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Sample records for reservoir pressure reduction

  1. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  2. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  3. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  4. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  5. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  6. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  7. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  8. Capillary pressure experiments under simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of residual trapping to a long-term storage of CO2 in saline aquifers mainly depends on the drainage capillary pressure of a reservoir and the hysteresis of the drainage and imbibition branches of the capillary pressure curve. However, the experimental database of capillary pressure measured at relevant pT conditions is still scarce. Here, we present an experimental set-up, which allows for the performance of capillary pressure experiments with a semi-permeable disk (porous plate) at simulated reservoir conditions. In the framework of the EU funded project CO2CARE, drainage and imbibition cycles are performed on Triassic sandstone samples. We use a temperature controlled oil pressure autoclave to apply a maximum confining pressure of 400 bar and a maximum working temperature of 150°C. The fluid displacement, and hence the sample saturation is controlled by a gear pump with a fine resolution of 0.01 ml. Additionally, the capillary pressure experiment is combined with measurements of elastic wave velocities as well as of the electrical resistivity. In this case, P and S wave velocities and the formation resistivity factor are determined as functions of the brine/ CO2 saturation. The experiment provides information about the efficiency of the capillary trapping of the sample and a calibration of the petrophysical properties on saturation.

  9. An analytical pressure-transient model for complex reservoir scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Edmond; Ambastha, Anil K.

    1994-10-01

    Reservoir deposition occurs through long periods of time, thus most reservoirs are heterogeneous in nature. The presence of various zones and layers of different rock and fluid properties is the usual circumstance in petroleum reservoirs. A secondary recovery operation, such as steam-flooding, results in a composite reservoir situation because of the presence of zones of different fluid properties. Because of reservoir heterogeneity and gravity override effects, fluid boundaries separating two zones may have complicated or irregular shapes. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new analytical pressure-transient model which can accommodate complex reservoir scenarios resulting from reservoir heterogeneity and from thermal recovery or other fluid-injection operations. Mathematically, our analytical model considers such complex situations as a generalized eigenvalue system resulting in a system of linear equations. Computational difficulties faced, validation approach of the new model, and an application for complex reservoir scenarios are discussed.

  10. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Burnett, J. E.; Felder, S. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    An intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system is described and data are presented covering performance in: (1) reducing intraocular pressure to a preselected value, (2) maintaining a set minimum intraocular pressure, and (3) reducing the dynamic increases in intraocular pressure resulting from external loads applied to the eye.

  11. Transient pressure analysis in composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, R.W.K.; Brigham, W.E.

    1982-08-01

    The problem of fluid flow in a radially composite reservoir is discussed. Recently published was the most general analytic solution available thus far. That analytic solution is analyzed, and the results are presented. The solution is dependent upon the following dimensionless parameters (if well-bore storage and skin effect are neglected): (1) dimensionless time based on the discontinuity radius, (2) the dimensionless discontinuity radius, (3) the mobility ratio, and (4) the diffusivity ratio. The range of parameters used in generating the results include dimensionless radius time of 0.01 t

  12. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    System designed to reduce intraocular pressure hydraulically to any level desired by physician over set time and in controlled manner has number of uses in ophthalmology. Device may be most immediately useful in treatment of glaucoma.

  13. Reservoir transport and poroelastic properties from oscillating pore pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Azar K.

    Hydraulic transport properties of reservoir rocks, permeability and storage capacity are traditionally defined as rock properties, responsible for the passage of fluids through the porous rock sample, as well as their storage. The evaluation of both is an important part of any reservoir characterization workflow. Moreover, permeability and storage capacity are main inputs into any reservoir simulation study, routinely performed by reservoir engineers on almost any major oil and gas field in the world. An accurate reservoir simulation is essential for production forecast and economic analysis, hence the transport properties directly control the profitability of the petroleum reservoir and their estimation is vital for oil and gas industry. This thesis is devoted to an integrated study of reservoir rocks' hydraulic, streaming potential and poroelastic properties as measured with the oscillating pore pressure experiment. The oscillating pore pressure method is traditionally used to measure hydraulic transport properties. We modified the method and built an experimental setup, capable of measuring all aforementioned rock properties simultaneously. The measurements were carried out for four conventional reservoir-rock quality samples at a range of oscillation frequencies and effective stresses. An apparent frequency dependence of permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient was observed. Measured frequency dispersion of drained poroelastic properties indicates an intrinsically inelastic nature of the porous mineral rock frame. Standard Linear Model demonstrated the best fit to the experimental dispersion data. Pore collapse and grain crushing effects took place during hydrostatic loading of the dolomitic sample and were observed in permeability, coupling coefficient and poroelastic measurements simultaneously. I established that hydraulically-measured storage capacities are overestimated by almost one order of magnitude when compared to elastically

  14. An evaluation of pore pressure diffusion into a shale overburden and sideburden induced by production-related changes in reservoir fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Ludovic P.; MacBeth, Colin; HajNasser, Yesser; Schutjens, Peter

    2012-06-01

    It is commonplace in the simulation of reservoir fluid flow induced by hydrocarbon production to regard shales as barriers to flow. Whilst this appears correct for fluid exchange, this is not the case for the fluid pressure component of this process. Indeed, the authors observe that pore pressure reduction due to reservoir depletion can propagate significant distances into the shale overburden or sideburden over the production time scale. Shales may deplete their pore pressures by more than 10% of that experienced in the reservoir sand for distances of tens of metres to kilometres into the shale, depending on the production history, duration and the specific shale properties. An important factor controlling these results is heterogeneity of the shale sediments, and the pressure diffusion process can be considerably enhanced by the presence of silt laminations and streaks. These results suggest a possible risk to drillers when advancing towards the top of a depleting reservoir or when drilling a well alongside an already depleted reservoir. Our analyses conclude that pore pressure diffusion should be considered as a factor in geomechanical and fluid flow reservoir modelling, and in mud weight determination during infill drilling.

  15. Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Griffin, Mr. Bob; Wright, Anthony L

    2006-01-01

    Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

  16. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  17. Evaluation of Very Low Pressure Sprinkler Irrigation and Reservoir Tillage for Efficient Use of Water and Energy : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, Dennis C.

    1987-03-01

    Two types of very low pressure devices were tested, spray nozzles and furrow drops (bubblers). For minimizing spray loss and maintaining uniformity, optimum conditions for spray heads are elevation about 6 feet, spacing 8 to 9 feet and pressure 15 to 20 psi. Use of furrow bubblers is not recommended for most regional conditions. Reservoir tillage with very low pressure systems reduces runoff on sloping fields while maintaining or slightly increasing yield. The total amount of water applied is slightly less because of reduction in spray loss. Effectiveness of reservoir tillage depends on the reservoir storing water until it infiltrates. Failure of the reservoirs during the season may result in increased runoff and erosion. Pressure regulators tested are adequate for their intended use. The uniformity of application using low pressure components was comparable to that of high pressure systems. Energy saving scan result from both low operating pressure and better application efficiency, but the relative importance of these two factors depends on individual circumstances. Payback times for some example systems are four years or less.

  18. Comparison of pressure transient response in intensely and sparsely fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.T.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive analytical model is presented to study the pressure transient behavior of a naturally fractured reservoir with a continuous matrix block size distribution. Geologically realistic probability density functions of matrix block size are used to represent reservoirs of varying fracture intensity and uniformity. Transient interporosity flow is assumed and interporosity skin is incorporated. Drawdown and interference pressure transient tests are investigated. The results show distinctions in the pressure response from intensely and sparsely fractured reservoirs in the absence of interporosity skin. Also, uniformly and nonuniformly fractured reservoirs exhibit distinct responses, irrespective of the degree of fracture intensity. The pressure response in a nonuniformly fractured reservoir with large block size variability, approaches a nonfractured (homogeneous) reservoir response. Type curves are developed to estimate matrix block size variability and the degree of fracture intensity from drawdown and interference well tests.

  19. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum

  20. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

  1. Reduction of Orifice-Induced Pressure Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, Elizabeth B.; Gloss, Blair B.; Eves, John W.; Stack, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Use of porous-plug orifice reduces or eliminates errors, induced by orifice itself, in measuring static pressure on airfoil surface in wind-tunnel experiments. Piece of sintered metal press-fitted into static-pressure orifice so it matches surface contour of model. Porous material reduces orifice-induced pressure error associated with conventional orifice of same or smaller diameter. Also reduces or eliminates additional errors in pressure measurement caused by orifice imperfections. Provides more accurate measurements in regions with very thin boundary layers.

  2. Improving multi-objective reservoir operation optimization with sensitivity-informed dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J.; Zhang, C.; Fu, G.; Li, Y.; Zhou, H.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a sensitivity-informed method for multi-objective operation of reservoir systems, which uses global sensitivity analysis as a screening tool to reduce computational demands. Sobol's method is used to screen insensitive decision variables and guide the formulation of the optimization problems with a significantly reduced number of decision variables. This sensitivity-informed method dramatically reduces the computational demands required for attaining high-quality approximations of optimal trade-off relationships between conflicting design objectives. The search results obtained from the reduced complexity multi-objective reservoir operation problems are then used to pre-condition the full search of the original optimization problem. In two case studies, the Dahuofang reservoir and the inter-basin multi-reservoir system in Liaoning province, China, sensitivity analysis results show that reservoir performance is strongly controlled by a small proportion of decision variables. Sensitivity-informed dimension reduction and pre-conditioning are evaluated in their ability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary optimization. Overall, this study illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the sensitivity-informed method and the use of global sensitivity analysis to inform dimension reduction of optimization problems when solving complex multi-objective reservoir operation problems.

  3. Transient pressure behavior for a horizontal well with multiple finite-conductivity fractures in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingjing; Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Liehui

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have been common and efficient practices in exploitation of tight reservoirs. Establishing corresponding mathematical models and analyzing transient pressure behaviors of this type of well-reservoir configuration can provide a better understanding of fluid flow patterns in formation as well as estimations of important parameters. Most current models proposed for fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs do not incorporate either reservoir permeability loss during the production, which is believed to be non-ignorable or finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures. A coupling model for a multi-fractured horizontal well (MFHW) in tight reservoirs is presented in this article, in which finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures and stress-dependant reservoir permeability are taken into account simultaneously. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in the Laplace domain by using source function theory, Laplace transformation, perturbation technique, discretization of fractures, and superposition principle. Analysis of transient pressure responses indicates that several characteristic flow periods of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs can be identified, including linear flow in fracture, bi-linear flow, linear flow in reservoir, pseudo-radial flow around fractures, and pseudo-radial flow around the horizontal wellbore and fractures. Parametric analysis shows that fracture conductivity, fracture spacing, fracture length, permeability modulus, and skin effect can significantly influence the transient pressure responses of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs. The model presented in this article can be applied to obtain important parameters pertinent to reservoir or fractures by type curve matching, and it can also provide useful information for optimizing fracture parameters. Finally, the model presented in this article can also be easily extended to dual-porosity cases.

  4. Transient pressure analysis of fractured well in bi-zonal gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Yong-hui; Hu, Shu-Yong; Liu, Qi-Guo

    2015-05-01

    For hydraulic fractured well, how to evaluate the properties of fracture and formation are always tough jobs and it is very complex to use the conventional method to do that, especially for partially penetrating fractured well. Although the source function is a very powerful tool to analyze the transient pressure for complex structure well, the corresponding reports on gas reservoir are rare. In this paper, the continuous point source functions in anisotropic reservoirs are derived on the basis of source function theory, Laplace transform method and Duhamel principle. Application of construction method, the continuous point source functions in bi-zonal gas reservoir with closed upper and lower boundaries are obtained. Sequentially, the physical models and transient pressure solutions are developed for fully and partially penetrating fractured vertical wells in this reservoir. Type curves of dimensionless pseudo-pressure and its derivative as function of dimensionless time are plotted as well by numerical inversion algorithm, and the flow periods and sensitive factors are also analyzed. The source functions and solutions of fractured well have both theoretical and practical application in well test interpretation for such gas reservoirs, especial for the well with stimulated reservoir volume around the well in unconventional gas reservoir by massive hydraulic fracturing which always can be described with the composite model.

  5. Genesis of the characteristic pulmonary venous pressure waveform as described by the reservoir-wave model

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-01-01

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pulmonary venous and left atrial (LA) pressure waveforms yields substantial forward and backward waves throughout the cardiac cycle; the reservoir wave model provides an alternative analysis with minimal waves during diastole. Pressure and flow in a single pulmonary vein (PV) and the main pulmonary artery (PA) were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading, and positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) were observed. The reservoir wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to PV pressure and flow. Subtracting reservoir pressure and flow resulted in ‘excess’ quantities which were treated as wave-related. Wave intensity analysis of excess pressure and flow quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (from the PA) and downstream (from the LA and/or left ventricle (LV)). Major features of the characteristic PV waveform are caused by sequential LA and LV contraction and relaxation creating backward compression (i.e. pressure-increasing) waves followed by decompression (i.e. pressure-decreasing) waves. Mitral valve opening is linked to a backwards decompression wave (i.e. diastolic suction). During late systole and early diastole, forward waves originating in the PA are significant. These waves were attenuated less with volume loading and delayed with PEEP. The reservoir wave model shows that the forward and backward waves are negligible during LV diastasis and that the changes in pressure and flow can be accounted for by the discharge of upstream reservoirs. In sharp contrast, conventional analysis posits forward and backward waves such that much of the energy of the forward wave is opposed by the backward wave. PMID:25015922

  6. Genesis of the characteristic pulmonary venous pressure waveform as described by the reservoir-wave model.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-09-01

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pulmonary venous and left atrial (LA) pressure waveforms yields substantial forward and backward waves throughout the cardiac cycle; the reservoir wave model provides an alternative analysis with minimal waves during diastole. Pressure and flow in a single pulmonary vein (PV) and the main pulmonary artery (PA) were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading, and positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) were observed. The reservoir wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to PV pressure and flow. Subtracting reservoir pressure and flow resulted in 'excess' quantities which were treated as wave-related.Wave intensity analysis of excess pressure and flow quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (from the PA) and downstream (from the LA and/or left ventricle (LV)).Major features of the characteristic PV waveform are caused by sequential LA and LV contraction and relaxation creating backward compression (i.e.pressure-increasing) waves followed by decompression (i.e. pressure-decreasing) waves. Mitral valve opening is linked to a backwards decompression wave (i.e. diastolic suction). During late systole and early diastole, forward waves originating in the PA are significant. These waves were attenuated less with volume loading and delayed with PEEP. The reservoir wave model shows that the forward and backward waves are negligible during LV diastasis and that the changes in pressure and flow can be accounted for by the discharge of upstream reservoirs. In sharp contrast, conventional analysis posits forward and backward waves such that much of the energy of the forward wave is opposed by the backward wave.

  7. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO₂ storage reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO₂ storage that combines CO₂ injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO₂. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO₂ injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO₂ injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO₂ storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be used directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.

  8. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO₂ storage reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO₂ storage that combines CO₂ injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO₂. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO₂ injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO₂ injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO₂ storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be usedmore » directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.« less

  9. Pressurization Risk Assessment of CO2 Reservoirs Utilizing Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyant, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Park, E.; Han, K.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of pressure buildup can provide explicit information on reservoir integrity and is an appealing tool, however pressure variation is dependent on a variety of factors causing high uncertainty in pressure predictions. This work evaluated pressurization of a reservoir system in the presence of leakage pathways as well as exploring the effects of compartmentalization of the reservoir utilizing design of experiments (Definitive Screening, Box Behnken, Central Composite, and Latin Hypercube designs) and response surface methods. Two models were developed, 1) an idealized injection scenario in order to evaluate the performance of multiple designs, and 2) a complex injection scenario implementing the best performing design to investigate pressurization of the reservoir system. A holistic evaluation of scenario 1, determined that the Central Composite design would be used for the complex injection scenario. The complex scenario evaluated 5 risk factors: reservoir, seal, leakage pathway and fault permeabilities, and horizontal position of the pathway. A total of 60 response surface models (RSM) were developed for the complex scenario with an average R2 of 0.95 and a NRMSE of 0.067. Sensitivity to the input factors was dynamic through space and time; at the earliest time (0.05 years) the reservoir permeability was dominant, and for later times (>0.5 years) the fault permeability became dominant for all locations. The RSM's were then used to conduct a Monte Carlo Analysis to further analyze pressurization risks, identifying the P10, P50, P90 values. This identified the in zone (lower) P90 values as 2.16, 1.77, and 1.53 MPa and above zone values of 1.35, 1.23, 1.09 MPa for monitoring locations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In summary, the design of experiments and response surface methods allowed for an efficient sensitivity and uncertainty analysis to be conducted permitting a complete evaluation of the pressurization across the entire parameter space.

  10. HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN A FAULT-CONTROLLED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR CHARGED AT CONSTANT PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, K. P.; Narasimhan, T. N.

    1981-12-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model of a fault controlled geothermal reservoir has been developed. Heated lighter water, rising in the fault, is assumed to charge a reservoir which, in turn, is overlain by a thin impermeable, thermally conducting cap rock. The mass flow rate or the pressure associated with the charging process at the fault inlet is unknown and can only be estimated. Thus, in this paper, the pressure in the fault at the bottom of the reservoir is assumed to be prescribed. Quasi-analytic solutions for the velocity, pressure, and temperature are obtained in the fault-reservoir system for a high Rayleigh number flow. In this approximation, the upwelling fluid does not cool off appreciably until it reaches the cold upper boundary of the reservoir and encounters conductive heat loss. This thermal boundary layer, which is thin at the top of the fault, grows outward laterally and occupies the full thickness of the aquifer far away from the fault. The mathematical model is based on the flow of liquid water in a saturated porous medium. The solution techniques involve the combination of perturbation methods, boundary layer theory and numerical methods. The analysis of this generic model can be applied to liquid dominated geothermal systems where the thickness of the impermeable caprock is very small compared to the depth of the reservoir.

  11. Characterizing Reservoir Properties Using Monitoring Gas Pressure Data after CO2-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Hou, Z.; Lin, G.; Fang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluate the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties of permeability, porosity and entry pressure using CO2 monitoring data such as spatiotemporal distributions of gas pressure. The injection reservoir was set to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface so that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain five homogenous layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 pressure monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various monitoring locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  12. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla

    2004-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. To this end it has commissioned several small consulting studies to technically support its effort to secure a partner. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and has written a thesis describing his research (titled ''Stimulating enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in west Texas light oil reservoir''). We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, it will be necessary to request

  13. Age-related changes in reservoir and excess components of central aortic pressure in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Cymberknop, Leandro; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Torrado, Juan; Farro, Federico; Pessana, Franco; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2011-01-01

    Study of humans aging has presented difficulties in separating the aging process from concomitant disease and/or in defining normality and abnormality during its development. In accordance with this, aging associates structural and functional changes evidenced in variations in vascular parameters witch suffer alterations during atherosclerosis and have been proposed as early markers of the disease. The absence of adequate tools to differentiate the expected (normal) vascular changes due to aging from those related with a vascular disease is not a minor issue. For an individual, an early diagnosis of a vascular disease should be as important as the diagnosis of a healthy vascular aging. Recent studies have proposed that the capacitive or reservoir function of the aorta and large elastic arteries plays a major role in determining the pulse wave morphology. The arterial pressure waveform can be explained in terms of a reservoir pressure, related to the arterial system compliance, and an "excess" or wave-related pressure, associated with the traveling waves. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of a mathematical approach, age-related changes in measured, reservoir and excess central aortic pressure in order to determine if age-related changes are concentrated in particular decades of life. Central aortic pressure waveform was non-invasively obtained in healthy subjects (age range: 20-69 years old). Age-related profiles in measured, reservoir and excess pressure were calculated.

  14. Alternative method to Mariotte reservoir system for maintaining constant hydraulic pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamir, Falah; ,

    1991-01-01

    Several problems with the Mariotte reservoir system were discovered when it was used to apply a constant water pressure as a boundary condition for a prolonged period. The constant-pressure boundary condition is required for some laboratory experiments to study water flow through porous media. The observed problems were caused by temperature and barometric-pressure fluctuations while the flow rates were very small and caused erroneous water flow-rate measurements. An alternative method was developed and used where the water pressure is controlled by regulating its level by using water-level sensing electrodes. The new method eliminated the effects of temperature and barometric-pressure fluctuations and maintained an acceptable accuracy of the estimated water flow rate without compromising the advantages of the Mariotte reservoir.

  15. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel

    2006-02-01

    The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus felt confident that funds could be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it would have been necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study. A project extension was granted but it appears Goldrus will have difficulty securing funds. We Bureau of Economic Geology are investigating a new approach on how to fulfill our initial objectives of promoting high-pressure air injection of Ellenburger reservoirs.

  16. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  17. Reduction of hydraulic line oscillating pressures induced by pump cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhak, G.; Marino, P.; Bernstein, M.

    1982-05-01

    A Helmholtz resonator cavitation attenuator to reduce oscillating pressure and resulting vibration induced stresses was developed. Its development, the magnitude of reduction it effected in hydraulic line and bracket stresses, and the analytic procedure to calculate the standing pressure wave induced stresses in hydraulic lines are described.

  18. Graded-density Reservoirs for Accessing High Pressure Low Temperature Material States

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Lorenz, K T; Ho, D; Remington, B; Hamza, A; Rogers, J; Pollaine, S; Jeon, S; Nam, Y; Kilkenny, J

    2006-04-19

    In recently developed laser-driven shockless compression experiments an ablatively driven shock in a primary target is transformed into a ramp compression wave in a secondary target via unloading followed by stagnation across an intermediate vacuum gap. Current limitations on the achievable peak pressures are limited by the ability of shaping the temporal profile of the ramp compression pulse. We report on new techniques using graded density reservoirs for shaping the loading profile and extending these techniques to high peak pressures.

  19. High-pressure temperature-programmed reduction of sulfided catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Labruyere, F.; Lacroix, M.; Breysse, M.

    1997-04-15

    Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of solids materials is a widely used technique of characterization in heterogeneous catalysis. So far all studies dealing with this technique have been carried out at ambient or subambient pressure. Because most catalytic processes are performed at higher hydrogen pressures, the impact of this technique could be enhanced by the development of a new generation of equipment working under conditions approaching those used in reality. This work describes a new experimental temperature-programmed reduction set-up working at hydrogen pressures above 1 atm. Basic hydrodynamic considerations have been employed for correcting the signal from the variations of the residence time distribution of the molecules in the reactor. Model and industrial sulfide catalysts were studied at various pressures. When the raw signals are suitably corrected, it appears that the hydrogen pressure does not influence the TPR patterns. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuziuti, Toru; Hatanaka, Shin-ichi; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Mitome, Hideto

    2002-04-01

    The effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence (MBSCL) is studied experimentally with a luminol solution through measurements of MBSCL intensity as a function of ultrasound irradiation time, applied voltage to a transducer and ultrasonic frequencies to accomplish high efficiency in chemical reactions. From the measurement of ambient-pressure dependence, it is shown that there is an ambient pressure that produces the maximum intensity of the MBSCL and the maximum intensity appears at higher ambient pressure as the applied voltage to the transducer increases. The highest intensity of MBSCL is obtained by appropriate reduction of ambient pressure both for various applied voltages and frequencies. This is caused by both the number of bubbles induced with supersaturation of the gas in a luminol solution and the variation in bubble dynamics.

  1. Pressure-velocity relations in reservoir rocks: Modified MacBeth's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana, Dario

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the saturation and pressure effects on elastic properties is a key factor in reservoir monitoring. The relation between saturation changes and velocity variations is well known in rock physics and at seismic frequency it can be satisfactorily described by Gassmann's equations. The pressure effect still requires deeper investigations in order to be included in rock physics models for 4D studies. Theoretical models of velocity-pressure relations often do not match lab measurements, or contain empirical constants or theoretical parameters that are difficult to calibrate or do not have a precise physical meaning. In this work, I present a new model to describe the pressure sensitivity of elastic moduli for clastic rocks. The proposed model is an extension of MacBeth's relations. These equations are then integrated within a complete rock physics model to describe the relation between rock properties (porosity and clay content), dynamic attributes (saturation and pressure) and elastic properties. The proposed model is calibrated with laboratory measurements of dry samples over a wide range of pressure variations and then applied to well data to simulate different production scenarios. The complete rock physics model can then be used in time-lapse inversion to predict the distribution of dynamic property changes in the reservoir within an inversion workflow for reservoir monitoring.

  2. Transient-pressure analysis in geothermal steam reservoirs with an immobile vaporizing liquid phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Atkinson, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-difference model for the radial horizontal flow of steam through a porous medium is used to evaluate transient-pressure behavior in the presence of an immobile vaporizing or condensing liquid phase. Graphs of pressure drawdown and buildup in terms of dimensionless pressure and time are obtained for a well discharging steam at a constant mass flow rate for a specified time. The assumptions are made that the steam is in local thermal equilibrium with the reservoir rocks, that temperature changes are due only to phase change, and that effects of vapor-pressure lowering are negligible. Computations show that when a vaporizing liquid phase is present the pressure drawdown exhibits behavior similar to that observed in noncondensable gas reservoirs, but delayed in time. A theoretical analysis allows for the computation of this delay and demonstrates that it is independent of flow geometry. The response that occurs upon pressure buildup is markedly different from that in a noncondensable gas system. This result may provide a diagnostic tool for establishing the existence of phase-change phenomena within a reservoir. ?? 1979.

  3. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson

    2005-01-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and his thesis was reported on in the last semi-annual report. We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, we requested and received an extension of the project to September 30, 2005. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project by the end of the extension data. We strongly believe that the results of

  4. Pressure and fluid-flow response to production from reservoirs bounded by faults with relay structures

    SciTech Connect

    Matthaei, S.K.; Aydin, A.; Pollard, D.D. )

    1996-01-01

    Compartmentatilization of hydrocarbon reservoirs by faults is a widely observed phenomenon in the North Sea and the Niger delta oil fields among others. Faults with significant throw or heave are identifiable in seismic surveys. However, toward their terminations or near relay structures, slip decreases so portions of the faults may be invisible in seismic data. Therefore, we use outcrop analogs to constrain the model geometry and permeability distributions to investigate the influence on fluid flow during production of such relay structures and the apparent terminations of faults in seismic images. We employ field measurements of the geometry, width and permeability of fault terminations and relay structures in the Entrada Sandstone, Arches National Park, Utah, to construct fluid flow models of a fault-bounded analog reservoir. Production from wells drilled into this reservoir is simulated with a novel high-resolution finite element code. Starting with initially uniform reservoir pressure, the results of these simulations based on geologically realistic parameters, comprise pressure differentials that build up during production across seismically detectable faults with associated deformation bands and joints in the relay structure. For a typical relay structure, we explore the implications of these results for fault-seal stability and for changes in reservoir flow patterns if fault permeability changes during production.

  5. Pressure and fluid-flow response to production from reservoirs bounded by faults with relay structures

    SciTech Connect

    Matthaei, S.K.; Aydin, A.; Pollard, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    Compartmentatilization of hydrocarbon reservoirs by faults is a widely observed phenomenon in the North Sea and the Niger delta oil fields among others. Faults with significant throw or heave are identifiable in seismic surveys. However, toward their terminations or near relay structures, slip decreases so portions of the faults may be invisible in seismic data. Therefore, we use outcrop analogs to constrain the model geometry and permeability distributions to investigate the influence on fluid flow during production of such relay structures and the apparent terminations of faults in seismic images. We employ field measurements of the geometry, width and permeability of fault terminations and relay structures in the Entrada Sandstone, Arches National Park, Utah, to construct fluid flow models of a fault-bounded analog reservoir. Production from wells drilled into this reservoir is simulated with a novel high-resolution finite element code. Starting with initially uniform reservoir pressure, the results of these simulations based on geologically realistic parameters, comprise pressure differentials that build up during production across seismically detectable faults with associated deformation bands and joints in the relay structure. For a typical relay structure, we explore the implications of these results for fault-seal stability and for changes in reservoir flow patterns if fault permeability changes during production.

  6. HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-12-10

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

  7. Microbial iron reduction under deep subsurface pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Hazemann, J.; Oger, P.

    2009-12-01

    The deep subsurface is characterized by hostile conditions in terms of temperature, pressure and nutrient availability. Our current view of the biosphere extension is restricted to depths shallower than the isotherm associated to the highest observed temperature for life, i.e. 122°C. At this temperature, depending on the geological setting, pressure varies between ambient pressure at geothermal springs and 350 MPa in cold subduction zones. In this high-pressure biosphere, biological iron reduction is an important process linked to carbon oxidation. Among the factors governing reaction rates and yields in the deep subsurface, pressure could be of importance due its effects on kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The understanding and modelling of Fe reduction in natural environments, especially in the subsurface, can be first comprehended thanks to studies of Fe reduction in pure cultures; indeed the study of the effects of high pressure on Fe-reducing bacteria in pure cultures can serve as a basic model for the effects of pressure on Fe reduction in the subsurface. We investigated the effects of pressure on the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. This strain is a mesophilic and piezosensitive counterpart of the psychrophilic and piezophilic Shewanella representatives that have been frequently isolated from deep-sea environments. Kinetics of Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) were monitored in situ by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) in an appropriate pressure vessel dedicated to in situ XAS measurements (Testemale et al. 2005). Measurements were performed at the BM30B beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilty (Grenoble, France). Experiments were conducted from 0.1 MPa to 100 MPa at MR-1 optimal temperature (30°C). Iron reduction was monitored until 100 MPa in cultures of MR-1 at a concentration of 10e8 cells/ml. This shows that the metabolic activity of a piezosensitive microbe extends far beyond its pressure

  8. Mechanical characterization of a CO2 fractured reservoir by means of microseismicity induced by high pressure injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Silvia; Soler, Joaquim; Carrera, Jesus; Slooten, Luit Jan; Ortiz, Gema

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir characterization is an essential issue in geological storage of CO2 in Technological Development Plant (TDP). In particular, hydromechanical characterization of the caprock-reservoir system is crucial, in order to define the maximum suitable injection pressure and the in-situ mechanical properties. Thus, it is possible to conjecture the hydromechanical behavior of the system during CO2 injection. Microseismicity induced by fluid injection may be used as instruments to find out fractured reservoir properties. Indeed, the hydromechanical response is controlled by permeability (k), Young modulus (E) and Poisson ratio (ν). In caprock-reservoir systems, reservoir stiffness controls the stress transfer towards the caprock, where failure may occur. Therefore, the location of the microseismic hypocenters could give information on the reservoir stiffness. In this work we propose a simulation and calibration method of the microseismicity induced by high pressure fluid injection in a fractured reservoir. Coupled hydromechanical models are peformed. The methology is applied to a particular case study.

  9. An assessment of the Tongonan geothermal reservoir, Philippines, at high-pressure operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Z.F.; Aquino, B.G.; Aunzo, Z.P.; Rodis, N.O.; Saw, V.S.

    1993-10-01

    An evaluation of the Tongonan geothermal reservoir was conducted to improve the power recovery through reservoir and process optimization. The performance of the existing production wells was reviewed and the response of the field based on the anticipated production levels was simulated at various operating conditions. The results indicate that the Tongonan geothermal reservoir can be exploited at a high pressure operating condition with substantial improvement in the field capacity. The authors calculate that the Upper Mahiao and the Malitbog sectors of the Tongonan field are capable of generating 395 MWe at 1.0 MPa abs., on top of the existing 112.5 MWe plant, compared with 275 MWe if the field is operated at 0.6 MPa abs. The total capacity for the proposed Leyte A 640 MWe expansion can be generated from these sectors with the additional power to be tapped from Mahanagdong and Alto Peak sectors.

  10. Pressure mediated reduction of ultrasonically-induced cell lysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaravino, V.; Miller, M.W.; Carstensen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chinese hamster V-79 cells, exposed in polystyrene tubes for 5 min to 1 MHz continous wave ultrasound, were lysed more by a 10W/cm/sup 2/ than a 5W/cm/sup 2/ intensity. Higher atmospheric pressure was needed to eliminate lysis with the former relative to the latter intensity, but lysis by 10W/cm/sup 2/ was completely eliminated with 2 atmospheres of hydrostatic pressure. The reduction in lysis per unit increase in atomspheric pressure was comparable for both ultrasound intensities.

  11. Integrating Flooding Control with Sediment Reduction in the Real-Time Operation Model for Tseng-Wen Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    chou, Y.; Chang, L.; Hsu, C.

    2012-12-01

    Typhoons are kind of natural hazards happened most frequently during summer in Taiwan. Typhoons induce the risk of instant damages such as dam break or floods caused by the overflow in downstream area. Besides, high turbidity inflow of reservoirs caused by erosions and mudslides in upstream area during typhoons brings a huge volume of sediments which highly decreases the storage volume of reservoir. Therefore, applying flooding management of reservoirs to increase the release quantities of sediments and to maintain the storage volumes of reservoirs becomes an important issue today. In this study, an optimal flooding operation model with considering sediment reduction which integrates the genetic algorithm (GA), HEC-RAS simulation, artificial neural network (ANN) and reservoir watershed sediment modeling is proposed. The objective function of the proposed model deals with four sub-objects includes water resource, flooding hazard reduction, peak release flow reduction and sediment reduction. The operation results are applied on Tseng-Wen Reservoir during five typhoon events include Typhoon TALIM (2005), SEPAT (2007), KORSA (2007), KALMAEGI (2008), SINLAKU (2008) and JANGMI (2008). Comparison between the results of models with and without sediment reduction, the increase amounts of sediment release for the model with sediment reduction respectively are 27 and 39 tons during Typhoon JANGMI and SINLAKU. Based on the comparison, the proposed model has ability to increase the release quantity of sediment.

  12. Influences of porous reservoir Laplace pressure on emissions from passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    Passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources are capable of efficiently emitting a variety of ion beams with promising applications to spacecraft propulsion and as focused ion beams. Practical devices will require integrated or coupled ionic liquid reservoirs; the effects of which have not been explored in detail. Porous reservoirs are a simple, scalable solution. However, we have shown that their pore size can dramatically alter the beam composition. Emitting the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(triflouromethylsulfonyl)amide, the same device was shown to yield either an ion or droplet dominated beam when using reservoirs of small or large pore size, respectively; with the latter having a mass flow in excess of 15 times larger than the former at negative polarity. Another source, emitting nearly purely ionic beams of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, was similarly shown to emit a significant droplet population when coupled to reservoirs of large (>100 μm) pores; constituting a reduction in propulsive efficiency from greater than 70% to less than 30%. Furthermore, we show that reservoir selection can alter the voltage required to obtain and sustain emission, increasing with smaller pore size.

  13. Influences of porous reservoir Laplace pressure on emissions from passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Daniel G. Shea, Herbert

    2015-09-07

    Passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources are capable of efficiently emitting a variety of ion beams with promising applications to spacecraft propulsion and as focused ion beams. Practical devices will require integrated or coupled ionic liquid reservoirs; the effects of which have not been explored in detail. Porous reservoirs are a simple, scalable solution. However, we have shown that their pore size can dramatically alter the beam composition. Emitting the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(triflouromethylsulfonyl)amide, the same device was shown to yield either an ion or droplet dominated beam when using reservoirs of small or large pore size, respectively; with the latter having a mass flow in excess of 15 times larger than the former at negative polarity. Another source, emitting nearly purely ionic beams of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, was similarly shown to emit a significant droplet population when coupled to reservoirs of large (>100 μm) pores; constituting a reduction in propulsive efficiency from greater than 70% to less than 30%. Furthermore, we show that reservoir selection can alter the voltage required to obtain and sustain emission, increasing with smaller pore size.

  14. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  15. Lava lake level as a gauge of magma reservoir pressure and eruptive hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity relies fundamentally on tracking magma pressure through the use of proxies, such as ground surface deformation and earthquake rates. Lava lakes at open-vent basaltic volcanoes provide a window into the uppermost magma system for gauging reservoir pressure changes more directly. At Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaiʻi, USA) the surface height of the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater fluctuates with surface deformation over short (hours to days) and long (weeks to months) time scales. This correlation implies that the lake behaves as a simple piezometer of the subsurface magma reservoir. Changes in lava level and summit deformation scale with (and shortly precede) changes in eruption rate from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, indicating that summit lava level can be used for short-term forecasting of rift zone activity and associated hazards at Kīlauea.

  16. Low-pressure reservoir drilled with air/N[sub 2] in a closed system

    SciTech Connect

    Teichrob, R.R. )

    1994-03-21

    Ignition tests on simulated produced fluids helped determine the ideal air/nitrogen mixture for an underbalanced drilling operation that used a closed surface system to process return fluids. The low-pressure, heavy-oil target reservoir required underbalanced drilling to minimize formation damage. Underbalanced or near-balanced drilling can improve production from pressure-depleted reservoirs by reducing the chance of formation damage from drilling fluid losses. Underbalanced drilling technology currently available includes the use of gas injection through parasite strings or through drilling tubulars. No one (to the author's knowledge) has combined concentric-string commingled gas injection with through-drilling-tubular commingled gas injection. The paper describes lab work, test results, surface returns, downhole design, operations, and field results.

  17. Compaction bands in high temperature/pressure diagenetically altered unconventional shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Veveakis, M.; Poulet, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy and mineral resources are typically trapped in a low porosity/permeability environment and are difficult to produce. An extreme end-member is the shale gas reservoir in the Cooper Basin (Australia) that is located at 3500-4000 m depth and ambient temperature conditions around 200oC. Shales of lacustrine origin (with high clay content) are diagenetically altered. Diagenesis involves fluid release mineral reactions of the general type Asolid ↔ Bsolid +Cfluid and switches on suddenly in the diagenetic window between 100-200oC. Diagenetic reactions can involve concentrations of smectite, aqueous silica compound, illite, potassium ions, aqueous silica, quartz, feldspar, kerogen, water and gas . In classical petroleum engineering such interlayer water/gas release reactions are considered to cause cementation and significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Yet in contradiction to the expected permeability reduction gas is successfully being produced. We propose that the success is based on the ductile equivalent of classical compaction bands in solid mechanics. The difference being that that the rate of the volumetric compaction is controlled by the diagenetic reactions. Ductile compaction bands are forming high porosity fluid channels rather than low porosity crushed grains in the solid mechanical equivalent. We show that this new type of volumetric instability appears in rate-dependent heterogenous materials as Cnoidal waves. These are nonlinear and exact periodic stationary waves, well known in the shallow water theory of fluid mechanics. Their distance is a direct function of the hydromechanical diffusivities. These instabilities only emerge in low permeability environment where the fluid diffusivity is about an order of magnitude lower than the mechanical loading. The instabilities are expected to be of the type as shown in the image below. The image shows a CT-scan of a laboratory experiment kindly provided by Papamichos (pers

  18. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-06-10

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO{sub 2} flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO{sub 2} injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO{sub 2} relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio show CO{sub 2}-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO{sub 2}. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected

  19. Evolution of pore fluid pressures in a stimulated geothermal reservoir inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Deichmann, N.

    2014-12-01

    We developed an inversion method to estimate the evolution of pore fluid pressure fields from earthquake focal mechanism solutions based on the Bayesian statistical inference and Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (ABIC). This method's application to induced seismicity in the Basel enhanced geothermal system in Switzerland shows the evolution of pore fluid pressures in response to fluid injection experiments. For a few days following the initiation of the fluid injection, overpressurized fluids are concentrated around the borehole and then anisotropically propagate within the reservoir until the bleed-off time. Then, the pore fluid pressure in the vicinity of the borehole drastically decreases, and overpressurized fluids become isolated in a few major fluid pockets. The pore fluid pressure in these pockets gradually decreases with time. The pore fluid pressure in the reservoir is less than the minimum principal stress at each depth, indicating that the hydraulic fracturing did not occur during stimulation. This suggests that seismic events may play an important role to promote the development of permeable channels, particularly southeast of the borehole where the largest seismic event (ML 3.4) occurred. This is not directly related to a drastic decrease in fault strength at the hypocenter, but rather the positive feedback between permeability enhancement and poro-elastic and stress transfer loading from slipping interfaces. These processes likely contribute to this event's nucleation.

  20. Pressure transient behavior of dilatant non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Okpobiri, G.A.; Ikoku, C.U.

    1983-01-01

    This study investigates pressure falloff testing in non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs. The non-Newtonian fluids of interest exhibit dilatant behavior. Initial water saturation is accounted for. Application of non-Newtonian well test analysis techniques and conventional Horner (Newtonian) techniques is investigated. The effects of different injection times before shut-in, external radii, flow behavior indexes, and non-Newtonian fluid consistencies on the pressure transient behavior constitute the salient features of this work. It is shown that early time falloff pressure data can be analyzed by non-Newtonian techniques while the late shut-in data, under certain conditions, can be analyzed by the conventional Horner method. Rheologic consideration is made to illustrate the pressure transient behavior. 27 references.

  1. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  2. Using pressure transient analysis to improve well performance and optimize field development in compartmentalized shelf margin deltaic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, K.L.; Crawford, G.E.; Mills, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    BP Exploration`s Gulf of Mexico group developed procedures to conduct effective well tests on conventional production wells and employed them during the development drilling phase of the Mississippi Canyon 109 (MC109) field. Bottomhole pressure data were recorded during the initial few weeks of production. Typically, a 48 hour pressure buildup survey (surface shut-in) was obtained near the end of data acquisition. Data from these tests were analyzed for completion efficiency, reservoir flow capacity, reservoir heterogeneities, and drainage area. Initially wells were gravel packed for sand control, until buildup interpretations indicated skins greater than 20. Frac packing technology was then employed, and an immediate improvement was observed with skins dropping into the teens. Over a period of time frac packs were optimized using the test derived skins as a metric. Analysis of pressure data also played an important role in identifying reservoir compartmentalization. The two major reservoir horizons at MC 109 are interpreted as shelf margin deltas. However, each of these has distinctly different compartmentalization issues. The continuous character of the G Sand made it easier to define the depositional system and investigate reservoir compartmentalization issues using a combination of well log, 3D seismic, static pressure trends, and fluid information. In the more distal deltaic reservoirs of the J Sand however, complications with seismic amplitudes and a less reliable tie between wireline and seismic data required the use of pressure transient analysis to efficiently exploit the reservoir.

  3. Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf D.; Thiel, Matthew P.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

  4. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturallyfractured vuggy reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y-S.; Ehlig-Economides, C.; Qin, Guan; Kang, Zhijang; Zhang,Wangming; Ajayi, Babatunde; Tao, Qingfeng

    2007-08-28

    We present an analytical approach for pressure transienttest analysis in naturally fractured vuggy reservoirs. This analysisapproach relies on a triple-continuum concept, using observed geologicaldata from carbonate oil formations in western China, to describetransient flow behavior in fracture-vug-matrix reservoirs. In theconceptual mathematical model, fractured vuggy rock is considered as atriple-continuum medium, consisting of fractures, rock matrix, and vugs(or cavities). Similar to the classical double-porosity model, thefracture continuum is assumed to be responsible for the occurrence ofglobal flow, while vuggy and matrix continua (providing primary storagespace) interact locally with each other as well as with globallyconnected fractures. Furthermore, the triple continua of fractures,matrix, and vugs are assumed to have uniform and homogeneous propertiesthroughout, and intercontinuum flows between them are at pseudosteadystate. With these assumptions, we derive analytical solutions in Laplacespace for transient flow toward a well in an infinite and finitereservoir with wellbore storage and skin effects. The analyticalsolutions reveal typical pressure responses in a fracture-vug-matrixreservoir and can be used for estimating vug properties, in addition tofracture and matrix parameters, through properly designed and conductedwell tests. As application examples, actual well test data from afractured-vuggy reservoir in Western China are analyzed using the triplecontinuum model.

  5. Pressure Drop Reduction of Slush Nitrogen in Turbulent Pipe Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, K.; Nozawa, M.; Ishimoto, J.; Koizumi, N.; Kamiya, T.

    2008-03-01

    Slush fluid such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen is a two-phase (solid-liquid) single-component cryogenic fluid containing solid particles in liquid, and consequently its density and refrigerant capacity are greater than for liquid state fluid. Experimental tests were performed with slush nitrogen to obtain the frictional pressure drop flowing in a 15 mm internal diameter, 400 mm long, horizontal, stainless steel pipe. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the pressure drop reduction phenomenon with changes in velocity and solid fraction. From the experimental results, the pressure drop correlation between the friction factor and the Reynolds number was obtained and an empirical correlation was derived. Flow patterns for slush nitrogen inside a pipe and the behavior of solid particles were also observed using a high speed camera.

  6. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  7. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Redox Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teesdale, Justin; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Ma, Yingzhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a noninnocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M 1s 1 at an applied potential of 2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that are not typically observed for fac- ReI(CO)3 complexes.

  8. Reservoir Modeling for Production Management

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1989-03-21

    For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

  9. Evolution of large Venusian volcanoes: Insights from coupled models of lithospheric flexure and magma reservoir pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, Gerald A.; McGovern, Patrick J.; Grosfils, Eric B.

    2011-03-01

    The growth and evolution of large volcanic edifices on Venus should reflect interactions between local magma reservoir-induced stresses and broader-scale stresses resulting from flexure of the lithosphere beneath the edifice load. Here, we explore the relationship between magma movement in the lithosphere and the flexural stress state via static, gravitationally loaded, axisymmetric finite element models. We find that reservoirs situated in the lower (extensional) lithosphere fail at the bottom and are therefore not viable long-term conduits for upward magma transport. Furthermore, for high-stress conditions (e.g., large edifices or thin lithospheres), chambers in the lowermost lithosphere exceed the failure criterion even before pressurization and are therefore unstable. In contrast, magma chambers located in the upper (compressional) lithosphere fail at or somewhat above the reservoir midsection, promoting lateral sill injection; continued failure in this mode would tend to produce oblate magma chambers with zones of intrusion at their margins. Reservoirs near the flexural neutral plane require the greatest overpressure to reach failure, emplacing cone sheets that transition to sills further from the chamber. The out-of-plane orientation of principal extensional stresses in the flexed lower lithosphere predicts the presence of radial dikes that are likely the main conduits for any subsequent magma ascent from the mantle melt source region. Our results also explain how the evolving stress state in the lithosphere tends to redirect magma passage over time: magma ascending into the lithosphere beneath the edifice is diverted to lateral sills in the upper lithosphere, inhibiting summit eruptions and possibly shifting eruption locations to the lower flanks at and beyond the distal margins of an oblate chamber or sill complex. We apply these results to interpret the observed structure and tectonism of Sapas Mons, Venus, in terms of flexurally controlled intrusive

  10. Seismically induced pressure transients at geothermal reservoirs in the eastern Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Wang, Rongjiang; Caka, Deniz; Irmak, T. Serkan; Tunc, Berna; Luehr, Birger-G.; Baris, Serif

    2014-05-01

    The potential role of fluids in processes related to the triggering of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions is frequently emphasized. Here, we focus on the response of hydrogeological systems to earthquakes, specifically on seismically induced pore-pressure variations in geothermal areas located in the eastern Marmara region. At a 500 m deep artesian geothermal well the pressure is continuously being monitored at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. A seismometer is co-located close to the well-head and the data are recorded by the same digitizer. Hydro-seismograms were recorded in relation to local and distant earthquakes. The ML=5.2 Manyas earthquake which occurred on 20 October 2006 at a distance of 77 km led to a dynamic response of the pore pressure of the order of 4 mbar triggered upon the arrival of the S-wave. Four days later, the ML=5.2 Gemlik earthquake at a distance of 20 km led to a dynamic pore pressure response of the order of 15 mbar triggered upon the arrival of the P-wave. In both cases the peak amplitude of the ground velocity was about 2 mm/s. Weak oscillations of the pore pressure were observed during the passage of surface waves generated by remote earthquakes at distances of up to 9,000 km. Additionally to the dynamic response, a small persistent pressure increase of 1 and 2 mbar had been recorded after both local earthquakes. According to preliminary results, the observed pressure increase is opposite to the static pressure decrease predicted by Okada's model. At the present stage we conclude that the response of the Armutlu geothermal system to earthquakes is likely caused by a dynamic interaction of passing seismic waves (P-, S-, and surface waves) with the fluid reservoir in case a threshold of the ground shaking is exceeded.

  11. Intensifying Antiretroviral Therapy With Raltegravir and Maraviroc During Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Does Not Accelerate HIV Reservoir Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Mario; Benko, Erika; Yue, Feng Yun; Kim, Connie J; Huibner, Sanja; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Pankovich, Jim; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Kaul, Rupert; Kandel, Gabor; Kovacs, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Persistent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) within the CD4(+) T-cell reservoir is an obstacle to eradication. We hypothesized that adding raltegravir and maraviroc to standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) during early HIV infection could substantially reduce viral reservoirs as a step towards eradication. Methods.  A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot trial enrolled 32 participants with documented early (<6 months) HIV infection to either standard cART (emtricitabine/tenofovir/lopinavir/ritonavir) or intensive cART (standard regimen + raltegravir/maraviroc). Human immunodeficiency virus reservoirs were assessed at baseline and at 48 weeks by (1) proviral DNA, (2) cell-associated RNA, and (3) replication-competent virus, all from purified blood CD4(+) T cells, and (4) gut proviral DNA. A multiassay algorithm (MAA) on baseline sera estimated timing of infection. Results.  Thirty individuals completed the study to the 48-week endpoint. The reduction in blood proviral burden was -1.03 log DNA copies/10(6) CD4(+) T cells versus -.84 log in the standard and intensive groups, respectively (P = .056). Overall, there was no significant difference in the rate of decline of HIV-associated RNA, replication-competent virus in blood CD4(+) T cells, nor proviral gut HIV DNA to 48 weeks. Individuals who presented with more recent HIV infection had significantly lower virus reservoirs, and cART tended to reduce their reservoirs to a greater extent. Conclusions.  Intensive cART led to no additional reduction in the blood virus reservoir at 48 weeks compared with standard cART. Human immunodeficiency virus reservoir size is smaller earlier in HIV infection. Other novel treatment strategies in combination with early cART will be needed to eliminate the HIV latent reservoir.

  12. Hornblende phenocrysts record a pressure gradient in and contamination of the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.; Wittke, J. ); Duffield, W. ); Davis, A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwestern New Mexico comprises 20 coeval porphyritic lava domes erupted from a large vertically zoned reservoir of silicic magma. The rhyolite is high-silica, subalkaline, and is nearly constant in major-element composition. Trace elements and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr[sub i] (0.705 to 0.713) define vertical zoning that records a downward-decreasing imprint of minor (<1 wt%) partial assimilation of Proterozoic roof rocks. Consistent with the major-element homogeneity, electron-microprobe analyses of hornblende phenocrysts show little or no measurable variation in principal constituents. The hornblende is edenite whose mean composition and standard deviation of 110 analyses are SiO[sub 2], 44.66 [+-] 0.64; TiO[sub g], 1.27 [+-] 0.13; Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], 6.80 [+-] 0.31; FeO, 21.00 [+-] 1.60; MnO, 1.19 [+-] 0.16; MgO, 9.94 [+-] 1.09; CaO, 10.51 [+-] 0.22; Na[sub 2]O, 2.22 [+-] 0.13; K[sup 2]O, 0.98 [+-] 0.08; F, 2.04 [+-] 0.35; Cl, 0.20 [+-] 0.03. Except for FeO, MnO, and MgO, compositional variations are non systematic and mostly within analytical uncertainty. FeO and Mno exhibit strong negative correlation with MgO. Individual hornblende crystals are zoned to relatively MgO-rich and FeO-MnO-poor rims, opposite what might be expected if the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir evolved chemically isolated from its surroundings. Hornblende with rims richest in MgO occurs in domes fed from the uppermost part of the reservoir. Calculated pressures based on Al in hornblende range from 1.6 to 2.0 kb, [+-] 0.5 kb. Though the range of calculated P is encompassed within the uncertainty, the lowest hornblende pressure is for a dome fed from, or near, the top of the reservoir, whereas the chemically defined vertical zoning.

  13. Pressure transient behavior of dilatant non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Okpobiri, G.A.; Ikoku, C.U.

    1983-11-01

    This study investigates pressure falloff testing in non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs. The non-Newtonian fluids of interest exhibit dilatant behavior. Initial water saturation is accounted for. Application of non-Newtonian well test analysis techniques and conventional Horner (Newtonian) techniques is investigated. The effects of different injection times before shut-in, external radii, flow behavior indexes and non-Newtonian fluid consistencies on the pressure transient behavior constitute the salient features of this work. It is shown that early time falloff pressure data can be analyzed by non-Newtonian techniques while the late shut-in data, under certain conditions, can be analyzed by the conventional Horner method. The time when the Newtonian fluid starts influencing the non-Newtonian falloff curves and the location of the non-Newtonian fluid front can be estimated by using the radius of investigation equation for power-law fluids and volumetric balance equation respectively. Rheological consideration is made to illustrate the pressure transient behavior.

  14. Gas-cap effects in pressure-transient response of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bemani, A.S.; Ershaghi, I.

    1997-03-01

    During the primary production life of an oil reservoir, segregation of oil and gas within the fissures before reaching the producing wells could create a secondary gas cap if no original gas cap were present, or will join the expanding original gas-cap gas. This paper presents a theoretical framework of gas-cap effects in naturally fractured reservoirs. General pressure solutions are derived for both pseudosteady-state and unsteady-state matrix-fracture interporosity flow. Deviation from the fracture or fracture-matrix response occurs as the gas-cap effect is felt. Anomalous slope changes during the transition period depend entirely on the contrast between the fracture anisotropy parameter, {lambda}{sub l}, and matrix-fracture interporosity parameter, {lambda}, and between the total gas-cap storage capacitance (1 {minus} {omega}{sub 1}) and oil-zone matrix storage (1 {minus} {omega}). A composite double-porosity response is observed for {omega}{sub 1} {le} {omega}{sub 1c} and 1.0 {le} {lambda}{sub 1}/{lambda} {le} 1,000. A triple-porosity response is observed for {omega}{sub 1} {ge} {omega}{sub k} and 140 < {omega}{lambda}{sub 1}/{lambda} < 1.0E05.

  15. Method for growth of crystals by pressure reduction of supercritical or subcritical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, P. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Crystals of high morphological quality are grown by dissolution of a substance to be grown into the crystal in a suitable solvent under high pressure, and by subsequent slow, time-controlled reduction of the pressure of the resulting solution. During the reduction of the pressure interchange of heat between the solution and the environment is minimized by performing the pressure reduction either under isothermal or adiabatic conditions.

  16. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  17. Thermodynamic Constraints on Sulfate Reduction and Methanogenesis in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Marquart, K. A.; Wilson, B. H.; Flynn, T. M.; Vinson, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we consider how commercial natural gas production could affect sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in coal-bearing sediments of the Cherokee Basin, Kansas, USA. Controls on the activity of these two groups of microbes are important to understand because their activity and interactions may influence methane formation and retention in unconventional reservoirs. During November 2013, we collected water and gas samples from 16 commercial gas wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. Results indicate that methane in the coalbeds formed biologically and that both methanogens and sulfate reducers are present. Gas samples consisted almost entirely of methane (C1/(C2+C3) = 2638 on avg.) and the δD and δ13C of methane averaged -222‰ VSMOW and -61‰ VPDB, respectively. Archaeal sequences in our samples were nearly all classified within groups of methanogens (avg. 91%) and cultivable methanogens were present in all water samples. On average, 6% of the bacterial sequences from our samples were classified in groups of sulfate reducers and sulfate available to support their activity ranged up to 110 μM in concentration. Any interaction that occurs between these groups may be influenced by the energetics of their metabolic reactions. Thermodynamic calculations show that methanogens hold an energy advantage over sulfate reducers if dissolved methane concentrations are low. Under current conditions, methanogens see between 12 and 16 kJ mol-1 more usable free energy than sulfate reducers, if we assume a minimal methane concentration (1 μM). However, usable energy for methanogens would equal that available to sulfate reducers at methane concentrations ranging between 144 and 831 μM, well below saturation levels. Production activities that hold methane concentration below these levels, therefore, would help maintain an energy advantage for methanogens. In contrast, if production activities cause sulfate concentrations to increase, sulfate reducers would

  18. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  19. Reduction of particulate carryover from a pressurized fluidized bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A bench scale fluidized bed combustor was constructed with a conical shape so that the enlarged upper part of the combustor would also serve as a granular bed filter. The combustor was fed coal and limestone. Ninety-nine tests of about four hours each were conducted over a range of conditions. Coal-to-air ratio varied from 0.033 to 0.098 (all lean). Limestone-to-coal ratio varied from 0.06 to 0.36. Bed depth varied from 3.66 to 8.07 feet. Temperature varied from 1447 to 1905 F. Pressure varied from 40 to 82 psia. Heat transfer area had the range zero to 2.72 ft squared. Two cone angles were used. The average particulate carry over of 2.5 grains/SCF was appreciably less than cylindrical fluidized bed combustors. The carry over was correlated by multiple regression analysis to yield the dependence on bed depth and hence the collection efficiency, which was 20%. A comparison with a model indicated that the exhaust port may be below the transport disengaging height for most of the tests, indicating that further reduction in carry over and increase in collection efficiency could be affected by increasing the freeboard and height of the exhaust port above the bed.

  20. Cocoa Flavanol Cardiovascular Effects Beyond Blood Pressure Reduction.

    PubMed

    Jumar, Agnes; Schmieder, Roland E

    2016-04-01

    The protective cardiovascular (CV) effect of cocoa flavanol has been a target of many recent clinical prospective and retrospective investigations. Epidemiological data in different patient cohorts revealed an association between higher intake of flavanol-rich foods and decreased incidence of CV events, especially stroke and myocardial infarction. Cocoa flavanol has been shown to reduce systolic (2.8 mm Hg) and diastolic (2.2 mm Hg) office blood pressure (BP). Greater BP reduction has been found in hypertensive patients and people younger than 50 years. Cocoa flavanol intake exerts beneficial effects on pathophysiologic mechanisms of hypertension-related organ damage, such as improved endothelial function, anti-inflammatory potency, inhibition of platelet activation, and increased vasodilatory capacity. Recent clinical trials have focused on establishing a potential link between epidemiology and pathophysiology of flavanol and identified possible mechanisms for prevention of end-organ damage in patients at CV risk. This review summarizes the available data on the antihypertensive effects of cocoa flavanol beyond BP-BP lowering lowering effects, accentuates subgroup-specific protective actions of cocoa according to patients' different CV risk profile, and outlines potential cocoa flavanol-associated clinical implications. PMID:26514936

  1. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  2. Effects of pressure drawdown and recovery on the Cerro Prieto beta reservoir in the CP-III area

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1998-02-01

    The production characteristics of wells in the northwestern Cerro Prieto III area changed greatly when the Cp-III power plant went on line in 1986. Fluid extraction in the field more than doubled and reservoir-wide boiling started immediately, greatly increasing the enthalpy of produced fluids. Some well fluids showed a decrease in chloride due to adiabatic steam condensation in the well and separator, and others were enriched in chloride due to boiling. As reservoir drawdown increased, entrance of cooler and more dilute groundwaters into the reservoir became evident (i.e., condensation stopped, and there was a decrease in enthalpy and chloride in produced fluids). Although some groundwater inflow was from the leaky western margin of the reservoir, the majority is in the northeast, inferred to be local and downward, possibly through more permeable zones associated with the normal fault H. This natural recharge and some reinjection have slowed and possibly reversed pressure drawdown throughout CP-III. Enthalpy has decreased and liquid saturation has increased as the steam-rich zone in the upper part of the reservoir has either disappeared or become thinner.

  3. Spatial distribution and reduction of PCDD/PCDF toxic equivalents along three shallow lowland reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, M; Kiedrzyńska, E; Zieliński, M; Tołoczko, W; Zalewski, M

    2014-03-01

    Reservoirs situated along a river continuum are ecosystems where rates of transfer of suspended matter and associated micropollutants are reduced due to sedimentation, accumulation, and biological and physical transformation processes. Among the micropollutants, PCDDs and PCDFs are substances that are highly toxic and carcinogenic for humans and animals. They are emitted and dispersed in the environment throughout the whole catchment area and may accumulate in aquatic and terrestrial food chains, creating a risk for human health. A wealth of data exists indicating the increase in the concentrations of pollutants along a river continuum. A comparative analysis of total, individual, and TEQ PCDD/PCDF concentrations in large lowland, shallow reservoirs located in different catchments ("I"-industrial/urban/agricultural, "U"-urban/agricultural, and "A"-agricultural/rural) showed decreases of the TEQ concentrations in bottom sediments along a gradient from the middle sections to the dam walls. Moreover, penta-, hexa-, and heptachlorinated CDD/CDF congeners were reduced from 28.8 up to 93.6 % in all three types of reservoirs. A further analysis of water samples from the inlets and outlets of the "A" reservoir confirmed this tendency. PMID:24337994

  4. Pressure pulse detection apparatus incorporating noise reduction feature

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1980-09-23

    An improved apparatus is disclosed for use in a measuring while drilling apparatus which forms a pressure pulse promulgated from a downhole location upwardly through the drill string and column of mud therein. This apparatus includes a mud line section adapted to flow drilling mud in the mud flow line through an axial passage therein. The apparatus includes an encircling bladder which receives hydraulic oil under pressure to inflate to choke the passage. A pitot tube is focused downstream and thus does not intercept the mud flow from the pump and the noise which is created by pump operation. Mud pressure variations directed upstream from the measuring while drilling apparatus, however, are directed into the pitot tube. These pressure variations are coupled to a pressure signal transducer which forms an output signal of some type which is recorded. Pump noise is nulled to a minimum.

  5. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. [Secondary prevention of stroke through arterial blood pressure reduction].

    PubMed

    Mancia, G; Grassi, G

    1997-07-01

    Large scale observational studies have conclusively demonstrated that systolic and diastolic blood pressure values are linearly related to the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases and that high blood pressure is an important risk factor for both primary and secondary development of stroke. Interventional studies have shown that blood pressure lowering by antihypertensive treatment reduces the incidence of stroke in hypertensive patients without a history of previous stroke. Whether this is the case also for the secondary prevention of cerebral ischemic attacks has not been unequivocally shown, however. The PROGRESS ("Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study") study has been designed and is under way to collect information on this important issue of the antihypertensive treatment, its purpose being to evaluate the blood pressure lowering effects with an ACE-inhibitor on recurrent stroke in an overall population of 6000 patients with a positive history of previous cerebral ischemic attacks or stroke. PMID:9340173

  7. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir, China, and potential nutrient reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Du, Pengfei; Lang, Cong

    2015-03-01

    The Miyun Reservoir is Beijing's main drinking water source. Increased nutrient levels in the reservoir have resulted in an increased risk of harmful algal blooms. One hundred ten water samples were collected at a range of spatial scales in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir and were analyzed for total nitrogen (TN), nitrate (NO3 (-)-N), ammonium (NH4 (+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), and the potassium permanganate index (CODMn). Empirical equations were developed from relationships between nutrient concentrations and the main controls on nutrient, and were used to identify parts of the catchment that should be targeted with nutrient load reduction measures. Cropland was the main source of sediment for the streams, and much of the phosphorus was associated with sediment. The annual mean TP concentrations were closely correlated with both the annual mean suspended sediment concentrations and the ratio of the cropland area to the total basin area. There was a linear relationship between the annual mean TN concentration and the population density in the basins. Soil conservation may play an important role in reducing TP concentrations in the upper reaches of the Chao and Bai Rivers. It may be useful to (1) construct natural riparian buffers and vegetated buffers along croplands close to the watercourses, (2) implement management strategies to reduce nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications, and (3) construct additional wetlands to reduce nutrient loads in the study area.

  8. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir, China, and potential nutrient reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Du, Pengfei; Lang, Cong

    2015-03-01

    The Miyun Reservoir is Beijing's main drinking water source. Increased nutrient levels in the reservoir have resulted in an increased risk of harmful algal blooms. One hundred ten water samples were collected at a range of spatial scales in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir and were analyzed for total nitrogen (TN), nitrate (NO3 (-)-N), ammonium (NH4 (+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), and the potassium permanganate index (CODMn). Empirical equations were developed from relationships between nutrient concentrations and the main controls on nutrient, and were used to identify parts of the catchment that should be targeted with nutrient load reduction measures. Cropland was the main source of sediment for the streams, and much of the phosphorus was associated with sediment. The annual mean TP concentrations were closely correlated with both the annual mean suspended sediment concentrations and the ratio of the cropland area to the total basin area. There was a linear relationship between the annual mean TN concentration and the population density in the basins. Soil conservation may play an important role in reducing TP concentrations in the upper reaches of the Chao and Bai Rivers. It may be useful to (1) construct natural riparian buffers and vegetated buffers along croplands close to the watercourses, (2) implement management strategies to reduce nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications, and (3) construct additional wetlands to reduce nutrient loads in the study area. PMID:25673273

  9. Pressure-ulcer reduction using low-friction fabric bootees.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deborah

    At St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, implementation of pressure management measures has reduced the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. There is now a focus on those pressure ulcers still occurring despite these measures, particularly grade 2 ulcers on the heel, which are often attributed to friction and shear. During 2012 and 2013 low friction fabric bootees (Parafricta®) were used on at-risk patients (where possible) to attempt to address this issue. The bootees were first introduced in 2012. There was a decline in heel ulcers of 78% in the 2 years, which accounted for a sizeable portion of the overall decline in all grade 2 pressure ulcers. There was also a substantial change in the ratio of heel to all other grade 2 pressure ulcers, which fell from 0.67 to 0.24. On the basis of heel pressure ulcers avoided, there is an implied net saving to the NHS. The trust concluded that routine use of low-friction fabric bootees made a significant further contribution towards achieving zero harm targets and had done so while providing substantial cost benefits.

  10. Physical Mechanisms of Failure, Ultralow Partial Pressure Lubrication, and the Reservoir Effect in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Adam

    measurements relating to microsystem contact conditions experiments must be conducted on actual microdevices. In the work presented here I have used microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tribometers to measure the friction and adhesive forces of SAM coated surfaces over the coarse of many sliding cycles as well as normal contacting cycles. It is shown that robustly adhered monolayer coatings degrade extremely rapidly and there is a direct correlation between the respective energies dissipated both in sliding and normal contacting cycles and the time it takes for the layers to degrade. Also it is shown that devices fail in two main modes: one where wear of the devices in the form of dislocation of polysilicon grains leads to a low/adhesion high wear regime and another where high adhesive forces are developed and the devices fail with little to no wear. In the studies of ultra low partial pressure lubrication of devices a clear correlation between lubricant mobility to device lubrication is observed even in the presence of a vapor, which should in principle be able to replenish removed lubricant in between sliding cycles. We show that ultralow partial pressures nominally corresponding to submonolayer coverages of ethanol and pentanol show a distinct decrease in coefficient of friction and lubricate MEMS microcontacts however this is only loosely correlated to their effectiveness as lubricants. Pentanol was only shown to lubricate at the point at which it becomes mobile on the surface where as ethanol is mobile at all times and lubricates effectively at very low partial pressures. Trifluoroethanol is not mobile at any portion of its isotherm and does not effectively lubricate the contacts. We also show the ability of the surrounding SAM to act as a lubricant reservoir when vapors of ethanol are removed. The correlation of lubricant mobility to lubrication can be used to predict the effectiveness to new lubricants as well as allow for the tailoring of lubricants to specific

  11. Compaction and Permeability Reduction of Castlegate Sandstone under Pore Pressure Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate time-dependent compaction and permeability changes by cycling pore pressure with application to compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a reservoir. Preliminary experiments capture the impacts of hydrostatic stress, pore water pressure, pore pressure cycling, chemical, and time-dependent considerations near a borehole in a CAES reservoir analog. CAES involves creating an air bubble in a reservoir. The high pressure bubble serves as a mechanical battery to store potential energy. When there is excess grid energy, bubble pressure is increased by air compression, and when there is energy needed on the grid, stored air pressure is released through turbines to generate electricity. The analog conditions considered are depth ~1 km, overburden stress ~20 MPa and a pore pressure ~10MPa. Pore pressure is cycled daily or more frequently between ~10 MPa and 6 MPa, consistent with operations of a CAES facility at this depth and may continue for operational lifetime (25 years). The rock can vary from initially fully-to-partially saturated. Pore pressure cycling changes the effective stress.Jacketed, room temperature tap water-saturated samples of Castlegate Sandstone are hydrostatically confined (20 MPa) and subjected to a pore pressure resulting in an effective pressure of ~10 MPa. Pore pressure is cycled between 6 to 10 MPa. Sample displacement measurements yielded determinations of volumetric strain and from water flow measurements permeability was determined. Experiments ran for two to four weeks, with 2 to 3 pore pressure cycles per day. The Castlegate is a fluvial high porosity (>20%) primarily quartz sandstone, loosely calcite cemented, containing a small amount of clay.Pore pressure cycling induces compaction (~.1%) and permeability decreases (~20%). The results imply that time-dependent compactive processes are operative. The load path, of increasing and decreasing pore pressure, may facilitate local loosening and grain readjustments that results in the

  12. Pore Pressure prediction in shale gas reservoirs using neural network and fuzzy logic with an application to Barnett Shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the proposed idea is to use the artificial intelligence such as the neural network and fuzzy logic to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Pore pressure is a very important parameter that will be used or estimation of effective stress. This last is used to resolve well-bore stability problems, failure plan identification from Mohr-Coulomb circle and sweet spots identification. Many models have been proposed to estimate the pore pressure from well-logs data; we can cite for example the equivalent depth model, the horizontal model for undercompaction called the Eaton's model…etc. All these models require a continuous measurement of the slowness of the primary wave, some thing that is not easy during well-logs data acquisition in shale gas formtions. Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic and the multilayer perceptron neural network to predict the pore pressure in two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale formation. The first horizontal well is used for the training of the fuzzy set and the multilayer perecptron, the input is the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the compression and shear wave, however the desired output is the estimated pore pressure using Eaton's model. Data of another horizontal well are used for generalization. Obtained results clearly show the power of the fuzzy logic system than the multilayer perceptron neural network machine to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Keywords: artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, pore pressure, multilayer perecptron, Barnett shale.

  13. An internal electron reservoir enhances catalytic CO2 reduction by a semisynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Camille R; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2016-08-01

    The development of an artificial metalloenzyme for CO2 reduction is described. The small-molecule catalyst [Ni(II)(cyclam)](2+) has been incorporated within azurin. Selectivity for CO generation over H(+) reduction is enhanced within the protein environment, while the azurin active site metal impacts the electrochemical overpotential and photocatalytic activity. The enhanced catalysis observed for copper azurin suggests an important role for intramolecular electron transfer, analogous to native CO2 reducing enzymes. PMID:27406946

  14. Field-wide Pressure Response of Three Mid-Cenozoic Sandstone Reservoirs to Fluid Production: a Reverse Analog to Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, J.; Jordan, P. D.; Chehal, S.; Gonzales, G.; goodell, J. A.; Wilson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Potential carbon storage reservoirs exist in mature oilfields of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California. Data regarding fluid extraction and injection and reservoir pressure exist for the three main oil reservoirs with carbon storage potential: the Monterey (Stevens sandstone member), Vedder and Temblor formations. The pressure response of these reservoirs to fluid volume changes over time provides information regarding how carbon storage may affect the pressure gradients in the adjacent saline aquifers outside the fields where less data exist. This project may provide a template for analysis of other potential carbon storage reservoirs that are contiguous with oilfields. A field-scale version of the productivity index (PI, defined as the average net fluid production rate divided by the average pressure drop over the time period) was calculated for fields with substantial production from depths suitable for carbon storage. The PI determines the reservoir's pressure response to fluid production and is related to the effective CO2 storage capacity. The variance of the 2005 pressure values within each reservoir provides a measure of reservoir continuity. The highest PI values (113,000 and 88,410 m3/yr/MPa) are in the Vedder Formation. The lowest PI values occur in the Temblor Formation and range from 3734 to 16,460 m3/yr/MPa. This indicates the Vedder reservoirs have more pressure support from the aquifer beyond the field than do the Temblor reservoirs. The pressure variance of 3.2 MPa within the Vedder Formation in the Greeley Field is the lowest. The greatest variance (8.5 MPa) occurs within the Temblor Formation in the Carneros unit of the Railroad Gap field. This indicates greater uniformity in the Vedder and more compartmentalization of the Temblor. Pressure response in the Stevens is more varied within the two fields examined in this study: North and South Coles Levee. In North Coles Levee, water injection was employed throughout the field resulting in a

  15. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 104 s−1 at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  16. Water quality change in dam reservoir and shallow aquifer: analysis on trend, seasonal variability and data reduction.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Al-Zahrani, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Change of water quality in dam reservoir and aquifer complicates safe drinking water supply. Few parameters are monitored to control water quality in these sources. Adequate knowledge on the correlation structure, interaction effect, trends and seasonal variability of these parameters is essential to control water quality. This study applied time series and multivariate analyses on 15 water quality parameters, collected from the King Fahd dam reservoir (L1) and aquifer (L2) in Saudi Arabia during April 2010 to February 2012. Moderate to strong correlations were observed between sulfate, hardness, fluoride, chloride, magnesium, conductivity, turbidity and total dissolved solids (TDS), while separate clusters were visible for TDS-chloride-magnesium-conductivity; fluoride-turbidity; chloride-hardness; ammonia-nitrate; and calcium-magnesium-hardness. Four major principal components explained 81.1% and 83.2% of the overall variances in L1 and L2, respectively. The factor analysis showed that 53% and 67% of the data were necessary to explain 81.3% and 83.2% of total variances for L1 and L2, respectively, indicating the possibility of data reduction. Possible degradation of water quality in these sources was highlighted, while such degradation may require enhanced treatment for producing drinking water in future.

  17. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability.

  18. Expanding the range for predicting critical flow rates of gas wells producing from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, E.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The critical flow rate of a gas well is the minimum flow rate required to prevent accumulation of liquids in the tubing. Theoretical models currently available for estimating critical flow rates are restricted to wells with water/gas ratios less than 150bbl/MMcf (0.84 X 10/sup -3/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/). For wells producing at higher water/gas ratios from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs, a method of estimating critical flow rates is derived through use of an empirical multiphase-flow correlation.

  19. New closed system integral cesium reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Hyop S.; Britt, Edward J.; Kim, Kwang Y.; Kennel, Elliot B.

    Attention is given to the lead-cesium solution reservoir concept, according to which the cesium reservoir is in the form of a gas-buffered heat pipe, such that the cesium pressure will remain roughly constant over a wide range of input temperature flux. This concept carries fission gases from the cesium. Experimental data show that adequate cesium pressure control is facilitated by a lead-cesium solution at the collector operating temperature of the thermionic fuel elements (TFEs). If the performance and material compatibility issues are resolved, the lead-cesium reservoir could offer great benefits in terms of simplicity and reduction of TFE manufacturing costs.

  20. [Partial pressure of CO2 and CO2 degassing fluxes of Huayuankou and Xiaolangdi Station affected by Xiaolangdi Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-ling; Yang, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    According to periodic sampling analysis per month in Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station from November 2011 to October 2012, combined with continuous sampling analysis of Xiaolangdi Reservoir during runoff and sediment control period in 2012, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface water were calculated based on Henry's Law, pCO2 features and air-water CO2 degassing fluxes of Huayuankou station and Xiaolangdi station affected by Xiaolangdi Reservoir were studied. The results were listed as follows, when Xiaolangdi Reservoir operated normally, pCO2 in surface water of Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station varied from 82 to 195 Pa and from 99 to 228 Pa, moreover, pCO2 in surface water from July to September were distinctly higher than those in other months; meanwhile, pCO, in surface water from Huayuankou station were higher than that from Xiaolangdi station. During runoff and sediment control period of Xiaolangdi Reservoir, two hydrological stations commonly indicated that pCO2 in surface water during water draining were obviously lower than those during sediment releasing. Whether in the period of normal operation or runoff and sediment control, pCO2 in surface water had positive relations to DIC content in two hydrological stations. Since the EpCO,/AOU value was higher than the theoretical value of 0. 62, the biological aerobic respiration effect had distinct contribution to pCO2. Throughout the whole year, air-water CO2 degassing fluxes from Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station were 0.486 p.mol (m2 s) -l and 0.588 pmol (m2 x s)(-1) respectively; When Xiaolangdi Reservoir operated normally, air-water CO, degassing fluxes in Huayuankou station were higher than that in Xiaolangdi station; during runoff and sediment control from Xiaolangdi Reservoir, two hydrological stations had one observation result in common, namely, air-water CO2 degassing fluxes in the period of water draining were obviously lower than that in the period of sediment releasing

  1. Multifunctional Low Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and NOx Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Acosta, Waldo

    2013-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of the induced synthetic jet is key, and is still TBD. center dot Available LPT vane volume is sufficient for tens of resonators per span-wise hole spacing, so physically feasible. center dot Determination of acoustic attenuation requires accurate model of vane, resonator locations, flow field and incident waves. (TBD) center dot Determination of NOx reduction is also TBD.

  2. Evolution of Large Venusian Volcanoes: Insights from Coupled Models of Lithospheric Flexure and Magma Reservoir Pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; McGovern, P. J.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2009-12-01

    Many large volcanic edifices on Venus exhibit surficial evidence of subsurface magma transport and storage: summit caldera faults indicating collapse into a magma chamber, and radial grabens indicating radiating dikes (although uplift may also produce the latter). These tectonic features reflect interactions between local magma-induced stresses and broader-scale stresses resulting from flexure of the lithosphere beneath the edifice load. Here, we explore the relationship between magma movement in the lithosphere and the flexural stress state via axisymmetric finite element models of the Venusian lithosphere. The lithosphere, modeled as an elastic material of thickness Te, is overlain with a conical edifice and embedded with an inflating, hence overpressured, spherical magma reservoir that perturbs the surrounding region. The volcanic edifice acts as a continuous gravitational load, flexing the lithosphere. The resulting flexural stress state beneath the edifice is characterized by high differential stresses, extensional in the upper part of the lithosphere and compressional in the lower part. These two distinct regions are separated by a neutral plane, a region characterized by relatively low differential stresses and least compressive principal stress (σ3) oriented out of the model plane. We examine models with different reservoir depths and analyze the orientation patterns of maximum stresses along the magma chamber wall. For a given chamber model, we increase the overpressure until one of the normal stresses at some point on the wall satisfies the failure criterion (here taken to be 0 MPa, the onset of the tensile regime). We find that reservoirs situated in the lower (extensional) lithosphere fail at the bottom; such a chamber is unstable, because it would not collect magma but rather expel it downward. Thus, we conclude magma chamber formation in the lower lithosphere is unlikely. In contrast, failure promoting lateral sill formation occurs near the reservoir

  3. Phospholipids fatty acids of drinking water reservoir sedimentary microbial community: Structure and function responses to hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bei-Bei; Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Li, Ya-Jiao

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities in three drinking water reservoirs, with different depth in Xi'an city, were quantified by phospholipids fatty acids analysis and multivariate statistical analysis was employed to interpret their response to different hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties of sediment and overlying water. Principle component analyses of sediment characteristics parameters showed that hydrostatic pressure was the most important effect factor to differentiate the overlying water quality from three drinking water reservoirs from each other. NH4+ content in overlying water was positive by related to hydrostatic pressure, while DO in water-sediment interface and sediment OC in sediment were negative by related with it. Three drinking water reservoir sediments were characterized by microbial communities dominated by common and facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, as well as, by sulfur oxidizing bacteria. Hydrostatic pressure and physico-chemical properties of sediments (such as sediment OC, sediment TN and sediment TP) were important effect factors to microbial community structure, especially hydrostatic pressure. It is also suggested that high hydrostatic pressure and low dissolved oxygen concentration stimulated Gram-positive and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bacterial population in drinking water reservoir sediment. This research supplied a successful application of phospholipids fatty acids and multivariate analysis to investigate microbial community composition response to different environmental factors. Thus, few physico-chemical factors can be used to estimate composition microbial of community as reflected by phospholipids fatty acids, which is difficult to detect.

  4. Thermal conductivity reduction of crystalline silicon by high-pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Tabara, Mitsuru; Ikoma, Yoshifumi; Horita, Zenji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Cahill, David G.; Kohno, Masamichi

    2014-06-01

    We report a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk crystalline silicon when subjected to intense plastic strain under a pressure of 24 GPa using high-pressure torsion (HPT). Thermal conductivity of the HPT-processed samples were measured using picosecond time domain thermoreflectance. Thermal conductivity measurements show that the HPT-processed samples have a lattice thermal conductivity reduction by a factor of approximately 20 (from intrinsic single crystalline value of 142 Wm-1 K-1 to approximately 7.6 Wm-1 K-1). Thermal conductivity reduction in HPT-processed silicon is attributed to the formation of nanograin boundaries and metastable Si-III/XII phases which act as phonon scattering sites, and because of a large density of lattice defects introduced by HPT processing. Annealing the samples at 873 K increases the thermal conductivity due to the reduction in the density of secondary phases and lattice defects.

  5. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten capillary pressure curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum; Soltanian, Mohamadreza; Ritzi, Robert, Jr.; Dominic, David

    2015-04-01

    Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs [1, 2]. Previously we showed how the dynamics of a CO2 plume, during and after injection, is influenced by the hierarchical and multi-scale stratal architecture in such reservoirs [3]. The results strongly suggest that representing these small scales (few cm in vertical direction and few meters in horizontal direction) features and representing how they are organized within a hierarchy of larger-scale features, is critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. The results also demonstrated the importance of using separate capillary pressure and relative permeability relationships for different textural facies types. Here we present the result of simulation of CO2 trapping in deep saline aquifers using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, to capillary pressure. We showed that capillary trapping as well as dissolution rates are very different for the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches if reservoir consists from various species with different capillary pressure and relative permeability curves. We also found a dramatic difference in simulation time; using the van Genuchten approach improves convergence and thus reduces calculation time by one-two orders of magnitude. [1] Bridge, J.S. (2006), Fluvial facies models: Recent developments, in Facies Models Revisited, SEPM Spec. Publ., 84, edited by H. W. Posamentier and R. G. Walker, pp. 85-170, Soc. for Sediment. Geol. (SEPM), Tulsa, Okla [2] Ramanathan, R., A. Guin, R.W. Ritzi, D.F. Dominic, V.L. Freedman, T.D. Scheibe, and I.A. Lunt (2010), Simulating the heterogeneity in channel belt deposits: Part 1. A geometric-based methodology and code, Water Resources

  6. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during methane dependent sulfate reduction in high pressure continuous incubation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, C.; Brunner, B.; Holler, T.; Widdel, F.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction in marine sediments is an important sink in the global methane budget. However, many aspects of methane dependent sulfate reduction are not fully understood. We developed a novel high pressure biotechnical system to simulate marine conditions with high concentrations of dissolved gases, e.g. at gas seeps and gas hydrate systems. The system allows for batch, fed-batch and continuous gas-phase free incubation. We employ this system to study the kinetics and isotope fractionation during AOM at varying methane partial pressures up to 10 MPa. We present the results of long-term continuous and fed-batch incubations with highly active naturally enriched biomass from microbial mats from the Black Sea. During these experiments the methane partial pressure was increased stepwise from 0.1 to 10 MPa. The methane dependent sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.1 mmol/l/d to 3.5 mmol/l/d resulting from the increase in methane concentration and microbial growth. Sulfate reduction was negligible in the absence of methane. The sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction was strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved methane. Sulfur isotope fractionation was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations. Relative to sulfate reduction rates, oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations.

  7. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  8. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  9. Involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide in blood pressure reduction induced by estradiol in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Belo, Najara O; Silva-Barra, Juliana; Carnio, Evelin C; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Dos Reis, Adelina M

    2004-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in blood pressure (BP) alterations induced by estradiol treatment. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar rats (WR) were ovariectomized and, after 3 weeks, were injected daily for 4 days with estradiol benzoate (E2; 5 microg/100 g/day) or a vehicle. One day after the last injection, the animals were decapitated, blood was collected, and both right and left atrial appendages were quickly removed for determination of ANP by radioimmunoassay (RIA), or used for ANP mRNA determination. Estradiol treatment induced a significant reduction of blood pressure in SHR, but not in WR. This reduction was correlated with the increase of plasma ANP levels that were significantly increased in E2-treated, compared with vehicle-treated, SHR. E2-treated SHR showed significant increases in ANP concentration in the right and left atria compared to the vehicle-treated animals. These observations were confirmed by ANP mRNA. In summary, the present study shows that short-term estradiol treatment reduces the blood pressure of ovariectomized SHR, but not of WR. This reduction was highly correlated with increased plasma estradiol and ANP levels. These results suggest that ANP is involved in mediating the effect of estradiol on blood pressure reduction.

  10. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation. PMID:24516104

  11. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation.

  12. The association of hypertension and diabetes: prevalence, cardiovascular risk and protection by blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Mancia, G

    2005-04-01

    Diabetes and hypertension frequently coexist, and their combination provides additive increases in the risk of life-threatening cardiovascular events. Recent guidelines agree on the need for early, aggressive reduction of blood pressure, with a goal of <130/80 mmHg, in patients with diabetes. The mechanism that underpins the increased sensitivity of diabetic subjects to hypertension is not known, but may involve impaired autoregulation or attenuated nocturnal decrease of blood pressure. All classes of antihypertensive agents are effective in reducing blood pressure in diabetic subjects, and all show evidence of a concomitant reduction in cardiovascular risk. Although there is some evidence that agents that interrupt the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) provide greater protective effects, the data are not conclusive. However, most diabetic subjects will require combination therapy to reach goal blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs can also significantly influence the probability that otherwise healthy individuals will develop metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. While diuretics and betablockers have a prodiabetic effect, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers may prevent diabetes more effectively than the metabolically neutral calcium channel blockers. Given that diabetes is an important cardiovascular risk factor, there is the potential for reductions in risk due to reduced blood pressure to be offset by an increased risk due to the development of diabetes. Such concerns should be considered in the selection of antihypertensive therapy. PMID:15868115

  13. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pastouret, Alan; Gooijer, Frans; Overton, Bob; Jonker, Jan; Curley, Jim; Constantine, Walter; Waterman, Kendall Miller

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High

  14. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  15. Temperature-pressure conditions in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin: Implications for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pashin, J.C.; McIntyre, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of gas onto coal is sensitive to pressure and temperature, and carbon dioxide can be a potentially volatile supercritical fluid in coalbed methane reservoirs. More than 5000 wells have been drilled in the coalbed methane fields of the Black Warrior basin in west-central Alabama, and the hydrologic and geothermic information from geophysical well logs provides a robust database that can be used to assess the potential for carbon sequestration in coal-bearing strata.Reservoir temperature within the coalbed methane target zone generally ranges from 80 to 125 ??F (27-52 ??C), and geothermal gradient ranges from 6.0 to 19.9 ??F/1000 ft (10.9-36.2 ??C/km). Geothermal gradient data have a strong central tendency about a mean of 9.0 ??F/1000 ft (16.4 ??C/km). Hydrostatic pressure gradients in the coalbed methane fields range from normal (0.43 psi/ft) to extremely underpressured (<0.05 psi/ft). Pressure-depth plots establish a bimodal regime in which 70% of the wells have pressure gradients greater than 0.30 psi/ft, and 20% have pressure gradients lower than 0.10 psi/ft. Pockets of underpressure are developed around deep longwall coal mines and in areas distal to the main hydrologic recharge zone, which is developed in structurally upturned strata along the southeastern margin of the basin.Geothermal gradients within the coalbed methane fields are high enough that reservoirs never cross the gas-liquid condensation line for carbon dioxide. However, reservoirs have potential for supercritical fluid conditions beyond a depth of 2480 ft (756 m) under normally pressured conditions. All target coal beds are subcritically pressured in the northeastern half of the coalbed methane exploration fairway, whereas those same beds were in the supercritical phase window prior to gas production in the southwestern half of the fairway. Although mature reservoirs are dewatered and thus are in the carbon dioxide gas window, supercritical conditions may develop as reservoirs

  16. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency.

  17. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. PMID:23553033

  18. The influence of high hydrostatic pressure on bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Daniel, Isabelle

    2012-07-01

    The impact of deep-subsurface pressure conditions on microbial activity is still poorly constrained. In particular it is unknown how pressure of deep environments affects microbial transformations of iron. We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the rate and the extent of bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR). We employed a novel experimental setup that enables in situ monitoring of Fe oxidation state and speciation in bacterial cultures in an optimized HHP incubation system using X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was incubated at 30 °C with Fe(III) citrate and tryptone at pressures between 0.1 and 100 MPa. For pressures up to 70 MPa strain MR-1 (108 cells ml-1) was able to reduce all 5 mM Fe(III) provided. Above 70 MPa, the final amount of Fe(III) that MR-1 could reduce decreased linearly and DIR was estimated to stop at 109 ± 7 MPa. The decrease in the reduction yield was correlated with the dramatic decrease in survival (as determined by CFU counts) above 70 MPa. The initial rate of DIR increased with pressure up to 40 MPa, then decreased to reach zero at about 110 MPa. Increased rates of DIR activity and relatively high growth rates for pressures below 40 MPa would potentially ensure the maintenance of MR-1 in most of deep subsurface environments where moderate pressures occur, i.e. deep-sea environments. This study not only provides the first in situ quantitative results for microbial iron metabolism under HHP conditions but also sets the stage for future investigations of deep-sea pressure-adapted iron reducers. Moreover it demonstrates for the first time that XANES at the Fe K-edge is a powerful probe for in vivo monitoring of iron transformations in living microbial cultures.

  19. Understanding CO2 Plume Behavior and Basin-Scale Pressure Changes during Sequestration Projects through the use of Reservoir Fluid Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.; Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Mehnert, E.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Jordan, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Large scale geologic sequestration tests are in the planning stages around the world. The liability and safety issues of the migration of CO2 away from the primary injection site and/or reservoir are of significant concerns for these sequestration tests. Reservoir models for simulating single or multi-phase fluid flow are used to understand the migration of CO2 in the subsurface. These models can also help evaluate concerns related to brine migration and basin-scale pressure increases that occur due to the injection of additional fluid volumes into the subsurface. The current paper presents different modeling examples addressing these issues, ranging from simple geometric models to more complex reservoir fluid models with single-site and basin-scale applications. Simple geometric models assuming a homogeneous geologic reservoir and piston-like displacement have been used for understanding pressure changes and fluid migration around each CO2 storage site. These geometric models are useful only as broad approximations because they do not account for the variation in porosity, permeability, asymmetry of the reservoir, and dip of the beds. In addition, these simple models are not capable of predicting the interference between different injection sites within the same reservoir. A more realistic model of CO2 plume behavior can be produced using reservoir fluid models. Reservoir simulation of natural gas storage reservoirs in the Illinois Basin Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone suggest that reservoir heterogeneity will be an important factor for evaluating storage capacity. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is a thick sandstone that underlies many significant coal fired power plants (emitting at least 1 million tonnes per year) in the midwestern United States including the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio. The initial commercial sequestration sites are expected to inject 1 to 2 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Depending on the geologic structure and

  20. Carbonates at high pressures: Possible carriers for deep carbon reservoirs in the Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, M. L.; Justo, J. F.; Assali, L. V. C.

    2016-09-01

    The high-pressure structural and elastic properties of MgCO3, CaCO3, and MgCa (CO3)2 have been investigated with density functional theory. By computing the isotropic elastic constants, we found that the bulk and shear acoustic wave velocities are smaller in carbonates than in their respective silicates for a wide range of pressure. In terms of geophysics, these results provide strong evidence that the low-velocity zones, near the bottom of the Earth's lower mantle, could be associated with the presence of carbon element in the form of carbonate minerals. This is a different model, associated with chemical differentiation, to explain those low-velocity zones, in addition to several other recent ones proposed in the literature.

  1. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten type capillary pressure curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Ritzi, Robert W., Jr.; Dominic, David F.; Mehnert, Edward; Okwen, Roland T.

    2016-10-01

    Geological heterogeneities affect the dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) plumes in subsurface environments in important ways. Previously, we showed how the dynamics of CO2 plumes are influenced by the multiscaled sedimentary architecture in deep brine fluvial-type reservoirs. The results confirm that representing small-scale features and the corresponding heterogeneity in saturation functions, along with hysteresis in saturation functions, are all critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. Here, we show that when heterogeneity and hysteresis are represented, the two conventional approaches for defining saturation functions, Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, represent fundamentally different physical systems. The Brooks-Corey approach represents heterogeneity in entry pressures, and leads to trapping by capillary pinning. The van Genuchten approach represents a network of pores transporting the nonwetting fluid, across rock types, with negligible capillary entry pressure, and leads to capillary retardation. These differences significantly affect the large-scale characteristics of CO2 plumes (i.e., their mass, shape, and position).

  2. Operation of a Pressurized System for Continuous Reduction of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Simon Stone; Michael E. McIlwain

    2012-09-01

    A Ag-based pressurized electrochemical system equipped for continuous reduction of CO2 is presented. At elevated pressures the quantity of CO which can be generated is 5 times that observed at ambient pressure with faradaic efficiencies as high as 92% observed at 350 mA cm-2. For operation at 225 mA cm-2 and 60 degrees C the cell voltage at 18.5 atm was 0.4 V below that observed at ambient pressure. Increasing the temperature further to 90 degrees C led to a cell voltage below 3 V (18.5 atm and 90 degrees C), which equates to an electrical efficiency of 50%.

  3. Drag Reduction Study by Wavelet Analysis of Differential Pressure Signals in Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zhen; Yassin, A. Hassan; Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis

    2004-07-01

    Drag reduction was studied when micro-bubbles with low void fractions were injected in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow. The particle tracking velocimetry (PIV) flow measurement technique was used to measure two-dimensional full velocity fields. Since pressure field distribution is associated with turbulence behavior and dissipation, it is important to study the changes of the pressure field. However, the differential pressure signals are difficult to analyze due to irregularity. The characteristics of these signals have been studied by traditional statistical methods. In this study, the multi-resolution technique of wavelet transform based on localized wavelet functions is utilized to nonlinear pressure signals. By using continuous wavelet transform method, the pressure signals in the turbulent flow can be decomposed into its approximations and details at different resolutions. The magnitudes of the coefficients represent the energy distribution at different scales and this also can facilitate the visual observation of the energy transition process. The wavelet decomposition coefficients at different scales plot would provide a tool to further our understanding of drag reduction mechanism via micro-bubbles injection. (authors)

  4. Sustained intraocular pressure reduction throughout the day with travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004%

    PubMed Central

    Dubiner, Harvey B; Noecker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to characterize intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction throughout the day with travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004% dosed once daily in the evening. Methods The results of seven published, randomized clinical trials including at least one arm in which travoprost 0.004% was dosed once daily in the evening were integrated. Means (and standard deviations) of mean baseline and on-treatment IOP, as well as mean IOP reduction and mean percent IOP reduction at 0800, 1000, and 1600 hours at weeks 2 and 12 were calculated. Results From a mean baseline IOP ranging from 25.0 to 27.2 mmHg, mean IOP on treatment ranged from 17.4 to 18.8 mmHg across all visits and time points. Mean IOP reductions from baseline ranged from 7.6 to 8.4 mmHg across visits and time points, representing a mean IOP reduction of 30%. Results of the safety analysis were consistent with the results from the individual studies for travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004%, with ocular hyperemia being the most common side effect. Conclusion Travoprost 0.004% dosed once daily in the evening provides sustained IOP reduction throughout the 24-hour dosing interval in subjects with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma. No reduction of IOP-lowering efficacy was observed at the 1600-hour time point which approached the end of the dosing interval. PMID:22536047

  5. Sensitivity of CO2 migration estimation on reservoir temperature and pressure uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston; Doughty, Christine

    2008-11-01

    The density and viscosity of supercritical CO{sub 2} are sensitive to pressure and temperature (PT) while the viscosity of brine is sensitive primarily to temperature. Oil field PT data in the vicinity of WESTCARB's Phase III injection pilot test site in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, show a range of PT values, indicating either PT uncertainty or variability. Numerical simulation results across the range of likely PT indicate brine viscosity variation causes virtually no difference in plume evolution and final size, but CO{sub 2} density variation causes a large difference. Relative ultimate plume size is almost directly proportional to the relative difference in brine and CO{sub 2} density (buoyancy flow). The majority of the difference in plume size occurs during and shortly after the cessation of injection.

  6. Effect of the Reservoir Volume on the Discharge Pressures in the Injection System of the N.A.C.A. Spray Photography Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Lee, D W

    1932-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effect of the reservoir volume on the discharge pressures in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. spray photography equipment. The data obtained are applicable to the design of a common rail fuel-injection system. The data show that an injection system of the type described can be designed so that not more than full load fuel quantity can be injected into the engine cylinders, and so that the fuel spray characteristics remain constant over a large range of engine speeds. Formulas are presented for computing the volume of the reservoir and the diameter of the discharge orifice.

  7. Pressure-drop Reduction and Heat-transfer Deterioration of Slush Nitrogen in Square Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi; Aoki, Itsuo

    Pressure drop and heat transfer tests were carried out using slush nitrogen flowing in a horizontal square pipe at flow velocity between 1.0 and 4.9 m/s, with a mass solid fraction between 6 and 26 wt.%, and with heat fluxes of 0, 10 and 20 kW/m2. Pressure drop reduction became apparent at flow velocity of 2.5 m/s and over, with the maximum amount of reduction being 12% in comparison with liquid nitrogen, regardless of heating, while heat transfer deterioration became apparent at flow velocity of 1.0 m/s and over, with the maximum amount of deterioration being 16 and 21% at 10 and 20 kW/m2, respectively.

  8. Sustained reduction of intraocular pressure in humans with the calcium channel blocker verapamil.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M B; Gilbert, C M; Smith, L M

    1988-02-15

    We investigated the effect of the calcium channel blocker verapamil on intraocular pressure in human volunteers. In the initial trial, 15 subjects with untreated ocular hypertension were tested. After a baseline measurement was obtained with applanation tonometry, a 40-microliter drop of verapamil, 1.25 mg/ml, was instilled in one eye. After 30 minutes, a second reading was taken. In a subsequent trial of 12 untreated ocular hypertensive subjects, the duration of action was determined using the same dose and method of delivery. Results showed that verapamil elicited a mean +/- S.E.M. change in intraocular pressure of -3.8 +/- 0.900 mm Hg in the treated eye, and -1.6 +/- 0.400 mm Hg in the untreated eye. This reduction was statistically different in both eyes (treated eye, P = .0007; untreated eye, P = .005). This decrease in intraocular pressure remained statistically significant when compared to predrug baseline values for up to ten hours.

  9. An ocular compression device for reduction of elevated post anesthetic intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    S P, Preejith; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar; Venkatakrishnan, Jaichandran

    2014-01-01

    Rise in Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP), after administration of regional ophthalmic anesthesia for surgery, is a commonly observed clinical phenomenon. Rise in IOP increases risk of retinal ischemia and leads to surgical complications. The current clinical practice for reduction of IOP, after delivery of local anesthesia, is manually administered digital compression. The highly subjective nature of manual compression, results in unknown duration and magnitude of the pressure applied, thus limiting the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. The work presented here addresses the need for a device that delivers all the benefits of digital compression, while eliminating the uncertainty and risks involved. Design, development and clinical validation of an air pressure based compression device have been presented in this paper. This device makes the compression procedure safe and reliable by quantifying all compression parameters applied and considering safety limits for individual subjects. PMID:25571070

  10. Thermal conductivity reduction of crystalline silicon by high-pressure torsion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk crystalline silicon when subjected to intense plastic strain under a pressure of 24 GPa using high-pressure torsion (HPT). Thermal conductivity of the HPT-processed samples were measured using picosecond time domain thermoreflectance. Thermal conductivity measurements show that the HPT-processed samples have a lattice thermal conductivity reduction by a factor of approximately 20 (from intrinsic single crystalline value of 142 Wm−1 K−1 to approximately 7.6 Wm−1 K−1). Thermal conductivity reduction in HPT-processed silicon is attributed to the formation of nanograin boundaries and metastable Si-III/XII phases which act as phonon scattering sites, and because of a large density of lattice defects introduced by HPT processing. Annealing the samples at 873 K increases the thermal conductivity due to the reduction in the density of secondary phases and lattice defects. PMID:25024687

  11. Thermal conductivity reduction of crystalline silicon by high-pressure torsion.

    PubMed

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Tabara, Mitsuru; Ikoma, Yoshifumi; Horita, Zenji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Cahill, David G; Kohno, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk crystalline silicon when subjected to intense plastic strain under a pressure of 24 GPa using high-pressure torsion (HPT). Thermal conductivity of the HPT-processed samples were measured using picosecond time domain thermoreflectance. Thermal conductivity measurements show that the HPT-processed samples have a lattice thermal conductivity reduction by a factor of approximately 20 (from intrinsic single crystalline value of 142 Wm(-1) K(-1) to approximately 7.6 Wm(-1) K(-1)). Thermal conductivity reduction in HPT-processed silicon is attributed to the formation of nanograin boundaries and metastable Si-III/XII phases which act as phonon scattering sites, and because of a large density of lattice defects introduced by HPT processing. Annealing the samples at 873 K increases the thermal conductivity due to the reduction in the density of secondary phases and lattice defects.

  12. Pressure drop reduction phenomenon of slush nitrogen flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide

    2011-07-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids, such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen, are two-phase single-component fluids containing solid particles in a liquid. Their density and refrigerant capacity are greater than those of a liquid-state fluid alone. Owing to these advantages, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as a clean-energy fuel, fuel for space-planes to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as a refrigerant for high-temperature superconducting power machines. Experimental tests were performed with slush nitrogen to obtain the frictional pressure drop flowing in a horizontal pipe with an inner diameter of 15 mm and a length of 400 mm. The primary objective of the study was to investigate the pressure drop reduction phenomenon according to changes in velocity and solid fraction. The pressure drop correlation between the friction factor and the Reynolds number was obtained, and an empirical correlation between them was derived. The flow pattern for slush nitrogen inside a pipe and the behavior of solid particles were observed using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method. From the experimental results, the pressure drop reduction phenomenon emerged clearly when the flow velocity was higher than 3.6 m/s and the flow pattern of solid particles inside the pipe was pseudo-homogeneous.

  13. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces.

  14. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  15. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  16. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM, LS, or HE and engaged in intervention sessions during health class for 3 months. Before, after, and 3 months following intervention cessation, self-reported hostility and 24-hour ABP were measured. Results indicated that between pre- and postintervention, BAM participants displayed significant reductions in self-reported hostility and 24-hour systolic ABP. Reductions in hostility were significantly related to reductions in 24-hour systolic ABP. Between postintervention and follow-up, participants receiving LS showed a significant reduction in hostility but not in 24-hour ABP. Significant changes were not found for the HE group in 24-hour ABP or self-reported hostility, but these change scores were significantly correlated. The implications of the findings are discussed with regard to behavioral stress reduction programs for the physical and emotional health of AAs. PMID:22485058

  17. Reduction of blood pressure variability by amlodipine in baroreceptor denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Van Vliet, B N; Chafe, L L

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of the calcium blocker amlodipine on the variability of mean arterial pressure (MAP), amlodipine besylate was acutely administered to sino-aortic baroreceptor-denervated (SAD) rats (0, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg s.c.), and chronically administered to SAD and sham-denervated rats (0, 50, 150, 500, and 1,500 mg x kg(-1) feed, 4 days per dose). Acute amlodipine administration caused significant dose-dependent reductions of the mean MAP level and short-term MAP variability at the 3 and 10 mg/kg dose levels, respectively. Chronic administration produced dose-dependent reductions in short-term MAP variability, becoming significant at the 150 and 500 mg x kg(-1) feed dose level in SAD and Sham groups, respectively. Day-night differences in blood pressure were significantly attenuated or reversed at the 500 and 1,500 mg x kg(-1) feed dose levels. Amlodipine had little or no effect upon the 24 h MAP level, long-term MAP variability, and only modestly reduced the MAP response to hexamethonium. These results demonstrate that amlodipine can reduce MAP variability independent of changes in the mean blood pressure level.

  18. Reduction in Cerebral Oxygenation After Prolonged Exercise in Hypoxia is Related to Changes in Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Dobashi, Shohei; Kiuchi, Masataka; Endo, Junko; Koyama, Katsuhiro; Subudhi, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relation between blood pressure and cerebral oxygenation (COX) immediately after exercise in ten healthy males. Subjects completed an exercise and recovery protocol while breathing either 21% (normoxia) or 14.1% (hypoxia) O2 in a randomized order. Each exercise session included four sets of cycling (30 min/set, 15 min rest) at 50% of altitude-adjusted peak oxygen uptake, followed by 60 min of recovery. After exercise, mean arterial pressure (MAP; 87±1 vs. 84±1 mmHg, average values across the recovery period) and COX (68±1% vs. 58±1%) were lower in hypoxia compared to normoxia (P<0.001). Changes in MAP and COX were correlated during the recovery period in hypoxia (r=0.568, P<0.001) but not during normoxia (r=0.028, not significant). These results demonstrate that reductions in blood pressure following exercise in hypoxia are (1) more pronounced than in normoxia, and (2) associated with reductions in COX. Together, these results suggest an impairment in cerebral autoregulation as COX followed changes in MAP more passively in hypoxia than in normoxia. These findings could help explain the increased risk for postexercise syncope at high altitude.

  19. Improvement in diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients in patients with HOCM after ethanol septal reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovner, Aleksandr; Smith, Rebecca; Greenberg, Neil L.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Smedira, Nicholas; Lever, Harry M.; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to validate measurement of intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) and analyze their change in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) after ethanol septal reduction (ESR). Quantitative analysis of color M-mode Doppler (CMM) images may be used to estimate diastolic IVPG noninvasively. Noninvasive IVPG measurement was validated in 10 patients undergoing surgical myectomy. Echocardiograms were then analyzed in 19 patients at baseline and after ESR. Pulsed Doppler data through the mitral valve and pulmonary venous flow were obtained. CMM was used to obtain the flow propagation velocity (Vp) and to calculate IVPG off-line. Left atrial pressure was estimated with the use of previously validated Doppler equations. Data were compared before and after ESR. CMM-derived IVPG correlated well with invasive measurements obtained before and after surgical myectomy [r = 0.8, P < 0.01, Delta(CMM - invasive IVPG) = 0.09 +/- 0.45 mmHg]. ESR resulted in a decrease of resting LVOT systolic gradient from 62 +/- 10 to 29 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the Vp and IVPG (from 48 +/- 5to 74 +/- 7 cm/s and from 1.5 +/- 0.2 to 2.6 +/- 0.3 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). Estimated left atrial pressure decreased from 16.2 +/- 1.1 to 11.5 +/- 0.9 mmHg (P < 0.001). The increase in IVPG correlated with the reduction in the LVOT gradient (r = 0.6, P < 0.01). Reduction of LVOT obstruction after ESR is associated with an improvement in diastolic suction force. Noninvasive measurements of IVPG may be used as an indicator of diastolic function improvement in HOCM.

  20. Stress reduction programs in patients with elevated blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rainforth, Maxwell V; Schneider, Robert H; Nidich, Sanford I; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W; Anderson, James W

    2007-12-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous meta-analyses of stress reduction and high blood pressure (BP) were outdated and/or methodologically limited. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review of the published literature and identified 107 studies on stress reduction and BP. Seventeen trials with 23 treatment comparisons and 960 participants with elevated BP met criteria for well-designed randomized controlled trials and were replicated within intervention categories. Meta-analysis was used to calculate BP changes for biofeedback, -0.8/-2.0 mm Hg (P = NS); relaxation-assisted biofeedback, +4.3/+2.4 mm Hg (P = NS); progressive muscle relaxation, -1.9/-1.4 mm Hg (P = NS); stress management training, -2.3/-1.3 mm (P = NS); and the Transcendental Meditation program, -5.0/-2.8 mm Hg (P = 0.002/0.02). Available evidence indicates that among stress reduction approaches, the Transcendental Meditation program is associated with significant reductions in BP. Related data suggest improvements in other CVD risk factors and clinical outcomes.

  1. Stress Reduction Programs in Patients with Elevated Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rainforth, Maxwell V.; Schneider, Robert H.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W.; Anderson, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous meta-analyses of stress reduction and high blood pressure (BP) were outdated and/or methodologically limited. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review of the published literature and identified 107 studies on stress reduction and BP. Seventeen trials with 23 treatment comparisons and 960 participants with elevated BP met criteria for well-designed randomized controlled trials and were replicated within intervention categories. Meta-analysis was used to calculate BP changes for biofeedback, −0.8/−2.0 mm Hg (P = NS); relaxation-assisted biofeedback, +4.3/+2.4 mm Hg (P = NS); progressive muscle relaxation, −1.9/−1.4 mm Hg (P = NS); stress management training, −2.3/−1.3 mm (P = NS); and the Transcendental Meditation program, −5.0/−2.8 mm Hg (P = 0.002/0.02). Available evidence indicates that among stress reduction approaches, the Transcendental Meditation program is associated with significant reductions in BP. Related data suggest improvements in other CVD risk factors and clinical outcomes. PMID:18350109

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine approaches to blood pressure reduction: An evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Richard

    2008-11-01

    ABSTRACTOBJECTIVETo review the evidence supporting complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of hypertension.QUALITY OF EVIDENCEMEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from January 1966 to May 2008 combining the key words hypertension or blood pressure with acupuncture, chocolate, cocoa, coenzyme Q10, ubiquinone, melatonin, vitamin D, meditation, and stress reduction. Clinical trials, prospective studies, and relevant references were included.MAIN MESSAGEEvidence from systematic reviews supports the blood pressure-lowering effects of coenzyme Q10, polyphenol-rich dark chocolate, Qigong, slow breathing, and transcendental meditation. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular risk; supplementation lowered blood pressure in 2 trials. Acupuncture reduced blood pressure in 3 trials; in 1 of these it was no better than an invasive placebo. Melatonin was effective in 2 small trials, but caution is warranted in patients taking pharmacotherapy.CONCLUSIONSeveral complementary and alternative medicine therapies can be considered as part of an evidence-based approach to the treatment of hypertension. The potential benefit of these interventions warrants further research using cardiovascular outcomes.

  3. Microfluidic vapor-diffusion barrier for pressure reduction in fully closed PCR modules.

    PubMed

    Czilwik, G; Schwarz, I; Keller, M; Wadle, S; Zehnle, S; von Stetten, F; Mark, D; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-02-21

    Microfluidic systems for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) should be fully closed to avoid vapor loss and to exclude the risk of contaminating the laboratory environment. In closed systems however, the high temperatures of up to 95 °C associated with PCR cause high overpressures up to 100 kPa, dominated by the increase of vapor partial pressure upon evaporation. Such high overpressures pose challenges to the mechanical stability of microfluidic chips as well as to the liquid handling in integrated sample-to-answer systems. In this work, we drastically reduce the pressure increase in fully closed PCR systems by integrating a microchannel that serves as a vapor-diffusion barrier (VDB), separating the liquid-filled PCR chamber from an auxiliary air chamber. In such configurations, propagation of vapor from the PCR chamber into the auxiliary air chamber and as a consequence the increase of pressure is limited by the slow diffusion process of vapor through the VDB. At temperature increase from 23 °C to 95 °C, we demonstrate the reduction of overpressure from more than 80 kPa without the VDB to only 35 kPa with the VDB. We further demonstrate proper function of VDB and its easy integration with downstream processes for PCR based nucleic acid amplification within centrifugal microfluidics. Without integration of the VDB, malfunction due to pressure-induced delamination of the microfluidic chip occurred.

  4. Capillary pressure - saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine: Implications for capillary/residual trapping in carbonate reservoirs during geologic carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    In geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), data on capillary pressure (Pc) - saturation (Sw) relations are routinely needed to appraise reservoir processes. Capillarity and its hysteresis have been often experimentally studied in oil-water, gas-water and three phase gas-oil-water systems, but fewer works have been reported on scCO2-water under in-situ reservoir conditions. Here, Pc-Sw relations of supercritical (sc) CO2 displacing brine, and brine rewetting the porous medium to trap scCO2 were studied to understand CO2 transport and trapping behavior in carbonate reservoirs under representative reservoir conditions. High-quality drainage and imbibition (and associated capillary pressure hysteresis) curves were measured under elevated temperature and pressure (45 ºC, 8.5 and 12 MPa) for scCO2-brine as well as at room temperature and pressure (23 ºC, 0.1 MPa) for air-brine in unconsolidated limestone and dolomite sand columns using newly developed semi-automated multistep outflow-inflow porous plate apparatus. Drainage and imbibition curves for scCO2-brine deviated from the universal scaling curves for hydrophilic interactions (with greater deviation under higher pressure) and shifted to lower Pc than predicted based on interfacial tension (IFT) changes. Augmented scaling incorporating differences in IFT and contact angle improved the scaling results but the scaled curves still did not converge onto the universal curves. Equilibrium residual trapping of the nonwetting phase was determined at Pc =0 during imbibition. The capillary-trapped amounts of scCO2 were significantly larger than for air. It is concluded that the deviations from the universal capillary scaling curves are caused by scCO2-induced wettability alteration, given the fact that pore geometry remained constant and IFT is well constrained. In-situ wettability alteration by reactive scCO2 is of critical importance and must be accounted for to achieve reliable predictions of CO2 behavior in GCS reservoirs.

  5. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  6. High-Pressure Micellar Solutions of Polystyrene-block-Polybutadiene and Polystyrene-block-Polyisoprene Solutions in Propane Exhibit Cloud-Pressure Reduction and Distinct Micellization End Points

    SciTech Connect

    Winoto, Winoto; Radosz, Maciej; Tan, Sugata; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    Micellar solutions of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene and polystyrene-block-polyisoprene in propane are found to exhibit significantly lower cloud pressures than the corresponding hypothetical non-micellar solutions. Such a cloud-pressure reduction indicates the extent to which micelle formation enhances the apparent diblock solubility in near-critical and hence compressible propane. Pressure-temperature points beyond which no micelles can be formed, referred to as the micellization end points, are found to depend on the block type, size and ratio, and on the polymer concentration. For a given pressure, the micellization end-point temperature corresponds to the "critical micelle temperature." The cloud-pressure reduction and the micellization end point measured for styrene-diene diblocks in propane should be characteristic of all amphiphilic diblock copolymer solutions that form micelles in compressible solvents.

  7. Perceived standing position after reduction of foot-pressure sensation by cooling the sole.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Asai, Hitoshi; Miyaguchi, Akiyoshi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kunita, Kenji; Inoue, Katsumi

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the influence of the reduction of foot-pressure sensation by cooling the sole of the foot, at 1 degree C for 30 or 40 minutes, on the perception of standing position varied in the anteroposterior direction. The subjects were 16 healthy undergraduates. Firstly, for 4 of the subjects, cooling the sole of the foot decreased sensory information from the mechanoreceptors in the sole, by testing for an increase in the threshold for two-point discrepancy discrimination on the sole of the foot and for the disappearance of postural change with vibration to the sole. Next, the perception of standing position was measured by reproduction of a given standing reference position involving forward or backward leaning under both normal and cooled conditions of the feet. Standing position was varied in relation to the location of the center of foot pressure, defined as distance from the heel in percentage of the length of the foot. The reference positions, representing various locations of the center of foot pressure, were set at 10% increments from 20% to 80% of the length of the foot. With eyes closed, the subject first experienced the reference position and then attempted to reproduce it. The mean location of the center of foot pressure in the quiet standing posture was 45.7%. At the 40%, 50%, and 60% reference positions, those closest to quiet standing, absolute errors of reproduction were significantly larger than at other reference positions in both the normal and the cooled conditions. They were significantly larger in the cooled than in the normal condition. The 50% and 60% reference positions were reproduced significantly further forward in the cooled than in the normal condition. These results may be explained as due to an absence of marked changes in sensory information from both muscular activity and foot pressure when moving to reference positions close to the quiet standing posture.

  8. Pressure-drop reduction and heat-transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen in horizontal pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Norifumi

    2011-10-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are two-phase, single-component fluids containing solid particles in a liquid. Since their density and refrigerant capacity are greater than those of liquid-state fluid alone, there are high expectations for the use of slush fluids in various applications such as clean-energy fuels, spacecraft fuels for improved efficiency in transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental tests were performed using slush nitrogen to obtain the flow and heat-transfer characteristics in two different types of horizontal circular pipes with inner diameters of 10 and 15 mm. One of the primary objectives for the study was to investigate the effect of pipe diameter on the pressure-drop reduction and heat-transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen according to changes in the pipe flow velocity, solid fraction and heat flux. In the case of an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop was reduced and heat-transfer characteristics deteriorated when the pipe flow velocity was higher than 3.6 m/s. On the other hand, in the case of an inner diameter of 10 mm, pressure drop was reduced and heat-transfer characteristics deteriorated when the pipe flow velocity was higher than 2.0 m/s. From these results, it can be seen that a larger pipe diameter produces a higher onset velocity for reducing pressure drop and deteriorating heat-transfer characteristics. Furthermore, based on observations using a high-speed video camera, it was confirmed that pressure drop was reduced and heat-transfer characteristics deteriorated when the solid particles migrated to the center of the pipe and the flow pattern of the solid particles inside the pipe was pseudo-homogeneous.

  9. Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) Pressurized Fuselage Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interim progress for an in-house study that is directed toward innovative structural analysis and design of next-generation advanced aircraft concepts, such as the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and the Advanced Mobility Concept-X flight vehicles, for structural weight reduction and associated performance enhancement. Unlike the conventional, skin-stringer-frame construction for a cylindrical fuselage, the box-type pressurized fuselage panels in the HWB undergo significant deformation of the outer aerodynamic surfaces, which must be minimized without significant structural weight penalty. Simple beam and orthotropic plate theory is first considered for sizing, analytical verification, and possible equivalent-plate analysis with appropriate simplification. By designing advanced composite stiffened-shell configurations, significant weight reduction may be possible compared with the sandwich and ribbed-shell structural concepts that have been studied previously. The study involves independent analysis of the advanced composite structural concepts that are presently being developed by The Boeing Company for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. High-fidelity parametric finite-element models of test coupons, panels, and multibay fuselage sections, were developed for conducting design studies and identifying critical areas of potential failure. Interim results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  10. The development of high hydrostatic pressure processes as an alternative to other pathogen reduction methods.

    PubMed

    Demazeau, G; Rivalain, N

    2011-06-01

    In biology, scientist's interest for high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has increased over the last 20 years, for both research and industrial developments, mainly because of the low energy associated with its application in liquid phase and its capacity to inactivate pathogens. It is now considered as an interesting alternative to heat treatments for the inactivation of contaminants in many products, from foods to pharmaceutical preparations. This last statement implies different objectives according to the type of product. The therapeutic properties of pharmaceutical preparations or other biological media of physiological importance are in general associated with specific and well-defined molecules such as proteins. Their activity mainly depends on their spatial conformation, maintained by weak chemical bonds that are often pressure sensitive. In this case, the optimization of a HHP process can be more complex than for foods, for which the organoleptic molecules are less pressure sensitive, and the evaluation of their preservation is more subjective and highly dependent on the consumers acceptance. The objective of this review is therefore to underline how, even if the basic concept for the optimization of a pathogen reduction process using HHP is the same whatever the product, major differences arise from the product itself and its final use.

  11. The influence of a rapid drawdown and prolonged dewatering on angling pressure, catch and harvest in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBoer, Jason A.; Webber, Christa M.; Dixon, Taylor A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Reservoirs can be dynamic systems, often prone to unpredictable and extreme water-level fluctuations, and can be environments where survival is difficult for zooplankton and larval fish. Although numerous studies have examined the effects of extreme reservoir drawdown on water quality, few have examined extreme drawdown on both abiotic and biotic characteristics. A fissure in the dam at Red Willow Reservoir in southwest Nebraska necessitated an extreme drawdown; the water level was lowered more than 6 m during a two-month period, reducing reservoir volume by 76%. During the subsequent low-water period (i.e., post-drawdown), spring sampling (April–June) showed dissolved oxygen concentration was lower, while turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration were greater, relative to pre-drawdown conditions. Additionally, there was an overall increase in zooplankton density, although there were differences among taxa, and changes in mean size among taxa, relative to pre-drawdown conditions. Zooplankton assemblage composition had an average dissimilarity of 19.3% from pre-drawdown to post-drawdown. The ratio of zero to non-zero catches was greater post-drawdown for larval common carp and for all larval fishes combined, whereas we observed no difference for larval gizzard shad. Larval fish assemblage composition had an average dissimilarity of 39.7% from pre-drawdown to post-drawdown. Given the likelihood that other dams will need repair or replacement in the near future, it is imperative for effective reservoir management that we anticipate the likely abiotic and biotic responses of reservoir ecosystems as these management actions will continue to alter environmental conditions in reservoirs.

  12. Weight and blood pressure reduction among participants engaged in a cancer awareness and prevention program

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Vivian L.; Dawkins, Norma L.; Howard, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives African–Americans consume a diet high in fat, salt and sugar; such dietary habits increase the risks of cancer and other chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to engage rural communities in a nutrition and physical activity behavior modification program to promote cancer awareness and risk reduction. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted to generate information for the development of a nutrition and physical activity program. African Americans (N = 62) from two rural counties (Bullock and Macon) in Alabama participated in a year-long intervention program in 2012 and 2013. Weight loss and blood pressure were evaluated to measure the impact of the intervention. Results Themes emerged for the focus group discussions were: nutrition, health, family, environment, and resource access. In Macon County participants lost weight irrespective of the exercise regimen, with those involved in floor exercise losing the most weight (− 22.4 lbs, or − 11.18% change), while in Bullock county walking was most effective in weight loss (6.1 lbs or − 3.40% change) p < 0.05. Systolic and diastolic pressure decreased from 5.3 to 10.5 mm Hg; − 2.0 to − 6.4 mm Hg, respectively, for Bullock county, except for the walking group. In Macon County, both systolic and diastolic pressure % change ranged from − 8.94 to 12.66 and − 5.34 to 12.66 mm Hg respectively, irrespective of physical activity respectively. Conclusion In this study, changes in weight lost and blood pressure were observed among individuals engaged in a nutrition education and physical activity program. PMID:26601053

  13. Veins in Paleo-reservoir as a Natural Indication of Coupled Changes in Pore Pressure and Stress, Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwon, S.; Edwards, P.; Kim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofracturing associated with elevated fluid pressure coupled with changes in stress has been crucial in enhancing the production and recovery of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, it is also an important issue to access the efficiency and stability of long-term CO2 geologic storage reservoirs. Veins are mineral-filled extension fractures developed along the plane of σ1-σ2 and perpendicular to σ3, and the fluid pressure must exceed σ3applied to the plane when the vein opens. Therefore, vein is a well-known natural analogue for fluid migration in a paleo-reservoir. In the Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, CO2-charged vein systems hosted in the bleached Entrada Formation are well developed and examined to understand the conditions of fluid pressure and stress during the injections of CO2-charged fluid. Based on color and relative cross-cutting relationship in the field, veins are subdivided into two sets; sub-vertical black mineral-rich veins and orthogonal calcite veins that have previously been described as 'grid-lock fractures'. The vein distribution and fluid leakage along through-going fractures in mechanic units allow us to determine the stress regime and driving stress condition through 3D-Mohr circle reconstruction. The results of this statistical analysis for the veins show that the orthogonal veins indicate a 'stress transition' with maximum principal stress direction changing from vertical to NNW-SSE sub-horizontal which coincides with the current regional stress regime. The possible causes of the stress transition can be considered. The process of repeated sealing, reactivation and localization of veins within the bleached zone is a natural indication of a coupled change in pore pressure and stress in the reservoir. Thus, an understanding of the effect of stress changes due to the volumetric injection of CO2 in the subsurface as well as a knowledge of how pre-existing fractures affect fluid flow with respect to elevated pore pressures in layered rocks are

  14. Reservoir sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Tillman, R.W.; Weber, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of papers focuses on sedimentology of siliclastic sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. Shows how detailed sedimentologic descriptions, when combined with engineering and other subsurface geologic techniques, yield reservoir models useful for reservoir management during field development and secondary and tertiary EOR. Sections cover marine sandstone and carbonate reservoirs; shoreline, deltaic, and fluvial reservoirs; and eolian reservoirs. References follow each paper.

  15. Compaction of North-sea chalk by pore-failure and pressure solution in a producing reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag; Jamtveit, Bjorn

    2016-02-01

    The Ekofisk field, Norwegian North sea,is an example of compacting chalk reservoir with considerable subsequent seafloor subsidence due to petroleum production. Previously, a number of models were created to predict the compaction using different phenomenological approaches. Here we present a different approach, we use a new creep model based on microscopic mechanisms with no fitting parameters to predict strain rate at core scale and at reservoir scale. The model is able to reproduce creep experiments and the magnitude of the observed subsidence making it the first microstructural model which can explain the Ekofisk compaction.

  16. Growth of bubbles on a solid surface in response to a pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Chen, Haosheng; Zhou, Weizheng; Wu, Bo; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2014-04-22

    A diffusion-controlled method is presented to study the growth of bubbles on a solid surface. The bubbles are nucleated spontaneously on a hydrophobic smooth surface in response to a sudden pressure reduction and then grow with an expanding contact line. The evolution of the bubbles in the early stage is found to grow with a constant bubble radius and a decreasing contact angle, while the bubbles continue their growth with a constant contact angle and an increasing bubble radius after the contact angle reaches its equilibrium value. A total variation of about 60° of the contact angle is observed during the growth of the bubbles with the size scale of 10-100 μm in radius. The growing process is described by the diffusion theory with the validation of the growth constant.

  17. Capillary pressure-saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in limestone/dolomite sands: implications for geologic carbon sequestration in carbonate reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2015-06-16

    In geologic carbon sequestration, capillary pressure (Pc)-saturation (Sw) relations are needed to predict reservoir processes. Capillarity and its hysteresis have been extensively studied in oil-water and gas-water systems, but few measurements have been reported for supercritical (sc) CO2-water. Here, Pc-Sw relations of scCO2 displacing brine (drainage), and brine rewetting (imbibition) were studied to understand CO2 transport and trapping behavior under reservoir conditions. Hysteretic drainage and imbibition Pc-Sw curves were measured in limestone sands at 45 °C under elevated pressures (8.5 and 12.0 MPa) for scCO2-brine, and in limestone and dolomite sands at 23 °C (0.1 MPa) for air-brine using a new computer programmed porous plate apparatus. scCO2-brine drainage and imbibition curves shifted to lower Pc relative to predictions based on interfacial tension, and therefore deviated from capillary scaling predictions for hydrophilic interactions. Fitting universal scaled drainage and imbibition curves show that wettability alteration resulted from scCO2 exposure over the course of months-long experiments. Residual trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined at Pc = 0 during imbibition. Amounts of trapped scCO2 were significantly larger than for those for air, and increased with pressure (depth), initial scCO2 saturation, and time. These results have important implications for scCO2 distribution, trapping, and leakage potential. PMID:25945400

  18. Dispersion reduction in open-channel liquid electrochromatographic columns via pressure-driven back flow.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis; Leighton, David T

    2003-07-15

    Application of electrokinetic forces to drive the mobile phase diminishes analyte dispersion in open-channel liquid chromatographic columns due to minimization of shear in the flow field. However, the retentive layer coating the inner walls of such devices slows down the average convective velocity of solute molecules in its vicinity, inherently causing dispersion of analyte bands. In this article, we explore the possibility of reducing such dispersion in electrochromatographic columns by imposing a pressure-driven back flow in the system. Analysis shows that although such a strategy introduces shear in the flow field, the overall dispersion in the mobile phase is reduced. This occurs as the streamline velocity in such a system is greater near the channel walls than that in the center of the conduit, thereby allowing fluid dispersion to counteract wall retention effects. For an optimally chosen magnitude of the back flow, hydrodynamic dispersion of any target species in the mobile phase may be shown to diminish by a factor of 3 and 10/3 in a circular tube and a parallel-plate geometry, respectively. A similar reduction in slug dispersion is also realized in rectangular conduits for all aspect ratios. In trapezoidal geometries with large wedge angles or isotropically etched profiles, this reduction factor may attain values of 10 or greater.

  19. Generation of isotopically and compositionally distinct water during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in carbonate reservoirs: Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Worden, Richard H.; Cai, Chunfang

    2015-09-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), the reaction of petroleum with anhydrite in reservoirs resulting in the growth of calcite and the accumulation of H2S, has been documented in the Feixianguan Formation dolomite reservoir in the Sichuan Basin, China. Fluid inclusion salinity and homogenization temperature data have shown that TSR results in a decrease in salinity from a pre-TSR value of 25 wt.% down to 5 wt.% as a result of water created as a byproduct of progressive TSR. We have studied the isotopic character of the water that resulted from TSR in the Feixianguan Formation by analyzing the oxygen isotopes of TSR calcite and determining the oxygen isotopes of the water in equilibrium with the TSR calcite at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have compared these TSR-waters to water that would have been in equilibrium with the bulk rock, also at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have found that the TSR-waters are relatively depleted in oxygen isotopes (by up to 8‰ compared to what would be expected at equilibrium between the bulk rock and water) since this type of water was specifically derived from anhydrite. The generation of relatively large volumes of low salinity, low δ18O water associated with advanced TSR in the Feixianguan Formation has also been reported in the Permian Khuff Formation in Abu Dhabi and from sour Devonian fields in the Western Canada Basin. This suggests that TSR-derived water may be a common phenomenon, the effects of which on mesogenetic secondary porosity and reservoir quality have previously been underappreciated.

  20. The Research on Borehole Stability in Depleted Reservoir and Caprock: Using the Geophysics Logging Data

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jingen; Luo, Yong; Guo, Shisheng; Zhang, Haishan; Tan, Qiang; Zhao, Kai; Hu, Lianbo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term oil and gas exploitation in reservoir will lead to pore pressure depletion. The pore pressure depletion will result in changes of horizontal in-situ stresses both in reservoirs and caprock formations. Using the geophysics logging data, the magnitude and orientation changes of horizontal stresses in caprock and reservoir are studied. Furthermore, the borehole stability can be affected by in-situ stresses changes. To address this issue, the dehydration from caprock to reservoir and roof effect of caprock are performed. Based on that, the influence scope and magnitude of horizontal stresses reduction in caprock above the depleted reservoirs are estimated. The effects of development on borehole stability in both reservoir and caprock are studied step by step with the above geomechanical model. PMID:24228021

  1. Pressure pyrolysed non-precious oxygen reduction catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathambi, Vijayadurga

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide energy demand has driven long-term efforts towards developing a clean, hydrogen-based energy economy. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are low emissions and high efficiency devices that utilize the power of hydrogen and are a key enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. Carbon supported platinum-black is the state-of the art catalyst for oxygen reduction in a PEMFC because it can withstand the acidic environment. However, the high cost and low abundance of this precious metal has limited large-scale commercialization of PEMFCs. Current efforts focus on developing alternative inexpensive, non-noble metal-based catalysts for oxygen reduction with performance comparable to conventional platinum based electrocatalysts. In this work, inexpensive metal-nitrogen-carbon (MNC) catalysts have been synthesized by pyrolyzing transition metal and nitrogen precursors together with high surface area carbon materials in a closed, constant-volume quartz tube. High pressure generated due to nitrogen precursor evaporation lead to increased surface nitrogen content in the catalysts post-pyrolysis. Electrochemical oxygen reduction activity of MNC catalysts was analyzed using half-cell Rotating Ring Disc Electrode (RRDE) studies. The effect of nitrogen precursor morphology on the generation of active sites has been explored in detail. By increasing the Nitrogen/Carbon ratio of the nitrogen precursor, the accessible active site density increased by reducing carbon deposition in the pores of the carbon support during pyrolysis. The most active catalysts were obtained using melamine, having a N/C ratio of 2. Single PEMFC measurements employing MNC catalysts as cathodes indicated kinetic current density as high as 15 A cm-3 at 0.8 ViR-free and over 100 h of stable current at 0.5 V were observed. Effects of carbon free ammonia generating solid nitrogen precursors such as urea and ammonium carbamate were also studied. These precursors etched the carbon support

  2. Pressure dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction at the platinum microelectrode/nafion interface - Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen reduction kinetics at the platinum/Nafion interface is of great importance in the advancement of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel-cell technology. This study focuses on the dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on oxygen pressure. Conventional Tafel analysis of the data shows that the reaction order with respect to oxygen is unity at both high and low current densities. Chronoamperometric measurements of the transport parameters for oxygen in Nafion show that oxygen dissolution follows Henry's isotherm. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen is invariant with pressure; however, the diffusion coefficient for oxygen is lower when air is used as the equilibrating gas as compared to when oxygen is used for equilibration. These results are of value in understanding the influence of O2 partial pressure on the performance of PEM fuel cells and also in elucidating the mechanism of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface.

  3. Sustained sympathetic and blood pressure reduction 1 year after renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Walton, Antony S; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Krum, Henry; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Lambert, Gavin W; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2014-07-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in resistant hypertension. Although a persistent BP-lowering effect has been demonstrated, the long-term effect on MSNA remains elusive. We investigated whether RDN influences MSNA over time. Office BP and MSNA were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after RDN in 35 patients with resistant hypertension. Office BP averaged 166±22/88±19 mm Hg, despite the use of an average of 4.8±2.1 antihypertensive drugs. Baseline MSNA was 51±11 bursts/min ≈2- to 3-fold higher than the level observed in healthy controls. Mean office systolic and diastolic BP significantly decreased by -12.6±18.3/-6.5±9.2, -16.1±25.6/-8.6±12.9, and -21.2±29.1/-11.1±12.9 mm Hg (P<0.001 for both systolic BP and diastolic BP) with RDN at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. MSNA was reduced by -8±12, -6±12, and -6±11 bursts/min (P<0.01) at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. The reduction in MSNA was maintained, despite a progressive fall in BP over time. No such changes were observed in 7 control subjects at 6-month follow-up. These findings confirm previous reports on the favorable effects of RDN on elevated BP and demonstrate sustained reduction of central sympathetic outflow ≤1-year follow-up in patients with resistant hypertension and high baseline MSNA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis of a substantial contribution of afferent renal nerve signaling to increased BP in resistant hypertension and argue against a relevant reinnervation at 1 year after procedure.

  4. A multistrategic approach in the development of sourdough bread targeted towards blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Peñas, E; Diana, M; Frias, J; Quílez, J; Martínez-Villaluenga, C

    2015-03-01

    Rising prevalence of hypertension is pushing food industry towards the development of innovative food products with antihypertensive effects. The aim was to study the effect of reduced sodium content and 21% addition of wholemeal wheat sourdough (produced by Lactobacillus brevis CECT 8183 and protease) on proximate composition, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and peptide content of wheat bread. Angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities were also evaluated. Sodium replacement by potassium salt did not affect chemical composition and biological activities of bread. In contrast, GABA and peptides <3 kDa contents in sourdough bread (SDB) were 7 and 3 times higher, respectively, than the observed in control. ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the peptide fraction < 3 kDa from SDB was 1.7 and 2.6-3.0 times higher than control. Therefore, the combination of reduced sodium content with enriched concentrations of bioactive compounds in bread making may provide interesting perspectives for development of innovative breads towards blood pressure reduction.

  5. Oleic acid content is responsible for the reduction in blood pressure induced by olive oil.

    PubMed

    Terés, S; Barceló-Coblijn, G; Benet, M; Alvarez, R; Bressani, R; Halver, J E; Escribá, P V

    2008-09-16

    Numerous studies have shown that high olive oil intake reduces blood pressure (BP). These positive effects of olive oil have frequently been ascribed to its minor components, such as alpha-tocopherol, polyphenols, and other phenolic compounds that are not present in other oils. However, in this study we demonstrate that the hypotensive effect of olive oil is caused by its high oleic acid (OA) content (approximately 70-80%). We propose that olive oil intake increases OA levels in membranes, which regulates membrane lipid structure (H(II) phase propensity) in such a way as to control G protein-mediated signaling, causing a reduction in BP. This effect is in part caused by its regulatory action on G protein-associated cascades that regulate adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. In turn, the OA analogues, elaidic and stearic acids, had no hypotensive activity, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that link membrane lipid structure and BP regulation are very specific. Similarly, soybean oil (with low OA content) did not reduce BP. This study demonstrates that olive oil induces its hypotensive effects through the action of OA.

  6. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  7. The application of high-pressure treatment in the reduction of phosphate levels in breakfast sausages.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, C C; Cruz-Romero, M C; Troy, D J; Mullen, A M; Kerry, J P

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated effects of high pressure (HP) treatment of pork meat at 150 or 300 MPa for 5 min before manufacturing sausages on the reduction of phosphate levels and compared to sausages manufactured with untreated pork meat (control sausages). Improvement in perceived saltiness, juiciness and overall flavour was observed in sausages manufactured using HP-treated meat at 150 MPa and 0% phosphate, compared to control sausages. Sausages manufactured using meat HP-treated at 150 MPa and 0.25% phosphate (P<0.05) improved hardness of sausages. HP-treated meat at 300 MPa and 0% phosphate decreased juiciness and adhesiveness, while at 0.25% phosphate, adversely affected emulsion stability and sensory attributes. HP treatment did not affect significantly the lightness of the sausages; however, elimination of phosphate reduced (P<0.05) the yellowness, while HP treatment at 150 MPa with 0.25 or 0.5% phosphate increased (P<0.05) redness. HP reatment at 150 MPa has potential for reducing phosphate levels in sausages without significant changes in their functionality and improved acceptability. PMID:24056406

  8. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D

  9. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  10. Research on Oil Recovery Mechanisms in Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Louis M. Castanier; William E. Brigham

    1998-03-31

    The goal of this project is to increase recovery of heavy oils. Towards that goal studies are being conducted in how to assess the influence of temperature and pressure on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in site combustion process; to develop and understand mechanisms of surfactants on for the reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; and to improve techniques of formation evaluation.

  11. Phytoplankton Composition and Abundance in Restored Maltański Reservoir under the Influence of Physico-Chemical Variables and Zooplankton Grazing Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Anna; Gołdyn, Ryszard; Dondajewska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the effects of environmental factors and zooplankton food pressure on phytoplankton in the restored man-made Maltański Reservoir (MR). Two methods of restoration: biomanipulation and phosphorus inactivation have been applied in the reservoir. Nine taxonomical groups of phytoplankton represented in total by 183 taxa were stated there. The richest groups in respect of taxa number were green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. The diatoms, cryptophytes, chrysophytes, cyanobacteria, green algae and euglenophytes dominated in terms of abundance and/or biomass. There were significant changes among environmental parameters resulting from restoration measures which influenced the phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. These measures led to a decrease of phosphorus concentration due to its chemical inactivation and enhanced zooplankton grazing as a result of planktivorous fish stocking. The aim of the study is to analyse the reaction of phytoplankton to the restoration measures and, most importantly, to determine the extent to which the qualitative and quantitative composition of phytoplankton depends on variables changing under the influence of restoration in comparison with other environmental variables. We stated that application of restoration methods did cause significant changes in phytoplankton community structure. The abundance of most phytoplankton taxa was negatively correlated with large zooplankton filter feeders, and positively with zooplankton predators and concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and partly of phosphates. However, restoration was insufficient in the case of decreasing phytoplankton abundance. The effects of restoration treatments were of less importance for the abundance of phytoplankton than parameters that were independent of the restoration. This was due to the continuous inflow of large loads of nutrients from the area of the river catchment. PMID:25906352

  12. Mechanism related to reduction of intraocular pressure by melanocortins in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Naveh, N; Kaplan-Messas, A; Marshall, J

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To investigate whether the ocular hypotensive effect of alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) is related to eicosanoids or cyclic AMP (cAMP).
METHODS—Intraocular pressure (IOP) readings were taken at a similar time on the day before and after a single dose of topical MSH. Changes in the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin in incubated iris ciliary body (ICB) explants were measured by specific radioimmunoassay (RIA). Incubated ICB explants were exposed to MSH or adrenaline (epinephrine) for a week. In addition, cAMP levels in the medium were determined following short term incubation using RIA.
RESULTS—A significant dose related reduction in IOP was noted with topical MSH (mean (SD) maximal effect 4.5 (0.1) mm Hg (21%); p<0.001 v appropriate baseline) which persisted up to 6 hours (p=0.05). MSH treated ICB explants showed a 1.5-fold increase in PGE2 and prostacyclin levels (p<0.001 for each parameter) while cAMP levels were increased twofold (p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—A single application of MSH caused a sustained dose related ocular hypotensive effect with no side effects. An increase in eicosanoid and cAMP levels following ICB exposure to MSH indicated their involvement in MSH induced ocular hypotension. MSH and its analogues might have clinical relevance as antiglaucoma drugs with fewer side effects because of their antiallergic and anti-inflammatory properties.

 PMID:11090484

  13. A rotating two-phase gas/liquid flow for pressure reduction in underwater plasma arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, H.; Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma arc welding processes are used in off-shore industry for the construction and maintenance in the wet surrounding of underwater structures and pipelines. In greater water depth the density of the plasma gas increase because of the greater hydrostatic pressure. This causes an increase of the conductive heat losses to the wet surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. The plasma arc has to burn in a locally dry area. This requirement can be fulfilled by a rotating disc placed above the workpiece. In the gap between the lower end of the cylinder and the workpiece a rotating two-phase flow is maintained. The flow around the rotating disc is experimentally investigated. The rotating disc is placed above the surface of the workpiece which is simulated by a flat plate. Water is forced out of the cylinder due to centrifugal forces set up by the rotating disc and flat plate. The velocity distribution in the flow is measured by Laser-Doppler-Anemometry. The phase distribution in the two-phase flow in the gap is measured by local electrical probes. The static pressure in the gaseous atmosphere is reduced in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding water. The pressure reduction is given by the void fraction, the phase distribution and the volume flow rates of both phases in the gap as well as by the speed of revolution and the design of the disc and the work surface. Apart from the investigations on the fluid dynamics, the method to reduce the pressure was technically proved. Experiments were carried out under water with a plasma MIG welder.

  14. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-10-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations.

  15. Reductions in central venous pressure by lower body negative pressure or blood loss elicit similar hemodynamic responses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair D.; van Helmond, Noud; Curry, Timothy B.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic and blood analyte responses to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) and pulse pressure (PP) elicited during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to those observed during graded blood loss (BL) in conscious humans. We hypothesized that the stimulus-response relationships of CVP and PP to hemodynamic responses during LBNP would mimic those observed during BL. We assessed CVP, PP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and other hemodynamic markers in 12 men during LBNP and BL. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of catecholamines, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arginine vasopressin, and blood gases. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg of suction. BL consisted of 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of hemorrhage (1,000 ml total). Individual r2 values and linear regression slopes were calculated to determine whether the stimulus (CVP and PP)-hemodynamic response trajectories were similar between protocols. The CVP-MAP trajectory was the only CVP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (0.93 ± 0.27 vs. 0.13 ± 0.26; P = 0.037). The PP-heart rate trajectory was the only PP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (−1.85 ± 0.45 vs. −0.46 ± 0.27; P = 0.024). Norepinephrine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were all lower at termination in the BL protocol compared with LBNP (P < 0.05). Consistent with our hypothesis, LBNP mimics the hemodynamic stimulus-response trajectories observed during BL across a significant range of CVP in humans. PMID:24876357

  16. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-08-12

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations. The injection pressure and ground surface displacement are often monitored for injection well safety, and are believed can partially reflect the risk of fault reactivation and seismicity. Based on the reduced order model and response surface, the input parameters can be screened for control the risk of induced seismicity. The uncertainty of the subsurface structure properties cause the numerical simulation based on a single or a few samples does not accurately estimate the geomechanical response in the actual injection site. Probability of risk can be used to evaluate and predict the risk of injection when there are great uncertainty in the subsurface properties and operation

  17. Evolution of the Cerro Prieto reservoirs under exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.; Puente, H.G.

    1997-07-01

    The Cerro Prieto Geothermal field of Baja California (Mexico) has been under commercial production to generate electricity since 1973. Over the years, the large amount of Geothermal fluids extracted (at present about 12,000 tons per hour) to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in a reduction of pressures, changes in reservoir processes, and increased flow of cooler groundwater into the geothermal system. The groundwater recharging the reservoir moves horizontally through permeable layers, as well as vertically through permeable fault zones. In addition, the supply of deep hot waters has continued unabated, and perhaps has increased as reservoir pressure decreased. Since 1989, this natural fluid recharge has been supplemented by injection which presently amounts to about 20% of the fluid produced. Changes in the chemical and physical characteristics of the reservoir fluids due to the drop in pressures and the inflow of cooler groundwaters and injectate have been detected on the basis of wellhead data. These changes point to reservoir processes like local boiling, phase segregation, steam condensation, mixing and dilution. Finally, the study identified areas where fluids are entering the reservoir, as well as indicated their source (i.e. natural Groundwater recharge versus injectate) and established the controlling geologic structures.

  18. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  19. Reservoir modeling and simulation of a middle eastern carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, M.J.; Bent, J.V.; Davis, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    A giant Middle Eastern reservoir was modeled and history matched during reservoir simulation. The model was used to help predict reservoir performance under various scenarios and to evaluate the impact on production rates, ultimate recovery and economics. Implementation of an infill, extension, and pressure maintenance plan is in progress. This model overcame shortcomings of previous models of this reservoir through detailed integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering data. Among the data incorporated were slabbed core, thin sections, core analyses, seismic, isotope, open-hole logs, TDTs, RFTs, field pressure surveys, oil and water production data, and production tests. Significant modifications were made to internal and external reservoir architecture, and a diagenetic barrier was discovered that is the primary barrier to aquifer support. Results of the study include increased booked reserves and production rates, additional infill wells, two reservoir extension area discoveries, and the design and implementation of a pressure maintenance program.

  20. Generation of methane in the Earth's mantle: in situ high pressure-temperature measurements of carbonate reduction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Henry P; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Herschbach, Dudley R; Fried, Laurence E; Howard, W Michael; Bastea, Sorin

    2004-09-28

    We present in situ observations of hydrocarbon formation via carbonate reduction at upper mantle pressures and temperatures. Methane was formed from FeO, CaCO(3)-calcite, and water at pressures between 5 and 11 GPa and temperatures ranging from 500 degrees C to 1,500 degrees C. The results are shown to be consistent with multiphase thermodynamic calculations based on the statistical mechanics of soft particle mixtures. The study demonstrates the existence of abiogenic pathways for the formation of hydrocarbons in the Earth's interior and suggests that the hydrocarbon budget of the bulk Earth may be larger than conventionally assumed.

  1. Experimental Investigation on the Influence of High Pressure and High Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of Deep Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Mishra, Brijes; Heasley, Keith A.

    2015-11-01

    Deep and ultra-deep resources extraction has resulted in the challenge of drilling into high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) environments. Drilling challenges at such extreme conditions prompted NETL to develop a specialized ultra-deep drilling simulator (UDS) for investigating drill behavior in such conditions. Using the UDS apparatus, complex laboratory tests were performed on Carthage marble (Warsaw limestone) and Crab Orchard sandstone, which represent the rocks in the basins of the Tuscaloosa trend in southern Louisiana and the Arbuckle play in Oklahoma and North Texas. Additionally, numerical models of the UDS were developed for performing parametric analyses that would be impossible with the UDS alone. Subsequently, it was found that the input properties for these two rock types at such extreme pressure and temperature conditions were unavailable. Therefore, a suite of unconfined compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, and triaxial compression tests ( σ 1 > σ 2 = σ 3) were performed on Carthage marble and Crab Orchard sandstone for investigating their behavior in HPHT environments. The HPHT experiments were performed at confining pressures ranging from atmospheric to 200 MPa, and with temperatures ranging from 25 to 180 °C. The influences of confining pressure and temperature on the mechanical properties of two rocks were investigated.

  2. Enhanced ventricular pump function and decreased reservoir backflow sustain rise in pulmonary blood flow after reduction of lung liquid volume in fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J

    2014-02-15

    Although a reduction in lung liquid volume increases fetal pulmonary blood flow, the changes in central flow patterns that sustain this increased pulmonary perfusion are unknown. To address this issue, eight anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), ductus arteriosus (DA), and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes, with blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses performed at baseline and after withdrawal of lung liquid via an endotracheal tube. Reducing lung liquid volume by 19 ± 6 ml/kg (mean ± SD) augmented right ventricular power by 34% (P < 0.001), with distribution of an accompanying increase in mean PT blood flow (245 ± 63 ml/min, P < 0.001) to the lungs (169 ± 91 ml/min, P = 0.001) and across the DA (77 ± 92 ml/min, P = 0.04). However, although PT and DA flow increments were confined to systole and were related to an increased magnitude of flow-increasing, forward-running compression waves, the rise in PA flow spanned both systole (108 ± 66 ml/min) and diastole (61 ± 32 ml/min). Flow profile analysis showed that the step-up in PA diastolic flow was associated with diminished PA diastolic backflow and accompanied by a lesser degree of diastolic right-to-left DA shunting. These data suggest that an increased pulmonary blood flow after reduction of lung liquid volume is associated with substantial changes in PT-DA-PA interactions and underpinned by two main factors: 1) enhanced right ventricular pump function that increases PA systolic inflow and 2) decreased PA diastolic backflow that arises from a fundamental change in PA reservoir function, thereby resulting in greater passage of systolic inflow through the lungs.

  3. Sedimentary reservoir oxidation during geologic CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Laura N.; Brown, Gordon E.; Bird, Dennis K.; Thomas, Randal B.; Johnson, Natalie C.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Maher, Katharine

    2015-04-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into subsurface geologic reservoirs during geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) introduces an oxidizing supercritical CO2 phase into a subsurface geologic environment that is typically reducing. The resulting redox disequilibrium provides the chemical potential for the reduction of CO2 to lower free energy organic species. However, redox reactions involving carbon typically require the presence of a catalyst. Iron oxide minerals, including magnetite, are known to catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions of C-bearing species. If the redox conditions in the reservoir are modified by redox transformations involving CO2, such changes could also affect mineral stability, leading to dissolution and precipitation reactions and alteration of the long-term fate of CO2 in GCS reservoirs. We present experimental evidence that reservoirs with reducing redox conditions are favorable environments for the relatively rapid abiotic reduction of CO2 to organic molecules. In these experiments, an aqueous suspension of magnetite nanoparticles was reacted with supercritical CO2 under pressure and temperature conditions relevant to GCS in sedimentary reservoirs (95-210 °C and ∼100 bars of CO2). Hydrogen production was observed in several experiments, likely caused by Fe(II) oxidation either at the surface of magnetite or in the aqueous phase. Heating of the Fe(II)-rich system resulted in elevated PH2 and conditions favorable for the reduction of CO2 to acetic acid. Implications of these results for the long-term fate of CO2 in field-scale systems were explored using reaction path modeling of CO2 injection into reservoirs containing Fe(II)-bearing primary silicate minerals, with kinetic parameters for CO2 reduction obtained experimentally. The results of these calculations suggest that the reaction of CO2 with reservoir constituents will occur in two primary stages (1) equilibration of CO2 with organic acids resulting in mineral-fluid disequilibrium, and

  4. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0–125 MPa) and temperatures (4–37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface. PMID:25653646

  5. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0-125 MPa) and temperatures (4-37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface. PMID:25653646

  6. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0-125 MPa) and temperatures (4-37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface.

  7. Blunted reduction of pulse pressure during nighttime is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in elderly hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takashi; Kohno, Isao; Fujioka, Daisuke; Ichigi, Yoshihide; Kawabata, Ken-ichi; Obata, Jun-ei; Osada, Mitsuru; Takano, Hajime; Umetani, Ken; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2004-08-01

    Increased pulse pressure (PP) is recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, especially in elderly patients. However, blood pressure (BP) is known to have a circadian variation. Therefore, this study asked whether or not PP has a circadian variation and, if so, whether a circadian variation of PP has clinical importance. Ambulatory BP monitoring (every 30 min for 48 h) was performed in 255 patients with untreated essential hypertension (24 to 82 years old; mean: 52+/-12 years). Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was estimated from M-mode echocardiography. PP was decreased during nighttime (10+/-11% reduction from daytime PP). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that, among four variables-the degree of nighttime PP reduction, daytime PP, 48-h systolic BP, and nondipper hypertension-the degree of nighttime PP reduction had the strongest (inverse) correlation with LVMI in a subgroup of elderly patients (> or =60 years old, n =67) (standardized regression coefficient=-0.32, p =0.02), whereas this association was not significant in the whole patient population unclassified by age. Furthermore, a blunted reduction of nighttime PP in combination with nondipper hypertension was an incremental risk for increase in LVMI in the elderly patients. In conclusion, PP is reduced during nighttime, but the degree of reduction varies among patients. The blunted reduction of nighttime PP is a risk for left ventricular hypertrophy, an established predictor of hypertension-induced cardiovascular events, and it may thus play a role in cardiovascular complications, especially in elderly patients with nondipper hypertension. PMID:15492477

  8. Moisture-pressure combination treatments for cyanide reduction in grated cassava.

    PubMed

    Harris, Mark Anglin; Koomson, Charles Kofi

    2011-01-01

    Several cyanide-associated health disorders have been linked with frequent consumption of mildly toxic cassava (Manihot esculenta crantz) products in individuals on a low-protein diet. Production of bread from cassava often involves application of prolonged physical pressure (pressing) to the freshly grated root for several hours. This study aimed to determine effects of pressure and wetting on grated cassava. Six treatments were applied: confining pressure for 12 h, wetting for 4 h at 25 °C, 2 h at 25 °C, 2 h at 40 °C, and 2 h at 50 °C, or each of the above followed by pressure for 12 h. Treatments released cyanide from samples in the order: 2-h wet at 50 °C + pressing >4-h wet at 25 °C + pressing = 2-h wet at 40 °C + pressing >2-h wet at 25 °C + pressing = 4-h wet at 25 °C >12-h pressing. Wetting for 2 h at 50 °C followed by pressure for 12 h reduced cyanide levels by at least 20% more than that of any other treatment. The combination of moisture and pressure enhanced the contact time between linamarin and linamarase to increase the release of hydrogen cyanide. PMID:21535726

  9. Reservoir limnology

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, K.W.; Kimmel, B.L.; Payne, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    This book addresses reservoirs as unique ecological systems and presents research indicating that reservoirs fall into two or three highly concatenated, interactive ecological systems ranging from riverine to lacustrine or hybrid systems. Includes some controversial concepts about the limnology of reservoirs.

  10. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  11. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  12. Reduction of pressure in postcapillary venules induced by EPI-fluorescent illumination of FITC-dextrans

    SciTech Connect

    Bekker, A.Y.; Ritter, A.B.; Duran, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    Blue light (488nm) irradiation of intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextrans induces platelet aggregation in microvessels. The build-up of the aggregates in the microvessel lumen results in a change in microcirculatory hemodynamics. We found that lumenal pressure falls to approximately 75% of the control pressure within the first 10 seconds following the onset of irradiation. The damage, however, is not permanent and pressure returns to control level after the illumination of the microcirculatory field is discontinued. This effect can lead to erroneous conclusions in studies of microcirculatory hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity in preparations in which intravital fluorescence microscopy is employed. Short time irradiation (1 min. or less) of the microcirculatory field is recommended as a means of minimizing the deleterious effects of blue light irradiation.

  13. Long-Lasting Reduction of Blood Pressure by Electroacupuncture in Patients with Hypertension: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Cheng, Ling; Liu, Dongmei; Painovich, Jeannette; Vinjamury, Sivarama; Longhurst, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture at specific acupoints has experimentally been found to reduce chronically elevated blood pressure. Objective: To examine effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA) at select acupoints to reduce systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) in hypertensive patients. Design: Two-arm parallel study. Patients: Sixty-five hypertensive patients not receiving medication were assigned randomly to one of the two acupuncture intervention (33 versus 32 patients). Intervention: Patients were assessed with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. They were treated with 30-minutes of EA at PC 5-6+ST 36-37 or LI 6-7+GB 37-39 once weekly for 8 weeks. Four acupuncturists provided single-blinded treatment. Main outcome measures: Primary outcomes measuring effectiveness of EA were peak and average SBP and DBP. Secondary outcomes examined underlying mechanisms of acupuncture with plasma norepinephrine, renin, and aldosterone before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Outcomes were obtained by double-blinded evaluation. Results: After 8 weeks, 33 patients treated with EA at PC 5-6+ST 36-37 had decreased peak and average SBP and DBP, compared with 32 patients treated with EA at LI 6-7+GB 37-39 control acupoints. Changes in blood pressures significantly differed between the two patient groups. In 14 patients, a long-lasting blood pressure–lowering acupuncture effect was observed for an additional 4 weeks of EA at PC 5-6+ST 36-37. After treatment, the plasma concentration of norepinephrine, which was initially elevated, was decreased by 41%; likewise, renin was decreased by 67% and aldosterone by 22%. Conclusions: EA at select acupoints reduces blood pressure. Sympathetic and renin-aldosterone systems were likely related to the long-lasting EA actions. PMID:26392838

  14. Tafluprost for the Reduction of Interocular Pressure in Open Angle Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Clyde

    2011-01-01

    Tafluprost is an FP receptor antagonist that has been shown in clinical studies in Europe and Japan to be extremely useful in treating elevated intraocular pressure and glaucoma. The drug is well tolerated and appears to be at least equal in effectiveness and perhaps superior to other protanoids for routine use comparison to be superior to other treatments for the elevated IOP as the side effects and other related symptomology appear to be less, while maintaining a level of pressure control for prolonged periods. PMID:23861619

  15. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Christopher G.; Cheng, Yiwei; Engelbrekston, Anna; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Li, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Coates, John D.; Conrad, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring) is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM) is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of −30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters (FW) containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and injection water (IW) containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures. PMID:25285094

  16. Non-invasive assessment of negative pressure wound therapy using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound: oedema reduction and new tissue accumulation.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen R; Hampton, Sylvie; Martin, Robin

    2013-08-01

    Tissue oedema plays an important role in the pathology of chronic and traumatic wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is thought to contribute to active oedema reduction, yet few studies have showed this effect. In this study, high frequency diagnostic ultrasound at 20 MHz with an axial resolution of 60 µm was used to assess the effect of NPWT at - 80 mmHg on pressure ulcers and the surrounding tissue. Wounds were monitored in four patients over a 3-month period during which changes in oedema and wound bed thickness (granulation tissue) were measured non-invasively. The results showed a rapid reduction of periwound tissue oedema in all patients with levels falling by a mean of 43% after 4 days of therapy. A 20% increase in the thickness of the wound bed was observed after 7 days due to new granulation tissue formation. Ultrasound scans through the in situ gauze NPWT filler also revealed the existence of macrodeformation in the tissue produced by the negative pressure. These preliminary studies suggest that non-invasive assessment using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound could be a valuable tool in clinical studies of NPWT.

  17. Effect of high pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a five-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a post-packaging intervention. QF was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, was starter-free and was not pressed...

  18. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  19. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  20. Increase of stagnation pressure and enthalpy in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1992-01-01

    High stagnation pressures and enthalpies are required for the testing of aerospace vehicles such as aerospace planes, aeroassist vehicles, and reentry vehicles. Among the most useful ground test facilities for performing such tests are shock tunnels. With a given driver gas condition, the enthalpy and pressure in the driven tube nozzle reservoir condition can be varied by changing the driven tube geometry and initial gas fill pressure. Reducing the driven tube diameter yields only very modest increases in reservoir pressure and enthalpy. Reducing the driven tube initial gas fill pressure can increase the reservoir enthalpy significantly, but at the cost of reduced reservoir pressure and useful test time. A new technique, the insertion of a converging section in the driven tube is found to produce substantial increases in both reservoir pressure and enthalpy. Using a one-dimensional inviscid full kinetics code, a number of different locations and shapes for the converging driven tube section were studied and the best cases found. For these best cases, for driven tube diameter reductions of factors of 2 and 3, the reservoir pressure can be increased by factors of 2.1 and 3.2, respectively and the enthalpy can be increased by factors of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively.

  1. Improved efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhanced prospects for CO{sub 2} flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.B.; Heller, J.P.; Schechter, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to improve the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous reservoirs. Activities include: exploration of the applicability of selective mobility reduction utilizing foams; possible higher economic viability of floods at slightly reduced CO{sub 2} injection pressures; and taking advantage of gravitational forces during flooding in fractured reservoirs.

  2. Effect of salt reduction intervention program using an electronic salt sensor and cellular phone on blood pressure among hypertensive workers.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Nozomi; Yamasue, Kotaro; Tochikubo, Osamu; Mizushima, Shunsaku

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of a workplace intervention program that utilized self-monitoring of daily salt excretion by an electronic salt sensor and sent personalized e-mail advice via cellular phone. Forty-one hypertensive male workers were assigned to intervention and control groups, then counseled together. Intervention group members were asked to measure daily salt excretion and received e-mail advice. After 4 weeks, a greater decrease of blood pressure (BP) was observed in the intervention group, with significant reductions to daily salt excretion and home BP. The new intervention program is considered useful for BP control among hypertensive workers.

  3. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension. PMID:26015450

  4. Stepping Up the Pressure: Arousal Can Be Associated with a Reduction in Male Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Mann, Traci; Westling, Erika H.; Creswell, J. David; Ebert, Jeffrey P.; Wallaert, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The attentional myopia model of behavioral control (Mann & Ward, 2007) was tested in an experiment investigating the relationship between physiological arousal and aggression. Drawing on previous work linking arousal and narrowed attentional focus, the model predicts that arousal will lead to behavior that is relatively disinhibited in situations in which promoting pressures to aggress are highly salient. In situations in which inhibitory pressures are more salient, the model predicts behavior that is relatively restrained. In the experiment, 81 male undergraduates delivered noise-blasts against a provoking confederate while experiencing either high or low levels of physiological arousal and, at the same time, being exposed to cues that served either to promote or inhibit aggression. In addition to supporting the predictions of the model, this experiment provided some of the first evidence for enhanced control of aggression under conditions of heightened physiological arousal. Implications for interventions designed to reduce aggression are discussed. PMID:18561301

  5. Fluid shifts, vasodilatation and ambulatory blood pressure reduction during long duration spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Norsk, Peter; Asmar, Ali; Damgaard, Morten; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2015-01-01

    Acute weightlessness in space induces a fluid shift leading to central volume expansion. Simultaneously, blood pressure is either unchanged or decreased slightly. Whether these effects persist for months in space is unclear. Twenty-four hour ambulatory brachial arterial pressures were automatically recorded at 1–2 h intervals with portable equipment in eight male astronauts: once before launch, once between 85 and 192 days in space on the International Space Station and, finally, once at least 2 months after flight. During the same 24 h, cardiac output (rebreathing method) was measured two to five times (on the ground seated), and venous blood was sampled once (also seated on the ground) for determination of plasma catecholamine concentrations. The 24 h average systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (mean ± se) in space were reduced by 8 ± 2 mmHg (P = 0.01; ANOVA), 9 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 10 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.006), respectively. The nightly blood pressure dip of 8 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.015) was maintained. Cardiac stroke volume and output increased by 35 ± 10% and 41 ± 9% (P < 0.001); heart rate and catecholamine concentrations were unchanged; and systemic vascular resistance was reduced by 39 ± 4% (P < 0.001). The increase in cardiac stroke volume and output is more than previously observed during short duration flights and might be a precipitator for some of the vision problems encountered by the astronauts. The spaceflight vasodilatation mechanism needs to be explored further. PMID:25774397

  6. On an ambulance stretcher suspension concerned with the reduction of patient's blood pressure variation.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, K; Inooka, H; Ino-oka, E; Takahashi, T

    1997-01-01

    The design process and control of an ambulance stretcher suspension to reduce patient's blood pressure variation (BPV) is discussed. The BPV caused by applying the vehicle brakes may lead to deterioration of a patient's condition. The proposed method can reduce BPV by tilting the stretcher and counterbalancing back-to-front acceleration of the ambulance with gravity. The experimental results obtained when using a manually controlled stretcher confirm that BPV is reduced by tilting the stretcher. A continuous control method that varies the tilting angle is investigated through simulation analysis. The results show that this control method reduces the BPV effectively and achieves safe transport of the patient.

  7. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  8. Magnitude of blood pressure reduction in the placebo arms of modern hypertension trials: implications for trials of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; Rosen, Stuart D; Krum, Henry; Lyon, Alexander R; Francis, Darrel P; di Mario, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Early phase studies of novel interventions for hypertension, such as renal sympathetic denervation, are sometimes single-armed (uncontrolled). We explored the wisdom of this by quantifying the blood pressure fall in the placebo arms of contemporary trials of hypertension. We searched Medline up to June 2014 and identified blinded, randomized trials of hypertension therapy in which the control arm received placebo medication or a sham (placebo) procedure. For nonresistant hypertension, we have identified all such trials of drugs licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration since 2000 (5 drugs). This US Food and Drug Administration-related restriction was not applied to resistant hypertension trials. This produced 7451 patients, who were allocated to a blinded control from 52 trials of nonresistant hypertension and 694 patients from 8 trials of resistant hypertension (3 drugs and 2 interventions). Systolic blood pressure fell by 5.92 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 5.14-6.71; P<0.0001) in the nonresistant cohort and by 8.76 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 4.83-12.70; P<0.0001) in the resistant cohort. Using metaregression, the falls were larger in trials that did not use ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as an inclusion criterion (z=2.84; P=0.0045), in those with higher baseline blood pressures (z=-0.3; P=0.0001), and in those where the patients were prescribed a continuous background of antihypertensives (z=-2.72; P=0.0065). The nontrivial magnitude of these apparent blood pressure reductions with perfectly ineffective intervention (placebo) illustrates that efficacy explorations of novel therapies for hypertension, once safety is established, should be performed with a randomized, appropriately controlled, and blinded design.

  9. Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval exercise performed in water or dryland condition.

    PubMed

    Sosner, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Dupuy, Olivier; Garzon, Mauricio; Lemasson, Christopher; Gremeaux, Vincent; Lalongé, Julie; Gonzales, Mariel; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Bosquet, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65 ± 7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic blood pressures [SBP/DBP]) were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24 minutes at 50% peak power output) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10 minutes with phases of 15 seconds 100% peak power output interspersed by 15 seconds of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-hour average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-hour BP decrease (SBP: -3.6 ± 5.7/DBP: -2.8 ± 3.0 mm Hg, P < .05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8 ± 9.5/DBP: -3.0 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P < .05). The one condition that modified 24-hour pulse-wave velocity was immersed HIIE (-0.21 ± 0.30 m/s, P < .05).

  10. Efficacy of combined cataract extraction and endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation for the reduction of intraocular pressure and medication burden

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sammie J.; Mulvahill, Matthew; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Pantcheva, Mina B.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Seibold, Leonard K.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report on the efficacy of combined endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) and phacoemulsification cataract extraction (PCE) with intraocular lens placement for reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) and medication burden in glaucoma. METHODS A retrospective case review of 91 eyes (73 patients) with glaucoma and cataract that underwent combined PCE/ECP surgery was performed. Baseline demographic and ocular characteristics were recorded, as well as intraocular pressure, number of glaucoma medications, and visual acuity postoperatively with 12-month follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as less than 20% reduction in IOP from baseline on two consecutive visits (at 1, 3, 6, or 12mo postoperatively), IOP ≥21 mm Hg or ≤5 mm Hg on two consecutive visits, or additional glaucoma surgery performed within 12mo after PCE/ECP. RESULTS Overall, mean medicated IOP was reduced from 16.65 mm Hg at baseline to 13.38 mm Hg at 12mo (P<0.0001). Mean number of glaucoma medications was reduced from 1.88 medications at baseline to 1.48 medications at 12mo (P=0.0003). At 3mo postoperatively, the success rate was 73.6% (95%CI: 63.3, 81.5), 57.1% at 6mo (95% CI: 46.3, 66.6), and 49.7% at 12mo (95%CI: 38.9, 59.6). Patient demographic characteristics were not associated with treatment success. The only ocular characteristic associated with treatment success was a higher baseline IOP. CONCLUSION Combined PCE/ECP surgery is an effective surgical option for the reduction of IOP and medication burden in glaucoma patients. Patients with higher baseline IOP levels are most likely to benefit from this procedure. PMID:27275423

  11. Exhumation of UHP/LT rocks due to the local reduction of the interplate pressure: Thermo-mechanical physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, David A.; Chemenda, Alexander I.

    2008-07-01

    Spatial distribution of UHP/LT terrains suggests that their exhumation is essentially a three-dimensional process that occurs only locally in specific sites along mountain belts. On the other hand, the continental subduction resulting in the formation of UHP/LT rocks takes place along the whole belt. The previously performed by the authors 2-D thermo-mechanical laboratory modelling of continental subduction has shown that exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust is possible only when the effective interplate pressure pn is lower than the lithostatic pressure (low compression subduction regime). At the same time, this modelling showed that for the deeply subducted continental crust to be preserved at low temperature at great depth, the continental subduction should be accompanied by the subduction of the fore-arc block or the arc plate. The latter process occurs only when pn is high (high compression regime). To reconcile both processes we suggest that within the background of a generally high compression regime the interplate pressure can be locally reduced in some specific situations which would then allow the local exhumation of UHP/LT material. Using physical modelling technique we investigate one of such situations that occurs when the frontal part of the overriding plate undergoes (subduction induced or not) extension parallel to the plate boundary with activation or formation of a strike-slip transform fault oblique to the plate boundary (to the interplate zone). The displacement along this fault results in a local reduction of the interplate pressure at the intersection of the fault with the interplate zone. This pressure reduction permits the rise of the deeply subducted low-density continental crust and sediments submitted to UHP/LT conditions under buoyancy force. A 10 km-thick slice of crust detaches at ~ 150 km-depth and moves up along the interplate zone with a starting rate of ca. 3 cm/yr. The ascent rate reduces when the unit reaches crustal

  12. Acidic Electrolyzed Water as a Novel Transmitting Medium for High Hydrostatic Pressure Reduction of Bacterial Loads on Shelled Fresh Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Du, Suping; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xiao, Lili; Lou, Yang; Pan, Yingjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP) processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products.

  13. Acidic Electrolyzed Water as a Novel Transmitting Medium for High Hydrostatic Pressure Reduction of Bacterial Loads on Shelled Fresh Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Du, Suping; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xiao, Lili; Lou, Yang; Pan, Yingjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP) processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products. PMID:27014228

  14. Reduction of salt in pork sausages by the addition of carrot fibre or potato starch and high pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Alberto; Søltoft-Jensen, Jakob; Knudsen, Jes Christian; Christensen, Mette; Orlien, Vibeke

    2012-12-01

    The combined effect of high pressure processing (HPP) (400, 600 and 800 MPa) and carrot fibre (CF) and potato starch (PS) on low salt (1.2%) pork sausages was investigated and compared with high (1.8%) salt sausages. Sausages had a marked increase in whitening with increasing content of fibre or starch, pressure level, and process temperature. The degree of redness was mainly affected by pressure level and heat treatment. An important finding regarding salt reduction was that the use of starch or fibre had more impact on textural properties than the level of salt since Young's modulus and strain at fracture were mainly affected by formulation and HPP. Water binding capacity of low salt sausages was improved to the same level as high salt sausages with HPP and addition of CF or PS particularly by the addition of PS which produced sausages with better sensory properties than CF. The sensory analysis showed that this approach is promising for producing low salt sausages. PMID:22682686

  15. Reduction of serum cholesterol and blood pressure in hypertensive patients by behaviour modification

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chandra

    1976-01-01

    In a pilot study, 14 pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients were given training in psychophysical relaxation exercises, reinforced by biofeedback instruments, for six weeks. The patients were asked to practise twice a day and also incorporate the exercises into everyday activities. In spite of their unchanged drug schedule, their mean blood pressure (B.P.) was reduced from 170·6/102·5 to 147·9/89·14 (P = < ·001) while their mean (± S.D.) serum cholesterol level was reduced from 241·6 ± 39·19 to 217·1 ± 38·12 mg/100 ml (P = < ·001). I believe the possibility of one therapy which can reduce two risk factors at the same time should be explored further in a controlled study. PMID:772198

  16. Effect of high-pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Renye, J A; Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Kwoczak, R; Toht, M; Leggett, L N; Luchansky, J B; Porto-Fett, A C S; Phillips, J G

    2014-03-01

    The effect of high-hydrostatic-pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a 5-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a postpackaging intervention. Queso Fresco was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, and was starter-free and not pressed. In phase 1, QF slices (12.7 × 7.6 × 1 cm), weighing from 52 to 66 g, were surface inoculated with L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g) and individually double vacuum packaged. The slices were then warmed to either 20 or 40°C and HPP treated at 200, 400, and 600 MPa for hold times of 5, 10, 15, or 20 min. Treatment at 600 MPa was most effective in reducing L. monocytogenes to below the detection level of 0.91 log10 cfu/g at all hold times and temperatures. High-hydrostatic-pressure processing at 40°C, 400 MPa, and hold time ≥ 15 min was effective but resulted in wheying-off and textural changes. In phase 2, L. monocytogenes was inoculated either on the slices (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g; ON) or in the curds (ca. 7.0 log10 cfu/g; IN) before the cheese block was formed and sliced. The slices were treated at 20°C and 600 MPa at hold times of 3, 10, and 20 min, and then stored at 4 and 10°C for 60 d. For both treatments, L. monocytogenes became less resistant to pressure as hold time increased, with greater percentages of injured cells at 3 and 10 min than at 20 min, at which the lethality of the process increased. For the IN treatment, with hold times of 3 and 10 min, growth of L. monocytogenes increased the first week of storage, but was delayed for 1 wk, with a hold time of 20 min. Longer lag times in growth of L. monocytogenes during storage at 4°C were observed for the ON treatment at hold times of 10 and 20 min, indicating that the IN treatment may have provided a more protective environment with less injury to the cells than the ON treatment. Similarly, HPP treatment for 10 min followed by storage at 4°C was the best method for suppressing the growth of

  17. Effect of high-pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Renye, J A; Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Kwoczak, R; Toht, M; Leggett, L N; Luchansky, J B; Porto-Fett, A C S; Phillips, J G

    2014-03-01

    The effect of high-hydrostatic-pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a 5-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a postpackaging intervention. Queso Fresco was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, and was starter-free and not pressed. In phase 1, QF slices (12.7 × 7.6 × 1 cm), weighing from 52 to 66 g, were surface inoculated with L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g) and individually double vacuum packaged. The slices were then warmed to either 20 or 40°C and HPP treated at 200, 400, and 600 MPa for hold times of 5, 10, 15, or 20 min. Treatment at 600 MPa was most effective in reducing L. monocytogenes to below the detection level of 0.91 log10 cfu/g at all hold times and temperatures. High-hydrostatic-pressure processing at 40°C, 400 MPa, and hold time ≥ 15 min was effective but resulted in wheying-off and textural changes. In phase 2, L. monocytogenes was inoculated either on the slices (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g; ON) or in the curds (ca. 7.0 log10 cfu/g; IN) before the cheese block was formed and sliced. The slices were treated at 20°C and 600 MPa at hold times of 3, 10, and 20 min, and then stored at 4 and 10°C for 60 d. For both treatments, L. monocytogenes became less resistant to pressure as hold time increased, with greater percentages of injured cells at 3 and 10 min than at 20 min, at which the lethality of the process increased. For the IN treatment, with hold times of 3 and 10 min, growth of L. monocytogenes increased the first week of storage, but was delayed for 1 wk, with a hold time of 20 min. Longer lag times in growth of L. monocytogenes during storage at 4°C were observed for the ON treatment at hold times of 10 and 20 min, indicating that the IN treatment may have provided a more protective environment with less injury to the cells than the ON treatment. Similarly, HPP treatment for 10 min followed by storage at 4°C was the best method for suppressing the growth of

  18. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  19. Effects of dietary sodium reduction on blood pressure in subjects with resistant hypertension: results from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Gaddam, Krishna K; Oparil, Suzanne; Aban, Inmaculada; Husain, Saima; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Calhoun, David A

    2009-09-01

    Observational studies indicate a significant relation between dietary sodium and level of blood pressure. However, the role of salt sensitivity in the development of resistant hypertension is unknown. The present study examined the effects of dietary salt restriction on office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in subjects with resistant hypertension. Twelve subjects with resistant hypertension entered into a randomized crossover evaluation of low (50 mmol/24 hours x 7 days) and high sodium diets (250 mmol/24 hours x 7 days) separated by a 2-week washout period. Brain natriuretic peptide; plasma renin activity; 24-hour urinary aldosterone, sodium, and potassium; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; aortic pulse wave velocity; and augmentation index were compared between dietary treatment periods. At baseline, subjects were on an average of 3.4+/-0.5 antihypertensive medications with a mean office BP of 145.8+/-10.8/83.9+/-11.2 mm Hg. Mean urinary sodium excretion was 46.1+/-26.8 versus 252.2+/-64.6 mmol/24 hours during low- versus high-salt intake. Low- compared to high-salt diet decreased office systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 22.7 and 9.1 mm Hg, respectively. Plasma renin activity increased whereas brain natriuretic peptide and creatinine clearance decreased during low-salt intake, indicative of intravascular volume reduction. These results indicate that excessive dietary sodium ingestion contributes importantly to resistance to antihypertensive treatment. Strategies to substantially reduce dietary salt intake should be part of the overall treatment of resistant hypertension.

  20. Beyond blood pressure: new paradigms in sodium intake reduction and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    King, Janet C; Reimers, Kristin J

    2014-09-01

    Since 1980, when inaugural national dietary guidance was to “avoid too much sodium,” recommendations have evolved to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ quantified guidance of 2300 and 1500 mg/d [USDA and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary guidelines for Americans, 1st (http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs1980Guidelines.htm) and 7th (http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/dietaryguidelines2010.pdf) eds.]. Too much sodium remains a valid concern, but are current targets too low for optimal health? New research moves beyond sodium’s effect on the surrogate marker of blood pressure to examine the relation between sodium intake and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results show that sodium intakes both less than and greater than ∼3000–5000 mg/d increase the risk of negative health outcomes. Additionally, newly compiled sodium intake data across populations show a uniformity that suggests that intake is physiologically set. Perhaps not coincidentally, the observed intakes fall within the range related to lowest risk. These findings are highly relevant to current efforts to achieve low sodium intakes across populations, because the data suggest that the efforts will be unsuccessful for healthy people and may cause harm to vulnerable populations. Remaining mindful of risks associated with both excessive and inadequate intakes is imperative with all nutrients, and sodium is no exception. Avoiding too much, and too little, sodium may be the best advice for Americans.

  1. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  2. Coarsened Exact Matching of Phaco-Trabectome to Trabectome in Phakic Patients: Lack of Additional Pressure Reduction from Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Hardik A.; Bussel, Igor I.; Schuman, Joel S.; Brown, Eric N.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) after trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy surgery in phakic patients (T) and trabectome with same session phacoemulsification (PT) using Coarsened Exact Matching. Although phacoemulsification is associated with IOP reduction when performed on its own, it is not known how much it contributes in PT. Methods Subjects were divided into phakic T and PT. Exclusion criteria were follow-up for <12 months and additional glaucoma surgery. Demographics were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared test for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multiple imputation was utilized to avoid eliminating data with missing values. Groups were then matched using Coarsened Exact Matching based on age, race, type of glaucoma, baseline IOP, and number of preoperative glaucoma medications. Univariate linear regression was used to examine IOP reduction after surgery; those variables that were statistically significant were included in the final multivariate regression model. Results A total of 753 cases were included (T: 255, PT: 498). When all variables except for age were kept constant, there was an additional IOP reduction of 0.05±0.01 mmHg conferred for every yearly increment in age. Every 1 mmHg increase in baseline IOP correlated to an additional IOP reduction of 0.80±0.02 mmHg. Phacoemulsification was not found to be a statistically significant contributor to IOP when comparing T and PT (p≥0.05). T had a 21% IOP reduction to 15.9±3.5 mmHg (p<0.01) while PT had an 18% reduction to 15.5±3.6 mmHg (p<0.01). Number of medications decreased (p<0.01) in both groups from 2.4±1.2 to 1.9±1.3 and from 2.3±1.1 to 1.7±1.3, respectively. Conclusion Phacoemulsification does not make a significant contribution to postoperative IOP or number of medications when combined with trabectome surgery in phakic patients. PMID:26895293

  3. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Frerichs, H.; Groth, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q(95) resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q(95) resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  4. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; West, W. P.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Mordijck, S.

    2009-10-16

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p{sub e} in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q{sub 95} resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p{sub e} reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q{sub 95} resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  5. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  6. The application of high-pressure treatment in the reduction of salt levels in reduced-phosphate breakfast sausages.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Claire C; Cruz-Romero, Malco C; Troy, Declan; Mullen, Anne M; Kerry, Joe P

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of high pressure (HP) treatment of pork meat before manufacturing sausages with reduced salt levels and compared them to sausages manufactured with untreated meat (control sausages). A 2×5 factorial design was set up incorporating two pressure levels (0 or 150 MPa) and five salt levels (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5%). Most quality attributes were affected when salt levels were reduced below 1.5%. Fat loss (FL) was (P<0.05) affected by salt level; samples with <1.5% salt had the highest FL. HP treatment increased emulsion stability and reduced cook loss (CL) compared to control sausages. Increased CL was observed when salt was reduced below 2.0%. Salt reduction below 1.5% adversely affected colour, sensory and texture attributes. Independent of salt, HP treatment affected adversely juiciness and cohesiveness while adhesiveness was improved. Overall, there is potential to manufacture sausages maintaining organoleptic and functional properties traditionally associated with sausages using HP treated meat. PMID:24334049

  7. Association of biometric factors with anterior chamber angle widening and intraocular pressure reduction after uneventful phacoemulsification for cataract

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guofu; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Lee, Roland; Chen, Yi-Chun; He, Mingguang; Lin, Shan C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate anterior chamber biometric factors associated with the degree of angle widening and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after phacoemulsification. SETTING University of California, San Francisco, California, USA. DESIGN Case series. METHODS Anterior chamber parameters obtained by anterior segment coherence tomography were compared preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Measurements included the angle opening distance 500 μm anterior to the scleral spur (AOD500), trabecular–iris space area 500 μm from the scleral spur (TISA500), iris curvature (I-Curv), anterior chamber angle (ACA), trabecular–iris space area, anterior chamber volume, anterior chamber width, and lens vault (LV). RESULTS The study enrolled 73 eyes. The mean patient age was 77.45 years ± 7.84 (SD); 65.75% of patients were women. From preoperatively to 3 months postoperatively, the mean AOD500 increased significantly (0.254 ± 0.105 to 0.433 ± 0.108 mm) and the mean IOP decreased significantly (14.97 ± 3.35 to 12.62 ± 3.37 mm Hg) (P < .001). The reduction in IOP was correlated with the increase in AOD500 (r = 0.240, P = .041) and preoperative LV (r = 0.235, P = .045). After adjusting for related factors, AOD500 widening was positively correlated with LV (β = 0.458, P = .044) and I-Curv (β = 0.235, P = .043) and negatively correlated with preoperative TISA500 (β = −0.269, P = .025) and ACA (β = −0.919, P = .027). CONCLUSIONS Surgically induced AOD widening was significantly correlated with anterior chamber biometric factors. Preoperative LV appears to be a significant factor in angle widening and IOP reduction after phacoemulsification. PMID:22055073

  8. Feasibility study of sustained-release travoprost punctum plug for intraocular pressure reduction in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Shamira A; Ting, Daniel SW; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Chew, Paul T; Aquino, Maria Cecilia D; Sng, Chelvin CA; Ho, Sue-Wei; Aung, Tin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and safety of a punctum plug-based sustained drug release system for a prostaglandin analog, travoprost (OTX-TP), for intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction in an Asian population. Methods This is an initial feasibility, prospective, single-arm study involving 26 eyes and a bioresorbable punctum plug containing OTX-TP. An OTX-TP was placed in the vertical portion of the superior or inferior canaliculus of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. The main outcome measure was the IOP-lowering efficacy of OTX-TP at 3 (8 am) and 10, 20, and 30 days (8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm), compared to baseline. Results A total of 26 OTX-TP were inserted for 17 subjects. The mean (standard deviation) age was 57.2 (13.8) years. At 10 days, all plugs were still present, and the IOP reduction from baseline was 6.2 (23%), 5.4 (21%), and 7.5 mmHg (28%) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively. At 10 days, the mean IOP (standard error of mean) was 21.2 (1.2), 20.4 (0.8), and 19.7 (1.0) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively, showing no discernible IOP trend during the course of the day. At 30 days, plug retention had declined to 42%, and the overall IOP reduction had decreased to 16%. Conclusion The sustained-release OTX-TP is able to reduce IOP by 24% (day 10) and 15.6% (day 30), respectively. It is a potentially well-tolerable ocular hypotensive for glaucoma patients with a history of poor compliance. PMID:27175058

  9. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  10. Sandstone reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, R.J.; Tillman, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain province of the United States contains structural and stratigraphic traps from which petroleum is produced from all types of sandstone reservoirs ranging in age from Cambrian to the Eocene. Three large typical stratigraphic traps in this province, where reservoirs are of Cretaceous age, are described. The Cut Bank Field, Montana produces from aluvial point bar sandstones; Patrick Draw field, Wyoming produces from marine shoreline sandstones; and, Hartzog Draw field, Wyoming produces from marine shelf sandstone. 10 refs.

  11. Lifestyle Modification in Blood Pressure Study II (LIMBS): Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of a 24 week structured yoga program versus lifestyle modification on blood pressure reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Debbie L.; Bowler, Annie; Fisher, Stephen A.; Norris, Angela; Newberg, Andrew; Rao, Hengyi; Bhavsar, Rupal; Detre, John A.; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major public health issue affecting 68 million adults in the United States. Lifestyle modifications including complementary therapies such as the movement based mind body practice of yoga have become increasingly popular in the United States and have been considered as a potential alternative to medication in blood pressure reduction. We completed a pilot study in 2009 which showed meaningful decreases in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure readings after a 12 week period of yoga participation. Based on data from our pilot study we are now completing The Lifestyle Modification and Blood Pressure Study (LIMBS II) which is a phase 2 randomized controlled trial designed to determine the effects of yoga therapy and enhanced lifestyle modification on lowering blood pressure in pre-hypertensive and stage 1 hypertensive subjects. Using 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, LIMBS II aims to compare the effects on blood pressure reduction in subjects randomized for 24 weeks to one of the three following groups: yoga therapy versus blood pressure education program (sodium restriction and walking program) versus a combination program that involves components of both groups. LIMBS II will also examine the impact that changes in blood pressure have on cerebral blood flow. If successful the LIMBS study will determine if yoga therapy combined with enhanced lifestyle modification will result in clinically meaningful decreases in blood pressure and thus can be implemented as an alternative to drug therapy for patients with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension. PMID:23721984

  12. Individual susceptibility to hypoperfusion and reductions in exercise performance when perfusion pressure is reduced: evidence for vasodilator phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Robert F.; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Moynes, Jackie S.; Poitras, Veronica J.; Walsh, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether cardiovascular compensatory response phenotypes exist in the face of a reduced perfusion pressure challenge to exercising muscle oxygen delivery (O2D), and whether these responses might be exercise intensity (EI) dependent. Ten healthy men (19.5 ± 0.4 yr) completed two trials of progressive forearm isometric handgrip exercise to exhaustion (24.5 N increments every 3.5 min) in each of forearm above and below heart level [forearm arterial perfusion pressure (FAPP) difference of 29.5 ± 0.97 mmHg]. At the end of each EI, measurements of forearm blood flow (FBF; ml/min) via brachial artery Doppler and echo ultrasound, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; mmHg) via finger photoplethysmography, and exercising forearm venous effluent via antecubital vein catheter revealed distinct cardiovascular response groups: n = 6 with compensatory vasodilation vs. n = 4 without compensatory vasodilation. Compensatory vasodilators were able to blunt the perfusion pressure-evoked reduction in submaximal O2D in the arm-above-heart condition, whereas nonvasodilators did not (−22.5 ± 13.6 vs. −65.4 ± 14.1 ml O2/min; P < 0.05), and in combination with being able to increase O2 extraction, nonvasodilators defended submaximal V̇o2 and experienced less of an accumulated submaximal O2D deficit (−80.7 ± 24.7 vs. −219.1 ± 36.0 ml O2/min; P < 0.05). As a result, the compensatory vasodilators experienced less of a compromise to peak EI than nonvasodilators (−24.5 ± 3.5 N vs. −52.1 ± 8.9 N; P < 0.05). In conclusion, in the forearm exercise model studied, vasodilatory response phenotypes exist that determine individual susceptibility to hypoperfusion and the degree to which aerobic metabolism and exercise performance are compromised. PMID:24970851

  13. Water aerobics is followed by short-time and immediate systolic blood pressure reduction in overweight and obese hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Arsa, Gisela; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Lopes, Lorena Curado; Santana, Fabio; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thais I; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2016-07-01

    One exercise training session such as walking, running, and resistance can lead to a decrease in blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, but few studies have investigated the effects of exercise training in an aquatic environment for overweight and obese hypertensive individuals. We aimed to assess the acute effects of a water aerobics session on blood pressure changes in pharmacologically treated overweight and obese hypertensive women. A randomized crossover study was carried out with 18 hypertensive women, 10 of them were overweight (54.4 ± 7.9 years; body mass index: 27.8 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) and eight obese (56.4 ± 6.6 years; body mass index: 33.0 ± 2.0 kg/m(2)). The water aerobics exercise session consisted of a 45-minute training at the intensity of 70%-75% of maximum heart rate adjusted for the aquatic environment. The control group did not enter the pool and did not perform any exercise. We measured systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) before, immediately after, and every 10 minutes up to 30 minutes after the aerobic exercise or control session. Overall (n = 18), DBP did not change after the water aerobic exercise and control session, and SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes postexercise compared to the control session. Among overweight women, SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes postexercise. In contrast, among obese women, SBP decreased only at 10 minutes postexercise. SBP variation was -2.68 mm Hg in overweight and -1.24 mm Hg in obese women. In conclusion, the water aerobics session leads to a reduction in SBP, but not in DBP, during 10 and 20 minutes postexercise recovery. Thus, it may be safely prescribed to overweight and obese women. PMID:27245928

  14. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  15. Comparison of hydrogen and acetate as substrates for the reductive immobilization of uranium under in-situ pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuston, Daniel Jon

    Complete baseline restoration at in-situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining sites has proven difficult through conventional methods. Bioremediation by means of reductive immobilization of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) is currently being investigated as a secondary restoration method. Various organic substrates have been used in many U bioremediation studies and applications. However, the oxidation of organic substrates increases total inorganic carbon concentrations (TIC) due to the respiration of heterotrophic bacteria. It is widely accepted that U forms stable complexes with carbonate that in turn lower the thermodynamic redox potential at which the U(VI)/U(IV) couple takes place. In this study, it was hypothesized that greater U reductive immobilization would be achieved with hydrogen (H2) as an electron donor compared to that with acetate (Ac) because H2 would select for autotrophic bacteria that would decrease TIC. The hypothesis was tested by supplying H 2 and Ac at the same reductive capacity to continuous-flow sediment-columns. Unlike previous studies, the columns were operated at pressures representative of the in-situ conditions at ISR mining sites. The experimental results indicated that effluent TIC and U concentrations were both significantly lower for the H2-supplied column than for the Ac-supplied column. Comparison of the experimental data to theoretical speciation indicated by a pE-versus-pH diagram revealed that the benefit of U solubility decreasing at lower TIC is only gained when the pH is held constant. However, a lower TIC and a constant pH were not realized in the H2 column due to the dynamics of the pH/alkalinity/total carbonate/CaCO 3 system. Nevertheless, based on prevailing theory, it was speculated that the superior U removal in the H2-supplied column may have been attributed to the presence of kinetically-limited Fe(OH)3 under the prevailing pE and pH conditions of the respective H2 and Ac columns. However, in the absence of sediment

  16. APFBC repowering could help meet Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction goals[Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.E.; Tonnemacher, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Clinton Administration signed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol agreement that would limit US greenhouse gas emissions, of which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the most significant. While the Kyoto Protocol has not yet been submitted to the Senate for ratification, in the past, there have been few proposed environmental actions that had continued and wide-spread attention of the press and environmental activists that did not eventually lead to regulation. Since the Kyoto Protocol might lead to future regulation, its implications need investigation by the power industry. Limiting CO{sub 2} emissions affects the ability of the US to generate reliable, low cost electricity, and has tremendous potential impact on electric generating companies with a significant investment in coal-fired generation, and on their customers. This paper explores the implications of reducing coal plant CO{sub 2} by various amounts. The amount of reduction for the US that is proposed in the Kyoto Protocol is huge. The Kyoto Protocol would commit the US to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions to 7% below 1990 levels. Since 1990, there has been significant growth in US population and the US economy driving carbon emissions 34% higher by year 2010. That means CO{sub 2} would have to be reduced by 30.9%, which is extremely difficult to accomplish. The paper tells why. There are, however, coal-based technologies that should be available in time to make significant reductions in coal-plant CO{sub 2} emissions. Th paper focuses on one plant repowering method that can reduce CO{sub 2} per kWh by 25%, advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology, based on results from a recent APFBC repowering concept evaluation of the Carolina Power and Light Company's (CP and L) L.V. Sutton steam station. The replacement of the existing 50-year base of power generating units needed to meet proposed Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction commitments would be a massive undertaking. It is

  17. [Bio-electrochemical effect on hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction stimulated by electrical field in the presence of H2 under atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Wei; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Shan-Shan; Li, Guang-He

    2009-07-15

    Microbial sulfate reduction rate is limited with H2 as electron donor. In order to improve hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction under normal atmospheric H2 pressure, a bio-electrochemical system with direct current was designed and performed in this study. Results indicates that sulfate reduction rate (SRR) increases with the augment of current intensity under lower current intensity (I < or = 1.50 mA). When optimum current intensity of 1.50 mA is applied, the SRR is 1.7 to 2.1 times higher than that of the control reactor. The synergistic effect of electrochemistry and microbiology on sulfate reduction varies at different current intensity. Under the condition of I < or = 1.50 mA, the most probable mechanism of SRR increase is that electric or magnetic field stimulates the proliferation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and the activity of the enzymes. When I is higher than 1.50 mA, the activity of SRB is inhibited, resulting in lower reduction rate compared with that at lower current. If controlling the cathode potential lower than -0.69 V and H2 partial pressure 1.01 x 10(5) Pa, electro-catalytic sulfate reduction process takes place with H2 as reductant in this bio-electrochemical system. However, the overall reduction rate is still lower than that when I = 1.50 mA is applied, and additionally the energy consumption is much higher. Therefore, electric field of low intensity can enhance hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction in the presence of H2 under atmospheric pressure.

  18. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  19. ISH PRE-1 REDUCTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY IN HYPERTENSIVES WITH COMORBIDITIES: BEYOND BLOOD PRESSURE LOWERING - THE ROLE OF ARTERIAL AGING.

    PubMed

    Safar, Michel E

    2016-09-01

    Mid-life elevated BP is classically associated with a raised systemic vascular resistance. A classical interpretation of the association between aortic stiffness and blood pressure (BP) invokes hypertension as a simple form of premature aging that increases stress on the arterial wall and accelerates age-related stiffening of the aorta. Recent clinical and experimental data have called into question the directionality of this sequence of events associating stiffness and hypertension.Therefore an initial abnormality in stiffness may antedate and contribute initially to the pathogenesis of hypertension, namely isolated systolic hypertension. This possibility is important to consider since it might affect the individual estimation of cardiovascular risk even in low risk prehypertensive subjects. Therefore, it might be essential to direct therapy of hypertension toward the reduction of both BP and aortic stiffness.Cardiovascular (CV) complications are dominant causes of death in severe hypertensive patients with comorbidities, especially diabetic hypertensive patients (DHS) and patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Vascular calcifi cation and arterial stiffness are highly prevalent in such subjects, particularly in those with co-morbidities. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) is the gold standard and simple, non-invasive and reproducible measure of large artery stiffness.This measurement have been frequently used as predictors for CV events and CV mortality in the general population, in specifi c populations such as in patients with DHS and ESRD. These fi ndings have been widely observed using conventional cross-sectional investigations. However, in such studies, it has been observed that the association between single measurements of CFPWV and CV events is frequently driven by the high incidence of late events, i.e. after 12 months of follow-up.New data from our prospective studies in DHS and ESRD evaluated the association between longitudinal changes

  20. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as

  1. Reservoir depletion at The Geysers geothermal area, California, shown by four-dimensional seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunasekera, R.C.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Intensive geothermal exploitation at The Geysers geothermal area, California, induces myriads of small-magnitude earthquakes that are monitored by a dense, permanent, local seismometer network. Using this network, tomographic inversions were performed for the three-dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs structure of the reservoir for April 1991, February 1993, December 1994, October 1996, and August 1998. The extensive low-Vp/Vs anomaly that occupies the reservoir grew in strength from a maximum of 9% to a maximum of 13.4% during the 7-year study period. This is attributed to depletion of pore liquid water in the reservoir and replacement with steam. This decreases Vp by increasing compressibility, and increases Vs because of reduction in pore pressure and the drying of argillaceous minerals, e.g., illite, which increase the shear modulus. These effects serendipitously combine to lower Vp/Vs, resulting in a strong overall effect that provides a convenient tool for monitoring reservoir depletion. Variations in the Vp and Vs fields indicate that water depletion is the dominant process in the central part of the exploited reservoir, and pressure reduction and mineral drying in the northwest and southeast parts of the reservoir. The rate at which the Vp/Vs anomaly grew in strength in the period 1991-1998 suggests most of the original anomaly was caused by exploitation. Continuous monitoring of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective geothermal reservoir depletion monitoring tool and can potentially provide information about depletion in parts of the reservoir that have not been drilled.

  2. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples. PMID:22822404

  3. An evaluation of the relative efficacy of an open airway, an oxygen reservoir and continuous positive airway pressure 5 cmH2O on the non-ventilated lung.

    PubMed

    Slimani, J; Russell, W J; Jurisevic, C

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study, during one-lung ventilation, was to evaluate if oxygenation could be improved by use of a simple oxygen reservoir or application of 5 cmH2O continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the non-ventilated lung compared with an open airway. Twenty-three patients with lung malignancy, undergoing thoracotomy requiring at least 60 minutes of one-lung ventilation before lung lobe excision, were studied. After routine induction and establishment of one-lung ventilation, the three treatments were applied in turn to the same patient in a sequence selected randomly. The first treatment was repeated as a fourth treatment and these results of the repeated treatment averaged to minimize the effect of slow changes. Arterial oxygenation was measured by an arterial blood gas 15 minutes after the application of each treatment. Twenty patients completed the study. Mean PaO2 (in mmHg) was 210.3 (SD 105.5) in the "OPEN" treatment, 186.0 (SD 109.2) in the "RESERVOIR" treatment, and 240.5 (SD 116.0) in the "CPAP" treatment. This overall difference was not quite significant (P = 0.058, paired ANOVA), but comparison of the pairs showed that there was a significant better oxygenation only with the CPAP compared to the reservoir treatments (t = 2.52, P = 0.021). While the effect on the surgical field was not apparent in most patients, in one patient surgery was impeded during CPAP. Our results show that the use of a reservoir does not give oxygenation better than an open tube, and is less effective than the use of CPAP 5 cmH2O on the non-ventilated lung during one-lung ventilation.

  4. Reservoir Simulations of Low-Temperature Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedre, Madhur Ganesh

    The eastern United States generally has lower temperature gradients than the western United States. However, West Virginia, in particular, has higher temperature gradients compared to other eastern states. A recent study at Southern Methodist University by Blackwell et al. has shown the presence of a hot spot in the eastern part of West Virginia with temperatures reaching 150°C at a depth of between 4.5 and 5 km. This thesis work examines similar reservoirs at a depth of around 5 km resembling the geology of West Virginia, USA. The temperature gradients used are in accordance with the SMU study. In order to assess the effects of geothermal reservoir conditions on the lifetime of a low-temperature geothermal system, a sensitivity analysis study was performed on following seven natural and human-controlled parameters within a geothermal reservoir: reservoir temperature, injection fluid temperature, injection flow rate, porosity, rock thermal conductivity, water loss (%) and well spacing. This sensitivity analysis is completed by using ‘One factor at a time method (OFAT)’ and ‘Plackett-Burman design’ methods. The data used for this study was obtained by carrying out the reservoir simulations using TOUGH2 simulator. The second part of this work is to create a database of thermal potential and time-dependant reservoir conditions for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs by studying a number of possible scenarios. Variations in the parameters identified in sensitivity analysis study are used to expand the scope of database. Main results include the thermal potential of reservoir, pressure and temperature profile of the reservoir over its operational life (30 years for this study), the plant capacity and required pumping power. The results of this database will help the supply curves calculations for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the United States, which is the long term goal of the work being done by the geothermal research group under Dr. Anderson at

  5. Increase in stagnation pressure and enthalpy in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    A new technique based on the insertion of a converging section in the driven tube is described which is capable of producing substantial increases in both reservoir pressure and enthalpy. A 1D inviscid full kinetics code is used to study a number of different locations and shapes for the converging driven tube section. For driven tube diameter reductions of factors of 2 and 3, the reservoir pressure is found to increase by factors of 2.1 and 3.2, respectively, and the enthalpy is found to simultaneously increase by factors of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively.

  6. Prediction of slug-to-annular flow pattern transition (STA) for reducing the risk of gas-lift instabilities and effective gas/liquid transport from low-pressure reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, P.R.; Vargas, E.; Kuru, E.

    2007-08-15

    Flow-pattern instabilities have frequently been observed in both conventional gas-lifting and unloading operations of water and oil in low-pressure gas and coalbed reservoirs. This paper identifies the slug-to-annular flow-pattern transition (STA) during upward gas/liquid transportation as a potential cause of flow instability in these operations. It is recommended that the slug-flow pattern be used mainly to minimize the pressure drop and gas compression work associated with gas-lifting large volumes of oil and water. Conversely, the annular flow pattern should be used during the unloading operation to produce gas with relatively small amounts of water and condensate. New and efficient artificial lifting strategies are required to transport the liquid out of the depleted gas or coalbed reservoir level to the surface. This paper presents held data and laboratory measurements supporting the hypothesis that STA significantly contributes to flow instabilities and should therefore be avoided in upward gas/liquid transportation operations. Laboratory high-speed measurements of flow-pressure components under a broad range of gas-injection rates including STA have also been included to illustrate the onset of large STA-related flow-pressure oscillations. The latter body of data provides important insights into gas deliquification mechanisms and identifies potential solutions for improved gas-lifting and unloading procedures. A comparison of laboratory data with existing STA models was performed first. Selected models were then numerically tested in field situations. Effective field strategies for avoiding STA occurrence in marginal and new (offshore) field applications (i.e.. through the use of a slug or annular flow pattern regimen from the bottomhole to wellhead levels) are discussed.

  7. Comparison study of intraocular pressure reduction efficacy and safety between latanoprost and tafluprost in Japanese with normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Tada, Kaori; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sotozono, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction efficacy and safety between the ophthalmic solutions 0.005% latanoprost (Lat) and 0.0015% tafluprost (Taf) in Japanese patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods In this randomized nonmasked study, we prospectively enrolled 30 Japanese NTG patients who had used Lat monotherapy for more than 4 weeks, and randomly divided them into the following two groups: 1) Lat-to-Taf group (LT group) and 2) Taf-to-Lat group (TL group). At the beginning of the study, both groups were switched from initial Lat to Lat or Taf for 12 weeks, and then switched over to the other drug (crossover) for 12 additional weeks. At 0, 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, we evaluated each patient’s IOP, conjunctival injection, and corneal epitheliopathy score, and at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, we evaluated their eyelash changes and pigmentation of the eyelids and irises. Results The mean IOP of the LT group (15 eyes) was 10.5, 10.6, and 11.1 mmHg, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively, whereas that of the TL group (15 eyes) was 11.7, 11.1, and 10.5 mmHg at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups and in the intragroup comparisons. Moreover, no significant differences were found between Lat and Taf in regard to the conjunctival injection score and corneal epitheliopathy score. Eyelash changes and eyelid and iris pigmentation were similar in both groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that Lat and Taf have equivalent efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with NTG. PMID:27601879

  8. Comparison study of intraocular pressure reduction efficacy and safety between latanoprost and tafluprost in Japanese with normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Tada, Kaori; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sotozono, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction efficacy and safety between the ophthalmic solutions 0.005% latanoprost (Lat) and 0.0015% tafluprost (Taf) in Japanese patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods In this randomized nonmasked study, we prospectively enrolled 30 Japanese NTG patients who had used Lat monotherapy for more than 4 weeks, and randomly divided them into the following two groups: 1) Lat-to-Taf group (LT group) and 2) Taf-to-Lat group (TL group). At the beginning of the study, both groups were switched from initial Lat to Lat or Taf for 12 weeks, and then switched over to the other drug (crossover) for 12 additional weeks. At 0, 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, we evaluated each patient’s IOP, conjunctival injection, and corneal epitheliopathy score, and at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, we evaluated their eyelash changes and pigmentation of the eyelids and irises. Results The mean IOP of the LT group (15 eyes) was 10.5, 10.6, and 11.1 mmHg, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively, whereas that of the TL group (15 eyes) was 11.7, 11.1, and 10.5 mmHg at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups and in the intragroup comparisons. Moreover, no significant differences were found between Lat and Taf in regard to the conjunctival injection score and corneal epitheliopathy score. Eyelash changes and eyelid and iris pigmentation were similar in both groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that Lat and Taf have equivalent efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with NTG.

  9. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  10. Impact of overpressures on subsurface exploration and reservoir management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, P.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of overpressures in the subsurface poses major problems for safety and cost efficient well design, but less well known is their importance for exploration and reservoir development. Overpressures reduce the vertical effective stress (VES, the difference between the vertical stress and fluid pressure) experienced by the sediment. As sediment compaction is primarily an irreversible function of VES, a reduction in VES will halt compaction. Similarly, a reduction in its rate of increase will reduce the rate of porosity loss. Porosity and other key rock properties will therefore reflect changes in vertical effective stress. Any measurement that senses porosity, or seismic velocity (e.g. sonic, density or resistivity logs) will provide a means of estimating overpressures. The reduction of porosity with vertical effective stress is exponential in nature. Consequently, overpressures generated early in the burial history, such as those generated by disequilibrium compaction, will have a greater impact on rock properties than those generated or emplaced during late burial. Indeed, late overpressuring, so-called inflation, may have little or no impact on rock properties and therefore methods for the prediction of overpressures from properties such as seismic velocity will not provide reliable pressure estimates. In order for fluid pressures to rise in a basin, the pressures have to be contained by rocks with sufficiently low permeability. Overpressures are transient and gradually leak away when the generation mechanism ceases to operate. In some areas, such as in parts of the central North Sea and the Middle East, fluid pressures have built up until the failure envelope of the seal is reached, leading to a subsequent loss of the sealing capacity. The failure envelope is usually considered to be determined by the minimum horizontal stress. The failure pressure for the seal systematically increases with depth and this variation will control the maximum pressures

  11. Measurement of Hydrogen Radical Density and Its Impact on Reduction of Copper Oxide in Atmospheric-Pressure Remote Plasma Using H2 and Ar Mixture Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Hirotoshi; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Kano, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Naofumi; Hori, Masaru

    2010-12-01

    A 60 Hz alternating current excited atmospheric-pressure plasma with an ultrahigh electron density of over 1016 cm-3 employing H2/Ar [ p(H2)/p(H2+Ar) 1-3%] gases was used to reduce copper oxides on copper. The remote plasma reduced CuO and Cu2O at room temperature. The ground-state hydrogen (H) radical density in the atmospheric-pressure plasma was measured by vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy using a micro hollow cathode lamp. The ratio of reduction of amount of CuO flux to the H radical flux was determined from the measured H radical density and gas temperature.

  12. Sleep-time blood pressure: prognostic value and relevance as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Fernández, José R; Mojón, Artemio

    2013-03-01

    Correlation between blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than clinical BP measurements. Nevertheless, the latter continue to be the "gold standard" to diagnose hypertension, assess CVD risk, and evaluate hypertension treatment. Independent ABPM studies have found that elevated sleep-time BP is a better predictor of CVD risk than either the awake or 24-h BP mean. A major limitation of all previous ABPM-based prognostic studies is the reliance only upon a single baseline profile from each participant at the time of inclusion, without accounting for potential changes in the level and pattern of ambulatory BP thereafter during follow-up. Accordingly, impact of the alteration over time, i.e., during long-term follow-up, of specific features of the 24-h BP variation on CVD risk has never been properly investigated. We evaluated the comparative prognostic value of (i) clinic and ambulatory BP; (ii) different ABPM-derived characteristics, e.g., asleep or awake BP mean; and (iii) specific changes in ABPM characteristic during follow-up, mainly whether reduced CVD risk is more related to the progressive decrease of asleep or awake BP. We prospectively studied 3344 subjects (1718 men/1626 women), 52.6 ± 14.5 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, during a median follow-up of 5.6 yrs. Those with hypertension at baseline were randomized to ingest all their prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or ≥1 of them at bedtime. At baseline, BP was measured at 20-min intervals from 07:00 to 23:00 h and at 30-min intervals at night for 48-h, and physical activity was simultaneously monitored every min by wrist actigraphy to accurately derive awake and asleep BP means. Identical assessment was scheduled annually and more frequently (quarterly) if treatment adjustment was required. Data collected either at baseline or the last ABPM evaluation per participant

  13. Reduction of Listeria Innocua Contamination in Vacuum-Packaged Dry-Cured Italian Pork Products After High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Merialdi, Giuseppe; Ramini, Mattia; Ravanetti, Emanuela; Gherri, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The present work aims to present the results of the application of a treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on Italian fermented and dry-cured pork products. The products used in this study were portioned cured ham, portioned bacon and salami, vacuumpackaged and produced by a single processing company. Two studies were conducted on a single batch of the three products by means of an artificial contamination with Listeria innocua as a surrogate of L. monocytogenes. In the first trial a superficial contamination was obtained by immersion for 3 min in the culture broth with a concentration of approximately 9 log cfu/mL. At the end of the inoculum step, the pieces were dred at room temperature and vacuum packaged. In the second trial 50 kg of minced pork meat were contaminated before production of salami. In both cases the inoculum contained 5 strains of L. innocua. Subsequently, in both trials, 10 samples were randomly divided into two groups of 5 pieces each: i) TH group, samples treated with HHP; ii) group C, control samples, not subjected to any treatment. All samples were stored at refrigeration temperature at the end of HHP treatments (if applied), and analyzed for the determination of the surface (1st trial) and deep (2nd trial) quantitative contamination of L. innocua. pH and aW were also determined on 3 pieces of each products belonging to group C. The difference between the medians of the log cfu/cm2 or g established between controls and treated were compared using the non-parametric test (Kruskal-Wallis test) with P<0.01. In all products and in both trials the level of contamination detected in treatment groups was always significantly lower than in controls (P<0.01). In particular, in vacuum-packaged ham, bacon and salami viability logarithmic viability reductions equal to -2.29, -2.54 and -2.51 were observed, respectively. This study aimed to evaluate a not-thermal treatment on Italian cured or fermented pork products. The results of this study

  14. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  15. Quantitative Discomanometry: Correlation of Intradiscal Pressure Values to Pain Reduction in Patients With Intervertebral Disc Herniation Treated With Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive, Image-Guided Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K. Mazioti, A. Papakonstantinou, O. Brountzos, E.; Gouliamos, A.; Kelekis, N. Kelekis, A.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To illustrate quantitative discomanometry's (QD) diagnostic efficacy and predictive value in discogenic-pain evaluation in a prospective study correlating intradiscal pressure values with pain reduction after percutaneous image-guided technique (i.e., percutaneous decompression, PD). Materials and Methods: During the last 3 years, 36 patients [21 male and 15 female (mean age 36 {+-} 5.8 years)] with intervertebral disc hernia underwent QD before PD. Under absolute sterilization and fluoroscopy, a mixture of contrast medium and normal saline (3:1 ratio) was injected. A discmonitor performed a constant rate injection and recorded pressure and volume values, thus producing the relative pressure-volume curve. PD was then performed. Pain reduction and improved mobility were recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months after PD using clinical evaluation and a numeric visual scale (NVS; 0 to 10 units). Results: Mean pain values of 7.5 {+-} 1.9 (range 4 to 8) NVS units were recorded before PD; these decreased to 2.9 {+-} 2.44 at 3 months, 1.0 {+-} 1.9 at 12 months, and 1.0 {+-} 1.9 NVS units at 24 months after PD. Recorded correlations (pressure, volume, significant pain-reduction values) with bilateral statistical significance included a maximum injected volume of 2.4 ml (p = 0.045), P{sub o} < 14 psi [initial pressure required to inject 0.1 ml of the mixture inside the disc (p = 0.05)], P{sub max} {<=} 65 psi [greatest pressure value on the curve (p = 0.018)], and P{sub max} - P{sub o} {<=} 47 psi (p = 0.038). Patients meeting these pressure or volume cut-off points, either independently or as a total, had significant pain reduction (>4 NVS units) after PD. No complications were noted. Conclusions: QD is an efficient technique that may have predictive value for discogenic pain evaluation. It might serve as a useful tool for patient selection for intervertebral disc therapies.

  16. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  17. Computational and experimental investigation of the drag reduction and the components of pressure drop in horizontal slug flow using liquids of different viscosities

    SciTech Connect

    Daas, Mutaz; Bleyle, Derek

    2006-03-01

    Computational and experimental investigation in 10-cm ID horizontal pipes have been carried out utilizing carbon dioxide as the gas phase and two types of oil with different viscosities; namely 0.0025Pas and 0.05Pas, as the liquid phase. The influence of oil viscosity on the magnitude of total pressure drop and each of its components as well as the effectiveness of a drag reducing additive (DRA, CDR WS 500M flow improver) in decreasing the pressure loss was investigated in two-phase oil-gas slug flow. The effects of changing oil viscosity on the contribution of frictional and accelerational components to total pressure drop in slug flow were also examined and analyzed. Computations of accelerational and frictional components of pressure drop were performed. The accelerational component of pressure drop was dominant in the 0.0025Pas oil while the frictional component had significant contributions in the 0.05Pas oil. Despite the fact that the magnitude of drag reduction was higher in the 0.05Pas oil, the DRA was more effective in reducing the total pressure drop and its components in the 0.0025Pas oil. (author)

  18. A kinetic pressure effect on the experimental abiotic reduction of aqueous CO2 to methane from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Codi; Cody, George D.; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2015-02-01

    Aqueous abiotic methane concentrations in a range of geologic settings are below levels expected for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that kinetics can control the speciation of reduced carbon-bearing fluids. Previous studies have suggested that mineral catalysts or gas-phase reactions may increase the rate of methanogenesis. Here, we report on experiments that indicate pressure can also accelerate aqueous reduction of CO2 to CH4. Four series of cold-seal hydrothermal experiments were performed from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C for two weeks and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The starting fluids were 10-20-μL solutions of 70-mmolal 13C-labeled formic acid (H13COOH) contained in welded gold capsules. Increasing pressure (P) resulted in a systematic, reproducible log-linear increase in 13CH4 yields. The pressure effect could be quantified the log-linear slope, Δlog[13CH4]/ΔP (log mmolal per kbar). The mean slope was 0.66 ± 0.05 (±1s.e.), indicating that 13CH4 yields increased by an average factor of 40-50 over a P range of 2.5 kbar. Pressure-independent variations in [13CH4] were observed as scatter about the log-linear regressions and as variations in the y-intercepts of the regressions. These variations were attributed to trace amounts of catalytic Fe along the inner capsule wall that remained despite cleaning the Au capsules in nitric acid prior to each experimental series. The mechanism for the pressure-dependent effect was interpreted to result from one or more of the following three processes: reduction of a metastable reaction intermediate such as methanol, formation of Fe-carbonyl complexes in the fluid, and/or heterogeneous catalysis by Fe. The results suggest that pressure may influence aqueous abiotic CH4 yields in certain geological environments, particularly when the relative effects of other kinetic factors such as temperature are diminished, e.g., in cool forearcs or other settings with a steep geothermal

  19. The Norne Field -- Exploration history and reservoir development strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gjerstad, H.M.; Steffensen, I.; Skagen, J.I.

    1995-12-31

    The Norne Field was discovered in December 1991, after 8 years of discouraging exploration activity in the Nordland 1 and 2 areas offshore Mid-Norway. A final well was drilled as alternative to the scheduled relinquishment, -- and a major oil field was found. 3D-seismic has been acquired, one appraisal well drilled to confirm reserves and one exploration well has proven minor reserves in a northeastern extension of the field. The reservoir comprises sandstones of Middle and Late Jurassic age of excellent quality. Recoverable oil is 72 million Sm{sup 3} (453 million barrels). The field will be produced by pressure maintenance, with injection of water and produced gas. All wells, 7 producers, 5 water injectors and 2 gas injectors, will be horizontal in the reservoir sections. 6 pre-drilled wells are sufficient to obtain plateau oil production rate from production start-up based on an average maximum well production rate in excess of 6,000 Sm{sup 3}/d. Plateau production is expected to maintain for about 3--4 years. Reservoir simulation models will be an important tool for understanding the reservoir dynamics and for continuous optimization of the development plan. Information from the development wells will be incorporated in the simulation model on regular basis for history matching and further predictions. With production start-up within 1 July 1997, a significant reduction in time from discovery until production is achieved.

  20. Evaluation of blood pressure reduction response and responder characteristics to fixed-dose combination treatment of amlodipine and losartan: a post hoc analysis of pooled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Wu, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Hanson, Mary E; Fujita, Kenji P

    2014-09-01

    Data from four clinical trials compared reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among patients treated with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs 5/100 mg and amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg and 10 mg. Response rate was assessed as reduction in SBP or DBP (>20/10 mm Hg) and proportion of patients achieving SBP <140 mm Hg or DBP <90 mm Hg. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on baseline SBP and DBP. Mean SBP and DBP were reduced in amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg (n=182) and amlodipine/losartan 5/100 mg (n=95) users across all baseline quartiles. Patients using amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg had significantly greater SBP and DBP reductions vs amlodipine 5 mg (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). Amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg users had significantly greater SBP reduction vs amlodipine 10 mg (SBP P=.02; DBP P=not significant). The odds of responding to therapy were significantly greater with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg (odds ratio, 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-25.5) and were similar vs amlodipine 10 mg (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.017-9.51). These results support the use of combination therapy early in the treatment of hypertension.

  1. Acute reduction in blood pressure following consumption of anthocyanin-rich cherry juice may be dose-interval dependant: a pilot cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Kent, Katherine; Charlton, Karen E; Jenner, Andrew; Roodenrys, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A pilot cross-over study assessed the acute effects on blood pressure and plasma biomarkers associated with consumption of a 300 ml anthocyanin-rich fruit juice, provided in differing dose-intervals. Young adults (n = 6) and older adults (n = 7) received in random order, either a single 300 ml dose or 3 × 100 ml doses of high-flavonoid cherry juice provided at 0, 1 and 2 h. Blood pressure and plasma levels of phenolic metabolites were measured at 0, 2 and 6 h.The single 300 ml dose of cherry juice resulted in a significant reduction in systolic (p = 0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.008) and heart-rate (p = 0.033) 2 h after consumption, before returning to baseline levels at 6 h post-consumption. The 3 × 100 ml dose provided over 2 h did not result in significant blood pressure reductions. Plasma phenolic metabolites increased at 2 and 6 h; however, fluctuations were higher after the single 300 ml dose in older adults. These findings have implications for design of intervention studies that investigate vascular effects associated with flavonoid-rich foods. PMID:26654244

  2. 08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

  3. Reservoir management of the Hartzog Draw field

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Hearn, C.L.

    1982-07-01

    The Hartzog Draw field is a recently discovered major oil reservoir in northwestern Wyoming. Initial reservoir performance indicated that the field soon would be depleted below the bubble-point pressure. To evaluate secondary recovery possibiliites, the working interest owners cooperated in an extensive reservoir study. Although there were some unique problems, both in evaluating reservoir data and in obtaining a unitization agreement, this effort led to the formation of the Hartzog Draw Unit within 5 years of field discovery. Secondary recovery by waterflooding has begun, and enhanced recovery possibilities are being evaluated.

  4. Reservoir management of the Hartzog draw field

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Hearn, C.H.

    1982-07-01

    The Hartzog draw field is a recently discovered major oil reservoir in northeastern Wyoming. Initial reservoir performance indicated that the field soon would be depleted below the bubble-point pressure. To evaluate secondary recovery possibilities, the working interest owners cooperated in an extensive reservoir study. Although there were some unique problems, both in evaluating reservoir data and in obtaining a unitization agreement, this effort led to the formation of the Hartzog Draw Unit within 5 years of field discovery. Secondary recovery by waterflooding has begun, and enhanced recovery possibilities are being evaluated.

  5. Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

    1988-12-01

    This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

  6. High-Reynolds-number turbulent-boundary-layer wall pressure fluctuations with skin-friction reduction by air injection.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Eric S; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steven L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2008-05-01

    The hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations that occur on the solid surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer are a common source of flow noise. This paper reports multipoint surface pressure fluctuation measurements in water beneath a high-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer with wall injection of air to reduce skin-friction drag. The experiments were conducted in the U.S. Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9-m-long, 3.05-m-wide hydrodynamically smooth flat plate at freestream speeds up to 20 ms and downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers exceeding 200 x 10(6). Air was injected from one of two spanwise slots through flush-mounted porous stainless steel frits (approximately 40 microm mean pore diameter) at volume flow rates from 17.8 to 142.5 l/s per meter span. The two injectors were located 1.32 and 9.78 m from the model's leading edge and spanned the center 87% of the test model. Surface pressure measurements were made with 16 flush-mounted transducers in an "L-shaped" array located 10.7 m from the plate's leading edge. When compared to no-injection conditions, the observed wall-pressure variance was reduced by as much as 87% with air injection. In addition, air injection altered the inferred convection speed of pressure fluctuation sources and the streamwise coherence of pressure fluctuations.

  7. Imaging thin-bed reservoirs with 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.

    1996-12-01

    This article explains how a 3-D seismic data volume, a vertical seismic profile (VSP), electric well logs and reservoir pressure data can be used to image closely stacked thin-bed reservoirs. This interpretation focuses on the Oligocene Frio reservoir in South Texas which has multiple thin-beds spanning a vertical interval of about 3,000 ft.

  8. Role of Geomechanics in Assessing the Feasibility of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Hydrocarbon Sandstone Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhi; Khaksar, Abbas

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in depleted sandstone hydrocarbon reservoirs could be complicated by a number of geomechanical problems associated with well drilling, completions, and CO2 injection. The initial production of hydrocarbons (gas or oil) and the resulting pressure depletion as well as associated reduction in horizontal stresses (e.g., fracture gradient) narrow the operational drilling mud weight window, which could exacerbate wellbore instabilities while infill drilling. Well completions (casing, liners, etc.) may experience solids flowback to the injector wells when injection is interrupted due to CO2 supply or during required system maintenance. CO2 injection alters the pressure and temperature in the near wellbore region, which could cause fault reactivation or thermal fracturing. In addition, the injection pressure may exceed the maximum sustainable storage pressure, and cause fracturing and fault reactivation within the reservoirs or bounding formations. A systematic approach has been developed for geomechanical assessments for CO2 storage in depleted reservoirs. The approach requires a robust field geomechanical model with its components derived from drilling and production data as well as from wireline logs of historical wells. This approach is described in detail in this paper together with a recent study on a depleted gas field in the North Sea considered for CO2 sequestration. The particular case study shows that there is a limitation on maximum allowable well inclinations, 45° if aligning with the maximum horizontal stress direction and 65° if aligning with the minimum horizontal stress direction, beyond which wellbore failure would become critical while drilling. Evaluation of sanding risks indicates no sand control installations would be needed for injector wells. Fracturing and faulting assessments confirm that the fracturing pressure of caprock is significantly higher than the planned CO2 injection and storage pressures for an ideal

  9. Prediction of a Required Log Reduction with Probability for Enterobacter sakazakii during High-Pressure Processing, Using a Survival/Death Interface Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Shige; Matsubara, Maki; Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2009-01-01

    A probabilistic model for predicting Enterobacter sakazakii inactivation in trypticase soy broth (TSB) and infant formula (IF) by high-pressure processing was developed. The modeling procedure is based on a previous model (S. Koseki and K. Yamamoto, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 116:136-143, 2007) that describes the probability of death of bacteria. The model developed in this study consists of a total of 300 combinations of pressure (400, 450, 500, 550, or 600 MPa), pressure-holding time (1, 3, 5, 10, or 20 min), temperature (25 or 40°C), inoculum level (3, 5, or 7 log10 CFU/ml), and medium (TSB or IF), with each combination tested in triplicate. For each replicate response of E. sakazakii, survival and death were scored with values of 0 and 1, respectively. Data were fitted to a logistic regression model in which the medium was treated as a dummy variable. The model predicted that the required pressure-holding times at 500 MPa for a 5-log reduction in IF with 90% achievement probability were 26.3 and 7.9 min at 25 and 40°C, respectively. The probabilities of achieving 5-log reductions in TSB and IF by treatment with 400 MPa at 25°C for 10 min were 92 and 3%, respectively. The model enabled the identification of a minimum processing condition for a required log reduction, regardless of the underlying inactivation kinetics pattern. Simultaneously, the probability of an inactivation effect under the predicted processing condition was also provided by taking into account the environmental factors mentioned above. PMID:19201951

  10. Prediction of a required log reduction with probability for Enterobacter sakazakii during high-pressure processing, using a survival/death interface model.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shige; Matsubara, Maki; Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2009-04-01

    A probabilistic model for predicting Enterobacter sakazakii inactivation in trypticase soy broth (TSB) and infant formula (IF) by high-pressure processing was developed. The modeling procedure is based on a previous model (S. Koseki and K. Yamamoto, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 116:136-143, 2007) that describes the probability of death of bacteria. The model developed in this study consists of a total of 300 combinations of pressure (400, 450, 500, 550, or 600 MPa), pressure-holding time (1, 3, 5, 10, or 20 min), temperature (25 or 40 degrees C), inoculum level (3, 5, or 7 log(10) CFU/ml), and medium (TSB or IF), with each combination tested in triplicate. For each replicate response of E. sakazakii, survival and death were scored with values of 0 and 1, respectively. Data were fitted to a logistic regression model in which the medium was treated as a dummy variable. The model predicted that the required pressure-holding times at 500 MPa for a 5-log reduction in IF with 90% achievement probability were 26.3 and 7.9 min at 25 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The probabilities of achieving 5-log reductions in TSB and IF by treatment with 400 MPa at 25 degrees C for 10 min were 92 and 3%, respectively. The model enabled the identification of a minimum processing condition for a required log reduction, regardless of the underlying inactivation kinetics pattern. Simultaneously, the probability of an inactivation effect under the predicted processing condition was also provided by taking into account the environmental factors mentioned above.

  11. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Surrogate Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    reservoir modeling becomes more pronounced. SRM is developed using the state of the art in neural computing and fuzzy pattern recognition to address the ever growing need in the oil and gas industry to perform accurate, but high speed simulation and modeling. Unlike conventional geo-statistical approaches (response surfaces, proxy models …) that require hundreds of simulation runs for development, SRM is developed only with a few (from 10 to 30 runs) simulation runs. SRM can be developed regularly (as new versions of the full field model become available) off-line and can be put online for real-time processing to guide important decisions. SRM has proven its value in the field. An SRM was developed for a giant oil field in the Middle East. The model included about one million grid blocks with more than 165 horizontal wells and took ten hours for a single run on 12 parallel CPUs. Using only 10 simulation runs, an SRM was developed that was able to accurately mimic the behavior of the reservoir simulation model. Performing a comprehensive reservoir analysis that included making millions of SRM runs, wells in the field were divided into five clusters. It was predicted that wells in cluster one & two are best candidates for rate relaxation with minimal, long term water production while wells in clusters four and five are susceptive to high water cuts. Two and a half years and 20 wells later, rate relaxation results from the field proved that all the predictions made by the SRM analysis were correct. While incremental oil production increased in all wells (wells in clusters 1 produced the most followed by wells in cluster 2, 3 …) the percent change in average monthly water cut for wells in each cluster clearly demonstrated the analytic power of SRM. As it was correctly predicted, wells in clusters 1 and 2 actually experience a reduction in water cut while a substantial increase in water cut was observed in wells classified into clusters 4 and 5. Performing these analyses

  13. A model for earthquakes near Palisades Reservoir, southeast Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schleicher, David

    1975-01-01

    The Palisades Reservoir seems to be triggering earthquakes: epicenters are concentrated near the reservoir, and quakes are concentrated in spring, when the reservoir level is highest or is rising most rapidly, and in fall, when the level is lowest. Both spring and fall quakes appear to be triggered by minor local stresses superposed on regional tectonic stresses; faulting is postulated to occur when the effective normal stress across a fault is decreased by a local increase in pore-fluid pressure. The spring quakes tend to occur when the reservoir level suddenly rises: increased pore pressure pushes apart the walls of the graben flooded by the reservoir, thus decreasing the effective normal stress across faults in the graben. The fall quakes tend to occur when the reservoir level is lowest: water that gradually infiltrated poorly permeable (fault-gouge?) zones during high reservoir stands is then under anomalously high pressure, which decreases the effective normal stress across faults in the poorly permeable zones.

  14. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Celotto, A C; Ferreira, L G; Capellini, V K; Albuquerque, A A S; Rodrigues, A J; Evora, P R B

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control. PMID:26648089

  15. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect

    PubMed Central

    Celotto, A.C.; Ferreira, L.G.; Capellini, V.K.; Albuquerque, A.A.S.; Rodrigues, A.J.; Evora, P.R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control. PMID:26648089

  16. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  17. Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1980-05-29

    Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River, Geothermal Field (RRGF), Idaho. Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters.

  18. Observation of reduction of radiation-pressure-induced rotational anti-spring effect on a 23 mg mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yutaro; Nagano, Koji; Nakano, Masayuki; Furusawa, Akira; Kawamura, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Although quantum radiation pressure noise could limit the sensitivity of the second-generation gravitational wave detectors, it has not been observed in a broad frequency band and its reduction methods have not been proven yet. A promising way to observe quantum radiation pressure noise is to store high power light in an optical cavity with a tiny mirror. However, anti-spring torque caused by radiation pressure of the light acting on the tiny mirror could make the system unstable, and it is generally difficult to attach actuators to the tiny mirror for stabilization. Hence a new method to overcome this anti-spring torque has been developed. In the new method, the other mirror of the cavity is controlled so that the position of the resonant light at the tiny mirror is fixed to decrease the anti-spring torque and stabilize angular motion of the tiny mirror. With the new method, it was successfully observed that the anti-spring torque caused by radiation pressure was suppressed in the present experiment with a 23 mg mirror, where resonant frequency of angular motion of the tiny mirror increased towards the mechanical resonant frequency.

  19. Reduction of mosquito biting-pressure: spatial repellents or mosquito traps? A field comparison of seven commercially available products in Israel.

    PubMed

    Revay, Edita E; Kline, Daniel L; Xue, Rui-De; Qualls, Whitney A; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Ghattas, Nina; Pstygo, Irina; Müller, Günter C

    2013-07-01

    The present study assessed the personal protection efficiency of seven commercially available mosquito control devices (MCD) under field conditions in Israel. Trials were performed in a high biting-pressure area inhabited by large populations of mosquito and biting midge species, using human volunteers as bait in landing catch experiments. Results show that under minimal air-movement, three spatial repellent based products (ThermaCELL(®) Patio Lantern, OFF!(®) PowerPad lamp, and Terminix(®) ALLCLEAR Tabletop Mosquito Repeller) significantly reduced the biting-pressure (t-test - P<0.01) when positioned at short distances from a volunteer (3, 7.5, and 10ft.), with the ThermaCELL unit being most effective (96.1, 89.9, and 76.66% reduction, respectively). No significant differences were seen between the three aforementioned devices at distances of 3 and 7.5ft., while at a distance of 10ft., only the ThermaCELL patio lantern repelled significantly more mosquitoes then the Terminix ALLCLEAR Tabletop Mosquito Repeller (t-test, P<0.05). In contrast, mosquito traps using attracting cues to bait mosquitoes (Dynatrap(®), Vortex(®) Electronic Insect Trap, Blue Rhino(®) SV3100) either significantly increased or had no effect on the biting-pressure at short distances compared with the unprotected control. Trials conducted over large areas showed that only the Blue Rhino trap was able to significantly reduce the biting-pressure (40.1% reduction), but this was only when operating four units at the corners of an intermediate sized area.

  20. Characterization of Reservoir Heterogeneity from Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharramov, M.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our earlier work we resolved complex evolution of pressure fronts in a heavyoil reservoir undergoing cyclic steam stimulation. Our method was based onsolving a regularized inverse problem for inverting the pore pressure changefrom surface displacements. In this work we extend our method to recoversharp contrasts in induced reservoir pressure that may be due to permeabilitybarriers or hydraulically conductive faults. We demonstrate our method byinverting the pressure change from uplift observations for a synthetic modelof a heterogeneous reservoir undergoing fluid injection. Using the theory ofconstrained optimization, we invert values and locations of sharp pressurecontrasts from noisy measurements of surface deformation, and estimate thelocation of an impermeable boundary between reservoir compartments. In our synthetic model, two highly permeable reservoir compartmentsseparated by a nearly impermeable barrier (first panel) undergo fluid injec-tion. We simulate pressure evolution within the reservoir (second panel) andmodel surface deformation induced by the subsurface pressure change (thirdpanel), adding measurement noise to the result. We invert the noisy sur-face uplift measurements by solving a constrained optimization problem withTikhonov regularization (fourth panel). The result achieves a good inversionquality in areas of finite pressure change but provides only a rough estimatefor the barrier location. However, applying our new inversion technique with atotal-variation regularization that favors sharp model contrasts while penalizingoscillations, we achieve a more accurate approximation of the permeabilitybarrier as a level set of the inverted pressure field (fifth panel). Our new method provides a potentially useful tool for locating sharpsubsurface pressure contrasts from surface uplift observations. The methodcan be used in a variety of applications for identifying subsurface permeabil-ity heterogeneities (such as seals and hydraulically conductive

  1. Impact of a Glaucoma Severity Index on Results of Trabectome Surgery: Larger Pressure Reduction in More Severe Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Roy, Pritha; Parikh, Hardik A.; Dang, Yalong; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To stratify outcomes of trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) by glaucoma severity using a simple and clinically useful glaucoma index. Based on prior data of trabectome after failed trabeculectomy, we hypothesized that more severe glaucoma might have a relatively more reduced facility compared to mild glaucoma and respond with a larger IOP reduction to trabecular meshwork ablation. Methods Patients with primary open angle glaucoma who had undergone AIT without any other same session surgery and without any second eye surgery during the following 12 months were analyzed. Eyes of patients that had less than 12 months follow up or were diagnosed with neovascular glaucoma were excluded. A glaucoma index (GI) was created to capture glaucoma severity based on visual field, number of preoperative medications, and preoperative IOP. Visual field (VF) was separated into 3 categories: mild, moderate, and advanced (assigned 1, 2, and 3 points, respectively). Preoperative number of medications (meds) was divided into 4 categories: ≤1, 2, 3 or ≥4, and assigned with a value of 1 to 4. Baseline IOP (IOP) was divided into 3 categories: <20 mmHg, 20–29 mmHg, and greater than 30 mmHg and assigned with 1 to 3 points. GI was defined as IOP × meds × VF and separated into 4 groups: <6 (Group 1), 6–12 (Group 2), >12–18 (Group 3) and >18 (Group 4). Linear regression was used to determine if there was an association between GI group and IOP reduction after one year or age, gender, race, diagnosis, cup to disc (C/D) ratio, and Shaffer grade. Results Out of 1340 patients, 843 were included in the analysis. The GI group distribution was GI1 = 164, GI2 = 202, GI3 = 260, and GI4 = 216. Mean IOP reduction after one year was 4.0±5.4, 6.4±5.8, 9.0±7.6, 12.0±8.0 mmHg for GI groups 1 to 4, respectively. Linear regression showed that IOP reduction was associated with GI group after adjusting for age, gender, race, diagnosis, cup to disc ratio, and Shaffer grade

  2. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1999-06-08

    This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 1998 through December 31, 1998, for the project, ''Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance in Fractured Reservoirs.'' In our first task area, disproportionate permeability reduction, a literature survey and analysis are underway to identify options for reducing permeability to water much more than that to oil. In our second task area, we are encouraging the use of our recently developed software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells. In several field applications, we noted the importance of obtaining accurate values of the static reservoir pressure before using our program. In our third task area, we examined gel properties as they extruded through fractures. We found stable pressure gradients during injection of a large volume of a one-day-old Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel into a 0.04-in.-wide, four-ft-long fracture. This finding confirms that gel injection (under our specific circumstances) did not lead to continuously increasing pressure gradients and severely limited gel propagation. Our experiments also provided insights into the mechanism for gel propagation during extrusion through fractures.

  3. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Nicholas A. D.C.

    2010-05-31

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  4. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Nicholas A.

    2010-05-01

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p = 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  5. Wills Eye Hospital and surgical network: successful pre-positioning strategies for payment reduction and managed care pressures.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D M

    2001-01-01

    Through strategic clinical diversification, political activism, and bold expansion, Wills Eye Hospital, a teaching specialty surgical hospital, survives ravages of sudden onslaughts of managed care payment reductions while maintaining autonomy. Slack inpatient resources were re-utilized to create unique programs attractive to regional managed care organizations. Advocacy and lobbying for short-term favorable treatment from Medicare bought the Hospital valuable time and positioning. Building out a regional network of ambulatory surgical centers assures the growth and access to market required for Wills to maintain its autonomy in a managed care contracting environment. PMID:11372488

  6. Wills Eye Hospital and surgical network: successful pre-positioning strategies for payment reduction and managed care pressures.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D M

    2001-01-01

    Through strategic clinical diversification, political activism, and bold expansion, Wills Eye Hospital, a teaching specialty surgical hospital, survives ravages of sudden onslaughts of managed care payment reductions while maintaining autonomy. Slack inpatient resources were re-utilized to create unique programs attractive to regional managed care organizations. Advocacy and lobbying for short-term favorable treatment from Medicare bought the Hospital valuable time and positioning. Building out a regional network of ambulatory surgical centers assures the growth and access to market required for Wills to maintain its autonomy in a managed care contracting environment.

  7. Anomalous nitrogen isotopes in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks from the Sulu orogenic belt: Effect of abiotic nitrogen reduction during fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Cartigny, Pierre; Li, Jianghanyang

    2014-10-01

    Modern nitrogen (N) fixation is primarily mediated by biological processes. However, in the early Earth where biological activity was absent or limited, abiotic N reduction in hydrothermal systems is thought to be a key process to transform atmospheric N2 and NOx to ammonium, an essential nutrient to support the emergence of life and also an N form that can be incorporated into rocks. Surprisingly, evidence for abiotic N reduction in the rock record has not been clearly identified. In this study, we reported anomalously low N isotope compositions (δN15 values as low as -15.8‰) of mica samples in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks from the Donghai area in the Sulu orogenic belt, eastern China. Compared with mica samples with typical crustal δN15 values (3-9‰) in similar metamorphic rocks from the western Dabie orogen, the 15N-depleted mica samples from the Sulu orogen are characterized by significant N enrichment (10 times higher) and extreme 18O depletion (δO18 values as low as -9‰). These features can be best explained by assimilation of N from a source characterized by extremely low δN15 values (less than ∼-16‰). The extremely low δN15 value would be produced by abiotic N reduction during reaction of a meteoric-hydrothermal fluid with crustal rocks before subduction. This observation provides a clue to the occurrence of abiotic N reduction in continental supracrustal rocks and infer that abiotic N reduction process could be a fundamental process driving the geological N cycling in early Earth.

  8. Reductions in systolic blood pressure with liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes: Insights from a patient-level pooled analysis of six randomized clinical trials☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vivian A.; DeVries, J. Hans; Henry, Robert R.; Donsmark, Morten; Thomsen, Henrik F.; Plutzky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantify the effect of liraglutide on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and assess the influence of covariates on observed SBP reductions. Methods A patient-level pooled analysis of six phase 3, randomized trials was conducted. Results The analysis included 2792 randomized patients. In the intention-to-treat population (n = 2783), mean [±SE] SBP reductions from baseline with liraglutide 1.2 mg (2.7 [0.8] mmHg) and 1.8 mg (2.9 [0.7] mmHg) once daily were significantly greater than with placebo (0.5 [0.9] mmHg; P = 0.0029 and P = 0.0004, respectively) after 26 weeks, and were evident after 2 weeks. Liraglutide was also associated with significantly greater SBP reductions than glimepiride and, at a dose of 1.8 mg, insulin glargine and rosiglitazone. SBP reductions with liraglutide weakly correlated with weight loss (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.08–0.12; P ≤ 0.0148). No dependence of these reductions on concomitant antihypertensive medications was detected (P = 0.1304). Liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg were associated with mean increases in pulse of 3 beats per minute (bpm), versus a 1 bpm increase with placebo (P < 0.0001 for each dose versus placebo). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces SBP in patients with T2D, including those receiving concomitant antihypertensive medication. PMID:24561125

  9. Reduction of the pectoral spine and girdle in domesticated Channel catfish is likely caused by changes in selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Fine, Michael L; Lahiri, Shweta; Sullivan, Amanda D H; Mayo, Mark; Newton, Scott H; Sismour, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Locked pectoral spines of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus more than double the fish's width and complicate ingestion by gape-limited predators. The spine mates with the pectoral girdle, a robust structure that anchors the spine. This study demonstrates that both spine and girdle exhibit negative allometric growth and that pectoral spines and girdles are lighter in domesticated than in wild Channel Catfish. This finding could be explained by changes in selection pressure for spine growth during domestication or by an epigenetic effect in which exposure to predators in wild fish stimulates pectoral growth. We tested the epigenetic hypothesis by exposing domesticated Channel Catfish fingerlings to Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides predators for 13 weeks. Spines and girdles grow isometrically in the fingerlings, and regression analysis indicates no difference in proportional pectoral growth between control and predator-exposed fish. Therefore a change in selection pressure likely accounts for smaller pectoral growth in domesticated Channel Catfish. Decreasing spine growth in older fish suggests anti-predator functions are most important in smaller fish. Additionally, growth of the appendicular and axial skeleton is controlled differentially, and mechanical properties of the spine and not just its length are an important component of this defensive adaptation.

  10. Reduction of the pectoral spine and girdle in domesticated Channel catfish is likely caused by changes in selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Fine, Michael L; Lahiri, Shweta; Sullivan, Amanda D H; Mayo, Mark; Newton, Scott H; Sismour, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Locked pectoral spines of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus more than double the fish's width and complicate ingestion by gape-limited predators. The spine mates with the pectoral girdle, a robust structure that anchors the spine. This study demonstrates that both spine and girdle exhibit negative allometric growth and that pectoral spines and girdles are lighter in domesticated than in wild Channel Catfish. This finding could be explained by changes in selection pressure for spine growth during domestication or by an epigenetic effect in which exposure to predators in wild fish stimulates pectoral growth. We tested the epigenetic hypothesis by exposing domesticated Channel Catfish fingerlings to Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides predators for 13 weeks. Spines and girdles grow isometrically in the fingerlings, and regression analysis indicates no difference in proportional pectoral growth between control and predator-exposed fish. Therefore a change in selection pressure likely accounts for smaller pectoral growth in domesticated Channel Catfish. Decreasing spine growth in older fish suggests anti-predator functions are most important in smaller fish. Additionally, growth of the appendicular and axial skeleton is controlled differentially, and mechanical properties of the spine and not just its length are an important component of this defensive adaptation. PMID:24673385

  11. Is ionized oxygen negatively or positively charged more effective for carboxyhemoglobin reduction compare to medical oxygen at atmospheric pressure?

    PubMed

    Perečinský, S; Kron, I; Engler, I; Murínová, L; Donič, V; Varga, M; Marossy, A; Legáth, Ľ

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) reversibly binds to hemoglobin forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). CO competes with O(2) for binding place in hemoglobin leading to tissue hypoxia. Already 30 % saturation of COHb can be deadly. Medical oxygen at atmospheric pressure as a therapy is not enough effective. Therefore hyperbaric oxygen O(2) inhalation is recommended. There was a question if partially ionized oxygen can be a better treatment at atmospheric pressure. In present study we evaluated effect of partially ionized oxygen produced by device Oxygen Ion 3000 by Dr. Engler in elimination of COHb in vitro experiments and in smokers. Diluted blood with different content of CO was purged with 5 l/min of either medicinal oxygen O(2), negatively ionized O(2) or positively ionized O(2) for 15 min, then the COHb content was checked. In vivo study, 15 smokers inhaled of either medicinal oxygen O(2) or negatively ionized O(2), than we compared CO levels in expired air before and after inhalation. In both studies we found the highest elimination of CO when we used negatively ionized O(2). These results confirmed the benefit of short inhalation of negatively ionized O(2), in frame of Ionized Oxygen Therapy (I O(2)Th/Engler) which could be used in smokers for decreasing of COHb in blood.

  12. Hydration and reduction of molecular beam epitaxy grown VO[subscript x]/a-Fe[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] (0001): Ambient pressure study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.-Y.; Klug, J.A.; Stair, P.C.; Bedzyk, M.J.

    2009-02-10

    Supported vanadium oxides processed under ambient environments have been studied by using X-ray standing wave (XSW) analysis of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the VO{sub x}/{alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) system, hydration and hydrogen annealing have been carried out under ambient pressure. Vanadium in the hydrated oxide phase occupies two high-symmetry surface adsorption sites with distinct adsorption heights, which resembles the adsorption geometry of fully oxidized vanadium. Reduction by the hydrogen annealing enhanced the V overlayer ordering by relocating a portion of the disordered V to high-symmetry sites. The V atoms located closer to the substrate oxygen layer in the hydrated phase moved toward the substrate after hydrogen reduction, while the V in the higher adsorption site stayed at the same height. The different responses of two adsorption sites to the reduction process are discussed and related to activities of the two sites.

  13. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 7: High pressure fuel turbo-pump third stage impeller analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Kirby V.

    1989-01-01

    This volume summarizes the analysis used to assess the structural life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbo-Pump (HPFTP) Third Stage Impeller. This analysis was performed in three phases, all using the DIAL finite element code. The first phase was a static stress analysis to determine the mean (non-varying) stress and static margin of safety for the part. The loads involved were steady state pressure and centrifugal force due to spinning. The second phase of the analysis was a modal survey to determine the vibrational modes and natural frequencies of the impeller. The third phase was a dynamic response analysis to determine the alternating component of the stress due to time varying pressure impulses at the outlet (diffuser) side of the impeller. The results of the three phases of the analysis show that the Third Stage Impeller operates very near the upper limits of its capability at full power level (FPL) loading. The static loading alone creates stresses in some areas of the shroud which exceed the yield point of the material. Additional cyclic loading due to the dynamic force could lead to a significant reduction in the life of this part. The cyclic stresses determined in the dynamic response phase of this study are based on an assumption regarding the magnitude of the forcing function.

  14. Development of a compositional model fully coupled with geomechanics and its application to tight oil reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yi

    solutions and results of a commercial simulator before conducting numerical studies. The numerical studies demonstrate the effect of capillary pressure on VLE, and further on production performance. The significant effect of capillary pressure on VLE leads to the suppression of bubble-point pressure and more light components dissolved in the oil phase. Consequently it is observed that there is smaller gas saturation, larger mole fractions of light components, and faster pressure decreasing at reservoir conditions; meanwhile less gas and more oil are produced at surface. The substantial decrease in reservoir pore pressure results in a large increase of effective stress, which induces the changes of rock properties and influences the production performance. The stress-induced degradation of permeability undermines the production performance, and the geomechanical effect on the permeability of natural fractures is mainly responsible for the undermined production performance. The reduction of pore size due to the geomechanical effect could increase the capillary pressure, which enlarges the influence of capillarity on VLE and further suppresses bubble-point pressure. On the other hand, the effect of capillary pressure on VLE influences the fluid flow and therefore influences the effective stress through the flow-stress coupling process. Thus the interaction between pore confinement and rock compaction can be modeled with MSFLOW_COM, and illustrated through numerical studies. This research provides a three-dimensional numerical tool for accurately modeling porous and fractured tight oil reservoirs. The developed simulator is able to assist scientists and engineers to study and understand the complex multiphase, multi-component fluid flow behaviors in tight oil reservoirs.

  15. Abiotic CO2 reduction during geologic carbon sequestration facilitated by Fe(II)-bearing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.; Thomas, B.; Johnson, N. C.; Rosenbauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Redox reactions involving subsurface minerals and fluids and can lead to the abiotic generation of hydrocarbons from CO2 under certain conditions. Depleted oil reservoirs and saline aquifers targeted for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) can contain significant quantities of minerals such as ferrous chlorite, which could facilitate the abiotic reduction of carbon dioxide to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and amorphous carbon (C0). If such reactions occur, the injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) could significantly alter the oxidation state of the reservoir and cause extensive reorganization of the stable mineral assemblage via dissolution and reprecipitation reactions. Naturally occurring iron oxide minerals such as magnetite are known to catalyze CO2 reduction, resulting in the synthesis of organic compounds. Magnetite is thermodynamically stable in Fe(II) chlorite-bearing mineral assemblages typical of some reservoir formations. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that GCS reservoirs buffered by the chlorite-kaolinite-carbonate(siderite/magnesite)-quartz assemblage favor the reduction of CO2 to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and C0, although the extent of abiotic CO2 reduction may be kinetically limited. To investigate the rates of abiotic CO2 reduction in the presence of magnetite, we performed batch abiotic CO2 reduction experiments using a Dickson-type rocking hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures (373 K) and pressures (100 bar) within the range of conditions relevant to GCS. Blank experiments containing CO2 and H2 were used to rule out the possibility of catalytic activity of the experimental apparatus. Reaction of brine-suspended magnetite nanoparticles with scCO2 at H2 partial pressures typical of reservoir rocks - up to 100 and 0.1 bars respectively - was used to investigate the kinetics of magnetite-catalyzed abiotic CO2 reduction. Later experiments introducing ferrous chlorite (ripidolite) were carried out to determine the potential for

  16. Validation status of the VARGOW oil reservoir model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Arnold, E.M.; Bowen, W.M.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-10-01

    VARGOW, a variable gas-oil-water reservoir model, provides recovery estimates suitable for assessing various reservoir production policies and regulations. Data were collected for a number of reservoirs. From this data base, three reservoirs approximating the model assumptions were selected for model testing purposes. For all three reservoirs, it has been possible to simulate the observed pressures in both interpolative and extrapolative modes. Simulating the gas/oil ratio (GOR) has not been as successful, however. The VARGOW model will predict physically unrealistic results if the reservoir being simulated is not initially at the bubble point pressure of the reservoir fluid. If the discovery pressure is slightly above the bubble point, adjustments to initial conditions can be made using a method that has been outlined in this report. If the discovery pressure is considerably above the bubble point, it is recommended that an undersaturated reservoir model be employed until the bubble point is reached. For simulating reservoirs whose discovery pressure is below the bubble point, the VARGOW model must be modified.

  17. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Modest Salt Reduction Lowers Blood Pressure and Albumin Excretion in Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Rebecca J; He, Feng J; Markandu, Nirmala D; MacGregor, Graham A

    2016-06-01

    The role of salt restriction in patients with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus is controversial, with a lack of well controlled, longer term, modest salt reduction trials in this group of patients, in spite of the marked increase in cardiovascular risk. We carried out a 12-week randomized double-blind, crossover trial of salt restriction with salt or placebo tablets, each for 6 weeks, in 46 individuals with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and untreated normal or high normal blood pressure (BP). From salt to placebo, 24-hour urinary sodium was reduced by 49±9 mmol (2.9 g salt). This reduction in salt intake led to fall in clinic BP from 136/81±2/1 mm Hg to 131/80±2/1 mm Hg, (systolic BP; P<0.01). Mean ambulatory 24-hour BP was reduced by 3/2±1/1 mm Hg (systolic BP, P<0.01 and diastolic BP, P<0.05), and albumin/creatinine ratio was reduced from 0.73 mg/mmol (0.5-1.5) to 0.64 mg/mmol (0.3-1.1; P<0.05). There was no significant change in fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, or insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, to approximately the amount recommended in public health guidelines, leads to significant and clinically relevant falls in BP in individuals who are early on in the progression of diabetes mellitus with normal or mildly raised BP. The reduction in urinary albumin excretion may carry additional benefits in reducing cardiovascular disease above the effects on BP. PMID:27160199

  20. Modest Salt Reduction Lowers Blood Pressure and Albumin Excretion in Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Rebecca J; He, Feng J; Markandu, Nirmala D; MacGregor, Graham A

    2016-06-01

    The role of salt restriction in patients with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus is controversial, with a lack of well controlled, longer term, modest salt reduction trials in this group of patients, in spite of the marked increase in cardiovascular risk. We carried out a 12-week randomized double-blind, crossover trial of salt restriction with salt or placebo tablets, each for 6 weeks, in 46 individuals with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and untreated normal or high normal blood pressure (BP). From salt to placebo, 24-hour urinary sodium was reduced by 49±9 mmol (2.9 g salt). This reduction in salt intake led to fall in clinic BP from 136/81±2/1 mm Hg to 131/80±2/1 mm Hg, (systolic BP; P<0.01). Mean ambulatory 24-hour BP was reduced by 3/2±1/1 mm Hg (systolic BP, P<0.01 and diastolic BP, P<0.05), and albumin/creatinine ratio was reduced from 0.73 mg/mmol (0.5-1.5) to 0.64 mg/mmol (0.3-1.1; P<0.05). There was no significant change in fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, or insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, to approximately the amount recommended in public health guidelines, leads to significant and clinically relevant falls in BP in individuals who are early on in the progression of diabetes mellitus with normal or mildly raised BP. The reduction in urinary albumin excretion may carry additional benefits in reducing cardiovascular disease above the effects on BP.

  1. Biogeochemical mass balances in a turbid tropical reservoir. Field data and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Doan, Thuy Kim; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Schmid, Martin

    2014-05-01

    entire mass balance of nutrients and of the mineralization rates (denitrification and aerobic benthic mineralization) calculated from the model fitted well to the field measurements. Furthermore, this analysis indicates that the benthic mineralizations are the dominant processes involved in the nutrients release. This is the first implementation of a biogeochemical model applied to a highly productive reservoir in the TMVB in order to estimate nutrients release from sediments. It could be used for scenarios of reduction of eutrophication in the reservoir. This study provides a good example of the behavior of a small tropical reservoir under intense human pressure and it will help stakeholders to adopt appropriate strategies for the management of turbid tropical reservoirs.

  2. IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid B. Grigg

    2003-10-31

    The second annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies have been undertaken with the intention to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Many items presented in this report are applicable to other interest areas: e.g. gas injection and production, greenhouse gas sequestration, chemical flooding, reservoir damage, etc. Major areas of studies include reduction of CO{sub 2} mobility to improve conformance, determining and understanding injectivity changes in particular injectivity loses, and modeling process mechanisms determined in the first two areas. Interfacial tension (IFT) between a high-pressure, high-temperature CO{sub 2} and brine/surfactant and foam stability are used to assess and screen surfactant systems. In this work the effects of salinity, pressure, temperature, surfactant concentration, and the presence of oil on IFT and CO{sub 2} foam stability were determined on the surfactant (CD1045{trademark}). Temperature, pressure, and surfactant concentration effected both IFT and foam stability while oil destabilized the foam, but did not destroy it. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) can be used as a sacrificial and an enhancing agent. This work indicates that on Berea sandstone CLS concentration, brine salinity, and temperature are dominant affects on both adsorption and desorption and that adsorption is not totally reversible. Additionally, CLS adsorption was tested on five minerals common to oil reservoirs; it was found that CLS concentration, salinity, temperature, and mineral type had significant effects on adsorption. The adsorption density from most to least was: bentonite > kaolinite > dolomite > calcite > silica. This work demonstrates the extent of dissolution and precipitation from co-injection of CO{sub 2} and brine in limestone core

  3. 20th century human pressures drive reductions in deepwater oxygen leading to losses of benthic methane-based food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Simon; Millet, Laurent; Verneaux, Valérie; Lami, Andrea; David, Etienne; Murgia, Laurie; Parent, Claire; Musazzi, Simona; Gauthier, Emilie; Bichet, Vincent; Magny, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater lakes play a key role in the global carbon cycle as sinks (organic carbon sequestration) and sources (greenhouse gas emissions). Understanding the carbon cycle response to environmental changes is becoming a crucial challenge in the context of global warming and the preponderance of human pressures. We reconstructed the long-term (1500 years) evolution of trophic functioning of the benthic food web, based on methanotrophic ancient DNA and chironomid isotope analyses). In addition, human land use is also reconstructed in three different lakes (eastern France, Jura Mountains). Our findings confirm that the benthic food web can be highly dependent on methane-derived carbon (up to 50% of the chironomid biomass) and reveal that the activation of this process can correspond to a natural functioning or be a consequence of anthropic perturbation. The studied lakes also showed a similar temporal evolution over the last century with the disappearance of the profundal aquatic insects (Chironomidae, Diptera), considered as keystone for the whole lake food web (e.g., coupling benthic-pelagic), inducing a potential collapse in the transfer of methane to top consumers. This functional state, also called the dead zone expansion, was caused by the change in human land-use occurring at the beginning of the 20th century. The strong modification of agro-pastoral practices (e.g., fertilization practices, intensive grazing, and sewage effluent) modified the influx of nutrients (by diffuse and/or point-source inputs) and induced a significant increase in the trophic status and organic matter sedimentation to reach unprecedented values. Further studies should be planned to assess dead zone expansion and, according to the regime shift theory, to provide environmental tipping points for sustainable resource management.

  4. COSTING MODELS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION: PART III- PUMPS, TANKS, AND RESERVOIRS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distribution systems are generally designed to ensure hydraulic reliability. Storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are critical in maintaining this reliability. Although storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are necessary for maintaining adequate pressure, they may also have a negati...

  5. Visit-to-Visit Variability and Reduction in Blood Pressure After a 3-Month Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Fujimi, Kanta; Ueda, Takashi; Ueda, Yoko; Matsuda, Takuro; Sakamoto, Maaya; Arimura, Tadaaki; Shiga, Yuhei; Kitajima, Ken; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-09-28

    Visit-to-visit variability (VVV) in blood pressure (BP) has been shown to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. It is unknown whether CR can improve VVV in BP as well as reducing BP. We enrolled 84 patients who had cardiovascular disease (CVD) and participated in a 3-month CR program. We measured systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP), pulse pressure (PP), and heart rate (HR) before exercise training at each visit and determined VVV in BP or HR expressed as the standard deviation of the average BP or HR. Patients who had uncontrolled BP at baseline and who did not change their antihypertensive drugs throughout the study period showed a significant reduction of both SBP and DBP with a decrease in PP after 3 months. Patients who did not change their antihypertensive drugs were divided into larger (L-) and smaller (S-) VVV in the SBP groups and L- and S-VVV in the DBP groups according to the average value of VVV in SBP or DBP. In the L-VVV in the SBP and DBP groups, VVV in SBP and DBP in the 1st month was significantly decreased after the 3rd month in both groups. HR at baseline was significantly decreased after 3 months. In addition, CR induced a significant increase in the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in blood. In conclusion, CR improved VVV in BP in patients with L-VVV in BP and evoked a significant reduction in HR and an increase in HDL-C. These effects due to the CR program may be cardioprotective.

  6. Geomechanical and Numerical Studies of Casing Damages in a Reservoir with Solid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadnejad, Mojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Casings damage is a usually reported incident during production in many fields. This incident is conventionally induced by compressional, tensional, burst or collapse forces applied to the casing string. Excessive anisotropic and non-uniform stresses, causing shear failure in unconsolidated reservoirs, are one of the main reasons reported for the casing failure. In this paper, geomechanical and finite element numerical analysis was applied to model hydraulic and mechanical interactions between casing, cement sheath and formations in a carbonate reservoir located in Southern of Iran. The geomechanical analysis indicated that significant in situ stresses induced as a result of the fault reactivation and pore pressure reduction due to reservoir depletion could be the potential reasons for the casing damage experienced in this field. To assess this, numerical analysis was carried out to simulate the casing in the presence of existing forces during drilling, completion and production phases. It was found that excessive and non-uniform stresses surrounding the wellbore together with pore pressure reduction caused the formation to loss its strength and fail. This shear failure results in solid production, creation of the cavities and deformation of the casing because of the excessive buckling force. In addition, a new empirical equation for prediction of ultimate strength of the casing was developed according to the parameters introduced by sensitivity analysis.

  7. Fully coupled analysis of reservoir compaction and subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, M.; Hansteen, H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the differences between fully-coupled and uncoupled formulations of models of production and subsidence. For highly compacting hydrocarbon reservoirs, production can cause compaction of the reservoir and subsidence of the overburden, and in turn, compaction and subsidence can affect the productivity of the reservoir by increasing the reservoir pressure. Intuitively, analyses of production and subsidence should be done in a fully-coupled fashion. However, most, if not all, of the analyses done so far on compacting reservoirs are uncoupled where production and subsidence are calculated in a staggered manner. The results of the numerical analyses using an uncoupled reservoir simulation, and a fully-coupled finite element simulation based on Biot`s formulation of a typical compacting reservoir are presented and compared. Different pore pressure response were obtained depending on whether an uncoupled or a fully-coupled analysis was performed, and also depending on whether there is arching of the overburden or not. The results of fully-coupled analyses of compaction and subsidence showed that the generation of additional pore pressure due to compaction cannot be correctly analyzed by simply adjusting the rock compressibilities in reservoir simulation. The most pronounced effect of coupling, obtained from the numerical simulations, is on the possibility of pore pressure increase close to the reservoir flanks even during production. The implications of the differences in the results of fully-coupled and uncoupled simulations are discussed.

  8. Reductions in Mean 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure After 6-Week Treatment With Canagliflozin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R; Machin, Israel; Ren, Jimmy; Trujillo, Angelina; Kawaguchi, Masato; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Damaraju, Chandrasekharrao V; Pfeifer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the early effects of canagliflozin on blood pressure (BP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension. Patients were randomized to canagliflozin 300 mg, canagliflozin 100 mg, or placebo for 6 weeks and underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring before randomization, on day 1 of treatment, and after 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean 24-hour systolic BP (SBP) from baseline to week 6. Overall, 169 patients were included (mean age, 58.6 years; glycated hemoglobin, 8.1%; seated BP 138.5/82.7 mm Hg). At week 6, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater reductions in mean 24-hour SBP than placebo (least squares mean -6.2 vs -1.2 mm Hg, respectively; P=.006). Numerical reductions in SBP were observed with canagliflozin 100 mg. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated, with side effects similar to those reported in previous studies. These results suggest that canagliflozin rapidly reduces BP in patients with T2DM and hypertension.

  9. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat fluid properties published in the original reports. This comparison allowed estimation of the ‘lost’ light hydrocarbon fractions. An Umiat 'dead' oil sample then could be physically created by adding the lost light ends to the weatherized Umiat dead oil sample. This recreated sample was recombined with solution gas to create a 'pseudo-live' Umiat oil sample which was then used for experimental PVT and phase behavior studies to determine fluid properties over the range of reservoir pressures and temperatures. The phase behavior of the ‘pseudo-live’ oil was also simulated using the Peng- Robinson equations of state (EOS). The EOS model was tuned with measured experimental data to accurately simulate the differential liberation tests in order to obtain the necessary data for reservoir simulation studies, including bubble point pressure and oil viscosity. The bubble point pressure of the reconstructed Umiat oil is 345 psi, suggesting that maintenance of reservoir pressures above that pressure will be important for the any proposed production technique. A major part of predicting how the Umiat reservoir will perform is determining the relative permeability of oil in the presence of ice. Early in the project, UAF work on samples of the Umiat reservoir indicated that there is a significant reduction in the relatively permeability of oil in the presence of ice. However, it was not clear as to why this reduction occurred or where the ice resided. To explore this further, additional experimental and theoretical work was conducted. Core flood experiments were performed on two clean Berea sandstone cores under permafrost conditions to determine the relative permeability to oil (kro) over a temperature range of 23ºC to - 10ºC and for a range of connate water salinities. Both cores showed maximum reduction in relative permeability to oil when saturated with deionized water and less

  10. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  11. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Surface Engineered Coating Systems for Aluminum Pressure Die Casting Dies: Towards a 'Smart' Die Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John J. Moore; Dr. Jianliang Lin,

    2012-07-31

    The main objective of this research program was to design and develop an optimal coating system that extends die life by minimizing premature die failure. In high-pressure aluminum die-casting, the die, core pins and inserts must withstand severe processing conditions. Many of the dies and tools in the industry are being coated to improve wear-resistance and decrease down-time for maintenance. However, thermal fatigue in metal itself can still be a major problem, especially since it often leads to catastrophic failure (i.e. die breakage) as opposed to a wear-based failure (parts begin to go out of tolerance). Tooling costs remain the largest portion of production costs for many of these parts, so the ability prevent catastrophic failures would be transformative for the manufacturing industry.The technology offers energy savings through reduced energy use in the die casting process from several factors, including increased life of the tools and dies, reuse of the dies and die components, reduction/elimination of lubricants, and reduced machine down time, and reduction of Al solder sticking on the die. The use of the optimized die coating system will also reduce environmental wastes and scrap parts. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on initial dissemination to the casting industry in 2010 and market penetration of 80% by 2020, is 3.1 trillion BTU's/year. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.63 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  12. Effect of Group Mindfulness-Based Stress-Reduction Program and Conscious Yoga on Lifestyle, Coping Strategies, and Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressures in Patients with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Somayeh; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Afrookhteh, Gita; Rahmani, Soheila; Hoveida, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy lifestyle and ineffective coping strategies are deemed significant variables among patients with hypertension. This study attempted to determine the status of these variables following intervention via the mindfulness-based stress-reduction program (MBSRP) in patients with hypertension. Method: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study sample, consisting of 30 patients referring to the Hypertension Clinic of Imam Hossein Hospital in 2013, was assigned either to the intervention (recipient of the MBSRP and conscious yoga) or to the control group (recipient of yoga training). The intervention group had 8 training sessions over 8 weeks. Lifestyle and coping strategies as well as blood pressure were measured in the intervention group before intervention and then immediately thereafter and at 2 months' follow-up and were compared to those in the control group at the same time points. Result: The mean age of the patients in the intervention (40% women) and control (53% women) groups was 43.66 ± 5.14 and 43.13 ± 5.04 years, respectively. The results showed that the mean scores of lifestyle (p value < 0.05), emotion-focused coping strategies (p value < 0.001), problem-focused coping strategies (p value < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p value < 0.001), and systolic blood pressure (p value < 0.001) were significantly different between the intervention and control groups after the intervention. Conclusion: Applying an intervention based on the MBSRP may further improve the lifestyle and coping strategies of patients with hypertension. PMID:26697087

  13. Quantification of geologic descriptions for reservoir characterization in carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, F.J.; Vander Stoep, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Recognition that a large volume of oil remains in carbonate reservoirs at the end of primary depletion and waterflooding has prompted the reevaluation of the reserve-growth potential of many existing carbonate reservoirs. Types of numerical data required include porosity, absolute permeability, relative permeability, fluid saturation, and capillary pressure, all of which are related to the size and distribution of pore space. Rock fabrics control the size and distribution of pore space and define facies that best characterize carbonate reservoirs. Thus, the link between facies descriptions and numerical engineering data is the relationship between pore-size distribution and present carbonate rock fabric. The most effective way to convert facies descriptions into engineering parameters is by considering three basic rock-fabric categories. The first category is interparticle pore space (both intergranular and intercrystalline pore types) with pore-size distribution controlled primarily by the size and shape of grains or crystals. Grain or crystal size is the key geologic measurement and, along with porosity, provides the basis for converting geologic descriptions into values for permeability, saturation, and capillarity. The second category is separate-vug pore space, such as moldic or intraparticle pore space. Separate-vug pore space adds porosity but little permeability to the reservoir rock. The contribution to saturation and capillarity depends upon the size of the separate-vug pore space. For example, moldic separate vugs will be saturated with oil, whereas microporous grains will be saturated with water. The third category is touching-vug pore space, which is vuggy pore space that is interconnected on a reservoir scale. The engineering parameters for this category are related to three diagenetic and tectonic factors.

  14. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Production-induced changes in reservoir geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoyedo, Sunday O.

    Sand production remains a source of concern in both conventional and heavy oil production. Porosity increase and changes in local stress magnitude, which often enhance permeability, have been associated with severe sanding. On the other hand, sand production has been linked to a large number of field incidences involving loss of well integrity, casing collapse and corrosion of down-hole systems. It also poses problems for separators and transport facilities. Numerous factors such as reservoir consolidation, well deviation angle through the reservoir, perforation size, grain size, capillary forces associated with water cut, flow rate and most importantly reservoir strain resulting from pore pressure depletion contribute to reservoir sanding. Understanding field-specific sand production patterns in mature fields and poorly consolidated reservoirs is vital in identifying sand-prone wells and guiding remedial activities. Reservoir strain analysis of Forties Field, located in the UK sector of the North Sea, shows that the magnitude of the production-induced strain, part of which is propagated to the base of the reservoir, is of the order of 0.2 %, which is significant enough to impact the geomechanical properties of the reservoir. Sand production analysis in the field shows that in addition to poor reservoir consolidation, a combined effect of repeated perforation, high well deviation, reservoir strain and high fluid flow rate have contributed significantly to reservoir sanding. Knowledge of reservoir saturation variation is vital for in-fill well drilling, while information on reservoir stress variation provides a useful guide for sand production management, casing design, injector placement and production management. Interpreting time-lapse difference is enhanced by decomposing time-lapse difference into saturation, pressure effects and changes in rock properties (e.g. porosity) especially in highly compacting reservoirs. Analyzing the stress and saturation

  17. Dolomite reservoirs: Porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.Q.

    1995-02-01

    Systematic analyses of the published record of dolomite reservoirs worldwide reveal that the majority of hydrocarbon-producing dolomite reservoirs occurs in (1) peritidal-dominated carbonate, (2) subtidal carbonate associated with evaporitic tidal flat/lagoon, (3) subtidal carbonate associated with basinal evaporite, and (4) nonevaporitic carbonate sequence associated with topographic high/unconformity, platform-margin buildup or fault/fracture. Reservoir characteristics vary greatly from one dolomite type to another depending upon the original sediment fabric, the mechanism by which dolomite was formed, and the extent to which early formed dolomite was modified by post-dolomitization diagenetic processes (e.g., karstification, fracturing, and burial corrosion). This paper discusses the origin of dolomite porosity and demonstrates the porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics of different dolomite types.

  18. Reservoir management of the Hartzog Draw Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Hearn, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Hartzog Draw Field is a recently-discovered major oil reservoir in Northeastern Wyoming. Initial reservoir performance indicated that the field would soon be depleted below the bubble point pressure. To evaluate secondary recovery possibilities, the working interest owners cooperated in an extensive reservoir study. This effort led to the formation of the Hartzog Draw Unit within five years of field discovery. Secondary recovery by waterflooding has begun, and enhanced recovery possibilities are being evaluated. The objectives of this paper are to 1) present the geology, performance history, and reservoir properties of the Hartzog Draw Field, 2) describe the unitization process, and 3) discuss the current status of field development and plans for enhanced recovery. Refs.

  19. Models for naturally fractured, carbonate reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Park, A.; Ozkan, G.; Zhan, X.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    This report outlines the need for new tools for the simulation of fractured carbonate reservoirs. Several problems are identified that call for the development of new reservoir simulation physical models and numerical techniques. These include: karst and vuggy media wherein Darcy`s and traditional multi-phase flow laws do not apply; the need for predicting the preproduction state of fracturing and stress so that the later response of effective stress-dependent reservoirs can be predicted; and methods for predicting the fracturing and collapse of vuggy and karst reservoirs in response to draw-down pressure created during production. Specific research directions for addressing each problem are outlined and preliminary results are noted.

  20. What's shaking?: Understanding creep and induced seismicity in depleting sandstone reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources, such as oil, gas and groundwater, removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. With global energy and water demand increasing rapidly, while availability diminishes, densely populated areas are becoming increasingly targeted for exploitation. Indeed, the impact of our geo-resources needs on the environment has already become noticeable. Deep groundwater pumping has led to significant surface subsidence in urban areas such as Venice and Bangkok. Hydrocarbons production has also led to subsidence and seismicity in offshore (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway) and onshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands). Fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased or show other time-lag effects in relation to changes in production rates. One of the main hypotheses advanced to explain this is time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the vertical rock overburden pressure. The operative deformation mechanisms may include grain-scale brittle fracturing and thermally-activated mass transfer processes (e.g. pressure solution). Unfortunately, these mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. As a first step to better describe creep in sedimentary granular aggregates, we have derived a universal, simple model for intergranular pressure solution (IPS) within an ordered pack of spherical grains. This universal model is able to predict the conditions under which each of the respective pressure solution serial processes, i.e. diffusion, precipitation or dissolution, is dominant. In essence, this creates a generic deformation mechanism map for IPS in any granular material. We have used

  1. Temperature dependence of hydraulic properties of Upper Rhine Graben rocks at conditions modelling deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Castañeda, Mariela Carolina; Renner, Joerg; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of reservoir rocks' hydraulic properties critically affects the operation and long term sustainability of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Mechanical and chemical effects modify the permeability and the storage capacity of a reservoir, whose time characteristics have remained poorly constrained up to now. The permeability (k) and specific storage capacity (s) of the rocks constituting the geothermal reservoir are important parameters controlling the extent of the space-time characteristics of the pressure drawdown (or buildup at the reinjection site). To study the evolution of permeability and specific storage capacity as a function of pressure, temperature, and time, we performed oscillatory pore pressure tests. Experiments were performed using samples collected at surface outcrops representing the lithological sequence of the Upper Rhine Graben reservoir in southern Germany, i.e. sandstone and limestone, as well as Padang granite, representing a homogeneous, crystalline reservoir rock. Experiments were run at temperatures between 20 and 200 ° C, confining pressures between 20 and 110 MPa, and a fixed fluid pressure of 10 MPa, modeling characteristic conditions of deep geothermal reservoirs. Intact samples of granite, limestone and sandstone yield permeability and specific storage capacity of about 10‑18, 10‑15, and 10‑14 m2, and 10‑10, 10‑11 and 10‑8 Pa‑1, respectively, with modest dependence on temperature and effective pressure. In addition, longitudinally fractured samples were prepared by simple splitting or cutting and grinding. Grinding was performed with sandpaper of different ISO grits designations (P100, P600, and P1200) to systematically vary the surfaces' roughness. Fractures cause an increase in room-temperature permeability up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitudes for samples of granite and limestone, respectively. Their pressure dependence corresponds to a reduction in permeability modulus by about one order of magnitude

  2. Temperature dependence of hydraulic properties of Upper Rhine Graben rocks at conditions modelling deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Castañeda, Mariela Carolina; Renner, Joerg; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of reservoir rocks' hydraulic properties critically affects the operation and long term sustainability of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Mechanical and chemical effects modify the permeability and the storage capacity of a reservoir, whose time characteristics have remained poorly constrained up to now. The permeability (k) and specific storage capacity (s) of the rocks constituting the geothermal reservoir are important parameters controlling the extent of the space-time characteristics of the pressure drawdown (or buildup at the reinjection site). To study the evolution of permeability and specific storage capacity as a function of pressure, temperature, and time, we performed oscillatory pore pressure tests. Experiments were performed using samples collected at surface outcrops representing the lithological sequence of the Upper Rhine Graben reservoir in southern Germany, i.e. sandstone and limestone, as well as Padang granite, representing a homogeneous, crystalline reservoir rock. Experiments were run at temperatures between 20 and 200 ° C, confining pressures between 20 and 110 MPa, and a fixed fluid pressure of 10 MPa, modeling characteristic conditions of deep geothermal reservoirs. Intact samples of granite, limestone and sandstone yield permeability and specific storage capacity of about 10-18, 10-15, and 10-14 m2, and 10-10, 10-11 and 10-8 Pa-1, respectively, with modest dependence on temperature and effective pressure. In addition, longitudinally fractured samples were prepared by simple splitting or cutting and grinding. Grinding was performed with sandpaper of different ISO grits designations (P100, P600, and P1200) to systematically vary the surfaces' roughness. Fractures cause an increase in room-temperature permeability up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitudes for samples of granite and limestone, respectively. Their pressure dependence corresponds to a reduction in permeability modulus by about one order of magnitude. However, the

  3. An integrated approach to reservoir engineering at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, G.M.

    1992-12-01

    A numerical model has been developed for the Pleasant Bayou Geothermal-Geopressured reservoir. This reservoir description is the result of integration of a variety of data, including geological and geophysical interpretations, pressure transient test analyses, and well operations. Transient test analyses suggested several enhancements to the geologic description provided by University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), including the presence of an internal fault not previously identified. The transient tests also suggested water influx from an adjacent aquifer during the long-term testing of Pleasant Bayou; comparisons between transient test analyses and the reservoir description from BEG suggests that this fault exhibits pressure-dependent behavior. Below some pressure difference across the fault, it remains a no-flow barrier; above this threshold pressure drop the barrier fails, and fluid moves across the fault. A history match exercise is presented, using the hypothesized {open_quotes}leaky fault.{close_quotes} Successful match of 4 years of production rates and estimates of average reservoir pressure supports the reservoir description developed herein. Sensitivity studies indicate that the degree of communication between the perforated interval and the upper and lower sands in the reservoir (termed {open_quotes}distal volume{close_quotes} by BEG) impact simulation results very little, whereas results are quite sensitive to storage and transport properties of this distal volume. The prediction phase of the study indicates that Pleasant Bayou is capable of producing 20,000 STB/d through 1997, with the final bottomhole pressure approximately 1600 psi above abandonment pressure.

  4. Recovery of heavy oils from deep reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, H. M.; Fox, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology required to economically produce heavy oil from deep reservoirs. Two approaches are being pursued: improving the thermal efficiency of injection string components and the development of downhole steam generators to achieve steam injection. The first approach has seen the testing of commercially available components at a high temperature (650/sup 0/F)/high pressure (2100 psi) simulation facility. Promising components will be tested shortly in a field test conducted by Husky Oil at Lloydminster, Canada. The second approach has seen the prototype development and laboratory testing of low-pressure and high-pressure hydrocarbon-fueled downhole steam generators. Concurrently, a modified high pressure steam generator has undergone extensive laboratory combustion studies and is currently being employed in a field test at Chevron's Kern River field. This field test is examining the effects of simultaneous injection of steam and combustion products on the reservoir and oil recovery. 9 figures.

  5. Geothermal reservoir technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1985-09-01

    A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  6. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subject to FMVSS No. 121 on the date of manufacture and all vacuum braked vehicles. Each motor vehicle using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the... pressure or vacuum below 70 percent of that indicated by the air or vacuum gauge immediately before...

  7. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subject to FMVSS No. 121 on the date of manufacture and all vacuum braked vehicles. Each motor vehicle using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the... pressure or vacuum below 70 percent of that indicated by the air or vacuum gauge immediately before...

  8. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subject to FMVSS No. 121 on the date of manufacture and all vacuum braked vehicles. Each motor vehicle using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the... pressure or vacuum below 70 percent of that indicated by the air or vacuum gauge immediately before...

  9. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... subject to FMVSS No. 121 on the date of manufacture and all vacuum braked vehicles. Each motor vehicle using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the... pressure or vacuum below 70 percent of that indicated by the air or vacuum gauge immediately before...

  10. 49 CFR 393.50 - Reservoirs required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subject to FMVSS No. 121 on the date of manufacture and all vacuum braked vehicles. Each motor vehicle using air or vacuum braking must have either reserve capacity, or a reservoir, that would enable the... pressure or vacuum below 70 percent of that indicated by the air or vacuum gauge immediately before...

  11. Predicting reservoir wettability via well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Cheng; Fu, Jinhua; Shi, Yujiang; Li, Gaoren; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-01

    Wettability is an important factor in controlling the distribution of oil and water. However, its evaluation has so far been a difficult problem because no log data can directly indicate it. In this paper, a new method is proposed for quantitatively predicting reservoir wettability via well log analysis. Specifically, based on the J function, diagenetic facies classification and the piecewise power functions, capillary pressure curves are constructed from conventional logs and a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log respectively. Under the influence of wettability, the latter is distorted while the former remains unaffected. Therefore, the ratio of the median radius obtained from the two kinds of capillary pressure curve is calculated to reflect wettability, a quantitative relationship between the ratio and reservoir wettability is then established. According to the low-permeability core sample capillary pressure curve, NMR {{T}2} spectrum and contact angle experimental data from the bottom of the Upper Triassic reservoirs in western Ordos Basin, China, two kinds of constructing capillary pressure curve models and a predictive wettability model are calibrated. The wettability model is verified through the Amott wettability index and saturation exponent from resistivity measurement and their determined wettability levels are comparable, indicating that the proposed model is quite reliable. In addition, the model’s good application effect is exhibited in the field study. Thus, the quantitatively predicting reservoir wettability model proposed in this paper provides an effective tool for formation evaluation, field development and the improvement of oil recovery.

  12. The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik; Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA )

    1989-08-01

    These are appendices A thru E of the Ahuachapan geothermal field reservoir analysis. The volume contains: mineralogy contours, ionic chlorine and silicon dioxide contours, well summaries, and temperature and pressure effects. (JEF)

  13. Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-01-01

    Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

  14. Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

    1988-12-01

    This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

  15. 95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  17. Geothermal reservoir engineering research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, H. J., Jr.; Kruger, P.; Brigham, W. E.; London, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Stanford University research program on the study of stimulation and reservoir engineering of geothermal resources commenced as an interdisciplinary program in September, 1972. The broad objectives of this program have been: (1) the development of experimental and computational data to evaluate the optimum performance of fracture-stimulated geothermal reservoirs; (2) the development of a geothermal reservoir model to evaluate important thermophysical, hydrodynamic, and chemical parameters based on fluid-energy-volume balances as part of standard reservoir engineering practice; and (3) the construction of a laboratory model of an explosion-produced chimney to obtain experimental data on the processes of in-place boiling, moving flash fronts, and two-phase flow in porous and fractured hydrothermal reservoirs.

  18. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion. PMID:26509211

  19. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion.

  20. Respiratory monitoring system based on the nasal pressure technique for the analysis of sleep breathing disorders: Reduction of static and dynamic errors, and comparisons with thermistors and pneumotachographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Mesquita, Jayme; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2004-03-01

    Thermally sensitive devices—thermistors—have usually been used to monitor sleep-breathing disorders. However, because of their long time constant, these devices are not able to provide a good characterization of fast events, like hypopneas. Nasal pressure recording technique (NPR) has recently been suggested to quantify airflow during sleep. It is claimed that the short time constants of the devices used to implement this technique would allow an accurate analysis of fast abnormal respiratory events. However, these devices present errors associated with nonlinearities and acoustic resonance that could reduce the diagnostic value of the NPR. Moreover, in spite of the high scientific and clinical potential, there is no detailed description of a complete instrumentation system to implement this promising technique in sleep studies. In this context, the purpose of this work was twofold: (1) describe the development of a flexible NPR device and (2) evaluate the performance of this device when compared to pneumotachographs (PNTs) and thermistors. After the design details are described, the system static accuracy is evaluated by a comparative analysis with a PNT. This analysis revealed a significant reduction (p<0.001) of the static error when system nonlinearities were reduced. The dynamic performance of the NPR system was investigated by frequency response analysis and time constant evaluations and the results showed that the developed device response was as good as PNT and around 100 times faster (τ=5,3 ms) than thermistors (τ=512 ms). Experimental results obtained in simulated clinical conditions and in a patient are presented as examples, and confirmed the good features achieved in engineering tests. These results are in close agreement with physiological fundamentals, supplying substantial evidence that the improved dynamic and static characteristics of this device can contribute to a more accurate implementation of medical research projects and to improve the

  1. Effects of pressure reductions in a proposed siphon water lift system at St. Stephen Dam, South Carolina, on mortality rates of juvenile American shad and blueback herring. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, J.M.; Schilt, C.R.; Jones, D.P.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents results of studies to predict the mortality rate of juvenile blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) and American shad (A. sapidissima) associated with reduced pressure as they pass downstream through a proposed siphon water lift system at St. Stephen Dam, South Carolina. The primary function of the siphon is to increase attracting flow to better guide upstream migrating adult herring of both species into the existing fish lift for upstream passage. The US Army Engineer District, Charleston, wishes to consider the siphon as an alternative bypass route through the dam for downstream migrating juvenile and adult herring. A pressure-reduction testing system that emulates some of the pressure characteristics of the siphon was used to determine the approximate percentage of juvenile fishes that could be reasonably expected to be killed passing through the reduced pressures anticipated for the siphon water lift system. The testing system could duplicate the range of pressure change anticipated for the siphon lift system but could not obtain pressures lower than 4.1 psi, whereas pressures for some design alternatives may approach the theoretical minimum pressure of 0.0 psi. Study results indicate that the mortality rate is probably about 20 percent. Power analysis indicates that mortality rate above 30 percent is unlikely. Conducting additional mortality studies is recommended to refine predicted mortality rates. Measures should be taken to prevent juvenile fish from entering the siphon lift system if excessive mortality rates are observed.

  2. The Optimal Operation of Multi-reservoir Floodwater Resources Control Based on GA-PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Zhu, X.; Lian, Y.; Fang, G.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Floodwater resources control operation has an important role to reduce flood disaster, ease the contradiction between water supply and demand and improve flood resource utilization. Based on the basin safety and floodwater resources utilization with the maximum benefit for floodwater optimal scheduling, the optimal operation of multi-reservoir floodwater resources control model is established. There are two objectives of floodwater resources control operation in multi-reservoir system. The first one is floodwater control safety, the other one is floodwater resource utilization with the maximum benefit. For the floodwater control safety target, the maximal flood peak reduction criterion is selected as the objective function. The maximal flood peak reduction criterion means that choosing reducing most peak flow as the judgment standard of the flood control operations optimal solution. For the floodwater resource utilization, maximum benefit of floodwater utilization refers to make full use of multi-reservoir capacity, accumulate transit flood as much as possible. In the other word, it refers to take releasing water as least as possible as the target in the case of determining the flood process. The model is solved by the coupling optimal method of genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization (GA-PSO). GA-PSO uses the mutation for reference and takes PSO as a template, introduces the crossover and mutation into the search process of PSO in order to improve the search capabilities of particles. In order to make the particles have the characteristics of the current global best solution, crossover and mutation are used in the updated particles. Taking Shilianghe reservoir and Anfengshan reservoir in Jiangsu Province, China, for an case study, the results show that the optimal operation will reduce the floodwater resources control pressure, as well as keep nearly 81.11 million cubic meters floodwater resources accumulating in Longlianghe river and Anfengshan

  3. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  4. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the preceding, the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this topical report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48.3km x48.3km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case of Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a. The Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the verification well VW2 which was drilled in 2012. The new porosity and permeability modeling was

  5. Optoelectronic reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Paquot, Y; Duport, F; Smerieri, A; Dambre, J; Schrauwen, B; Haelterman, M; Massar, S

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

  6. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  7. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-02-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

  8. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  9. Mechanical Testing Development for Reservoir Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Wenski, E.G.

    2000-05-22

    The goal of this project was to determine the machining techniques and testing capabilities required for mechanical property evaluation of commercially procured reservoir forgings. Due to the small size of these specific forgings, specialized methods are required to adequately machine and test these sub-miniature samples in accordance with the requirements of ASTM-E8 and ASTM-E9. At the time of project initiation, no capability existed at Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) to verify the physical properties of these reservoirs as required on the drawing specifications. The project determined the sample definitions, machining processes, and testing procedures to verify the physical properties of the reservoir forgings; specifically, tensile strength, yield strength, reduction of area, and elongation. In addition, a compression test method was also developed to minimize sample preparation time and provide a more easily machined test sample while maintaining the physical validation of the forging.

  10. The Anderson Reservoir seismic gap - Induced aseismicity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    1976-01-01

    A persistent 10-km seismicity gap along the Calaveras fault appears to be related to the presence of the Leroy Anderson Reservoir in the Calaveras-Silver Creek fault zones southeast of San Jose, California. A magnitude-4.7 earthquake occurred at a depth of 5 km in the centre of the gap on October 3, 1973. The sequence of immediate aftershocks usually accompanying shallow earthquakes of this magnitude in central California did not occur. A bridge crossing the reservoir near its southeast end has been severely deformed, apparently the result of tectonic creep on the Calaveras fault. The occurrence of creep and absence of small earthquakes along the Calaveras in the vicinity of the reservoir suggest a transition from stick slip to stable sliding, possibly brought about by increased pore pressure. ?? 1976.

  11. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nayyer

    corrected for, indicate water encroachment at the base of the producing reservoir. I also identify specific sites of leakage from various unproduced reservoirs, the result of regional pressure blowdown as explained in previous studies; those earlier studies, however, were unable to identify direct evidence of fluid movement. Of particular interest is the identification of one site where oil apparently leaked from one reservoir into a "new" reservoir that did not originally contain oil, but was ideally suited as a trap for fluids leaking from the neighboring spill-point. With continued pressure drop, oil in the new reservoir increased as more oil entered into the reservoir and expanded, liberating gas from solution. Because of the limited volume available for oil and gas in that temporary trap, oil and gas also escaped from it into the surrounding formation. I also note that some of the reservoirs demonstrate time-lapse changes only in the "gas cap" and not in the oil zone, even though gas must be coming out of solution everywhere in the reservoir. This is explained by interplay between pore-fluid modulus reduction by gas saturation decrease and dry-frame modulus increase by frame stiffening. In the second part of this work, I examine various rock-physics models in an attempt to quantitatively account for frame-stiffening that results from reduced pore-fluid pressure in the producing reservoir, searching for a model that would predict the unusual AVO features observed in the time-lapse prestack and stacked data at Teal South. While several rock-physics models are successful at predicting the time-lapse response for initial production, most fail to match the observations for continued production between Phase I and Phase II. Because the reservoir was initially overpressured and unconsolidated, reservoir compaction was likely significant, and is probably accomplished largely by uniaxial strain in the vertical direction; this implies that an anisotropic model may be required

  12. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  13. Potential Mammalian Filovirus Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Darin S.; Mills, James N.; Johnson, Karl M.

    2004-01-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses are maintained in unknown reservoir species; spillover into human populations results in occasional human cases or epidemics. We attempted to narrow the list of possibilities regarding the identity of those reservoir species. We made a series of explicit assumptions about the reservoir: it is a mammal; it supports persistent, largely asymptomatic filovirus infections; its range subsumes that of its associated filovirus; it has coevolved with the virus; it is of small body size; and it is not a species that is commensal with humans. Under these assumptions, we developed priority lists of mammal clades that coincide distributionally with filovirus outbreak distributions and compared these lists with those mammal taxa that have been tested for filovirus infection in previous epidemiologic studies. Studying the remainder of these taxa may be a fruitful avenue for pursuing the identity of natural reservoirs of filoviruses. PMID:15663841

  14. Geothermal reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. W., Jr.; Faust, C.; Pinder, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    The prediction of long-term geothermal reservoir performance and the environmental impact of exploiting this resource are two important problems associated with the utilization of geothermal energy for power production. Our research effort addresses these problems through numerical simulation. Computer codes based on the solution of partial-differential equations using finite-element techniques are being prepared to simulate multiphase energy transport, energy transport in fractured porous reservoirs, well bore phenomena, and subsidence.

  15. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  16. Modeling and optimizing a gas-water reservoir: Enhanced recovery with waterflooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.E.; Monash, E.A.; Waterman, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    Accepted practice dictates that waterflooding of gas reservoirs should commence, if ever, only when the reservoir pressure has declined to the minimum production pressure. Analytical proof of this hypothesis has yet to appear in the literature however. This paper considers a model for a gas-water reservoir with a variable production rate and enhanced recovery with waterflooding and, using an initial dynamic programming approach, confirms the above hypothesis. ?? 1979 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  17. Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Bjornsson, S.; Lippmann, M.; Pruess, K.

    1982-09-01

    Numerical simulation methods are used to study how the exploitation of different horizons affects the behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir. Our reservoir model is a schematic representation of the Olkaria field in Kenya. The model consists of a two-phase vapordominated zone overlying the main liquid-dominated reservoir. Four different cases were studied, with fluid produced from: (1) the vapor zone only, (2) the liquid zone only, (3) both zones, and (4) both zones but with lower values for vertical permeability and porosity assumed. The results indicate that production from the shallow two-phase zone, although resulting in higher enthalpy fluids, may not be advantageous in the long run. Shallow production gives rise to a rather localized depletion of the reservoir, whereas production from deeper horizons may yield a more uniform depletion process if vertical permeability is sufficiently large. The exploitation from deeper zones causes boiling and subsequent upflow of steam that condenses at shallow depths. This tends to make temperatures and pressures more uniform throughout the reservoir, resulting in maximum energy recovery.

  18. Conowingo Reservoir Sedimentation and Chesapeake Bay: State of the Science.

    PubMed

    Cerco, Carl F

    2016-05-01

    The Conowingo Reservoir is situated on the Susquehanna River, immediately upstream of Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States. Sedimentation in the reservoir provides an unintended benefit to the bay by preventing sediments, organic matter, and nutrients from entering the bay. The sediment storage capacity of the reservoir is nearly exhausted, however, and the resulting increase in loading of sediments and associated materials is a potential threat to Chesapeake Bay water quality. In response to this threat, the Lower Susquehanna River Watershed Assessment was conducted. The assessment indicates the reservoir is in a state of "dynamic equilibrium" in which sediment loads from the upstream watershed to the reservoir are balanced by sediments leaving the reservoir. Increased sediment loads are not a threat to bay water quality. Increased loads of associated organic matter and nutrients are, however, detrimental. Bottom-water dissolved oxygen declines of 0.1 to 0.2 g m are projected as a result of organic matter oxidation and enhanced eutrophication. The decline is small relative to normal variations but results in violations of standards enforced in a recently enacted total maximum daily load. Enhanced reductions in nutrient loads from the watershed are recommended to offset the decline in water quality caused by diminished retention in the reservoir. The assessment exposed several knowledge gaps that require additional investigation, including the potential for increased loading at flows below the threshold for reservoir scour and the nature and reactivity of organic matter and nutrients scoured from the reservoir bottom. PMID:27136154

  19. Conowingo Reservoir Sedimentation and Chesapeake Bay: State of the Science.

    PubMed

    Cerco, Carl F

    2016-05-01

    The Conowingo Reservoir is situated on the Susquehanna River, immediately upstream of Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States. Sedimentation in the reservoir provides an unintended benefit to the bay by preventing sediments, organic matter, and nutrients from entering the bay. The sediment storage capacity of the reservoir is nearly exhausted, however, and the resulting increase in loading of sediments and associated materials is a potential threat to Chesapeake Bay water quality. In response to this threat, the Lower Susquehanna River Watershed Assessment was conducted. The assessment indicates the reservoir is in a state of "dynamic equilibrium" in which sediment loads from the upstream watershed to the reservoir are balanced by sediments leaving the reservoir. Increased sediment loads are not a threat to bay water quality. Increased loads of associated organic matter and nutrients are, however, detrimental. Bottom-water dissolved oxygen declines of 0.1 to 0.2 g m are projected as a result of organic matter oxidation and enhanced eutrophication. The decline is small relative to normal variations but results in violations of standards enforced in a recently enacted total maximum daily load. Enhanced reductions in nutrient loads from the watershed are recommended to offset the decline in water quality caused by diminished retention in the reservoir. The assessment exposed several knowledge gaps that require additional investigation, including the potential for increased loading at flows below the threshold for reservoir scour and the nature and reactivity of organic matter and nutrients scoured from the reservoir bottom.

  20. Reservoir engineering studies of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal resource; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Min; Less, K.; Miller, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Transient pressure analysis techniques have been used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A fault-controlled aquifer influx model has also been developed to account for pressure support observed during both reservoir depletion and recovery phases. The Gladys McCall No. 1 well was drilled and completed in the lower Miocene geopressured sandstones under the US Department of Energy geopressured-geothermal research program. The well was shut in October 1987 after producing over 27 MMstb of brine and 676 MMscf gas since October 1983. Eight pressure transient tests were conducted in the well. Analysis of transient pressure data provided a quantitative evaluation of reservoir characteristics, including: (a) formation transmissibility and skin, (b) the size and possible shape of the main producing reservoir, and (c) characteristics of the pressure support mechanism. The pressure behavior of 1983 Reservoir Limits Test (RLT) suggested that the Gladys McCall reservoir might have a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. An elongated numerical model developed accordingly was able to reproduce the pressure characteristics shown in the test. During both the reservoir production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. Based on reservoir material-balance calculations, an aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir.

  1. Reservoir engineering studies of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal resource. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.M.; Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    Transient pressure analysis techniques have been used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A fault-controlled aquifer influx model has also been developed to account for pressure support observed during both reservoir depletion and recovery phases. The Gladys McCall No. 1 well was drilled and completed in the lower Miocene geopressured sandstones under the US Department of energy geopressured-geothermal research program. The well was shut in october 1987 after producing over 27 MMstb of brine and 676 MMscf gas since October 1983. Eight pressure transient tests were conducted in the well. Analysis of transient pressure data provided a quantitative evaluation of reservoir characteristics, including: (a) formation transmissibility and skin, (b) the size and possible shape of the main producing reservoir, (c) characteristics of the pressure support mechanism. The pressure behavior of 1983 Reservoir Limits Test (RLT) suggested that the Gladys McCall reservoir might have a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. An elongated numerical model developed accordingly was able to reproduce the pressure characteristics show in the test. During both the reservoir production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. Based on reservoir material-balance calculations, an aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir.

  2. Paonia Reservoir Sediment Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrel, S.; Collins, K.; Williams, C.

    2014-12-01

    Paonia Dam and Reservoir are located on Muddy Creek, a tributary of the North Fork Gunnison River in western Colorado. Since dam closure in 1962, the 2002 survey estimates an annual sedimentation rate of 153,000 m3/y, resulting in a 25% loss of total reservoir capacity. Long before sediment levels completely fill the reservoir, the outlet works have recently plugged with sediment and debris, adversely impacting operations, and emphasizing the urgency of formulating an effective sediment management plan. Starting in 2010-2011, operations were changed to lower the reservoir and flush sediment through the outlet works in early spring before filling the pool for irrigation. Even though the flushing strategy through the long, narrow reservoir (~5 km long and 0.3 km wide) has prevented outlet works plugging, a long term plan is needed to manage inflowing and deposited sediment more efficiently. Reclamation's Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group is leading an effort to study the past and current sediment issues at Paonia Dam and Reservoir, evaluate feasible sediment management alternatives, and formulate a plan for future operations and monitoring. The study is building on previously collected data and the existing knowledge base to develop a comprehensive, sustainable sediment management plan. The study is being executed in three phases: Phase 1 consisted of an initial site visit to map and sample existing reservoir bottom sediments, a preliminary site evaluation upstream and downstream of the dam, and establishment of time-lapse photo sites and taking initial ground-based photos. Phase 2 includes a bathymetric survey of entire reservoir and 11 km of the river downstream of the dam, continuous suspended sediment monitoring upstream and downstream of the reservoir, and collection of additional core samples of reservoir bottom sediments. Phase 3 involves the evaluation of current and past operations and sediment management practices, evaluate feasible sediment

  3. Relation between facies, diagenesis, and reservoir quality of Rotliegende reservoirs in north Germany

    SciTech Connect

    David, F.; Gast, R.; Kraft, T. )

    1993-09-01

    In north Germany, the majority of Rotliegende gas fields is confined to an approximately 50 km-wide east-west-orientated belt, which is situated on the gently north-dipping flank of the southern Permian basin. Approximately 400 billion m[sup 3] of natural gas has been found in Rotliegende reservoir sandstones with average porosities of depths ranging from 3500 to 5000 m. Rotliegende deposition was controlled by the Autunian paleo-relief, and arid climate and cyclic transgressions of the desert lake. In general, wadis and large dunefields occur in the hinterland, sebkhas with small isolate dunes and shorelines define the coastal area, and a desert lake occurs to the north. The sandstones deposited in large dunefields contain only minor amounts of illite, anhydrite, and calcite and form good reservoirs. In contrast, the small dunes formed in the sebkha areas were affected by fluctuations of the desert lake groundwaters, causing the infiltration of detrital clay and precipitation of gypsum and calcite. These cements were transformed to illite, anhydrite, and calcite-II during later diagenesis, leading to a significant reduction of the reservoir quality. The best reservoirs occur in the shoreline sandstones because porosity and permeability were preserved by early magnesium-chlorite diagenesis. Since facies controls diagenesis and consequently reservoir quality, mapping of facies also indicates the distribution of reservoir and nonreservoir rocks. This information is used to identify play area and to interpret and calibrate three-dimensional seismic data.

  4. Water coning in fractured basement reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, S.E.D.M.; Darwich, T.D.; Asaad, Y.

    1995-11-01

    The problem of water coning in fractured basement reservoirs has been addressed in this work. The outcome of experimental and theoretical investigation to determine the critical production rate for single- and multi-fractured system, the capillary pressure effect, and the break-through time is presented. The results of the experimental work verify the presented theoretical relationship for different fluid viscosities, fracture angles, oil-water contacts (OWC), and rates for the case of single fracture system. The results also indicate that the capillary pressure effect may be generally neglected if the distance between the OWC and the fluid entry is sufficiently large compared to the capillary rise. The extension of the critical rate determination for a multi-fractured reservoir is also discussed. Finally, the main factors influencing the break-through time were investigated. The difference in viscosity between the oil and water phases has been fond to be the main factor affecting the breakthrough time.

  5. Process employing CO/sub 2//CH gas mixtures for secondary exploitation of oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, L.; Dolleschall, S.; Nemeth, E.; Tiszai, G.; Balint, V.; Torok, J.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a process for the secondary recovery of crude oil from subterranean reservoirs by injecting carbon dioxide-containing gas into the reservoir through at least one injection well penetrating into the reservoir until a desired volume of carbon dioxide has been added. Then, water is injected through at least one injection well to force such carbon dioxide through the reservoir, and oil is withdrawn through at least one production well at such a flow rate as to maintain a reservoir pressure of at least 100 atm. until the water breaks through into the production well. The improvement described here comprises diluting the carbon dioxide gas in the reservoir with from 5 to 35 vol. % of hydrocarbon gases at a reservoir pressure ranging from above 107 up to 250 atm.

  6. Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity for Depleted Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yen Ting; Shen, Chien-Hao; Tseng, Chi-Chung; Fan, Chen-Hui; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    A depleted gas reservoir is one of the best options for CO2 storage for many reasons. First of all, the storage safety or the caprock integrity has been proven because the natural gas was trapped in the formation for a very long period of time. Also the formation properties and fluid flow characteristics for the reservoir have been well studied since the discovery of the gas reservoir. Finally the surface constructions and facilities are very useful and relatively easy to convert for the use of CO2 storage. The purpose of this study was to apply an analytical approach to estimate CO2 storage capacity in a depleted gas reservoir. The analytical method we used is the material balance equation (MBE), which have been widely used in natural gas storage. We proposed a modified MBE for CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir by introducing the z-factors of gas, CO2 and the mixture of the two. The MBE can be derived to a linear relationship between the ratio of pressure to gas z-factor (p/z) and the cumulative term (Gp-Ginj, where Gp is the cumulative gas production and Ginj is the cumulative CO2 injection). The CO2 storage capacity can be calculated when constraints of reservoir recovery pressure are adopted. The numerical simulation was also used for the validation of the theoretical estimation of CO2 storage capacity from the MBE. We found that the quantity of CO2 stored is more than that of gas produced when the reservoir pressure is recovered from the abandon pressure to the initial pressure. This result was basically from the fact that the gas- CO2 mixture z-factors are lower than the natural gas z-factors in reservoir conditions. We also established a useful p/z plot to easily observe the pressure behavior of CO2 storage and efficiently calculate the CO2 storage capacity. The application of the MBE we proposed was demonstrated by a case study of a depleted gas reservoir in northwestern Taiwan. The estimated CO2 storage capacities from conducting reservoir simulation

  7. Sustainable reservoir operation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brennan T; Jager, Yetta; March, Patrick

    2007-07-01

    Reservoir releases are typically operated to maximize the efficiency of hydropower production and the value of hydropower produced. In practice, ecological considerations are limited to those required by law. We first describe reservoir optimization methods that include mandated constraints on environmental and other water uses. Next, we describe research to formulate and solve reservoir optimization problems involving both energy and environmental water needs as objectives. Evaluating ecological objectives is a challenge in these problems for several reasons. First, it is difficult to predict how biological populations will respond to flow release patterns. This problem can be circumvented by using ecological models. Second, most optimization methods require complex ecological responses to flow to be quantified by a single metric, preferably a currency that can also represent hydropower benefits. Ecological valuation of instream flows can make optimization methods that require a single currency for the effects of flow on energy and river ecology possible. Third, holistic reservoir optimization problems are unlikely to be structured such that simple solution methods can be used, necessitating the use of flexible numerical methods. One strong advantage of optimal control is the ability to plan for the effects of climate change. We present ideas for developing holistic methods to the point where they can be used for real-time operation of reservoirs. We suggest that developing ecologically sound optimization tools should be a priority for hydropower in light of the increasing value placed on sustaining both the ecological and energy benefits of riverine ecosystems long into the future.

  8. 49 CFR 236.792 - Reservoir, equalizing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equalizing piston chamber of the automatic brake valve, to provide uniform service reductions in brake pipe pressure regardless of the length of the train. Cross Reference: Rocker, see § 236.755....

  9. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    PubMed Central

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations. PMID:22371825

  10. Lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume in the Ecosystems of the World series studies lakes and reservoirs. The book opens with a discussion of the ecosystem processes that are common to all lakes and reservoirs and then proceeds to a description of mathematical models of these processes. The chapters concentrate on lakes and reservoirs in different parts of the world, ranging from polar to tropical lakes, and in many of the chapters the effects of human activities such as dam construction, increased nutrient inputs, toxic contaminants and fish introduction, are also considered. The book concludes with a summary of the efforts at lake restoration that are being undertaken in many communities in an attempt to undo the damage that has resulted from some of these activities.

  11. Assessing the effects of microbial metabolism and metabolities on reservoir pore structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Adkins, J.P.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Tanner, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of microbial treatment on pore structure of sandstone and carbonatereservoirs was determined. Understanding how different bacterial strains and their metabolic bioproducts affect reservoir pore structure will permit the prudent application of microorganisms for enhanced oil recovery. The microbial strains tested included Clostridium acetobutylicum, a polymer-producing Bacillus strain, and an unidentified halophilic anaerobe that mainly produced acids and gases. Electrical conductivity, absolute permeability, porosity and centrifuge capillary pressure were used to examine rock pore structures. Modifications of the pore structure observed in the laboratory cores included pore enlargement due to acid dissolution of carbonates and poare throat reduction due to biomass plugging. This paper shows that careful selection of microbes based on proper understanding of the reservoir petrophysical characteristics is necessary for applications of microbially enhanced oil recovery. These methods and results can be useful to field operators and laboratory researchers involved in design and screening of reservoirs for MEOR. The methods are also applicable in evaluation of formation damage caused by drilling, injection or completion fluids or stimulation caused by acids.

  12. REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    George Scott III

    2002-08-01

    Ongoing Phase 2 work comprises the development and field-testing of a real-time reservoir stimulation diagnostic system. Phase 3 work commenced in June 2001, and involved conducting research, development and field-testing of real-time enhanced dual-fluid stimulation processes. Experimental field-testing to date includes three well tests. Application of these real-time stimulation processes and diagnostic technologies has been technically successful with commercial production from the ''marginal'' reservoirs in the first two well tests. The third well test proved downhole-mixing is an efficient process for acid stimulation of a carbonate reservoir that produced oil and gas with 2200 psi bottomhole reservoir pressure, however, subsequent shut-in pressure testing indicated the reservoir was characterized by low-permeability. Realtimezone continues to seek patent protection in foreign markets to the benefit of both RTZ and NETL. Realtimezone and the NETL have licensed the United States patented to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies, from well testing conducted over the last 12-month work period and including well test scheduled for year-end of 2002. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer, public presentations and industry publications. Final Phase 3 test work will be focused on further field-testing the innovational process of blending stimulation fluids downhole. This system provides a number of advantages in comparison to older industry fracturing techniques and allows the operator to control reservoir fracture propagation and concentrations of proppant placed in the reservoir, in real-time. Another observed advantage is that lower friction pressures result, which results in lower pump treating pressures and safer reservoir hydraulic fracturing jobs.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Reservoirs in the Lower Jordan Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Alshboul, Zeyad; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed monthly hydrological, meteorological and water quality data from three irrigation and drinking water reservoirs in the lower Jordan River basin and estimated the atmospheric emission rates of CO2. The data were collected between 2006 and 2013 and show that the reservoirs, which differ in size and age, were net sources of CO2. The estimated surface fluxes were comparable in magnitude to those reported for hydroelectric reservoirs in the tropical and sub-tropical zones. Highest emission rates were observed for a newly established reservoir, which was initially filled during the sampling period. In the two older reservoirs, CO2 partial pressures and fluxes were significantly decreasing during the observation period, which could be related to simultaneously occurring temporal trends in water residence time and chemical composition of the water. The results indicate a strong influence of water and reservoir management (e.g. water consumption) on CO2 emission rates, which is affected by the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the limited water resources in the study area. The low wind speed and relatively high pH favored chemical enhancement of the CO2 gas exchange at the reservoir surfaces, which caused on average a four-fold enhancement of the fluxes. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the uncertainty of the estimated fluxes is, besides pH, mainly affected by the poorly resolved wind speed and resulting uncertainty of the chemical enhancement factor. PMID:26588241

  14. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Reservoirs in the Lower Jordan Watershed.

    PubMed

    Alshboul, Zeyad; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed monthly hydrological, meteorological and water quality data from three irrigation and drinking water reservoirs in the lower Jordan River basin and estimated the atmospheric emission rates of CO2. The data were collected between 2006 and 2013 and show that the reservoirs, which differ in size and age, were net sources of CO2. The estimated surface fluxes were comparable in magnitude to those reported for hydroelectric reservoirs in the tropical and sub-tropical zones. Highest emission rates were observed for a newly established reservoir, which was initially filled during the sampling period. In the two older reservoirs, CO2 partial pressures and fluxes were significantly decreasing during the observation period, which could be related to simultaneously occurring temporal trends in water residence time and chemical composition of the water. The results indicate a strong influence of water and reservoir management (e.g. water consumption) on CO2 emission rates, which is affected by the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the limited water resources in the study area. The low wind speed and relatively high pH favored chemical enhancement of the CO2 gas exchange at the reservoir surfaces, which caused on average a four-fold enhancement of the fluxes. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the uncertainty of the estimated fluxes is, besides pH, mainly affected by the poorly resolved wind speed and resulting uncertainty of the chemical enhancement factor. PMID:26588241

  15. Manicouagin Reservoir of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Recorded by the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 mission, this is a photograph of the ice- covered Manicouagin Reservoir located in the Canadian Shield of Quebec Province in Eastern Canada, partially obscured by low clouds. This reservoir marks the site of an impact crater, 60 miles (100 kilometers) wide, which according to geologists was formed 212 million years ago when a meteorite crashed into this area. Over millions of years, the crater has been worn down by glaciers and other erosional processes. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  16. Reduction of dead times and dead zones in the self-quenching streamer mode at high pressures and high quencher concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, R.D.; Mulera, T.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schnurnacher, G.

    1985-02-01

    The large saturated pulses referred to as ''self-quenching streamer'' (SQS) provide a convenient and inexpensive method of radiation detection. Our previous work has revealed a strong dependence of the dead time, and of the length of the dead zone along the anode, on the pressure of the gas filling and on the concentration of the quenching component of this filling. These measurements have been extended to higher pressures and higher quencher concentrations with the object of achieving the smallest dead times and dead zones while still retaining the large amplitudes and fast rise times characteristic of the SQS mode of operation.

  17. Interactive reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    McVay, D.A.; Bastian, P.A. ); Epperson, B.D. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper describes a system that allows engineers to monitor and control a reservoir simulation run during its execution. The system consists of a 3D, three-phase black-oil reservoir simulator running simultaneously with an interactive graphics pre- and postprocessor. Previous authors have described systems that allow monitoring of job execution with simultaneous graphics displays; the system described here is unique in that the engineer can modify simulator and well-control parameters during the execution. While the system will be helpful in detection and correction of time-dependent data problems, it will be very useful in optimizing reservoir management decisions in future performance projections. The system is implemented on an IBM-compatible 486 microcomputer with commercially available multitasking software, although it can be implemented easily on any microcomputer or workstation capable of multitasking. The authors show that implementation of the system required only a moderate amount of modification of the pre- and postprocessor and even less modification of the reservoir simulator.

  18. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Don W.

    2003-04-08

    Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

  19. The big fat LARS - a LArge Reservoir Simulator for hydrate formation and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Priegnitz, Mike; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven

    2013-04-01

    differences between gaseous and dissolved methane (Zimmer et al., 2011). Gas hydrate is formed using a confined pressure of 12-15 MPa and a fluid pressure of 8-11 MPa with a set temperature of 275 K. The duration of the formation process depends on the required hydrate saturation and is usually in a range of several weeks. The subsequent decomposition experiments aiming at testing innovative production scenarios such as the application of a borehole tool for thermal stimulation of hydrate via catalytic oxidation of methane within an autothermal catalytic reactor (Schicks et al. 2011). Furthermore, experiments on hydrate decomposition via pressure reduction are performed to mimic realistic scenarios such as found during the production test in Mallik (Yasuda and Dallimore, 2007). In the near future it is planned to scale up existing results on CH4-CO2 exchange efficiency (e.g. Strauch and Schicks, 2012) by feeding CO2 to the hydrate reservoir. All experiments are due to the gain of high-resolution spatial and temporal data predestined as a base for numerical modeling. References Schicks, J. M., Spangenberg, E., Giese, R., Steinhauer, B., Klump, J., Luzi, M., 2011. Energies, 4, 1, 151-172. Zimmer, M., Erzinger, J., Kujawa, C., 2011. Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5, 4, 995-1001. Yasuda, M., Dallimore, S. J., 2007. Jpn. Assoc. Pet. Technol., 72, 603-607. Beeskow-Strauch, B., Schicks, J.M., 2012. Energies, 5, 420-437.

  20. Using surface deformation to image reservoir dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Karasaki, K.; Doughty, C.

    2000-02-01

    The inversion of surface deformation data such as tilt, displacement, or strain provides a noninvasive method for monitoring subsurface volume change. Reservoir volume change is related directly to processes such as pressure variations induced by injection and withdrawal. The inversion procedure is illustrated by an application to tiltmeter data from the Hijiori test site in Japan. An inversion of surface tilt data allows one to image flow processes in a fractured granodiorite. Approximately 650 barrels of water, injected 2 km below the surface, produces a peak surface tilt of the order of 0.8 microradians. The authors find that the pattern of volume change in the granodiorite is very asymmetrical, elongated in a north-northwesterly direction, and the maximum volume change is offset by more than 0.7 km to the east of the pumping well. The inversion of a suite of leveling data from the Wilmington oil field in Long Beach, California, images large-scale reservoir volume changes in 12 one- to two-year increments from 1976 to 1996. The influence of various production strategies is seen in the reservoir volume changes. In particular, a steam flood in fault block 2 in the northwest portion of the field produced a sudden decrease in reservoir volume.

  1. Reduction of mosquito biting-pressure: spatial repellents or mosquito traps? A field comparison of seven commercially available products in Israel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The personal protection capability of seven commercially available mosquito control devices (MCD) is compared under field conditions in Israel. Trials were performed in a high biting-pressure area inhabited by large populations of mosquito and biting midge species and using human volunteers for lan...

  2. Effects of low-fat high-fibre diet and mitratapide on body weight reduction, blood pressure and metabolic parameters in obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Peña, Cristina; Suarez, Lourdes; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada; Juste, M Candelaria; Carretón, Elena; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the impact on blood pressure and different metabolic parameters of a weight-loss program on obese dogs fed on a low-fat high-fibre diet and treated with and without mitratapide. The study sample consisted of 36 obese dogs, randomly assigned to a control group (n=17), which were fed on a low-fat high-fibre diet, and an intervention group (n=19), fed on the same diet and treated with mitratapide. Variables measured included body condition score, body weight, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures; total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels; alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity, measured both at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the weight loss program (day 85). All the studied parameters had decreased in both groups at the end of the study; these being diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and alanine aminotransferase, significantly lower in dogs treated with mitratapide. The use of mitrapide in addition to low-fat high-fibre diet does not seem to offer any further useful effect in the loss of weight during the treatment of canine obesity. On the other hand, mitratapide seems to present certain beneficial effects on pathologies associated with obesity, these being mainly related to blood pressure, lipids and hepatic parameters.

  3. Effects of Low-Fat High-Fibre Diet and Mitratapide on Body Weight Reduction, Blood Pressure and Metabolic Parameters in Obese Dogs

    PubMed Central

    PEÑA, Cristina; SUAREZ, Lourdes; BAUTISTA-CASTAÑO, Inmaculada; JUSTE, M. Candelaria; CARRETÓN, Elena; MONTOYA-ALONSO, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the present study was to compare the impact on blood pressure and different metabolic parameters of a weight-loss program on obese dogs fed on a low-fat high-fibre diet and treated with and without mitratapide. The study sample consisted of 36 obese dogs, randomly assigned to a control group (n=17), which were fed on a low-fat high-fibre diet, and an intervention group (n=19), fed on the same diet and treated with mitratapide. Variables measured included body condition score, body weight, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures; total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels; alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity, measured both at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the weight loss program (day 85). All the studied parameters had decreased in both groups at the end of the study; these being diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and alanine aminotransferase, significantly lower in dogs treated with mitratapide. The use of mitrapide in addition to low-fat high-fibre diet does not seem to offer any further useful effect in the loss of weight during the treatment of canine obesity. On the other hand, mitratapide seems to present certain beneficial effects on pathologies associated with obesity, these being mainly related to blood pressure, lipids and hepatic parameters. PMID:24920548

  4. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 4: High pressure fuel turbo-pump inlet housing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Kirby V.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis performed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) inlet housings is summarized. Three DIAL finite element models were build to aid in assessing the structural life of the welds and fillets at the vanes. Complete results are given.

  5. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 3B: High pressure fuel turbo-pump preburner pump bearing assembly analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, Gloria B.; Violett, Rebeca S.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis performed on the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) preburner pump bearing assembly located on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is summarized. An ANSYS finite element model for the inlet assembly was built and executed. Thermal and static analyses were performed.

  6. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  7. Effects of ice-cap unloading on shallow magmatic reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    One of the effects of global warming is the increase of volcanic activity. Glacial melting has been shown to cause visco-elastic relaxation of the upper mantle, which in turn promotes upwelling of magmas through the crust. To date, the effects of ice-cap melting on shallow (i.e., less than 10 km depth) plumbing systems of volcanoes are still not clear. We investigate the pressure changes due to glacial unloading around a magmatic reservoir by combining laboratory and numerical methods. As a case study we focus on Snæfellsjökull, a volcano in Western Iceland whose ice cap is currently melting 1.25 meters (thickness) per year. Our approach is as follows: we obtain representative rock samples from the field, preform tri-axial deformation tests at relevant pressure and temperature (PT) conditions and feed the results into a numerical model in which the stress fields before and after ice cap removal are compared. A suite of deformation experiments were conducted using a Paterson-type tri-axial deformation apparatus. All experiments were performed at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1, while varying the PT conditions. We applied confining pressures between 50 and 150 MPa and temperatures between 200 and 1000 ° C. Between 200 and 800 ° C we observe a localized deformation and a slight decrease of the Young's modulus from 41 to 38 GPa. Experiments at 900 and 1000 ° C exhibit macroscopically ductile behavior and a marked reduction of the Young's modulus down to 4 GPa at 1000 ° C. These results are used to construct a numerical finite-element model in which we approximate the volcanic edifice and basement by a 2D axisymmetric half-space. We first calculate the steady-state temperature field in the volcanic system and assign the laboratory-derived temperature-dependent Young's modulus to every element of the model. Then the pressure in the edifice is calculated for two scenarios: with and without ice cap. The comparison between the two scenarios allows us estimate the

  8. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi; Dong, Zhanfeng; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Biota • Climate effect • Models • Remediation and restoration • Reservoir operations • Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management • Water quality.

  9. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi; Dong, Zhanfeng; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Biota • Climate effect • Models • Remediation and restoration • Reservoir operations • Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management • Water quality. PMID:27620102

  10. Using Reservoirs to Mitigate Nutrient Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmijewski, N.; Worman, A. L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir management for the purpose of hydropower production alters the hydrological flow regime and can have significant impact on nutrient transport as well as ecology. Using reservoir management to reduce the nutrient load to downstream areas can be of great importance for aquatic habitats in recipient waters as well as the overall health of coastal areas. In this study the regulation of a network of reservoirs in River Dalälven, Sweden, is simulated using a multi-objective approach that accounts for both the nutrient export and power production. The optimization model is used to derive the Pareto front for the two objectives; the hydropower production and water quality objectives. The effect of regulation of River Dalälven on the nutrient transport is examined as a possible control method for limiting nutrient transport from the watershed. The cost in the form of loss of hydroelectric power is quantified. Optimization of a large-scale river network is done at great computational expense and the additional states (concentration of nutrient) increase the computational load significantly, for this reason several simplifications of the system dynamics are made. It is shown that a 50% reduction of the nutrient discharge can be achieved to a limited loss of power production (<5 - 10%), but that additional reduction is associated with a significant loss in power production.

  11. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of

  12. Computation of dimensional changes in isotropic cesium-graphite reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joe N.; Heffernan, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    Cs-graphite reservoirs have been utilized in many operating thermionic converters and TFEs, in both in-core and out-of-core tests. The vapor pressure of cesium over Cs-intercalated graphite is well documented for unirradiated reservoirs. The vapor pressure after irradiation is the subject of on-going study. Dimensional changes due to both intercalation and to neutron irradiation have been quantified only for highly oriented graphite. This paper describes extrapolation of the data for intercalated oriented graphite, to provide a qualitative description of the response of isotropic graphite to exposure to both cesium and neutrons.

  13. [Repeated percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation leads to reduction of left ventricular outflow-tract pressure gradient in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Masafumi; Mori, Takao; Ohashi, Yoshitaka; Ichikawa, Shinobu; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Ejiri, Junya; Awano, Kojiro

    2006-06-01

    A 61-year-old man with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was treated twice with percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA). The first procedure improved the left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient (LVOTG) from 148 to 48 mmHg and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class from III to II in a week. However, the LVOTG increased to 197 mmHg and the NYHA class worsened to III within 3 months. In spite of medical treatment with beta-blocker, syncope attack occurred suddenly. Repeated PTSMA was performed. Just after the second procedure, the LVOTG did not decrease. However, the LVOTG decreased to 81 mmHg and the NYHA class improved to II with 3 months. The different response of pressure gradient in the acute and chronic phase with repeated PTSMA was interesting. PMID:16800375

  14. Losartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy surpasses high-dose angiotensin receptor blocker in the reduction of morning home blood pressure in patients with morning hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Nakamura, Yoshio; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are the first-line antihypertensive agents. In clinical practice, it is often difficult to achieve the recommended blood pressure level by ARBs in their ordinal dosages alone. This study examined the practical efficacy of a combination therapy of ARB with thiazide diuretics for lowering morning home blood pressure (MHBP) in comparison to high-dose ARB therapy in patients with morning hypertension administered an ordinal dosage of ARB. This study was performed in a prospective, randomized, open-labeled and blind-endpoint fashion. Patients were considered to have morning hypertension when their self-measured systolic MHBPs were 135mmHg or higher, irrespective of their diastolic MHBP and office blood pressures (OBPs). Forty-eight outpatients with morning hypertension receiving the ordinal dosage of ARB were given either losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (n = 26) or high-dose ARB (n = 22) in place of their previously prescribed ARB. No change in any medication was permitted during this period. Decreases of both systolic and diastolic MHBP after 3 months of treatment were significantly greater in the losartan/hydrochlorothiazide group than in the high-dose ARB group (p < 0.05, respectively). The ratio of adverse events was somewhat high (23.1% in the losartan/hydrochlorothiazide group, 9.1% in the high-dose ARB group, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in any particular adverse event between groups. This study suggested losartan/hydrochlorothiazide might be superior to high-dose ARB for reducing morning home blood pressure. PMID:23254579

  15. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 3A: High pressure oxidizer turbo-pump preburner pump housing stress analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, Robert V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The model generation and structural analysis performed for the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) preburner pump volute housing located on the main pump end of the HPOTP in the space shuttle main engine are summarized. An ANSYS finite element model of the volute housing was built and executed. A static structural analysis was performed on the Engineering Analysis and Data System (EADS) Cray-XMP supercomputer

  16. Gas content of Gladys McCall reservoir brine

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.G.; Randolph, P.L.

    1987-05-29

    On October 8, 1983, after the first full day of production from Sand No.8 in the Gladys McCall well, samples of separator gas and separator brine were collected for laboratory P-V-T (pressure, volume, temperature) studies. Recombination of amounts of these samples based upon measured rates at the time of sample collection, and at reservoir temperature (290 F), revealed a bubble point pressure of 9200 psia. This is substantially below the reported reservoir pressure of 12,783 psia. The gas content of the recombined fluids was 30.19 SCF of dry gas/STB of brine. In contrast, laboratory studies indicate that 35.84 SCF of pure methane would dissolve in each STB of 95,000 mg/L sodium chloride brine. These results indicate that the reservoir brine was not saturated with natural gas. By early April, 1987, production of roughly 25 million barrels of brine had reduced calculated flowing bottomhole pressure to about 6600 psia at a brine rate of 22,000 STB/D. If the skin factor(s) were as high as 20, flowing pressure drop across the skin would still be only about 500 psi. Thus, some portion of the reservoir volume was believed to have been drawn down to below the bubble point deduced from the laboratory recombination of separator samples. When the pressure in a geopressured geothermal reservoir is reduced to below the bubble point pressure for solution gas, gas is exsolved from the brine flowing through the pores in the reservoir rock. This exsolved gas is trapped in the reservoir until the fractional gas saturation of pore volume becomes large enough for gas flow to commence through a continuous gas-filled channel. At the same time, the gas/brine ratio becomes smaller and the chemistry of the remaining solution gas changes for the brine from which gas is exsolved. A careful search was made for the changes in gas/brine ratio or solution gas chemistry that would accompany pressure dropping below the bubble point pressure. Changes of about the same magnitude as the scatter in

  17. Reservoir water loss modeling and measurements at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    An extensive series of pressurized reservoir water loss experiments are presently being conducted in the deeper Phase II reservoir, at the Laboratory's Fenton Hill site in north-central New Mexico. The objectives of these experiments are: to measure the reservoir water leak-off rate at a number of equilibrium reservoir pressure levels, and as a function of time; and with this pressure- and time-dependent water-loss data, to determine the joint dilation (i.e., mean joint porosity) of the reservoir as a function of pressure up to about 24 MPa (as measured at the surface). The permeability model of Gangi has been used to explain the Phase II reservoir water loss as measured during two reservoir flow tests of 7 and 30 days duration. During the 30-day flow test, the model strongly suggests that the reservoir was actively growing by fracture extension, even at injection pressures as low as 27 MPa, which is confirmed by our seismic observations. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The role of reservoirs in global sediment budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, G.; Renwick, W.; Poesen, J.; de Vente, J.; Vinogradova, N.; Bazzoffi, P.; Lajczak, A.; Radoane, M.; Rey, F.

    2009-04-01

    Man-made reservoirs are an important sink for sediment eroded from the land and thus constitute an important aspect of the sediment budget. Their impact has mostly been assessed at the scale of an individual river basin but rarely on a continental or even a global scale. Although there are recent estimates of global sediment retention by dams, these studies have solely focussed on the role reservoirs play in controlling sediment fluxes to the oceans, thus on their net impact for global sediment budgets. However, the net impact of reservoirs is much larger than the gross amount of sediment stored within all reservoirs on the globe. Furthermore, the impact of smaller waterholding structures is mostly neglected. In this paper, we present a first comprehensive assessment of global annual sediment storage within reservoirs based on sedimentation rates obtained from over 3700 reservoirs, representing nearly 25% of the global storage capacity. We argue that at least 27 petagrams (Pg) sediment are stored annually in all larger reservoirs, with possible sediment retention of an additional 27 Pg in smaller man-made water bodies. These values are 2 to 4 times larger than the estimated sediment mass transported annually to the global coastal ocean, and 8 to 15 times larger than the net reduction of sediment flux to the oceans attributed to reservoirs. These estimates provide minimum annual continental erosion rates and comparison with soil erosion data suggest that soil erosion on agricultural land is not the dominant source of sediment deposited in reservoirs or exported to the ocean. In recent decades, reservoir sedimentation has become as least as important as floodplain sediment storage and can nowadays be considered as one of the most important sediment sinks in continental sediment budgets.

  19. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  20. Well test analysis for naturally-fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Da Prat, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    In this work pressure transient analysis for constant rate production and transient rate analysis for constant pressure production are presented for a naturally fractured reservoir. Constant producing pressure solutions, which define declining production rates with time, are presented. The solutions for the dimensionless flowrate and pressure are based on a model presented by Warren and Root (1963). The results obtained for a finite no-flow outer boundary are new and surprising. It was found that the flowrate shows a rapid decline initially, becomes nearly constant for a period, and then a final decline in rate takes place. A striking result of the present study is that ignoring the presence of a constant flowrate period in a type-curve match can lead to erroneous estimates of the dimensionless outer radius of a reservoir. A method to determine the permeability-thickness product for a naturally-fractured reservoir is presented. The method involves a semilog graph of the pressure difference log(anti p-p/sub ws/) vs shut-in time ..delta..t. The mathematical theory is based on the extended Muskat analysis for a homogeneous reservoir. A comparison is made with the Pollard method. It was found that both methods are mathematically related. The dimensionless matrix pressure and fracture pressure distributions are presented for both the constant rate case and constant pressure production. Interference tests for the constant rate production can be interpreted at long times using the line-source solution. For the constant pressure production case, the pressure array from the wellbore does not correlate with the line source solution.

  1. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Feasibility study of sedimentary enhanced geothermal systems using reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyoung

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the preliminary feasibility of commercial geothermal projects, from a sedimentary reservoir with low permeability that requires productivity enhancement, using numerical reservoir simulation. The performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir is investigated in terms of reservoir hydraulics and thermal evolution. To build a reliable benchmark for simulation study, validation of the numerical reservoir model with respect to an analytical model is presented, and the process to achieve an acceptable match between the numerical and analytical solutions is described. The analytical model used in this study is based on the work of Gringarten (1978), which consists of a conceptual geothermal reservoir, considering an injection and production well doublet in a homogeneous porous media. A commercial thermal reservoir simulator (STARS from Computer Modeling Group, CMG) is used in this work for numerical modeling. In order to reproduce the analytical model results, the numerical simulation model is modified to include the same assumptions of the analytical model. Simulation model parameters that make the numerical results deviate from the analytical solution, such as the grid block size, time step and no-flow boundary are identified and investigated. An analytical tracer test model proposed by Shook (2000) is numerically modeled. This model allows us to predict the time when the temperature of the produced water decreases by capturing a tracer component at production well. Reservoir simulation models with different porosity and permeability distribution are tested to see the effects of reservoir inhomogeneity and anisotropy. In particular, premature thermal breakthrough due to the presence of high permeability streak in a reservoir model is simulated. In an effort to apply the knowledge we obtained from the analytical solutions, the effects of reservoir rock and water properties, as a function of pressure and temperature, are

  3. Biological souring and mitigation in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Gieg, Lisa M; Jack, Tom R; Foght, Julia M

    2011-10-01

    Souring in oil field systems is most commonly due to the action of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes, a diverse group of anaerobic microorganisms that respire sulfate and produce sulfide (the key souring agent) while oxidizing diverse electron donors. Such biological sulfide production is a detrimental, widespread phenomenon in the petroleum industry, occurring within oil reservoirs or in topside processing facilities, under low- and high-temperature conditions, and in onshore or offshore operations. Sulfate reducers can exist either indigenously in deep subsurface reservoirs or can be "inoculated" into a reservoir system during oil field development (e.g., via drilling operations) or during the oil production phase. In the latter, souring most commonly occurs during water flooding, a secondary recovery strategy wherein water is injected to re-pressurize the reservoir and sweep the oil towards production wells to extend the production life of an oil field. The water source and type of production operation can provide multiple components such as sulfate, labile carbon sources, and sulfate-reducing communities that influence whether oil field souring occurs. Souring can be controlled by biocides, which can non-specifically suppress microbial populations, and by the addition of nitrate (and/or nitrite) that directly impacts the sulfate-reducing population by numerous competitive or inhibitory mechanisms. In this review, we report on the diversity of sulfate reducers associated with oil reservoirs, approaches for determining their presence and effects, the factors that control souring, and the approaches (along with the current understanding of their underlying mechanisms) that may be used to successfully mitigate souring in low-temperature and high-temperature oil field operations.

  4. Biological souring and mitigation in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Gieg, Lisa M; Jack, Tom R; Foght, Julia M

    2011-10-01

    Souring in oil field systems is most commonly due to the action of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes, a diverse group of anaerobic microorganisms that respire sulfate and produce sulfide (the key souring agent) while oxidizing diverse electron donors. Such biological sulfide production is a detrimental, widespread phenomenon in the petroleum industry, occurring within oil reservoirs or in topside processing facilities, under low- and high-temperature conditions, and in onshore or offshore operations. Sulfate reducers can exist either indigenously in deep subsurface reservoirs or can be "inoculated" into a reservoir system during oil field development (e.g., via drilling operations) or during the oil production phase. In the latter, souring most commonly occurs during water flooding, a secondary recovery strategy wherein water is injected to re-pressurize the reservoir and sweep the oil towards production wells to extend the production life of an oil field. The water source and type of production operation can provide multiple components such as sulfate, labile carbon sources, and sulfate-reducing communities that influence whether oil field souring occurs. Souring can be controlled by biocides, which can non-specifically suppress microbial populations, and by the addition of nitrate (and/or nitrite) that directly impacts the sulfate-reducing population by numerous competitive or inhibitory mechanisms. In this review, we report on the diversity of sulfate reducers associated with oil reservoirs, approaches for determining their presence and effects, the factors that control souring, and the approaches (along with the current understanding of their underlying mechanisms) that may be used to successfully mitigate souring in low-temperature and high-temperature oil field operations. PMID:21858492

  5. Trends in reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.S.

    1995-06-01

    The future of reservoir simulation is driven by two different and, on the surface, paradoxical trends. On the one hand, the user base is on average becoming less experienced, and on the other, increasingly complex models are being built to honor the advances in reservoir-description technology. The job of the software development community is to create software that satisfies both the ease-of-use needs of the novice and the accuracy needs of the integrated geoscience team. One of the near-term effects of these demands will be to improve the capabilities and quality of the fully integrated geoscience work-station. This will include the need for implementation of industry-wide data standards. Reservoir simulators will need to incorporate increasing amounts of interactivity and built-in expertise. Accuracy of results will be improved by increased use of unstructured grids, including automatic gridding software with dynamic capabilities. Additional research will focus on complex wells, including both in-flow performance and wellbore hydraulics. Finally, grid size will continue to escalate in step with advances in hardware and software. The growth of grid size will be mitigated by substantial efforts in upscaling, but ultimately parallel computing must provide the mechanism for continued growth.

  6. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  7. Diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs in Carboniferous Benxi Formation, Southeast Ordos Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Yu, Xinghe; Shan, Xin; Su, Dongxu; Wang, Jiao; Li, Yalong; Shi, Xin; Xu, Liqiang

    2016-04-01

    The Ordos Basin, situated in west-central China, is one of the oldest and most important fossil-fuel energy base, which contains large reserves of coal, oil and natural gas. The Upper Palaeozoic strata are widely distributed with rich gas-bearing and large natural gas resources, whose potential is tremendous. Recent years have witnessed a great tight gas exploration improvement of the Upper Paleozoic in Southeastern Ordos basin. The Carboniferous Benxi Formation, mainly buried more than 2,500m, is the key target strata for hydrocarbon exploration, which was deposited in a barrier island and tidal flat environment. The sandy bars and flats are the favorable sedimentary microfacies. With an integrated approach of thin-section petrophysics, constant velocity mercury injection test, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs of Benxi Formation were analyzed in detail. The result shows that the main lithology of sandstone in this area is dominated by moderately to well sorted quartz sandstone. The average porosity and permeability is 4.72% and 1.22mD. The reservoirs of Benxi Formation holds a variety of pore types and the pore throats, with obvious heterogeneity and poor connection. Based on the capillary pressure curve morphological characteristics and parameters, combined with thin section and phycical property data, the reservoir pore structure of Benxi Formation can be divided into 4 types, including mid pore mid throat type(I), mid pore fine throat type(II), small pore fine throat type(III) and micro pro micro throat type(Ⅳ). The reservoirs primarily fall in B-subsate of middle diagenesis and late diagenesis, which mainly undergo compaction, cmentation, dissolution and fracturing process. Employing the empirical formula of different sorting for unconsolideated sandstone porosity, the initial sandstone porosity is 38.32% on average. Quantitative evaluation of the increase and decrease of

  8. The efficacy of short and repeated high-pressure processing treatments on the reduction of non-O157:H7 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli in ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Scheinberg, Joshua A; Senevirathne, Reshani; Cutter, Catherine N

    2015-04-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has previously been shown to be effective at reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in meat products. However, few studies have determined whether HPP may be effective at reducing non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in ground beef. This study investigated the efficacy of short and repeated HPP treatments to reduce non-O157:H7 STEC inoculated into ground beef. Irradiated ground beef patties (80:20, 90:10 [lean:fat]) were inoculated with pairs of E. coli serogroups O103, O111, O26, O145, O121, O45, O157:H7, and DH5α, vacuum-packaged and high-pressure processed (four, 60 s cycles, 400 MPa, 17°C). Surviving E. coli populations were enumerated on Rainbow Agar O157 and Tryptic Soy Agar. HPP treatments produced >2.0 log₁₀ CFU/g reductions of each E. coli serogroup, and reductions ranged from 2.35-3.88 and 2.26-4.31 log₁₀ CFU/g in 80:20 and 90:10 samples, respectively. These results suggest that HPP could be an effective, post-processing intervention to reduce the risk of non-O157:H7 STEC contamination in ground beef.

  9. Effects of nonlinear reservoir compaction on casing behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, Y.P.; Bradley, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Depletion of overpressured, undercompacted reservoirs can cause large reservoir pressure drops and sediment compaction, which may result in casing deformation and well failure. To predict soil and casing deformation during depletion, a finite-element model was developed. Nonlinear elastic and plastic behavior of the soils and slippage along the wellbore boundary are major advancements in this study. This axisymmetric model is composed of casing wall, cement column, slippage interface, and sediments from 11,400 to 13,200 ft (3475 to 4025 m) in depth with a radius of 3,400 ft (1035 m). This study features a process of concurrent fluid flow, nonlinear elastic and plastic soil deformation, slippage from the wellbore boundary, and casing deformation. The modeling results show that the decline in near-wellbore reservoir pressure during depletion causes vertical compaction in both the sand reservoirs and the confining shale formations. Slippage next to the wellbore decreases the axial shear load placed on the casing by the sediments. Nonlinear elastic and plastic soils show a greater tendency for casing deformation with depletion than do linear elastic soils. Axial strains in the casing above the yield strain eventually developed as near-wellbore reservoir pressure was allowed to decline to a minimum. Because this effect is quantified, the production rate may be held to a safe maximum so that the operating limits of the casing are not exceeded. Criteria are given to improve both completion design and production rate specification.

  10. Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir Analysis - January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many sedimentary basins contain formations with pore fluids at pressures higher than hydrostatic value; these formations are called geopressured. The pore pressure is generally well in excess of hydrostatic and the fluids vary in scalinity, temperature, and dissolved methane. As part of its program to define the magnitude and recoverability of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource, the US Department of Energy has drilled and tested deep wells in geopressured formations in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Geological information for the Pleasant Bayou geopressured geothermal resource is most extensive among the reservoirs tested. Earlier testing of the DOE well (Pleasant Bayou Well No.2) was conducted in several phases during 1979-1983. Long-term testing was resumed in May 1988 and is currently in progress. This report summarizes the pertinent field and laboratory test data available through December 31, 1990. A numerical reservoir simulator is employed as a tool for synthesizing and integrating the reservoir information, formation rock and fluid properties data from laboratory tests, well data from the earlier testing (1979-1983), and the ongoing long-term production testing (1988-1990) of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2. A reservoir simulation model has been constructed which provides a detailed match to the well test history to date. This model is constructed within a geologic framework described by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and relies heavily on the pressure transient data from the 1980 Reservoir Limits Test in conjunction with the 1988-1990 production testing.

  11. Reduction of frontal-plane hip joint reaction force via medio-lateral foot center of pressure manipulation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Solomonow-Avnon, Deborah; Wolf, Alon; Herman, Amir; Rozen, Nimrod; Haim, Amir

    2015-02-01

    Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulation of lower-limb joints has been shown to influence lower-limb biomechanics. Numerous studies report the influence of such interventions on the knee, however little is known about the influence of these interventions on the hip. The present study analyzed kinetic and kinematic changes about the hip of 12 healthy young males who underwent biomechanical manipulation utilizing the APOS biomechanical device (APOS-Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd., Herzliya, Israel) allowing controlled foot center of pressure manipulation. Subjects underwent gait testing in four para-sagittal device configurations: Medial, lateral, neutral, and regular shoes. In the medial configuration, subjects demonstrated no change in step width (i.e., distance between right and left foot center of pressure), however inter-malleolar distance significantly increased. Likewise with the medial setting, greater hip abduction was recorded, while hip adduction moment and joint reaction force decreased significantly. We speculate that subjects adopt a modified gait pattern aimed to maintain constant base of support. As a result, hip abductor muscle moment arm increases and adduction moment and joint reaction force decreases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to show this relationship. These results contribute to the understanding of lower-limb biomechanics and warrant further investigation.

  12. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-02-01

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  13. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow

    2004-05-01

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  14. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow

    2004-07-01

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  15. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-12-08

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  16. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  17. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2005-04-01

    -wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  18. Production decline analysis for a multi-fractured horizontal well considering elliptical reservoir stimulated volumes in shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingqiang; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Zhang, Tiantian

    2016-06-01

    Multi-fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs) are an effective technique for developing shale gas reservoirs. After fracturing, stimulated reservoir volumes (SRVs) invariably exist around the wellbore. In this paper, a composite elliptical SRV model for each hydraulic fracturing stage is established, based on micro-seismic events. Both the SRV and the outer regions are assumed as single-porosity media with different formation physical parameters. Based on unstructured perpendicular bisection (PEBI) grids, a mathematical model considering Darcy flow, diffusion and adsorption/desorption in shale gas reservoirs is presented. The numerical solution is obtained by combining the control volume finite element method with the fully implicit method. The model is verified by a simplified model solution. The MFHW Blasingame production decline curves, which consider elliptical SRVs in shale gas reservoirs, are plotted by computer programming. The flow regions can be divided into five flow regimes: early formation linear flow, radial flow in the SRV region, transient flow, pseudo radial flow and boundary dominated flow. Finally, the effect of six related parameters, including the SRV area size, outer region permeability, SRV region permeability, Langmuir pressure, Langmuir volume and diffusion coefficient, are analyzed on type curves. The model presented in this paper can expand our understanding of MFHW production decline behaviors in shale gas reservoirs and can be applied to estimate reservoir properties, the SRV area, and reserves in these types of reservoirs by type curve matching.

  19. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Govers, R.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically on the role of creep of rock salt caprocks in response to production-induced differential stresses. We start by discussing available rock salt creep flow laws. We then present the subsidence evolution above an axisymmetric finite element representation of a generic reservoir that extends over a few kilometers and explore the effects of rock salt flow law choice on the subsidence response. We find that if rock salt creep is linear, as appropriate for steady state flow by pressure solution, the subsidence response to any pressure reduction history contains two distinct components, one that leads to the subsidence bowl becoming narrower and deeper and one that leads to subsidence rebound and becomes dominant at later stages. This subsidence rebound becomes inhibited if rock salt deforms purely through steady state power law creep at low stresses. We also show that an approximate representation of transient creep leads to relatively small differences in subsidence predictions. Most importantly, the results confirm that rock salt flow must be modeled accurately if good subsidence predictions are required. However, in practice, large uncertainties exist in the creep behavior of rock salt, especially at low stresses. These are a consequence of the spatial variability of rock salt physical properties, which is practically impossible to constrain. A conclusion therefore is that modelers can only resort to calculating bounds for the subsidence evolution above producing rock salt-capped reservoirs.

  20. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  1. Conservation program (EQIP) reduces atrazine in Columbus, OH drinking water supply reservoir

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation dollars applied in the Upper Big Walnut Creek Watershed have achieved a significant reduction in the atrazine levels in Hover Reservoir, a major drinking water source for Columbus, Ohio. During the 1990s, atrazine levels in this reservoir periodically exceeded the health advisory limit ...

  2. WATER LEVEL DRAWDOWN TRIGGERS SYSTEM-WIDE BUBBLE RELEASE FROM RESERVOIR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reservoirs are an important anthropogenic source of methane and ebullition is a key pathway by which methane stored in reservoir sediments can be released to the atmosphere. Changes in hydrostatic pressure during periods of falling water levels can trigger bubbling events, sugge...

  3. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Wayne D.; Acevedo, Horacio; Green, Aaron; Len, Shawn; Minavea, Anastasia; Wood, James; Xie, Deyi

    2002-01-29

    This project has completed the initially scheduled third year of the contract, and is beginning a fourth year, designed to expand upon the tech transfer aspects of the project. From the Stratton data set, demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along `phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the Boonsville data set , developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Teal South data set provided a surprising set of data, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines.

  4. Carbon dioxide concentration dictates alternative methanogenic pathways in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Dolfing, Jan; Sakata, Susumu; Maeda, Haruo; Miyagawa, Yoshihiro; Ikarashi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Mio; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Deep subsurface formations (for example, high-temperature oil reservoirs) are candidate sites for carbon capture and storage technology. However, very little is known about how the subsurface microbial community would respond to an increase in CO2 pressure resulting from carbon capture and storage. Here we construct microcosms mimicking reservoir conditions (55 °C, 5 MPa) using high-temperature oil reservoir samples. Methanogenesis occurs under both high and low CO2 conditions in the microcosms. However, the increase in CO2 pressure accelerates the rate of methanogenesis to more than twice than that under low CO2 conditions. Isotope tracer and molecular analyses show that high CO2 conditions invoke acetoclastic methanogenesis in place of syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis that typically occurs in this environment (low CO2 conditions). Our results present a possibility of carbon capture and storage for enhanced microbial energy production in deep subsurface environments that can mitigate global warming and energy depletion.

  5. Alternate operating strategies for Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Flow testing and heat extraction experiments in prototype Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs have uncovered several challenges which must be addressed before commercialization of the technology is possible. Foremost among these is the creation of a reservoir which simultaneously possesses high permeability pathways and a large volume of fractured rock. The current concept of heat extraction -- a steady state circulation system with fluid pumping from the injection well to a single, low pressure production well -- may limit our ability to create heat extraction systems which meet these goals. A single injection well feeding two production wells producing fluid at moderate pressures is shown to be a potentially superior way to extract heat. Cyclic production is also demonstrated to have potential as a method for sweeping fluid through a larger volume of rock, thereby inhibiting flow channeling and increasing reservoir lifetime. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Induced stresses due to fluid extraction from axisymmetric reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segall, P.

    1992-01-01

    Earthquakes can be induced by fluid extraction, as well as by fluid injection. Segall (1989) proposed that poroelastic stresses are responsible for inducing earthquakes associated with fluid extraction. Here, I present methods for computing poroelastic stress changes due to fluid extraction for general axisymmetric reservoir geometries. The results of Geertsma (1973) for a thin disk reservoir with uniform pressure drop are recovered as a special case. Predicted surface subsidence agrees very well with measured leveling changes over the deep Lacq gas field in southwestern France. The induced stresses are finite if the reservoir pressure changes are continuous. Computed stress changes are on the order of several bars, suggesting that the preexisting stress states in regions of extraction induced seismicity are very close to frictional instability prior to production. ?? 1992 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Here are considerations in evaluating Russian flow tests, reservoir performance

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, J.A. ); Connelly, W. )

    1992-12-28

    Flow test data contain some of the most important information for evaluation of a field. As part of the Russian evaluation process, research wells are extensively tested. Three types of well tests are conducted: drillstem tests, production flow test (if the well flows to the surface), and rising head test (if the well will not flow to the surface). Drillstem tests are run in the open hole across potential pay zones. After casing is run, wells are flow tested with multiple-rate tests, and the bottom hole pressures are recorded during the build-up periods. Results of the tests are summarized in test reports, on net pay maps, and on logs. The results from these tests include reservoir pressure, reservoir temperature, formation permeability, productivity index, and damage ratio. This paper reports that this information provides the basis for estimating production capacities and future reservoirs.

  8. Root-Contact/Pressure-Plate Assembly For Hydroponic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Carlton E.; Loretan, Philip A.; Bonsi, Conrad K.; Hill, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    Hydroponic system includes growth channels equipped with rootcontact/pressure-plate assemblies. Pump and associated plumbing circulate nutrient liquid from reservoir, along bottom of growth channels, and back to reservoir. Root-contact/pressure-plate assembly in each growth channel stimulates growth of roots by applying mild contact pressure. Flat plate and plate connectors, together constitute pressure plate, free to move upward to accommodate growth of roots. System used for growing sweetpotatoes and possibly other tuber and root crops.

  9. The characteristics of magma reservoir failure beneath a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Debra M.; Long, Sylvan M.; Grosfils, Eric B.

    2009-12-01

    Eruptions fed from subsurface reservoirs commonly construct volcanic edifices at the surface, and the growth of an edifice will in turn modify the subsurface stress state that dictates the conditions under which subsequent rupture of the inflating reservoir can occur. We re-examine this problem using axisymmetric finite element models of ellipsoidal reservoirs beneath conical edifices, explicitly incorporating factors (e.g., full gravitational loading conditions, an elastic edifice instead of a surface load, reservoir pressures sufficient to induce tensile rupture) that compromise previous solutions to illustrate why variations in rupture behavior can occur. Relative to half-space model results, the presence of an edifice generally rotates rupture toward the crest of a spherical reservoir, with increasing flank slope (for an edifice of constant volume) and larger edifices (or greater reservoir scaled depths) normally serving to enhance this trend. When non-spherical reservoirs are considered, the presence of an edifice amplifies previously identified half-space failure characteristics, shifting rupture to the crest more rapidly for prolate reservoirs while forcing rupture closer to the midpoint of oblate reservoirs. Rupture is always observed to occur in the σt orientation, and depending on where initial failure occurs rupture favors the initial emplacement of either lateral sills, circumferential intrusions or vertically ascending dikes. Ultimately, integration of our numerical model results with other information, for instance the sequence of intrusion/eruption events observed at a given volcano, can provide useful new insight into how a volcano's subsurface magma plumbing system evolved. We demonstrate this process through application of our model to Summer Coon, a well-studied stratocone on Earth, and Ilithyia Mons, a large conical shield volcano on Venus.

  10. Coupled Planetary Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    We can look beyond the Earth, to Venus and Mars, to find opportunities to understand interactions among crust, mantle, hydrosphere, and atmosphere reservoirs. There has obviously been coupling among some of these reservoirs on other worlds, and in some cases feedback may have been in play but that is more difficult to demonstrate. The massive CO2 atmosphere of Venus has likely fluctuated significantly over its history due to exchange with other reservoirs, with attendant greenhouse effects strongly modulating surface temperature. Additionally, release of H2O and SO2 from large-scale magmatic events may have led to significant surface temperature increases, ΔT0, and the details depend on the competition between IR radiation warming and planetary albedo increase due to cloud formation. Diffusion of Δ T0 into the shallow crust may be responsible for the rapid global formation of compressional wrinkle ridges following widespread volcanic resurfacing [Solomon et al., 1999]. Diffusion of ΔT0 into the venusian upper mantle could have increased the rate of partial melting. The accompanying increase in volatile release to the atmosphere could set up a positive feedback because of increased greenhouse warming diffusing into the planet's interior [Phillips et al., 2001, Venus]. Another outcome of deep penetration of a greenhouse-induced positive ΔT0 is the lowering of mantle viscosity and an accompanying decrease in convective stress, which could shut down an exisiting lithospheric recycling regime [Lenardic et al., 2008]. Mars offers a rich set of possibilities for coupling between reservoirs [Jakosky and Phillips, 2001]. Magmatism at the massive Tharsis volcanic complex possibly induced episodic climate changes in the latter part of the Noachian era (~3.6-4.2 Ga). This could have led to clement conditions, forming valley networks that follow a regional slope caused partly by the mass load of Tharsis itself [Phillips et al., 2001, Mars]. Earlier in the Noachian

  11. Microbial Life in an Underground Gas Storage Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombach, Petra; van Almsick, Tobias; Richnow, Hans H.; Zenner, Matthias; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    While underground gas storage is technically well established for decades, the presence and activity of microorganisms in underground gas reservoirs have still hardly been explored today. Microbial life in underground gas reservoirs is controlled by moderate to high temperatures, elevated pressures, the availability of essential inorganic nutrients, and the availability of appropriate chemical energy sources. Microbial activity may affect the geochemical conditions and the gas composition in an underground reservoir by selective removal of anorganic and organic components from the stored gas and the formation water as well as by generation of metabolic products. From an economic point of view, microbial activities can lead to a loss of stored gas accompanied by a pressure decline in the reservoir, damage of technical equipment by biocorrosion, clogging processes through precipitates and biomass accumulation, and reservoir souring due to a deterioration of the gas quality. We present here results from molecular and cultivation-based methods to characterize microbial communities inhabiting a porous rock gas storage reservoir located in Southern Germany. Four reservoir water samples were obtained from three different geological horizons characterized by an ambient reservoir temperature of about 45 °C and an ambient reservoir pressure of about 92 bar at the time of sampling. A complementary water sample was taken at a water production well completed in a respective horizon but located outside the gas storage reservoir. Microbial community analysis by Illumina Sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated the presence of phylogenetically diverse microbial communities of high compositional heterogeneity. In three out of four samples originating from the reservoir, the majority of bacterial sequences affiliated with members of the genera Eubacterium, Acetobacterium and Sporobacterium within Clostridiales, known for their fermenting capabilities. In

  12. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  13. Reservoir management cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article by Mohinder S. Gulati, Chief Engineer, Unocal Geothermal Operations, discusses cost cutting in geothermal reservoir management. The reservoir engineer or geoscientist can make a big difference in the economical outcome of a project by improving well performance and thus making geothermal energy more competitive in the energy marketplace. Bringing plants online in less time and proving resources to reduce the cycle time are some of the ways to reduce reservoir management costs discussed in this article.

  14. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  15. Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Reactive Transport of CO2 and Its Impact on Geomechanical Properties of Faulted Reservoir Rocks and Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, B. N.; Hou, Z.; Bacon, D. H.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation develops a multiscale model to analyze CO2 faulted reservoirs using the STOMP-CO2-R code that is interfaced with the ABAQUS® finite element package. The STOMP-CO2-R/ABAQUS® simulator accounts for the reactive transport of CO2 causing mineral composition changes that modify the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals. Rocks' elastic properties that vary during CO2 injection and govern the poroelastic behavior of rocks are modeled by an Eshelby-Mori-Tanka approach implemented in ABAQUS®. A three-dimensional (3D) STOMP-CO2-R model for a reservoir containing an inclined fault is built to analyze a formation containing a reaction network with 5 minerals: albite, anorthite, calcite, kaolinite and quartz. A 3D ABAQUS® finite element mesh that exactly maps the STOMP-CO2-R grid is developed for coupled hydro-geochemical-mechanical analyses. The model contains alternating sandstone and shale layers. The impact of reactive transport of CO2 on the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals are studied in terms of mineral composition changes that affect the rock stiffness, stress and strain distributions, and pressure margin to fracture (PMF). Simulations assuming extensional and compressional stress regimes with and without coupled geochemistry are developed to study the stress regime effect on the risk of hydraulic fracture. The tendency for the fault to slip is examined in terms of stress regime, geomechanical and geochemical-mechanical effects. The results show that the mineralogical changes due to long-term injection of CO2 reduce the permeability and elastic modulus of the reservoir leading to a reduction of the PMF at and beyond the injection location. Hydraulic fracture and fault slip are not predicted to occur. However, accounting for the geomechemical-mechanical effect in the analysis under the extensional stress regime leads to reduction of the PMF at the injection location and at the seal immediately above this location.

  16. A vapor-dominated reservoir exceeding 600{degrees}F at the Geysers, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.A.; Sternfeld, J.N.; Haizlip, J.R.; Drenick, A.F.; Combs, Jim

    1988-01-01

    A high-temperature vapor-dominated reservoir underlies a portion of the Northwest Geysers area, Sonoma County, California. The high-temperature reservoir (HTR) is defined by flowing fluid temperatures exceeding 500º F, rock temperatures apparently exceeding 600º F and steam enthalpies of about 1320 BTU/lb. Steam from existing wells drilled in the Northwest Geysers is produced from both a “typical” Geysers reservoir and the HTR. In all cases, the HTR is in the lower portion of the wells and is overlain by a “typical” Geysers reservoir. Depth to the high-temperature reservoir is relatively uniform at about -5900 ft subsea. There are no identified lithologic or mineralogic conditions that separate the HTR from the “typical” reservoir, although the two reservoirs are vertically distinct and can be located in most wells to within about 200 ft by the use of downhole temperature-depth measurements. Gas concentrations in steam from the HTR are higher (6 to 9 wt %) than from the “typical” Geysers reservoir (0.85 to 2.6 wt %). Steam from the HTR is enriched in chloride and the heavy isotopes of water relative to the “typical” reservoir. Available static and dynamic measurements show pressures are subhydrostatic in both reservoirs with no anomalous differences between the two: the HTR pressure being near 520 psia at sea level datum. The small observed differences in pressure between the reservoirs appear to vary along a steam density gradient. It is postulated that the Northwest Geysers area evolved more slowly toward vapor-dominated conditions than other parts of The Geysers field because of its poor connection with the surface. In this paper, a model is presented in which the boundary between the HTR and “typical” reservoir is a thermodynamic feature only, resulting from recent deep venting of a liquid-dominated system in which conduction is still an important component of heat transfer.

  17. NFFLOW: A reservoir simulator incorporating explicit fractures (SPE 153890)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, E.J.; Sams, W.N.

    2012-01-01

    NFFLOW is a research code that quickly and inexpensively simulates flow in moderately fractured reservoirs. It explicitly recognizes fractures separately from rock matrix. In NFFLOW fracture flow is proportional to the pressure gradient along the fracture, and flow in the rock matrix is determined by Darcy’s Law. The two flow mechanisms are coupled through the pressure gradient between a fracture and its adjacent rock matrix. Presented is a promising change to NFFLOW that allows for flow across a rock matrix block.

  18. Gas-well production decline in multiwell reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Aminian, K.; Ameri, S. ); Stark, J.J. ); Yost, A.B. II )

    1990-12-01

    This paper introduces a pseudosteady-state constant-pressure solution for gas wells. The solution was used to develop a type-curve-based method to history match and predict multiwell gas reservoir production. Good agreements between the predicted and actual gas well production rates were obtained.

  19. Reduction in sodium intake is independently associated with improved blood pressure control in people with chronic kidney disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Nerbass, Fabiana B; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; McIntyre, Natasha J; Shardlow, Adam; McIntyre, Christopher W; Taal, Maarten W

    2015-09-28

    Decreasing sodium intake has been associated with improvements in blood pressure (BP) and proteinuria, two important risk factors for CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. We aimed to investigate the role of sodium intake by examining the effect of changes in sodium intake over 1 year on BP and proteinuria in people with early stage CKD. From thirty-two general practices, 1607 patients with previous estimated glomerular filtration rate of 59-30 ml/min per 1.73 m² and mean age of 72.9 (sd 9.0) years were recruited. Clinical assessment, urine and serum biochemistry testing were performed at baseline and after 1 year. Sodium intake was estimated from early morning urine specimens using an equation validated for this study population. We found that compared with people who increased their sodium intake from ≤ 100 to >100 mmol/d over 1 year, people who decreased their intake from >100 to ≤ 100 mmol/d evidenced a greater decrease in all BP variables (Δmean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) = -7.44 (SD 10.1) v. -0.23 (SD 10.4) mmHg; P<0.001) as well as in pulse wave velocity (ΔPWV = -0.47 (SD 1.3) v. 0.08 (SD 1.88) m/s; P<0.05). Albuminuria improved only in albuminuric patients who decreased their sodium intake. BP improved in people who maintained low sodium intake at both times and in those with persistent high intake, but the number of anti-hypertensive increased only in the higher sodium intake group, and PWV improved only in participants with lower sodium intake. Decreasing sodium intake was an independent determinant of ΔMAP. Although more evidence is needed, our results support the benefits of reducing and maintaining sodium intake below 100 mmol/d (2.3-2.4 g/d) in people with early stages of CKD. PMID:26243465

  20. All-optical reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  1. All-optical reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-01

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm which uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  2. Tracer testing for reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Abbaszadeh-Dehghani, M.

    1987-05-01

    When a reservoir is studied in detail for an EOR project, well-to-well tracers should be used as a tool to help understand the reservoir in a quantitative way. Tracers complement the more traditional reservoir evaluation tools. This paper discusses the concepts underlying tracer testing, the analysis methods used to produce quantitative results, and the meaning of these results in terms of conceptual picture of the reservoir. Some of the limitations of these analysis methods are discussed, along with ongoing research on tracer flow.

  3. New life in old reservoirs - the microbial conversion of oil to methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gründger, Friederike; Feisthauer, Stefan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Since almost 20 years it is known from stable isotope studies that large amounts of biogenic methane are formed in oil reservoirs. The investigation of this degradation process and of the underlying biogeochemical controls are of economical and social importance, since even under optimal conditions, not more than 30-40 % of the oil in a reservoir is actually recovered. The conversion of parts of this non-recoverable oil via an appropriate biotechnological treatment into easily recoverable methane would provide an extensive and ecologically sound energy resource. Laboratory mesocosm as well as high pressure autoclave experiments with samples from different geosystems showed high methane production rates after the addition of oils, single hydrocarbons or coals. The variation of parameters, like temperature, pressure or salinity, showed a broad tolerance to environmental conditions. The fingerprinting of the microbial enrichments with DGGE showed a large bacterial diversity while that of Archaea was limited to three to four dominant species. The Q-PCR results showed the presence of high numbers of Archaea and Bacteria. To analyse their function, we measured the abundances of genes indicative of metal reduction (16S rRNA gene for Geobacteraceae), sulphate reduction (sulphate reductase, dsr), and methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M-reductase, mcrA). The methanogenic consortia will be further characterised to determine enzymatic pathways and the individual role of each partner. Degradation pathways for different compounds will be studied using 13C-labelled substrates and molecular techniques. Our stable isotope data from both, methane produced in our incubations with samples from various ecosystems and field studies, implies a common methanogenic biodegradation mechanism, resulting in consistent patterns of hydrocarbon alteration.

  4. Low-temperature reduction of Ge oxide by Si and SiH4 in low-pressure H2 and Ar environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Kaichiro; Moriya, Atsushi; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Kiyohiko; Yamada, Masayuki; Kunii, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio; Murota, Junichi

    2015-08-01

    Introduction of Ge into ULSIs has become increasingly attractive because of the higher carrier mobility of Ge. Since Ge native oxide is formed easily in cleanroom air, the control of formation and reduction of the Ge oxide is requested for the introduction of Ge layers into Si process. Here, the reactions between gas phase Ge oxide and Si substrate and between the Ge oxide on Ge epitaxial layer and SiH4 are investigated. The native-oxidized Ge amount is obtained by calculating from chemically shifted peak intensity of Ge 3d measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By the adsorption of the Ge oxide on Si(1 0 0) surface, pure Ge and Si oxide are formed on the Si surface even at 350 °C and the formed Ge amount tends to correspond to the oxidized Si amount, independently of the heat-treatment environment of H2 and Ar under the condition that Si oxide is not reduced by H2. By SiH4 treatment, the amount of the oxidized Ge on the Ge layer decreases drastically even at 350 °C and Si oxide is formed on the Ge layer. From these results, it is suggested that the Ge oxide is reduced even at 350 °C by Si or SiH4, and the Si oxide and the pure Ge are formed.

  5. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  6. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 2: High pressure oxidizer turbo-pump turbine end bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, Gregory A.

    1989-01-01

    The high-pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) consists of two centrifugal pumps, on a common shaft, that are directly driven by a hot-gas turbine. Pump shaft axial thrust is balanced in that the double-entry main inducer/impeller is inherently balanced and the thrusts of the preburner pump and turbine are nearly equal but opposite. Residual shaft thrust is controlled by a self-compensating, non-rubbing, balance piston. Shaft hang-up must be avoided if the balance piston is to perform properly. One potential cause of shaft hang-up is contact between the Phase 2 bearing support and axial spring cartridge of the HPOTP main pump housing. The status of the bearing support/axial spring cartridge interface is investigated under current loading conditions. An ANSYS version 4.3, three-dimensional, finite element model was generated on Lockheed's VAX 11/785 computer. A nonlinear thermal analysis was then executed on the Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Analysis Data System (EADS). These thermal results were then applied along with the interference fit and bolt preloads to the model as load conditions for a static analysis to determine the gap status of the bearing support/axial spring cartridge interface. For possible further analysis of the local regions of HPOTP main pump housing assembly, detailed ANSYS submodels were generated using I-DEAS Geomod and Supertab (Appendix A).

  7. Reservoir simulation in a North Sea reservoir experiencing significant compaction drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.C.; Jewell, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Valhall field in the Norwegian North Sea is a high porosity chalk reservoir undergoing primary pressure depletion. Over the last ten years there have been a number of computer modeling studies of the field which have all assumed an original oil-in-place of approximately 2,000 MMSTB (318.0{times}10{sup 6}m{sup 3}) to the present due to the addition of wells and the optimization of completion techniques. However, the single most important and unique feature influencing Valhall long term production performance is reservoir rock compaction. This paper describes the mathematical model used to simulate reservoir performance in a compacting reservoir with specific discussion regarding the proportion of oil produced by each physical recovery process. An understanding of the recovery mechanisms and their relative importance is critical for the successful management of the field. This paper also presents an alternative method for evaluating the various recovery processes using a simple solution to the material balance equation. This is used to substantiate the magnitude of the various recovery mechanisms identified in the simulation model.

  8. A Constrained Differential Evolution Algorithm for Reservoir Management: Optimal Placement and Control of Wells for Geological Carbon Storage with Uncertainty in Reservoir Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Bianchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of large volume of CO2 into deep geological reservoirs for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is expected to cause significant pressure perturbations in subsurface. Large-scale pressure increases in injection reservoirs during GCS operations, if not controlled properly, may limit dynamic storage capacity and increase risk of environmental impacts. The high pressure may impact caprock integrity, induce fault slippage, and cause leakage of brine and/or CO2 into shallow fresh groundwater resources. Thus, monitoring and controlling pressure buildup are critically important for environmentally safe implementation of GCS projects. Extraction of native brine during GCS operations is a pressure management approach to reduce significant pressure buildup. Extracted brine can be transferred to the surface for utilization or re-injected into overlying/underlying saline aquifers. However, pumping, transportation, treatment and disposal of extracted brine can be challenging and costly. Therefore, minimizing volume of extracted brine, while maximizing CO2 storage, is an essential objective of the pressure management with brine extraction schemes. Selection of optimal well locations and extraction rates are critical for maximizing storage and minimizing brine extraction during GCS. However, placing of injection and extraction wells is not intuitive because of heterogeneity in reservoir properties and complex reservoir geometry. Efficient computerized algorithms combining reservoir models and optimization methods are needed to make proper decisions on well locations and control parameters. This study presents a global optimization methodology for pressure management during geologic CO2 sequestration. A constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm is introduced for solving optimization problems involving well placement and injection/extraction control. The CDE methodology is tested and applied for realistic CO2 storage scenarios with the presence of uncertainty in

  9. Calderas and magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Giordano, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Large caldera-forming eruptions have long been a focus of both petrological and volcanological studies; traditionally, both have assumed that eruptible magma is stored within a single long-lived melt body. Over the past decade, however, advances in analytical techniques have provided new views of magma storage regions, many of which provide evidence of multiple melt lenses feeding a single eruption, and/or rapid pre-eruptive assembly of large volumes of melt. These new petrological views of magmatic systems have not yet been fully integrated into volcanological perspectives of caldera-forming eruptions. We discuss the implications of syn-eruptive melt extraction from complex, rather than simple, reservoirs and its potential control over eruption size and style, and caldera collapse timing and style. Implications extend to monitoring of volcanic unrest and eruption progress under conditions where successive melt lenses may be tapped. We conclude that emerging views of complex magma reservoir configurations provide exciting opportunities for re-examining volcanological concepts of caldera-forming systems

  10. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does.

  11. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does. PMID:27090239

  12. Reservoir analysis of the Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Amistoso, A.E.; Aquino, B.G.; Aunzo, Z.P.; Jordan, O.T.; Ana, F.X.M.S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Doughty, C.

    1993-10-01

    The Philippine National Oil Company and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have conducted an informal cooperative project on the reservoir evaluation of the Palinpinon geothermal field in the Philippines. The work involved the development of various numerical models of the field in order to understand the observed data. A three-dimensional porous medium model of the reservoir has been developed that matches well the observed pressure declines and enthalpy transients of the wells. Submodels representing the reservoir as a fractured porous medium were developed for the analysis of chemical transport of chlorides within the reservoir and the movement of the cold water front away from injection wells. These models indicate that the effective porosity of the reservoir varies between 1 and 7% and the effective permeability between 1 and 45 millidarcies. The numerical models were used to predict the future performance of the Palinpinon reservoir using various possible exploitation scenarios. A limited number of make-up wells were allocated to each sector of the field. When all the make-up wells had been put on line, power production gradually began to decline. The model indicates that under the assumed conditions it will not be possible to maintain the planned power production of 112.5 MWe at Palinpinon I and 80 MWe at Palinpinon II for the next 30 years, but the decline in power output will be within acceptable normal operating capacities of the plants.

  13. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-04-01

    West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. This behavior includes: (1) Decrease in WOR over time; (2) Decrease in GOR at initial stages; (3) High decline rates of oil and gas; and (4) strong hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. By using core and log data as well as fluorescence information, we demonstrate that our hypothesis of how the reservoir is formed is consistent with these observations. Namely, oil migrated in water wet reservoir, over time, oil changed the wettability of some part of the reservoir, oil eventually leaked to upper formations prompting re-introduction of water into reservoir. Because of change in wettability, different pore size distributions responded differently to water influx. This hypothesis is consistent with fluorescence and porosity data, as we explain it in this quarterly report. The second issue deals with how to best calculate connected oil volume in the reservoir. The log data does not necessarily provide us with relevant information regarding oil in place. However, we have developed a new material balance technique to calculate the connected oil volume based on observed pressure and production data. By using the technique to four different fields producing from Hunton formation, we demonstrate that the technique can be successfully applied to calculate the connected oil in place.

  14. An updated conceptual model of the Los Humeros geothermal reservoir (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, V. M.; García, A.; Barragán, R. M.; Izquierdo, G.; Aragón, A.; Nieva, D.

    2003-05-01

    An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between 850 and 100 m a.s.l. with temperatures between 300 and 400°C. Both reservoirs seem to be separated by a vitreous tuff lithological unit, but hydraulic connectivity occurs through faults and fractures of the system, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows down (porous heat pipe). The geochemical and isotopic (δ 18O, δD) composition of the produced fluids can be explained as the result of a boiling process with reservoir steam separation and partial condensation, a fact that agrees with the proposed reservoir engineering model.

  15. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1996-04-30

    On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

  16. Evolution of Abnormally Low Pressure at Bravo Dome and its Implications for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhbari, D.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage allows reductions of the rapidly rising CO2 from fossil fuel-based power generation, if large storage rates and capacities can be achieved. The injection of large fluid volumes at high rates leads to a build-up of pore-pressure in the storage formation that may induce seismicity and compromise the storage security. Many natural CO2 fields in midcontinent US, in contrast, are under-pressured rather than over-pressured suggesting that natural processes reduce initial over-pressures and generate significant under-pressures. The question is therefore to understand the sequence of process(es) that allow the initial over-pressure to be eliminated and the under-pressure to be maintained over geological periods of time. We therefore look into pressure evolution in Bravo Dome, one of the largest natural CO2 accumulations in North America, which stores 1.3 Gt of CO2. Bravo Dome is only 580-900 m deep and is divided into several compartments with near gas-static pressure (see Figure). The pre-production gas pressures in the two main compartments that account for 70% of the mass of CO2 stored at Bravo Dome are more than 6 MPa below hydrostatic pressure. Here we show that the under-pressure in the Bravo Dome CO2 reservoir is maintained by hydrological compartmentalization over millennial timescales and generated by a combination of processes including cooling, erosional unloading, limited leakage into overlying formations, and CO2 dissolution into brine. Herein, we introduce CO2 dissolution into brine as a new process that reduce gas pressure in a compartmentalized reservoir and our results suggest that it may contribute significantly to reduce the initial pressure build-up due to injection. Bravo Dome is the first documented case of pressure drop due to CO2 dissolution. To have an accurate prediction of pressure evolution in Bravo Dome, our models must include geomechanics and thermodynamics for the reservoir while they account for the pressure

  17. Operational resilience of reservoirs to climate change, agricultural demand, and tourism: A case study from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Mereu, Simone; Sušnik, Janez; Trabucco, Antonio; Daccache, Andre; Vamvakeridou-Lyroudia, Lydia; Renoldi, Stefano; Virdis, Andrea; Savić, Dragan; Assimacopoulos, Dionysis

    2016-02-01

    Many (semi-) arid locations globally, and particularly islands, rely heavily on reservoirs for water supply. Some reservoirs are particularly vulnerable to climate and development changes (e.g. population change, tourist growth, hydropower demands). Irregularities and uncertainties in the fluvial regime associated with climate change and the continuous increase in water demand by different sectors will add new challenges to the management and to the resilience of these reservoirs. The resilience of vulnerable reservoirs must be studied in detail to prepare for and mitigate potential impacts of these changes. In this paper, a reservoir balance model is developed and presented for the Pedra e' Othoni reservoir in Sardinia, Italy, to assess resilience to climate and development changes. The model was first calibrated and validated, then forced with extensive ensemble climate data for representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5, agricultural data, and with four socio-economic development scenarios. Future projections show a reduction in annual reservoir inflow and an increase in demand, mainly in the agricultural sector. Under no scenario is reservoir resilience significantly affected, the reservoir always achieves refill. However, this occurs at the partial expenses of hydropower production with implications for the production of renewable energy. There is also the possibility of conflict between the agricultural sector and hydropower sector for diminishing water supply. Pedra e' Othoni reservoir shows good resilience to future change mostly because of the disproportionately large basin feeding it. However this is not the case of other Sardinian reservoirs and hence a detailed resilience assessment of all reservoirs is needed, where development plans should carefully account for the trade-offs and potential conflicts among sectors. For Sardinia, the option of physical connection between reservoirs is available, as are alternative water supply measures

  18. Meandering stream reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.G.; Sangree, J.B.; Sneider, R.M.

    1987-12-01

    Braided stream deposits, described in a previous article in this series, and meandering stream deposits commonly are excellent reservoirs. Meandering high-sinuousity channels are found on flat alluvial plains with slopes less than 1 1/2/sup 0/ (0.026 rad). These rivers have wide ranges of discharges from low-water flow to flood stage. Two main processes are responsible for development of sand bodies. These are point-bar deposits left by channel migration, and oxbow-lake deposits left in loops of the river course abandoned when the stream cuts a new course during flooding. Extremely high floods spill over the banks and deposit sheets of very fine sand, silt, and clay onto the flood plain.

  19. Monterey fractured reservoir, Santa Barbara Channel, California

    SciTech Connect

    Belfield, W.C.; Helwig, J.; La Pointe, P.R.; Dahleen, W.K.

    1983-03-01

    The South Elwood field in the Santa Barbara Channel is a faulted anticline with cumulative production of 14.5 million bbl from the Monterey Formation as of September 1, 1982. The distributions of pressure, flow rates, and oil-water contacts and the low average matrix permeability of 0.2 md require a fractured reservoir. Core and outcrop studies show a dominant fracture set characterized by vertical, lithologically controlled fractures oriented across strike, and breccias controlled by lithology and structure. Generally, the fracture intensity is unaffected by structural position or bed curvature but is controlled by lithology and bed thickness. Other varieties of fracturing in the Monterey are related to a protracted history of diagenesis, deformation, and fluid injection. Three types of tar-bearing breccias occur in the Monterey Formation: stratigraphic breccia, coalescent-fracture breccia, and fault-related breccia. Formation of breccias probably involves high pore pressures. Because of their polygenetic origin, breccia masses have diverse orientations paralleling bedding or fracture/fault systems. In conclusions, fracturing and brecciation of the Monterey Formation reflect the interplay between processes of diagenesis, deformation, and fluid dynamics. The most important features of the reservoir in the area of the present study are: (1) vertical fractures oriented normal to the structural trends and inferred to be favorably oriented (to remain open) with respect to the regional minimum horizontal stress; and (2) breccias that are both stratigraphically and structurally controlled and inferred to be related to the interaction of rock stress and fluid dynamics.

  20. Simulating Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Evolution Surrounding Fluid Injection in a Fractured Porous Geothermal Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taron, J.; Min, K.; Elsworth, D.

    2006-12-01

    Computational analysis is conducted on the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of a stimulated EGS geothermal reservoir. Numerical analyses utilize a newly developed simulator capable of examining THMC processes in fractured porous geologic media. The simulator links the thermal-hydrologic- chemical (THC) computational code TOUGHREACT with the mechanical (M) capability of FLAC3D, where the response of pore fluid pressure to mechanical disturbance is treated as an undrained system and mineral precipitation/dissolution generates porosity and permeability change within each dual-permeability continuum. Non-linear permeability response to thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) mechanisms is accommodated via embryonic mechanical and transport constitutive laws, and is considered to act in union with permeability changes associated with the removal or addition of minerals within the system. This construct is applied to the geometry of an injector-withdrawal doublet within the Coso Geothermal field, where in situ stress conditions, thermal state, and mineralogical composition at 3000m depth are extracted from recorded field data. Initial results for feasible parametric settings show that permeability reduction in the vicinity of a cool (80°C) injection well may be significant, within an order of magnitude, and accompanied by large (MPa) changes in the stress field throughout the reservoir for imposed boundary conditions of constant stress.

  1. Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R.H.; Hickman, S.H.; Barton, C.A.; Shapiro, A.M.; Benoit, W.R.; Sass, J.H.

    1998-08-01

    Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

  2. Numerical Well Testing Interpretation Model and Applications in Crossflow Double-Layer Reservoirs by Polymer Flooding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; He, Youwei; Li, Lei; Du, Song; Cheng, Shiqing

    2014-01-01

    This work presents numerical well testing interpretation model and analysis techniques to evaluate formation by using pressure transient data acquired with logging tools in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. A well testing model is established based on rheology experiments and by considering shear, diffusion, convection, inaccessible pore volume (IPV), permeability reduction, wellbore storage effect, and skin factors. The type curves were then developed based on this model, and parameter sensitivity is analyzed. Our research shows that the type curves have five segments with different flow status: (I) wellbore storage section, (II) intermediate flow section (transient section), (III) mid-radial flow section, (IV) crossflow section (from low permeability layer to high permeability layer), and (V) systematic radial flow section. The polymer flooding field tests prove that our model can accurately determine formation parameters in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. Moreover, formation damage caused by polymer flooding can also be evaluated by comparison of the interpreted permeability with initial layered permeability before polymer flooding. Comparison of the analysis of numerical solution based on flow mechanism with observed polymer flooding field test data highlights the potential for the application of this interpretation method in formation evaluation and enhanced oil recovery (EOR). PMID:25302335

  3. Estimates the Effects of Benthic Fluxes on the Water Quality of the Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Huh, I. A.; Park, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs located in highly populated and industrialized regions receive discharges of nutrients and pollutants from the watershed that have great potential to impair water quality and threaten aquatic life. The Euiam reservoir is a multiple-purpose water body used for tourism, fishery, and water supply and has been reported as eutrophic since 1990s. The external nutrients loading is considered to be the main cause of eutrophication of water bodies, and control strategies therefore focus on its reduction. However, algae blooms often continue even after external nutrients loading has been controlled, being benthic nutrient loading the main source of nutrients in the water column. Attempts to quantify benthic nutrients fluxes and their role as a source of nutrients to the water column have produced ambiguous results. Benthic flux is dependent on the upward flow of pore water caused by hydrostatic pressure, molecular diffusion, and mixing of sediment and water. In addition, it is controlled by dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, pH values and temperature in the overlying water. Therefore, linking a benthic flux to a water quality model should give us more insight on the effects of benthic fluxes to better quantify nutrient concentration within an entire reservoir system where physical, chemical, biological properties are variable. To represent temporal and spatial variations in the nutrient concentrations of the reservoir, a three-dimensional time variable model, Generalized Longitudinal-Lateral-Vertical Hydrodynamic and Transport (GLLVHT) was selected. The GLLVHT model is imbedded within the Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surface waters (GEMSS). The computational grid of the three-dimensional model was developed using the GIS. The horizontal grid is composed of 580 active cells at the surface layer with spacing varies from 54.2 m to 69.8 m. There are 15 vertical layers with uniform thickness of 1.9 m resolution. To calibrate the model, model prediction for

  4. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  5. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  6. Cost Distribution of Environmental Flow Demands in a Large Scale Multi-Reservoir System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, G.; Tilmant, A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the recovery of a prescribed flow regime through reservoir system reoperation, focusing on the associated costs and losses imposed on different power plants depending on flows, power plant and reservoir characteristics and systems topology. In large-scale reservoir systems such cost distribution is not trivial, and it should be properly evaluated to identify coordinated operating solutions that avoid penalizing a single reservoir. The methods combine an efficient stochastic dual dynamic programming algorithm for reservoir optimization subject to environmental flow targets with specific magnitude, duration and return period, which effects on fish recruitment are already known. Results indicate that the distribution of the effect of meeting the environmental flow demands throughout the reservoir cascade differs largely, and in some reservoirs power production and revenue are increased, while in others it is reduced. Most importantly, for the example system modeled here (10 reservoirs in the Parana River basin, Brazil) meeting the target environmental flows was possible without reducing the total energy produced in the year, at a cost of $25 Million/year in foregone hydropower revenues (3% reduction). Finally, the results and methods are useful in (a) quantifying the foregone hydropower and revenues resulting from meeting a specific environmental flow demand, (b) identifying the distribution and reallocation of the foregone hydropower and revenue across a large scale system, and (c) identifying optimal reservoir operating strategies to meet environmental flow demands in a large scale multi-reservoir system.

  7. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-04-08

    Natural gas reservoirs are obvious targets for carbon sequestration by direct carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection by virtue of their proven record of gas production and integrity against gas escape. Carbon sequestration in depleted natural gas reservoirs can be coupled with enhanced gas production by injecting CO{sub 2} into the reservoir as it is being produced, a process called Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). In this process, supercritical CO{sub 2} is injected deep in the reservoir while methane (CH{sub 4}) is produced at wells some distance away. The active injection of CO{sub 2} causes repressurization and CH{sub 4} displacement to allow the control and enhancement of gas recovery relative to water-drive or depletion-drive reservoir operations. Carbon dioxide undergoes a large change in density as CO{sub 2} gas passes through the critical pressure at temperatures near the critical temperature. This feature makes CO{sub 2} a potentially effective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at the end of the CSEGR process when the reservoir is filled with CO{sub 2}, additional benefit of the reservoir may be obtained through its operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this paper, we present discussion and simulation results from TOUGH2/EOS7C of gas mixture property prediction, gas injection, repressurization, migration, and mixing processes that occur in gas reservoirs under active CO{sub 2} injection.

  8. Production of superheated steam from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; White, D.E.

    1973-01-01

    Vapor-dominated geothermal systems such as Larderello, Italy, The Geysers, California, and Matsukawa, Japan yield dry or superheated steam when exploited. Models for these systems are examined along with production data and the thermodynamic properties of water, steam and rock. It is concluded that these systems initially consist of a water and steam filled reservoir, a water-saturated cap rock, and a water or brine-saturated deep reservoir below a water table. Most liquid water in all parts of the system is relatively immobilized in small pores and crevices; steam dominates the large fractures and voids of the reservoir and is the continuous, pressure-controlling phase. With production, the pressure is lowered and the liquid water boils, causing massive transfer of heat from the rock and its eventual drying. Passage of steam through already dried rock produces superheating. After an initial vaporization of liquid water in the reservoir, the decrease in pressure produces increased boiling below the deep water table. With heavy exploitation, boiling extends deeper into hotter rock and the temperature of the steam increases. This model explains most features of the published production behavior of these systems and can be used to guide exploitation policies. ?? 1973.

  9. Modeling Shear-Enhanced Permeability as the Mechanism for Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs - A Promising Improvement to Predicting Reservoir Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate geomechanical reservoir model including constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, mechanical rock properties, and the orientations and characteristics of natural fractures is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low permeability reservoirs such as crystalline basement geothermal or oil and gas reservoirs. In these low permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. These hydraulic properties of the fractures, their width, stiffness and strength are often difficult to quantify, leading to large uncertainties in predicted response to stimulation of fractured reservoirs. A well-constrained and calibrated fracture model makes it possible not only to predict reservoir response to stimulation, including the shape and orientation of the stimulated region, but also to predict the required stimulation pressure. Such a model also makes it possible to predict the change in flow properties during production due to depletion, resulting in better predictions of production rate and ultimate recovery. As part of the evaluation process of a compartmentalized fractured basement reservoir, wellbore image and other data were used to develop a 3D geomechanical model of stress and natural fractures through the reservoir volume. Although the results clearly defined the optimal directions in which to drill wells to exploit pre-existing natural fractures, large uncertainties in the models resulted in significant uncertainties in predictions of stimulation response. Because the pre-existing natural fractures were insufficiently permeable and operational constraints precluded the use of hydraulic fracturing to stimulate the reservoir, an innovative approach was taken to determine the extent to which injection at pressures below

  10. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  11. Projecting the Impact of Regional Land-Use Change and Water Management Policies on Lake Water Quality: An Application to Periurban Lakes and Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Catherine, Arnaud; Mouillot, David; Maloufi, Selma; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    As the human population grows, the demand for living space and supplies of resources also increases, which may induce rapid change in land-use/land-cover (LULC) and associated pressures exerted on aquatic habitats. We propose a new approach to forecast the impact of regional land cover change and water management policies (i.e., targets in nutrient loads reduction) on lake and reservoir water eutrophication status using a model that requires minimal parameterisation compared with alternative methods. This approach was applied to a set of 48 periurban lakes located in the Ile de France region (IDF, France) to simulate catchment-scale management scenarios. Model outputs were subsequently compared to governmental agencies’ 2030 forecasts. Our model indicated that the efforts made to reduce pressure in the catchment of seepage lakes might be expected to be proportional to the gain that might be obtained, whereas drainage lakes will display little improvement until a critical level of pressure reduction is reached. The model also indicated that remediation measures, as currently planned by governmental agencies, might only have a marginal impact on improving the eutrophication status of lakes and reservoirs within the IDF region. Despite the commitment to appropriately managing the water resources in many countries, prospective tools to evaluate the potential impacts of global change on freshwater ecosystems integrity at medium to large spatial scales are lacking. This study proposes a new approach to investigate the impact of region-scale human-driven changes on lake and reservoir ecological status and could be implemented elsewhere with limited parameterisation. Issues are discussed that relate to model uncertainty and to its relevance as a tool applied to decision-making. PMID:23991066

  12. Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

    1993-03-01

    This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

  13. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage.

  14. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage. PMID:22932387

  15. A new representation of wells in numerical reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Ding; Renard, G. )

    1994-05-01

    Numerical PI's are used to relate wellblock and wellbore pressures and the flow rate of a well in reservoir simulations by finite difference. This approach is based on an equivalent wellblock radius'', r[sub eq,o]. When nonuniform grids are used, r[sub eq,o] may create an error in wellbore pressure or oil rate. This paper presents a new well representation. The analytical solution for near-well pressure is included by modifying the transmissibilities between gridblocks so that flow around as well is described fully. The new method is applicable to non-uniform grids and nonisolated wells.

  16. Development of a nuclear technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless steel cylinders was developed. It is based on differences in attenuation coefficients of water and air for Cs137 (662 keV) gamma rays. Experimentally observed gamma ray counting rates with and without water in model reservoir cylinder were compared with corresponding calculated values for two different gamma ray detection theshold energies. Calculated values include the effects of multiple scattering and attendant gamma ray energy reductions. The agreement between the measured and calculated values is reasonably good. Computer programs for calculating angular and spectral distributions of scattered radition in various media are included.

  17. Gas/oil capillary pressure at chalk at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Christoffersen, K.R.; Whitson, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Accurate capillary pressure curves are essential for studying the recovery of oil by gas injection in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs. A simple and fast method to determine high-pressure drainage capillary pressure curves has been developed. The effect of gas/oil interfacial tension (IFT) on the capillary pressure of chalk cores has been determined for a methane/n-pentane system. Measurements on a 5-md outcrop chalk core were made at pressures of 70, 105, and 130 bar, with corresponding IFT`s of 6.3, 3.2, and 1.5 mN/m. The results were both accurate and reproducible. The measured capillary pressure curves were not a linear function of IFT when compared with low-pressure centrifuge data. Measured capillary pressures were considerably lower than IFT-scaled centrifuge data. It appears that the deviation starts at an IFT of about 5 mN/m. According to the results of this study, the recovery of oil by gravity drainage in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs may be significantly underestimated if standard laboratory capillary pressure curves are scaled by IFT only. However, general conclusions cannot be made on the basis on only this series of experiments on one chalk core.

  18. Operation of TVA reservoirs. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1981. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Plates are included in this report tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1981. Additional plates are included for the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of Reservoir Operations. Tables of monthly and annual storages and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included at the end of their respective annual operations summary. Individual plotting of midnight reservoir elevations during calendar year 1981 are included for the principal tributary storage reservoirs and Normandy Reservoir. Group charts are included showing midnight reservoir elevations for other tributary reservoirs, the Tennessee River reservoirs, and the principal Cumberland Basin reservoirs.

  19. Operation of TVA reservoirs: annual 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1980. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Plates are included in this report tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1980. Additional plates are included for the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of Reservoir Operations. Tables of monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included at the end of their respective annual operations summary. Individual plottings of midnight reservoir elevations are included for the principal tributary storage reservoirs and Normandy Reservoir. Group charts are included showing midnight reservoir elevations for other tributary reservoirs, the Tennessee River reservoirs, and the principal Cumberland Basin reservoirs.

  20. Fault Permeability Estimated From Rate of Sea Water Recharge Into an Underpressured Hydrocarbon Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, J. R.; Horner, S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane has leaked from the offshore South Ellwood fault at least since discovery of the South Ellwood field at Platform Holly. The fault bounds the north side of the field and has 600 meters of normal offset. The reservoir, which is fractured Monterey shale at one kilometer depth, was initially 5% over hydrostatic pressure, but is currently at 25% below hydrostatic pressure. Production fluid in well tubing that connects the platform and reservoir is isolated from the ocean. New data indicate that the ocean is in direct hydraulic communication with the reservoir in the vicinity of the fault. Quartz pressure sensors were installed at about one km depth in five wells during a 15 day production shut down. A well that intersects the fault at reservoir depth (about one km subsea), shows a pressure variation that matches the frequency of the ocean tide. Within +/- 1 minute, there is no lag between the predicted tide signal and the pressure variation in the well. The pressure change is less than predicted from sea heights, which we attribute to compressibility of the gas in the fault zone. The other wells (160m-1 km from the fault) do not show the tidal signal, indicating that pressure change is not a general effect of the tide on the earth's crust. During testing, fluid pressures increased at a rate of 55 Pa/hr (0.008 psi/hr) in the well adjacent to the fault. We conclude that the pressure recovery from sub-hydrostatic conditions is due to sea water flowing down the fault into the under pressured reservoir. From this data we calculate the permeability of the South Ellwood Fault to be about 20 md, a value similar to the overall field permeability in the fractured Monterey reservoir.

  1. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-03-31

    The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

  2. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulat