to assess the feasibility of implementing a set of internal and external control measures and hydromorphological adjustments to meet the goal of oligotrophication. This shallow reservoir is another case where recurrent eutrophication has led to reach annual mean total phosphorus concentrations (0.16 ± 0.08 mg total phosphorus/L) over the threshold of current water policies, triggering cyanobacterial growth up to undesirable levels in summer time (approximately 50,000 cells/mL). Modeling results showed that (i) after upgrading water treatment in the main tributary, (ii) applying a lanthanum-modified bentonite into the water column and sediment, and (iii) increasing reservoir water level, in-lake P concentrations and cyanobacterial abundance decreased in an 88% (below 0.01 mg total phosphorus/L) and 84% (below 6000 cells/mL), respectively in the most critical periods. However, the constraints of the proposed management strategies are associated with their costs of implementation and the time span for a stable trophic recovery of the reservoir. In that end, integrated management approaches are aimed to be adopted by water managers to reach adequate ecological status of freshwater bodies.

  10. Pressure management as a leakage reduction and water demand management tool: The case of the City of Mutare, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marunga, Antony; Hoko, Zvikomborero; Kaseke, Evans

    Water is now considered a scarce but essential resource, which should be managed in an integrated manner. The traditional approaches of resource development are now considered as unsustainable. Water demand management (WDM), the new approach, aims at influencing demand, thus improving distribution efficiency. Leakage control and pressure management are some of the WDM strategies. The study was carried out in Mutare and investigated the potential for leakage control through pressure management. The city experiences high water losses due to an aged system of reticulation, faulty metering of 25% and high system pressures. Unaccounted for water (UFW) for the city during the study period averaged 57%. UFW for the two specific study areas in Chikanga averaged 47% and 32%. One of the areas was investigated for leakage reduction through pressure management. The normal operating pressure in the system was 75-80 m. Epanet was used for modelling pressure distribution. Results from logged minimum night flows (MNF) show that at 77 m UFW due to leakage was 25%. A pressure reduction from 77 m to 50 m resulted in 25% reduction in MNF. Further reduction of pressure below 50 m resulted in deterioration of service. No flow was received at the highest point when the pressure was set at 30 m. At this pressure, results from Epanet gave -0.84 m pressure at the highest point. The hydraulic model predicted 50 m as minimum pressure for an acceptable minimum pressure in the system. It was concluded that operating the system at 50 m in the area under pressure management reduced the MNF by 25% without affecting the service. There is great potential for leakage control through pressure management. It is recommended that leakage control through pressure management be investigated in other parts of the city using Epanet as a tool. Replacement of very old pipes should be considered together with other strategies.

  11. Improvement in diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients in patients with HOCM after ethanol septal reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovner, Aleksandr; Smith, Rebecca; Greenberg, Neil L.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Smedira, Nicholas; Lever, Harry M.; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to validate measurement of intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) and analyze their change in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) after ethanol septal reduction (ESR). Quantitative analysis of color M-mode Doppler (CMM) images may be used to estimate diastolic IVPG noninvasively. Noninvasive IVPG measurement was validated in 10 patients undergoing surgical myectomy. Echocardiograms were then analyzed in 19 patients at baseline and after ESR. Pulsed Doppler data through the mitral valve and pulmonary venous flow were obtained. CMM was used to obtain the flow propagation velocity (Vp) and to calculate IVPG off-line. Left atrial pressure was estimated with the use of previously validated Doppler equations. Data were compared before and after ESR. CMM-derived IVPG correlated well with invasive measurements obtained before and after surgical myectomy [r = 0.8, P < 0.01, Delta(CMM - invasive IVPG) = 0.09 +/- 0.45 mmHg]. ESR resulted in a decrease of resting LVOT systolic gradient from 62 +/- 10 to 29 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the Vp and IVPG (from 48 +/- 5to 74 +/- 7 cm/s and from 1.5 +/- 0.2 to 2.6 +/- 0.3 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). Estimated left atrial pressure decreased from 16.2 +/- 1.1 to 11.5 +/- 0.9 mmHg (P < 0.001). The increase in IVPG correlated with the reduction in the LVOT gradient (r = 0.6, P < 0.01). Reduction of LVOT obstruction after ESR is associated with an improvement in diastolic suction force. Noninvasive measurements of IVPG may be used as an indicator of diastolic function improvement in HOCM.

  12. Study of polytropic exponent based on high pressure switching expansion reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanyin; Luo, Yuxi; Xu, Zhipeng

    2011-10-01

    Switching expansion reduction (SER) uses a switch valve to substitute the throttle valve to reduce pressure for high pressure pneumatics. The experiments indicate that the simulation model well predicts the actual characteristics. The heat transfers and polytropic exponents of the air in expansion tank and supply tanks of SER have been studied on the basis of the experiments and the simulation model. Through the mathematical reasoning in this paper, the polytropic exponent can be calculated by the air mass, heat, and work exchanges of the pneumatic container. For the air in a constant volume tank, when the heat-absorption is large enough to raise air temperature in discharging process, the polytropic exponent is less than 1; when the air is experiencing a discharging and heat-releasing process, the polytropic exponent exceeds the specific heat ratio (the value of 1.4).

  13. Reduction of the bulk modulus at high pressure in CrN.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, Francisco; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Quintela, Camilo X; Piñeiro, Alberto; Pardo, Victor; Baldomir, Daniel; López-Quintela, Manuel Arturo; Rivas, José; Ramos, Carlos A; Salva, Horacio; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B

    2009-12-01

    Nitride coatings are increasingly demanded in the cutting- and machining-tool industry owing to their hardness, thermal stability and resistance to corrosion. These properties derive from strongly covalent bonds; understanding the bonding is a requirement for the design of superhard materials with improved capabilities. Here, we report a pressure-induced cubic-to-orthorhombic transition at approximately 1 GPa in CrN. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations show an unexpected reduction of the bulk modulus, K0, of about 25% in the high-pressure (lower volume) phase. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach shows that this effect is the result of a large exchange striction due to the approach of the localized Cr:t3 electrons to becoming molecular-orbital electrons in Cr-Cr bonds. The softening of CrN under pressure is a manifestation of a strong competition between different types of chemical bond that are found at a crossover from a localized to a molecular-orbital electronic transition.

  14. Microfluidic vapor-diffusion barrier for pressure reduction in fully closed PCR modules.

    PubMed

    Czilwik, G; Schwarz, I; Keller, M; Wadle, S; Zehnle, S; von Stetten, F; Mark, D; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-02-21

    Microfluidic systems for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) should be fully closed to avoid vapor loss and to exclude the risk of contaminating the laboratory environment. In closed systems however, the high temperatures of up to 95 °C associated with PCR cause high overpressures up to 100 kPa, dominated by the increase of vapor partial pressure upon evaporation. Such high overpressures pose challenges to the mechanical stability of microfluidic chips as well as to the liquid handling in integrated sample-to-answer systems. In this work, we drastically reduce the pressure increase in fully closed PCR systems by integrating a microchannel that serves as a vapor-diffusion barrier (VDB), separating the liquid-filled PCR chamber from an auxiliary air chamber. In such configurations, propagation of vapor from the PCR chamber into the auxiliary air chamber and as a consequence the increase of pressure is limited by the slow diffusion process of vapor through the VDB. At temperature increase from 23 °C to 95 °C, we demonstrate the reduction of overpressure from more than 80 kPa without the VDB to only 35 kPa with the VDB. We further demonstrate proper function of VDB and its easy integration with downstream processes for PCR based nucleic acid amplification within centrifugal microfluidics. Without integration of the VDB, malfunction due to pressure-induced delamination of the microfluidic chip occurred.

  15. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  16. Stress reduction programs in patients with elevated blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rainforth, Maxwell V; Schneider, Robert H; Nidich, Sanford I; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W; Anderson, James W

    2007-12-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous meta-analyses of stress reduction and high blood pressure (BP) were outdated and/or methodologically limited. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review of the published literature and identified 107 studies on stress reduction and BP. Seventeen trials with 23 treatment comparisons and 960 participants with elevated BP met criteria for well-designed randomized controlled trials and were replicated within intervention categories. Meta-analysis was used to calculate BP changes for biofeedback, -0.8/-2.0 mm Hg (P = NS); relaxation-assisted biofeedback, +4.3/+2.4 mm Hg (P = NS); progressive muscle relaxation, -1.9/-1.4 mm Hg (P = NS); stress management training, -2.3/-1.3 mm (P = NS); and the Transcendental Meditation program, -5.0/-2.8 mm Hg (P = 0.002/0.02). Available evidence indicates that among stress reduction approaches, the Transcendental Meditation program is associated with significant reductions in BP. Related data suggest improvements in other CVD risk factors and clinical outcomes.

  17. Fracturing high-permeability reservoirs increases productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dusterhoft, R.G. ); Chapman, B.J. )

    1994-06-20

    Hydraulic fracturing of high-permeability reservoirs has increased long-term hydrocarbon production and reduced sand production in many areas of the world. A key element is the reduction of near well bore drawdown during production. Drawdown, the difference between reservoir and production pressures, is the driving force for flow into the well bore. As drawdown increases because of higher production rates or depletion, formation instability may cause fines and sand to migrate into the well bore region. A greater well bore radius reduces both radial velocity and drawdown. Fracturing beyond the well bore region effectively bypasses the damaged zone, increasing the effective radius of the well bore and enabling higher flow rates with lower drawdown pressures. In essence, the reservoir energy is used more efficiently because the conductive proppant bed bypasses the near well bore restrictions. The paper discusses candidate well selection; proppant selection; sand control; minifrac procedures; spurt losses; fracture design; equipment; case histories in West Africa and offshore Louisiana.

  18. Evolution of pore-fluid pressure during folding and basin contraction in overpressured reservoirs assessed by combined fracture analysis and calcite twinning paleopiezometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Amrouch, Khalid; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2014-05-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of paleofluid (over)pressure in sedimentary basins during deformation is a challenging problem, especially when no hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions are available to provide barometric constraints on the fluid system. This contribution reports the application to a natural case (the Bighorn Basin) of recent methodological advance to access fluid (over)pressure level prevailing in strata during sub-seismic fracture development. The fluid pressure evolution in the Mississippian-Permian Madison-Phosphoria carbonate reservoir is tentatively reconstructed from the early Sevier Layer Parallel Shortening to the Laramide folding in two basement-cored folds: the Sheep Mountain Anticline and the Rattlesnake Mountain Anticline, located on both edges of the Bighorn Basin. This reconstruction is based on a combination of stress inversion of fault slip data, calcite twins paleopiezometry and rock mechanics. Results point out that supra-hydrostatic pressure values prevail in the carbonate reservoir during most of its whole Sevier-Laramide history, and a coeval evolution between fluid overpressure and differential stress build-up is also emphasized. In each fold, a maximum value of 30-35 MPa for overpressure (i.e. above hydrostatic value) is recorded, just before Laramide folding, while minimum values of 0 MPa or 7 MPa are recorded during Sevier foreland flexure/forebulge and Laramide folding, respectively. After normalization to the same depth for both folds of differential stress magnitudes obtained from calcite twins paleopiezometry, the reconstructed values for the two folds can be compared and this comparison provides an image of the evolution fluid pressure levels at the basin scale. Until folding, the evolution of the fluid overpressure during deformation can be interpreted as reflecting large-scale fluid migrations in a laterally connected reservoir. The drop of fluid overpressure recorded in both folds during folding illustrates the

  19. Perceived standing position after reduction of foot-pressure sensation by cooling the sole.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Asai, Hitoshi; Miyaguchi, Akiyoshi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kunita, Kenji; Inoue, Katsumi

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the influence of the reduction of foot-pressure sensation by cooling the sole of the foot, at 1 degree C for 30 or 40 minutes, on the perception of standing position varied in the anteroposterior direction. The subjects were 16 healthy undergraduates. Firstly, for 4 of the subjects, cooling the sole of the foot decreased sensory information from the mechanoreceptors in the sole, by testing for an increase in the threshold for two-point discrepancy discrimination on the sole of the foot and for the disappearance of postural change with vibration to the sole. Next, the perception of standing position was measured by reproduction of a given standing reference position involving forward or backward leaning under both normal and cooled conditions of the feet. Standing position was varied in relation to the location of the center of foot pressure, defined as distance from the heel in percentage of the length of the foot. The reference positions, representing various locations of the center of foot pressure, were set at 10% increments from 20% to 80% of the length of the foot. With eyes closed, the subject first experienced the reference position and then attempted to reproduce it. The mean location of the center of foot pressure in the quiet standing posture was 45.7%. At the 40%, 50%, and 60% reference positions, those closest to quiet standing, absolute errors of reproduction were significantly larger than at other reference positions in both the normal and the cooled conditions. They were significantly larger in the cooled than in the normal condition. The 50% and 60% reference positions were reproduced significantly further forward in the cooled than in the normal condition. These results may be explained as due to an absence of marked changes in sensory information from both muscular activity and foot pressure when moving to reference positions close to the quiet standing posture.

  20. The influence of a rapid drawdown and prolonged dewatering on angling pressure, catch and harvest in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBoer, Jason A.; Webber, Christa M.; Dixon, Taylor A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Reservoirs can be dynamic systems, often prone to unpredictable and extreme water-level fluctuations, and can be environments where survival is difficult for zooplankton and larval fish. Although numerous studies have examined the effects of extreme reservoir drawdown on water quality, few have examined extreme drawdown on both abiotic and biotic characteristics. A fissure in the dam at Red Willow Reservoir in southwest Nebraska necessitated an extreme drawdown; the water level was lowered more than 6 m during a two-month period, reducing reservoir volume by 76%. During the subsequent low-water period (i.e., post-drawdown), spring sampling (April–June) showed dissolved oxygen concentration was lower, while turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration were greater, relative to pre-drawdown conditions. Additionally, there was an overall increase in zooplankton density, although there were differences among taxa, and changes in mean size among taxa, relative to pre-drawdown conditions. Zooplankton assemblage composition had an average dissimilarity of 19.3% from pre-drawdown to post-drawdown. The ratio of zero to non-zero catches was greater post-drawdown for larval common carp and for all larval fishes combined, whereas we observed no difference for larval gizzard shad. Larval fish assemblage composition had an average dissimilarity of 39.7% from pre-drawdown to post-drawdown. Given the likelihood that other dams will need repair or replacement in the near future, it is imperative for effective reservoir management that we anticipate the likely abiotic and biotic responses of reservoir ecosystems as these management actions will continue to alter environmental conditions in reservoirs.

  1. Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) Pressurized Fuselage Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interim progress for an in-house study that is directed toward innovative structural analysis and design of next-generation advanced aircraft concepts, such as the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and the Advanced Mobility Concept-X flight vehicles, for structural weight reduction and associated performance enhancement. Unlike the conventional, skin-stringer-frame construction for a cylindrical fuselage, the box-type pressurized fuselage panels in the HWB undergo significant deformation of the outer aerodynamic surfaces, which must be minimized without significant structural weight penalty. Simple beam and orthotropic plate theory is first considered for sizing, analytical verification, and possible equivalent-plate analysis with appropriate simplification. By designing advanced composite stiffened-shell configurations, significant weight reduction may be possible compared with the sandwich and ribbed-shell structural concepts that have been studied previously. The study involves independent analysis of the advanced composite structural concepts that are presently being developed by The Boeing Company for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. High-fidelity parametric finite-element models of test coupons, panels, and multibay fuselage sections, were developed for conducting design studies and identifying critical areas of potential failure. Interim results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  2. Blood pressure reduction due to hemoglobin glycosylation in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Vázquez, Miguel A Salazar; Vázquez, Beatriz Y Salazar; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Intaglietta, Marcos; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that glycosylation of hemoglobin constitutes a risk factor for hypertension. Methods: A total of 129 relative uniform diabetic subjects (86 women and 42 men) were enrolled in a cross sectional study. Exclusion criteria included alcohol consumption, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, neoplasia, renal, hepatic, and chronic inflammatory disease. Systolic and diastolic pressures were recorded in subsequent days and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was determined. Hemoglobin glycosylation was measured by determining the percentage glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by means of the automated microparticle enzyme immunoassay test. Results: MAP was found to be independent of the concentration of HbA1c; however, correcting MAP for the variability in hematocrit, to evidence the level of vasoconstriction (or vasodilatation) showed that MAP is negatively correlated with the concentration of HbA1c (p for trend <0.05), when patients treated for hypertension are excluded from the analysis. Patients treated for hypertension showed the opposite trend with increasing MAP as HbA1c increased (p for the difference in trends <0.05). Conclusions: Glycosylation per se appears to lead to blood pressure reduction in type 2 diabetic patients untreated for hypertension. Treatment for hypertension may be associated with a level of endothelial dysfunction that interferes with the antihypertensive effect of HbA1c. PMID:19066010

  3. Veins in Paleo-reservoir as a Natural Indication of Coupled Changes in Pore Pressure and Stress, Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwon, S.; Edwards, P.; Kim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofracturing associated with elevated fluid pressure coupled with changes in stress has been crucial in enhancing the production and recovery of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, it is also an important issue to access the efficiency and stability of long-term CO2 geologic storage reservoirs. Veins are mineral-filled extension fractures developed along the plane of σ1-σ2 and perpendicular to σ3, and the fluid pressure must exceed σ3applied to the plane when the vein opens. Therefore, vein is a well-known natural analogue for fluid migration in a paleo-reservoir. In the Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, CO2-charged vein systems hosted in the bleached Entrada Formation are well developed and examined to understand the conditions of fluid pressure and stress during the injections of CO2-charged fluid. Based on color and relative cross-cutting relationship in the field, veins are subdivided into two sets; sub-vertical black mineral-rich veins and orthogonal calcite veins that have previously been described as 'grid-lock fractures'. The vein distribution and fluid leakage along through-going fractures in mechanic units allow us to determine the stress regime and driving stress condition through 3D-Mohr circle reconstruction. The results of this statistical analysis for the veins show that the orthogonal veins indicate a 'stress transition' with maximum principal stress direction changing from vertical to NNW-SSE sub-horizontal which coincides with the current regional stress regime. The possible causes of the stress transition can be considered. The process of repeated sealing, reactivation and localization of veins within the bleached zone is a natural indication of a coupled change in pore pressure and stress in the reservoir. Thus, an understanding of the effect of stress changes due to the volumetric injection of CO2 in the subsurface as well as a knowledge of how pre-existing fractures affect fluid flow with respect to elevated pore pressures in layered rocks are

  4. Compaction of North-sea chalk by pore-failure and pressure solution in a producing reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag; Jamtveit, Bjorn

    2016-02-01

    The Ekofisk field, Norwegian North sea,is an example of compacting chalk reservoir with considerable subsequent seafloor subsidence due to petroleum production. Previously, a number of models were created to predict the compaction using different phenomenological approaches. Here we present a different approach, we use a new creep model based on microscopic mechanisms with no fitting parameters to predict strain rate at core scale and at reservoir scale. The model is able to reproduce creep experiments and the magnitude of the observed subsidence making it the first microstructural model which can explain the Ekofisk compaction.

  5. Capillary pressure-saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in limestone/dolomite sands: implications for geologic carbon sequestration in carbonate reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2015-06-16

    In geologic carbon sequestration, capillary pressure (Pc)-saturation (Sw) relations are needed to predict reservoir processes. Capillarity and its hysteresis have been extensively studied in oil-water and gas-water systems, but few measurements have been reported for supercritical (sc) CO2-water. Here, Pc-Sw relations of scCO2 displacing brine (drainage), and brine rewetting (imbibition) were studied to understand CO2 transport and trapping behavior under reservoir conditions. Hysteretic drainage and imbibition Pc-Sw curves were measured in limestone sands at 45 °C under elevated pressures (8.5 and 12.0 MPa) for scCO2-brine, and in limestone and dolomite sands at 23 °C (0.1 MPa) for air-brine using a new computer programmed porous plate apparatus. scCO2-brine drainage and imbibition curves shifted to lower Pc relative to predictions based on interfacial tension, and therefore deviated from capillary scaling predictions for hydrophilic interactions. Fitting universal scaled drainage and imbibition curves show that wettability alteration resulted from scCO2 exposure over the course of months-long experiments. Residual trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined at Pc = 0 during imbibition. Amounts of trapped scCO2 were significantly larger than for those for air, and increased with pressure (depth), initial scCO2 saturation, and time. These results have important implications for scCO2 distribution, trapping, and leakage potential.

  6. Blood pressure reduction does not reduce perihematoma oxygenation: a CT perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Kate, Mahesh P; Hansen, Mikkel B; Mouridsen, Kim; Østergaard, Leif; Choi, Victor; Gould, Bronwen E; McCourt, Rebecca; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Emery, Derek J; Buck, Brian H; Butcher, Kenneth S

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) reduction after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is controversial, because of concerns that this may cause critical reductions in perihematoma perfusion and thereby precipitate tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that BP reduction reduces perihematoma tissue oxygenation.Acute ICH patients were randomized to a systolic BP target of <150 or <180 mm Hg. Patients underwent CT perfusion (CTP) imaging 2 hours after randomization. Maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), maximum oxygen extraction fraction (OEF(max)), and the resulting maximum cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2(max)) permitted by local hemodynamics, were calculated from raw CTP data.Sixty-five patients (median (interquartile range) age 70 (20)) were imaged at a median (interquartile range) time from onset to CTP of 9.8 (13.6) hours. Mean OEF(max) was elevated in the perihematoma region (0.44±0.12) relative to contralateral tissue (0.36±0.11; P<0.001). Perihematoma CMRO2(max) (3.40±1.67 mL/100 g per minute) was slightly lower relative to contralateral tissue (3.63±1.66 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.025). Despite a significant difference in systolic BP between the aggressive (140.5±18.7 mm Hg) and conservative (163.0±10.6 mm Hg; P<0.001) treatment groups, perihematoma CBF was unaffected (37.2±11.9 versus 35.8±9.6 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.307). Similarly, aggressive BP treatment did not affect perihematoma OEF(max) (0.43±0.12 versus 0.45±0.11; P=0.232) or CMRO2(max) (3.16±1.66 versus 3.68±1.85 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.857). Blood pressure reduction does not affect perihematoma oxygen delivery. These data support the safety of early aggressive BP treatment in ICH.

  7. Effects of dietary fish and weight reduction on ambulatory blood pressure in overweight hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Bao, D Q; Mori, T A; Burke, V; Puddey, I B; Beilin, L J

    1998-10-01

    Obesity is a major factor contributing to hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular consumption of dietary fish and omega3 fatty acids of marine origin can lower blood pressure (BP) levels and reduce cardiovascular risk. This study examined the potential effects of combining dietary fish rich in omega3 fatty acids with a weight loss regimen in overweight hypertensive subjects, with ambulatory BP levels as the primary end point. Using a factorial design, 69 overweight medication-treated hypertensives were randomized to a daily fish meal (3.65 g omega3 fatty acids), weight reduction, the 2 regimens combined, or a control regimen for 16 weeks. Sixty-three subjects with a mean+/-SEM body mass index of 31.6+/-0.5 kg/m2 completed the study. Weight fell by 5.6+/-0.8 kg with energy restriction. Dietary fish and weight loss had significant independent and additive effects on 24-hour ambulatory BP. Effects were greatest on awake systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.01); relative to control, awake pressures fell 6.0/3.0 mm Hg with dietary fish alone, 5.5/2.2 mm Hg with weight reduction alone, and 13.0/9.3 mm Hg with fish and weight loss combined. These results also remained significant after further adjustment for changes in urinary sodium, potassium, or the sodium/potassium ratio, as well as dietary macronutrients. Dietary fish also significantly reduced 24-hour (-3.1+/-1.4 bpm, P=0.036) and awake (-4.2+/-1.6 bpm, P=0. 013) ambulatory heart rates. Weight reduction had a significant effect on sleeping heart rate only (-3.2+/-1.7 bpm, P=0.037). Combining a daily fish meal with a weight-reducing regimen led to additive effects on ambulatory BP and decreased heart rate. The effects were large, suggesting that cardiovascular risk and antihypertensive drug requirements are likely to be reduced substantially by combining dietary fish meals rich in omega3 fatty acids with weight-loss regimens in overweight medication-treated hypertensives. The reduction in heart

  8. Blood pressure reduction after gastric bypass surgery is explained by a decrease in cardiac output.

    PubMed

    van Brussel, Peter M; van den Bogaard, Bas; de Weijer, Barbara A; Truijen, Jasper; Krediet, C T Paul; Janssen, Ignace M; van de Laar, Arnold; Kaasjager, Karin; Fliers, Eric; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Serlie, Mireille J; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) decreases in the first weeks after Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Yet the pathophysiology of the BP-lowering effects observed after gastric bypass surgery is incompletely understood. We evaluated BP, systemic hemodynamics, and baroreflex sensitivity in 15 obese women[mean age 42 ± 7 standard deviation (SD) yr, body mass index 45 ± 6 kg/m(2)] 2 wk before and 6 wk following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Six weeks after gastric bypass surgery, mean body weight decreased by 13 ± 5 kg (10%, P < 0.001). Office BP decreased from 137 ± 10/86 ± 6 to 128 ± 12/81 ± 9 mmHg (P < 0.001, P < 0.01), while daytime ambulatory BP decreased from 128 ± 14/80 ± 9 to 114 ± 10/73 ± 6 mmHg (P = 0.01, P = 0.05), whereas nighttime BP decreased from 111 ± 13/66 ± 7 to 102 ± 9/62 ± 7 mmHg (P = 0.04, P < 0.01). The decrease in BP was associated with a 1.6 ± 1.2 l/min (20%, P < 0.01) decrease in cardiac output (CO), while systemic vascular resistance increased (153 ± 189 dyn·s·cm(-5), 15%, P < 0.01). The maximal ascending slope in systolic blood pressure decreased (192 mmHg/s, 19%, P = 0.01), suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility. Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 9.0 [6.4-14.3] to 13.8 [8.5-19.0] ms/mmHg (median [interquartile range]; P < 0.01) and was inversely correlated with the reductions in heart rate (R = -0.64, P = 0.02) and CO (R = -0.61, P = 0.03). In contrast, changes in body weight were not correlated with changes in either BP or CO. The BP reduction following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery is correlated with a decrease in CO independent of changes in body weight. The contribution of heart rate to the reduction in CO together with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity suggests a shift toward increased parasympathetic cardiovascular control.

  9. The research on borehole stability in depleted reservoir and caprock: using the geophysics logging data.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Junliang; Deng, Jingen; Luo, Yong; Guo, Shisheng; Zhang, Haishan; Tan, Qiang; Zhao, Kai; Hu, Lianbo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term oil and gas exploitation in reservoir will lead to pore pressure depletion. The pore pressure depletion will result in changes of horizontal in-situ stresses both in reservoirs and caprock formations. Using the geophysics logging data, the magnitude and orientation changes of horizontal stresses in caprock and reservoir are studied. Furthermore, the borehole stability can be affected by in-situ stresses changes. To address this issue, the dehydration from caprock to reservoir and roof effect of caprock are performed. Based on that, the influence scope and magnitude of horizontal stresses reduction in caprock above the depleted reservoirs are estimated. The effects of development on borehole stability in both reservoir and caprock are studied step by step with the above geomechanical model.

  10. The Research on Borehole Stability in Depleted Reservoir and Caprock: Using the Geophysics Logging Data

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jingen; Luo, Yong; Guo, Shisheng; Zhang, Haishan; Tan, Qiang; Zhao, Kai; Hu, Lianbo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term oil and gas exploitation in reservoir will lead to pore pressure depletion. The pore pressure depletion will result in changes of horizontal in-situ stresses both in reservoirs and caprock formations. Using the geophysics logging data, the magnitude and orientation changes of horizontal stresses in caprock and reservoir are studied. Furthermore, the borehole stability can be affected by in-situ stresses changes. To address this issue, the dehydration from caprock to reservoir and roof effect of caprock are performed. Based on that, the influence scope and magnitude of horizontal stresses reduction in caprock above the depleted reservoirs are estimated. The effects of development on borehole stability in both reservoir and caprock are studied step by step with the above geomechanical model. PMID:24228021

  11. Generation of isotopically and compositionally distinct water during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in carbonate reservoirs: Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Worden, Richard H.; Cai, Chunfang

    2015-09-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), the reaction of petroleum with anhydrite in reservoirs resulting in the growth of calcite and the accumulation of H2S, has been documented in the Feixianguan Formation dolomite reservoir in the Sichuan Basin, China. Fluid inclusion salinity and homogenization temperature data have shown that TSR results in a decrease in salinity from a pre-TSR value of 25 wt.% down to 5 wt.% as a result of water created as a byproduct of progressive TSR. We have studied the isotopic character of the water that resulted from TSR in the Feixianguan Formation by analyzing the oxygen isotopes of TSR calcite and determining the oxygen isotopes of the water in equilibrium with the TSR calcite at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have compared these TSR-waters to water that would have been in equilibrium with the bulk rock, also at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have found that the TSR-waters are relatively depleted in oxygen isotopes (by up to 8‰ compared to what would be expected at equilibrium between the bulk rock and water) since this type of water was specifically derived from anhydrite. The generation of relatively large volumes of low salinity, low δ18O water associated with advanced TSR in the Feixianguan Formation has also been reported in the Permian Khuff Formation in Abu Dhabi and from sour Devonian fields in the Western Canada Basin. This suggests that TSR-derived water may be a common phenomenon, the effects of which on mesogenetic secondary porosity and reservoir quality have previously been underappreciated.

  12. Late blood pressure reduction in SHR subjected to transient captopril treatment in youth: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zicha, J; Dobesová, Z; Kunes, J

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are characterized by enhanced nifedipine-sensitive component of sympathetic vasoconstriction. Our study tried to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for long-term reduction of blood pressure (BP) in SHR subjected to early transient captopril treatment. Adult untreated SHR aged 30-34 weeks were compared with animals subjected to chronic captopril treatment for 6 weeks either in youth (between 4 and 10 weeks of age) or in adulthood (between 24 and 30 weeks of age). Antihypertensive effects of captopril were more pronounced in young than adult SHR. This was due to greater attenuation of sympathetic and nifedipine-sensitive BP components and prevention of residual BP rise in young captopril-treated SHR in which the reductions of nifedipine-sensitive BP component and residual BP persisted for 20 weeks after captopril withdrawal. The magnitude of nifedipine-sensitive component of sympathetic vasoconstriction is decisive for BP maintenance not only in untreated SHR but also in SHR during active captopril treatment by or after its withdrawal.

  13. Competitive, microbially-mediated reduction of nitrate with sulfide and aromatic oil components in a low-temperature, western Canadian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Lambo, Adewale J; Noke, Kim; Larter, Steve R; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-12-01

    Fields from which oil is produced by injection of sulfate-bearing water often exhibit an increase in sulfide concentration with time (souring). Nitrate added to the injection water lowers the sulfide concentration by the action of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria (SO-NRB). However, the injected nitrate can also be reduced with oil organics by heterotrophic NRB (hNRB). Aqueous volatile fatty acids (VFAs; a mixture of acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are considered important electron donors in this regard. Injection and produced waters from a western Canadian oil field with a low in situ reservoir temperature (30 degrees C) had only 0.1-0.2 mM VFAs. Amendment of these waters with nitrate gave therefore only partial reduction. More nitrate was reduced when 2% (v/v) oil was added, with light oil giving more reduction than heavy oil. GC-MS analysis of in vitro degraded oils and electron balance considerations indicated that toluene served as the primary electron donor for nitrate reduction. The differences in the extent of nitrate reduction were thus related to the toluene content of the light and heavy oil (30 and 5 mM, respectively). Reduction of nitrate with sulfide by SO-NRB always preceded that with oil organics by hNRB, even though microbially catalyzed kinetics with either electron donor were similar. Inhibition of hNRB by sulfide is responsible for this phenomenon. Injected nitrate will thus initially be reduced with sulfide through the action of SO-NRB. However, once sulfide has been eliminated from the near-injection wellbore region, oil organics will be targeted by the action of hNRB. Hence, despite the kinetic advantage of SO-NRB, the nitrate dose required to eliminate sulfide from a reservoir depends on the concentration of hNRB-degradable oil organics, with toluene being the most important in the field under study. Because the toluene concentration is lower in heavy oilthan in light oil, nitrate injection into a heavy-oil-producing field of

  14. Petroleum reservoir data for testing simulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.M.; Harrison, W.

    1980-09-01

    This report consists of reservoir pressure and production data for 25 petroleum reservoirs. Included are 5 data sets for single-phase (liquid) reservoirs, 1 data set for a single-phase (liquid) reservoir with pressure maintenance, 13 data sets for two-phase (liquid/gas) reservoirs and 6 for two-phase reservoirs with pressure maintenance. Also given are ancillary data for each reservoir that could be of value in the development and validation of simulation models. A bibliography is included that lists the publications from which the data were obtained.

  15. Pressure dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction at the platinum microelectrode/nafion interface - Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen reduction kinetics at the platinum/Nafion interface is of great importance in the advancement of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel-cell technology. This study focuses on the dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on oxygen pressure. Conventional Tafel analysis of the data shows that the reaction order with respect to oxygen is unity at both high and low current densities. Chronoamperometric measurements of the transport parameters for oxygen in Nafion show that oxygen dissolution follows Henry's isotherm. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen is invariant with pressure; however, the diffusion coefficient for oxygen is lower when air is used as the equilibrating gas as compared to when oxygen is used for equilibration. These results are of value in understanding the influence of O2 partial pressure on the performance of PEM fuel cells and also in elucidating the mechanism of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface.

  16. Sustained sympathetic and blood pressure reduction 1 year after renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Walton, Antony S; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Krum, Henry; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Lambert, Gavin W; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2014-07-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in resistant hypertension. Although a persistent BP-lowering effect has been demonstrated, the long-term effect on MSNA remains elusive. We investigated whether RDN influences MSNA over time. Office BP and MSNA were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after RDN in 35 patients with resistant hypertension. Office BP averaged 166±22/88±19 mm Hg, despite the use of an average of 4.8±2.1 antihypertensive drugs. Baseline MSNA was 51±11 bursts/min ≈2- to 3-fold higher than the level observed in healthy controls. Mean office systolic and diastolic BP significantly decreased by -12.6±18.3/-6.5±9.2, -16.1±25.6/-8.6±12.9, and -21.2±29.1/-11.1±12.9 mm Hg (P<0.001 for both systolic BP and diastolic BP) with RDN at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. MSNA was reduced by -8±12, -6±12, and -6±11 bursts/min (P<0.01) at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. The reduction in MSNA was maintained, despite a progressive fall in BP over time. No such changes were observed in 7 control subjects at 6-month follow-up. These findings confirm previous reports on the favorable effects of RDN on elevated BP and demonstrate sustained reduction of central sympathetic outflow ≤1-year follow-up in patients with resistant hypertension and high baseline MSNA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis of a substantial contribution of afferent renal nerve signaling to increased BP in resistant hypertension and argue against a relevant reinnervation at 1 year after procedure.

  17. Human norovirus surrogate reduction in milk and juice blends by high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Horm, Katie Marie; Harte, Federico Miguel; D'Souza, Doris Helen

    2012-11-01

    Novel processing technologies such as high pressure homogenization (HPH) for the inactivation of foodborne viruses in fluids that retain nutritional attributes are in high demand. The objectives of this research were (i) to determine the effects of HPH alone or with an emulsifier (lecithin) on human norovirus surrogates-murine norovirus (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV-F9)-in skim milk and orange juice, and (ii) to determine HPH effects on FCV-F9 and MNV-1 in orange and pomegranate juice blends. Experiments were conducted in duplicate at 0, 100, 200, 250, and 300 MPa for <2 s and plaque was assayed in duplicate. In milk, FCV-F9 was reduced by ≥4 and ∼1.3 log PFU/ml at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively, and ≥4- and ∼1-log PFU/ml reductions were obtained in orange juice at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively. In orange juice or milk combined with lecithin, FCV-F9 was reduced to nondetectable levels at 300 MPa, and by 1.77 and 0.78 log PFU/ml at 250 MPa. MNV-1 in milk was reduced by ∼1.3 log PFU/ml only at 300 MPa, and by ∼0.8 and ∼0.4 log PFU/ml in orange juice at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively. MNV-1 in milk or orange juice containing lecithin at 300 MPa showed 1.32- and 2.5-log PFU/ml reductions, respectively. In the pomegranate-orange juice blend, FCV-F9 was completely reduced, and MNV-1 was reduced by 1.04 and 1.78 log PFU/ml at 250 and 300 MPa, respectively. These results show that HPH has potential for commercial use to inactivate foodborne virus surrogates in juices.

  18. Relationship between corneal hysteresis and lamina cribrosa displacement after medical reduction of intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Marta; Palacios-Pozo, Elena; Davo-Cabrera, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between the displacement of the lamina cribrosa (LC) and prelaminar tissue with corneal hysteresis (CH) using spectral-domain coherence tomography (SD-OCT) after reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) with medical treatment. Methods Sixty-one eyes of 61 patients with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma who were going to start with treatment were imaged by means of 12 cross-sectional scans of the optic nerve using enhanced depth imaging SD-OCT before and after 1 week of treatment. We used the ‘follow-up’ mode to make sure that all the measurements were performed in the same location. We also measured the CH using an Ocular Response Analyzer, and we related it to the magnitude of displacement of LC and prelaminar tissue and the thickness of both structures. Results There was a significant variation of LC thickness from 132.66±37.40 to 160.09±41.13 µm (p<0001). LC distance was significantly reduced from 258.53±145 µm before treatment to 239.86±135 µm after it. No significant changes were found in the thickness and movement of prelaminar tissue before and after treatment. The only factors related with LC displacement were CH (R2=0.48) and age (R2=0.42). Conclusions A significant increase in LC thickness and a reduction in the posterior displacement of LC but not in the prelaminar tissue were demonstrated after IOP reduction with medical treatment. The factors most related with LC displacement were age and CH. PMID:27474156

  19. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D

  20. Influence of Titration of Neurohormonal Antagonists and Blood Pressure Reduction on Renal Function and Decongestion in Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, F. Perry; Brisco, Meredith A.; Bellumkonda, Lavanya; Jacoby, Daniel; Coca, Steven G.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP reduction) during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is strongly and independently associated with worsening renal function (WRF). Our objective was to determine if SBP reduction or titration of oral neurohormonal antagonists during ADHF treatment negatively influences diuresis and decongestion. Methods and Results SBP reduction was evaluated from admission to discharge in consecutive ADHF admissions (n=656). Diuresis and decongestion was examined across a range of parameters such as diuretic efficiency, fluid output, hemoconcentration, and diuretic dose. The average reduction in SBP was 14.4 ± 19.4 mmHg and 77.6% of the population had discharge SBP lower than admission. SBP reduction was strongly associated with WRF (OR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-2.9, p=0.004), a finding that persisted after adjusting for parameters of diuresis and decongestion (OR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.2, p=0.002). However, SBP reduction did not negatively impact diuresis or decongestion (p≥0.25 for all parameters). Uptitration of neurohormonal antagonists occurred in over 50% of admissions and was associated with a modest additional reduction in blood pressure (≤ 5.6 mmHg). Notably, WRF was not increased and diuretic efficiency was significantly improved with the uptitration of neurohormonal antagonists. Conclusions Despite a higher rate of WRF, blood pressure reduction was not associated with worsening of diuresis or decongestion. Furthermore, titration of oral neurohormonal antagonists was actually associated with improved diuresis in this cohort. These results provide reassurance that the guideline recommended titration of chronic oral medication during ADHF hospitalization may not be antagonistic to the short-term goal of decongestion. PMID:26699390

  1. Oleic acid content is responsible for the reduction in blood pressure induced by olive oil.

    PubMed

    Terés, S; Barceló-Coblijn, G; Benet, M; Alvarez, R; Bressani, R; Halver, J E; Escribá, P V

    2008-09-16

    Numerous studies have shown that high olive oil intake reduces blood pressure (BP). These positive effects of olive oil have frequently been ascribed to its minor components, such as alpha-tocopherol, polyphenols, and other phenolic compounds that are not present in other oils. However, in this study we demonstrate that the hypotensive effect of olive oil is caused by its high oleic acid (OA) content (approximately 70-80%). We propose that olive oil intake increases OA levels in membranes, which regulates membrane lipid structure (H(II) phase propensity) in such a way as to control G protein-mediated signaling, causing a reduction in BP. This effect is in part caused by its regulatory action on G protein-associated cascades that regulate adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. In turn, the OA analogues, elaidic and stearic acids, had no hypotensive activity, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that link membrane lipid structure and BP regulation are very specific. Similarly, soybean oil (with low OA content) did not reduce BP. This study demonstrates that olive oil induces its hypotensive effects through the action of OA.

  2. Use of negative-pressure dressings and split-thickness skin grafts following penile shaft reduction and reduction scrotoplasty in the management of penoscrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Tracey H; Follmar, Keith E; Silverstein, Ari D; Weizer, Alon Z; Donatucci, Craig F; Anderson, Everett E; Erdmann, Detlev

    2006-06-01

    From 1988 to 2005, 8 men who presented with penoscrotal elephantiasis underwent penile shaft degloving and reduction scrotoplasty, followed by transplantation of a split-thickness skin graft (STSG) to the penile shaft. The etiology of elephantiasis in these patients included self-injection of viscous fluid and postsurgical obstructive lymphedema. In the 6 most recent cases, negative-pressure dressings were applied over the STSG to promote graft take, and STSG take rate was 100%. The results of our series corroborate those of a previous report, which showed circumferential negative-pressure dressings to be safe and efficacious in bolstering STSGs to the penile shaft. Furthermore, these results suggest that the use of negative-pressure dressings may improve graft take in this patient population.

  3. Phytoplankton Composition and Abundance in Restored Maltański Reservoir under the Influence of Physico-Chemical Variables and Zooplankton Grazing Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Anna; Gołdyn, Ryszard; Dondajewska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the effects of environmental factors and zooplankton food pressure on phytoplankton in the restored man-made Maltański Reservoir (MR). Two methods of restoration: biomanipulation and phosphorus inactivation have been applied in the reservoir. Nine taxonomical groups of phytoplankton represented in total by 183 taxa were stated there. The richest groups in respect of taxa number were green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. The diatoms, cryptophytes, chrysophytes, cyanobacteria, green algae and euglenophytes dominated in terms of abundance and/or biomass. There were significant changes among environmental parameters resulting from restoration measures which influenced the phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. These measures led to a decrease of phosphorus concentration due to its chemical inactivation and enhanced zooplankton grazing as a result of planktivorous fish stocking. The aim of the study is to analyse the reaction of phytoplankton to the restoration measures and, most importantly, to determine the extent to which the qualitative and quantitative composition of phytoplankton depends on variables changing under the influence of restoration in comparison with other environmental variables. We stated that application of restoration methods did cause significant changes in phytoplankton community structure. The abundance of most phytoplankton taxa was negatively correlated with large zooplankton filter feeders, and positively with zooplankton predators and concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and partly of phosphates. However, restoration was insufficient in the case of decreasing phytoplankton abundance. The effects of restoration treatments were of less importance for the abundance of phytoplankton than parameters that were independent of the restoration. This was due to the continuous inflow of large loads of nutrients from the area of the river catchment.

  4. Phytoplankton Composition and Abundance in Restored Maltański Reservoir under the Influence of Physico-Chemical Variables and Zooplankton Grazing Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Anna; Gołdyn, Ryszard; Dondajewska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the effects of environmental factors and zooplankton food pressure on phytoplankton in the restored man-made Maltański Reservoir (MR). Two methods of restoration: biomanipulation and phosphorus inactivation have been applied in the reservoir. Nine taxonomical groups of phytoplankton represented in total by 183 taxa were stated there. The richest groups in respect of taxa number were green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. The diatoms, cryptophytes, chrysophytes, cyanobacteria, green algae and euglenophytes dominated in terms of abundance and/or biomass. There were significant changes among environmental parameters resulting from restoration measures which influenced the phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. These measures led to a decrease of phosphorus concentration due to its chemical inactivation and enhanced zooplankton grazing as a result of planktivorous fish stocking. The aim of the study is to analyse the reaction of phytoplankton to the restoration measures and, most importantly, to determine the extent to which the qualitative and quantitative composition of phytoplankton depends on variables changing under the influence of restoration in comparison with other environmental variables. We stated that application of restoration methods did cause significant changes in phytoplankton community structure. The abundance of most phytoplankton taxa was negatively correlated with large zooplankton filter feeders, and positively with zooplankton predators and concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and partly of phosphates. However, restoration was insufficient in the case of decreasing phytoplankton abundance. The effects of restoration treatments were of less importance for the abundance of phytoplankton than parameters that were independent of the restoration. This was due to the continuous inflow of large loads of nutrients from the area of the river catchment. PMID:25906352

  5. Void reduction in autoclave processing of thermoset composites. I - High pressure effects on void reduction. II - Void reduction in a microwave curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boey, F. Y. C.; Lye, S. W.

    1992-07-01

    Two novel methods for reducing void levels in thermoset composites are reported. The first procedure, which eliminates vacuum application, uses high pressure of up to 7000 kPa, by means of an isostatic press, effectively reducing the void levels to below 3 percent. The second process uses microwave curing by means of a modified approach involving vacuum bagging and applied autoclave pressure. This process achieves a void level of 4 percent.

  6. Seal assessment and estimated storage capacities of a targeted CO2 reservoir based on new displacement pressures in SW Wyoming, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaeth, Lynsey; Campbell-Stone, Erin; Lynds, Ranie; Frost, Carol; McLaughlin, J. Fred

    2013-04-01

    single wetting phase at elevated pressures and temperatures, resulting in an interfacial tension of 0 milliNewton/meter. Under these conditions the pore throat radius of sealing units is assumed to be the principle inhibitor to flow through the seal. Experimental data indicate pore throat radii range from 39.2 to 113.5 nanometers in the confining system, and preliminary column height calculations indicate that, depending on the size of the plume, reservoir thickness will most likely be the limiting factor to the amount of CO2 that can be sequestered rather than the column height.

  7. Design of novel melatonin analogs for the reduction of intraocular pressure in normotensive rabbits.

    PubMed

    Alarma-Estrany, Pilar; Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Huete, Fernando; Peral, Assumpta; Plourde, Robert; Pelaez, Teresa; Yerxa, Benjamin; Pintor, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Melatonin, the MT(2) melatonin receptor agonist IIK7 [N-butanoyl-2-(2-methoxy-6H-isoindolo[2,1-a]indol-11-yl)ethanamine], and the putative MT(3) melatonin receptor agonist 5-MCA-NAT [5-methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine] have previously been shown to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in ocular normotensive rabbits. To gain a better understanding of the structure-activity relationship of compounds that activate MT(2) and MT(3) receptors mediating reductions in IOP, novel melatonin analogs with rationally varied substitutions were synthesized and tested for their effects on IOP in ocular normotensive rabbits (n = 160). All synthesized melatonin analogs reduced IOP. The best-effect lowering IOP was obtained with the analogs INS48848 [methyl-1-methylene-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-6-ylcarbamate], INS48862 [methyl-2-bromo-3-(2-ethanamidoethyl)-1H-indol-5-ylcarbamate], and INS48852 [(E)-N-(2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl)-3-phenylprop-2-enamide]. These compounds produced dose-dependent decreases in IOP that were maximal at 0.1 mM (total dose of 0.259 μg for INS48848, 0.354 μg for INS48862, and 0.320 μg for INS48852) and 1 mM (total dose of 2.59 μg for INS48848, 3.54 μg for INS48862, and 3.20 μg for INS48852), with maximal reductions of 36.0 ± 4.0, 24.0 ± 1.5, and 30.0 ± 1.5% for INS48848, INS48862, and INS48852, respectively. Studies using melatonin receptor antagonists (luzindole, prazosin, and DH97 [N-pentanoyl-2-benzyltryptamine]) indicated that INS48862 and INS48852 activate preferentially a MT(2) melatonin receptor and suggest that INS48848 may act mainly via a MT(3) receptor. The most effective compounds were also well tolerated in a battery of standard ocular surface irritation studies. The implication of these findings to the design of novel drugs to treat ocular hypertension is discussed.

  8. Evolution of the Cerro Prieto reservoirs under exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.; Puente, H.G.

    1997-07-01

    The Cerro Prieto Geothermal field of Baja California (Mexico) has been under commercial production to generate electricity since 1973. Over the years, the large amount of Geothermal fluids extracted (at present about 12,000 tons per hour) to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in a reduction of pressures, changes in reservoir processes, and increased flow of cooler groundwater into the geothermal system. The groundwater recharging the reservoir moves horizontally through permeable layers, as well as vertically through permeable fault zones. In addition, the supply of deep hot waters has continued unabated, and perhaps has increased as reservoir pressure decreased. Since 1989, this natural fluid recharge has been supplemented by injection which presently amounts to about 20% of the fluid produced. Changes in the chemical and physical characteristics of the reservoir fluids due to the drop in pressures and the inflow of cooler groundwaters and injectate have been detected on the basis of wellhead data. These changes point to reservoir processes like local boiling, phase segregation, steam condensation, mixing and dilution. Finally, the study identified areas where fluids are entering the reservoir, as well as indicated their source (i.e. natural Groundwater recharge versus injectate) and established the controlling geologic structures.

  9. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  10. 28-day intraocular pressure reduction with a single dose of brimonidine tartrate-loaded microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fedorchak, Morgan V; Conner, Ian P; Medina, Carlos A; Wingard, Jeremy B; Schuman, Joel S; Little, Steven R

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of glaucoma by intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction is typically accomplished through the administration of eye drops, the difficult and frequent nature of which contributes to extremely low adherence rates. Poor adherence to topical treatment regimens in glaucoma patients can lead to irreversible vision loss and increased treatment costs. Currently there are no approved treatments for glaucoma that address the inherent inefficiencies in drug delivery and patient adherence. Brimonidine tartrate (BT), a common glaucoma medication, requires dosing every 8-12 h, with up to 97% of patients not taking it as prescribed. This study provides proof-of-principle testing of a controlled release BT formulation. BT was encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres and drug release was quantified using UV-Vis spectroscopy. For in vivo studies, rabbits were randomized to receive a single subconjunctival injection of blank (no drug) or BT-loaded microspheres or twice daily topical 0.2% BT drops. The microspheres released an average of 2.1 ± 0.37 μg BT/mg microspheres/day in vitro. In vivo, the percent decrease in IOP from baseline was significantly greater in the treated eye for both topical drug and drug-loaded microspheres versus blank microspheres throughout the 4-week study, with no evidence of migration or foreign body response. IOP measurements in the contralateral, untreated eyes also suggested a highly localized effect from the experimental treatment. A treatment designed using the release systems described in this study would represent a vast improvement over the current clinical standard of 56-84 topical doses over 28 days.

  11. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-08-12

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations. The injection pressure and ground surface displacement are often monitored for injection well safety, and are believed can partially reflect the risk of fault reactivation and seismicity. Based on the reduced order model and response surface, the input parameters can be screened for control the risk of induced seismicity. The uncertainty of the subsurface structure properties cause the numerical simulation based on a single or a few samples does not accurately estimate the geomechanical response in the actual injection site. Probability of risk can be used to evaluate and predict the risk of injection when there are great uncertainty in the subsurface properties and operation

  12. A rotating two-phase gas/liquid flow for pressure reduction in underwater plasma arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, H.; Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma arc welding processes are used in off-shore industry for the construction and maintenance in the wet surrounding of underwater structures and pipelines. In greater water depth the density of the plasma gas increase because of the greater hydrostatic pressure. This causes an increase of the conductive heat losses to the wet surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. The plasma arc has to burn in a locally dry area. This requirement can be fulfilled by a rotating disc placed above the workpiece. In the gap between the lower end of the cylinder and the workpiece a rotating two-phase flow is maintained. The flow around the rotating disc is experimentally investigated. The rotating disc is placed above the surface of the workpiece which is simulated by a flat plate. Water is forced out of the cylinder due to centrifugal forces set up by the rotating disc and flat plate. The velocity distribution in the flow is measured by Laser-Doppler-Anemometry. The phase distribution in the two-phase flow in the gap is measured by local electrical probes. The static pressure in the gaseous atmosphere is reduced in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding water. The pressure reduction is given by the void fraction, the phase distribution and the volume flow rates of both phases in the gap as well as by the speed of revolution and the design of the disc and the work surface. Apart from the investigations on the fluid dynamics, the method to reduce the pressure was technically proved. Experiments were carried out under water with a plasma MIG welder.

  13. Sedimentary reservoir oxidation during geologic CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Laura N.; Brown, Gordon E.; Bird, Dennis K.; Thomas, Randal B.; Johnson, Natalie C.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Maher, Katharine

    2015-04-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into subsurface geologic reservoirs during geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) introduces an oxidizing supercritical CO2 phase into a subsurface geologic environment that is typically reducing. The resulting redox disequilibrium provides the chemical potential for the reduction of CO2 to lower free energy organic species. However, redox reactions involving carbon typically require the presence of a catalyst. Iron oxide minerals, including magnetite, are known to catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions of C-bearing species. If the redox conditions in the reservoir are modified by redox transformations involving CO2, such changes could also affect mineral stability, leading to dissolution and precipitation reactions and alteration of the long-term fate of CO2 in GCS reservoirs. We present experimental evidence that reservoirs with reducing redox conditions are favorable environments for the relatively rapid abiotic reduction of CO2 to organic molecules. In these experiments, an aqueous suspension of magnetite nanoparticles was reacted with supercritical CO2 under pressure and temperature conditions relevant to GCS in sedimentary reservoirs (95-210 °C and ∼100 bars of CO2). Hydrogen production was observed in several experiments, likely caused by Fe(II) oxidation either at the surface of magnetite or in the aqueous phase. Heating of the Fe(II)-rich system resulted in elevated PH2 and conditions favorable for the reduction of CO2 to acetic acid. Implications of these results for the long-term fate of CO2 in field-scale systems were explored using reaction path modeling of CO2 injection into reservoirs containing Fe(II)-bearing primary silicate minerals, with kinetic parameters for CO2 reduction obtained experimentally. The results of these calculations suggest that the reaction of CO2 with reservoir constituents will occur in two primary stages (1) equilibration of CO2 with organic acids resulting in mineral-fluid disequilibrium, and

  14. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0–125 MPa) and temperatures (4–37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface. PMID:25653646

  15. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0-125 MPa) and temperatures (4-37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface.

  16. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Glaucomatous Versus Nonglaucomatous Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Coh, Paul; Moghimi, Sasan; Chen, Rebecca I.; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Masís Solano, Marissé; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and in nonglaucomatous patients. Methods The main outcomes of this prospective study were percent and absolute IOP change, which were calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in POAG and nonglaucomatous eyes. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + one-half lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, axial length (AL), ACD, LT, relative lens position (RLP), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of IOP change. Results Four months postoperatively, the average IOP reduction was 2.80 ± 3.83 mm Hg (15.79%) from the preoperative mean of 14.73 ± 2.89 mm Hg for nonglaucomatous eyes. The average IOP reduction was 2.66 ± 2.07 mm Hg (16.98%) from the preoperative mean of 14.86 ± 2.97 mm Hg for POAG eyes. Preoperative IOP, sex, AL, ACD, PD ratio, and LP predicted IOP change in nonglaucomatous eyes. Preoperative IOP and PD ratio predicted IOP change in POAG eyes. Conclusions Intraocular pressure reduction after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes is significantly greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Though it did not reach statistical significance in patients with glaucoma, the association of LP with IOP reduction is in the same direction as in nonglaucomatous patients where smaller LP appears to predict greater IOP reduction. Lens position is a simple, easily calculable, accurate, and widely available parameter, which clinicians can potentially utilize in managing glaucoma. PMID:27163773

  17. Reduction of fluctuating pressure loads in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barter, John W.; Dolling, David S.

    1995-01-01

    Fluctuating surface pressure measurements have been made to investigate the effectiveness of boundary layer separators (BLS's) in reducing the fluctuating pressure loads produced by separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Measurements have been made under unswept and swept compression corner interactions in a Mach 5 flow. BLS's fix the separation location and eliminate the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuating pressure loads upstream of the compression corners. The loads on the unswept compression corner face are reduced by as much as 59%. The BLS's also shift the mean pressure distribution on the unswept corner face in the streamwise direction. Results show that the loads on the corner face vary with the BLS height and the distance between the BLS and the compression corner. Suggestions for the optimum placement and the use of the BLS's are also made.

  18. Automatic versus manual pressure support reduction in the weaning of post-operative patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Corinne; Eid, Raquel C; Saghabi, Cilene; Souza, Rogério; Silva, Eliezer; Knobel, Elias; Paes, Ângela T; Barbas, Carmen S

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Reduction of automatic pressure support based on a target respiratory frequency or mandatory rate ventilation (MRV) is available in the Taema-Horus ventilator for the weaning process in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. We hypothesised that MRV is as effective as manual weaning in post-operative ICU patients. Methods There were 106 patients selected in the post-operative period in a prospective, randomised, controlled protocol. When the patients arrived at the ICU after surgery, they were randomly assigned to either: traditional weaning, consisting of the manual reduction of pressure support every 30 minutes, keeping the respiratory rate/tidal volume (RR/TV) below 80 L until 5 to 7 cmH2O of pressure support ventilation (PSV); or automatic weaning, referring to MRV set with a respiratory frequency target of 15 breaths per minute (the ventilator automatically decreased the PSV level by 1 cmH2O every four respiratory cycles, if the patient's RR was less than 15 per minute). The primary endpoint of the study was the duration of the weaning process. Secondary endpoints were levels of pressure support, RR, TV (mL), RR/TV, positive end expiratory pressure levels, FiO2 and SpO2 required during the weaning process, the need for reintubation and the need for non-invasive ventilation in the 48 hours after extubation. Results In the intention to treat analysis there were no statistically significant differences between the 53 patients selected for each group regarding gender (p = 0.541), age (p = 0.585) and type of surgery (p = 0.172). Nineteen patients presented complications during the trial (4 in the PSV manual group and 15 in the MRV automatic group, p < 0.05). Nine patients in the automatic group did not adapt to the MRV mode. The mean ± sd (standard deviation) duration of the weaning process was 221 ± 192 for the manual group, and 271 ± 369 minutes for the automatic group (p = 0.375). PSV levels were significantly higher in MRV compared with that of

  19. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  20. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  1. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  2. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  3. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  4. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  5. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Christopher G; Cheng, Yiwei; Engelbrekston, Anna; Druhan, Jennifer L; Li, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Coates, John D; Conrad, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring) is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM) is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of -30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters (FW) containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and injection water (IW) containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures.

  6. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Christopher G.; Cheng, Yiwei; Engelbrekston, Anna; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Li, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Coates, John D.; Conrad, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring) is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM) is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of −30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters (FW) containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and injection water (IW) containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures. PMID:25285094

  7. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389.

  8. Cesium reservoir and interconnective components. Final test report: TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW range. A thermionic converter must be supplied with cesium vapor for two reasons. Cesium atoms adsorbed on the surface of the emitter cause a reduction of the emitter work function to permit high current densities without excessive heating of the emitter. The second purpose of the cesium vapor is to provide space-charge neutralization in the emitter-collector gap so that the high current densities may flow across the gap unattenuated. The function of the cesium reservoir is to provide a source of cesium atoms, and to provide a reserve in the event that cesium is lost from the plasma by any mechanism. This can be done with a liquid cesium metal reservoir in which case it is heated to the desired temperature with auxiliary heaters. In a TFE, however, it is desirable to have the reservoir passively heated by the nuclear fuel. In this case, the reservoir must operate at a temperature intermediate between the emitter and the collector, ruling out the use of liquid reservoirs. Integral reservoirs contained within the TFE will produce cesium vapor pressures in the desired range at typical electrode temperatures. The reservoir material that appears to be the best able to meet requirements is graphite. Cesium intercalates easily into graphite, and the cesium pressure is insensitive to loading for a given intercalation stage. The goals of the cesium reservoir test program were to verify the performance of Cs-graphite reservoirs in the temperature-pressure range of interest to TFE operation, and to test the operation of these reservoirs after exposure to a fast neutron fluence corresponding to seven year mission lifetime. In addition, other materials were evaluated for possible use in the integral reservoir.

  9. Fluid transients in pipes. Reduction and control of pressure surges in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-11-01

    ESDU 84013 provides a simplified graphical method for predicting maximum pressure changes in liquid filled pipework systems that may be treated as one-line systems. The method applies to pressures induced by partial or total valve closure, covering all common valve types, or pump trips. Data are also given for the estimation of the size of air vessel, situated just downstream of a pump, to protect against excessive upsurge and downsurge pressure changes following pump trip. A computer program is included to analyze transients in one-line systems and does not use the simplifying assumptions necessary for the graphical data. Practical worked examples, illustrating the use of the methods, are included and guidance is given on the data required for a full fluid transients analysis going beyond the scope of ESDU 84013.

  10. Non-invasive assessment of negative pressure wound therapy using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound: oedema reduction and new tissue accumulation.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen R; Hampton, Sylvie; Martin, Robin

    2013-08-01

    Tissue oedema plays an important role in the pathology of chronic and traumatic wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is thought to contribute to active oedema reduction, yet few studies have showed this effect. In this study, high frequency diagnostic ultrasound at 20 MHz with an axial resolution of 60 µm was used to assess the effect of NPWT at - 80 mmHg on pressure ulcers and the surrounding tissue. Wounds were monitored in four patients over a 3-month period during which changes in oedema and wound bed thickness (granulation tissue) were measured non-invasively. The results showed a rapid reduction of periwound tissue oedema in all patients with levels falling by a mean of 43% after 4 days of therapy. A 20% increase in the thickness of the wound bed was observed after 7 days due to new granulation tissue formation. Ultrasound scans through the in situ gauze NPWT filler also revealed the existence of macrodeformation in the tissue produced by the negative pressure. These preliminary studies suggest that non-invasive assessment using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound could be a valuable tool in clinical studies of NPWT.

  11. Increase of stagnation pressure and enthalpy in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1992-01-01

    High stagnation pressures and enthalpies are required for the testing of aerospace vehicles such as aerospace planes, aeroassist vehicles, and reentry vehicles. Among the most useful ground test facilities for performing such tests are shock tunnels. With a given driver gas condition, the enthalpy and pressure in the driven tube nozzle reservoir condition can be varied by changing the driven tube geometry and initial gas fill pressure. Reducing the driven tube diameter yields only very modest increases in reservoir pressure and enthalpy. Reducing the driven tube initial gas fill pressure can increase the reservoir enthalpy significantly, but at the cost of reduced reservoir pressure and useful test time. A new technique, the insertion of a converging section in the driven tube is found to produce substantial increases in both reservoir pressure and enthalpy. Using a one-dimensional inviscid full kinetics code, a number of different locations and shapes for the converging driven tube section were studied and the best cases found. For these best cases, for driven tube diameter reductions of factors of 2 and 3, the reservoir pressure can be increased by factors of 2.1 and 3.2, respectively and the enthalpy can be increased by factors of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively.

  12. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  13. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  14. Effect of high pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a five-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a post-packaging intervention. QF was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, was starter-free and was not pressed...

  15. Fractured petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.; Chang, E.; Tang, G.Q.

    2000-01-10

    Total compressibility in a fractured reservoir is estimated using the pressure response due to gravitational potential variations. Both the moon and the sun gravitational potentials are accounted for using the full expression by inclusion of longer-period components. The semi-diurnal and diurnal pressure data show substantial long-term variations. The gravitational potential also contains the same variation trend; the ratio between the potential and pressure has a fairly uniform value over successive cycles. The computed total compressibility is also fairly constant and independent of the cycle. Results show the effects of the time interval over which the pressure measurements are performed as well as the location.

  16. Effect of continuous smoking reduction and abstinence on blood pressure and heart rate in smokers switching to electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos; Cibella, Fabio; Caponnetto, Pasquale; Campagna, Davide; Morjaria, Jaymin Bhagwanji; Battaglia, Eliana; Caruso, Massimo; Russo, Cristina; Polosa, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    We present prospective blood pressure (BP) and hear rate (HR) changes in smokers invited to switch to e-cigarettes in the ECLAT study. BP and HR changes were compared among (1) different study groups (users of high, low, and zero nicotine products) and (2) pooled continuous smoking phenotype classification (same phenotype from week 12 to -52), with participants classified as quitters (completely quit smoking), reducers (≥50% reduction in smoking consumption) and failures (<50% or no reduction in smoking consumption). Additionally, the latter comparison was repeated in a subgroup of participants with elevated BP at baseline. No significant changes were observed among study groups for systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HR. In 145 subjects with a continuous smoking phenotype, we observed lower systolic BP at week 52 compared to baseline but no effect of smoking phenotype classification. When the same analysis was repeated in 66 subjects with elevated BP at baseline, a substantial reduction in systolic BP was observed at week 52 compared to baseline (132.4 ± 12.0 vs. 141.2 ± 10.5 mmHg, p < 0.001), with a significant effect found for smoking phenotype classification. After adjusting for weight change, gender and age, reduction in systolic BP from baseline at week 52 remains associated significantly with both smoking reduction and smoking abstinence. In conclusion, smokers who reduce or quit smoking by switching to e-cigarettes may lower their systolic BP in the long term, and this reduction is apparent in smokers with elevated BP. The current study adds to the evidence that quitting smoking with the use of e-cigarettes does not lead to higher BP values, and this is independently observed whether e-cigarettes are regularly used or not.

  17. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension.

  18. Stepping Up the Pressure: Arousal Can Be Associated with a Reduction in Male Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Mann, Traci; Westling, Erika H.; Creswell, J. David; Ebert, Jeffrey P.; Wallaert, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The attentional myopia model of behavioral control (Mann & Ward, 2007) was tested in an experiment investigating the relationship between physiological arousal and aggression. Drawing on previous work linking arousal and narrowed attentional focus, the model predicts that arousal will lead to behavior that is relatively disinhibited in situations in which promoting pressures to aggress are highly salient. In situations in which inhibitory pressures are more salient, the model predicts behavior that is relatively restrained. In the experiment, 81 male undergraduates delivered noise-blasts against a provoking confederate while experiencing either high or low levels of physiological arousal and, at the same time, being exposed to cues that served either to promote or inhibit aggression. In addition to supporting the predictions of the model, this experiment provided some of the first evidence for enhanced control of aggression under conditions of heightened physiological arousal. Implications for interventions designed to reduce aggression are discussed. PMID:18561301

  19. Fluid shifts, vasodilatation and ambulatory blood pressure reduction during long duration spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Norsk, Peter; Asmar, Ali; Damgaard, Morten; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2015-01-01

    Acute weightlessness in space induces a fluid shift leading to central volume expansion. Simultaneously, blood pressure is either unchanged or decreased slightly. Whether these effects persist for months in space is unclear. Twenty-four hour ambulatory brachial arterial pressures were automatically recorded at 1–2 h intervals with portable equipment in eight male astronauts: once before launch, once between 85 and 192 days in space on the International Space Station and, finally, once at least 2 months after flight. During the same 24 h, cardiac output (rebreathing method) was measured two to five times (on the ground seated), and venous blood was sampled once (also seated on the ground) for determination of plasma catecholamine concentrations. The 24 h average systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (mean ± se) in space were reduced by 8 ± 2 mmHg (P = 0.01; ANOVA), 9 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 10 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.006), respectively. The nightly blood pressure dip of 8 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.015) was maintained. Cardiac stroke volume and output increased by 35 ± 10% and 41 ± 9% (P < 0.001); heart rate and catecholamine concentrations were unchanged; and systemic vascular resistance was reduced by 39 ± 4% (P < 0.001). The increase in cardiac stroke volume and output is more than previously observed during short duration flights and might be a precipitator for some of the vision problems encountered by the astronauts. The spaceflight vasodilatation mechanism needs to be explored further. PMID:25774397

  20. Contact-pressure reduction of pyramidal optical probe array on corrugated aluminium/silicon nitride membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jinhee; Oh, Seonghyeon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we develop an optical contact probe array for scanning near-field lithography. We fabricate the optical probes with a pyramidal tip array on an aluminium/silicon nitride composite membrane. Here, we reduce the contact pressure using the corrugations on the silicon nitride membrane and the flattened surface on top of the tip. After fabricating the 5  ×  5 probes in the array, we evaluate the contact pressure using the force–distance curve obtained by an atomic force microscope. The spring constants of the corrugated membranes are 10  ±  0.6 N m‑1. The contact pressure on a flattened 295 nm in-radius is calculated to be approximately 33 MPa for a 300 nm deflection. This value is 22 times smaller than that of a sharp pyramidal tip of 20 nm in-radius on a flat membrane.

  1. Environmental pressure reduction with a new method of noble metal recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, EV

    2017-02-01

    Discoveries in the area of hydrometallurgy of noble metals can be of use in metal recovery from low-grade solutions and slurries, including liquid tailings. Efficiency of noble metal recovery and reduction in mining waste is gained owing to utilization of two forms of ion-exchange sorbent, including OH‑ for recovery of cyanic compounds of gold and cyanides, which allows abating burden on natural systems.

  2. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the.... Each service reservoir system on a motor vehicle shall be protected against a loss of air pressure or vacuum due to a failure or leakage in the system between the service reservoir and the source of...

  3. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the.... Each service reservoir system on a motor vehicle shall be protected against a loss of air pressure or vacuum due to a failure or leakage in the system between the service reservoir and the source of...

  4. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the.... Each service reservoir system on a motor vehicle shall be protected against a loss of air pressure or vacuum due to a failure or leakage in the system between the service reservoir and the source of...

  5. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the.... Each service reservoir system on a motor vehicle shall be protected against a loss of air pressure or vacuum due to a failure or leakage in the system between the service reservoir and the source of...

  6. a Review of the Hydrogen Reduction of Ruby at Megabar Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoff, Arthur L.

    It is shown that the available optical data on composites of hydrogen and Al2O3 are an indirect proof of the presence of metallic Al formed in the reaction Al2O3 + 0.75 H2 = 1.5 AlOOH + 0.5 Al at 177 GPa. The AlOOH (diaspore) Raman peak for the OH stretching mode is not strong and is very broad. This unfortunately eliminates one direct method of showing that the reaction proceeds. It is shown that recent arguments attempting to show that Al does not form at high pressure are invalid.

  7. Magnitude of blood pressure reduction in the placebo arms of modern hypertension trials: implications for trials of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; Rosen, Stuart D; Krum, Henry; Lyon, Alexander R; Francis, Darrel P; di Mario, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Early phase studies of novel interventions for hypertension, such as renal sympathetic denervation, are sometimes single-armed (uncontrolled). We explored the wisdom of this by quantifying the blood pressure fall in the placebo arms of contemporary trials of hypertension. We searched Medline up to June 2014 and identified blinded, randomized trials of hypertension therapy in which the control arm received placebo medication or a sham (placebo) procedure. For nonresistant hypertension, we have identified all such trials of drugs licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration since 2000 (5 drugs). This US Food and Drug Administration-related restriction was not applied to resistant hypertension trials. This produced 7451 patients, who were allocated to a blinded control from 52 trials of nonresistant hypertension and 694 patients from 8 trials of resistant hypertension (3 drugs and 2 interventions). Systolic blood pressure fell by 5.92 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 5.14-6.71; P<0.0001) in the nonresistant cohort and by 8.76 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 4.83-12.70; P<0.0001) in the resistant cohort. Using metaregression, the falls were larger in trials that did not use ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as an inclusion criterion (z=2.84; P=0.0045), in those with higher baseline blood pressures (z=-0.3; P=0.0001), and in those where the patients were prescribed a continuous background of antihypertensives (z=-2.72; P=0.0065). The nontrivial magnitude of these apparent blood pressure reductions with perfectly ineffective intervention (placebo) illustrates that efficacy explorations of novel therapies for hypertension, once safety is established, should be performed with a randomized, appropriately controlled, and blinded design.

  8. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  9. Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval exercise performed in water or dryland condition.

    PubMed

    Sosner, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Dupuy, Olivier; Garzon, Mauricio; Lemasson, Christopher; Gremeaux, Vincent; Lalongé, Julie; Gonzales, Mariel; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Bosquet, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65 ± 7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic blood pressures [SBP/DBP]) were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24 minutes at 50% peak power output) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10 minutes with phases of 15 seconds 100% peak power output interspersed by 15 seconds of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-hour average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-hour BP decrease (SBP: -3.6 ± 5.7/DBP: -2.8 ± 3.0 mm Hg, P < .05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8 ± 9.5/DBP: -3.0 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P < .05). The one condition that modified 24-hour pulse-wave velocity was immersed HIIE (-0.21 ± 0.30 m/s, P < .05).

  10. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  11. Hypersensitivity of mesenteric veins to 5-hydroxytryptamine- and ketanserin-induced reduction of portal pressure in portal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, S. A.; Groszmann, R. J.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Isolated superior mesenteric veins from portal hypertensive rats were 3 to 10 times more sensitive to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 3 times less sensitive to (-)-noradrenaline than veins from sham-operated rats. The sensitivity to vasopressin did not differ in the 2 groups. Ketanserin competitively antagonized the effects of 5-HT in superior mesenteric veins and portal veins with high affinity (KB values 0.1-0.3 nM), as expected for 5-HT2-receptors. The affinity of ketanserin for 5-HT2-receptors was similar in veins from normal, sham-operated or portal-hypertensive rats. Intraportal injections of low doses of 5-HT caused increases in portal pressure which were more pronounced in portal hypertensive rats than in sham-operated rats and were blocked by 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin in both groups. Ketanserin 0.3 mg kg-1 did not block the portal pressor response to (-)-noradrenaline in either group of rats. In portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin caused decreases in portal pressure, portal flow and cardiac output, as estimated by radioactive microspheres. The reduction in portal pressure caused by ketanserin was due mainly to a decrease in portal venous inflow secondary to a decreased cardiac output. The reduction in cardiac output, which was observed only in the portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, is consistent with venous dilatation and pooling of blood in the portal venous system. The venous pooling could be secondary to the blockade of 5-HT2-receptors in the portal venous system. It is proposed that ketanserin should be explored for the treatment of patients with portal hypertension. PMID:3801785

  12. Efficacy of combined cataract extraction and endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation for the reduction of intraocular pressure and medication burden

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sammie J.; Mulvahill, Matthew; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Pantcheva, Mina B.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Seibold, Leonard K.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report on the efficacy of combined endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) and phacoemulsification cataract extraction (PCE) with intraocular lens placement for reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) and medication burden in glaucoma. METHODS A retrospective case review of 91 eyes (73 patients) with glaucoma and cataract that underwent combined PCE/ECP surgery was performed. Baseline demographic and ocular characteristics were recorded, as well as intraocular pressure, number of glaucoma medications, and visual acuity postoperatively with 12-month follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as less than 20% reduction in IOP from baseline on two consecutive visits (at 1, 3, 6, or 12mo postoperatively), IOP ≥21 mm Hg or ≤5 mm Hg on two consecutive visits, or additional glaucoma surgery performed within 12mo after PCE/ECP. RESULTS Overall, mean medicated IOP was reduced from 16.65 mm Hg at baseline to 13.38 mm Hg at 12mo (P<0.0001). Mean number of glaucoma medications was reduced from 1.88 medications at baseline to 1.48 medications at 12mo (P=0.0003). At 3mo postoperatively, the success rate was 73.6% (95%CI: 63.3, 81.5), 57.1% at 6mo (95% CI: 46.3, 66.6), and 49.7% at 12mo (95%CI: 38.9, 59.6). Patient demographic characteristics were not associated with treatment success. The only ocular characteristic associated with treatment success was a higher baseline IOP. CONCLUSION Combined PCE/ECP surgery is an effective surgical option for the reduction of IOP and medication burden in glaucoma patients. Patients with higher baseline IOP levels are most likely to benefit from this procedure. PMID:27275423

  13. Acidic Electrolyzed Water as a Novel Transmitting Medium for High Hydrostatic Pressure Reduction of Bacterial Loads on Shelled Fresh Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Du, Suping; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xiao, Lili; Lou, Yang; Pan, Yingjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP) processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products. PMID:27014228

  14. Reduction of salt in pork sausages by the addition of carrot fibre or potato starch and high pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Alberto; Søltoft-Jensen, Jakob; Knudsen, Jes Christian; Christensen, Mette; Orlien, Vibeke

    2012-12-01

    The combined effect of high pressure processing (HPP) (400, 600 and 800 MPa) and carrot fibre (CF) and potato starch (PS) on low salt (1.2%) pork sausages was investigated and compared with high (1.8%) salt sausages. Sausages had a marked increase in whitening with increasing content of fibre or starch, pressure level, and process temperature. The degree of redness was mainly affected by pressure level and heat treatment. An important finding regarding salt reduction was that the use of starch or fibre had more impact on textural properties than the level of salt since Young's modulus and strain at fracture were mainly affected by formulation and HPP. Water binding capacity of low salt sausages was improved to the same level as high salt sausages with HPP and addition of CF or PS particularly by the addition of PS which produced sausages with better sensory properties than CF. The sensory analysis showed that this approach is promising for producing low salt sausages.

  15. Antihypertensive combination therapy: optimizing blood pressure control and cardiovascular risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2007-11-01

    Treating hypertension reduces the rates of myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal disease; however, clinical trial experience suggests that monotherapy is not likely to be successful for achieving goal blood pressure (BP) levels in many hypertensive patients. In multiple recent clinical trials including various subsets of hypertensive patients, the achievement of BP goal has typically required the combination of 2 or more medications, particularly in patients with BP levels>160/100 mm Hg. When initiating combination therapy for hypertension, careful consideration must be given to the choice of medication. Clinical trial evidence has shown the efficacy of various combinations of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics in reducing BP and cardiovascular risk. Ongoing trials should provide additional guidance on the optimal choice of combination regimens in specific clinical settings.

  16. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  17. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  18. Effect of high-pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Renye, J A; Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Kwoczak, R; Toht, M; Leggett, L N; Luchansky, J B; Porto-Fett, A C S; Phillips, J G

    2014-03-01

    The effect of high-hydrostatic-pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a 5-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a postpackaging intervention. Queso Fresco was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, and was starter-free and not pressed. In phase 1, QF slices (12.7 × 7.6 × 1 cm), weighing from 52 to 66 g, were surface inoculated with L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g) and individually double vacuum packaged. The slices were then warmed to either 20 or 40°C and HPP treated at 200, 400, and 600 MPa for hold times of 5, 10, 15, or 20 min. Treatment at 600 MPa was most effective in reducing L. monocytogenes to below the detection level of 0.91 log10 cfu/g at all hold times and temperatures. High-hydrostatic-pressure processing at 40°C, 400 MPa, and hold time ≥ 15 min was effective but resulted in wheying-off and textural changes. In phase 2, L. monocytogenes was inoculated either on the slices (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g; ON) or in the curds (ca. 7.0 log10 cfu/g; IN) before the cheese block was formed and sliced. The slices were treated at 20°C and 600 MPa at hold times of 3, 10, and 20 min, and then stored at 4 and 10°C for 60 d. For both treatments, L. monocytogenes became less resistant to pressure as hold time increased, with greater percentages of injured cells at 3 and 10 min than at 20 min, at which the lethality of the process increased. For the IN treatment, with hold times of 3 and 10 min, growth of L. monocytogenes increased the first week of storage, but was delayed for 1 wk, with a hold time of 20 min. Longer lag times in growth of L. monocytogenes during storage at 4°C were observed for the ON treatment at hold times of 10 and 20 min, indicating that the IN treatment may have provided a more protective environment with less injury to the cells than the ON treatment. Similarly, HPP treatment for 10 min followed by storage at 4°C was the best method for suppressing the growth of

  19. Effects of dietary sodium reduction on blood pressure in subjects with resistant hypertension: results from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Gaddam, Krishna K; Oparil, Suzanne; Aban, Inmaculada; Husain, Saima; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Calhoun, David A

    2009-09-01

    Observational studies indicate a significant relation between dietary sodium and level of blood pressure. However, the role of salt sensitivity in the development of resistant hypertension is unknown. The present study examined the effects of dietary salt restriction on office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in subjects with resistant hypertension. Twelve subjects with resistant hypertension entered into a randomized crossover evaluation of low (50 mmol/24 hours x 7 days) and high sodium diets (250 mmol/24 hours x 7 days) separated by a 2-week washout period. Brain natriuretic peptide; plasma renin activity; 24-hour urinary aldosterone, sodium, and potassium; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; aortic pulse wave velocity; and augmentation index were compared between dietary treatment periods. At baseline, subjects were on an average of 3.4+/-0.5 antihypertensive medications with a mean office BP of 145.8+/-10.8/83.9+/-11.2 mm Hg. Mean urinary sodium excretion was 46.1+/-26.8 versus 252.2+/-64.6 mmol/24 hours during low- versus high-salt intake. Low- compared to high-salt diet decreased office systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 22.7 and 9.1 mm Hg, respectively. Plasma renin activity increased whereas brain natriuretic peptide and creatinine clearance decreased during low-salt intake, indicative of intravascular volume reduction. These results indicate that excessive dietary sodium ingestion contributes importantly to resistance to antihypertensive treatment. Strategies to substantially reduce dietary salt intake should be part of the overall treatment of resistant hypertension.

  20. Blood pressure control and the reduction of left atrial overload is essential for controlling atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yasuko; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Naka; Sato, Nobuyuki; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the ideal control of atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with hypertensive patients depends on the usage of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors or whether it occurs regardless of the kind of antihypertensive agents used. The control of AF was compared in 112 outpatients between 1) those with or without the administration of RAS inhibitors, and 2) those with an ideal or poor control of the blood pressure (BP) regardless of the kind of antihypertensive therapy used. The therapies with or without RAS inhibitors did not yield any significant difference in the AF control states, even though RAS inhibitors had been administered to the patient group with a high proportion of organic heart disease. The ideal BP control group exhibited a significantly better AF control in comparison to the poor BP control group. The former group had a significantly smaller left atrial diameter determined by ultrasonic echocardiography. BP control itself may essentially be important for preventing AF in the general patient population. Poor BP control seemed to have an affect on worsening AF possibly via left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, followed by left atrial overload.

  1. Coarsened Exact Matching of Phaco-Trabectome to Trabectome in Phakic Patients: Lack of Additional Pressure Reduction from Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Hardik A.; Bussel, Igor I.; Schuman, Joel S.; Brown, Eric N.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) after trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy surgery in phakic patients (T) and trabectome with same session phacoemulsification (PT) using Coarsened Exact Matching. Although phacoemulsification is associated with IOP reduction when performed on its own, it is not known how much it contributes in PT. Methods Subjects were divided into phakic T and PT. Exclusion criteria were follow-up for <12 months and additional glaucoma surgery. Demographics were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared test for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multiple imputation was utilized to avoid eliminating data with missing values. Groups were then matched using Coarsened Exact Matching based on age, race, type of glaucoma, baseline IOP, and number of preoperative glaucoma medications. Univariate linear regression was used to examine IOP reduction after surgery; those variables that were statistically significant were included in the final multivariate regression model. Results A total of 753 cases were included (T: 255, PT: 498). When all variables except for age were kept constant, there was an additional IOP reduction of 0.05±0.01 mmHg conferred for every yearly increment in age. Every 1 mmHg increase in baseline IOP correlated to an additional IOP reduction of 0.80±0.02 mmHg. Phacoemulsification was not found to be a statistically significant contributor to IOP when comparing T and PT (p≥0.05). T had a 21% IOP reduction to 15.9±3.5 mmHg (p<0.01) while PT had an 18% reduction to 15.5±3.6 mmHg (p<0.01). Number of medications decreased (p<0.01) in both groups from 2.4±1.2 to 1.9±1.3 and from 2.3±1.1 to 1.7±1.3, respectively. Conclusion Phacoemulsification does not make a significant contribution to postoperative IOP or number of medications when combined with trabectome surgery in phakic patients. PMID:26895293

  2. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  3. Weight loss and blood pressure reduction in obese subjects in response to nutritional guidance using information communication technology.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Kanako; Sakurai, Nozomi; Tochikubo, Osamu

    2009-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome caused by visceral-fat obesity is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. This study used a new information communication technology (ICT) to investigate body weight (BW) and blood pressure (BP) changes in response to nutritional guidance. Obese subjects with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or impaired glucose tolerance received guidance with the ICT method (n = 13) or face-to-face according to conventional methods (n = 39). The effects of the methods were compared. After 12 weeks, significant weight loss and BP reduction were observed in the ICT group. Also, significant higher improvements were observed in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and HbA(1c) in the ICT-group compared with those groups using the conventional method. The effectiveness of the ICT method in reducing BW, BP, total and LDL cholesterol, and HbA(1c) was demonstrated.

  4. Feasibility study of sustained-release travoprost punctum plug for intraocular pressure reduction in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Shamira A; Ting, Daniel SW; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Chew, Paul T; Aquino, Maria Cecilia D; Sng, Chelvin CA; Ho, Sue-Wei; Aung, Tin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and safety of a punctum plug-based sustained drug release system for a prostaglandin analog, travoprost (OTX-TP), for intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction in an Asian population. Methods This is an initial feasibility, prospective, single-arm study involving 26 eyes and a bioresorbable punctum plug containing OTX-TP. An OTX-TP was placed in the vertical portion of the superior or inferior canaliculus of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. The main outcome measure was the IOP-lowering efficacy of OTX-TP at 3 (8 am) and 10, 20, and 30 days (8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm), compared to baseline. Results A total of 26 OTX-TP were inserted for 17 subjects. The mean (standard deviation) age was 57.2 (13.8) years. At 10 days, all plugs were still present, and the IOP reduction from baseline was 6.2 (23%), 5.4 (21%), and 7.5 mmHg (28%) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively. At 10 days, the mean IOP (standard error of mean) was 21.2 (1.2), 20.4 (0.8), and 19.7 (1.0) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively, showing no discernible IOP trend during the course of the day. At 30 days, plug retention had declined to 42%, and the overall IOP reduction had decreased to 16%. Conclusion The sustained-release OTX-TP is able to reduce IOP by 24% (day 10) and 15.6% (day 30), respectively. It is a potentially well-tolerable ocular hypotensive for glaucoma patients with a history of poor compliance. PMID:27175058

  5. Application of low pressure capacitively coupled rf hydrogen plasma for low temperature reduction of iron clusters in structure of fe-pillared materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starshinova, V. L.; Gorelysheva, V. E.; Shinka Jr., A. A., rev; Gnevashev, S. G.; Kulevtsov, G. N.; Shinkarev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The unique properties of pillared materials determine their use in catalysis, purification and separation. The paper studies the reduction of composite catalysts, Fe-pillared materials. The authors compare their reduction in low temperature capacitively coupled RF hydrogen discharge of low pressure to their conventional direct hydrogen reduction in a tubular muffle furnace. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to characterize the iron-bearing phases. The results show that the reduction of iron hydro/oxide clusters associated with an aluminosilicate matrix to metallic iron is very challenging due to the degree of the pore space availability for hydrogen.

  6. Reduction in blood pressure and serum lipids by lycosome formulation of dark chocolate and lycopene in prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Petyaev, Ivan M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Y; Chalyk, Natalia E; Klochkov, Victor; Kyle, Nigel H

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine healthy volunteers aged 47–69 years old were randomly assigned to a 28-day oral intake of different dark chocolate (DC) formulations. The main group received daily 30 g of proprietary lycopene-containing (L-tug) lycosome formulation of DC with enhanced bioavailability of cocoa flavanols. Two control groups daily consumed either 30 g of regular DC alone or along with 7 mg of lycopene, which corresponds to the amount of lycopene ingested with L-tug formulation. It was found that L-tug was more efficient in reducing diastolic blood pressure (mean value of −6.22 mmHg, 95% CI: 5.00, 8.00) when compared with the regular DC group (−3.00 mmHg, P < 0.05) or the group which ingested the DC and lycopene as two separate formulations (mean reduction of −4 mmHg, 95% CI: 2.47, 6.00, P = 0.0262). Only marginal superiority for L-tug formulation in the reduction in systolic blood pressure was seen. However, the L-tug formulation was the only formulation of DC which affected serum lipids. There was a reduction in total cholesterol (from median 228.00 mg/dL [95% CI: 206.2, 242.5] to 187.00 mg/dL [95% CI: 166.2, 202.2, P < 0.05]) with corresponding decline of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (from a median of 166.00 mg/dL [95% CI: 130.8, 177.0] to 151.00 mg/dL [95% CI: 122.8, 167.4; P < 0.05]) at the end of the intervention period. Similar decline was seen in serum triglycerides (P < 0.05). Serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, glucose levels, and C-reactive protein (CRP) values remained statistically unchanged in all study groups throughout the intervention period. A superior biological activity of the L-tug lycosome formulation of DC extending beyond its antihypertensive effect to lipid-lowering ability opens up new possibilities for the use of DC for health purposes helping to reduce daily caloric intake without compromising on the health benefits of DC consumption. PMID:25493193

  7. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  8. Reservoir microseismicity at the Ekofisk Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.; Boade, R.R.; Dangerfield, J.; Landa, G.H.

    1994-07-01

    A triaxial, downhole geophone was deployed within the Ekofisk oil reservoir for monitoring ambient microseismicity as a test to determine if microearthquake signals generated from discrete shear failure of the reservoir rock could be detected. The results of the test were positive. During 104 hours of monitoring, 572 discrete events were recorded which have been identified as shear-failure microearthquakes. Reservoir microseismicity was detected at large distances (1000 m) from the monitor borehole and at rates (> 5 events per hour) which may allow practical characterization of the reservoir rock and overburden deformation induced by reservoir pressure changes.

  9. Persistence of mortality reduction after the end of randomized therapy in clinical trials of blood pressure-lowering medications.

    PubMed

    Kostis, William J; Thijs, Lutgarde; Richart, Tom; Kostis, John B; Staessen, Jan A

    2010-12-01

    Long-term follow-up of clinical trials of blood pressure-lowering medications has suggested a continuation of event reduction after study completion. We evaluated the persistence of mortality benefit of these agents after the end of clinical trials, when all of the patients were advised to take the same open-label therapy. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials using blood pressure-lowering medications, used in patients with hypertension, myocardial infarction, or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, (n=18; 132 854 patients; 11 988 deaths) when a second report describing results after the end of the trial was available. During the randomized (first) phase, 80% (interquartile range: 75% to 83%) of the patients randomized to receive active therapy actually received it compared with 16% (interquartile range: 7% to 22%) of those randomized to control. In this phase, mortality was lower in the intervention group (odds ratio: 0.84 [95% CI: 0.79 to 0.90]; P<0.0001). Mortality was also lower during the open-label follow-up (second) phase (odds ratio: 0.85 [95% CI: 0.79 to 0.91]; P<0.0001), when all of the patients were advised to take the same therapy, and rates of receiving active therapy were similar in the 2 groups (59% [interquartile range: 46% to 77%], among those originally randomized to active, and 43% [interquartile range: 20% to 68%], in the control). Several sensitivity analyses indicated stability of the effects. In studies of antihypertensive medications, a decrease in overall mortality persists after the end of trial phase, when most patients in both the intervention and control groups receive active therapy. These analyses imply that earlier intervention would result in better clinical outcomes.

  10. TiO2 Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reli, Martin; Kobielusz, Marcin; Matějová, Lenka; Daniš, Stanislav; Macyk, Wojciech; Obalová, Lucie; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Anatase-brookite TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents-water/methanol/water (TiO2(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO2(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO2 Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO2(M) appeared more active than TiO2(E) in the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide due to a lower density of defects created in the crystal lattice.

  11. The pressure reduction coefficient: A new parameter to assess aneurysmal blood stasis induced by flow diverters/disruptors.

    PubMed

    Gascou, Gregory; Ferrara, Riccardo; Ambard, Dominique; Sanchez, Mathieu; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Jourdan, Franck; Costalat, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose Pore density (PD), surface metal coverage (SMC) and the number of wires are all different parameters which can influence the efficacy of a flow disruptor/diverter. Nevertheless, the relative importance of a parameter to induce intra-aneurysmal blood stasis is still poorly evaluated. Therefore, comparison between devices based on a unique value is not reliable. The aim of this study was to propose a new bench top parameter (the pressure reduction coefficient (PRC; ξ)) in order to assess the global haemodynamic effect of each flow diverter/disruptor to slow flow. Methods Eight devices were tested in vitro during three different flow conditions. For the eight devices, the PRC was computed at different volumetric flow rates to characterise flow reduction. Comparison was made with SMC, PD and the number of wires. Results The PRC obtained for flow disruptors was on average 1.5 times more efficient in reducing flow compared to flow diverters. PD (mm(2)) ranged from 24 to 38 for flow diverters and did not independently correlate with the PRC. The SMC of flow diverters ranged from 25% to 70%, and ranged from 20% to 100% for flow disruptors, without independent correlation to the PRC. The number of wires ranged from 48 to 96 for the flow diverters and did not correlate independently to the PRC. Conclusion There were no direct correlations between individual device characteristics and the PRC, suggesting a multifaceted and interrelating association of the overall design of each implant. Hence, the PRC could be used as a simple, reliable parameter to assess the overall capacity of flow disruptors/diverters to induce intra-aneurysmal blood stasis.

  12. Reservoir depletion at The Geysers geothermal area, California, shown by four-dimensional seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunasekera, R.C.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Intensive geothermal exploitation at The Geysers geothermal area, California, induces myriads of small-magnitude earthquakes that are monitored by a dense, permanent, local seismometer network. Using this network, tomographic inversions were performed for the three-dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs structure of the reservoir for April 1991, February 1993, December 1994, October 1996, and August 1998. The extensive low-Vp/Vs anomaly that occupies the reservoir grew in strength from a maximum of 9% to a maximum of 13.4% during the 7-year study period. This is attributed to depletion of pore liquid water in the reservoir and replacement with steam. This decreases Vp by increasing compressibility, and increases Vs because of reduction in pore pressure and the drying of argillaceous minerals, e.g., illite, which increase the shear modulus. These effects serendipitously combine to lower Vp/Vs, resulting in a strong overall effect that provides a convenient tool for monitoring reservoir depletion. Variations in the Vp and Vs fields indicate that water depletion is the dominant process in the central part of the exploited reservoir, and pressure reduction and mineral drying in the northwest and southeast parts of the reservoir. The rate at which the Vp/Vs anomaly grew in strength in the period 1991-1998 suggests most of the original anomaly was caused by exploitation. Continuous monitoring of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective geothermal reservoir depletion monitoring tool and can potentially provide information about depletion in parts of the reservoir that have not been drilled.

  13. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as

  14. APFBC repowering could help meet Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction goals[Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.E.; Tonnemacher, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Clinton Administration signed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol agreement that would limit US greenhouse gas emissions, of which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the most significant. While the Kyoto Protocol has not yet been submitted to the Senate for ratification, in the past, there have been few proposed environmental actions that had continued and wide-spread attention of the press and environmental activists that did not eventually lead to regulation. Since the Kyoto Protocol might lead to future regulation, its implications need investigation by the power industry. Limiting CO{sub 2} emissions affects the ability of the US to generate reliable, low cost electricity, and has tremendous potential impact on electric generating companies with a significant investment in coal-fired generation, and on their customers. This paper explores the implications of reducing coal plant CO{sub 2} by various amounts. The amount of reduction for the US that is proposed in the Kyoto Protocol is huge. The Kyoto Protocol would commit the US to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions to 7% below 1990 levels. Since 1990, there has been significant growth in US population and the US economy driving carbon emissions 34% higher by year 2010. That means CO{sub 2} would have to be reduced by 30.9%, which is extremely difficult to accomplish. The paper tells why. There are, however, coal-based technologies that should be available in time to make significant reductions in coal-plant CO{sub 2} emissions. Th paper focuses on one plant repowering method that can reduce CO{sub 2} per kWh by 25%, advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology, based on results from a recent APFBC repowering concept evaluation of the Carolina Power and Light Company's (CP and L) L.V. Sutton steam station. The replacement of the existing 50-year base of power generating units needed to meet proposed Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction commitments would be a massive undertaking. It is

  15. Comparison of hydrogen and acetate as substrates for the reductive immobilization of uranium under in-situ pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuston, Daniel Jon

    Complete baseline restoration at in-situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining sites has proven difficult through conventional methods. Bioremediation by means of reductive immobilization of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) is currently being investigated as a secondary restoration method. Various organic substrates have been used in many U bioremediation studies and applications. However, the oxidation of organic substrates increases total inorganic carbon concentrations (TIC) due to the respiration of heterotrophic bacteria. It is widely accepted that U forms stable complexes with carbonate that in turn lower the thermodynamic redox potential at which the U(VI)/U(IV) couple takes place. In this study, it was hypothesized that greater U reductive immobilization would be achieved with hydrogen (H2) as an electron donor compared to that with acetate (Ac) because H2 would select for autotrophic bacteria that would decrease TIC. The hypothesis was tested by supplying H 2 and Ac at the same reductive capacity to continuous-flow sediment-columns. Unlike previous studies, the columns were operated at pressures representative of the in-situ conditions at ISR mining sites. The experimental results indicated that effluent TIC and U concentrations were both significantly lower for the H2-supplied column than for the Ac-supplied column. Comparison of the experimental data to theoretical speciation indicated by a pE-versus-pH diagram revealed that the benefit of U solubility decreasing at lower TIC is only gained when the pH is held constant. However, a lower TIC and a constant pH were not realized in the H2 column due to the dynamics of the pH/alkalinity/total carbonate/CaCO 3 system. Nevertheless, based on prevailing theory, it was speculated that the superior U removal in the H2-supplied column may have been attributed to the presence of kinetically-limited Fe(OH)3 under the prevailing pE and pH conditions of the respective H2 and Ac columns. However, in the absence of sediment

  16. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  17. Major element composition of an Early Enriched Reservoir: constraints from 142Nd/144Nd isotope systematics in the early Earth and high-pressure melting experiments of a primitive peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Nozomi; Yoshino, Takashi; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Kogiso, Tetsu

    2016-12-01

    The Accessible Silicate Earth (ASE) has a higher 142Nd/144Nd ratio than most chondrites. Thus, if the Earth is assumed to have formed from these chondrites, a complement low-142Nd/144Nd reservoir is needed. Such a low-142Nd/144Nd reservoir is believed to have been derived from a melt in the early Earth and is called the Early Enriched Reservoir (EER). Although the major element composition of the EER is crucial for estimating its chemical and physical properties (e.g., density) and is also essential for understanding the origin and fate of the EER, which are both major factors that determine the present composition of the Earth, it has not yet been robustly established. In order to determine the major element composition of the EER, we estimated the age and pressure-temperature conditions to form the EER that would best explain its Nd isotopic characteristics, based on Sm-Nd partitioning and its dependence on pressure, temperature, and melting phase relations. Our estimate indicates that the EER formed within 33.5 Myr of Solar System formation and at near-solidus temperatures and shallow upper-mantle pressures. We then performed high-pressure melting experiments on primitive peridotite to determine the major element composition of the EER at estimated temperature at 7 GPa and calculated the density of the EER. The result of our experiments indicates that the near-solidus melt is iron-rich komatiite. The estimated density of the near-solidus melt is lower than that of the primitive peridotite, suggesting that the EER melt would have ascended in the mantle to form an early crust. Given that high mantle potential temperatures are assumed to have existed in the Hadean, it follows that the EER melt was generated at high pressure and, therefore, its composition would have been picritic to komatiitic. As the formation age of the EER estimated in our study precedes the last giant, lunar-forming impact, the picritic to komatiitic crust (EER) would most likely have been

  18. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples. PMID:22822404

  19. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench.

    PubMed

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples.

  20. Increase in stagnation pressure and enthalpy in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    A new technique based on the insertion of a converging section in the driven tube is described which is capable of producing substantial increases in both reservoir pressure and enthalpy. A 1D inviscid full kinetics code is used to study a number of different locations and shapes for the converging driven tube section. For driven tube diameter reductions of factors of 2 and 3, the reservoir pressure is found to increase by factors of 2.1 and 3.2, respectively, and the enthalpy is found to simultaneously increase by factors of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively.

  1. Reductions in non-point source pollution through different management practices for an agricultural watershed in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yaowu; Huang, Zhilin; Xiao, Wenfa

    2010-01-01

    Non-point source water pollution generated by agricultural production is considered a major environmental issue in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) of China. The Annualised Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution (AnnAGNPS) model was selected to assess the impact of the application of various management treats, including seven crops, five fertilizer levels and three-group management practice scenarios, on water quality from Heigou River Watershed in TGRA. The scenario subsets include conservation tillage practice (CTP), conservation reserve program (CRP) and conversion of cropland into forestland program (CCFP). Results indicated that tea can not be replaced by other crops because comparatively tea resulted in a higher sediment yield. CTP with no-tillage was more effective to reduce sediment yield, but could increased nutrient loss. CRP reduced sediment yield significantly, but slightly benefited on nutrient loss. CCFP reduced not only sediment yield but also the nutrient loss significantly. The conversion of cropland with a slope greater than 10 degrees into forestland was found to be the best scenario as the sediment yield export is less than 5 tons/ha and nutrient loss is within the permissible limit.

  2. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  3. Comparison study of intraocular pressure reduction efficacy and safety between latanoprost and tafluprost in Japanese with normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Tada, Kaori; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sotozono, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction efficacy and safety between the ophthalmic solutions 0.005% latanoprost (Lat) and 0.0015% tafluprost (Taf) in Japanese patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods In this randomized nonmasked study, we prospectively enrolled 30 Japanese NTG patients who had used Lat monotherapy for more than 4 weeks, and randomly divided them into the following two groups: 1) Lat-to-Taf group (LT group) and 2) Taf-to-Lat group (TL group). At the beginning of the study, both groups were switched from initial Lat to Lat or Taf for 12 weeks, and then switched over to the other drug (crossover) for 12 additional weeks. At 0, 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, we evaluated each patient’s IOP, conjunctival injection, and corneal epitheliopathy score, and at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, we evaluated their eyelash changes and pigmentation of the eyelids and irises. Results The mean IOP of the LT group (15 eyes) was 10.5, 10.6, and 11.1 mmHg, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively, whereas that of the TL group (15 eyes) was 11.7, 11.1, and 10.5 mmHg at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups and in the intragroup comparisons. Moreover, no significant differences were found between Lat and Taf in regard to the conjunctival injection score and corneal epitheliopathy score. Eyelash changes and eyelid and iris pigmentation were similar in both groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that Lat and Taf have equivalent efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with NTG. PMID:27601879

  4. Possible involvement of nitric oxide in morphine-induced miosis and reduction of intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Bucolo, Claudio; Camillieri, Giovanni; Drago, Filippo

    2006-03-18

    The role of mu3 opioid receptors in morphine-induced intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effect and miosis was evaluated in conscious, dark-adapted New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits using a masked-design study. IOP and pupil diameter (PD) measurements were taken at just before and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 h after monolateral instillation of morphine (10, 50 and 100 microg/30 microl) as compared to vehicle administered in the contralateral eye. Morphine-induced ocular effects were challenged by a pre-treatment with the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (100 microg/30 microl), the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 1%, 30 microl), or the non-selective mu3 opioid receptor inhibitor, reduced L-glutathione (GSH, 1%, 30 microl). Morphine induced a dose-dependent decrease in IOP and PD. Pre-treatment with naloxone totally prevented morphine-induced decrease in IOP and miosis. Ocular administration of L-NAME or GSH alone failed to affect IOP or PD of NZW rabbits. However, pre-treatment with either drugs significantly reduced, but not totally prevented ocular effects of morphine. These results suggest that biochemical mechanisms related to nitric oxide release are involved, at least in part, in morphine effects on the eye. Since the mu3 opioid receptor subtype is able to release nitric oxide and is sensitive to inactivation by GSH, it may be possible that mu3 opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced miosis and reduction in IOP.

  5. Use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for reduction of nitrate and sulfate and methanogenesis in microcosms and bioreactors simulating an oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Shen, Yin; An, Dongshan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-27

    Acetate, propionate and butyrate (volatile fatty acids, VFA) occur in oil field waters and are frequently used for microbial growth of oil field consortia. We determined the kinetics of use of these VFA components (3 mM of each) by an anaerobic oil field consortium in microcosms containing 2 mM sulfate and either 0, 4, 6, 8 or 13 mM of nitrate. Nitrate was reduced first with preference for acetate and propionate. Sulfate reduction then proceeded with propionate (not butyrate) as the electron donor, whereas the fermentation of butyrate (not propionate) was associated with methanogenesis. Microbial community analyses indicated Paracoccus-Thauera, Desulfobulbus and Syntrophomonas-Methanobacterium as the dominant taxa catalyzing these three processes. Most probable number assays showed the presence of up to 10(7)/ml of propionate-oxidizing SRB in waters from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field. Bioreactors with the same concentrations of sulfate and VFA responded similarly to increasing concentrations of injected nitrate as observed in the microcosms: sulfide formation was prevented by adding approximately 80% of the nitrate dose needed to completely oxidize VFA to CO2 in both. Thus this work has demonstrated that simple time-dependent observations of the use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in microcosms are a good proxy for these processes in bioreactors of which monitoring is more complex.

  6. Association between respiratory muscle strength and reduction of arterial blood pressure levels after aerobic training in hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Silva, Andreia Maria; Bogão, José Angelo; Braz de Oliveira, Marcos Paulo; Araújo, Hayslenne Andressa Gonçalves de Oliveira; Oliveira, Maísa Sodoco; Maldonado, Ana Clara Desiderio; Ulisses de Oliveira, Herick; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of present study was associate the increase of respiratory muscle strength with blood pressure levels in hypertensive subjects who underwent an aerobic exercise program. [Subjects and Methods] 90 hypertensive subjects were divided in two groups: intervention and control. All participants had an interview with a physiotherapist and were evaluated by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, before and after the 8 weeks. In the intervention group, the subjects underwent aerobic exercise program, 2 times a week for 8 weeks [Results] After the program, the levels of blood pressure were significantly reduced and the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test and the respiratory muscle strength were increased, compared to pre intervention and control group values. However, there was no correlation between the results provided by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure with systolic arterial blood pressure levels. Nonetheless, the distance walked correlated with respiratory muscle strength values, in the intervention group. [Conclusion] The present study demonstrated that the aerobic training was effective in reducing the arterial blood pressure in hypertensive subjects associated with an improvement of physical conditioning and respiratory muscle strength. PMID:28174465

  7. Effect of modest salt reduction on blood pressure, urinary albumin, and pulse wave velocity in white, black, and Asian mild hypertensives.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; Marciniak, Maciej; Visagie, Elisabeth; Markandu, Nirmala D; Anand, Vidya; Dalton, R Neil; MacGregor, Graham A

    2009-09-01

    A reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure. However, most previous trials were in whites with few in blacks and Asians. Salt reduction may also reduce other cardiovascular risk factors (eg, urinary albumin excretion, arterial stiffness). However, few well-controlled trials have studied these effects. We carried out a randomized double-blind crossover trial of salt restriction with slow sodium or placebo, each for 6 weeks, in 71 whites, 69 blacks, and 29 Asians with untreated mildly raised blood pressure. From slow sodium to placebo, urinary sodium was reduced from 165+/-58 (+/-SD) to 110+/-49 mmol/24 hours (9.7 to 6.5 g/d salt). With this reduction in salt intake, there was a significant decrease in blood pressure from 146+/-13/91+/-8 to 141+/-12/88+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001), urinary albumin from 10.2 (IQR: 6.8 to 18.9) to 9.1 (6.6 to 14.0) mg/24 hours (P<0.001), albumin/creatinine ratio from 0.81 (0.47 to 1.43) to 0.66 (0.44 to 1.22) mg/mmol (P<0.001), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity from 11.5+/-2.3 to 11.1+/-1.9 m/s (P<0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that the reductions in blood pressure and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were significant in all groups, and the decrease in pulse wave velocity was significant in blacks only. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, approximately the amount of the current public health recommendations, causes significant falls in blood pressure in all 3 ethnic groups. Furthermore, it reduces urinary albumin and improves large artery compliance. Although both could be attributable to the falls in blood pressure, they may carry additional benefits on reducing cardiovascular disease above that obtained from the blood pressure falls alone.

  8. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  9. SMALL, GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX RESERVOIRS CAN BENEFIT FROM RESERVOIR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Bennett

    2002-06-24

    The Cascade Sand zone of the Mission-Visco Lease in the Cascade Oil field of Los Angeles County, California, has been under water flood since 1970. Increasing water injection to increase oil production rates was being considered as an opportunity to improve oil recovery. However, a secondary gas cap had formed in the up-dip portion of the reservoir with very low gas cap pressures, creating concern that oil could be displaced into the gas cap resulting in the loss of recoverable oil. Therefore, injecting gas into the gas cap to keep the gas cap pressurized and restrict the influx of oil during water injection was also being considered. Further, it was recognized that the reservoir geology in the gas cap area is very complex with numerous folding and faulting and thus there are potential pressure barriers in several locations throughout the reservoir. With these conditions in mind, there were concerns regarding well to well continuity in the gas cap, which could interfere with the intended repressurization impact. Concerns about the pattern of gas flow from well to well, the possibilities of cycling gas without the desired increased pressure, and the possible loss of oil displaced into the gas cap resulted in the decision to conduct a gas tracer survey in an attempt to better define inter-well communication. Following the gas tracer survey, a reservoir model would be developed to integrate the findings of the gas tracer survey, known geologic and reservoir data, and historic production data. The reservoir model would be used to better define the reservoir characteristics and provide information that could help optimize the waterflood-gas injection project under consideration for efficient water and gas injection management to increase oil production. However, due to inadequate gas sampling procedures in the field and insufficiently developed laboratory analytical techniques, the laboratory was unable to detect the tracer in the gas samples taken. At that point, focus

  10. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  11. Sleep-time blood pressure: prognostic value and relevance as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Fernández, José R; Mojón, Artemio

    2013-03-01

    Correlation between blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than clinical BP measurements. Nevertheless, the latter continue to be the "gold standard" to diagnose hypertension, assess CVD risk, and evaluate hypertension treatment. Independent ABPM studies have found that elevated sleep-time BP is a better predictor of CVD risk than either the awake or 24-h BP mean. A major limitation of all previous ABPM-based prognostic studies is the reliance only upon a single baseline profile from each participant at the time of inclusion, without accounting for potential changes in the level and pattern of ambulatory BP thereafter during follow-up. Accordingly, impact of the alteration over time, i.e., during long-term follow-up, of specific features of the 24-h BP variation on CVD risk has never been properly investigated. We evaluated the comparative prognostic value of (i) clinic and ambulatory BP; (ii) different ABPM-derived characteristics, e.g., asleep or awake BP mean; and (iii) specific changes in ABPM characteristic during follow-up, mainly whether reduced CVD risk is more related to the progressive decrease of asleep or awake BP. We prospectively studied 3344 subjects (1718 men/1626 women), 52.6 ± 14.5 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, during a median follow-up of 5.6 yrs. Those with hypertension at baseline were randomized to ingest all their prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or ≥1 of them at bedtime. At baseline, BP was measured at 20-min intervals from 07:00 to 23:00 h and at 30-min intervals at night for 48-h, and physical activity was simultaneously monitored every min by wrist actigraphy to accurately derive awake and asleep BP means. Identical assessment was scheduled annually and more frequently (quarterly) if treatment adjustment was required. Data collected either at baseline or the last ABPM evaluation per participant

  12. Reduction of Listeria Innocua Contamination in Vacuum-Packaged Dry-Cured Italian Pork Products After High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Merialdi, Giuseppe; Ramini, Mattia; Ravanetti, Emanuela; Gherri, Giorgio; Bonilauri, Paolo

    2015-05-28

    The present work aims to present the results of the application of a treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on Italian fermented and dry-cured pork products. The products used in this study were portioned cured ham, portioned bacon and salami, vacuumpackaged and produced by a single processing company. Two studies were conducted on a single batch of the three products by means of an artificial contamination with Listeria innocua as a surrogate of L. monocytogenes. In the first trial a superficial contamination was obtained by immersion for 3 min in the culture broth with a concentration of approximately 9 log cfu/mL. At the end of the inoculum step, the pieces were dred at room temperature and vacuum packaged. In the second trial 50 kg of minced pork meat were contaminated before production of salami. In both cases the inoculum contained 5 strains of L. innocua. Subsequently, in both trials, 10 samples were randomly divided into two groups of 5 pieces each: i) TH group, samples treated with HHP; ii) group C, control samples, not subjected to any treatment. All samples were stored at refrigeration temperature at the end of HHP treatments (if applied), and analyzed for the determination of the surface (1st trial) and deep (2nd trial) quantitative contamination of L. innocua. pH and aW were also determined on 3 pieces of each products belonging to group C. The difference between the medians of the log cfu/cm2 or g established between controls and treated were compared using the non-parametric test (Kruskal-Wallis test) with P<0.01. In all products and in both trials the level of contamination detected in treatment groups was always significantly lower than in controls (P<0.01). In particular, in vacuum-packaged ham, bacon and salami viability logarithmic viability reductions equal to -2.29, -2.54 and -2.51 were observed, respectively. This study aimed to evaluate a not-thermal treatment on Italian cured or fermented pork products. The results of this study

  13. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-05-07

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m(2) g(-1), respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2(-) content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm(-2) were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method.

  14. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-04-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m2 g-1, respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2- content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm-2 were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method.Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In

  15. Quantitative Discomanometry: Correlation of Intradiscal Pressure Values to Pain Reduction in Patients With Intervertebral Disc Herniation Treated With Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive, Image-Guided Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K. Mazioti, A. Papakonstantinou, O. Brountzos, E.; Gouliamos, A.; Kelekis, N. Kelekis, A.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To illustrate quantitative discomanometry's (QD) diagnostic efficacy and predictive value in discogenic-pain evaluation in a prospective study correlating intradiscal pressure values with pain reduction after percutaneous image-guided technique (i.e., percutaneous decompression, PD). Materials and Methods: During the last 3 years, 36 patients [21 male and 15 female (mean age 36 {+-} 5.8 years)] with intervertebral disc hernia underwent QD before PD. Under absolute sterilization and fluoroscopy, a mixture of contrast medium and normal saline (3:1 ratio) was injected. A discmonitor performed a constant rate injection and recorded pressure and volume values, thus producing the relative pressure-volume curve. PD was then performed. Pain reduction and improved mobility were recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months after PD using clinical evaluation and a numeric visual scale (NVS; 0 to 10 units). Results: Mean pain values of 7.5 {+-} 1.9 (range 4 to 8) NVS units were recorded before PD; these decreased to 2.9 {+-} 2.44 at 3 months, 1.0 {+-} 1.9 at 12 months, and 1.0 {+-} 1.9 NVS units at 24 months after PD. Recorded correlations (pressure, volume, significant pain-reduction values) with bilateral statistical significance included a maximum injected volume of 2.4 ml (p = 0.045), P{sub o} < 14 psi [initial pressure required to inject 0.1 ml of the mixture inside the disc (p = 0.05)], P{sub max} {<=} 65 psi [greatest pressure value on the curve (p = 0.018)], and P{sub max} - P{sub o} {<=} 47 psi (p = 0.038). Patients meeting these pressure or volume cut-off points, either independently or as a total, had significant pain reduction (>4 NVS units) after PD. No complications were noted. Conclusions: QD is an efficient technique that may have predictive value for discogenic pain evaluation. It might serve as a useful tool for patient selection for intervertebral disc therapies.

  16. A kinetic pressure effect on the experimental abiotic reduction of aqueous CO2 to methane from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Codi; Cody, George D.; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2015-02-01

    Aqueous abiotic methane concentrations in a range of geologic settings are below levels expected for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that kinetics can control the speciation of reduced carbon-bearing fluids. Previous studies have suggested that mineral catalysts or gas-phase reactions may increase the rate of methanogenesis. Here, we report on experiments that indicate pressure can also accelerate aqueous reduction of CO2 to CH4. Four series of cold-seal hydrothermal experiments were performed from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C for two weeks and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The starting fluids were 10-20-μL solutions of 70-mmolal 13C-labeled formic acid (H13COOH) contained in welded gold capsules. Increasing pressure (P) resulted in a systematic, reproducible log-linear increase in 13CH4 yields. The pressure effect could be quantified the log-linear slope, Δlog[13CH4]/ΔP (log mmolal per kbar). The mean slope was 0.66 ± 0.05 (±1s.e.), indicating that 13CH4 yields increased by an average factor of 40-50 over a P range of 2.5 kbar. Pressure-independent variations in [13CH4] were observed as scatter about the log-linear regressions and as variations in the y-intercepts of the regressions. These variations were attributed to trace amounts of catalytic Fe along the inner capsule wall that remained despite cleaning the Au capsules in nitric acid prior to each experimental series. The mechanism for the pressure-dependent effect was interpreted to result from one or more of the following three processes: reduction of a metastable reaction intermediate such as methanol, formation of Fe-carbonyl complexes in the fluid, and/or heterogeneous catalysis by Fe. The results suggest that pressure may influence aqueous abiotic CH4 yields in certain geological environments, particularly when the relative effects of other kinetic factors such as temperature are diminished, e.g., in cool forearcs or other settings with a steep geothermal

  17. 08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

  18. Evaluation of blood pressure reduction response and responder characteristics to fixed-dose combination treatment of amlodipine and losartan: a post hoc analysis of pooled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Wu, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Hanson, Mary E; Fujita, Kenji P

    2014-09-01

    Data from four clinical trials compared reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among patients treated with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs 5/100 mg and amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg and 10 mg. Response rate was assessed as reduction in SBP or DBP (>20/10 mm Hg) and proportion of patients achieving SBP <140 mm Hg or DBP <90 mm Hg. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on baseline SBP and DBP. Mean SBP and DBP were reduced in amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg (n=182) and amlodipine/losartan 5/100 mg (n=95) users across all baseline quartiles. Patients using amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg had significantly greater SBP and DBP reductions vs amlodipine 5 mg (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). Amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg users had significantly greater SBP reduction vs amlodipine 10 mg (SBP P=.02; DBP P=not significant). The odds of responding to therapy were significantly greater with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg (odds ratio, 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-25.5) and were similar vs amlodipine 10 mg (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.017-9.51). These results support the use of combination therapy early in the treatment of hypertension.

  19. Experimental Investigation on Oil Enhancement Mechanism of Hot Water Injection in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongmao, Hao; Mingjing, Lu; Chengshun, Dong; Jianpeng, Jia; Yuliang, Su; Guanglong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at enhancing the oil recovery of tight reservoirs, the mechanism of hot water flooding was studied in this paper. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of hot water injection on oil properties, and the interaction between rock and fluid, petrophysical property of the reservoirs. Results show that with the injected water temperature increasing, the oil/water viscosity ratio falls slightly in a tight reservoir which has little effect on oil recovery. Further it shows that the volume factor of oil increases significantly which can increase the formation energy and thus raise the formation pressure. At the same time, oil/water interfacial tension decreases slightly which has a positive effect on production though the reduction is not obvious. Meanwhile, the irreducible water saturation and the residual oil saturation are both reduced, the common percolation area of two phases is widened and the general shape of the curve improves. The threshold pressure gradient that crude oil starts to flow also decreases. It relates the power function to the temperature, which means it will be easier for oil production and water injection. Further the pore characteristics of reservoir rocks improves which leads to better water displacement. Based on the experimental results and influence of temperature on different aspects of hot water injection, the flow velocity expression of two-phase of oil and water after hot water injection in tight reservoirs is obtained.

  20. Lymphedema Risk Reduction Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... now! Position Paper: Lymphedema Risk Reduction Practices Category: Position Papers Tags: Risks Archives Treatment risk reduction garments surgery obesity infection blood pressure trauma morbid obesity body weight ...

  1. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Sulfur isotope analysis of bitumen and pyrite associated with thermal sulfate reduction in reservoir carbonates at the Big Piney-La Barge production complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Hubert E.; Walters, Clifford C.; Horn, William C.; Zimmer, Mindy; Heines, Maureen M.; Lamberti, William A.; Kliewer, Christine; Pottorf, Robert J.; Macleod, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur isotopes of solid bitumen and associated pyrite from the Madison Limestone in the Big Piney-La Barge production complex were measured using a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method. The solid bitumens, a product of thermochemical sulfate reduction, yielded δ34S values of +18.9 ± 3.9 that are consistent with inferred values for native Mississippian sulfate. In contrast, coarse and fine grain pyrite grains were found to be 34S depleted, with values similar to that of the produced H2S (δ34S ∼ +10‰). We interpret these results to indicate that two different sources of sulfate were involved with TSR within the Madison Limestone-autochthonous anhydrite, which is now completely replaced with calcite, and Permian age sulfate dissolved in the aquifer. While checking for inclusions within the bitumen that could lead to erroneous measurement, we found the bitumen possesses a ∼5 μm rim and internal “worm-like” features enriched in organic sulfur. We hypothesize that the rim is the result of back reaction of the late forming H2S with the solid bitumen and that the <1 μm diameter wormy features may result from liquid-liquid immiscibility occurring at the high temperatures of formation.

  3. High-Reynolds-number turbulent-boundary-layer wall pressure fluctuations with skin-friction reduction by air injection.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Eric S; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steven L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2008-05-01

    The hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations that occur on the solid surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer are a common source of flow noise. This paper reports multipoint surface pressure fluctuation measurements in water beneath a high-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer with wall injection of air to reduce skin-friction drag. The experiments were conducted in the U.S. Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9-m-long, 3.05-m-wide hydrodynamically smooth flat plate at freestream speeds up to 20 ms and downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers exceeding 200 x 10(6). Air was injected from one of two spanwise slots through flush-mounted porous stainless steel frits (approximately 40 microm mean pore diameter) at volume flow rates from 17.8 to 142.5 l/s per meter span. The two injectors were located 1.32 and 9.78 m from the model's leading edge and spanned the center 87% of the test model. Surface pressure measurements were made with 16 flush-mounted transducers in an "L-shaped" array located 10.7 m from the plate's leading edge. When compared to no-injection conditions, the observed wall-pressure variance was reduced by as much as 87% with air injection. In addition, air injection altered the inferred convection speed of pressure fluctuation sources and the streamwise coherence of pressure fluctuations.

  4. Pore-by-pore capillary pressure measurements using X-ray microtomography at reservoir conditions: Curvature, snap-off, and remobilization of residual CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, Matthew; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2014-11-01

    X-ray microtomography was used to image the shape and size of residual ganglia of supercritical CO2 at resolutions of 3.5 and 2 μm and at representative subsurface conditions of temperature and pressure. The capillary pressure for each ganglion was found by measuring the curvature of the CO2-brine interface, while the pore structure was parameterized using distance maps of the pore space. The formation of the residual clusters by snap-off was examined by comparing the ganglion capillary pressure to local pore topography. The capillary pressure was found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the largest restriction (throat) surrounding the ganglion, which validates the imbibition mechanisms used in pore-network modeling. The potential mobilization of residual ganglia was assessed using a reformulation of both the capillary (Ncmacro) and Bond numbers (Nbmacro), rigorously based on a balance of pore-scale forces, with the majority of ganglia remobilized at Ncmacro around 1. Buoyancy forces were found to be small in this system (Nbmacro << 1), meaning the gravitational remobilization of CO2 after residual trapping would be extremely difficult.

  5. Simulation of irreversible rock compaction effects on geopressured reservoir response: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1986-12-01

    A series of calculations are presented which quantitatively demonstrate the effects of nonlinear stress-deformation properties on the behavior of geopressured reservoirs. The range of stress-deformation parameters considered is based on information available from laboratory rock mechanics tests performed at the University of Texas at Austin and at Terra Tek, Inc. on cores recovered from geopressured wells. The effects of irreversible formation rock compaction, associated permeability reduction, and repetitive load/unload cycling are considered. The formation rock and geopressured brine properties are incorporated into an existing reservoir simulator using a bilinear model for the irreversible compaction process. Pressure drawdown and buildup testing of a well producing from the geopressured formation is simulated for a suite of calculations covering the range of formation parameters. The results are presented and discussed in terms of the inference (e.g., permeability and reservoir volume) that would be drawn from the simulated test data by an analyst using conventional methods.

  6. Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1980-05-29

    Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River, Geothermal Field (RRGF), Idaho. Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Subsurface Transport and Groundwater Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. T.; Moridis, G. J.; Keen, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown tremendously over the last decade, and concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways that could connect the stimulated reservoir to shallower groundwater aquifers. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a deeper tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying groundwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, assuming that the formation of a connecting pathway has already occurred. We focus on two general transport scenarios: 1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and 2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. The simulations explore a range of permeabilities and geometries over time scales, and evaluate the mechanisms and factors that could lead to the escape of gas or reservoir fluid and the contamination of groundwater resources. We also examine the effects of overpressured reservoirs, and explore long-term transport processes as part of a continuing study. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Gas production from the reservoir via a horizontal well is likely to mitigate release through the reduction of available free gas and the lowering of reservoir pressure. We also find that fractured tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of large volumes of migrating gas, and incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  8. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Celotto, A C; Ferreira, L G; Capellini, V K; Albuquerque, A A S; Rodrigues, A J; Evora, P R B

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control.

  9. Numerical Simulation for Natural State of Two-Phase Liquid Dominated Geothermal Reservoir with Steam Cap Underlying Brine Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, Heru Berian; Miryani Saptadji, Nenny

    2016-09-01

    Hydrothermal reservoir which liquid-dominated hydrothermal reservoir is a type of geothermal reservoir that most widely used for power plant. The exploitation of mass and heat from the geothermal fluid will decrease the pressure in the reservoir over time. Therefore the pressure drop in the reservoir will have an impact on the formation of boiling zones or boiling will increase. The impacts are an increase in the fraction of steam, dryness, in the reservoir and with good vertical permeability will form a steam cap underlying the brine reservoir. The two- phase liquid dominated reservoir is sensitive to the porosity and difficult to assign average properties of the entire reservoir when there is boiling zone in some area of the reservoir. These paper showed successful development of two-phase liquid dominated geothermal reservoir and discussed the formation of steam cap above brine reservoir through numerical simulation for state natural conditions. The natural state modeling in steam cap shows a match with the conceptual model of the vapor-dominated developed. These paper also proofed the presence of transition zone, boiling zone, between steam cap and brine reservoir.

  10. Defect reduction in photon-accelerated negative bias instability of InGaZnO thin-film transistors by high-pressure water vapor annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seung Rim, You; Jeong, Wooho; Du Ahn, Byung; Jae Kim, Hyun

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the effects of high-pressure water vapor annealing (WHPA) under negative bias temperature illumination stress and light incidence on amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistors. WHPA could improve device reliability and reduce the hump occurrence. It was attributed to the effective reduction and passivation in oxygen vacancies under WHPA. By comparing the experimental and technology computer-aided design simulation, we could confirm that the low-density of deep-donor-like oxygen vacancy (Vo) states near the valance band maximum contributed to the reduction of photo-excited single ionized oxygen vacancies (Vo+) and double ionized oxygen vacancies (Vo2+) as shallow-donor states near the conduction band minimum.

  11. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1999-06-08

    This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 1998 through December 31, 1998, for the project, ''Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance in Fractured Reservoirs.'' In our first task area, disproportionate permeability reduction, a literature survey and analysis are underway to identify options for reducing permeability to water much more than that to oil. In our second task area, we are encouraging the use of our recently developed software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells. In several field applications, we noted the importance of obtaining accurate values of the static reservoir pressure before using our program. In our third task area, we examined gel properties as they extruded through fractures. We found stable pressure gradients during injection of a large volume of a one-day-old Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel into a 0.04-in.-wide, four-ft-long fracture. This finding confirms that gel injection (under our specific circumstances) did not lead to continuously increasing pressure gradients and severely limited gel propagation. Our experiments also provided insights into the mechanism for gel propagation during extrusion through fractures.

  12. Reservoir modles

    SciTech Connect

    Malzahn, Mark

    1987-01-06

    The project to match the pressure response seen at EE-3A during the final shut-in of the ICFT initially began as an attempt to solve a mass-balance equation for an inflated, penny-shaped planar fracture during shut-in. Implicit assumptions include no flow along the fracture, no fracture extension after shut-in, constant fracture length and a homogenous rock mass with constant permeability surrounding the fracture. The resulting expression equates the fluid volume permeating into the rock to the change in volume of the fracture as it deflates during shut-in.

  13. Implementation of pressurized air injection system in a Kaplan prototype for the reduction of vibration caused by tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, A.; Angulo, M.; Lucino, C.; Hene, M.; Capezio, O.; Liscia, S.

    2016-11-01

    Blade tip cavitation is a well-known phenomenon that affects the performance of large-diameter Kaplan turbines and induces structural vibration. Injection of pressurized air has been found to yield promising results in reducing those damaging effects. In this work, the results of an experimental test of air injection on a 9.5-m-diameter Kaplan turbine are reported. Experiments were performed for several load conditions and for two different net heads. Accelerations, pressure pulsation and noise emission were monitored for every tested condition. Results show that, at the expense of a maximum efficiency drop of 0.2%, air injection induces a decrease on the level of vibration from 57% up to 84%, depending on the load condition. Such decrease is seen to be proportional to the air flow rate, in the range from 0.06 to 0.8‰ (respect to the discharge at the best efficiency point).

  14. A general formulation for compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, F.; Guzman, J.; Galindo-Nava, A. |

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors present a general formulation to solve the non-linear difference equations that arise in compositional reservoir simulation. The general approach here presented is based on newton`s method and provides a systematic approach to generate several formulations to solve the compositional problem, each possessing a different degree of implicitness and stability characteristics. The Fully-Implicit method is at the higher end of the implicitness spectrum while the IMPECS method, implicit in pressure-explicit in composition and saturation, is at the lower end. They show that all methods may be obtained as particular cases of the fully-implicit method. Regarding the matrix problem, all methods have a similar matrix structure; the composition of the Jacobian matrix is however unique in each case, being in some instances amenable to reductions for optimal solution of the matrix problem. Based on this, a different approach to derive IMPECS type methods is proposed; in this case, the whole set of 2nc + 6 equations, that apply in each gridblock, is reduced to a single pressure equation through matrix reduction operations; this provides a more stable numerical scheme, compared to other published IMPCS methods, in which the subset of thermodynamic equilibrium equations is arbitrarily decoupled form the set of gridblock equations to perform such reduction. The authors discuss how the general formulation here presented can be used to formulate and construct an adaptive-implicit compositional simulators. They also present results on the numerical performance of FI, IMPSEC and IMPECS methods on some test problems.

  15. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Nicholas A.

    2010-05-01

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p = 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  16. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Nicholas A. D.C.

    2010-05-31

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  17. Effect of a reduction in sodium intake on cold-induced elevation of blood pressure in the rat.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, P; Fregly, M J; Papanek, P E

    1992-09-01

    Chronic exposure of rats to cold (5 degrees C) induces hypertension within 3 weeks. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of treatment with graded levels of dietary NaCl on the induction of hypertension during chronic exposure to cold. Four groups of male rats were used. The first, given a commercial sodium-deficient diet containing 0.30% NaCl, served as the warm-adapted control group. The second, third, and fourth groups were given the same diet containing 0.075%, 0.15%, and 0.30% NaCl, respectively. Because cold-exposed rats ingest approximately twice as much food as warm-adapted controls, this represented half, the same, and twice the amount of NaCl ingested by the control group. The latter three groups were placed in cold air (5 degrees C). All cold-treated groups had an elevation of systolic blood pressure that was proportional to the concentration of NaCl in the diet by the seventeenth week of exposure to cold. Cardiac hypertrophy occurred to the same extent in all cold-exposed groups and was thus unaffected by the NaCl content of the diet or by the extent of elevation of blood pressure. Hence, cardiac hypertrophy during chronic exposure to cold is supported by other factors, possibly by the increased concentration of either norepinephrine or triiodothyronine, or both, which occurs characteristically in rats under these conditions. The results of this experiment suggest that the amount of NaCl ingested daily plays a role in the cold-induced elevation of blood pressure observed in rats.

  18. Regenerating Pt-3d-Pt model electrocatalysts through oxidation-reduction cycles monitored at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menning, Carl A.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    The interchange between the Pt-Ni-Pt and Ni-Pt-Pt bimetallic configurations in O 2 and H 2 is confirmed experimentally at atmospheric pressure using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The subsurface Pt-3d-Pt structure, a desirable configuration as cathode electrocatalysts for PEM fuel cells, is found to be preferred in the reducing environment of H 2 whereas the surface 3d-Pt-Pt configuration is preferred in O 2. This process has been found to be reversible, providing useful insights into the maintenance and regeneration of the desirable subsurface structure.

  19. Wills Eye Hospital and surgical network: successful pre-positioning strategies for payment reduction and managed care pressures.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D M

    2001-01-01

    Through strategic clinical diversification, political activism, and bold expansion, Wills Eye Hospital, a teaching specialty surgical hospital, survives ravages of sudden onslaughts of managed care payment reductions while maintaining autonomy. Slack inpatient resources were re-utilized to create unique programs attractive to regional managed care organizations. Advocacy and lobbying for short-term favorable treatment from Medicare bought the Hospital valuable time and positioning. Building out a regional network of ambulatory surgical centers assures the growth and access to market required for Wills to maintain its autonomy in a managed care contracting environment.

  20. Development of a compositional model fully coupled with geomechanics and its application to tight oil reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yi

    solutions and results of a commercial simulator before conducting numerical studies. The numerical studies demonstrate the effect of capillary pressure on VLE, and further on production performance. The significant effect of capillary pressure on VLE leads to the suppression of bubble-point pressure and more light components dissolved in the oil phase. Consequently it is observed that there is smaller gas saturation, larger mole fractions of light components, and faster pressure decreasing at reservoir conditions; meanwhile less gas and more oil are produced at surface. The substantial decrease in reservoir pore pressure results in a large increase of effective stress, which induces the changes of rock properties and influences the production performance. The stress-induced degradation of permeability undermines the production performance, and the geomechanical effect on the permeability of natural fractures is mainly responsible for the undermined production performance. The reduction of pore size due to the geomechanical effect could increase the capillary pressure, which enlarges the influence of capillarity on VLE and further suppresses bubble-point pressure. On the other hand, the effect of capillary pressure on VLE influences the fluid flow and therefore influences the effective stress through the flow-stress coupling process. Thus the interaction between pore confinement and rock compaction can be modeled with MSFLOW_COM, and illustrated through numerical studies. This research provides a three-dimensional numerical tool for accurately modeling porous and fractured tight oil reservoirs. The developed simulator is able to assist scientists and engineers to study and understand the complex multiphase, multi-component fluid flow behaviors in tight oil reservoirs.

  1. Reductions in systolic blood pressure with liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes: Insights from a patient-level pooled analysis of six randomized clinical trials☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vivian A.; DeVries, J. Hans; Henry, Robert R.; Donsmark, Morten; Thomsen, Henrik F.; Plutzky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantify the effect of liraglutide on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and assess the influence of covariates on observed SBP reductions. Methods A patient-level pooled analysis of six phase 3, randomized trials was conducted. Results The analysis included 2792 randomized patients. In the intention-to-treat population (n = 2783), mean [±SE] SBP reductions from baseline with liraglutide 1.2 mg (2.7 [0.8] mmHg) and 1.8 mg (2.9 [0.7] mmHg) once daily were significantly greater than with placebo (0.5 [0.9] mmHg; P = 0.0029 and P = 0.0004, respectively) after 26 weeks, and were evident after 2 weeks. Liraglutide was also associated with significantly greater SBP reductions than glimepiride and, at a dose of 1.8 mg, insulin glargine and rosiglitazone. SBP reductions with liraglutide weakly correlated with weight loss (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.08–0.12; P ≤ 0.0148). No dependence of these reductions on concomitant antihypertensive medications was detected (P = 0.1304). Liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg were associated with mean increases in pulse of 3 beats per minute (bpm), versus a 1 bpm increase with placebo (P < 0.0001 for each dose versus placebo). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces SBP in patients with T2D, including those receiving concomitant antihypertensive medication. PMID:24561125

  2. Reduction of the pectoral spine and girdle in domesticated Channel catfish is likely caused by changes in selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Fine, Michael L; Lahiri, Shweta; Sullivan, Amanda D H; Mayo, Mark; Newton, Scott H; Sismour, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Locked pectoral spines of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus more than double the fish's width and complicate ingestion by gape-limited predators. The spine mates with the pectoral girdle, a robust structure that anchors the spine. This study demonstrates that both spine and girdle exhibit negative allometric growth and that pectoral spines and girdles are lighter in domesticated than in wild Channel Catfish. This finding could be explained by changes in selection pressure for spine growth during domestication or by an epigenetic effect in which exposure to predators in wild fish stimulates pectoral growth. We tested the epigenetic hypothesis by exposing domesticated Channel Catfish fingerlings to Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides predators for 13 weeks. Spines and girdles grow isometrically in the fingerlings, and regression analysis indicates no difference in proportional pectoral growth between control and predator-exposed fish. Therefore a change in selection pressure likely accounts for smaller pectoral growth in domesticated Channel Catfish. Decreasing spine growth in older fish suggests anti-predator functions are most important in smaller fish. Additionally, growth of the appendicular and axial skeleton is controlled differentially, and mechanical properties of the spine and not just its length are an important component of this defensive adaptation.

  3. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Basic gas storage reservoir operations and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nowaczewski, S.F. )

    1994-08-01

    Operation and performance analysis of gas storage reservoirs is described in very basic and general terms. Reservoir selection criteria (capacity, deliverability, location, field type, trap type) are reviewed. Well construction considerations and practices (casing sizing, placement, and cementing) are highlighted with regard to the need for long-lived safe operation. Deliverability estimation and prediction and gas inventory methodologies are described. The benefits of high density, high quality data on gas pressure and composition, production rates and volumes, and geologic information to reservoir performance evaluation and prediction are demonstrated.

  5. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  6. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Understanding Microbial Reservoir Souring and Desouring Processes Using Reactive Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Bouskill, N.; Hubbard, C. G.; Hubbard, S. S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Li, L.; Engelbrektson, A. L.; Coates, J. D.; Surasani, V.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is the major metabolic process that leads to oil reservoir souring. Souring typically occurs when (sea)water is injected into the oil reservoir to maintain pressure and sweep remnant oil through the reservoir. Because biogenesis of hydrogen sulfide has detrimental impacts on oil production operations and can cause significant environmental and health problems, we strive to develop predictive understanding of reservoir souring and associated mitigation processes. Recent laboratory sediment column experiments have demonstrated the effectiveness of nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate treatments as souring control strategies. In this study, we describe the development of a reactive transport model that is based on the reaction mechanisms and kinetics revealed through the column experimental data. The model was used to simulate the temporal and spatial evolution of the primary chemical species (e.g. sulfate, sulfide, nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate) and the microbial dynamics involved in the souring and desouring processes. The growth and inhibition dynamics of the sulfate reducing bacterial population are explicitly simulated and constrained by energetics. Simulation of the laboratory experimental results show that the model captured the spatio-temporal trend of the chemical species and microbial guilds during both souring and desouring. Ongoing research is focusing on extending the reactive transport model to mechanistically understand, quantify, and predict souring and desouring processes within heterogeneous reservoirs as a step toward optimizing field scale souring control strategies.

  8. Biogeochemical mass balances in a turbid tropical reservoir. Field data and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Doan, Thuy Kim; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Schmid, Martin

    2014-05-01

    entire mass balance of nutrients and of the mineralization rates (denitrification and aerobic benthic mineralization) calculated from the model fitted well to the field measurements. Furthermore, this analysis indicates that the benthic mineralizations are the dominant processes involved in the nutrients release. This is the first implementation of a biogeochemical model applied to a highly productive reservoir in the TMVB in order to estimate nutrients release from sediments. It could be used for scenarios of reduction of eutrophication in the reservoir. This study provides a good example of the behavior of a small tropical reservoir under intense human pressure and it will help stakeholders to adopt appropriate strategies for the management of turbid tropical reservoirs.

  9. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 7: High pressure fuel turbo-pump third stage impeller analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Kirby V.

    1989-01-01

    This volume summarizes the analysis used to assess the structural life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbo-Pump (HPFTP) Third Stage Impeller. This analysis was performed in three phases, all using the DIAL finite element code. The first phase was a static stress analysis to determine the mean (non-varying) stress and static margin of safety for the part. The loads involved were steady state pressure and centrifugal force due to spinning. The second phase of the analysis was a modal survey to determine the vibrational modes and natural frequencies of the impeller. The third phase was a dynamic response analysis to determine the alternating component of the stress due to time varying pressure impulses at the outlet (diffuser) side of the impeller. The results of the three phases of the analysis show that the Third Stage Impeller operates very near the upper limits of its capability at full power level (FPL) loading. The static loading alone creates stresses in some areas of the shroud which exceed the yield point of the material. Additional cyclic loading due to the dynamic force could lead to a significant reduction in the life of this part. The cyclic stresses determined in the dynamic response phase of this study are based on an assumption regarding the magnitude of the forcing function.

  10. Reduction of the uncertainty of the PTB vacuum pressure scale by a new large area non-rotating piston gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Th; Ahrendt, H.; Jousten, K.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the metrological characterization of a new large area piston gauge (FRS5, Furness Rosenberg Standard) installed at the vacuum metrology laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The operational procedure and the uncertainty budget for pressures between 30 Pa and 11 kPa are given. Comparisons between the FRS5 and a mercury manometer, a rotary piston gauge and a force-balanced piston gauge are described. We show that the reproducibility of the calibration values of capacitance diaphragm gauges is enhanced by a factor of 6 compared with a static expansion primary standard (SE2). Improvements of the SE2 performance by reducing the number of expansions and smaller uncertainties of expansion ratios are discussed.

  11. IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid B. Grigg

    2003-10-31

    The second annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies have been undertaken with the intention to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Many items presented in this report are applicable to other interest areas: e.g. gas injection and production, greenhouse gas sequestration, chemical flooding, reservoir damage, etc. Major areas of studies include reduction of CO{sub 2} mobility to improve conformance, determining and understanding injectivity changes in particular injectivity loses, and modeling process mechanisms determined in the first two areas. Interfacial tension (IFT) between a high-pressure, high-temperature CO{sub 2} and brine/surfactant and foam stability are used to assess and screen surfactant systems. In this work the effects of salinity, pressure, temperature, surfactant concentration, and the presence of oil on IFT and CO{sub 2} foam stability were determined on the surfactant (CD1045{trademark}). Temperature, pressure, and surfactant concentration effected both IFT and foam stability while oil destabilized the foam, but did not destroy it. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) can be used as a sacrificial and an enhancing agent. This work indicates that on Berea sandstone CLS concentration, brine salinity, and temperature are dominant affects on both adsorption and desorption and that adsorption is not totally reversible. Additionally, CLS adsorption was tested on five minerals common to oil reservoirs; it was found that CLS concentration, salinity, temperature, and mineral type had significant effects on adsorption. The adsorption density from most to least was: bentonite > kaolinite > dolomite > calcite > silica. This work demonstrates the extent of dissolution and precipitation from co-injection of CO{sub 2} and brine in limestone core

  12. COSTING MODELS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION: PART III- PUMPS, TANKS, AND RESERVOIRS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distribution systems are generally designed to ensure hydraulic reliability. Storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are critical in maintaining this reliability. Although storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are necessary for maintaining adequate pressure, they may also have a negati...

  13. Fully coupled analysis of reservoir compaction and subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, M.; Hansteen, H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the differences between fully-coupled and uncoupled formulations of models of production and subsidence. For highly compacting hydrocarbon reservoirs, production can cause compaction of the reservoir and subsidence of the overburden, and in turn, compaction and subsidence can affect the productivity of the reservoir by increasing the reservoir pressure. Intuitively, analyses of production and subsidence should be done in a fully-coupled fashion. However, most, if not all, of the analyses done so far on compacting reservoirs are uncoupled where production and subsidence are calculated in a staggered manner. The results of the numerical analyses using an uncoupled reservoir simulation, and a fully-coupled finite element simulation based on Biot`s formulation of a typical compacting reservoir are presented and compared. Different pore pressure response were obtained depending on whether an uncoupled or a fully-coupled analysis was performed, and also depending on whether there is arching of the overburden or not. The results of fully-coupled analyses of compaction and subsidence showed that the generation of additional pore pressure due to compaction cannot be correctly analyzed by simply adjusting the rock compressibilities in reservoir simulation. The most pronounced effect of coupling, obtained from the numerical simulations, is on the possibility of pore pressure increase close to the reservoir flanks even during production. The implications of the differences in the results of fully-coupled and uncoupled simulations are discussed.

  14. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  15. Pressure transient method for front tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1983-08-01

    A pressure transient technique for tracking the advance of cold water fronts during water flooding and goethermal injection operations has been developed. The technique is based on the concept that the steady state pressure buildup in the reservoir region inside the front can be calculated by a fluid skin factor. By analyzing successive pressure falloff tests, the advance of the front in the reservoir can be monitored. The validity of the methods is demonstrated by application to three numerically simulated data sets, a nonisothermal step-rate injection test, a series of pressure falloffs in a multilayered reservoir, and a series of pressure falloff tests in a water flooded oil reservoir.

  16. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat fluid properties published in the original reports. This comparison allowed estimation of the ‘lost’ light hydrocarbon fractions. An Umiat 'dead' oil sample then could be physically created by adding the lost light ends to the weatherized Umiat dead oil sample. This recreated sample was recombined with solution gas to create a 'pseudo-live' Umiat oil sample which was then used for experimental PVT and phase behavior studies to determine fluid properties over the range of reservoir pressures and temperatures. The phase behavior of the ‘pseudo-live’ oil was also simulated using the Peng- Robinson equations of state (EOS). The EOS model was tuned with measured experimental data to accurately simulate the differential liberation tests in order to obtain the necessary data for reservoir simulation studies, including bubble point pressure and oil viscosity. The bubble point pressure of the reconstructed Umiat oil is 345 psi, suggesting that maintenance of reservoir pressures above that pressure will be important for the any proposed production technique. A major part of predicting how the Umiat reservoir will perform is determining the relative permeability of oil in the presence of ice. Early in the project, UAF work on samples of the Umiat reservoir indicated that there is a significant reduction in the relatively permeability of oil in the presence of ice. However, it was not clear as to why this reduction occurred or where the ice resided. To explore this further, additional experimental and theoretical work was conducted. Core flood experiments were performed on two clean Berea sandstone cores under permafrost conditions to determine the relative permeability to oil (kro) over a temperature range of 23ºC to - 10ºC and for a range of connate water salinities. Both cores showed maximum reduction in relative permeability to oil when saturated with deionized water and less

  17. 20th century human pressures drive reductions in deepwater oxygen leading to losses of benthic methane-based food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Simon; Millet, Laurent; Verneaux, Valérie; Lami, Andrea; David, Etienne; Murgia, Laurie; Parent, Claire; Musazzi, Simona; Gauthier, Emilie; Bichet, Vincent; Magny, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater lakes play a key role in the global carbon cycle as sinks (organic carbon sequestration) and sources (greenhouse gas emissions). Understanding the carbon cycle response to environmental changes is becoming a crucial challenge in the context of global warming and the preponderance of human pressures. We reconstructed the long-term (1500 years) evolution of trophic functioning of the benthic food web, based on methanotrophic ancient DNA and chironomid isotope analyses). In addition, human land use is also reconstructed in three different lakes (eastern France, Jura Mountains). Our findings confirm that the benthic food web can be highly dependent on methane-derived carbon (up to 50% of the chironomid biomass) and reveal that the activation of this process can correspond to a natural functioning or be a consequence of anthropic perturbation. The studied lakes also showed a similar temporal evolution over the last century with the disappearance of the profundal aquatic insects (Chironomidae, Diptera), considered as keystone for the whole lake food web (e.g., coupling benthic-pelagic), inducing a potential collapse in the transfer of methane to top consumers. This functional state, also called the dead zone expansion, was caused by the change in human land-use occurring at the beginning of the 20th century. The strong modification of agro-pastoral practices (e.g., fertilization practices, intensive grazing, and sewage effluent) modified the influx of nutrients (by diffuse and/or point-source inputs) and induced a significant increase in the trophic status and organic matter sedimentation to reach unprecedented values. Further studies should be planned to assess dead zone expansion and, according to the regime shift theory, to provide environmental tipping points for sustainable resource management.

  18. Serial Multifocal Electroretinograms during Long-term Elevation and Reduction of Intraocular Pressure in Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Nork, T. Michael; Kim, Charlene B. Y.; Heatley, Gregg A.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Lucarelli, Mark J.; Levin, Leonard A.; Ver Hoeve, James N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between elevations of intraocular pressure (IOP) and the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) in non-human primates. Experimental glaucoma was induced in 4 rhesus and 4 cynomolgus monkeys by laser trabecular meshwork destruction (LTD) in one eye. To evaluate the contribution of ganglion cells to mfERG changes, one monkey of each species had previously underwent unilateral optic nerve transection (ONT). After ≥ 44 weeks of elevation, the IOP was reduced by trabeculectomy in 2 non-transected animals. In the intact (non-transected) animals there was an increase in the amplitude of the early mfERG waveforms (N1 and P1) of the first order kernel (K1) throughout the period of IOP elevation in all of the rhesus, but not all of the cynomolgus monkeys. A species difference was also present as a decrease of the second order kernel, first slice (K2.1) in all of the cynomolgus monkeys but only in 1 of the rhesus monkeys (the 1 with the ONT). Similar IOP effects on the mfERG were seen in the ONT animals. Surgical lowering of IOP resulted in a return of the elevated K1 amplitudes to baseline levels. However, the depressed K2.1 RMS in the cynomolgus monkeys did not recover. These results demonstrate species-specific changes in cone-driven retinal function during periods of elevated IOP. These IOP-related effects can occur in the absence of retinal ganglion cells and may be reversible. PMID:20422254

  19. Quantification of geologic descriptions for reservoir characterization in carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, F.J.; Vander Stoep, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Recognition that a large volume of oil remains in carbonate reservoirs at the end of primary depletion and waterflooding has prompted the reevaluation of the reserve-growth potential of many existing carbonate reservoirs. Types of numerical data required include porosity, absolute permeability, relative permeability, fluid saturation, and capillary pressure, all of which are related to the size and distribution of pore space. Rock fabrics control the size and distribution of pore space and define facies that best characterize carbonate reservoirs. Thus, the link between facies descriptions and numerical engineering data is the relationship between pore-size distribution and present carbonate rock fabric. The most effective way to convert facies descriptions into engineering parameters is by considering three basic rock-fabric categories. The first category is interparticle pore space (both intergranular and intercrystalline pore types) with pore-size distribution controlled primarily by the size and shape of grains or crystals. Grain or crystal size is the key geologic measurement and, along with porosity, provides the basis for converting geologic descriptions into values for permeability, saturation, and capillarity. The second category is separate-vug pore space, such as moldic or intraparticle pore space. Separate-vug pore space adds porosity but little permeability to the reservoir rock. The contribution to saturation and capillarity depends upon the size of the separate-vug pore space. For example, moldic separate vugs will be saturated with oil, whereas microporous grains will be saturated with water. The third category is touching-vug pore space, which is vuggy pore space that is interconnected on a reservoir scale. The engineering parameters for this category are related to three diagenetic and tectonic factors.

  20. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Reduction of peak acoustic pressure and shaping of heated region by use of multifoci sonications in MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound mediated mild hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Ari; Tillander, Matti; Yarmolenko, Pavel S.; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.; Köhler, Max O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ablative hyperthermia (>55 °C) has been used as a definitive treatment for accessible solid tumors not amenable to surgery, whereas mild hyperthermia (40–45 °C) has been shown effective as an adjuvant for both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. An optimal mild hyperthermia treatment is spatially accurate, with precise and homogeneous heating limited to the target region while also limiting the likelihood of unwanted thermal or mechanical bioeffects (tissue damage, vascular shutoff). Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) can noninvasively heat solid tumors under image-guidance. In a mild hyperthermia setting, a sonication approach utilizing multiple concurrent foci may provide the benefit of reducing acoustic pressure in the focal region (leading to reduced or no mechanical effects), while providing better control over the heating. The objective of this study was to design, implement, and characterize a multifoci sonication approach in combination with a mild hyperthermia heating algorithm, and compare it to the more conventional method of electronically sweeping a single focus. Methods: Simulations (acoustic and thermal) and measurements (acoustic, with needle hydrophone) were performed. In addition, heating performance of multifoci and single focus sonications was compared using a clinical MR-HIFU platform in a phantom (target = 4–16 mm), in normal rabbit thigh muscle (target = 8 mm), and in a Vx2 tumor (target = 8 mm). A binary control algorithm was used for real-time mild hyperthermia feedback control (target range = 40.5–41 °C). Data were analyzed for peak acoustic pressure and intensity, heating energy efficiency, temperature accuracy (mean), homogeneity of heating (standard deviation [SD], T10 and T90), diameter and length of the heated region, and thermal dose (CEM43). Results: Compared to the single focus approach, multifoci sonications showed significantly lower (67% reduction) peak acoustic

  3. Improved efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhanced prospects for CO{sub 2} flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.B.; Heller, J.P.; Schechter, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this experimental research is to improve the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous reservoirs. Activities are being conducted in three closely related areas: (1) exploring further the applicability of selective mobility reduction (SMR) in the use of foam flooding, (2) exploring the possibility of higher economic viability of floods at slightly reduced CO{sub 2} injection pressures, and (3) taking advantage of gravitational forces during low interfacial tension (IFT), CO{sub 2} flooding in tight, vertically fractured reservoirs. Progress made this quarter in the following tasks is described: Task 1 CO{sub 2}-foams for selective mobility reduction; task 2 reduction of the amount of CO{sub 2} required in CO{sub 2} flooding; and Task 3 low IFT processes and gas injection in fractured reservoirs.

  4. Transient analysis of the 1991 Hijiori Shallow Reservoir Circulation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, M.; Shinohara, N.; Takasugi, S.; Wright, C.A.; Conant, R..

    1996-01-24

    Like any dynamic system, HDR reservoirs cannot be fully characterized by their steady-state behavior. Circulation tests analysis should be performed on both the steady-state response and the transient response of HDR systems. Transient analysis allows not only estimation of critical reservoir parameters and how these parameters change with operating conditions / history, but transient analysis also aids in evaluating the feasibility of various modes of HDR system operation (base load, load following, etc.). This paper details the transient analysis of NEDO's FY 1991 Shallow Reservoir Circulation Test at the Hijiori HDR site in Japan. Reservoir fluid storage is carefully bounded through the employment of two distinct methods for calculation of the fluid storage from the observed transient response. A brief discussion is also included of the distribution of reservoir fluid storage; the relationship between pressure, reservoir stress, and apparent reservoir capacitance; and appropriate circulation test design to facilitate transient analysis.

  5. Production-induced changes in reservoir geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoyedo, Sunday O.

    Sand production remains a source of concern in both conventional and heavy oil production. Porosity increase and changes in local stress magnitude, which often enhance permeability, have been associated with severe sanding. On the other hand, sand production has been linked to a large number of field incidences involving loss of well integrity, casing collapse and corrosion of down-hole systems. It also poses problems for separators and transport facilities. Numerous factors such as reservoir consolidation, well deviation angle through the reservoir, perforation size, grain size, capillary forces associated with water cut, flow rate and most importantly reservoir strain resulting from pore pressure depletion contribute to reservoir sanding. Understanding field-specific sand production patterns in mature fields and poorly consolidated reservoirs is vital in identifying sand-prone wells and guiding remedial activities. Reservoir strain analysis of Forties Field, located in the UK sector of the North Sea, shows that the magnitude of the production-induced strain, part of which is propagated to the base of the reservoir, is of the order of 0.2 %, which is significant enough to impact the geomechanical properties of the reservoir. Sand production analysis in the field shows that in addition to poor reservoir consolidation, a combined effect of repeated perforation, high well deviation, reservoir strain and high fluid flow rate have contributed significantly to reservoir sanding. Knowledge of reservoir saturation variation is vital for in-fill well drilling, while information on reservoir stress variation provides a useful guide for sand production management, casing design, injector placement and production management. Interpreting time-lapse difference is enhanced by decomposing time-lapse difference into saturation, pressure effects and changes in rock properties (e.g. porosity) especially in highly compacting reservoirs. Analyzing the stress and saturation

  6. Low-frequency echo-reduction and insertion-loss measurements from small passive-material samples under ocean environmental temperatures and hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Piquette, J C; Forsythe, S E

    2001-10-01

    System L is a horizontal tube designed for acoustical testing of underwater materials and devices, and is part of the Low Frequency Facility of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island. The tube contains a fill fluid that is composed of a propylene glycol/water mixture. This system is capable of achieving test temperatures in the range of -3 to 40 deg Centigrade, and hydrostatic test pressures in the range 40 to 68,950 kPa. A unidirectional traveling wave can be established within the tube over frequencies of 100 to 1750 Hz. Described here is a technique for measuring the (normal-incidence) echo reduction and insertion loss of small passive-material samples that approximately fill the tube diameter of 38 cm. (Presented also is a waveguide model that corrects the measurements when the sample fills the tube diameter incompletely.) The validity of the system L measurements was established by comparison with measurements acquired in a large acoustic pressure-test vessel using a relatively large panel of a candidate material, a subsample of which was subsequently evaluated in system L. The first step in effecting the comparison was to least-squares fit the data acquired from the large panel to a causal material model. The material model was used to extrapolate the panel measurements into the frequency range of system L. The extrapolations show good agreement with the direct measurements acquired in system L.

  7. Reductions in Mean 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure After 6-Week Treatment With Canagliflozin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R; Machin, Israel; Ren, Jimmy; Trujillo, Angelina; Kawaguchi, Masato; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Damaraju, Chandrasekharrao V; Pfeifer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the early effects of canagliflozin on blood pressure (BP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension. Patients were randomized to canagliflozin 300 mg, canagliflozin 100 mg, or placebo for 6 weeks and underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring before randomization, on day 1 of treatment, and after 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean 24-hour systolic BP (SBP) from baseline to week 6. Overall, 169 patients were included (mean age, 58.6 years; glycated hemoglobin, 8.1%; seated BP 138.5/82.7 mm Hg). At week 6, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater reductions in mean 24-hour SBP than placebo (least squares mean -6.2 vs -1.2 mm Hg, respectively; P=.006). Numerical reductions in SBP were observed with canagliflozin 100 mg. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated, with side effects similar to those reported in previous studies. These results suggest that canagliflozin rapidly reduces BP in patients with T2DM and hypertension.

  8. Dolomite reservoirs: Porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.Q.

    1995-02-01

    Systematic analyses of the published record of dolomite reservoirs worldwide reveal that the majority of hydrocarbon-producing dolomite reservoirs occurs in (1) peritidal-dominated carbonate, (2) subtidal carbonate associated with evaporitic tidal flat/lagoon, (3) subtidal carbonate associated with basinal evaporite, and (4) nonevaporitic carbonate sequence associated with topographic high/unconformity, platform-margin buildup or fault/fracture. Reservoir characteristics vary greatly from one dolomite type to another depending upon the original sediment fabric, the mechanism by which dolomite was formed, and the extent to which early formed dolomite was modified by post-dolomitization diagenetic processes (e.g., karstification, fracturing, and burial corrosion). This paper discusses the origin of dolomite porosity and demonstrates the porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics of different dolomite types.

  9. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Surface Engineered Coating Systems for Aluminum Pressure Die Casting Dies: Towards a 'Smart' Die Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John J. Moore; Dr. Jianliang Lin,

    2012-07-31

    The main objective of this research program was to design and develop an optimal coating system that extends die life by minimizing premature die failure. In high-pressure aluminum die-casting, the die, core pins and inserts must withstand severe processing conditions. Many of the dies and tools in the industry are being coated to improve wear-resistance and decrease down-time for maintenance. However, thermal fatigue in metal itself can still be a major problem, especially since it often leads to catastrophic failure (i.e. die breakage) as opposed to a wear-based failure (parts begin to go out of tolerance). Tooling costs remain the largest portion of production costs for many of these parts, so the ability prevent catastrophic failures would be transformative for the manufacturing industry.The technology offers energy savings through reduced energy use in the die casting process from several factors, including increased life of the tools and dies, reuse of the dies and die components, reduction/elimination of lubricants, and reduced machine down time, and reduction of Al solder sticking on the die. The use of the optimized die coating system will also reduce environmental wastes and scrap parts. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on initial dissemination to the casting industry in 2010 and market penetration of 80% by 2020, is 3.1 trillion BTU's/year. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.63 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  10. Models for naturally fractured, carbonate reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Park, A.; Ozkan, G.; Zhan, X.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    This report outlines the need for new tools for the simulation of fractured carbonate reservoirs. Several problems are identified that call for the development of new reservoir simulation physical models and numerical techniques. These include: karst and vuggy media wherein Darcy`s and traditional multi-phase flow laws do not apply; the need for predicting the preproduction state of fracturing and stress so that the later response of effective stress-dependent reservoirs can be predicted; and methods for predicting the fracturing and collapse of vuggy and karst reservoirs in response to draw-down pressure created during production. Specific research directions for addressing each problem are outlined and preliminary results are noted.

  11. What's shaking?: Understanding creep and induced seismicity in depleting sandstone reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources, such as oil, gas and groundwater, removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. With global energy and water demand increasing rapidly, while availability diminishes, densely populated areas are becoming increasingly targeted for exploitation. Indeed, the impact of our geo-resources needs on the environment has already become noticeable. Deep groundwater pumping has led to significant surface subsidence in urban areas such as Venice and Bangkok. Hydrocarbons production has also led to subsidence and seismicity in offshore (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway) and onshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands). Fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased or show other time-lag effects in relation to changes in production rates. One of the main hypotheses advanced to explain this is time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the vertical rock overburden pressure. The operative deformation mechanisms may include grain-scale brittle fracturing and thermally-activated mass transfer processes (e.g. pressure solution). Unfortunately, these mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. As a first step to better describe creep in sedimentary granular aggregates, we have derived a universal, simple model for intergranular pressure solution (IPS) within an ordered pack of spherical grains. This universal model is able to predict the conditions under which each of the respective pressure solution serial processes, i.e. diffusion, precipitation or dissolution, is dominant. In essence, this creates a generic deformation mechanism map for IPS in any granular material. We have used

  12. Blood Pressure Reduction in the Acute Phase of an Ischemic Stroke Does Not Improve Short- or Long-Term Dependency or Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rong; Liu, Feng-Di; Wang, Shuo; Peng, Jia-Li; Tao, Xiao-Xiao; Zheng, Bo; Zhang, Qi-Ting; Yao, Qian; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Su, Jing-Jing; Shu, Liang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of current literature to determine whether lowering blood pressure (BP) during the acute phase of an ischemic stroke improves short- and long-term outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase were searched until September 5, 2014 using combinations of the search terms: blood pressure reduction, reduced blood pressure, lowering blood pressure, ischemic stroke, acute stroke, and intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trial and patients with acute stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) treated with an antihypertensive agent or placebo. Outcome measures were change in systolic and diastolic BP (SBP, DBP) after treatment, and short- and long-term dependency and mortality rates. A total of 459 studies were identified, and ultimately 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The total number of participants in the treatment groups was 5672 (range, 6–2308), and in the control groups was 5416 (range, 6–2033). In most studies, more than 50% of the participants were males and the mean age was more than 60 years. The mean follow-up time ranged from 5 days to 12 months. As expected, treatment groups had a greater decrease in BP than control groups, and this effect was seen with different classes of antihypertensive drugs. Short-term and long-term dependency rates were similar between treatment and control groups (short-term dependency: pooled odds ratio [OR] = 1.041, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.936–1.159, P = 0.457; long-term dependency: pooled OR = 1.013, 95% CI: 0.915–1.120, P = 0.806). Short-term or long-term mortality was similar between the treatment and control groups (short-term mortality: pooled OR = 1.020, 95% CI: 0.749–1.388, P = .902; long-term mortality: pooled OR = 1.039, 95% CI: 0.883–1.222, P = 0.644). Antihypertensive agents effectively reduce BP during the acute phase of an ischemic stroke, but provide no benefit with

  13. Predicting reservoir wettability via well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Cheng; Fu, Jinhua; Shi, Yujiang; Li, Gaoren; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-01

    Wettability is an important factor in controlling the distribution of oil and water. However, its evaluation has so far been a difficult problem because no log data can directly indicate it. In this paper, a new method is proposed for quantitatively predicting reservoir wettability via well log analysis. Specifically, based on the J function, diagenetic facies classification and the piecewise power functions, capillary pressure curves are constructed from conventional logs and a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log respectively. Under the influence of wettability, the latter is distorted while the former remains unaffected. Therefore, the ratio of the median radius obtained from the two kinds of capillary pressure curve is calculated to reflect wettability, a quantitative relationship between the ratio and reservoir wettability is then established. According to the low-permeability core sample capillary pressure curve, NMR {{T}2} spectrum and contact angle experimental data from the bottom of the Upper Triassic reservoirs in western Ordos Basin, China, two kinds of constructing capillary pressure curve models and a predictive wettability model are calibrated. The wettability model is verified through the Amott wettability index and saturation exponent from resistivity measurement and their determined wettability levels are comparable, indicating that the proposed model is quite reliable. In addition, the model’s good application effect is exhibited in the field study. Thus, the quantitatively predicting reservoir wettability model proposed in this paper provides an effective tool for formation evaluation, field development and the improvement of oil recovery.

  14. The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik; Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA )

    1989-08-01

    These are appendices A thru E of the Ahuachapan geothermal field reservoir analysis. The volume contains: mineralogy contours, ionic chlorine and silicon dioxide contours, well summaries, and temperature and pressure effects. (JEF)

  15. Application of a standardised protocol for hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement improves quality of readings and facilitates reduction of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Tze Tong; Gogna, Apoorva; Irani, Farah Gillan; Too, Chow Wei; Lo, Hoau Gong Richard; Tan, Bien Soo; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Lui, Hock Foong; Chang, Pik Eu Jason

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement is recommended for prognostic and therapeutic indications in centres with adequate resources and expertise. Our study aimed to evaluate the quality of HVPG measurements at our centre before and after introduction of a standardised protocol, and the clinical relevance of the HVPG to variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. METHODS HVPG measurements performed at Singapore General Hospital from 2005–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Criteria for quality HVPG readings were triplicate readings, absence of negative pressure values and variability of ≤ 2 mmHg. The rate of variceal bleeding was compared in cirrhotics who achieved a HVPG response to pharmacotherapy (reduction of the HVPG to < 12 mmHg or by ≥ 20% of baseline) and those who did not. RESULTS 126 HVPG measurements were performed in 105 patients (mean age 54.7 ± 11.4 years; 55.2% men). 80% had liver cirrhosis and 20% had non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH). The mean overall HVPG was 13.5 ± 7.2 mmHg, with a significant difference between the cirrhosis and NCPH groups (p < 0.001). The proportion of quality readings significantly improved after the protocol was introduced. HVPG response was achieved in 28 (33.3%, n = 84) cirrhotics. Nine had variceal bleeding over a median follow-up of 29 months. The rate of variceal bleeding was significantly lower in HVPG responders compared to nonresponders (p = 0.025). CONCLUSION The quality of HVPG measurements in our centre improved after the introduction of a standardised protocol. A HVPG response can prognosticate the risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. PMID:26996384

  16. Diuretics enhance effects of increased dose of candesartan on ambulatory blood pressure reduction in Japanese patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with medium-dose angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Sakima, Atsushi; Kita, Toshihiro; Nakada, Seigo; Yokota, Naoto; Tamaki, Noboru; Etoh, Takuma; Shimokubo, Toru; Kitamura, Kazuo; Takishita, Shuichi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although blockade of the renin-angiotensin system by increasing the dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is recommended to achieve clinical benefits in terms of blood pressure (BP) control and cardiovascular and renal outcomes, the effect of this increased dose on ambulatory BP monitoring has not been evaluated completely in Japanese patients with uncontrolled hypertension undergoing medium-dose ARB therapy. The primary objective of this study was to examine the effect of the relatively high dose of the ARB candesartan (12 mg/day) on 24-h systolic BP and the attainment of target BP levels in uncontrolled hypertension treated with a medium dose of ARBs. A total of 146 hypertensive patients (age: 69.9 ± 9.3 years; females: 65.8%) completed the study. After switching to candesartan at 12 mg/day, all these BP measurements decreased significantly (p<0.001). Attainment of the target office BP (p=0.0014) and 24-h BP levels (p=0.0296) also improved significantly. Subgroup analysis indicated that the reduction of 24-h systolic BP was larger in patients treated with diuretics than those without (p=0.0206). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between the combined ARB and diuretic therapy, and the change in 24-h systolic BP irrespective of preceding ARBs. In conclusion, the switching therapy to increased dose of candesartan caused significant reductions in office and ambulatory BP levels, and improved the attainment of target BP levels in patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with a medium dose of ARBs. Combination with diuretics enhanced this effect.

  17. Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-01-01

    Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

  18. 95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Reservoir Inflation Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Ponden, Raymond F.

    1991-11-22

    Inflation of the reservoir is to begin on Friday afternoon, November 22 and continue through mid day on Monday, November 25. Inflation of the reservoir shall be accomplished by using only injection pump, HP-2. NOTE: Under no circumstances should injection pump, HP-1 be operated.

  20. Geothermal reservoir engineering research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, H. J., Jr.; Kruger, P.; Brigham, W. E.; London, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Stanford University research program on the study of stimulation and reservoir engineering of geothermal resources commenced as an interdisciplinary program in September, 1972. The broad objectives of this program have been: (1) the development of experimental and computational data to evaluate the optimum performance of fracture-stimulated geothermal reservoirs; (2) the development of a geothermal reservoir model to evaluate important thermophysical, hydrodynamic, and chemical parameters based on fluid-energy-volume balances as part of standard reservoir engineering practice; and (3) the construction of a laboratory model of an explosion-produced chimney to obtain experimental data on the processes of in-place boiling, moving flash fronts, and two-phase flow in porous and fractured hydrothermal reservoirs.

  1. Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, Mike

    1992-03-24

    Modeling and prediction of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs is an excellent example of an engineering problem that can be solved through many different means. The problem may be approached from a purely numerical viewpoint, where a successful history match ''demonstrates'' the validity of the reservoir model, or from an analytical point of view. Each method has its own inherent limitations and weaknesses. Such limitations can be minimized by using some combination of both numerical and analytical methods, taking advantage of the strengths of each without the attendant weaknesses. This paper describes a combined numerical/analytical approach to reservoir engineering at the Pleasant Bayou geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A reservoir description had previously been developed, through which a successful history match was performed. Certain details of the reservoir can also be obtained through analysis of pressure and flow transients; these can then be used to constrain the numerical model. Methods for extracting such reservoir data are discussed, and the manner in which they can be used as constraints in the numerical models are presented.

  2. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion.

  3. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the preceding, the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this topical report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48.3km x48.3km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case of Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a. The Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the verification well VW2 which was drilled in 2012. The new porosity and permeability modeling was

  4. More rigorous protocol adherence to intensive structured management improves blood pressure control in primary care: results from the Valsartan Intensified Primary carE Reduction of Blood Pressure study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Simon; Stocks, Nigel P.; Burrell, Louise M.; de Looze, Ferdinandus J.; Esterman, Adrian; Harris, Mark; Hung, Joseph; Swemmer, Carla H.; Kurstjens, Nicol P.; Jennings, Garry L.; Carrington, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine protocol adherence to structured intensive management in the Valsartan Intensified Primary carE Reduction of Blood Pressure (VIPER-BP) study involving 119 primary care clinics and 1562 randomized participants. Methods: Prospective criteria for assessing adherence to treatment prescription, uptitration, and visit attendance at 6, 10, 14, and 18 weeks postrandomization were applied to 1038 intervention participants. Protocol adherence scores of 1–5 (least to most adherent) were compared to blood pressure (BP) control during 26 weeks of follow-up. Results: Mean age was 59.3 ± 12.0 years, 963 (62%) were men, and 1045 (67%) had longstanding hypertension. Clinic attendance dropped from 91 (week 6) to 83% (week 26) and pharmacological instructions were followed for 93% (baseline) to 61% at week 14 (uptitration failures commonly representing protocol deviations). Overall, 26-week BP levels and BP target attainment ranged from 132 ± 14/79 ± 9 and 51% to 141 ± 15/83 ± 11 mmHg and 19% in those participants subject to the highest (n = 270, 26%) versus least (n = 148, 14%) per protocol adherence, respectively; adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.22 per unit protocol adherence score, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15–1.31; for achieving BP target (P < 0.001). Participants with a per protocol score of 4 or 5 (512/1038, 49.3%) were 1.54-fold (95% CI 1.31–1.81; P < 0.001) more likely to achieve their individual BP target compared with usual care. Clinics equipped with a practice nurse significantly influenced protocol adherence (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06–1.37; P = 0.004) and individual BP control (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.04–1.41; P = 0.015). Conclusion: There is considerable potential for structured care management to improve BP control in primary care, especially when optimally applied. PMID:24759125

  5. Transient groundwater observations and modelling at a rockslide in fractured rocks adjacent to a hydropower reservoir (Kaunertal valley, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, Thomas; Zangerl, Christian; Loew, Simon; Holzmann, Michael; Perzlmaier, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    numerical models consider saturated and unsaturated water flow. The reservoir at the slope toe and slope infiltration (precipitation and snowmelt) are defined as constant or transient boundary conditions in various models. Piezometric borehole sensors show a clear communication to the hydropower reservoir with fast response times of less than one day. In comparison to that, recharge from rainfall-events and snowmelt has only a small influence on the groundwater fluctuations. The deformation zones have a minor influence on the pore water pressure. Hydraulic packer tests show that the differences in potential heads between the sliding mass and the bedrock below are small. A lowering of the groundwater level after the construction of an exploring drift is indicated by an borehole where hydraulic packer tests were performed before and after the construction of the drift. All of these observations can be reproduced and explained by the numerical models. The numerical models further suggest a reduction in groundwater fluctuations in the nearby setting of the exploring adit.

  6. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  7. Respiratory monitoring system based on the nasal pressure technique for the analysis of sleep breathing disorders: Reduction of static and dynamic errors, and comparisons with thermistors and pneumotachographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Mesquita, Jayme; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2004-03-01

    Thermally sensitive devices—thermistors—have usually been used to monitor sleep-breathing disorders. However, because of their long time constant, these devices are not able to provide a good characterization of fast events, like hypopneas. Nasal pressure recording technique (NPR) has recently been suggested to quantify airflow during sleep. It is claimed that the short time constants of the devices used to implement this technique would allow an accurate analysis of fast abnormal respiratory events. However, these devices present errors associated with nonlinearities and acoustic resonance that could reduce the diagnostic value of the NPR. Moreover, in spite of the high scientific and clinical potential, there is no detailed description of a complete instrumentation system to implement this promising technique in sleep studies. In this context, the purpose of this work was twofold: (1) describe the development of a flexible NPR device and (2) evaluate the performance of this device when compared to pneumotachographs (PNTs) and thermistors. After the design details are described, the system static accuracy is evaluated by a comparative analysis with a PNT. This analysis revealed a significant reduction (p<0.001) of the static error when system nonlinearities were reduced. The dynamic performance of the NPR system was investigated by frequency response analysis and time constant evaluations and the results showed that the developed device response was as good as PNT and around 100 times faster (τ=5,3 ms) than thermistors (τ=512 ms). Experimental results obtained in simulated clinical conditions and in a patient are presented as examples, and confirmed the good features achieved in engineering tests. These results are in close agreement with physiological fundamentals, supplying substantial evidence that the improved dynamic and static characteristics of this device can contribute to a more accurate implementation of medical research projects and to improve the

  8. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  9. Effects of pressure reductions in a proposed siphon water lift system at St. Stephen Dam, South Carolina, on mortality rates of juvenile American shad and blueback herring. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, J.M.; Schilt, C.R.; Jones, D.P.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents results of studies to predict the mortality rate of juvenile blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) and American shad (A. sapidissima) associated with reduced pressure as they pass downstream through a proposed siphon water lift system at St. Stephen Dam, South Carolina. The primary function of the siphon is to increase attracting flow to better guide upstream migrating adult herring of both species into the existing fish lift for upstream passage. The US Army Engineer District, Charleston, wishes to consider the siphon as an alternative bypass route through the dam for downstream migrating juvenile and adult herring. A pressure-reduction testing system that emulates some of the pressure characteristics of the siphon was used to determine the approximate percentage of juvenile fishes that could be reasonably expected to be killed passing through the reduced pressures anticipated for the siphon water lift system. The testing system could duplicate the range of pressure change anticipated for the siphon lift system but could not obtain pressures lower than 4.1 psi, whereas pressures for some design alternatives may approach the theoretical minimum pressure of 0.0 psi. Study results indicate that the mortality rate is probably about 20 percent. Power analysis indicates that mortality rate above 30 percent is unlikely. Conducting additional mortality studies is recommended to refine predicted mortality rates. Measures should be taken to prevent juvenile fish from entering the siphon lift system if excessive mortality rates are observed.

  10. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  11. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nayyer

    corrected for, indicate water encroachment at the base of the producing reservoir. I also identify specific sites of leakage from various unproduced reservoirs, the result of regional pressure blowdown as explained in previous studies; those earlier studies, however, were unable to identify direct evidence of fluid movement. Of particular interest is the identification of one site where oil apparently leaked from one reservoir into a "new" reservoir that did not originally contain oil, but was ideally suited as a trap for fluids leaking from the neighboring spill-point. With continued pressure drop, oil in the new reservoir increased as more oil entered into the reservoir and expanded, liberating gas from solution. Because of the limited volume available for oil and gas in that temporary trap, oil and gas also escaped from it into the surrounding formation. I also note that some of the reservoirs demonstrate time-lapse changes only in the "gas cap" and not in the oil zone, even though gas must be coming out of solution everywhere in the reservoir. This is explained by interplay between pore-fluid modulus reduction by gas saturation decrease and dry-frame modulus increase by frame stiffening. In the second part of this work, I examine various rock-physics models in an attempt to quantitatively account for frame-stiffening that results from reduced pore-fluid pressure in the producing reservoir, searching for a model that would predict the unusual AVO features observed in the time-lapse prestack and stacked data at Teal South. While several rock-physics models are successful at predicting the time-lapse response for initial production, most fail to match the observations for continued production between Phase I and Phase II. Because the reservoir was initially overpressured and unconsolidated, reservoir compaction was likely significant, and is probably accomplished largely by uniaxial strain in the vertical direction; this implies that an anisotropic model may be required

  12. Water-Balance Simulations of Runoff and Reservoir Storage for the Upper Helmand Watershed and Kajakai Reservoir, Central Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vining, Kevin C.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2007-01-01

    A study was performed to provide information on monthly historical and hypothetical future runoff for the Upper Helmand watershed and reservoir storage in Kajakai Reservoir that could be used by Afghanistan authorities to make economic and demographic decisions concerning reservoir design and operation, reservoir sedimentation, and development along the Helmand River. Estimated reservoir volume at the current spillway elevation of 1,033.5 meters decreased by about 365 million cubic meters from 1968 to 2006 because of sedimentation. Water-balance simulations indicated a good fit between modeled and recorded monthly runoff at the two gaging stations in the watershed for water years 1956-79 and indicated an excellent fit between modeled and recorded monthly changes in Kajakai Reservoir storage for water years 1956-79. Future simulations, which included low starting reservoir water levels and a spillway raised to an elevation of 1,045 meters, indicated that the reservoir is likely to fill within 2 years. Although Kajakai Reservoir is likely to fill quickly, multiyear deficits may still occur. If future downstream irrigation demand doubles but future precipitation, temperature, and reservoir sedimentation remain similar to historical conditions, the reservoir would have more than a 50-percent chance of being full during April or May of a typical year. Future simulations with a 10-percent reduction in precipitation indicated that supply deficits would occur more than 1 in 4 years, on average, during August, September, or October. The reservoir would be full during April or May fewer than 1 in 2 years, on average, and multiyear supply deficits could occur. Increased sedimentation had little effect on reservoir levels during April through July, but the frequency of deficits increased substantially during September and October.

  13. Geysers reservoir studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Three reservoir engineering studies are described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

  14. Potential Mammalian Filovirus Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Darin S.; Mills, James N.; Johnson, Karl M.

    2004-01-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses are maintained in unknown reservoir species; spillover into human populations results in occasional human cases or epidemics. We attempted to narrow the list of possibilities regarding the identity of those reservoir species. We made a series of explicit assumptions about the reservoir: it is a mammal; it supports persistent, largely asymptomatic filovirus infections; its range subsumes that of its associated filovirus; it has coevolved with the virus; it is of small body size; and it is not a species that is commensal with humans. Under these assumptions, we developed priority lists of mammal clades that coincide distributionally with filovirus outbreak distributions and compared these lists with those mammal taxa that have been tested for filovirus infection in previous epidemiologic studies. Studying the remainder of these taxa may be a fruitful avenue for pursuing the identity of natural reservoirs of filoviruses. PMID:15663841

  15. Geothermal reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. W., Jr.; Faust, C.; Pinder, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    The prediction of long-term geothermal reservoir performance and the environmental impact of exploiting this resource are two important problems associated with the utilization of geothermal energy for power production. Our research effort addresses these problems through numerical simulation. Computer codes based on the solution of partial-differential equations using finite-element techniques are being prepared to simulate multiphase energy transport, energy transport in fractured porous reservoirs, well bore phenomena, and subsidence.

  16. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  17. Andrew integrated reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Andrew field is an oil and gas accumulation in Palaeocene deep marine sands in the Central North Sea. It is currently being developed with mainly horizontal oil producers. Because of the field`s relatively small reserves (mean 118 mmbbls), the performance of each of the 10 or so horizontal wells is highly important. Reservoir description work at sanction time concentrated on supporting the case that the field could be developed commercially with the minimum number of wells. The present Integrated Reservoir Description (IRD) is focussed on delivering the next level of detail that will impact the understanding of the local reservoir architecture and dynamic performance of each well. Highlights of Andrew IRD Include: (1) Use of a Reservoir Uncertainty Statement (RUS) developed at sanction time to focus the descriptive effort of both asset, support and contract petrotechnical staff, (2) High resolution biostratigraphic correlation to support confident zonation of the reservoir, (3) Detailed sedimentological analysis of the core including the use of dipmeter to interpret channel/sheet architecture to provide new insights into reservoir heterogeneity; (4) Integrated petrographical and petrophysical investigation of the controls on Sw-Height and relative permeability of water; (5) Fluids description using oil geochemistry and Residual Salt Analysis Sr isotope studies. Andrew IRD has highlighted several important risks to well performance, including the influence of more heterolithic intervals on gas breakthrough and the controls on water coning exerted by suppressed water relative permeability in the transition zone.

  18. Andrew integrated reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Andrew field is an oil and gas accumulation in Palaeocene deep marine sands in the Central North Sea. It is currently being developed with mainly horizontal oil producers. Because of the field's relatively small reserves (mean 118 mmbbls), the performance of each of the 10 or so horizontal wells is highly important. Reservoir description work at sanction time concentrated on supporting the case that the field could be developed commercially with the minimum number of wells. The present Integrated Reservoir Description (IRD) is focussed on delivering the next level of detail that will impact the understanding of the local reservoir architecture and dynamic performance of each well. Highlights of Andrew IRD Include: (1) Use of a Reservoir Uncertainty Statement (RUS) developed at sanction time to focus the descriptive effort of both asset, support and contract petrotechnical staff, (2) High resolution biostratigraphic correlation to support confident zonation of the reservoir, (3) Detailed sedimentological analysis of the core including the use of dipmeter to interpret channel/sheet architecture to provide new insights into reservoir heterogeneity; (4) Integrated petrographical and petrophysical investigation of the controls on Sw-Height and relative permeability of water; (5) Fluids description using oil geochemistry and Residual Salt Analysis Sr isotope studies. Andrew IRD has highlighted several important risks to well performance, including the influence of more heterolithic intervals on gas breakthrough and the controls on water coning exerted by suppressed water relative permeability in the transition zone.

  19. Conowingo Reservoir Sedimentation and Chesapeake Bay: State of the Science.

    PubMed

    Cerco, Carl F

    2016-05-01

    The Conowingo Reservoir is situated on the Susquehanna River, immediately upstream of Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States. Sedimentation in the reservoir provides an unintended benefit to the bay by preventing sediments, organic matter, and nutrients from entering the bay. The sediment storage capacity of the reservoir is nearly exhausted, however, and the resulting increase in loading of sediments and associated materials is a potential threat to Chesapeake Bay water quality. In response to this threat, the Lower Susquehanna River Watershed Assessment was conducted. The assessment indicates the reservoir is in a state of "dynamic equilibrium" in which sediment loads from the upstream watershed to the reservoir are balanced by sediments leaving the reservoir. Increased sediment loads are not a threat to bay water quality. Increased loads of associated organic matter and nutrients are, however, detrimental. Bottom-water dissolved oxygen declines of 0.1 to 0.2 g m are projected as a result of organic matter oxidation and enhanced eutrophication. The decline is small relative to normal variations but results in violations of standards enforced in a recently enacted total maximum daily load. Enhanced reductions in nutrient loads from the watershed are recommended to offset the decline in water quality caused by diminished retention in the reservoir. The assessment exposed several knowledge gaps that require additional investigation, including the potential for increased loading at flows below the threshold for reservoir scour and the nature and reactivity of organic matter and nutrients scoured from the reservoir bottom.

  20. Phosphorous control in a eutrophied reservoir.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Pacheco, H; Hansen, A M; Falcón-Rojas, A

    2013-12-01

    Water in lakes and reservoirs accumulate phosphorous (P) from both internal and external loads. The external P load (EPL) coming from the watershed is considered to be the main cause of eutrophication of water bodies, and control strategies therefore focus on its reduction. However, algae blooms and anoxic conditions often continue even after EPL have been controlled, being the internal P load (IPL) originating from the sediment the main sources of P. To assess the efficiency of the adsorbent Phoslock (a modified bentonite) in controlling P concentrations in water and immobilize releasable P in sediments, mesocosm trials were carried out in a eutrophied reservoir and a model was described and applied that determines the amount of adsorbent and the application frequency necessary to control P concentrations in a eutrophied reservoir. The mesocosm trials confirm that Phoslock reduced P concentrations to or below the limits that define water in mesotrophic state, in approximately 2 weeks. The modeling results suggest that periodic reapplications of the adsorbent are required, unless EPL is reduced by 36 %, which allows the P concentrations in the water column to be constant. Such reduction in EPL would allow future applications of the adsorbent to be required only for control of IPL. The developed model allows planning remediation actions by determining quantities and frequencies for application of adsorbents for P control in eutrophied lakes and reservoirs.

  1. Laboratory evaluation of the CO2 huff-n-puff process for heavy oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, S.G.; Maini, B.B.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate a CO2 huff-n-puff well stimulation process in a Lloydminster heavy oil reservoir. Two series of phase behavior measurements were done on the reconstituted oil, each in a pressurization-then-liberation cycle. The first series was performed using CO2 as the carbonating gas. Some oil swelling occurred, and a large viscosity reduction was observed. CO2 was retained preferentially to CH4 during liberation and, consequently reduced viscosities were maintained down to low pressures. The second series was performed using a 1:3 mole ratio CH4:CO2, simulating the use of recycled gas in the huff-n-puff process. The results revealed that CH4 reduces the efficiency of CO2. 12 references.

  2. Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity for Depleted Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yen Ting; Shen, Chien-Hao; Tseng, Chi-Chung; Fan, Chen-Hui; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    A depleted gas reservoir is one of the best options for CO2 storage for many reasons. First of all, the storage safety or the caprock integrity has been proven because the natural gas was trapped in the formation for a very long period of time. Also the formation properties and fluid flow characteristics for the reservoir have been well studied since the discovery of the gas reservoir. Finally the surface constructions and facilities are very useful and relatively easy to convert for the use of CO2 storage. The purpose of this study was to apply an analytical approach to estimate CO2 storage capacity in a depleted gas reservoir. The analytical method we used is the material balance equation (MBE), which have been widely used in natural gas storage. We proposed a modified MBE for CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir by introducing the z-factors of gas, CO2 and the mixture of the two. The MBE can be derived to a linear relationship between the ratio of pressure to gas z-factor (p/z) and the cumulative term (Gp-Ginj, where Gp is the cumulative gas production and Ginj is the cumulative CO2 injection). The CO2 storage capacity can be calculated when constraints of reservoir recovery pressure are adopted. The numerical simulation was also used for the validation of the theoretical estimation of CO2 storage capacity from the MBE. We found that the quantity of CO2 stored is more than that of gas produced when the reservoir pressure is recovered from the abandon pressure to the initial pressure. This result was basically from the fact that the gas- CO2 mixture z-factors are lower than the natural gas z-factors in reservoir conditions. We also established a useful p/z plot to easily observe the pressure behavior of CO2 storage and efficiently calculate the CO2 storage capacity. The application of the MBE we proposed was demonstrated by a case study of a depleted gas reservoir in northwestern Taiwan. The estimated CO2 storage capacities from conducting reservoir simulation

  3. Reservoir simulation of a high viscous crude and strong water drive reservoir in Sarawak, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Ramli, A.

    1995-10-01

    The Bokor field is located offshore Sarawak, Malaysia and is one of the largest fields in the Baram Delta Province. The A3/6 group of reservoirs is the largest among the Bokor reservoir groups. The reservoir comprises a series of multiple, stacked, well-developed, fluviomarine sandstones connected to a large aquifer. Production from this reservoir started in 1983 and since then some 15 MMstb of oil have been produced. To better understand the production performance, displacement mechanism and further development opportunities in this high viscous crude (10 cP) and strong water drive reservoir, a 3D sector reservoir simulation has been carried out. The model comprises 8640 active grid blocks, with 14 strings completed on four reservoir units with separate fluid contacts. The layering system and grid dimensions were found to be critical in the history matching process, which was supported by a X-sectional study carried out prior to embarking on the 3D model. Based on the history match, remaining oil was identified on the eastern flank, at the top of each sand unit (due to water under-running) and in the downdip area due to the existing crestal oriented development. The history matched model was subsequently used to aid further development planning and to formulate a cost-effective reservoir management strategy. Various development scenarios were tested in this 3D model, which include infill drilling, horizontal wells and pressure maintenance by water injection. This paper describes the various steps taken to obtain a good history match over the 10 years of production history and discusses the findings of the prediction runs.

  4. A Method to Recover Useful Geothermal-Reservoir Parameters from Production Characteristic Curves (1) Steam Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, E.; Arellano, V.; Garfias, A.; Miranda, C.; Hernandez, J.; Gonzalez, J.

    1983-12-15

    In this paper we develop and demonstrate a method to estimate the reservoir pressure and a productivity index for vertical steam wells, from its production characteristic (also called output) curves. In addition, the method allows to estimate the radius of influence of the well, provided that a value of the reservoir transmisivity is available. The basic structure of the present method is: first, the measured well head mass flowrates and pressures are transformed to downhole conditions by means of a numerical simulator; then, the computed downhole variables are fitted to a simple radial model that predicts the sandface flowrate in terms of the flowing pressure. For demonstration, the method was applied to several steam wells from the Los Azufres Geothermal field. We found excellent agreement of the model with this ample set of field data. As a bonus, the processed data allowed several inferences about the steam producing zone of the reservoir: that the wells considered produce from relatively isolated pockets of steam, which are probably fed by near-by inmobile water; and that these feed zones are in poor hydraulic communication with the field surface waters. our method are that it provides a way to retrieve important reservoir information from usually available production characteristic curves, and that the method works from easily and accurately taken wellhead measurements.

  5. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    PubMed Central

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations. PMID:22371825

  6. REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    George Scott III

    2002-08-01

    Ongoing Phase 2 work comprises the development and field-testing of a real-time reservoir stimulation diagnostic system. Phase 3 work commenced in June 2001, and involved conducting research, development and field-testing of real-time enhanced dual-fluid stimulation processes. Experimental field-testing to date includes three well tests. Application of these real-time stimulation processes and diagnostic technologies has been technically successful with commercial production from the ''marginal'' reservoirs in the first two well tests. The third well test proved downhole-mixing is an efficient process for acid stimulation of a carbonate reservoir that produced oil and gas with 2200 psi bottomhole reservoir pressure, however, subsequent shut-in pressure testing indicated the reservoir was characterized by low-permeability. Realtimezone continues to seek patent protection in foreign markets to the benefit of both RTZ and NETL. Realtimezone and the NETL have licensed the United States patented to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies, from well testing conducted over the last 12-month work period and including well test scheduled for year-end of 2002. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer, public presentations and industry publications. Final Phase 3 test work will be focused on further field-testing the innovational process of blending stimulation fluids downhole. This system provides a number of advantages in comparison to older industry fracturing techniques and allows the operator to control reservoir fracture propagation and concentrations of proppant placed in the reservoir, in real-time. Another observed advantage is that lower friction pressures result, which results in lower pump treating pressures and safer reservoir hydraulic fracturing jobs.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Reservoirs in the Lower Jordan Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Alshboul, Zeyad; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed monthly hydrological, meteorological and water quality data from three irrigation and drinking water reservoirs in the lower Jordan River basin and estimated the atmospheric emission rates of CO2. The data were collected between 2006 and 2013 and show that the reservoirs, which differ in size and age, were net sources of CO2. The estimated surface fluxes were comparable in magnitude to those reported for hydroelectric reservoirs in the tropical and sub-tropical zones. Highest emission rates were observed for a newly established reservoir, which was initially filled during the sampling period. In the two older reservoirs, CO2 partial pressures and fluxes were significantly decreasing during the observation period, which could be related to simultaneously occurring temporal trends in water residence time and chemical composition of the water. The results indicate a strong influence of water and reservoir management (e.g. water consumption) on CO2 emission rates, which is affected by the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the limited water resources in the study area. The low wind speed and relatively high pH favored chemical enhancement of the CO2 gas exchange at the reservoir surfaces, which caused on average a four-fold enhancement of the fluxes. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the uncertainty of the estimated fluxes is, besides pH, mainly affected by the poorly resolved wind speed and resulting uncertainty of the chemical enhancement factor. PMID:26588241

  8. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Reservoirs in the Lower Jordan Watershed.

    PubMed

    Alshboul, Zeyad; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed monthly hydrological, meteorological and water quality data from three irrigation and drinking water reservoirs in the lower Jordan River basin and estimated the atmospheric emission rates of CO2. The data were collected between 2006 and 2013 and show that the reservoirs, which differ in size and age, were net sources of CO2. The estimated surface fluxes were comparable in magnitude to those reported for hydroelectric reservoirs in the tropical and sub-tropical zones. Highest emission rates were observed for a newly established reservoir, which was initially filled during the sampling period. In the two older reservoirs, CO2 partial pressures and fluxes were significantly decreasing during the observation period, which could be related to simultaneously occurring temporal trends in water residence time and chemical composition of the water. The results indicate a strong influence of water and reservoir management (e.g. water consumption) on CO2 emission rates, which is affected by the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the limited water resources in the study area. The low wind speed and relatively high pH favored chemical enhancement of the CO2 gas exchange at the reservoir surfaces, which caused on average a four-fold enhancement of the fluxes. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the uncertainty of the estimated fluxes is, besides pH, mainly affected by the poorly resolved wind speed and resulting uncertainty of the chemical enhancement factor.

  9. Assessing the effects of microbial metabolism and metabolities on reservoir pore structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Adkins, J.P.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Tanner, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of microbial treatment on pore structure of sandstone and carbonatereservoirs was determined. Understanding how different bacterial strains and their metabolic bioproducts affect reservoir pore structure will permit the prudent application of microorganisms for enhanced oil recovery. The microbial strains tested included Clostridium acetobutylicum, a polymer-producing Bacillus strain, and an unidentified halophilic anaerobe that mainly produced acids and gases. Electrical conductivity, absolute permeability, porosity and centrifuge capillary pressure were used to examine rock pore structures. Modifications of the pore structure observed in the laboratory cores included pore enlargement due to acid dissolution of carbonates and poare throat reduction due to biomass plugging. This paper shows that careful selection of microbes based on proper understanding of the reservoir petrophysical characteristics is necessary for applications of microbially enhanced oil recovery. These methods and results can be useful to field operators and laboratory researchers involved in design and screening of reservoirs for MEOR. The methods are also applicable in evaluation of formation damage caused by drilling, injection or completion fluids or stimulation caused by acids.

  10. Manicouagin Reservoir of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Recorded by the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 mission, this is a photograph of the ice- covered Manicouagin Reservoir located in the Canadian Shield of Quebec Province in Eastern Canada, partially obscured by low clouds. This reservoir marks the site of an impact crater, 60 miles (100 kilometers) wide, which according to geologists was formed 212 million years ago when a meteorite crashed into this area. Over millions of years, the crater has been worn down by glaciers and other erosional processes. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  11. [What is the benefit of salt reduction on blood pressure? Assessment of the Cochrane Review: Effect of longer-term modest salt reduction on blood pressure. He FJ, Li J, Macgregor GA. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Apr 30;4:CD004937].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2013-01-01

    No presente artigo avaliamos e comentamos a Revisão Sistemática da Cochrane “Effect of longer-term modest salt reduction on blood pressure. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Apr 30;4:CD004937”.Questão Clinica: Qual o impacto a longo prazo (≥ 4 semanas) da restrição moderada de ingestão de sal na pressão arterial.Conclusões: Esta revisão sistemática concluiu que a restrição moderada de ingestão de sal (redução média -4,4 g por dia) diminuide forma significativa a pressão arterial (PA) em indivíduos normotensos (-2,42 mmHg PA sistólica; -1,00 mmHg PA diastólica) ou com hipertensão arterial (-5,39 mmHg PA sistólica; -2,82 mmHg PA diastólica). Verificaram-se ligeiros aumentos da actividade da renina plasmática, aldosterona e norepinefrina. Contudo, não se identificaram alterações significativas do perfil lipídico.

  12. The influence of nozzle type, operating pressure, and tank-mixture components on droplet characteristics and the EPA's drift reduction rating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction of drift reduction technology (DRT) guidelines by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established testing protocols for nozzles, agrochemicals, application parameters, and combinations thereof for applying agrochemicals by certified individuals in the United States....

  13. Reservoir stability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, T.J.

    1981-07-01

    The objective of the reservoir stability studies project is to develop stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock caverns, and porous rock structures for air storage in utility applications. Because reservoir stability was deemed crucial to commercialization of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems this project has received major emphasis in the early phases of the overall CAES program. A long term plan, including state-of-the-art assessment, numerical model development and experimental studies culminating in field research, as necessary, was formulated. This plan, initiated in 1977, has been completed during FY-1981 to the stage of specific experimental studies and field research. Activities within this project during FY-1981 have included completion of site specific geotechnical design evaluations using methodologies developed to assess hard rock cavern stability, implementation of in-mine research to evaluate numerical and laboratory study conclusions on the response of domal salt, and preparation of integrated laboratory and field study facilities to assess developed predictive methods and determine in situ response of a porous media reservoir to air injection. The major activity in the project has been the field study component of the porous media studies. Accomplishments there have included completion of exploration, permitting and leasing, operation contractor selection and negotiation, and initiation of procurement and construction for an FY-1982 test initiation. A major program milestone, drilling of the injection withdrawal well for this test, was completed ahead of schedule.

  14. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  15. Arterial compliance, blood pressure, plasma leptin, and plasma lipids in women are improved with weight reduction equally with a meat-based diet and a plant-based diet.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Sasahara, T; Pomeroy, S E; Collier, G; Nestel, P J

    1998-11-01

    Obesity, strongly associated with the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), is becoming increasingly prevalent. This study was designed to establish first whether systemic arterial compliance (SAC), an index of arterial function, is improved with weight loss and second, whether cardiovascular risk factors that improve with weight loss are reduced equally with lean meat or with an equivalent amount of plant protein in the diet. Thirty-six women, mostly overweight or obese, aged 40+/-9 years, were allocated nonrandomly to a 16-week parallel-design trial of two equienergetic diets designed to lead to weight loss, with one arm of the study emphasizing red meat and the other soybeans as the major protein source. Body weight, waist and hip circumference, and plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, and leptin levels were measured, and SAC was calculated from ultrasound measurement of aortic flow velocity and aortic root driving pressure. Subjects lost weight (9% of body weight in 16 weeks) and showed decreased plasma total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (12% and 14%, P < .0001, respectively), triacylglycerol (17%, P < .05), and leptin (24%, P < .01) concentrations. However, lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels did not change significantly. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 7% and SAC increased 28% (P < .001 for both). However, only the decrease in arterial pressure correlated significantly with the reduction in the waist to hip ratio (WHR), and the improvement in SAC correlated inversely with the blood pressure reduction (P < .001 for both). Further, weight loss and the metabolic benefits of weight loss occurred equally with the meat-based and plant-based diets. We conclude that moderate weight loss in women leads to a substantial reduction in the cardiovascular risk, including SAC.

  16. Using surface deformation to image reservoir dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Karasaki, K.; Doughty, C.

    2000-02-01

    The inversion of surface deformation data such as tilt, displacement, or strain provides a noninvasive method for monitoring subsurface volume change. Reservoir volume change is related directly to processes such as pressure variations induced by injection and withdrawal. The inversion procedure is illustrated by an application to tiltmeter data from the Hijiori test site in Japan. An inversion of surface tilt data allows one to image flow processes in a fractured granodiorite. Approximately 650 barrels of water, injected 2 km below the surface, produces a peak surface tilt of the order of 0.8 microradians. The authors find that the pattern of volume change in the granodiorite is very asymmetrical, elongated in a north-northwesterly direction, and the maximum volume change is offset by more than 0.7 km to the east of the pumping well. The inversion of a suite of leveling data from the Wilmington oil field in Long Beach, California, images large-scale reservoir volume changes in 12 one- to two-year increments from 1976 to 1996. The influence of various production strategies is seen in the reservoir volume changes. In particular, a steam flood in fault block 2 in the northwest portion of the field produced a sudden decrease in reservoir volume.

  17. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  18. The big fat LARS - a LArge Reservoir Simulator for hydrate formation and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Priegnitz, Mike; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven

    2013-04-01

    differences between gaseous and dissolved methane (Zimmer et al., 2011). Gas hydrate is formed using a confined pressure of 12-15 MPa and a fluid pressure of 8-11 MPa with a set temperature of 275 K. The duration of the formation process depends on the required hydrate saturation and is usually in a range of several weeks. The subsequent decomposition experiments aiming at testing innovative production scenarios such as the application of a borehole tool for thermal stimulation of hydrate via catalytic oxidation of methane within an autothermal catalytic reactor (Schicks et al. 2011). Furthermore, experiments on hydrate decomposition via pressure reduction are performed to mimic realistic scenarios such as found during the production test in Mallik (Yasuda and Dallimore, 2007). In the near future it is planned to scale up existing results on CH4-CO2 exchange efficiency (e.g. Strauch and Schicks, 2012) by feeding CO2 to the hydrate reservoir. All experiments are due to the gain of high-resolution spatial and temporal data predestined as a base for numerical modeling. References Schicks, J. M., Spangenberg, E., Giese, R., Steinhauer, B., Klump, J., Luzi, M., 2011. Energies, 4, 1, 151-172. Zimmer, M., Erzinger, J., Kujawa, C., 2011. Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5, 4, 995-1001. Yasuda, M., Dallimore, S. J., 2007. Jpn. Assoc. Pet. Technol., 72, 603-607. Beeskow-Strauch, B., Schicks, J.M., 2012. Energies, 5, 420-437.

  19. Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficken, W. H.; Schulien, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device supplies controlled amounts of lubricating oil to ball bearings during operation of the bearings. The dynamic reservoir lubricating device includes a rotating reservoir nut, a hollow cylinder filled with lubricating oil, flow restrictors and a ball bearing retainer.

  20. Modeling of eutrophication and strategies for improvement of water quality in reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Shourian, Mojtaba; Moridi, Ali; Kaveh, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to survey the thermal regime and eutrophication states in Ilam reservoir in Iran as the case study. For this purpose and to find solutions for improving the water's quality in the reservoir, two general strategies for reducing the entering pollution loads and water depletions from the reservoir's outlets were analyzed by use of the CE-QUAL-W2 model. Results of the simulation of the present situation show the existence of thermal stratification during summer, which results in the qualitative stratification in the reservoir. According to the qualitative criteria, the Ilam reservoir's state is between mesotrophic and eutrophic. Results of the scenarios of reduction of the nutrients show that in the scenario of 50% reduction of the phosphorus and nitrogen loads into the reservoir, the state of the reservoir would recover from eutrophic to semi-eutrophic. Also, release of water from the reservoir during September, October and November would cause the restoration of the quality of water in the reservoir. To avoid the occurrence of critical eutrophication in the reservoir, reducing the ponding time in the reservoir by fast depletion, preventing entrance of the upstream villages' sewage and agricultural drained waters, which are sources of nitrate and phosphate contamination into the rivers, and also management of the usage of agricultural fertilizers have been suggested.

  1. Effects of ice-cap unloading on shallow magmatic reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    One of the effects of global warming is the increase of volcanic activity. Glacial melting has been shown to cause visco-elastic relaxation of the upper mantle, which in turn promotes upwelling of magmas through the crust. To date, the effects of ice-cap melting on shallow (i.e., less than 10 km depth) plumbing systems of volcanoes are still not clear. We investigate the pressure changes due to glacial unloading around a magmatic reservoir by combining laboratory and numerical methods. As a case study we focus on Snæfellsjökull, a volcano in Western Iceland whose ice cap is currently melting 1.25 meters (thickness) per year. Our approach is as follows: we obtain representative rock samples from the field, preform tri-axial deformation tests at relevant pressure and temperature (PT) conditions and feed the results into a numerical model in which the stress fields before and after ice cap removal are compared. A suite of deformation experiments were conducted using a Paterson-type tri-axial deformation apparatus. All experiments were performed at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1, while varying the PT conditions. We applied confining pressures between 50 and 150 MPa and temperatures between 200 and 1000 ° C. Between 200 and 800 ° C we observe a localized deformation and a slight decrease of the Young's modulus from 41 to 38 GPa. Experiments at 900 and 1000 ° C exhibit macroscopically ductile behavior and a marked reduction of the Young's modulus down to 4 GPa at 1000 ° C. These results are used to construct a numerical finite-element model in which we approximate the volcanic edifice and basement by a 2D axisymmetric half-space. We first calculate the steady-state temperature field in the volcanic system and assign the laboratory-derived temperature-dependent Young's modulus to every element of the model. Then the pressure in the edifice is calculated for two scenarios: with and without ice cap. The comparison between the two scenarios allows us estimate the

  2. Reservoir Studies of the Seltjarnarnes Geothermal Field, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Tulinius, H.; Spencer, A.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kristmannsdottir, H.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A.E.

    1987-01-20

    The Seltjarnarnes geothermal field in Iceland has been exploited for space heating for the last 16 years. A model of the field has been developed that integrates all available data. The model has been calibrated against the flow rate and pressure decline histories of the wells and the temperature and chemical changes of the produced fluids. This has allowed for the estimation of the permeability and porosity distribution of the system, and the volume of the hot reservoir. Predictions of future reservoir behavior using the model suggest small pressure and temperature changes, but a continuous increase in the salinity of the fluids produced. 10 figs., 23 refs.

  3. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of

  4. Reservoir water loss modeling and measurements at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    An extensive series of pressurized reservoir water loss experiments are presently being conducted in the deeper Phase II reservoir, at the Laboratory's Fenton Hill site in north-central New Mexico. The objectives of these experiments are: to measure the reservoir water leak-off rate at a number of equilibrium reservoir pressure levels, and as a function of time; and with this pressure- and time-dependent water-loss data, to determine the joint dilation (i.e., mean joint porosity) of the reservoir as a function of pressure up to about 24 MPa (as measured at the surface). The permeability model of Gangi has been used to explain the Phase II reservoir water loss as measured during two reservoir flow tests of 7 and 30 days duration. During the 30-day flow test, the model strongly suggests that the reservoir was actively growing by fracture extension, even at injection pressures as low as 27 MPa, which is confirmed by our seismic observations. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 3B: High pressure fuel turbo-pump preburner pump bearing assembly analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, Gloria B.; Violett, Rebeca S.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis performed on the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) preburner pump bearing assembly located on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is summarized. An ANSYS finite element model for the inlet assembly was built and executed. Thermal and static analyses were performed.

  6. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 4: High pressure fuel turbo-pump inlet housing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Kirby V.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis performed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) inlet housings is summarized. Three DIAL finite element models were build to aid in assessing the structural life of the welds and fillets at the vanes. Complete results are given.

  7. Reduction of mosquito biting-pressure: spatial repellents or mosquito traps? A field comparison of seven commercially available products in Israel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The personal protection capability of seven commercially available mosquito control devices (MCD) is compared under field conditions in Israel. Trials were performed in a high biting-pressure area inhabited by large populations of mosquito and biting midge species and using human volunteers for lan...

  8. Effects of low-fat high-fibre diet and mitratapide on body weight reduction, blood pressure and metabolic parameters in obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Peña, Cristina; Suarez, Lourdes; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada; Juste, M Candelaria; Carretón, Elena; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the impact on blood pressure and different metabolic parameters of a weight-loss program on obese dogs fed on a low-fat high-fibre diet and treated with and without mitratapide. The study sample consisted of 36 obese dogs, randomly assigned to a control group (n=17), which were fed on a low-fat high-fibre diet, and an intervention group (n=19), fed on the same diet and treated with mitratapide. Variables measured included body condition score, body weight, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures; total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels; alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity, measured both at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the weight loss program (day 85). All the studied parameters had decreased in both groups at the end of the study; these being diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and alanine aminotransferase, significantly lower in dogs treated with mitratapide. The use of mitrapide in addition to low-fat high-fibre diet does not seem to offer any further useful effect in the loss of weight during the treatment of canine obesity. On the other hand, mitratapide seems to present certain beneficial effects on pathologies associated with obesity, these being mainly related to blood pressure, lipids and hepatic parameters.

  9. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Feasibility study of sedimentary enhanced geothermal systems using reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyoung

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the preliminary feasibility of commercial geothermal projects, from a sedimentary reservoir with low permeability that requires productivity enhancement, using numerical reservoir simulation. The performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir is investigated in terms of reservoir hydraulics and thermal evolution. To build a reliable benchmark for simulation study, validation of the numerical reservoir model with respect to an analytical model is presented, and the process to achieve an acceptable match between the numerical and analytical solutions is described. The analytical model used in this study is based on the work of Gringarten (1978), which consists of a conceptual geothermal reservoir, considering an injection and production well doublet in a homogeneous porous media. A commercial thermal reservoir simulator (STARS from Computer Modeling Group, CMG) is used in this work for numerical modeling. In order to reproduce the analytical model results, the numerical simulation model is modified to include the same assumptions of the analytical model. Simulation model parameters that make the numerical results deviate from the analytical solution, such as the grid block size, time step and no-flow boundary are identified and investigated. An analytical tracer test model proposed by Shook (2000) is numerically modeled. This model allows us to predict the time when the temperature of the produced water decreases by capturing a tracer component at production well. Reservoir simulation models with different porosity and permeability distribution are tested to see the effects of reservoir inhomogeneity and anisotropy. In particular, premature thermal breakthrough due to the presence of high permeability streak in a reservoir model is simulated. In an effort to apply the knowledge we obtained from the analytical solutions, the effects of reservoir rock and water properties, as a function of pressure and temperature, are

  11. A method to implement the reservoir-wave hypothesis using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert D M; Parker, Kim H; Quail, Michael A; Taylor, Andrew M; Biglino, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir-wave hypothesis states that the blood pressure waveform can be usefully divided into a "reservoir pressure" related to the global compliance and resistance of the arterial system, and an "excess pressure" that depends on local conditions. The formulation of the reservoir-wave hypothesis applied to the area waveform is shown, and the analysis is applied to area and velocity data from high-resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A validation study shows the success of the principle, with the method producing largely robust and physically reasonable parameters, and the linear relationship between flow and wave pressure seen in the traditional pressure formulation is retained. The method was successfully tested on a cohort of 20 subjects (age range: 20-74 years; 17 males). This paper: •Demonstrates the feasibility of deriving reservoir data non-invasively from CMR.•Includes a validation cohort (CMR data).•Suggests clinical applications of the method.

  12. Biological souring and mitigation in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Gieg, Lisa M; Jack, Tom R; Foght, Julia M

    2011-10-01

    Souring in oil field systems is most commonly due to the action of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes, a diverse group of anaerobic microorganisms that respire sulfate and produce sulfide (the key souring agent) while oxidizing diverse electron donors. Such biological sulfide production is a detrimental, widespread phenomenon in the petroleum industry, occurring within oil reservoirs or in topside processing facilities, under low- and high-temperature conditions, and in onshore or offshore operations. Sulfate reducers can exist either indigenously in deep subsurface reservoirs or can be "inoculated" into a reservoir system during oil field development (e.g., via drilling operations) or during the oil production phase. In the latter, souring most commonly occurs during water flooding, a secondary recovery strategy wherein water is injected to re-pressurize the reservoir and sweep the oil towards production wells to extend the production life of an oil field. The water source and type of production operation can provide multiple components such as sulfate, labile carbon sources, and sulfate-reducing communities that influence whether oil field souring occurs. Souring can be controlled by biocides, which can non-specifically suppress microbial populations, and by the addition of nitrate (and/or nitrite) that directly impacts the sulfate-reducing population by numerous competitive or inhibitory mechanisms. In this review, we report on the diversity of sulfate reducers associated with oil reservoirs, approaches for determining their presence and effects, the factors that control souring, and the approaches (along with the current understanding of their underlying mechanisms) that may be used to successfully mitigate souring in low-temperature and high-temperature oil field operations.

  13. Interactive reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Regtien, J.M.M. Por, G.J.A.; Stiphout, M.T. van; Vlugt, F.F. van der

    1995-12-31

    Shell`s new Modular Reservoir Simulator (MoReS) has been equipped with a comprehensive and versatile user interface called FrontEnd. Apart from providing a user-friendly environment for interactive reservoir simulation, FrontEnd serves a software platform for other dynamic simulation and reservoir-engineering applications. It offers to all supported applications a common user interface, enables the re-use of code and reduces overall maintenance and support costs associated with the embedded applications. Because of its features, FrontEnd facilitates the transfer of research results in the form of operational software to end users. When coupled with MoReS, FrontEnd can be used for pre- and post-processing and interactive simulation. The pre-processing options allow data to be inputted by means of various OSF/Motif widgets containing a spreadsheet, text editors, dialogues and graphical input. The display of the input data as well as the post-processing of all simulation results is made possible by a variety of user-defined plot of tabular (e.g. timestep summary) and array (simulation grid) data. During a simulation user-defined plots can be displayed and edited, allowing a close inspection of the results as they are being calculated. FrontEnd has been equipped with a powerful input command language, which gives the batch user as much flexibility and control over the input as the interactive user.

  14. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  15. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  16. Reservoir engineering studies of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, K. P.; Lippmann, M. J.; Tsang, C. F.

    1982-09-01

    Reservoir engineering studies of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field began in 1978 under a five-year cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and the Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico, with the ultimate objective of simulating the reservoir to forecast its production capacity, energy longevity, and recharge capability under various production and injection scenarios. During the fiscal year 1981, attempts were made to collect information on the evolution history of the field since exploitation began; the information is to be used later to validate the reservoir model. To this end, wellhead production data were analyzed for heat and mass flow and also for changes in reservoir pressures, temperatures, and saturations for the period from March 1973 to November 1980.

  17. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 3A: High pressure oxidizer turbo-pump preburner pump housing stress analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, Robert V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The model generation and structural analysis performed for the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) preburner pump volute housing located on the main pump end of the HPOTP in the space shuttle main engine are summarized. An ANSYS finite element model of the volute housing was built and executed. A static structural analysis was performed on the Engineering Analysis and Data System (EADS) Cray-XMP supercomputer

  18. Diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs in Carboniferous Benxi Formation, Southeast Ordos Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Yu, Xinghe; Shan, Xin; Su, Dongxu; Wang, Jiao; Li, Yalong; Shi, Xin; Xu, Liqiang

    2016-04-01

    The Ordos Basin, situated in west-central China, is one of the oldest and most important fossil-fuel energy base, which contains large reserves of coal, oil and natural gas. The Upper Palaeozoic strata are widely distributed with rich gas-bearing and large natural gas resources, whose potential is tremendous. Recent years have witnessed a great tight gas exploration improvement of the Upper Paleozoic in Southeastern Ordos basin. The Carboniferous Benxi Formation, mainly buried more than 2,500m, is the key target strata for hydrocarbon exploration, which was deposited in a barrier island and tidal flat environment. The sandy bars and flats are the favorable sedimentary microfacies. With an integrated approach of thin-section petrophysics, constant velocity mercury injection test, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs of Benxi Formation were analyzed in detail. The result shows that the main lithology of sandstone in this area is dominated by moderately to well sorted quartz sandstone. The average porosity and permeability is 4.72% and 1.22mD. The reservoirs of Benxi Formation holds a variety of pore types and the pore throats, with obvious heterogeneity and poor connection. Based on the capillary pressure curve morphological characteristics and parameters, combined with thin section and phycical property data, the reservoir pore structure of Benxi Formation can be divided into 4 types, including mid pore mid throat type(I), mid pore fine throat type(II), small pore fine throat type(III) and micro pro micro throat type(Ⅳ). The reservoirs primarily fall in B-subsate of middle diagenesis and late diagenesis, which mainly undergo compaction, cmentation, dissolution and fracturing process. Employing the empirical formula of different sorting for unconsolideated sandstone porosity, the initial sandstone porosity is 38.32% on average. Quantitative evaluation of the increase and decrease of

  19. Representation of wells in numerical reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Renard, G.; Weill, L.

    1995-12-31

    In reservoir simulation, linear approximations are generally used for well modeling. However, this type of approximations can be inaccurate for fluid flow calculation in the vicinity of wells leading to incorrect well performance predictions. To overcome such problems, a new well representation has been proposed that uses a ``logarithmic`` type of approximation for vertical wells. In this paper, it is shown how the new well model can be easily implemented in existing simulator through the conventional PI. The relationship between wellbore pressure, wellblock pressure and flow rate is discussed in more detail, especially for the definition of wellblock pressure. Extension of the new approach to off-center wells and to flexible grids are both presented. Through this extension, the equivalence of various gridding techniques for the well model is emphasized. The key element is the accurate calculation of flow components in the vicinity of wells.

  20. A Study of the Fluid-Dynamic Pressure Fields on Compressor Reed Valves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    nigher *A pressures. The total pressure ol the reservoir wnicn suppiieo the air was measured on either a lovi-incn mercury manometer or a3 -v)-incn... mercury manometer . This was the same manometer which was used to measure the total pressure of the reservoir. A pressure tap ran from this total

  1. Stress Path Evolution Associated With CO2 Storage Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilarrasa, V.; Gheibi, S.; Holt, R. M.; Lavrov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Safe storage of CO2 in geological formations is an essential part of CO2 sequestration projects. Pressure changes inside the formation cause effective and total stress changes inside and outside of those formations. These changes can bring the reservoir or its surroundings to failure conditions. The existence of faults and weak zones increases the likelihood of failure in rock masses depending on the amount of the injection-induced changes and the formation properties. This paper discusses the stress changes in different reservoir and injection conditions. Numerical analysis indicates that the pressure buildup can significantly change the total and effective stress and these changes are more severe when faults are present in the formation. Also, the reservoir and caprock experience a greater decrease in the mean effective stress and increase in the deviatoric stress in the footwall and hanging wall of a fault in reverse and normal faulting stress regimes, respectively. The stress path depends on the size of the CO2 plume, the pressure distribution inside the reservoir, and fault and reservoir properties.

  2. Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir Analysis - January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many sedimentary basins contain formations with pore fluids at pressures higher than hydrostatic value; these formations are called geopressured. The pore pressure is generally well in excess of hydrostatic and the fluids vary in scalinity, temperature, and dissolved methane. As part of its program to define the magnitude and recoverability of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource, the US Department of Energy has drilled and tested deep wells in geopressured formations in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Geological information for the Pleasant Bayou geopressured geothermal resource is most extensive among the reservoirs tested. Earlier testing of the DOE well (Pleasant Bayou Well No.2) was conducted in several phases during 1979-1983. Long-term testing was resumed in May 1988 and is currently in progress. This report summarizes the pertinent field and laboratory test data available through December 31, 1990. A numerical reservoir simulator is employed as a tool for synthesizing and integrating the reservoir information, formation rock and fluid properties data from laboratory tests, well data from the earlier testing (1979-1983), and the ongoing long-term production testing (1988-1990) of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2. A reservoir simulation model has been constructed which provides a detailed match to the well test history to date. This model is constructed within a geologic framework described by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and relies heavily on the pressure transient data from the 1980 Reservoir Limits Test in conjunction with the 1988-1990 production testing.

  3. Production decline analysis for a multi-fractured horizontal well considering elliptical reservoir stimulated volumes in shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingqiang; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Zhang, Tiantian

    2016-06-01

    Multi-fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs) are an effective technique for developing shale gas reservoirs. After fracturing, stimulated reservoir volumes (SRVs) invariably exist around the wellbore. In this paper, a composite elliptical SRV model for each hydraulic fracturing stage is established, based on micro-seismic events. Both the SRV and the outer regions are assumed as single-porosity media with different formation physical parameters. Based on unstructured perpendicular bisection (PEBI) grids, a mathematical model considering Darcy flow, diffusion and adsorption/desorption in shale gas reservoirs is presented. The numerical solution is obtained by combining the control volume finite element method with the fully implicit method. The model is verified by a simplified model solution. The MFHW Blasingame production decline curves, which consider elliptical SRVs in shale gas reservoirs, are plotted by computer programming. The flow regions can be divided into five flow regimes: early formation linear flow, radial flow in the SRV region, transient flow, pseudo radial flow and boundary dominated flow. Finally, the effect of six related parameters, including the SRV area size, outer region permeability, SRV region permeability, Langmuir pressure, Langmuir volume and diffusion coefficient, are analyzed on type curves. The model presented in this paper can expand our understanding of MFHW production decline behaviors in shale gas reservoirs and can be applied to estimate reservoir properties, the SRV area, and reserves in these types of reservoirs by type curve matching.

  4. Gas condensate reservoir characterisation for CO2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    During oil and gas production hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is significantly increased by injecting miscible CO2 gas in order to displace hydrocarbons towards producing wells. This process of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) might be used for the total CO2 storage after complete hydrocarbon reservoir depletion. This kind of potential storage sites was selected for detailed studies, including generalised development study to investigate the applicability of CO2 for storages. The study is focused on compositional modelling to predict the miscibility pressures. We consider depleted gas condensate field in Kazakhstan as important target for CO2 storage and EOR. This reservoir being depleted below the dew point leads to retrograde condensate formed in the pore system. CO2 injection in the depleted gas condensate reservoirs may allow enhanced gas recovery by reservoir pressurisation and liquid re-vaporisation. In addition a number of geological and petrophysical parameters should satisfy storage requirements. Studied carbonate gas condensate and oil field has strong seal, good petrophysical parameters and already proven successful containment CO2 and sour gas in high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions. The reservoir is isolated Lower Permian and Carboniferous carbonate platform covering an area of about 30 km. The reservoir contains a gas column about 1.5 km thick. Importantly, the strong massive sealing consists of the salt and shale seal. Sour gas that filled in the oil-saturated shale had an active role to form strong sealing. Two-stage hydrocarbon saturation of oil and later gas within the seal frame were accompanied by bitumen precipitation in shales forming a perfect additional seal. Field hydrocarbon production began three decades ago maintaining a strategy in full replacement of gas in order to maintain pressure of the reservoir above the dew point. This was partially due to the sour nature of the gas with CO2 content over 5%. Our models and

  5. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-02-01

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  6. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-12-08

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  7. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  8. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  9. Building more realistic reservoir optimization models using data mining - A case study of Shelbyville Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Cai, Ximing

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we promote a novel approach to develop reservoir operation routines by learning from historical hydrologic information and reservoir operations. The proposed framework involves a knowledge discovery step to learn the real drivers of reservoir decision making and to subsequently build a more realistic (enhanced) model formulation using stochastic dynamic programming (SDP). The enhanced SDP model is compared to two classic SDP formulations using Lake Shelbyville, a reservoir on the Kaskaskia River in Illinois, as a case study. From a data mining procedure with monthly data, the past month's inflow ( Qt-1 ), current month's inflow ( Qt), past month's release ( Rt-1 ), and past month's Palmer drought severity index ( PDSIt-1 ) are identified as important state variables in the enhanced SDP model for Shelbyville Reservoir. When compared to a weekly enhanced SDP model of the same case study, a different set of state variables and constraints are extracted. Thus different time scales for the model require different information. We demonstrate that adding additional state variables improves the solution by shifting the Pareto front as expected while using new constraints and the correct objective function can significantly reduce the difference between derived policies and historical practices. The study indicates that the monthly enhanced SDP model resembles historical records more closely and yet provides lower expected average annual costs than either of the two classic formulations (25.4% and 4.5% reductions, respectively). The weekly enhanced SDP model is compared to the monthly enhanced SDP, and it shows that acquiring the correct temporal scale is crucial to model reservoir operation for particular objectives.

  10. WATER LEVEL DRAWDOWN TRIGGERS SYSTEM-WIDE BUBBLE RELEASE FROM RESERVOIR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reservoirs are an important anthropogenic source of methane and ebullition is a key pathway by which methane stored in reservoir sediments can be released to the atmosphere. Changes in hydrostatic pressure during periods of falling water levels can trigger bubbling events, sugge...

  11. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Wayne D.; Acevedo, Horacio; Green, Aaron; Len, Shawn; Minavea, Anastasia; Wood, James; Xie, Deyi

    2002-01-29

    This project has completed the initially scheduled third year of the contract, and is beginning a fourth year, designed to expand upon the tech transfer aspects of the project. From the Stratton data set, demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along `phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the Boonsville data set , developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Teal South data set provided a surprising set of data, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines.

  12. Carbon dioxide concentration dictates alternative methanogenic pathways in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Dolfing, Jan; Sakata, Susumu; Maeda, Haruo; Miyagawa, Yoshihiro; Ikarashi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Mio; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Deep subsurface formations (for example, high-temperature oil reservoirs) are candidate sites for carbon capture and storage technology. However, very little is known about how the subsurface microbial community would respond to an increase in CO2 pressure resulting from carbon capture and storage. Here we construct microcosms mimicking reservoir conditions (55 °C, 5 MPa) using high-temperature oil reservoir samples. Methanogenesis occurs under both high and low CO2 conditions in the microcosms. However, the increase in CO2 pressure accelerates the rate of methanogenesis to more than twice than that under low CO2 conditions. Isotope tracer and molecular analyses show that high CO2 conditions invoke acetoclastic methanogenesis in place of syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis that typically occurs in this environment (low CO2 conditions). Our results present a possibility of carbon capture and storage for enhanced microbial energy production in deep subsurface environments that can mitigate global warming and energy depletion.

  13. Hybrid-CVFE method for flexible-grid reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, L.S.K.; Buchanan, L.; Sharma, R. )

    1994-08-01

    Well flows and pressures are the most important boundary conditions in reservoir simulation. In a typical simulation, rapid changes and large pressure, temperature, saturation, and composition gradients occur in near-well regions. Treatment of these near-well phenomena significantly affects the accuracy of reservoir simulation results; therefore, extensive efforts have been devoted to the numerical treatment of wells and near-well flows. The flexible control-volume finite-element (CVFE) method is used to construct hybrid grids. The method involves use of a local cylindrical or elliptical grid to represent near-well flow accurately while honoring complex reservoir boundaries. The grid transition is smooth without any special discretization approximation, which eliminates the grid transition problem experienced with Cartesian local grid refinement and hybrid Cartesian gridding techniques.

  14. The efficacy of short and repeated high-pressure processing treatments on the reduction of non-O157:H7 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli in ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Scheinberg, Joshua A; Senevirathne, Reshani; Cutter, Catherine N

    2015-04-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has previously been shown to be effective at reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in meat products. However, few studies have determined whether HPP may be effective at reducing non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in ground beef. This study investigated the efficacy of short and repeated HPP treatments to reduce non-O157:H7 STEC inoculated into ground beef. Irradiated ground beef patties (80:20, 90:10 [lean:fat]) were inoculated with pairs of E. coli serogroups O103, O111, O26, O145, O121, O45, O157:H7, and DH5α, vacuum-packaged and high-pressure processed (four, 60 s cycles, 400 MPa, 17°C). Surviving E. coli populations were enumerated on Rainbow Agar O157 and Tryptic Soy Agar. HPP treatments produced >2.0 log₁₀ CFU/g reductions of each E. coli serogroup, and reductions ranged from 2.35-3.88 and 2.26-4.31 log₁₀ CFU/g in 80:20 and 90:10 samples, respectively. These results suggest that HPP could be an effective, post-processing intervention to reduce the risk of non-O157:H7 STEC contamination in ground beef.

  15. Poroelastic Coupling of the Zipingpu Reservoir and the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W.; Masterlark, T.; Shen, Z.; Ronchin, E.

    2011-12-01

    Impoundment of the Zipingpu Reservoir, China, began in September 2005 and culminated in a water depth of almost 100 meters. This impoundment was followed 2.7 years later by the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake (WE), which ruptured the Longmen Shan Fault with an epicenter about 6 kilometers away from the Zipingpu Reservoir. The close proximity of reservoir impoundment and the WE in both space and time suggests that the events are coupled. We use 2D Finite Element Models (FEMs) to simulate the fully-coupled poroelastic evolution of Coulomb stress in the region due to reservoir impoundment. The FEMs predict that significant Coulomb stress changes due to the initial reservoir impoundment are restricted to a local region beneath the reservoir. However, following reservoir impoundment, the fluid load from the reservoir drives a pore-pressure front that slowly propagates through the crust with fluid diffusion and eventually intersects the hypocentral region of the Longmen Shan Fault. Coulomb stress along the Longmen Shan Fault is initially negative in response to the reservoir impoundment load, but recovers and becomes increasingly positive leading up to the initiation of the WE. The hypocentral region of the Longmen Shan Fault reaches a Coulomb Stress triggering threshold of 0.1 MPa a few years after reservoir impoundment. These results suggest that poroelastic coupling explains the proximity of the impoundment of the Zipingpu Reservoir and the WE in both space and time.

  16. Calderas and magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Giordano, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Large caldera-forming eruptions have long been a focus of both petrological and volcanological studies; petrologists have used the eruptive products to probe conditions of magma storage (and thus processes that drive magma evolution), while volcanologists have used them to study the conditions under which large volumes of magma are transported to, and emplaced on, the Earth's surface. Traditionally, both groups have worked on the assumption that eruptible magma is stored within a single long-lived melt body. Over the past decade, however, advances in analytical techniques have provided new views of magma storage regions, many of which provide evidence of multiple melt lenses feeding a single eruption, and/or rapid pre-eruptive assembly of large volumes of melt. These new petrological views of magmatic systems have not yet been fully integrated into volcanological perspectives of caldera-forming eruptions. Here we explore the implications of complex magma reservoir configurations for eruption dynamics and caldera formation. We first examine mafic systems, where stacked-sill models have long been invoked but which rarely produce explosive eruptions. An exception is the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland, where seismic and petrologic data show that multiple sills at different depths fed a multi-phase (explosive and effusive) eruption. Extension of this concept to larger mafic caldera-forming systems suggests a mechanism to explain many of their unusual features, including their protracted explosivity, spatially variable compositions and pronounced intra-eruptive pauses. We then review studies of more common intermediate and silicic caldera-forming systems to examine inferred conditions of magma storage, time scales of melt accumulation, eruption triggers, eruption dynamics and caldera collapse. By compiling data from large and small, and crystal-rich and crystal-poor, events, we compare eruptions that are well explained by simple evacuation of a zoned

  17. Microbial Life in an Underground Gas Storage Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombach, Petra; van Almsick, Tobias; Richnow, Hans H.; Zenner, Matthias; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    While underground gas storage is technically well established for decades, the presence and activity of microorganisms in underground gas reservoirs have still hardly been explored today. Microbial life in underground gas reservoirs is controlled by moderate to high temperatures, elevated pressures, the availability of essential inorganic nutrients, and the availability of appropriate chemical energy sources. Microbial activity may affect the geochemical conditions and the gas composition in an underground reservoir by selective removal of anorganic and organic components from the stored gas and the formation water as well as by generation of metabolic products. From an economic point of view, microbial activities can lead to a loss of stored gas accompanied by a pressure decline in the reservoir, damage of technical equipment by biocorrosion, clogging processes through precipitates and biomass accumulation, and reservoir souring due to a deterioration of the gas quality. We present here results from molecular and cultivation-based methods to characterize microbial communities inhabiting a porous rock gas storage reservoir located in Southern Germany. Four reservoir water samples were obtained from three different geological horizons characterized by an ambient reservoir temperature of about 45 °C and an ambient reservoir pressure of about 92 bar at the time of sampling. A complementary water sample was taken at a water production well completed in a respective horizon but located outside the gas storage reservoir. Microbial community analysis by Illumina Sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated the presence of phylogenetically diverse microbial communities of high compositional heterogeneity. In three out of four samples originating from the reservoir, the majority of bacterial sequences affiliated with members of the genera Eubacterium, Acetobacterium and Sporobacterium within Clostridiales, known for their fermenting capabilities. In

  18. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  19. Reduction of frontal-plane hip joint reaction force via medio-lateral foot center of pressure manipulation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Solomonow-Avnon, Deborah; Wolf, Alon; Herman, Amir; Rozen, Nimrod; Haim, Amir

    2015-02-01

    Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulation of lower-limb joints has been shown to influence lower-limb biomechanics. Numerous studies report the influence of such interventions on the knee, however little is known about the influence of these interventions on the hip. The present study analyzed kinetic and kinematic changes about the hip of 12 healthy young males who underwent biomechanical manipulation utilizing the APOS biomechanical device (APOS-Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd., Herzliya, Israel) allowing controlled foot center of pressure manipulation. Subjects underwent gait testing in four para-sagittal device configurations: Medial, lateral, neutral, and regular shoes. In the medial configuration, subjects demonstrated no change in step width (i.e., distance between right and left foot center of pressure), however inter-malleolar distance significantly increased. Likewise with the medial setting, greater hip abduction was recorded, while hip adduction moment and joint reaction force decreased significantly. We speculate that subjects adopt a modified gait pattern aimed to maintain constant base of support. As a result, hip abductor muscle moment arm increases and adduction moment and joint reaction force decreases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to show this relationship. These results contribute to the understanding of lower-limb biomechanics and warrant further investigation.

  20. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  1. Reservoir management cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article by Mohinder S. Gulati, Chief Engineer, Unocal Geothermal Operations, discusses cost cutting in geothermal reservoir management. The reservoir engineer or geoscientist can make a big difference in the economical outcome of a project by improving well performance and thus making geothermal energy more competitive in the energy marketplace. Bringing plants online in less time and proving resources to reduce the cycle time are some of the ways to reduce reservoir management costs discussed in this article.

  2. Characterizing CO2 storage reservoir for above-zone monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, K. M.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) provides an excellent opportunity for commercial sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Fluvial, strand plain, and deltaic sandstones of Oligocene and Miocene formations that extend across the Gulf Coast Basin were prolific oil producers for many decades and are also considered to be effective reservoirs for large scale carbon storage. A deep-seated salt dome, faulted anticlinal structure from Gulf coastal region is currently under investigation to develop a monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) plan as coordinated with commercial surveillance of an EOR site for injecting large volume (>1 Million ton/year) of CO2. Geophysical logs have been used to characterize the injection zone reservoir and overburden. One novel MVA element in design is above-zone pressure and geochemical monitoring for out-of-zone migration. Initial characterization with wireline logs demonstrates the extent and areal continuity of reservoir sands and geometries of faults that cut the reservoir. To develop the monitoring plan, we focus characterization on several elements: (1) input data for quick-look dynamic model of the extent of CO2 plume and amount and extent of accompanying pressure elevation, (2) characterization of the zones above the top-reservoir seal for above-zone pressure monitoring, and (3) intersection of faults with well-bores in intervals above the top-reservoir seal for thermal monitoring. Other uncertainties addressed during characterization are the upper extent of faults and juxtaposition of layers to assess the potential for cross-fault fluid migration. Such detail characterization will allow realistic assessment of the sensitivity of monitoring techniques such as temperature logging for tracking up-fault fluid migration and pressure change for out-of zone fluid migration. Successful use of such geophysical techniques for MVA based on uniting elements of existing regulatory monitoring expectations with commercial best practices will be

  3. A vapor-dominated reservoir exceeding 600{degrees}F at the Geysers, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.A.; Sternfeld, J.N.; Haizlip, J.R.; Drenick, A.F.; Combs, Jim

    1988-01-01

    A high-temperature vapor-dominated reservoir underlies a portion of the Northwest Geysers area, Sonoma County, California. The high-temperature reservoir (HTR) is defined by flowing fluid temperatures exceeding 500º F, rock temperatures apparently exceeding 600º F and steam enthalpies of about 1320 BTU/lb. Steam from existing wells drilled in the Northwest Geysers is produced from both a “typical” Geysers reservoir and the HTR. In all cases, the HTR is in the lower portion of the wells and is overlain by a “typical” Geysers reservoir. Depth to the high-temperature reservoir is relatively uniform at about -5900 ft subsea. There are no identified lithologic or mineralogic conditions that separate the HTR from the “typical” reservoir, although the two reservoirs are vertically distinct and can be located in most wells to within about 200 ft by the use of downhole temperature-depth measurements. Gas concentrations in steam from the HTR are higher (6 to 9 wt %) than from the “typical” Geysers reservoir (0.85 to 2.6 wt %). Steam from the HTR is enriched in chloride and the heavy isotopes of water relative to the “typical” reservoir. Available static and dynamic measurements show pressures are subhydrostatic in both reservoirs with no anomalous differences between the two: the HTR pressure being near 520 psia at sea level datum. The small observed differences in pressure between the reservoirs appear to vary along a steam density gradient. It is postulated that the Northwest Geysers area evolved more slowly toward vapor-dominated conditions than other parts of The Geysers field because of its poor connection with the surface. In this paper, a model is presented in which the boundary between the HTR and “typical” reservoir is a thermodynamic feature only, resulting from recent deep venting of a liquid-dominated system in which conduction is still an important component of heat transfer.

  4. Root-Contact/Pressure-Plate Assembly For Hydroponic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Carlton E.; Loretan, Philip A.; Bonsi, Conrad K.; Hill, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    Hydroponic system includes growth channels equipped with rootcontact/pressure-plate assemblies. Pump and associated plumbing circulate nutrient liquid from reservoir, along bottom of growth channels, and back to reservoir. Root-contact/pressure-plate assembly in each growth channel stimulates growth of roots by applying mild contact pressure. Flat plate and plate connectors, together constitute pressure plate, free to move upward to accommodate growth of roots. System used for growing sweetpotatoes and possibly other tuber and root crops.

  5. All-optical reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  6. NFFLOW: A reservoir simulator incorporating explicit fractures (SPE 153890)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, E.J.; Sams, W.N.

    2012-01-01

    NFFLOW is a research code that quickly and inexpensively simulates flow in moderately fractured reservoirs. It explicitly recognizes fractures separately from rock matrix. In NFFLOW fracture flow is proportional to the pressure gradient along the fracture, and flow in the rock matrix is determined by Darcy’s Law. The two flow mechanisms are coupled through the pressure gradient between a fracture and its adjacent rock matrix. Presented is a promising change to NFFLOW that allows for flow across a rock matrix block.

  7. Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Reactive Transport of CO2 and Its Impact on Geomechanical Properties of Reservoir Rocks and Seals

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.

    2016-01-04

    This article develops a novel multiscale modeling approach to analyze CO2 reservoirs using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s STOMP-CO2-R code that is interfaced with the ABAQUS® finite element package. The STOMP-CO2-R/ABAQUS® sequentially coupled simulator accounts for the reactive transport of CO2 causing mineral composition changes that modify the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals. Formation rocks’ elastic properties that vary during CO2 injection and govern the poroelastic behavior of rocks are modeled by an Eshelby-Mori-Tanka approach (EMTA) implemented in ABAQUS® via user-subroutines. The computational tool incorporates the change in rock permeability due to both geochemistry and geomechanics. A three-dimensional (3D) STOMP-CO2-R model for a model CO2 reservoir containing a vertical fault is built to analyze a formation containing a realistic geochemical reaction network with 5 minerals: albite, anorthite, calcite, kaolinite and quartz. A 3D ABAQUS® model that maps the above STOMP-CO2-R model is built for the analysis using STOMP-CO2-R/ABAQUS®. The results show that the changes in volume fraction of minerals include dissolution of anorthite, precipitation of calcite and kaolinite, with little change in the albite volume fraction. After a long period of CO2 injection the mineralogical and geomechanical changes significantly reduced the permeability and elastic modulus of the reservoir (between the base and caprock) in front of the fault leading to a reduction of the pressure margin to fracture at and beyond the injection location. The impact of reactive transport of CO2 on the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals are studied in terms of mineral composition changes that directly affect the rock stiffness, stress and strain distributions as well as the pressure margin to fracture.

  8. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union. Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1°C/4 hours). Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. Methods/design This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35°C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure <20 mmHg, on morbidity and mortality 6 months after traumatic brain injury. The study aims to recruit 1800 patients over 41 months. Enrolment started in April 2010. Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure <20 mmHg. Intracranial hypertension is defined as an intracranial pressure >20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. Discussion The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It

  9. Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Reactive Transport of CO2 and Its Impact on Geomechanical Properties of Faulted Reservoir Rocks and Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, B. N.; Hou, Z.; Bacon, D. H.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation develops a multiscale model to analyze CO2 faulted reservoirs using the STOMP-CO2-R code that is interfaced with the ABAQUS® finite element package. The STOMP-CO2-R/ABAQUS® simulator accounts for the reactive transport of CO2 causing mineral composition changes that modify the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals. Rocks' elastic properties that vary during CO2 injection and govern the poroelastic behavior of rocks are modeled by an Eshelby-Mori-Tanka approach implemented in ABAQUS®. A three-dimensional (3D) STOMP-CO2-R model for a reservoir containing an inclined fault is built to analyze a formation containing a reaction network with 5 minerals: albite, anorthite, calcite, kaolinite and quartz. A 3D ABAQUS® finite element mesh that exactly maps the STOMP-CO2-R grid is developed for coupled hydro-geochemical-mechanical analyses. The model contains alternating sandstone and shale layers. The impact of reactive transport of CO2 on the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals are studied in terms of mineral composition changes that affect the rock stiffness, stress and strain distributions, and pressure margin to fracture (PMF). Simulations assuming extensional and compressional stress regimes with and without coupled geochemistry are developed to study the stress regime effect on the risk of hydraulic fracture. The tendency for the fault to slip is examined in terms of stress regime, geomechanical and geochemical-mechanical effects. The results show that the mineralogical changes due to long-term injection of CO2 reduce the permeability and elastic modulus of the reservoir leading to a reduction of the PMF at and beyond the injection location. Hydraulic fracture and fault slip are not predicted to occur. However, accounting for the geomechemical-mechanical effect in the analysis under the extensional stress regime leads to reduction of the PMF at the injection location and at the seal immediately above this location.

  10. Reservoir simulation in a North Sea reservoir experiencing significant compaction drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.C.; Jewell, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Valhall field in the Norwegian North Sea is a high porosity chalk reservoir undergoing primary pressure depletion. Over the last ten years there have been a number of computer modeling studies of the field which have all assumed an original oil-in-place of approximately 2,000 MMSTB (318.0{times}10{sup 6}m{sup 3}) to the present due to the addition of wells and the optimization of completion techniques. However, the single most important and unique feature influencing Valhall long term production performance is reservoir rock compaction. This paper describes the mathematical model used to simulate reservoir performance in a compacting reservoir with specific discussion regarding the proportion of oil produced by each physical recovery process. An understanding of the recovery mechanisms and their relative importance is critical for the successful management of the field. This paper also presents an alternative method for evaluating the various recovery processes using a simple solution to the material balance equation. This is used to substantiate the magnitude of the various recovery mechanisms identified in the simulation model.

  11. A Constrained Differential Evolution Algorithm for Reservoir Management: Optimal Placement and Control of Wells for Geological Carbon Storage with Uncertainty in Reservoir Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Bianchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of large volume of CO2 into deep geological reservoirs for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is expected to cause significant pressure perturbations in subsurface. Large-scale pressure increases in injection reservoirs during GCS operations, if not controlled properly, may limit dynamic storage capacity and increase risk of environmental impacts. The high pressure may impact caprock integrity, induce fault slippage, and cause leakage of brine and/or CO2 into shallow fresh groundwater resources. Thus, monitoring and controlling pressure buildup are critically important for environmentally safe implementation of GCS projects. Extraction of native brine during GCS operations is a pressure management approach to reduce significant pressure buildup. Extracted brine can be transferred to the surface for utilization or re-injected into overlying/underlying saline aquifers. However, pumping, transportation, treatment and disposal of extracted brine can be challenging and costly. Therefore, minimizing volume of extracted brine, while maximizing CO2 storage, is an essential objective of the pressure management with brine extraction schemes. Selection of optimal well locations and extraction rates are critical for maximizing storage and minimizing brine extraction during GCS. However, placing of injection and extraction wells is not intuitive because of heterogeneity in reservoir properties and complex reservoir geometry. Efficient computerized algorithms combining reservoir models and optimization methods are needed to make proper decisions on well locations and control parameters. This study presents a global optimization methodology for pressure management during geologic CO2 sequestration. A constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm is introduced for solving optimization problems involving well placement and injection/extraction control. The CDE methodology is tested and applied for realistic CO2 storage scenarios with the presence of uncertainty in

  12. New life in old reservoirs - the microbial conversion of oil to methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gründger, Friederike; Feisthauer, Stefan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Since almost 20 years it is known from stable isotope studies that large amounts of biogenic methane are formed in oil reservoirs. The investigation of this degradation process and of the underlying biogeochemical controls are of economical and social importance, since even under optimal conditions, not more than 30-40 % of the oil in a reservoir is actually recovered. The conversion of parts of this non-recoverable oil via an appropriate biotechnological treatment into easily recoverable methane would provide an extensive and ecologically sound energy resource. Laboratory mesocosm as well as high pressure autoclave experiments with samples from different geosystems showed high methane production rates after the addition of oils, single hydrocarbons or coals. The variation of parameters, like temperature, pressure or salinity, showed a broad tolerance to environmental conditions. The fingerprinting of the microbial enrichments with DGGE showed a large bacterial diversity while that of Archaea was limited to three to four dominant species. The Q-PCR results showed the presence of high numbers of Archaea and Bacteria. To analyse their function, we measured the abundances of genes indicative of metal reduction (16S rRNA gene for Geobacteraceae), sulphate reduction (sulphate reductase, dsr), and methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M-reductase, mcrA). The methanogenic consortia will be further characterised to determine enzymatic pathways and the individual role of each partner. Degradation pathways for different compounds will be studied using 13C-labelled substrates and molecular techniques. Our stable isotope data from both, methane produced in our incubations with samples from various ecosystems and field studies, implies a common methanogenic biodegradation mechanism, resulting in consistent patterns of hydrocarbon alteration.

  13. Complete Release of Horizontal Shear Stresses During Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenball, M.; Gaucher, E.; Wellmann, F.; Kohl, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismicity can be induced in previously seismically inactive regions by man-made changes of the stress field. Notable stress perturbations are created by injection or withdrawal of fluids such as wastewater, fresh water or hydrocarbons. Over the last decades our knowledge of the physical processes of induced seismicity has improved largely. However, the driving force of seismicity, i.e. the actual perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir during fluid injection, remains largely unknown up to now. Measurements of fluid pressure at the well are not enough to extrapolate the pressure change in the reservoir. Here we study the evolution of the stress field during a massive hydraulic stimulation of a 5 km deep well at the enhanced geothermal system at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. Fresh water was pumped with rates of 30 to 50 ls-1 for 6 days. Locations of 7215 events with maximum magnitude of MW=2.5 were obtained, for 715 events with MW > 1 focal mechanism solutions were derived. At first we present observations of several peculiar phenomena of the seismicity migration, of fluid flow and earthquake mechanisms following the shut-in of the well, which indicate to yet not understood hydro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in connection with shut-in. In order to analyze the changes of the stress field during and after the stimulation we identify the fracture planes from the two nodal planes by a probability-based method where we incorporate structural geological information gained from well logs and uncertainties of the determination of focal mechanism solutions and independent estimates of the stress field. In principle, this approach is able to incorporate further uncertainties, if available. We then conduct stress inversions resolved in time and depth to study spatio-temporal changes of the stress tensor. Our results show an increasingly perturbed stress state with time with a strong reduction of the horizontal shear stresses in areas of highest seismic activity

  14. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does.

  15. Reservoir analysis of the Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Amistoso, A.E.; Aquino, B.G.; Aunzo, Z.P.; Jordan, O.T.; Ana, F.X.M.S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Doughty, C.

    1993-10-01

    The Philippine National Oil Company and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have conducted an informal cooperative project on the reservoir evaluation of the Palinpinon geothermal field in the Philippines. The work involved the development of various numerical models of the field in order to understand the observed data. A three-dimensional porous medium model of the reservoir has been developed that matches well the observed pressure declines and enthalpy transients of the wells. Submodels representing the reservoir as a fractured porous medium were developed for the analysis of chemical transport of chlorides within the reservoir and the movement of the cold water front away from injection wells. These models indicate that the effective porosity of the reservoir varies between 1 and 7% and the effective permeability between 1 and 45 millidarcies. The numerical models were used to predict the future performance of the Palinpinon reservoir using various possible exploitation scenarios. A limited number of make-up wells were allocated to each sector of the field. When all the make-up wells had been put on line, power production gradually began to decline. The model indicates that under the assumed conditions it will not be possible to maintain the planned power production of 112.5 MWe at Palinpinon I and 80 MWe at Palinpinon II for the next 30 years, but the decline in power output will be within acceptable normal operating capacities of the plants.

  16. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-04-01

    West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. This behavior includes: (1) Decrease in WOR over time; (2) Decrease in GOR at initial stages; (3) High decline rates of oil and gas; and (4) strong hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. By using core and log data as well as fluorescence information, we demonstrate that our hypothesis of how the reservoir is formed is consistent with these observations. Namely, oil migrated in water wet reservoir, over time, oil changed the wettability of some part of the reservoir, oil eventually leaked to upper formations prompting re-introduction of water into reservoir. Because of change in wettability, different pore size distributions responded differently to water influx. This hypothesis is consistent with fluorescence and porosity data, as we explain it in this quarterly report. The second issue deals with how to best calculate connected oil volume in the reservoir. The log data does not necessarily provide us with relevant information regarding oil in place. However, we have developed a new material balance technique to calculate the connected oil volume based on observed pressure and production data. By using the technique to four different fields producing from Hunton formation, we demonstrate that the technique can be successfully applied to calculate the connected oil in place.

  17. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1996-04-30

    On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

  18. Dynamic Strength of Metals at High Pressure and Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to materials science at very high pressures and strain rates has been developed on the Omega laser, using a ramped plasma piston drive. A laser drives an ablative shock through a solid plastic reservoir where it unloads at the rear free surface, expands across a vacuum gap, and stagnates on the metal sample under study. This produces a gently increasing ram pressure, compressing the sample nearly isentropically. The peak pressure on the sample, diagnosed with VISAR measurements, can be varied by adjusting the laser energy and pulse length, gap size, and reservoir density, and obeys a simple scaling relation.^1 This has been demonstrated at OMEGA at pressures to 200 GPa in Al foils. In an important application, using in-flight x-ray radiography, the material strength of solid-state samples at high pressure can be inferred by measuring the reductions in the growth rates (stabilization) of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable interfaces. RT instability measurements of solid of Al-6061-T6 ^2 and vanadium, at pressures of 20-100 GPa, and strain rates of 10^6 to 10^8 s-1, show clear material strength effects. Modelling results for two constitutive strength models -- Steinberg-Guinan and Preston-Tonks-Wallace, show enhanced dynamic strength that may be correlated with a high-strain-rate, phono-drag mechanism. Data, modeling details and future prospects for this project using the National Ignition Facility laser, will be presented. [1] J. Edwards et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 075002 (2004). [2] K. T. Lorenz et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056309 (2005). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. HEC Activities in Reservoir Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    June 1979. Now, HEC-5, "Simulation of Flood Con- trol and Conservation Systems," (9) is our primary reservoir simulation program. Since its June release...are being incorporated into the reservoir simulation model HEC-5. The objective is to provide a computer program and methodology for total water

  20. Efficient bacterial inactivation in aqueous solution by low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma application with a reduction of the solution pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsuhisa; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-10-01

    With some medical applications in mind, bacterial inactivation experiments in aqueous solution have been performed with the use of low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas. We have successfully found that efficient bactericidal activity can be achieved if the solution is sufficiently acidic. It is interesting to note that there is a critical pH value of about 4.7 for the bactericidal effects, below which the bacteria are efficiently inactivated and above which the bacteria are hardly affected by the plasma application. When the plasmas were exposed to E. coli suspensions at pH 5.2, 4.7, 4.2 and 3.7, D values were found to be 1.92, 0.96, 0.59, and 0.21 min., respectively, under our experimental conditions. It has been also found experimentally that the presence of superoxide anion radicals O2^-in the solution is essential for bacterial inactivation by the plasma application. The critical pH value may be associated with pKa of the dissociation equilibrium between O2^-and hydroperoxy radicals HOO,hich is known to be approximately 4.8. The formation of radicals in solution by such plasma has been confirmed from ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) with spin trapping agents. The ambient gas has been found to influence the radical formation in liquid significantly.

  1. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  2. Sustained reduction of intraocular pressure by supraciliary delivery of brimonidine-loaded poly(lactic acid) microspheres for the treatment of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Chiang, B; Kim, Y C; Doty, A C; Grossniklaus, H E; Schwendeman, S P; Prausnitz, M R

    2016-04-28

    Although effective drugs that lower intraocular pressure (IOP) in the management of glaucoma exist, their efficacy is limited by poor patient adherence to the prescribed eye drop regimen. To replace the need for eye drops, in this study we tested the hypothesis that IOP can be reduced for one month after a single targeted injection using a microneedle for administration of a glaucoma medication (i.e., brimonidine) formulated for sustained release in the supraciliary space of the eye adjacent to the drug's site of action at the ciliary body. To test this hypothesis, brimonidine-loaded microspheres were formulated using poly(lactic acid) (PLA) to release brimonidine at a constant rate for 35 days and microneedles were designed to penetrate through the sclera, without penetrating into the choroid/retina, in order to target injection into the supraciliary space. A single administration of these microspheres using a hollow microneedle was performed in the eye of New Zealand White rabbits and was found to reduce IOP initially by 6 mmHg and then by progressively smaller amounts for more than one month. All administrations were well tolerated without significant adverse events, although histological examination showed a foreign-body reaction to the microspheres. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the highly-targeted delivery of brimonidine-loaded microspheres into the supraciliary space using a microneedle is able to reduce IOP for one month as an alternative to daily eye drops.

  3. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 2: High pressure oxidizer turbo-pump turbine end bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, Gregory A.

    1989-01-01

    The high-pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) consists of two centrifugal pumps, on a common shaft, that are directly driven by a hot-gas turbine. Pump shaft axial thrust is balanced in that the double-entry main inducer/impeller is inherently balanced and the thrusts of the preburner pump and turbine are nearly equal but opposite. Residual shaft thrust is controlled by a self-compensating, non-rubbing, balance piston. Shaft hang-up must be avoided if the balance piston is to perform properly. One potential cause of shaft hang-up is contact between the Phase 2 bearing support and axial spring cartridge of the HPOTP main pump housing. The status of the bearing support/axial spring cartridge interface is investigated under current loading conditions. An ANSYS version 4.3, three-dimensional, finite element model was generated on Lockheed's VAX 11/785 computer. A nonlinear thermal analysis was then executed on the Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Analysis Data System (EADS). These thermal results were then applied along with the interference fit and bolt preloads to the model as load conditions for a static analysis to determine the gap status of the bearing support/axial spring cartridge interface. For possible further analysis of the local regions of HPOTP main pump housing assembly, detailed ANSYS submodels were generated using I-DEAS Geomod and Supertab (Appendix A).

  4. Operational resilience of reservoirs to climate change, agricultural demand, and tourism: A case study from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Mereu, Simone; Sušnik, Janez; Trabucco, Antonio; Daccache, Andre; Vamvakeridou-Lyroudia, Lydia; Renoldi, Stefano; Virdis, Andrea; Savić, Dragan; Assimacopoulos, Dionysis

    2016-02-01

    Many (semi-) arid locations globally, and particularly islands, rely heavily on reservoirs for water supply. Some reservoirs are particularly vulnerable to climate and development changes (e.g. population change, tourist growth, hydropower demands). Irregularities and uncertainties in the fluvial regime associated with climate change and the continuous increase in water demand by different sectors will add new challenges to the management and to the resilience of these reservoirs. The resilience of vulnerable reservoirs must be studied in detail to prepare for and mitigate potential impacts of these changes. In this paper, a reservoir balance model is developed and presented for the Pedra e' Othoni reservoir in Sardinia, Italy, to assess resilience to climate and development changes. The model was first calibrated and validated, then forced with extensive ensemble climate data for representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5, agricultural data, and with four socio-economic development scenarios. Future projections show a reduction in annual reservoir inflow and an increase in demand, mainly in the agricultural sector. Under no scenario is reservoir resilience significantly affected, the reservoir always achieves refill. However, this occurs at the partial expenses of hydropower production with implications for the production of renewable energy. There is also the possibility of conflict between the agricultural sector and hydropower sector for diminishing water supply. Pedra e' Othoni reservoir shows good resilience to future change mostly because of the disproportionately large basin feeding it. However this is not the case of other Sardinian reservoirs and hence a detailed resilience assessment of all reservoirs is needed, where development plans should carefully account for the trade-offs and potential conflicts among sectors. For Sardinia, the option of physical connection between reservoirs is available, as are alternative water supply measures

  5. Accessing ultra-high pressures and strain rates in the solid state: An experimental path to extreme materials science on the Omega and NIF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, K. Thomas

    2005-03-01

    A new approach to materials science at extreme pressures and strain rates has been developed on the Omega laser, using a ramped plasma piston drive. The laser drives a shock through a solid plastic reservoir that unloads at the rear free surface, expands across a vacuum gap, and stagnates on the metal sample under study. This produces a gently increasing ram pressure, compressing the sample nearly isentropically. The peak pressure on the sample, diagnosed with VISAR measurements, can be varied by adjusting the laser energy and pulse length, gap size, and reservoir density, and obeys a simple scaling relation.^1 This has been demonstrated at OMEGA at pressures to 200 GPa in Al foils. In an important application, using in-flight x-ray radiography, the material strength of solid-state samples at high pressure can be inferred by measuring the reductions in the growth rates (stabilization) of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable interfaces. RT instability measurements of solid Al-6061-T6 and vanadium, at pressures of 20-100 GPa and strain rates of 10^6 to 10^8 s-1, show clear material strength effects. High-pressure experimental designs based on this drive have been developed for the NIF laser, predicting that solid-state samples can be quasi-isentropically driven to pressures an order of magnitude higher than on Omega - accessing new regimes of dense, high-pressure matter. [1] J. Edwards et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 075002 (2004).

  6. A dual-porosity reservoir model with a nonlinear coupling term

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Chen, G.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1992-09-01

    Since their introduction by Barenblatt et al. (1960), double-porosity models have been widely used for simulating flow in fractured reservoirs, such as geothermal reservoirs. In a dual-porosity system, the matrix blocks provide most of the storage of the reservoir, whereas the fractures provide the global transmissivity. Initially, most work on dual-porosity models emphasized the development of analytical solutions to idealized reservoir problems. Increasingly, the dual-porosity approach is being implemented by numerical reservoir simulators. Accurate numerical simulation of a dual-porosity problem often requires a prohibitively large number of computational cells in order to resolve the transient pressure gradients in the matrix blocks. We discuss a new dual-porosity model that utilizes a nonlinear differential equation to approximate the fracture/matrix interactions, When implemented into a numerical simulator, it eliminates the need to discretize the matrix blocks, and thereby allows more efficient simulation of reservoir problems.

  7. Performance Prediction of Two-Phase Geothermal Reservoir using Lumped Parameter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurlaela, F.; Sutopo

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have been conducted to simulate performance of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs using lumped parameter method. Limited work had been done on applying non-isothermal lumped parameter models to higher temperature geothermal reservoirs. In this study, the lumped parameter method was applied to high-temperature two phase geothermal reservoirs. The model couples both energy and mass balance equations thus can predict temperature, pressure and fluid saturation changes in the reservoir as a result of production, reinjection of water, and/or natural recharge. This method was validated using reservoir simulation results of TOUGH2. As the results, the two phase lumped parameter model simulation without recharge shows good matching, however reservoir model with recharge condition show quite good conformity.

  8. Design of Cesium Reservoir Critical Component Experiment for S-PRIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskolczy, Gabor; Witt, Tony; Lieb, Dave; McVey, John; Hatch, Laurie

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to confirm the operating temperatures and pressures of the cesium graphite integral reservoir design for the Space Power Reactor In-Core Multicell Evolutionary (S-PRIME) thermionic reactor. The test will verify the reservoir performance under both steady state and transient situations. The special cylindrical TFE (Thermionic Fuel Element) cell used for this test has a prototypic reservoir design and electrical heating for the emitter. It is similar to cylindrical converters designed in the past such as CC-1X (General Atomics 1988) built under the TFE verification program, except for the reservoir details. The S-PRIME TFE has six cells and one graphite reservoir. The reservoir is integral to one of the end cells and is thermally coupled to both of the emitters via the emitter sleeve and the collector via a section of a sheath insulator.

  9. Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

  10. Stochastic thermodynamics with information reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2014-10-01

    We generalize stochastic thermodynamics to include information reservoirs. Such information reservoirs, which can be modeled as a sequence of bits, modify the second law. For example, work extraction from a system in contact with a single heat bath becomes possible if the system also interacts with an information reservoir. We obtain an inequality, and the corresponding fluctuation theorem, generalizing the standard entropy production of stochastic thermodynamics. From this inequality we can derive an information processing entropy production, which gives the second law in the presence of information reservoirs. We also develop a systematic linear response theory for information processing machines. For a unicyclic machine powered by an information reservoir, the efficiency at maximum power can deviate from the standard value of 1 /2 . For the case where energy is consumed to erase the tape, the efficiency at maximum erasure rate is found to be 1 /2 .

  11. Meandering stream reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.G.; Sangree, J.B.; Sneider, R.M.

    1987-12-01

    Braided stream deposits, described in a previous article in this series, and meandering stream deposits commonly are excellent reservoirs. Meandering high-sinuousity channels are found on flat alluvial plains with slopes less than 1 1/2/sup 0/ (0.026 rad). These rivers have wide ranges of discharges from low-water flow to flood stage. Two main processes are responsible for development of sand bodies. These are point-bar deposits left by channel migration, and oxbow-lake deposits left in loops of the river course abandoned when the stream cuts a new course during flooding. Extremely high floods spill over the banks and deposit sheets of very fine sand, silt, and clay onto the flood plain.

  12. Numerical simulation of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoir systems with turbulence and closure stress effects

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, A.M.; Crichlow, H.B.; Soliman, M.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A numerical technique for analyzing the behavior of a fractured gas reservoir system is presented. The reservoir is simulated by a fully implicit three-dimensional model that incorporates the effects of turbulent flow and closure stress in a finite conductivity fracture. The model utilizes the real gas pseudo-pressure, two-point upstream transmissibilities and a stable iterative process based on a sparse matrix approach to solving the equation systems. This paper presents a description of the model and applications to various reservoirs to illustrate the effects of fracture heights, turbulence and closure pressure on well performance. 16 refs.

  13. Diagenetic capping of carbonate reservoir facies

    SciTech Connect

    Lighty, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The diagenetic model proposed involves the effect of submarine cementation on previously lithified carbonates, such as submerged relict shelf-margin buildups (e.g., drowned reefs, ooid shoals) or previously subaerially exposed formations (e.g., dune ridges) that were submerged by later sea level rise. These deposits generally have pronounced topographic relief (visible on seismic), good reservoir geometries, and high internal porosity of either primary or secondary origin. Petrologic studies on examples of both of these situations, a submerged early Holocene barrier reef off Florida and a 175-km (110-m) long submerged Pleistocene eolian ridge in the Bahamas, show that their exposed surface and uppermost facies (0.1 m, or 0.3 ft, below top) are further infilled and cemented, creating an extensively lithified, low porosity/low permeability zone or diagenetic cap rock. Quantitative mineralogic studies of occluding cements reveal an exponential reduction in porosity while moving upward into the seal zone. Submarine cements effectively infill and form a surficial permeability barrier that acts to impede further diagenesis and porosity reduction within underlying potential reservoir facies. To form this diagenetic seal only requires that the original carbonate buildup be resubmerged for some brief period of time prior to subsequent burial by sediments. If buildup accumulation later resumes without intermediate sediment burial, a common stratigraphic situation, the diagenetic seal would represent a disconformity separating two similar facies. The early formation of a diagenetic cap rock lends support to models of early hydrocarbon migration and emplacement. Prediction and recognition of submarine diagenetic seals will aid in exploration and development of obvious buildup reservoirs as well as subtle intraformational traps.

  14. Monterey fractured reservoir, Santa Barbara Channel, California

    SciTech Connect

    Belfield, W.C.; Helwig, J.; La Pointe, P.R.; Dahleen, W.K.

    1983-03-01

    The South Elwood field in the Santa Barbara Channel is a faulted anticline with cumulative production of 14.5 million bbl from the Monterey Formation as of September 1, 1982. The distributions of pressure, flow rates, and oil-water contacts and the low average matrix permeability of 0.2 md require a fractured reservoir. Core and outcrop studies show a dominant fracture set characterized by vertical, lithologically controlled fractures oriented across strike, and breccias controlled by lithology and structure. Generally, the fracture intensity is unaffected by structural position or bed curvature but is controlled by lithology and bed thickness. Other varieties of fracturing in the Monterey are related to a protracted history of diagenesis, deformation, and fluid injection. Three types of tar-bearing breccias occur in the Monterey Formation: stratigraphic breccia, coalescent-fracture breccia, and fault-related breccia. Formation of breccias probably involves high pore pressures. Because of their polygenetic origin, breccia masses have diverse orientations paralleling bedding or fracture/fault systems. In conclusions, fracturing and brecciation of the Monterey Formation reflect the interplay between processes of diagenesis, deformation, and fluid dynamics. The most important features of the reservoir in the area of the present study are: (1) vertical fractures oriented normal to the structural trends and inferred to be favorably oriented (to remain open) with respect to the regional minimum horizontal stress; and (2) breccias that are both stratigraphically and structurally controlled and inferred to be related to the interaction of rock stress and fluid dynamics.

  15. Effectiveness of physical activity promotion in blood pressure and blood sugar reduction: A community–based intervention study in rural south India

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Subitha; Bala, Soudarssanane M.; Ramanujam, Murugesan; Kannan, G.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Physical activity of moderate intensity for 30 minutes a day, on most days substantially reduces the risk of many chronic diseases. Aim: To assess the effect of regular physical activity on blood pressure and blood sugar levels in a rural Indian community Settings and Design: This community-based study was carried out in Periakattupalayam and Rangareddipalayam in south India, with 485 subjects, aged 20 to 49 years. Materials and Methods: The study was done in five phases: Awareness campaign, baseline assessment of participants, intervention phase (10 weeks), interim, and final assessment. Physical activity of moderate intensity (brisk walking for 30 minutes on four days / week) was promoted by forming 30 small walking groups, in a home-based setting, with professional supervision. Village leaders and Self-Help Group members were the resource people for the promotion of physical activity. Statistical Analysis: Analysis was done by using paired ‘t’ test; the ‘Intention-to-Treat’ approach was utilized for the interpretation of the findings of the study. Results: Of the 485 subjects, 265 (54.6%) complied with walking on more than four days / week, while 156 (32.2%) walked on one to four days / week, and 64 (13.2%) dropped out during the intervention period. This study has shown that a 10-week intervention to promote physical activity was effective in significantly decreasing the population's BP by 1.56 / 0.74 mm Hg, fasting blood sugar levels by 2.82 mg%, body weight by 0.17 kg, and BMI by 0.06 kg / m2. Conclusions: This study has proved the functional feasibility of enabling people to undertake physical activity in a rural Indian community, and the effectiveness of using physical activity, to significantly reduce the population's mean BP and blood sugar levels. PMID:22870410

  16. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  17. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  18. Cost Distribution of Environmental Flow Demands in a Large Scale Multi-Reservoir System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, G.; Tilmant, A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the recovery of a prescribed flow regime through reservoir system reoperation, focusing on the associated costs and losses imposed on different power plants depending on flows, power plant and reservoir characteristics and systems topology. In large-scale reservoir systems such cost distribution is not trivial, and it should be properly evaluated to identify coordinated operating solutions that avoid penalizing a single reservoir. The methods combine an efficient stochastic dual dynamic programming algorithm for reservoir optimization subject to environmental flow targets with specific magnitude, duration and return period, which effects on fish recruitment are already known. Results indicate that the distribution of the effect of meeting the environmental flow demands throughout the reservoir cascade differs largely, and in some reservoirs power production and revenue are increased, while in others it is reduced. Most importantly, for the example system modeled here (10 reservoirs in the Parana River basin, Brazil) meeting the target environmental flows was possible without reducing the total energy produced in the year, at a cost of $25 Million/year in foregone hydropower revenues (3% reduction). Finally, the results and methods are useful in (a) quantifying the foregone hydropower and revenues resulting from meeting a specific environmental flow demand, (b) identifying the distribution and reallocation of the foregone hydropower and revenue across a large scale system, and (c) identifying optimal reservoir operating strategies to meet environmental flow demands in a large scale multi-reservoir system.

  19. Environmental impact assessments of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir on the most hyperconcentrated laden river, Yellow River, China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dongxian; Miao, Chiyuan; Wu, Jingwen; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Duan, Qingyun; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-02-01

    The Yellow River is the most hyperconcentrated sediment-laden river in the world. Throughout recorded history, the Lower Yellow River (LYR) experienced many catastrophic flood and drought events. To regulate the LYR, a reservoir was constructed at Xiaolangdi that became operational in the early 2000s. An annual water-sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) was then implemented, aimed at flood control, sediment reduction, regulated water supply, and power generation. This study examines the eco-environmental and socioenvironmental impacts of Xiaolangdi Reservoir. In retrospect, it is found that the reservoir construction phase incurred huge financial cost and required large-scale human resettlement. Subsequent reservoir operations affected the local geological environment, downstream riverbed erosion, evolution of the Yellow River delta, water quality, and aquatic biodiversity. Lessons from the impact assessment of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir are summarized as follows: (1) The construction of large reservoirs is not merely an engineering challenge but must also be viewed in terms of resource exploitation, environmental protection, and social development; (2) long-term systems for monitoring large reservoirs should be established, and decision makers involved at national policy and planning levels must be prepared to react quickly to the changing impact of large reservoirs; and (3) the key to solving sedimentation in the LYR is not Xiaolangdi Reservoir but instead soil conservation in the middle reaches of the Yellow River basin. Proper assessment of the impacts of large reservoirs will help promote development strategies that enhance the long-term sustainability of dam projects.

  20. Numerical Well Testing Interpretation Model and Applications in Crossflow Double-Layer Reservoirs by Polymer Flooding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; He, Youwei; Li, Lei; Du, Song; Cheng, Shiqing

    2014-01-01

    This work presents numerical well testing interpretation model and analysis techniques to evaluate formation by using pressure transient data acquired with logging tools in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. A well testing model is established based on rheology experiments and by considering shear, diffusion, convection, inaccessible pore volume (IPV), permeability reduction, wellbore storage effect, and skin factors. The type curves were then developed based on this model, and parameter sensitivity is analyzed. Our research shows that the type curves have five segments with different flow status: (I) wellbore storage section, (II) intermediate flow section (transient section), (III) mid-radial flow section, (IV) crossflow section (from low permeability layer to high permeability layer), and (V) systematic radial flow section. The polymer flooding field tests prove that our model can accurately determine formation parameters in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. Moreover, formation damage caused by polymer flooding can also be evaluated by comparison of the interpreted permeability with initial layered permeability before polymer flooding. Comparison of the analysis of numerical solution based on flow mechanism with observed polymer flooding field test data highlights the potential for the application of this interpretation method in formation evaluation and enhanced oil recovery (EOR). PMID:25302335

  1. Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R.H.; Hickman, S.H.; Barton, C.A.; Shapiro, A.M.; Benoit, W.R.; Sass, J.H.

    1998-08-01

    Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

  2. Numerical well testing interpretation model and applications in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Guo, Hui; He, Youwei; Xu, Hainan; Li, Lei; Zhang, Tiantian; Xian, Bo; Du, Song; Cheng, Shiqing

    2014-01-01

    This work presents numerical well testing interpretation model and analysis techniques to evaluate formation by using pressure transient data acquired with logging tools in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. A well testing model is established based on rheology experiments and by considering shear, diffusion, convection, inaccessible pore volume (IPV), permeability reduction, wellbore storage effect, and skin factors. The type curves were then developed based on this model, and parameter sensitivity is analyzed. Our research shows that the type curves have five segments with different flow status: (I) wellbore storage section, (II) intermediate flow section (transient section), (III) mid-radial flow section, (IV) crossflow section (from low permeability layer to high permeability layer), and (V) systematic radial flow section. The polymer flooding field tests prove that our model can accurately determine formation parameters in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. Moreover, formation damage caused by polymer flooding can also be evaluated by comparison of the interpreted permeability with initial layered permeability before polymer flooding. Comparison of the analysis of numerical solution based on flow mechanism with observed polymer flooding field test data highlights the potential for the application of this interpretation method in formation evaluation and enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

  3. Production of superheated steam from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; White, D.E.

    1973-01-01

    Vapor-dominated geothermal systems such as Larderello, Italy, The Geysers, California, and Matsukawa, Japan yield dry or superheated steam when exploited. Models for these systems are examined along with production data and the thermodynamic properties of water, steam and rock. It is concluded that these systems initially consist of a water and steam filled reservoir, a water-saturated cap rock, and a water or brine-saturated deep reservoir below a water table. Most liquid water in all parts of the system is relatively immobilized in small pores and crevices; steam dominates the large fractures and voids of the reservoir and is the continuous, pressure-controlling phase. With production, the pressure is lowered and the liquid water boils, causing massive transfer of heat from the rock and its eventual drying. Passage of steam through already dried rock produces superheating. After an initial vaporization of liquid water in the reservoir, the decrease in pressure produces increased boiling below the deep water table. With heavy exploitation, boiling extends deeper into hotter rock and the temperature of the steam increases. This model explains most features of the published production behavior of these systems and can be used to guide exploitation policies. ?? 1973.

  4. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  5. Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

    1993-03-01

    This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

  6. Effect of Shear Slip on Fault Permeability in Shale Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, J. S.; Zoback, M. D.; Kohli, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding flow along faults and fractures in shales is important for better understanding of hydraulic stimulation in unconventional reservoirs. For example, the re-activation of faults and fractures during hydraulic stimulation appears to be an important process contributing to reservoir permeability. In this study, we examine the effect of shear slip on fault permeability in shale reservoir rocks. We perform shear experiments in a triaxial apparatus on two types of samples: 1) a sample sawcut at 30° to the cylindrical axis and 2) a naturally broken sample. Both samples are from 3481 m (11422 ft) depth within the Haynesville reservoir containing 22 wt.% clay. First, we hydrostatically load the samples to a confining pressure of 15 MPa (2176 psi), followed by triaxial loading in which a constant axial displacement rate of 1 μm/s is applied for increments in axial displacement of initially 0.25 mm and later 1 mm. After each shear increment, we perform measurements of fault permeability at a constant mean pore pressure of 2.1 MPa (300 psi) using the steady state Darcy flow method. Boreholes drilled parallel to the cylindrical axis on either side of the shale sample allow pore fluid to access the fault plane. The coefficient of friction increases with shearing from 0.53 to 0.61 for the sawcut sample and from about 0.60 to 0.74 for the naturally broken sample. The sawcut sample indicates stable sliding behavior whereas small stick-slip events occur in the naturally broken sample. Upon shearing, fault permeability decreases by about 2.5 and 1.5 orders of magnitude within the first mm of shear displacement for the sawcut and naturally broken sample, respectively. Fault permeability of both samples continues to slowly decrease up to a maximum axial displacement of 4 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Laser scanning images before and after shearing show the formation of small striations in the direction of slip for the sawcut sample and the break-off of several grain

  7. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage.

  8. Projecting the Impact of Regional Land-Use Change and Water Management Policies on Lake Water Quality: An Application to Periurban Lakes and Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Catherine, Arnaud; Mouillot, David; Maloufi, Selma; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    As the human population grows, the demand for living space and supplies of resources also increases, which may induce rapid change in land-use/land-cover (LULC) and associated pressures exerted on aquatic habitats. We propose a new approach to forecast the impact of regional land cover change and water management policies (i.e., targets in nutrient loads reduction) on lake and reservoir water eutrophication status using a model that requires minimal parameterisation compared with alternative methods. This approach was applied to a set of 48 periurban lakes located in the Ile de France region (IDF, France) to simulate catchment-scale management scenarios. Model outputs were subsequently compared to governmental agencies’ 2030 forecasts. Our model indicated that the efforts made to reduce pressure in the catchment of seepage lakes might be expected to be proportional to the gain that might be obtained, whereas drainage lakes will display little improvement until a critical level of pressure reduction is reached. The model also indicated that remediation measures, as currently planned by governmental agencies, might only have a marginal impact on improving the eutrophication status of lakes and reservoirs within the IDF region. Despite the commitment to appropriately managing the water resources in many countries, prospective tools to evaluate the potential impacts of global change on freshwater ecosystems integrity at medium to large spatial scales are lacking. This study proposes a new approach to investigate the impact of region-scale human-driven changes on lake and reservoir ecological status and could be implemented elsewhere with limited parameterisation. Issues are discussed that relate to model uncertainty and to its relevance as a tool applied to decision-making. PMID:23991066

  9. Projecting the impact of regional land-use change and water management policies on lake water quality: an application to periurban lakes and reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Arnaud; Mouillot, David; Maloufi, Selma; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    As the human population grows, the demand for living space and supplies of resources also increases, which may induce rapid change in land-use/land-cover (LULC) and associated pressures exerted on aquatic habitats. We propose a new approach to forecast the impact of regional land cover change and water management policies (i.e., targets in nutrient loads reduction) on lake and reservoir water eutrophication status using a model that requires minimal parameterisation compared with alternative methods. This approach was applied to a set of 48 periurban lakes located in the Ile de France region (IDF, France) to simulate catchment-scale management scenarios. Model outputs were subsequently compared to governmental agencies' 2030 forecasts. Our model indicated that the efforts made to reduce pressure in the catchment of seepage lakes might be expected to be proportional to the gain that might be obtained, whereas drainage lakes will display little improvement until a critical level of pressure reduction is reached. The model also indicated that remediation measures, as currently planned by governmental agencies, might only have a marginal impact on improving the eutrophication status of lakes and reservoirs within the IDF region. Despite the commitment to appropriately managing the water resources in many countries, prospective tools to evaluate the potential impacts of global change on freshwater ecosystems integrity at medium to large spatial scales are lacking. This study proposes a new approach to investigate the impact of region-scale human-driven changes on lake and reservoir ecological status and could be implemented elsewhere with limited parameterisation. Issues are discussed that relate to model uncertainty and to its relevance as a tool applied to decision-making.

  10. THE ALLISON UNIT CO{sub 2}-ECBM PILOT: A RESERVOIR MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves; Anne Taillefert; Larry Pekot; Chris Clarkson

    2003-02-01

    history was matched using the COMET2 reservoir simulator, and future field performance was forecast under various operating conditions. Based on the results of the study, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) The injection of CO{sub 2} at the Allison Unit has resulted in incremental methane recovery over estimated ultimate primary recovery, in a proportion of approximately one volume of methane for every three volumes of CO{sub 2} injected. (2) The study area was successfully modeled with ARI's COMET2 model. However, aspects of the model remain uncertain, such as producing and injecting bottomhole pressures, CO{sub 2} content profiles of the produced gas, and the pressure at the observation well. (3) There appears to be clear evidence of significant coal permeability reduction with CO{sub 2} injection. This permeability reduction, and the associated impact on CO{sub 2} injectivity, compromised incremental methane recoveries and project economics. Finding ways to overcome and/or prevent this effect is therefore an important topic for future research. (4) From a CO{sub 2} sequestration standpoint, the incremental methane recoveries (based solely on the conditions encountered at the Allison Unit), can provide a meaningful offset to CO{sub 2} separation, capture and transportation costs, on the order of $2-5/ton of CO{sub 2}.

  11. Angiotensin System Blockade Combined With Calcium Channel Blockers Is Superior to Other Combinations in Cardiovascular Protection With Similar Blood Pressure Reduction: A Meta-Analysis in 20,451 Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chen; Tai, Chenhui; Bai, Bin; Yu, Shikai; Karamanou, Marianna; Wang, Jiguang; Protogerou, Athanase; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yawei

    2016-08-01

    The authors aimed to investigate the superiority of angiotensin system blockade (angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker [ARB]) plus a calcium channel blocker (CCB) (A+C) over other combination therapies in antihypertensive treatment. A meta-analysis in 20,451 hypertensive patients from eight randomized controlled trials was conducted to compare the A+C treatment with other combination therapies in terms of blood pressure (BP) reduction, clinical outcomes, and adverse events. The results showed that BP reduction did not differ significantly among the A+C therapy and other combination therapies in systolic and diastolic BP (P=.87 and P=.56, respectively). However, A+C therapy, compared with other combination therapies, achieved a significantly lower incidence of cardiovascular composite endpoints, including cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke (risk ratio [RR], 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-0.91; P<.001), but similar all-cause mortality (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.77-1.04; P=.15) and stroke rates (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.77-1.04; P=.09). Moreover, A+C therapy yielded a 4.21 mL/min/1.73 m(2) lower estimated glomerular filtration rate reduction than other combinations (P<.001). Finally, A+C therapy showed a similar incidence of adverse events as other combination therapies (P=.34) but presented a significantly lower incidence of serious adverse events (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; P=.03). In conclusion, A+C therapy is superior to other combinations of antihypertensive treatment as it shows a lower incidence of cardiovascular events and adverse events, while it has similar effects in lowering BP and preserving renal function.

  12. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-03-31

    The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

  13. Efficient computation of the compositional model for gas condensate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jifu; Li, Jiachun; Ye, Jigen

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a direct method, unsymmetric-pattern multifrontal factorization, for a large sparse system of linear equations is applied in the compositional reservoir model. The good performances of this approach are shown by solving the Poisson equation. And then the numerical module is embedded in the compositional model for simulating X1/5 (3) gas condensate reservoir in KeKeYa gas field, Northwest China. The results of oil/gas reserves, variations of stratum pressure and oil/gas production, etc. are compared with the observation. Good agreement comparable to COMP4 model is achieved, suggesting that the present model is both efficient and powerful in compositional reservoir simulations.

  14. Fault Permeability Estimated From Rate of Sea Water Recharge Into an Underpressured Hydrocarbon Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, J. R.; Horner, S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane has leaked from the offshore South Ellwood fault at least since discovery of the South Ellwood field at Platform Holly. The fault bounds the north side of the field and has 600 meters of normal offset. The reservoir, which is fractured Monterey shale at one kilometer depth, was initially 5% over hydrostatic pressure, but is currently at 25% below hydrostatic pressure. Production fluid in well tubing that connects the platform and reservoir is isolated from the ocean. New data indicate that the ocean is in direct hydraulic communication with the reservoir in the vicinity of the fault. Quartz pressure sensors were installed at about one km depth in five wells during a 15 day production shut down. A well that intersects the fault at reservoir depth (about one km subsea), shows a pressure variation that matches the frequency of the ocean tide. Within +/- 1 minute, there is no lag between the predicted tide signal and the pressure variation in the well. The pressure change is less than predicted from sea heights, which we attribute to compressibility of the gas in the fault zone. The other wells (160m-1 km from the fault) do not show the tidal signal, indicating that pressure change is not a general effect of the tide on the earth's crust. During testing, fluid pressures increased at a rate of 55 Pa/hr (0.008 psi/hr) in the well adjacent to the fault. We conclude that the pressure recovery from sub-hydrostatic conditions is due to sea water flowing down the fault into the under pressured reservoir. From this data we calculate the permeability of the South Ellwood Fault to be about 20 md, a value similar to the overall field permeability in the fractured Monterey reservoir.

  15. Development of a nuclear technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless steel cylinders was developed. It is based on differences in attenuation coefficients of water and air for Cs137 (662 keV) gamma rays. Experimentally observed gamma ray counting rates with and without water in model reservoir cylinder were compared with corresponding calculated values for two different gamma ray detection theshold energies. Calculated values include the effects of multiple scattering and attendant gamma ray energy reductions. The agreement between the measured and calculated values is reasonably good. Computer programs for calculating angular and spectral distributions of scattered radition in various media are included.

  16. The Iġnik Sikumi Field Experiment, Alaska North Slope: Design, operations, and implications for CO2−CH4 exchange in gas hydrate reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Schoderbek, David; Collett, Timothy S.; Ohtsuki, Satoshi; White, Mark; Anderson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    uncontrolled destabilization; (2) gas hydrate test wells must be carefully designed to enable rapid remediation of wellbore blockages that will occur during any cessation in operations; (3) sand production during hydrate production likely can be managed through standard engineering controls; and (4) reservoir heat exchange during depressurization was more favorable than expected—mitigating concerns for near-wellbore freezing and enabling consideration of more aggressive pressure reduction.

  17. Gas/oil capillary pressure at chalk at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Christoffersen, K.R.; Whitson, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Accurate capillary pressure curves are essential for studying the recovery of oil by gas injection in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs. A simple and fast method to determine high-pressure drainage capillary pressure curves has been developed. The effect of gas/oil interfacial tension (IFT) on the capillary pressure of chalk cores has been determined for a methane/n-pentane system. Measurements on a 5-md outcrop chalk core were made at pressures of 70, 105, and 130 bar, with corresponding IFT`s of 6.3, 3.2, and 1.5 mN/m. The results were both accurate and reproducible. The measured capillary pressure curves were not a linear function of IFT when compared with low-pressure centrifuge data. Measured capillary pressures were considerably lower than IFT-scaled centrifuge data. It appears that the deviation starts at an IFT of about 5 mN/m. According to the results of this study, the recovery of oil by gravity drainage in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs may be significantly underestimated if standard laboratory capillary pressure curves are scaled by IFT only. However, general conclusions cannot be made on the basis on only this series of experiments on one chalk core.

  18. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  19. Cascade Reservoirs Floodwater Resources Utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A reasonable floodwater resources utilization method is put forward by dynamic controlling of cascade reservoirs flood control limited level in this paper. According to the probability distribution of the beginning time of the first flood and the ending time of the final flood from July to September, the Fuzzy Statistic Analysis was used to divide the main flood season. By fitting the flood season membership functions of each period, the cascade reservoirs flood control limited water level for each period were computed according to the characteristic data of reservoirs. In terms of the benefit maximization and risk minimum principle, the reasonable combination of flood control limited water level of cascade reservoirs was put forward.

  20. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-03

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers.

  1. Reservoir evaporation in Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Ayala, Rolando A.

    2014-03-01

    The role of reservoir surface evaporation in river/reservoir water budgets and water management is explored using a modeling system that combines historical natural hydrology with current conditions of water resources development and management. The long-term mean evaporation from the 3415 reservoirs in the Texas water rights permit system is estimated to be 7.53 billion m3/year, which is equivalent to 61% of total agricultural or 126% of total municipal water use in the state during the year 2010. Evaporation varies with the hydrologic conditions governing reservoir surface areas and evaporation rates. Annual statewide total evaporation volumes associated with exceedance probabilities of 75%, 50%, and 25% are 7.07, 7.47, and 7.95 billion m3/year, respectively. Impacts of evaporation are greatest during extended severe droughts that govern water supply capabilities.

  2. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  3. Functional wettability in carbonate reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Patrick V.; Thyne, Geoffrey

    2016-10-11

    Oil adsorbs to carbonate reservoirs indirectly through a relatively thick separating water layer, and directly to the surface through a relatively thin intervening water layer. Whereas directly sorbed oil desorbs slowly and incompletely in response to changes in reservoir conditions, indirectly sorbed oil can be rapidly desorbed by changing the chemistry of the separating water layer. The additional recovery might be as much as 30% original oil in place (OOIP) above the ~30% OOIP recovered from carbonates through reservoir depressurization (primary production) and viscous displacement (waterflooding). Electrostatic adhesive forces are the dominant control over carbonate reservoir wettability. A surface complexationmore » model that quantifies electrostatic adhesion accurately predicts oil recovery trends for carbonates. Furthermore, the approach should therefore be useful for estimating initial wettability and designing fluids that improve oil recovery.« less

  4. Functional wettability in carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick V.; Thyne, Geoffrey

    2016-10-11

    Oil adsorbs to carbonate reservoirs indirectly through a relatively thick separating water layer, and directly to the surface through a relatively thin intervening water layer. Whereas directly sorbed oil desorbs slowly and incompletely in response to changes in reservoir conditions, indirectly sorbed oil can be rapidly desorbed by changing the chemistry of the separating water layer. The additional recovery might be as much as 30% original oil in place (OOIP) above the ~30% OOIP recovered from carbonates through reservoir depressurization (primary production) and viscous displacement (waterflooding). Electrostatic adhesive forces are the dominant control over carbonate reservoir wettability. A surface complexation model that quantifies electrostatic adhesion accurately predicts oil recovery trends for carbonates. Furthermore, the approach should therefore be useful for estimating initial wettability and designing fluids that improve oil recovery.

  5. Tight gas reservoir simulation: Modeling discrete irregular strata-bound fracture network flow, including dynamic recharge from the matrix

    SciTech Connect

    McKoy, M.L., Sams, W.N.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, has sponsored a project to simulate the behavior of tight, fractured, strata-bound gas reservoirs that arise from irregular discontinuous, or clustered networks of fractures. New FORTRAN codes have been developed to generate fracture networks, or simulate reservoir drainage/recharge, and to plot the fracture networks and reservoirs pressures. Ancillary codes assist with raw data analysis.

  6. Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature

    DOEpatents

    Kamath, Krishna

    1984-08-14

    The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7.degree. F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88.degree. F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

  7. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from aGeologic Storage Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-09

    The amounts of CO2 that would need to be injected intogeologic storage reservoirs to achieve a significant reduction ofatmospheric emissions are very large. A 1000 MWe coal-fired power plantemits approximately 30,000 tonnes of CO2 per day, 10 Mt per year(Hitchon, 1996). When injected underground over a typical lifetime of 30years of such a plant, the CO2 plume may occupy a large area of order 100km2 or more, and fluid pressure increase in excess of 1 bar(corresponding to 10 m water head) may extend over an area of more than2,500 km2 (Pruess, et al., 2003). The large areal extent expected for CO2plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered,such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape fromthe primary storage reservoir. Under most subsurface conditions oftemperature and pressure, CO2 is buoyant relative to groundwaters. If(sub-)vertical pathways are available, CO2 will tend to flow upward and,depending on geologic conditions, may eventually reach potablegroundwater aquifers or even the land surface. Leakage of CO2 could alsooccur along wellbores, including pre-existing and improperly abandonedwells, or wells drilled in connection with the CO2 storage operations.The pressure increases accompanying CO2 injection will give rise tochanges in effective stress that could cause movement along faults,increasing permeability and potential for leakage.Escape of CO2 from aprimary geologic storage reservoir and potential hazards associated withits discharge at the land surface raise a number of concerns, including(1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard whenleaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase inatmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy,eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In orderto gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address theseissues

  8. Blood Pressure Reduction in the Acute Phase of an Ischemic Stroke Does Not Improve Short- or Long-Term Dependency or Mortality: A Meta-Analysis of Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rong; Liu, Feng-Di; Wang, Shuo; Peng, Jia-Li; Tao, Xiao-Xiao; Zheng, Bo; Zhang, Qi-Ting; Yao, Qian; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Su, Jing-Jing; Shu, Liang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of current literature to determine whether lowering blood pressure (BP) during the acute phase of an ischemic stroke improves short- and long-term outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase were searched until September 5, 2014 using combinations of the search terms: blood pressure reduction, reduced blood pressure, lowering blood pressure, ischemic stroke, acute stroke, and intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trial and patients with acute stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) treated with an antihypertensive agent or placebo. Outcome measures were change in systolic and diastolic BP (SBP, DBP) after treatment, and short- and long-term dependency and mortality rates. A total of 459 studies were identified, and ultimately 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The total number of participants in the treatment groups was 5672 (range, 6-2308), and in the control groups was 5416 (range, 6-2033). In most studies, more than 50% of the participants were males and the mean age was more than 60 years. The mean follow-up time ranged from 5 days to 12 months. As expected, treatment groups had a greater decrease in BP than control groups, and this effect was seen with different classes of antihypertensive drugs. Short-term and long-term dependency rates were similar between treatment and control groups (short-term dependency: pooled odds ratio [OR] = 1.041, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.936-1.159, P = 0.457; long-term dependency: pooled OR = 1.013, 95% CI: 0.915-1.120, P = 0.806). Short-term or long-term mortality was similar between the treatment and control groups (short-term mortality: pooled OR = 1.020, 95% CI: 0.749-1.388, P = .902; long-term mortality: pooled OR = 1.039, 95% CI: 0.883-1.222, P = 0.644). Antihypertensive agents effectively reduce BP during the acute phase of an ischemic stroke, but provide no benefit with respect to short- and

  9. 33 CFR 211.81 - Reservoir areas.