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Sample records for reshocked two-dimensional richtmyer-meshkov

  1. Effects of WENO flux reconstruction order and spatial resolution on reshocked two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O; Don, W S

    2006-06-12

    Weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) simulations of the reshocked two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using third-, fifth- and ninth-order spatial flux reconstruction and uniform grid resolutions corresponding to 128, 256 and 512 points per initial perturbation wavelength are presented. The dependence of the density, vorticity, simulated density Schlieren and baroclinic production fields, mixing layer width, circulation deposition, mixing profiles, production and mixing fractions, energy spectra, statistics, probability distribution functions, numerical turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy production/dissipation rates, numerical Reynolds numbers, and numerical viscosity on the order and resolution is investigated to long evolution times. The results are interpreted using the implicit numerical dissipation in the characteristic projection-based, finite-difference WENO method. It is shown that higher order higher resolution simulations have lower numerical dissipation. The sensitivity of the quantities considered to the order and resolution is further amplified following reshock, when the energy deposition by the second shock-interface interaction induces the formation of small-scale structures. Lower-order lower-resolution simulations preserve large-scale structures and flow symmetry to late times, while higher-order higher-resolution simulations exhibit fragmentation of the structures, symmetry breaking and increased mixing. Similar flow features are qualitatively and quantitatively captured by either approximately doubling the order or the resolution. Additionally, the computational scaling shows that increasing the order is more advantageous than increasing the resolution for the flow considered here. The present investigation suggests that the ninth-order WENO method is well-suited for the simulation and analysis of complex multi-scale flows and mixing generated by shock-induced hydrodynamic instabilities.

  2. Effects of WENO flux reconstruction order and spatial resolution on reshocked two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O; Don, W

    2006-03-16

    Finite-difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) simulations of the reshocked two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using third-, fifth- and ninth-order spatial flux reconstruction and uniform spatial grid resolutions corresponding to 128, 256 and 512 points per initial perturbation wavelength are presented. The dependence of the density, vorticity, simulated density Schlieren and baroclinic production fields, mixing layer width, circulation deposition, mixing profiles, chemical products and mixing fractions, energy spectra, statistics, probability distribution functions, effective turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy production/dissipation rates, numerical Reynolds numbers, and effective numerical viscosity on the order and resolution is comprehensively investigated to long evolution times. The results are interpreted using the computed implicit numerical diffusion arising from the truncation errors in the characteristic projection-based WENO method. It is quantitatively shown that simulations with higher order and higher resolution have lower numerical dissipation. The sensitivity of the quantities considered to the order and resolution is further amplified following reshock, when the energy deposition on the evolving interface by the second shock-interface interaction induces the formation of small-scale structures. Simulations using lower orders of reconstruction and on coarser grids preserve large-scale structures and flow symmetry to late times, while simulations using higher orders of reconstruction and on finer grids exhibit fragmentation of the structures, symmetry breaking and increased mixing. The investigation demonstrates that similar flow features are qualitatively and quantitatively captured by either approximately doubling the order or the resolution. Additionally, the computational scaling shows that increasing the order is more advantageous than doubling the resolution for the complex shock-driven hydrodynamic

  3. Dynamics of Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing with reshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mula, Swathi; Craig, Stuart; Prestridge, Kathy

    2016-11-01

    Variable density mixing plays a very important role in a number of applications, including inertial confinement fusion, supernovae, and supersonic combustion ramjet engines. To better understand the dynamics of variable density mixing, experiments are developed at the Vertical Shock Tube (VST) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. At this facility, an initially perturbed density interface (air-SF6, Atwood number = 0.6) is impulsively accelerated by a low Mach shock wave (Mach <3), which induces Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing of the two fluids. Initial perturbations on the air-SF6 interface are generated by an oscillating flapper that initially separates the two fluids. The time evolution of RM mixing is studied by way of simultaneous density and velocity measurements using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques. For two separate initial conditions, the measurements capture the air-SF6 interface, at multiple time locations, before and after the passage of shock and reshock at Mach = 1.3. At each time location, multiple instantaneous shots are acquired. From these measurements, we study the evolution of RM instability along with the dependence of mixing flow features (post-shock and reshock) on the initial conditions.

  4. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on a low atwood number interface after reshock.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Chris

    2009-09-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability after reshock is investigated in shock tube experiments at the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory using planar laser imaging and a new high speed interface tracking technique. The interface is a 50-50% volume fraction mixture of helium and argon stratified over pure argon. This interface has an Atwood number of 0.29 and near single mode, two-dimensional, standing wave perturbation with an average amplitude of 0.35 cm and a wavelength of 19.4 cm. The incident shock wave of Mach number 1.92 accelerates the interface before it is reshocked by a reflected Mach 1.70 shock wave. The amplitude growth after reshock is reported for variations in this initial amplitude, and several amplitude growth rate models are compared to the experimental growth rate after reshock. A new growth model is introduced, based on a model of circulation deposition calculated from one-dimensional gas dynamics parameters. This model is shown to compare well with the amplitude growth rate after reshock and the circulation over a half-wavelength of the interface after the first shock wave and after reshock.

  5. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in dilute gas-particle mixtures with re-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, J. C.; Gottiparthi, K. C.; Menon, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated in a dilute gas-particle mixture using three-dimensional numerical simulations. This work extends an earlier two-dimensional study [S. Ukai, K. Balakrishnan, and S. Menon, "On Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in dilute gas-particle mixtures," Phys. Fluids 22, 104103 (2010)] to a larger parameter space consisting of variations in the mass loading and the particle size as well as considering both single-mode and multi-mode interface initializations. In addition, the effect of the presence of particles on re-shock RMI is also investigated. Single-phase numerical predictions of the mixing layer growth-rate are shown to compare well to both experimental and theoretical results. In a dilute gas-particle mixture, the initial growth-rate of RMI shows similar trends compared to previous work; however, the current numerical predictions show that there is an observable increase, not previously predicted, in the growth of the mixing layer at higher mass loadings. For the range of cases considered, an increase as much as 56% is observed. This increase is attributed to additional vorticity production in the mixing layer resulting from inter-phase momentum coupling. Moreover, the presence of particles introduces a continuous drag on the gas-phase resulting in a delay in the time at which re-shock occurs. This delay, which is observed to be as much as 6%, is largest for higher initial mass loadings and smaller particle radii and has a corresponding effect on both the growth-rate of the mixing-layer after re-shock and the final width of the mixing layer. A new semi-analytical correlation is developed and verified against the numerical data to predict the re-shocked RMI growth-rate in dilute gas-particle flows. The correlation shows that the re-shock RMI growth-rate is linearly proportional to the velocity jump at re-shock, the molecular mixing fraction, and the multi-phase Atwood number. Depending on the initial mass loading and

  6. Physics of reshock and mixing in single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, O; Latini, M; Don, W

    2006-12-13

    The ninth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method is used to investigate the physics of reshock and mixing in two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability to late times. The initial conditions and computational domain were adapted from the Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF{sub 6} shock tube experiment of Collins and Jacobs [J. Fluid Mech. 464, 113 (2002)]: the growth of the bubble and spike perturbation amplitudes from fifth- and ninth-order WENO simulations of this experiment were compared to the predictions of amplitude growth models, and were shown to be in very good agreement with the experimental data prior to reshock [Latini, Schilling and Don, Phys. Fluids (2007), in press]. In the present investigation, the density, vorticity, baroclinic vorticity production, and simulated density Schlieren fields are first presented to qualitatively describe reshock. The baroclinic circulation deposition on the interface is shown to agree with the predictions of the Samtaney and Zabusky [J. Fluid Mech. 269, 45 (1994)] model and linear instability theory. The time-evolution of the positive and negative circulation on the interface is considered before and after reshock: it is shown that the circulations are equal before, as well as after reshock, until the interaction of the reflected rarefaction with the layer leads to flow symmetry breaking and different evolutions of the positive and negative circulation. The post-reshock mixing layer growth is shown to be in very good agreement with three models predicting linear growth for a short time following reshock. Next, a comprehensive investigation of local and global mixing properties as a function of time is performed. The distribution and amount of mixed fluid along the shock propagation direction is characterized using averaged mole fraction profiles, a fast kinetic reaction model, and molecular mixing fractions. The modal distribution of energy in the mixing layer is quantified using

  7. Physics of reshock and mixing in single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Oleg; Latini, Marco; Don, Wai Sun

    2007-08-01

    The ninth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method is used to investigate the physics of reshock and mixing in two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability to late times. The initial conditions and computational domain were adapted from the Mach 1.21 air (acetone)/ SF6 shock tube experiment of Collins and Jacobs [J. Fluid Mech. 464, 113 (2002)]: the growth of the bubble and spike amplitudes from fifth- and ninth-order WENO simulations of this experiment were compared to the predictions of linear and nonlinear amplitude growth models, and were shown to be in very good agreement with the experimental data prior to reshock by Latini, Schilling, and Don [Phys. Fluids 19, 024104 (2007)]. In the present investigation, the density, vorticity, baroclinic vorticity production, and simulated density Schlieren fields are first presented to qualitatively describe the reshock process. The baroclinic circulation deposition on the interface is shown to agree with the predictions of the Samtaney-Zabusky model and with linear instability theory. The time evolution of the positive and negative circulation on the interface is considered before and after reshock: it is shown that the magnitudes of the circulations are equal before as well as after reshock, until the interaction of the reflected rarefaction with the layer induces flow symmetry breaking and different evolutions of the magnitude of the positive and negative circulation. The post-reshock mixing layer growth is shown to be in generally good agreement with three models predicting linear growth for a short time following reshock. Next, a comprehensive investigation of local and global mixing properties as a function of time is performed. The distribution and amount of mixed fluid along the shock propagation direction is characterized using averaged mole fraction profiles, a fast kinetic reaction model, and mixing fractions. The modal distribution of energy in the mixing layer is

  8. Investigating shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov ripple evolution before and after re-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Raman, K. S.; Baumann, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Islam, T. S.; Felker, S.; Holder, J. P.; Seugling, R. M.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.; Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Perry, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Late-time Rayleigh-Taylor/Richtmyer-Meshkov(RM) ripple growth in an opposing-shock geometry is investigated using x-ray area backlit imaging of a shock-tube with indirectly driven shocks. The shocks are driven from opposing sides of the tube. The ablator layer on one side has pre-imposed ripples in the form of a sine wave with two amplitudes and a single wavelength. This ablator includes an opaque tracer layer that is used to track the perturbed interface as it is driven into a lower density foam. The ablator on the opposing side of the tube is flat, and is used to launch the shock that re-shocks the rippled interface. A large-area backlighter and gated x-ray radiography is used to capture images at different times during the RM instability growth. Here, first measurements obtained with this experimental platform at the NIF, including the optimization of the platform are presented. The RM ripple evolution before and after re-shock, including a possible loss of initial conditions are, also discussed. The data that informs the codes is compared to simulation results Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-674941.

  9. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional multimode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Thornber, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs as shock waves pass through a perturbed material interface, triggering transition to an inhomogeneous turbulence variable density flow. This paper presents a series of large-eddy-simulations of the two dimensional turbulent RM instability and compares the results to the fully three dimensional simulations. There are two aims for this paper, the first is to explore what numerical resolution is required for a statistically converged solution for a two dimensional inhomogeneous flow field. The second aim is to elucidate the key differences in flow physics between the two dimensional and three dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities, particularly their asymptotic self-similar regime. Convergence is achieved using 64 independent realisations and grid resolutions up to 4096{sup 2} in the plane. It is shown that for narrowband cases the growth rate θ = 0.48 which is substantially higher than the three-dimensional equivalent. Mix measures are consistently lower compared to three-dimensional, and the kinetic energy distribution is homogeneous at late time. The broadband case has a similar initial growth rate as the three-dimensional case, with a marginally lower θ = 0.63. Mix is similar in magnitude, but is reducing at late time. The spectra in both cases exhibit the dual-cascade expected from two-dimensional turbulence.

  10. The effects of initial conditions and circulation deposition on the inclined-interface reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, David; McFarland, Jacob; Mohaghar, Mohammad; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study of a twice-accelerated Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, where reshock provides the second acceleration, focusing on the effects of initial conditions and circulation deposition is presented. Experiments were performed using the inclined shock tube facility at the Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory. Three experimental cases are presented that have the same Atwood number, inclination angle, and Mach number, but are differentiated by their pre-reshock development time. Both Mie scattering and particle image velocimetry diagnostics were implemented. Velocity statistics were ensemble-averaged over instantaneous realizations for each case before and after reshock. Results show that while the mix width decreases after reshock, the interface length continues to increase because the reshock wave amplifies small-scale perturbations on the pre-reshock interface, resulting in greater mixing. A more developed interface also experiences greater circulation deposition after reshock. After reshock, the sign of the vorticity near the interface reverses due to a second application of baroclinic torque by the reshock wave. Velocity statistics showed that the cross-correlation () is nonzero over much of the mixing layer, which indicates that shear and anisotropy are present. Turbulent kinetic energy spectra for the most developed case after reshock exhibited a inertial range.

  11. Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Simulations and Modeling of Complex Hydrodynamic Flows. Part 2. Single-Mode Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with Reshock

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O

    2005-04-27

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a fundamental fluid instability that occurs when perturbations on an interface separating gases with different properties grow following the passage of a shock. This instability is typically studied in shock tube experiments, and constitutes a fundamental example of a complex hydrodynamic flow. Numerical simulations and models for the instability growth and evolution have also been used to further elucidate the physics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. In the present work, the formally high-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method using a third-order total-variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta time-evolution scheme (as implemented in the HOPE code [68]) is applied to simulate the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock in two spatial dimensions. The initial conditions and computational domain for the simulations are modeled after the Collins and Jacobs [29] single-mode, Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF{sub 6} shock tube experiment. The following boundary conditions are used: (1) periodic in the spanwise direction corresponding to the cross section of the test section; (2) outflow at the entrance of the test section in the streamwise direction, and; (3) reflecting at the end wall of the test section in the streamwise direction. The present investigation has three principal motivations: (1) to provide additional validation of the HOPE code against available experimental data; (2) to provide numerical simulation data for detailed analysis of mixing induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock, and; (3) to systematically investigate the dependence of mixing properties on both the order of WENO reconstruction and on the spatial resolution. The present study constitutes the first comprehensive application of the high-resolution WENO method to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock, as well as analysis of the resulting mixing.

  12. High-resolution simulations and modeling of reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. I. Comparison to experimental data and to amplitude growth model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O; Don, W

    2006-05-15

    The reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is simulated in two spatial dimensions using the fifth- and ninth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory shock-capturing method with uniform spatial resolution of 256 points per initial perturbation wavelength. The initial conditions and computational domain are modeled after the single-mode, Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF{sub 6} shock tube experiment of Collins and Jacobs [J. Fluid Mech. 464, 113 (2002)]. The simulation densities are shown to be in very good agreement with the corrected experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence images at selected times before reshock of the evolving interface. Analytical, semianalytical and phenomenological linear and nonlinear, impulsive, perturbation and potential flow models for single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable perturbation growth are summarized. The simulation amplitudes are shown to be in very good agreement with the experimental data and with the predictions of linear amplitude growth models for small times and with those of nonlinear amplitude growth models at later times up to the time at which the driver-based expansion in the experiment (but not present in the simulations or models) expands the layer before reshock. The qualitative and quantitative differences between the fifth- and ninth-order simulation results are discussed. Using a local and global quantitative metric, the prediction of the Zhang and Sohn [Phys. Fluids 9, 1106 (1997)] nonlinear Pade model is shown to be in best overall agreement with the simulation amplitudes before reshock. The sensitivity of the amplitude growth model predictions to the initial growth rate from linear instability theory, the post-shock Atwood number and amplitude, and the velocity jump due to the passage of the shock through the interface is also investigated numerically. In Part II [Phys. Fluids (2006)], a comprehensive investigation of mixing induced by the reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is

  13. Numerical simulation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in initially nonuniform flows and mixing with reshock.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing-Song; Wang, Bing; Wang, Tao; Liu, Kun

    2012-12-01

    Based on previous instability experiments of the double mode perturbed interface in initially nonuniform flows, we numerically investigate the effect of the nonuniformity of flows on the evolution of instability in a nonlinear regime after reshock by adopting two different nonuniform coefficients (δ_{1} = 0.6162 and δ_{2} = 0.4961) in the Gaussian distribution of the initial nonuniform density. We obtain the evolution of the mixing zone width and vortex structure of the air-SF_{6} interface and compare the circulation discrepancies of the nonuniform and uniform flows before and after reshock. These results indicate that the nonuniformity of the initial flow has great effect on the evolution of instability in the linear regime and the weak nonlinear regime prior to reshock. However, the mixing layer has little dependence on the nonuniformity of the initial flow in the nonlinear regime after reshock; namely, the effect of the nonuniformity is reduced significantly as the instability enters the strongly nonlinear regime after reshock. Although the growth rate of the perturbations has a significant increase, the characteristics of the flow like the mixing width, vorticity, and circulation are close to those of a uniform flow.

  14. Multicomponent Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulations of Reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability and Turbulent Mixing: Mach Number and Atwood Number Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran-Lopez, Tiberius; Schilling, Oleg

    2014-11-01

    Reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing for various gas pairs and large shock Mach numbers is simulated using a third-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) implementation of a new K- ɛ multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model. Experiments previously performed at the University of Provence with gas pairs CO2 /He, CO2 /Ar, and CO2 /Kr (with At = - 0 . 73 , - 0 . 05 , and 0 . 3 , respectively) and incident shock Mach numbers Ma = 2 . 4 , 3 . 1 , 3 . 7 , 4 . 2 , and 4 . 5 are considered. The evolution of the mixing layer widths is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Budgets of the turbulent transport equations are used to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to turbulent mixing in large Mach number reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. These results are contrasted with those from previous modeling of smaller Mach number experiments to identify the physical effects which require accurate modeling, including mean and turbulent enthalpy diffusion, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation dissipation. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. TWO-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL STUDY FOR RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR AND RICHTMYER-MESHKOV INSTABILITIES IN RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei

    2013-07-20

    We study the stability of a non-rotating single-component jet using two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. By assuming translational invariance along the jet axis, we exclude the destabilization effect by Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. The nonlinear evolution of the transverse structure of the jet with a normal jet velocity is highlighted. An intriguing finding in our study is that Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov type instabilities can destroy cylindrical jet configuration as a result of spontaneously induced radial oscillating motion. This is powered by in situ energy conversion between the thermal and bulk kinetic energies. The effective inertia ratio of the jet to the surrounding medium {eta} determines a threshold for the onset of instabilities. The condition {eta} < 1 should be satisfied for the transverse structure of the jet being persisted.

  16. High-Order Weno Simulations of Three-Dimensional Reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability to Late Times: Dynamics, Dependence on Initial Conditions, and Comparisons to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, O; Latini, M

    2010-01-12

    The dynamics of the reshocked multi-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated using 513 x 257{sup 2} three-dimensional ninth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing simulations. A two-mode initial perturbation with superposed random noise is used to model the Mach 1.5 air/SF{sub 6} Vetter-Sturtevant shock tube experiment. The mass fraction and enstrophy isosurfaces, and density cross-sections are utilized to show the detailed flow structure before, during, and after reshock. It is shown that the mixing layer growth agrees well with the experimentally measured growth rate before and after reshock. The post-reshock growth rate is also in good agreement with the prediction of the Mikaelian model. A parametric study of the sensitivity of the layer growth to the choice of amplitudes of the short and long wavelength initial interfacial perturbation is also presented. Finally, the amplification effects of reshock are quantified using the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent enstrophy spectra, as well as the evolution of the baroclinic enstrophy production, buoyancy production, and shear production terms in the enstrophy and turbulent kinetic transport equations.

  17. Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Simulations and Modeling of Complex Hydrodynamic Flows. Part 2. Single-Mode Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with Reshock

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, O; Latini, M

    2004-10-06

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a fundamental fluid instability that occurs when perturbations on an interface separating gases with different properties grow following the passage of a shock. This instability is typically studied in shock tube experiments, and constitutes a fundamental example of a complex hydrodynamic flow. Numerical simulations and models for the instability growth and evolution have also been used to further understand the physics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. In the present work, the formally high-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method using a third-order total-variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta time-evolution scheme (as implemented in the HOPE code [57]) is applied to simulate the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock in two spatial dimensions. The initial conditions and computational domain for the simulations are modeled after the Collins and Jacobs [23] single-mode, Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF6 shock tube experiment. The following boundary conditions are used: (1) periodic in the spanwise direction corresponding to the cross-section of the test section; (2) outflow at the entrance of the test section in the streamwise direction, and; (3) reflecting at the end wall of the test section in the streamwise direction. The present investigation has three principal motivations: (1) to provide additional validation of the HOPE code against available experimental data; (2) to provide numerical simulation data for detailed analysis of mixing induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock, and; (3) to systematically investigate the dependence of mixing properties on both the order of WENO reconstruction and spatial resolution. The present study constitutes the first comprehensive application of the high-resolution WENO method to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock, as well as analysis of the resulting mixing. First, analytical, semi-analytical, and

  18. Progress on Multicomponent Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Model Development and Validation for Rayleigh-Taylor and Reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2014-11-01

    Recent progress on the development and validation of a new K- ɛ multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model is discussed. The model includes mixture molecular dissipation and diffusion terms, molecular and turbulent enthalpy diffusion terms, and models for pressure-dilatation and dilatation dissipation. The model has successfully been applied to a set of ten reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing experiments, and more recently to experiments with larger Mach numbers and various Atwood numbers. An extension of the model to include a modeled density variance transport equation is described. The three-equation model is applied to various Rayleigh-Taylor mixing cases with complex accelerations. The evolution of various turbulence statistics, fields, and turbulent transport equation budgets are compared among these cases to elucidate differences in the turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion mechanisms. It is also shown that the mechanical turbulence timescale is poorly correlated with the molecular mixing timescale determined by the time-evolution of the molecular mixing parameter. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Startup process in Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardini, Manuel; Pullin, D. I.

    2007-11-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for the initial growth of the planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the case of a reflected shock. The model captures the main features of the interfacial perturbation growth before the asymptotic linear regime is attained, over a wide range of incident shock Mach number and Atwood ratio. The problem is formulated in the general framework of the compressible Euler equations for ideal gases, and consists of solving the initial-value problem describing a shock impacting a slightly sinusoidally perturbed density interface. The equations are linearized about a base flow corresponding to the 1D Riemann problem of the shock interaction with an unperturbed interface. An appropriate scaling, similar to the Rayleigh-Jansen method, is then used to construct a perturbation expansion about the basic state. Linearized boundary conditions are applied at both reflected and transmitted perturbed shocks and at the contact interface. The zeroth order of the expansion is retained and leads to an explicit expression for the growth of the interface perturbation. Results are compared with computations obtained from two-dimensional, highly-resolved numerical simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  20. Extended model for Richtmyer-Meshkov mix

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-11-18

    We examine four Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) experiments on shock-generated turbulent mix and find them to be in good agreement with our earlier simple model in which the growth rate h of the mixing layer following a shock or reshock is constant and given by 2{alpha}A{Delta}v, independent of initial conditions h{sub 0}. Here A is the Atwood number ({rho}{sub B}-{rho}{sub A})/({rho}{sub B} + {rho}{sub A}), {rho}{sub A,B} are the densities of the two fluids, {Delta}V is the jump in velocity induced by the shock or reshock, and {alpha} is the constant measured in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments: {alpha}{sup bubble} {approx} 0.05-0.07, {alpha}{sup spike} {approx} (1.8-2.5){alpha}{sup bubble} for A {approx} 0.7-1.0. In the extended model the growth rate beings to day after a time t*, when h = h*, slowing down from h = h{sub 0} + 2{alpha}A{Delta}vt to h {approx} t{sup {theta}} behavior, with {theta}{sup bubble} {approx} 0.25 and {theta}{sup spike} {approx} 0.36 for A {approx} 0.7. They ascribe this change-over to loss of memory of the direction of the shock or reshock, signaling transition from highly directional to isotropic turbulence. In the simplest extension of the model h*/h{sub 0} is independent of {Delta}v and depends only on A. They find that h*/h{sub 0} {approx} 2.5-3.5 for A {approx} 0.7-1.0.

  1. Numerical physics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Todd Michael

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a fluid instability of importance to scientists and engineers. This instability occurs when a perturbed fluid interface is crossed by a shock wave and subjected to a rapid acceleration. A central goal of research into the dynamics of this instability is to determine the rate of growth of the boundaries of the resulting mixing layer. In the present work, we report high-quality numerical simulations of the single-mode two-dimensional planer Richtmyer-Meshkov instability across a variety of physical parameters, focusing on the effect of the variation of the Atwood number for Mach two incident shocks. We compare the growth of the mixing layer, bubble and spike fronts to analytical models and examine the coherent structures of the developing mixing layer. We examine the breakdown in symmetry between bubble and spike fronts. We describe a new method of modeling the acceleration terms of traditional bouyancy drag models of mixing layer growth by drawing these terms from the compressible linear theory. As a result, we treat the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability as a Rayleigh-Taylor instability with time-varying acceleration terms. The resulting model gives an excellent fit to the velocities of the spike and bubble fronts for the simulations performed for the present work from shock passage until well into the nonlinear regime. We describe and discuss possible reasons for deviation from the present model.

  2. Numerical simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in finite-thickness fluid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1996-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in shocked fluid layers are reported and compared with analytic theory. To investigate new phenomena such as freeze-out, interface coupling, and feedthrough, several new configurations are simulated on a two-dimensional hydrocode. The basic system is an A/B/A combination, where A is air and B is a finite-thickness layer of freon, SF6, or helium. The middle layer B has perturbations either on its upstream or downstream side, or on both sides, in which case the perturbations may be in phase (sinuous) or out of phase (varicose). The evolution of such perturbations under a Mach 1.5 shock is calculated, including the effect of a reshock. Recently reported gas curtain experiments [J. M. Budzinski et al., Phys. Fluids 6, 3510 (1994)] are also simulated and the code results are found to agree very well with the experiments. A new gas curtain configuration is also considered, involving an initially sinuous SF6 or helium layer and a new pattern, opposite mushrooms, is predicted to emerge. Upon reshock a relatively simple sinuous gas curtain is found to evolve into a highly complex pattern of nested mushrooms.

  3. Measurement of a Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability at an Air-SF6 Interface in a Semiannular Shock Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Juchun; Si, Ting; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-07-01

    We report the first measurements of the perturbation amplitude in the converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a semiannular shock tube. At early stages, the amplitude growth agrees well with the impulsive model considering the geometrical convergence effect. A quick decrease of the growth rate at late time, even to be negative, before the reshock is observed for the first time. The reduction of the growth rate is ascribed to the Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization caused by the interface deceleration motion only presented in the converging circumstance. By reasonably evaluating the Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization, a modified model based on the Bell equation is proposed, which well predicts the perturbation growth in a converging geometry from early to late stages before the reshock. It is also found that the flow compressibility is significant in the converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  4. Measurement of a Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability at an Air-SF_{6} Interface in a Semiannular Shock Tube.

    PubMed

    Ding, Juchun; Si, Ting; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-07-07

    We report the first measurements of the perturbation amplitude in the converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a semiannular shock tube. At early stages, the amplitude growth agrees well with the impulsive model considering the geometrical convergence effect. A quick decrease of the growth rate at late time, even to be negative, before the reshock is observed for the first time. The reduction of the growth rate is ascribed to the Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization caused by the interface deceleration motion only presented in the converging circumstance. By reasonably evaluating the Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization, a modified model based on the Bell equation is proposed, which well predicts the perturbation growth in a converging geometry from early to late stages before the reshock. It is also found that the flow compressibility is significant in the converging Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  5. Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, D; Cook, A

    2007-01-09

    We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

  6. Experimental investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher R.

    2011-09-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using several different initial conditions and with a range of diagnostics. First, a broadband initial condition is created using a shear layer between helium+acetone and argon. The post-shocked turbulent mixing is investigated using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). The signature of turbulent mixing is present in the appearance of an inertial range in the mole fraction energy spectrum and the isotropy of the late-time dissipation structures. The distribution of the mole fraction values does not appear to transition to a homogeneous mixture, and it is possible that this effect may be slow to develop for the RMI. Second, the influence of the RMI on the kinetic energy spectrum is investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The influence of the perturbation is visible relatively far from the interface when compared to the energy spectrum of an initially flat interface. Closer to the perturbation, an increase in the energy spectrum with time is observed and is possibly due to a cascade of energy from the large length scales of the perturbation. Finally, the single mode perturbation growth rate is measured after reshock using a new high speed imaging technique. This technique produced highly time-resolved interface position measurements. Simultaneous measurements at the spike and bubble location are used to compute a perturbation growth rate history. The growth rates from several experiments are compared to a new reshock growth rate model.

  7. Measurement of ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution from laser imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Delorme, B.; Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in plastic (CH2) foils. The two-dimensional (2-D) perturbations were created by laser imprinting using a special phase plate with a 2-D single mode, ˜70 μm wavelength sinusoidal intensity pattern on the plastic foil. The growth of imprinted perturbations was measured by face-on, X-ray radiography using Sm and Ta backlighters in 30-μm and 50-μm thick plastic foils, respectively. After the initial imprinting phase, the 2-D perturbations grew due to ablative RM instability before the onset of foil acceleration when they were further amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Experimental results agree reasonably well with 2-D hydrodynamic simulations and analytic models showing that the modulation growth in areal density is due to ablative RM instability.

  8. Suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in the Presence of a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi Samtaney

    2003-03-21

    We present numerical evidence from two dimensional simulations that the growth of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is suppressed in the presence of a magnetic field. A bifurcation occurs during the refraction of the incident shock on the density interface which transports baroclinically generated vorticity away from the interface to a pair of slow or intermediate magnetosonic shocks. Consequently, the density interface is devoid of vorticity and its growth and associated mixing is completely suppressed.

  9. Wave interference in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellingwerf, Robert; Pandian, Arun; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2016-10-01

    While it is a conventional wisdom that the initial conditions determine the linear and nonlinear dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows, the research in this area is focused primarily on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation. The information is hitherto largely ignored about the influences on the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of the relative phase of a multi-wave perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves. In this work we report a detailed study of confluence of effects of the relative phase as well as amplitudes of the interfacial waves on the structure of bubbles and spikes that is formed at the RM unstable interface after the shock passage. We show that the phase and the wave interference are important factors of the dynamics, because they influence the RM flow qualitatively and quantitatively, inclduing the symmetry of the interface, the morphology of spikes and bubbles, and the RMI growth. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  10. Wave interference in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Pandian, Arun; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    While it is a conventional wisdom that the initial conditions determine the linear and nonlinear dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows, the research in this area is focused primarily on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation. The information is hitherto largely ignored about the influences on the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of the relative phase of a multi-wave perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves. In this work we report a detailed study of confluence of effects of the relative phase as well as amplitudes of the interfacial waves on the structure of bubbles and spikes that is formed at the RM unstable interface after the shock passage. We show that the phase and the wave interference are important factors of the dynamics, because they influence the RM flow qualitatively and quantitatively, including the symmetry of the interface, the morphology of spikes and bubbles, and the RMI growth. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  11. Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable dynamics influenced by pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, A. K.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically study the effect of pressure fluctuations on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interface in approximation of ideal incompressible immiscible fluids and two-dimensional flow. Pressure fluctuations are treated as an effective acceleration directed from the heavy to light fluid with inverse square time dependence. The group theory approach is applied to analyze large-scale coherent dynamics, solve the complete set of the governing equations, and find regular asymptotic solutions describing RM bubbles. A strong effect is found, for the first time to our knowledge, of pressure fluctuations on the interface morphology and dynamics. In the linear regime, a nearly flat bubble gets more curved, and its velocity increases for strong pressure fluctuations and decreases otherwise. In the nonlinear regime, solutions form a one-parameter family parameterized by the bubble front curvature. For the fastest stable solution in the family, the RM bubble is curved for strong pressure fluctuations and is flattened otherwise. The flow is characterized by the intense motion of the fluids in the vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion away from the interface, and presence of shear at the interface leading to formation of smaller scale vortical structures. Our theoretical results agree with and explain existing experiments and simulations and identify new qualitative and quantitative characteristics to evaluate the strength of pressure fluctuations in experiments and simulations.

  12. DSMC Studies of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, M. A.; Koehler, T. P.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    A new exascale-capable Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code, SPARTA, developed to be highly efficient on massively parallel computers, has extended the applicability of DSMC to challenging, transient three-dimensional problems in the continuum regime. Because DSMC inherently accounts for compressibility, viscosity, and diffusivity, it has the potential to improve the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instabilities. Here, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the interface between two gases was studied parametrically using SPARTA. Simulations performed on Sequoia, an IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are used to investigate various Atwood numbers (0.33-0.94) and Mach numbers (1.2-12.0) for two-dimensional and three-dimensional perturbations. Comparisons with theoretical predictions demonstrate that DSMC accurately predicts the early-time growth of the instability. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Long Duration Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Hunyadi, Sarah; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids with an initial 2-D sinusoidal perturbation. The experiments are conducted in NASA Glenn Research Center's 2.2 Second Drop Tower. The experimental rig is isolated from aerodynamic drag by a surrounding drag shield. The rig falls 7 1/2 inches relative to the drag shield during the 79 ft fall of the system. An internal spring-driven sled impacting a clay ball provides the impulsive acceleration while the package is at the top of the drop tower, with the package timed to release just after the impulsive acceleration is complete. The instability evolves for 2.2 seconds until the package impacts an air bag at the bottom of the drop tower. The increased duration of these experiments provides for more than twice the observation time of the RM instability in the non-linear regime that will allow for better experimental comparison with asymptotic theories of perturbation amplitude and velocity.

  14. Shock-driven Rayleigh-Taylor/Richtmyer-Meshkov ripple evolution measurements using the split target geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Raman, K. S.; Baumann, T.; Bender, J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Holder, J. P.; Savage, L.; Seugling, R. M.; Simmons, L.; Wang, P.; Flippo, K. A.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    The study of singly or multiply shocked Rayleigh-Taylor/Richtmyer-Meshkov systems usually uses an opaque, denser material to track the perturbed interface that is driven into a lower density, more transparent material. A difficulty of this setup is the obscuration of small-scale features, especially of the lighter material by the opaque denser material, can change the mix-width measurement. To mitigate this, we use a split target where one half produces a conventional radiograph, while the other provides an inverse image, where the light material is opaque and the dense material is transparent. Here we present first measurements from re-shock experiments at the NIF, which use such a split target geometry to investigate the mix-width for initial single mode and 2D multimode perturbations. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-696884.

  15. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, M. A.; Koehler, T. P.; Torczynski, J. R.; Plimpton, S. J.

    2015-08-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Due to the inherent statistical noise and the significant computational requirements, DSMC is hardly ever applied to hydrodynamic flows. Here, DSMC RMI simulations are performed to quantify the shock-driven growth of a single-mode perturbation on the interface between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases prior to re-shocking as a function of the Atwood and Mach numbers. The DSMC results qualitatively reproduce all features of the RMI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models. Consistent with previous work in this field, the DSMC simulations indicate that RMI growth follows a universal behavior.

  16. Mixing and Turbulence Statistics in an Inclined Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.55 shockwave with a nominally inclined interface is considered. Unlike the classical Richtmyer-Meshkov problem, the interface evolution is non-linear from early time and large highly correlated vortical structures are observed even after reshock. The simulations target the experiment of McFarland et al. (2014). Simulations are performed using the Miranda code (Cook et al., 2005) that uses high-order spectral-like numerics (Lele, 1992). Results from multiple grid resolutions up to 4 billion grid points establish grid convergence. Comparisons to the experiments show that the simulations adequately capture the physics of the problem. Analysis of the data from the simulations based on variable density turbulence equations in the Favre averaged form will be presented. Statistics of unclosed terms in the variable density RANS equations will also be presented and compared to standard closure models. It is observed that the Reynolds Stresses have a non-monotonic return to isotropy after reshock and that compressibility effects are important long after reshock. The effect of numerics are also quantified and presented. Computer time for this work was provided by NSF PRAC award "Multi-material turbulent mixing" on the Blue Waters system.

  17. Effect of Shock Proximity on Richtmyer-Meshkov Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S G; Bolstad, J; Braun, D G; Edwards, M J; Hsing, W W; Lasinski, B F; Louis, H; Miles, A; Moreno, J; Peyser, T A; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Turano, E J; Verdon, C P; Zhou, Y

    2002-10-31

    We report here experiments, conducted on the Omega laser [T.R. Boehly et al., Optics Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], and simulations that show reduced Richtmyer-Meshkov growth rates in a strongly shocked system with linear initial amplitudes (k{eta}{sub 0} {le} 0.9). The growth rate at early time is less than half the impulsive model prediction, rising at later time to near the impulsive prediction. An analytical model that accounts for shock proximity agrees with the results.

  18. Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with an imposed, random initial perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Krivets, V. V.; Tsiklashvili, V.; Likhachev, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    A vertical shock tube is used to perform experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with a three-dimensional random initial perturbation. A membraneless flat interface is formed by opposed gas flows in which the light and heavy gases enter the shock tube from the top and from the bottom of the shock tube driven section. An air/SF6 gas combination is used and a Mach number M = 1.2 incident shock wave impulsively accelerates the interface. Initial perturbations on the interface are created by vertically oscillating the gas column within the shock tube to produce Faraday waves on the interface resulting in a short wavelength, three-dimensional perturbation. Planar Mie scattering is used to visualize the flow in which light from a laser sheet is scattered by smoke seeded in the air, and image sequences are captured using three high-speed video cameras. Measurements of the integral penetration depth prior to reshock show two growth behaviors, both having power law growth with growth exponents in the range found in previous experiments and simulations. Following reshock, all experiments show very consistent linear growth with a growth rate in good agreement with those found in previous studies.

  19. Three- and Two- Dimensional Simulations of Re-shock Experiments at High Energy Densities at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Stephan; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of recent high-energy-density (HED) re-shock experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth that occurs after successive shocks transit a sinusoidally-perturbed interface between materials of different densities. The shock tube is driven at one or both ends using indirect-drive laser cavities or hohlraums. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to visualize the growth at different times. Our simulations are done with the three-dimensional, radiation hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at LLNL. We show the instabilitygrowth rate, inferred from the experimental radiographs, agrees well with our 2D and 3D simulations. We also discuss some 3D geometrical effects, suggested by our simulations, which could deteriorate the images at late times, unless properly accounted for in the experiment design. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-680789.

  20. Numerical simulations of a chemically reacting Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshochi, Hilda; Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    We report on results from detailed numerical simulations that capture the evolution through the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a multi-mode interface that initially separates a fuel (H2) and a corresponding oxidizer (O2) . The three-dimensional simulations were carried out at a resolution of 512 × 512 × 3072 using a modified version of the FLASH code, capable of handling detailed H2-O2 combustion chemistry, temperature-dependent equation of state, and temperature-dependent molecular transport properties. The perturbation interface was initialized with ``alpha-group'' type perturbations, and impacted by a Mach 1.2 incident shock travelling from the light (H2) to heavy (O2) fluid. We track several quantities through the linear, non-linear and turbulent stages of evolution, and make comparisons with the corresponding non-reacting flowfield from a separate set of simulations. The turbulent mixing layer is also subjected to reshock, which dramatically increases the combustion efficiency at the interface.

  1. Experimental study of initial condition dependence on mixing in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Prestridge, Katherine P; Orlicz, Gregory C; Balasubramaniam, Balakumar J

    2010-11-18

    Recent work has shown that buoyancy-driven turbulence can be affected at late time by initial conditions, thus presenting an opportunity to predict and design late-time turbulent mixing, with transformative impact on our understanding and prediction of Inertial Confinement Fusion and general fluid mixing processes. In this communication, we report results on the initial condition parameters, amplitude ({delta}) and wavelength ({lambda}) of perturbation, that impact the material mixing and transition to turbulence in shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Experiments were conducted using a stable, membrane-free, heavy gas varicose curtain (air-SF{sub 6}-air) at shock Mach number, Ma = 1.2. The velocity and density field of our initial conditions was quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar-Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively. Quantitative measurements on the temporal and spatial evolution of developing structures after first shock and subsequent re-shock at different times obtained using PLlF aid us in understating the importance of the initial conditions on transition to turbulence and mixing.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Multi-Material Mixing in an Inclined Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability arises when a shock wave interacts with an interface separating two fluids. In this work, high fidelity simulations of shock induced multi-material mixing between N2 and CO2 in a shock tube are performed for a Mach 1.55 shock interacting with a planar material interface that is inclined with respect to the shock propagation direction. In the current configuration, unlike the classical perturbed flat interface case, the evolution of the interface is non-linear from early time onwards. Our previous simulations of this problem at multiple spatial resolutions have shown that very small 3D perturbations have a large effect on vortex breakdown mechanisms and hence fine scale turbulence. We propose a comparison of our simulations to the experiments performed at the Georgia Tech Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory (STAML). Results before and after reshock of the interface will be shown. Results from simulations of a second case with a more complex initial interface will also be presented. Simulations shown are conducted with an extended version of the Miranda solver developed by Cook et al. (2007) which combines high-order compact finite differences with localized non-linear artificial properties for shock and interface capturing. This research is part of the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (awards OCI-0725070 and ACI-1238993) and the state of Illinois.

  3. Two-fluid plasma Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Vincent; Bond, Daryl; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a shock accelerated perturbed density interface is computationally investigated in the context of ideal two-fluid plasmas. This is accomplished by numerically solving separate sets of conservation equations for the ions and electrons, coupled to the full Maxwell's equations. We focus on cases without an imposed magnetic field and with Debye lengths ranging from a thousandth to a tenth of the interface perturbation wavelength. For all cases investigated, the behavior of the flow is substantially different from that predicted by the Euler or ideal magnetohydrodynamics equations. Electric fields generated by charge separation cause interface oscillations, particularly in the electrons, that drive a secondary high-wavenumber instability. Consequently, the density interface is substantially more unstable than predicted by the Euler equations for all cases investigated. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted within our simulations, but their orientation is such that they do not dampen the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  4. The transverse field Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.; Pullin, D. I.; Gehre, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated for the case where the initial magnetic field is unperturbed and aligned with the mean interface location. For this initial condition, the magnetic field lines penetrate the perturbed density interface, forbidding a tangential velocity jump and therefore the presence of a vortex sheet. Through simulation, we find that the vorticity distribution present on the interface immediately after the shock acceleration breaks up into waves traveling parallel and anti-parallel to the magnetic field, which transport the vorticity. The interference of these waves as they propagate causes the perturbation amplitude of the interface to oscillate in time. This interface behavior is accurately predicted over a broad range of parameters by an incompressible linearized model derived presently by solving the corresponding impulse driven, linearized initial value problem. Our use of an equilibrium initial condition results in interface motion produced solely by the impulsive acceleration. Nonlinear compressible simulations are used to investigate the behavior of the transverse field magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and the performance of the incompressible model, over a range of shock strengths, magnetic field strengths, perturbation amplitudes and Atwood numbers.

  5. Multiphysics computations on cellular interaction in complex geometries and vortex-accelerated vorticity deposition in Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gaozhu

    The cellular interactions during leukocyte margination and adhesion cascade in cardiovascular microcirculations are multi-scale and multiphysics phenomena, involving fluid flow, cell mechanics, chemical reaction kinetics and transport, fluid structure interaction. The vascular network in vivo has rather complicated topology unlike straight and flat channels and pipes where most biological experiments in vitro and numerical simulations are carried. A computational framework is formulated towards a goal of building a virtual blood vessel system to simulate the hydrodynamic and kinetic interactions of blood cells in complex vascular geometries, including vascular network bifurcations and irregular shapes of the endothelial monolayer lining the blood vessel lumen in vivo. Mixed front tracking, immersed boundary and ghost cell methods are applied. The codes are benchmarked and validated with five selected problems. We find that the erythrocyte-leukocyte interaction, leukocyte-leukocyte interaction, and vascular geometries play important roles in leukocyte margination, initial tethering and adhesion to the vascular endothelium. In part II of the dissertation, we studied the two-dimensional microscale Richtmyer-Meshkov interfaces and discovered the self-driven vortex-accelerated vorticity deposition (VAVD) process. Opposite-signed secondary vorticity deposited by the VAVD is rolled into vortex double layers which are extremely unstable and lead to enhanced fluid mixing. The VAVD process examined and the new quantification procedure, the circulation rate of change, comprise a new vortex paradigm for examining the effect of specific initial conditions on the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor interfaces through intermediate times.

  6. Turbulent mixing induced by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivets, V. V.; Ferguson, K. J.; Jacobs, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied in shock tube experiments with an Atwood number of 0.7. The interface is formed in a vertical shock tube using opposed gas flows, and three-dimensional random initial interface perturbations are generated by the vertical oscillation of gas column producing Faraday waves. Planar Laser Mie scattering is used for flow visualization and for measurements of the mixing process. Experimental image sequences are recorded at 6 kHz frequency and processed to obtain the time dependent variation of the integral mixing layer width. Measurements of the mixing layer width are compared with Mikaelian's [1] model in order to extract the growth exponent θ where a fairly wide range of values is found varying from θ ≈ 0.2 to 0.6.

  7. Reynolds Number Effects on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Vitaliy, Krivets; Collins, Brett; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    This presentation compares the results of two very different experimental studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability: shock tube experiments in which an air/SF6 interface is accelerated by a weak shock wave; and incompressible experiments in which a box containing two different density miscible liquids is impulsively accelerated by bouncing it off of a fixed coil spring. Both experiments are initiated with sinusoidal initial perturbations. The interface perturbation initially remains sinusoidal as it grows in amplitude, but eventually the interfacial vorticity concentrates into points, forming a row of line vortices of alternating sign. The Reynolds number based on vortex circulation ranges from 1,000 to 45,000 in these experiments. It is found that viscous effects have a large, quantifiable effect on the evolution of the individual vortices. The effects of viscosity on the overall perturbation amplitude, however, are small and will be compared to theory.

  8. An Experimental Study of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey W.; Niederhaus, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a planar interface separating two fluids of different density is impulsively accelerated In the direction of its normal. It is one of the most fundamental of fluid instabilities and is of importance in fields ranging from astrophysics to materials processing. Because RM instability experiments are normally carried out in shock tubes, where the generation of a sharp well controlled interface between gases is difficult, there is a scarcity of good experimental results. The experiments presented here utilize a novel technique which circumvents many of the experimental difficulties that have previously limited the study of RM instability. In this system, the instability is generated by bouncing a thin rectangular tank containing two liquids off of a fixed spring. Results obtained from these experiments yield particularly well visualized images of the nonlinear development of the instability. However, because the run time in these experiments is limited, new experiments capable of achieving longer run times are planned.

  9. Linear theory of Richtmyer-Meshkov like flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouchuk, J. G.; Cobos-Campos, F.

    2017-01-01

    The hydrodynamic flow generated by rippled shocks and rarefactions (Richtmyer-Meshkov like flows) is presented. When a corrugated shock travels inside an homogeneous fluid, it leaves pressure, density and velocity perturbations in the compressed fluid. The velocity perturbations generated in the composed fluid are inherently rotational. Vorticity is an important quantity in order to determine the asymptotic rate of growth in the linear stage. The size of the strongest vortices generated by the rippled shocks is analyzed as a function of the shock Mach number for different boundary conditions downstream. Comparison to experiments and simulations is provided for the RMI in the shock and rarefaction reflected cases and the validity of the growth law {{\\psi}∞}+δ vi∞t is emphasized.

  10. Application of Self-Similarity Constrained Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Models to Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Unstable Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartland, Tucker A.; Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Analytical self-similar solutions corresponding to Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are combined with observed values of the growth parameters in these instabilities to derive coefficient sets for K- ɛ and K- L- a Reynolds-averaged turbulence models. It is shown that full numerical solutions of the model equations give mixing layer widths, fields, and budgets in good agreement with the corresponding self-similar quantities for small Atwood number. Both models are then applied to Rayleigh-Taylor instability with increasing density contrasts to estimate the Atwood number above which the self-similar solutions become invalid. The models are also applied to a reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and the predictions are compared with data. The expressions for the growth parameters obtained from the similarity analysis are used to develop estimates for the sensitivity of their values to changes in important model coefficients. Numerical simulations using these modified coefficient values are then performed to provide bounds on the model predictions associated with uncertainties in these coefficient values. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was supported by the 2016 LLNL High-Energy-Density Physics Summer Student Program.

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Three-Dimensional Experiment on Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Induced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jingsong

    A program MVFT3D of large-eddy simulation is developed and performed to solve the multi compressible Navier- Stokes equations. The SGS dissipation and molecular viscosity dissipation have been analyzed, and the former is much larger than the later. Our test shows that the SGS dissipation of Vreman model is smaller than the Smagorinsky model. We mainly simulate the experiment of fluid instability of shock-accelerated interface by Poggi in this paper. The decay of the turbulent kinetic energy before the first reflected shock wave-mixing zone interaction and its strong enhancement by re-shocks are presented in our numerical simulations. The computational mixing zone width under double re-shock agreement well with the experiment, and the decaying law of the turbulent kinetic energy is consistent with Mohamed and Larue's investigation. Also, by using MVFT3D we give some simulation results of the inverse Chevron model from AWE. The numerical simulations presented in this paper allow us to characterize and better understand the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced turbulence, and the code MVFT3D is validated.

  12. Numerical investigation of a single-mode chemically reacting Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, N.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-07-01

    We report on high-resolution, numerical simulations of a single-mode, chemically reacting, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, at different interface thicknesses. The gases on either side of the diffuse interface were Hydrogen (H and Oxygen (O, with a pre-shock Atwood number of 0.5. An incident shock with a Mach number of 1.2 is allowed to traverse from the light (H to the heavy (O medium in the 2D numerical shock tube. The simulations were performed using the astrophysical FLASH code developed at the University of Chicago, with extensive modifications implemented by the authors to describe detailed H-O chemistry, temperature-dependent specific heats, and multi-species equation of state. The interface thickness was systematically varied in the simulations to study the effect of the total mass of fuel burnt and heat added on the hydrodynamic instability growth rates. In the absence of an incident shock, burning results in the formation of so-called combustion waves, which spontaneously trigger RM and Rayleigh-Taylor like instability growth of the interface. We are able to obtain the resulting growth rates of an imposed sinusoidal perturbation, and compare them with the predictions of an impulsive model, with simple modifications to account for the finite thickness of the interface, density changes due to heat addition, and compression of the material line due to the combustion wave. When additionally an incident shock is present, we observe complex interactions between the shock and the aforementioned combustion waves, resulting in significant non-planar distortions of each. When the unstable interface is subjected to a reshock, significant mixing enhancement is observed, accompanied by a dramatic increase in combustion product formation, and combustion efficiency.

  13. An Evaluation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Supernova Remnant Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J. |; Drake, R.P. |; Remington, B.A. |

    1999-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of the role of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in supernova remnant (SNR) formation. Although the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is most often considered in the canonical picture of SNR formation, the theoretical penetration depths for RM instability suggest that it could play a significant role in the early stages of SNR formation. We have used the code PROMETHEUS to perform a sequence of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in order to test this possibility. Here we discuss a case in which we impose a large perturbation in the expanding ejecta behind the reverse shock. The interaction of the reverse shock with the perturbation produces significant early RM growth, with spikes penetrating from the contact surface to near the forward shock. Then the RM instability weakens, RT growth eventually dominates, and the perturbation of the forward shock diminishes. We conclude that RM instability growth due to the type of perturbation we have studied might contribute to, but alone cannot account for, the observed radio and X-ray structures that extend to the forward shock in such SNRs as supernova 1006. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  14. Reynolds number effects on the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walchli, B.; Thornber, B.

    2017-01-01

    The Reynolds number effects on the nonlinear growth rates of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are investigated using two-dimensional numerical simulations. A decrease in Reynolds number gives an increased time to reach nonlinear saturation, with Reynolds number effects only significant in the range Re<256 . Within this range there is a sharp change in instability properties. The bubble and spike amplitudes move towards equal size at lower Reynolds numbers and the bubble velocities decay faster than predicted by Sohn's model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302]. Predicted amplitudes show reasonable agreement with the existing theory of Carles and Popinet [P. Carles and S. Popinet, Phys. Fluids Lett. 13, 1833 (2001), 10.1063/1.1377863; Eur. J. Mech. B 21, 511 (2002), 10.1016/S0997-7546(02)01199-8] and Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 47, 375 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevE.47.375; K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 87, 031003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.031003], with the former being the closest match to the current computations.

  15. A comparative study of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in 2D and 3D in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberger, Z.; Maddox, B. R.; Opachich, Y. P.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Kraus, R. G.; Remington, B. A.; Randall, G. C.; Farrell, M.; Ravichandran, G.

    2017-01-01

    Driving a shock wave through the interface between two materials with different densities can result in the Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor instability and initial perturbations at the interface will grow. If the shock wave is sufficiently strong, the instability will lead to plastic flow at the interface. Material strength will reduce the amount of plastic flow and suppress growth. While such instabilities have been investigated in 2D, no studies of this phenomena have been performed in 3D on materials with strength. Initial perturbations to seed the hydrodynamic instability were coined into tantalum recovery targets. Two types of perturbations were used, two dimensional (2D) perturbations (hill and valley) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations (egg crate pattern). The targets were subjected to dynamic loading using the Janus laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility. Shock pressures ranged from 50 GPa up to 150 GPa and were calibrated using VISAR drive targets.

  16. Nonlinear Saturation Amplitude in Classical Planar Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Wang, Xiang; Jiang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Wen-Fang

    2016-04-01

    The classical planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at a fluid interface supported by a constant pressure is investigated by a formal perturbation expansion up to the third order, and then according to definition of nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) in Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), the NSA in planar RMI is obtained explicitly. It is found that the NSA in planar RMI is affected by the initial perturbation wavelength and the initial amplitude of the interface, while the effect of the initial amplitude of the interface on the NSA is less than that of the initial perturbation wavelength. Without marginal influence of the initial amplitude, the NSA increases linearly with wavelength. The NSA normalized by the wavelength in planar RMI is about 0.11, larger than that corresponding to RTI. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11472278 and 11372330, the Scientific Research Foundation of Education Department of Sichuan Province under Grant No. 15ZA0296, the Scientific Research Foundation of Mianyang Normal University under Grant Nos. QD2014A009 and 2014A02, and the National High-Tech ICF Committee

  17. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  18. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  19. Turbulent mixing induced by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey; Krivets, Vitaliy; Morgan, Robert; Sewell, Everest

    2015-06-01

    A vertical shock tube is used for experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. A membrane-less interface is formed by opposed gas flows in which the light and heavy gases enter the shock tube from the top and from the bottom of the driven section. An air/SF6 gas combination is used and an M = 1.2 incident shock wave impulsively accelerates the interface. Initial perturbations are generated by harmonically oscillating the gases either horizontally to produce standing internal waves having sinusoidal shape, or vertically, using two loudspeakers mounted in the shock tube wall, to produce Faraday resonance resulting in more random short wavelength perturbations. Planar Mie scattering is used to visualize the flow using a laser sheet to illuminate smoke particles seeded in the air. Image sequences are captured using high-speed video cameras. New experiments are presented in which the full three-dimensional initial perturbation is recorded immediately prior to shock interaction using a galvanometer to sweep the laser sheet across the test section, producing a volumetric image of the initial perturbation. Comparisons are made between experimental measurements and numerical simulations.

  20. PLIF Flow Visualization of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Krivets, V. V.

    2001-11-01

    A vertical shock tube is used to study the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of an Air/SF6 interface. The two gases enter the shock tube at opposite ends of the driven section and exit through slots in the shock tube wall. A sinusoidal perturbation is given to the interface by oscillating the shock tube in the lateral direction to produce a standing wave. PLIF is used to visualize the flow by seeding the air with acetone vapor, illuminating it with a light sheet produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, and recording the resulting image with a cooled CCD camera. The PLIF images show very clearly the development of the instability far into the nonlinear regime in which the interface is deformed into mushroom structures. New results using M=1.3 shock waves will be presented which clearly show the transition to turbulence in this flow at late times. The transition process begins with the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the vortex spirals. After formation, the initially coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz pattern very quickly decays into turbulence. Eventually the turbulence, which is initially confined to the vortex cores, begins to erode the remainder of the mushroom structures.

  1. Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with indirect drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Clark, D. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Landen, O. L.; Mikaelian, K. O.; Robey, H. F.; Wouchuk, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (ARM) instability develops while a strong radiation pulse, rapidly rising to its constant peak intensity, drives a constant-strength shock wave from the rippled irradiated surface of a solid target into its volume. For the direct laser irradiation, the theory, experiment, and simulations have demonstrated that the development of the ARM results in decaying oscillations of the areal mass/optical thickness modulation amplitude. Much less is known about the ARM with the indirect drive. This effect causing oscillations of the ablation front is the physical basis of the recently proposed and successfully demonstrated adiabat-shaping approach to improving the NIF target performance. We report a theoretical and numerical stability analysis of the indirectly-driven shock-piston flow performed to investigate the physical mechanism of the ablation-front oscillations detected in the simulations and the NIF experiments on adiabat shaping. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE/NNSA by NRL, and by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. JGW was supported by MINECO under Grant No. ENE2013-45661-C2-1-P, and JCCM, PEI-2014-008.

  2. On reliable quantification of Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Nora; Stanic, Milos; Stellingwerf, Robert; Oakley, Jason; Bonazza, Riccardo; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We report an integrated study including experiments, Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, and theoretical and data analyses to reliably quantify Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by moderate shocks. The RM evolution is analyzed for realistic gases with different densities (Atwood numbers 0.68, 0.95) driven by moderate shocks (Mach 2.86, 1.95) in case of relatively small amplitude of the initial perturbation (0.06, 0.08 of the perturbation wavelength). Our study includes the systematic consideration of the effects of gamma, the initial perturbation amplitude, and the interference of the perturbation waves. We analyze quantitative and qualitative features of RM dynamics, including the vector and scalar flow fields, the bulk and interface velocities, the large-scale interfacial structures and small-scale non-uniformities (reverse jets, hot spots) in the bulk. We argue that a systematic interpretation of RM dynamics from the data and a reliably quantification the RM evolution requires a synergy of the experiments, simulation, and theory. Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  3. Asymptotic behavior of the mixed mass in Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye; Cabot, William H.; Thornber, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are serious practical issues in inertial confinement fusion research, and also have relevance to many cases of astrophysical fluid dynamics. So far, much of the attention has been paid to the late-time scaling of the mixed width, which is used as a surrogate to how well the fluids have been mixed. Yet, the actual amount of mixed mass could be viewed as a more direct indicator on the evolution of the mixing layers due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Despite its importance, there is no systematic study as yet on the scaling of the mixed mass for either the RTI or the RMI induced flow. In this article, the normalized mixed mass (Ψ) is introduced for measuring the efficiency of the mixed mass. Six large numerical simulation databases have been employed: the RTI cases with heavy-to-light fluid density ratios of 1.5, 3, and 9; the single shock RMI cases with density ratios of 3 and 20; and a reshock RMI case with density ratio of 3. Using simulated flow fields, the normalized mixed mass Ψ is shown to be more sensitive in discriminating the variation with Atwood number for the RTI flows. Moreover, Ψ is demonstrated to provide more consistent results for both the RTI and RMI flows when compared with the traditional mixedness parameters, Ξ and Θ.

  4. Large-eddy simulations of Richtmyer Meshkov instability in a converging geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardini, Manuel; Deiterding, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) refers to the baroclinic generation of vorticity at a perturbed density interface when impacted by a shock wave. It is often thought of as the impulsive limit of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. While the RMI has been widely covered in planar geometries, the present simulations investigate the mixing of materials resulting from the interaction of an imploding cylindrical shock wave with a concentric interface, perturbed in both axial and azimuthal directions, which separates outside air from SF{sub 6} (initially 5 times denser) confined in a 90{sup o} wedge. Two incident shocks of Mach numbers M{sub i} = 1.3 and 2.0 at initial impact are tested. These canonical simulations support recent work on understanding the compressible turbulent mixing in converging geometries relevant to both inertial confinement fusion and core-collapse supernova dynamics. Initial irregularities in the density interface form the misalignment between density and pressure gradients required to initiate a first RMI. A second RMI occurs after the initial shock has converged down the wedge, reflected off the axis and reshocks the distorted interface. Reshock interactions of decreasing intensity follow successively. Due to the converging geometry, the accelerated or decelerated motion of the interface also generates Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Secondary Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities develop along the sides of the interpenetrating fingering structures. The energetic reshock produces a large dynamical range of turbulent scales, requiring the utilization of large-eddy simulation (LES). We employed the stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model of turbulent and scalar transport based on an explicit structural modeling of small-scale dynamics. The imploding nature of the flow is particularly suitable for the use of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) provided by the parallel block-structured AMR framework AMROC. The Favre-filtered Navier-Stokes equations are solved on

  5. Formula for growth rate of mixing width applied to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fujie; Zhang, Yousheng; He, Zhiwei; Tian, Baolin

    2016-11-01

    The mixing zone width and its growth rate are of great significance in the study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). In this paper, a formula for the growth rate of the mixing width is proposed for analysis of the RMI-induced mixing process. A new definition of the mixing width h ˙ , based on the mass fraction ϕ, is used to derive the formula of the growth rate of the mixing width, h ˙ . In the derivation, the velocity field and the diffusion term are concisely introduced into the formula by using the mass equation and mass fraction equation. This formula is used together with two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical data to quantitatively study the effects of compressibility and the diffusion process on the development of the RMI. The results based on our simulations show the following. After a shock, the magnitudes of the contributions of compressibility and diffusion to h ˙ increase initially, and in the middle stage of the RMI, they appear to attain a maximum value, around 10%; however, under some conditions (e.g., absolute value of Atwood number ˜0.9), this value can be more than 10%. The results indicate that compressibility and the diffusion process become important in the later stages of the RMI and the neglect of these physical processes is not always suitable. This study shows that the derived formula is not only an approach for modeling of the mixing zone width but also a quantitative tool for the study of an RMI-induced mixing process. This formula is expected to be useful in the analysis of turbulent mixing in the later stages of the RMI process.

  6. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for elastic-plastic solids in converging geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Barton, P. T.; Pullin, D. I.; Meiron, D. I.

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the interface instability that develops at the boundary between a shell of elastic-plastic material and a cylindrical core of confined gas during the inbound implosive motion generated by a shock-wave. The main instability in this configuration is the so-called Richtmyer-Meshkov instability that arises when the shock wave crosses the material interface. Secondary instabilities, such as Rayleigh-Taylor, due to the acceleration of the interface, and Kelvin-Helmholtz, due to slip between solid and fluid, arise as the motion progresses. The reflection of the shock wave at the axis and its second interaction with the material interface as the shock moves outbound, commonly known as re-shock, results in a second Richtmyer-Meshkov instability that potentially increases the growth rate of interface perturbations, resulting in the formation of a mixing zone typical of fluid-fluid configurations and the loss of the initial perturbation length scales. The study of this problem is of interest for achieving stable inertial confinement fusion reactions but its complexity and the material conditions produced by the implosion close to the axis prove to be challenging for both experimental and numerical approaches. In this paper, we attempt to circumvent some of the difficulties associated with a classical numerical treatment of this problem, such as element inversion in Lagrangian methods or failure to maintain the relationship between the determinant of the deformation tensor and the density in Eulerian approaches, and to provide a description of the different events that occur during the motion of the interface. For this purpose, a multi-material numerical solver for evolving in time the equations of motion for solid and fluid media in an Eulerian formalism has been implemented in a Cartesian grid. Equations of state are derived using thermodynamically consistent hyperelastic relations between internal energy and stresses. The resolution required

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Niederhaus, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when two different density fluids are impulsively accelerated in the direction normal to their nearly planar interface. The instability causes small perturbations on the interface to grow and eventually become a turbulent flow. It is closely related to Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the instability of a planar interface undergoing constant acceleration, such as caused by the suspension of a heavy fluid over a lighter one in the earth's gravitational field. Like the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, RM instability is a fundamental hydrodynamic instability which exhibits many of the nonlinear complexities that transform simple initial conditions into a complex turbulent flow. Furthermore, the simplicity of RM instability (in that it requires very few defining parameters), and the fact that it can be generated in a closed container, makes it an excellent test bed to study nonlinear stability theory as well as turbulent transport in a heterogeneous system. However, the fact that RM instability involves fluids of unequal densities which experience negligible gravitational force, except during the impulsive acceleration, requires RM instability experiments to be carried out under conditions of microgravity. This experimental study investigates the instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids with an initial sinusoidal perturbation. The impulsive acceleration is generated by bouncing a rectangular tank containing two different density liquids off a retractable vertical spring. The initial perturbation is produced prior to release by oscillating the tank in the horizontal direction to produce a standing wave. The instability evolves in microgravity as the tank travels up and then down the vertical rails of a drop tower until hitting a shock absorber at the bottom. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) is employed to visualize the flow. PLIF images are captured by a video camera that travels

  8. Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J.; Niederhaus, C.

    2000-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) instability occurs when two different density fluids are impulsively accelerated in the direction normal to their nearly planar interface. The instability causes small perturbations on the interface to grow and possibly become turbulent given the proper initial conditions. R-M instability is similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability, which is generated when the two fluids undergo a constant acceleration. R-M instability is a fundamental fluid instability that is important to fields ranging from astrophysics to high-speed combustion. For example, R-M instability is currently the limiting factor in achieving a net positive yield with inertial confinement fusion. The experiments described here utilize a novel technique that circumvents many of the experimental difficulties previously limiting the study of the R-M instability. A Plexiglas tank contains two unequal density liquids and is gently oscillated horizontally to produce a controlled initial fluid interface shape. The tank is mounted to a sled on a high speed, low friction linear rail system, constraining the main motion to the vertical direction. The sled is released from an initial height and falls vertically until it bounces off of a movable spring, imparting an impulsive acceleration in the upward direction. As the sled travels up and down the rails, the spring retracts out of the way, allowing the instability to evolve in free-fall until impacting a shock absorber at the end of the rails. The impulsive acceleration provided to the system is measured by a piezoelectric accelerometer mounted on the tank, and a capacitive accelerometer measures the low-level drag of the bearings. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence is used for flow visualization, which uses an Argon ion laser to illuminate the flow and a CCD camera, mounted to the sled, to capture images of the interface. This experimental study investigates the instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids

  9. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    BP Puranik; JG Oakley; MH Anderson; R Bonaazza

    2003-11-12

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  10. Experimental growth of inertial forced Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities for different Atwood numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, J. M.; Castilla, R.

    2009-04-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when a shock wave impinges on an interface separating two fluids having different densities [1,2]. The instability causes perturbations on the interface to grow, bubbles and spikes, producing vortical structures which potentially result in a turbulent mixing layer. In addition to shock tube experiments, the incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability has also been studied by impulsively accelerating containers of incompressible fluids. Castilla and Redondo (1994) [3] first exploited this technique by dropping tanks containing a liquid and air or two liquids onto a cushioned surface. This technique was improved upon by Niederhaus and Jacobs (2003)[4] by mounting the tank onto a rail system and then allowing it to bounce off of a fixed spring. A range of both miscible and inmiscible liquids were used, giving a wide range of Atwood numbers using the combinations of air, water, alcohol, oil and mercury. Experimental results show the different pattern selection of both the bubbles and spikes for the different Atwood numbers. Visual analysis of the marked interfaces allows to distinguish the regions of strong mixing and compare self-similarity growth of the mixing region. [1] Meshkov, E. E. 1969 Instability of the interface of two gases accelerated by a shock wave. Fluid Dynamics 4, 101-104. [2] Brouillette, M. & Sturtevant, B. 1994 Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability: single-scale perturbations on a continuous interface. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 263, 271-292. [3] Castilla, R. & Redondo, J. M. 1994 Mixing Front Growth in RT and RM Instabilities. Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, Cambridge, United Kingdom, edited by P. F. Linden, D. L. Youngs, and S. B. Dalziel, 11-31. [4] Niederhaus, C. E. & Jacobs, J. W. 2003 Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 485, 243-277.

  11. Asymptotic behavior of the mixed mass in Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye; Cabot, William; Thornber, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are serious practical issues in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and also have relevance to many cases of astrophysical fluid dynamics. So far much of the attention has been paid to the late-time scaling of the mixed width, which is used as a surrogate to how well the fluids have been mixed. Yet, the actual amount of mixed mass could be viewed as a more direct indicator on the evolution of the mixing layers due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Despite its importance, there is no systematic study as yet on the scaling of the mixed mass for either the RTI or the RMI induced flow. In this work, the normalized mixed mass (Ψ) is introduced for measuring the efficiency of the mixed mass. Six large numerical simulation databases have been employed: the RTI cases with heavy-to-light fluid density ratios of 1.5, 3, and 9; the single shock RMI cases with density ratios of 3 and 20; and a reshock RMI case with density ratio of 3. Using simulated flow fields, the normalized mixed mass Ψ is shown to be more sensitive in discriminating the variation with Atwood number for the RTI flows. Moreover, Ψ is demonstrated to provide more consistent results for both the RTI and RMI flows when compared with the traditional mixedness parameters, Ξ and Θ. This work was performed under the auspices of the LLNS, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and ARC's Discovery Projects funding DP150101059.

  12. A comparative study of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in 2D and 3D in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberger, Zach; Ravichandran, Ravi; Wehrenberg, Chris; Remington, Bruce; Maddox, Brian; Opachich, Kathy; Randall, Greg; Farrell, Mike

    2015-06-01

    Driving a shock wave through the interface between two materials with different densities can result in Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor instability and initial perturbations at the interface will grow. If the shock wave is sufficiently strong, the instability will lead to plastic flow at the interface. Material strength will reduce the amount of plastic flow and suppress growth. While such instabilities have been investigated in 2D, no studies of this phenomena have been performed in 3D on materials with strength. Initial perturbations to seed the hydrodynamic instability were coined into tantalum recovery targets. Two types of perturbations were used, two dimensional (2D) perturbations (hill and valley) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations (egg crate pattern). The targets were subjected to dynamic loading using the Janus laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility. Shock pressures ranged from 30 GPa up to 200 GPa, and were calibrated using VISAR drive targets. The recovered targets show that the 3D initial perturbations grew more than the 2D initial perturbations at the same shock strength. This result is compared with predictions of existing models in the literature.

  13. Numerical simulation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with an adaptive central-upwind sixth-order WENO scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritschler, V. K.; Hu, X. Y.; Hickel, S.; Adams, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are conducted and compared to experimental results of Jacobs and Krivets (2005 Phys. Fluids 17 034105). The employed adaptive central-upwind sixth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme (Hu et al 2010 J. Comput. Phys. 229 8952-65) introduces only very small numerical dissipation while preserving the good shock-capturing properties of other standard WENO schemes. Hence, it is well suited for simulations with both small-scale features and strong gradients. A generalized Roe average is proposed to make the multicomponent model of Shyue (1998 J. Comput. Phys. 142 208-42) suitable for high-order accurate reconstruction schemes. A first sequence of single-fluid simulations is conducted and compared to the experiment. We find that the WENO-CU6 method better resolves small-scale structures, leading to earlier symmetry breaking and increased mixing. The first simulation, however, fails to correctly predict the global characteristic structures of the RMI. This is due to a mismatch of the post-shock parameters in single-fluid simulations when the pre-shock states are matched with the experiment. When the post-shock parameters are matched, much better agreement with the experimental data is achieved. In a sequence of multifluid simulations, the uncertainty in the density gradient associated with transition between the fluids is assessed. Thereby the multifluid simulations show a considerable improvement over the single-fluid simulations.

  14. The evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in a finite height domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2014-10-01

    We apply group theory analysis to systematically study the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities in a domain of a finite height. The fluids with similar and contrasting densities are considered in case of two-dimensional RT and RM instabilities that are driven by sustained and impulsive accelerations respectively. The flow is periodic normal to the acceleration direction and has no external sources. For the nonlinear boundary value problem a family of asymptotic solutions is found, and the properties of the family solutions as well as their stability are thoroughly analyzed. For the first time the relation is identified between the family parameter (e.g. the front curvature) and the velocity shear at the front. The growth-rate of shear-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is evaluated. It is shown in the nonlinear RT and RM flows in finite height domain there is an intense motion in a vicinity of the front and there is effectively no motion away from the front. In a finite size the domain the flow is decelerating in comparison to the spatially extended case. The theory outcomes for the numerical modeling of the RT and RM instabilities and for the design of experiments are discussed. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation; Moved to poster by APS.

  15. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the 3D single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Krivets, Vitaliy V.; Sewell, Everest G.; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2016-11-01

    A vertical shock tube is used to perform experiments on the single-mode three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI). The light gas (Air) and the heavy gas (SF6) enter from the top and the bottom of the shock tube driven section to form the interface. The initial perturbation is then generated by oscillating the gases vertically. Both gases are seeded with particles generated through vaporizing propylene glycol. An incident shock wave (M 1.2) impacts the interface to create an impulsive acceleration. The seeded particles are illuminated by a dual cavity 75W, Nd: YLF laser. Three high-speed CMOS cameras record time sequences of image pairs at a rate of 2 kHz. The initial perturbation used is that of a single, square-mode perturbation with either a single spike or a single bubble positioned at the center of the shock tube. The full time dependent velocity field is obtained allowing the determination of the circulation versus time. In addition, the evolution of time dependent amplitude is also determined. The results are compared with PIV measurements from previous two-dimensional single mode experiments along with PLIF measurements from previous three-dimensional single mode experiments.

  16. Effects of surface tension and viscosity on the growth rates of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2009-11-01

    We present an analytical model for unstable interfaces with surface tension in fluids of arbitrary viscosity. Linear and nonlinear asymptotic solutions are obtained for growth rates of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. In Rayleigh-Taylor instability, both surface tension and viscosity decrease the asymptotic bubble velocity. For Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, the analysis of the model suggests a dependence of the decaying rate of the bubble velocity on the relative importance of viscosity and surface tension. Results of numerical simulations are also given, and comparisons of the solutions of the model with numerical results are in good agreement.

  17. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of shocked gaseous interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F. ); Besnard, D.; Haas, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The instability of shocked and reshocked perturbed interface between gases of different densities is analyzed by comparing flow visualization from 2D and 3D shock-tube experiments with 2D numerical simulations and theory. The shadowgraphs and calculations show similar large scales of mixing by fluid interpenetration induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkhov instability. In 2D, experimental instability growth following acceleration by the initial shock is less than calculated by linear theory or simulated. The 3D experiments are approximately simulated by 2D calculations with an increased initial amplitude of the interface. The kinetic energy of the interpenetrating velocity field from the simulations are also compared to a theoretical estimate derived from the linear theory. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  18. A Bouyancy-Drag Model for Single-Mode Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Todd; Tangerman, Folkert

    2001-04-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations on the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability performed with the FronTier hydrodynamics code. The growth of the mixing layer is analyzed through the use of a modified form of standard bouyancy-drag models. The model gives an excellent fit to the simulation data for the growth rates of the spike and bubble fronts from shock passage until well into the nonlinear regime across a range of physical parameters, including a wide range of Atwood numbers.

  19. Investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in complex geometries using vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latini, Marco; Meiron, Daniel; Dimotakis, Paul

    2004-11-01

    The generalized vortex method of Baker, Meiron and Orszag (1982) is applied to study the evolution of the classical single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the instability generated by an oblique shock passing through a perturbed material interface. The initial vorticity deposited by the shock on the interface is modeled exactly using the asymptotic formulae of Zabusky and Samtaney (1994). The mixing layer width, bubble and spike velocities computed from the vortex method are compared with analytical models and with results from high-resolution Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) simulations. Supported by the Caltech ASCI-Alliance Program.

  20. Oscillations of a standing shock in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig

    2016-11-01

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing shock undergoes well known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing experiments at Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K.S.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Farley, D.R.; Murray, S.; Peyser, T.A.

    1997-09-15

    The evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities in the nonlinear regime of growth was investigated in indirect-drive experiments on the Nova laser. The RT experiments investigated the evolution of both single- and multimode perturbations at an embedded interface, isolated from the effects of ablation. This ``classical`` geometry allows short wavelength ({lambda} {approximately} 10-20 {micro}m) perturbations to grow strongly, in marked contrast to prior results at an ablation front. The RM experiments studied singly- and doubly-shocked perturbed interfaces in both face-on and side-on geometries. (U)

  2. Three dimensional high-resolution simulations of richtmyer-meshkov mixing and shock-turbulence interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Dannevik, W.P.; Dinits, A.; Miason, D.; Mirin, A.A.; Portor, D.H.; Schilling, O.; Woodward, P.W.

    1997-06-13

    Three-dimensional high-resolution simulations are performed of the Richtmyer- Meshkov (RM) instability for a Mach 6 shock, and of the passage of a second shock from the same side through a developed RM instability. The second shock is found to rapidly smear fine structure and strongly enhance mixing. Studies of the interaction of moderately strong shocks with a pre-existing turbulent field indicate amplification of transverse vorticity and reduction Of stream-wise vorticity, as well as the mechanisms for these changes.

  3. Experimental investigation of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability before and after the reflected shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Houas, L.

    1996-06-01

    Results of an experimental investigation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a He-CO2 interface are reported. A simultaneous three-directional laser absorption technique is used to follow, at a single abscissa, the evolution of the created mixing zone before and after the interaction with the reflected shock, during the same run. CO2 density profiles have been determined within both the incident and the compressed mixing zones. However, near the pure CO2, the wall boundary layer reflected shock interaction perturbs measurements and does not allow objective conclusions.

  4. The late time structure of high density contrast, single mode Richtmyer-Meshkov flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. J. R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the late time flow structure of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Recent numerical work [F. J. Cherne et al. "On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum," J. Appl. Phys. 118, 185901 (2015)] has suggested a self-similar collapse of the development of this instability at late times, independent of the initial surface profile. Using the form of collapse suggested, we derive an analytic expression for the mass-velocity relation in the spikes, and a global theory for the late time flow structure. We compare these results with fluid dynamical simulation.

  5. Power Laws and Similarity of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Mixing Fronts at All Density Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Alon, U.; Hecht, J.; Ofer, D.; Shvarts, D. Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 )

    1995-01-23

    The nonlinear evolution of large structure in Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov bubble and spike fronts is studied numerically and explained theoretically on the basis of single-mode and two-bubble interaction physics at Atwood numbers ([ital A]). Multimode Rayleigh-Taylor bubble (spike) fronts are found as [ital h][sub [ital B

  6. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, Z.; Abarzhi, S. I. E-mail: sabarji@andrew.cmu.edu; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2015-09-15

    We systematically study the effect of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. A broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered. The amplitude of the initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. The simulations results are compared, wherever possible, with four rigorous theories, and with other experiments and simulations, achieving good quantitative and qualitative agreement. Our study is focused on early time dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). We analyze the initial growth-rate of RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. For the first time, to the authors' knowledge, we find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the initial perturbation amplitude, thus restraining the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends on the shock strength and the density ratio, whereas the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio.

  7. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardo Bonazza; Mark Anderson; Leslie Smith

    2004-01-14

    Some of the major difficulties encountered in the effort to achieve nuclear fusion by means of inertial confinement arise from the unstable behavior of the interface between the shell material and the nuclear fuel which develops upon implosion of the shell by direct or indirect laser drive. The fluid flows that develop (termed the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities) cause the gassified shell material to mix with the nuclear fuel, causing a reduction in energy yield or no ignition altogether. The present research program addresses the Rayleigh-Taylor and the Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with extensive laboratory and computational experiments. In the past year, three new activities have been initiated: a new shock tube experiment, involving the impulsive acceleration of a test gas-filled soap bubble, diagnosed with planar Mie scattering or planar induced fluorescence; a Rayleigh-Taylor experiment based on the use of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid to fix the initial shape of the interface between the MR fluid and water; and a series of computer calculations using the Raptor code (made available by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) to design and simulate the shock tube experiments.

  8. The Design of Useful Mix Characterization Experiments for the LLNL Reshock Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanim

    2015-11-01

    The NIF Re-shock platform has been extensively engineered to minimize boundary effects and polluting shocks. It is capable of comprehensively and reproducibly exploring a large parameter space important in mix experiments: strength and timing of shocks and reshocks; the amplitude and wavelength of Richtmyer-Meshkov-unstable interfaces; the Atwood number of these mixing layers; and using a technique developed with experiments at the Omega laser, the simultaneous visualization of spike and bubble fronts. In this work, I explore multimodal and roughened surface designed, and combinations of light and heavy materials, that may illuminate our understanding of mix in plasmas.

  9. Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution under steady shock conditions in the high-energy-density regime

    DOE PAGES

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Malamud, G.; Kuranz, C. C.; ...

    2015-03-17

    This work presents direct experimental evidence of long-predicted nonlinear aspects of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) process, in which new modes first arise from the coupling of initially-present modes, and in which shorter-wavelength modes are eventually overtaken by longer-wavelength modes. This is accomplished using a technique we developed employing a long driving laser pulse to create a strong (Mach ~ 8) shock across a well-characterized material interface seeded by a two-mode sinusoidal perturbation. Furthermore, this technique further permits the shock to be sustained, without decay of the high-energy-density flow conditions, long enough for the system to evolve into the nonlinear phase.

  10. Computational Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with a Complex Initial Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob; Reilly, David; Greenough, Jeffrey; Ranjan, Devesh

    2014-11-01

    Results are presented for a computational study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with a complex initial condition. This study covers experiments which will be conducted at the newly-built inclined shock tube facility at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The complex initial condition employed consists of an underlying inclined interface perturbation with a broadband spectrum of modes superimposed. A three-dimensional staggered mesh arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code developed at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory called ARES was used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative results. Qualitative results are discussed using time series of density plots from which mixing width may be extracted. Quantitative results are also discussed using vorticity fields, circulation components, and energy spectra. The inclined interface case is compared to the complex interface case in order to study the effect of initial conditions on shocked, variable-density flows.

  11. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher R.

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  12. Experimental investigation of the effect of multimodal inclined interface on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghar, Mohammad; Carter, John; Musci, Benjamin; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    In the Georgia Tech Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory, the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) which arises from two initial conditions, namely, a predominantly single mode, inclined interface between two gases, and a perturbed, multimodal, inclined interface are studied. The gas combination of nitrogen-acetone as light gas and carbon dioxide as heavy gas (Atwood number of 0.23) with an inclination angle of 80 degrees (η/ λ = 0.097) was chosen in this set of experiments. The interface is visualized using planar laser diagnostics (simultaneous PLIF/PIV measurements), once impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.55. The ensemble-averaged turbulence measurements of the density, velocity and density-velocity cross-statistics are used to investigate the effects of added secondary modes to the interface on the correlation between turbulence and mixing quantities.

  13. An experimental platform for generating Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Eric; Martin, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability results when a shock wave crosses a rippled interface between two different materials. The shock deposited vorticity causes the ripples to grow into long spikes. Ultimately this process encourages mixing in many warm dense matter and plasma flows of interest. However, generating pure RM instabilities from initially solid targets is difficult because longlived, steady shocks are required. As a result only a few relevant experiments exist, and current theoretical understanding is limited. Here we propose using a flyer-plate driven target to generate RM instabilities with the Z machine. The target consists of a Be impact layer with sinusoidal perturbations and is followed by a low-density carbon foam. Simulation results show that the RM instability grows for 60 ns before release waves reach the perturbation. This long drive time makes Z uniquely suited for generating the high-quality data that is needed by the community.

  14. Nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G

    1998-11-01

    Scaled experiments on the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh- Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities are described under a variety, of conditions that occur in nature. At high Reynolds number, the mixing layer grows self-similarly - {alpha}{sub i}Agt{sup 2} for a constant acceleration (g), and as a power law t{sup {theta}{sub i}} for impulsive accelerations U{delta}(t) at low and high Mach numbers. The growth coefficients {alpha}{sub i} and {theta}{sub i} exponents are measured over a comprehensive range of Atwood numbers A. The RT instability is also investigated with Non- Newtonian materials which are independently characterized. A critical wavelength and amplitude for instability is observed associated with the shear modulus and tensile yield of the material. The results are applicable from supernova explosions to geophysical flows subject to these hydrodynamic instabilities.

  15. Are accurate equation of state parameters important in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    1999-08-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a classical fluid dynamical instability that has been extensively studied to help understand turbulent mixing. A recent numerical simulation of a shock tube experiment with an air-SF6 interface and a weak shock (Mach 1.2) used the ideal gas equation of state for air and an artificially low temperature as a surrogate for the correct SF6 gas physics. We have run a similar problem with both the correct gas physics and three versions of the air surrogate to understand the errors thereby introduced. We find that for the weakly driven single-mode case considered here, the instability amplitude is not affected, the interface location is affected only slightly, but the thermodynamic states are quite different. This result is not surprising because the flow far from the shock waves is essentially incompressible.

  16. Are accurate equation of state parameters important in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities?

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    1999-08-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a classical fluid dynamical instability that has been extensively studied to help understand turbulent mixing. A recent numerical simulation of a shock tube experiment with an air-SF6 interface and a weak shock (Mach 1.2) used the ideal gas equation of state for air and an artificially low temperature as a surrogate for the correct SF6 gas physics. We have run a similar problem with both the correct gas physics and three versions of the air surrogate to understand the errors thereby introduced. We find that for the weakly driven single-mode case considered here, the instability amplitude is not affected, the interface location is affected only slightly, but the thermodynamic states are quite different. This result is not surprising because the flow far from the shock waves is essentially incompressible.

  17. New Type of the Interface Evolution in the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarzhi, S. I.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    We performed systematic theoretical and numerical studies of the nonlinear large-scale coherent dynamics in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for fluids with contrast densities. Our simulations modeled the interface dynamics for compressible and viscous uids. For a two-fluid system we observed that in the nonlinear regime of the instability the bubble velocity decays and its surface attens, and the attening is accompanied by slight oscillations. We found the theoretical solution for the system of conservation laws, describing the principal influence of the density ratio on the motion of the nonlinear bubble. The solution has no adjustable parameters, and shows that the attening of the bubble front is a distinct property universal for all values of the density ratio. This property follows from the fact that the RM bubbles decelerate. The theoretical and numerical results validate each other, describe the new type of the bubble front evolution in RMI, and identify the bubble curvature as important and sensitive diagnostic parameter.

  18. Characteristics of turbulent mixing at late stage of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fujie; Zhang, Yousheng; He, Zhiwei; Li, Li; Tian, Baolin

    2017-07-01

    We present a model for the mixing width, h, at self-similar stage of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). The derivation of the model is based on the formula of the growth rate of mixing width [Gao et al., Phys. Fluids 28, 114101, (2016)], which is essentially equals to the first principle (Navior-Stokes equation). The model predicts that, in the self-similar mixing stage of the RMI h2 is linearly proportional to time. This is substantially different from the classical h ˜τ𝜃 description. The linearity is validated by various experimental and numerical data. The exponent, 𝜃 , in the classical relation is also discussed according to the present model.

  19. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, Riccardo; Anderson, Mark; Smith, Leslie

    2005-02-09

    The present research program is centered on the experimental and numerical study of two instabilities that develop at the interface between two different fluids when the interface experiences an impulsive or a constant acceleration. The instabilities, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability, respectively, adversely affect target implosion in experiments aimed at the achievement of nuclear fusion by inertial confinement by causing the nuclear fuel contained in a target and the shell material to mix, leading to contamination of the fuel, yield reduction or no ignition at all. The laboratory experiments summarized in this report include shock tube experiments to study a shock-accelerated bubble and a shock-accelerated 2-D sinusoidal interface; and experiments based on the use of magnetorheological fluids for the study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Computational experiments based on the shock tube experimental conditions are also reported.

  20. Measurement of Richtmyer-Meshkov mode coupling under steady shock conditions and at high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Malamud, G.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present experiments observing Richtmyer-Meshkov mode coupling and bubble competition in a system arising from well-characterized initial conditions and driven by a strong (Mach ~ 8) shock. These measurements and the analysis method developed to interpret them provide an important step toward the possibility of observing self-similarity under such conditions, as well as a general platform for performing and analyzing hydrodynamic instability experiments. A key feature of these experiments is that the shock is sustained sufficiently long that this nonlinear behavior occurs without decay of the shock velocity or other hydrodynamic properties of the system, which facilitates analysis and allows the results to be used in the study of analytic models.

  1. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardo Bonazza, Mark Anderson, Jason Oakley

    2006-11-03

    The present research program is centered on the experimental and numerical study of two instabilities that develop at the interface between two different fluids when the interface experiences an impulsive or a constant acceleration. The instabilities, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability, respectively, adversely affect target implosion in experiments aimed at the achievement of nuclear fusion by inertial confinement by causing the nuclear fuel contained in a target and the shell material to mix, leading to contamination of the fuel, yield reduction or no ignition at all. The laboratory experiments summarized in this report include shock tube experiments to study a shock-accelerated bubble and a shock-accelerated 2-D sinusoidal interface; and experiments based on the use of magnetorheological fluids for the study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Computational experiments based on the shock tube experimental conditions are also reported.

  2. Shock induced Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the presence of a wall boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Billiotte, M.; Houas, L.

    1996-06-01

    An experimental investigation on gaseous mixing zones originated from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability has been undertaken in a square cross section shock tube. Mass concentration fields, of one of the two mixing constituents, have been determined within the mixing zone when the shock wave passes from the heavy gas to the light one, from one gas to an other of close density, and from the light gas to the heavy one. Results have been obtained before and after the coming back of the reflected shock wave. The diagnostic method is based on the infrared absorption of one of the two constituents of the mixing zone. It is shown that the mixing zone is strongly deformed by the wall boundary layer. The consequence is the presence of strong gradients of concentration in the direction perpendicular to the shock wave propagation. Finally, it is pointed out that the mixing goes more homogeneous when the Atwood number tends to zero.

  3. RICHTMYER-MESHKOV-TYPE INSTABILITY OF A CURRENT SHEET IN A RELATIVISTICALLY MAGNETIZED PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2012-11-20

    The linear stability of a current sheet that is subject to an impulsive acceleration due to shock passage with the effect of a guide magnetic field is studied. We find that a current sheet embedded in relativistically magnetized plasma always shows a Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability, while the stability depends on the density structure in the Newtonian limit. The growth of the instability is expected to generate turbulence around the current sheet, which can induce the so-called turbulent reconnection, the rate of which is essentially free from plasma resistivity. Thus, the instability can be applied as a triggering mechanism for rapid magnetic energy release in a variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena such as pulsar wind nebulae, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei, where the shock wave is thought to play a crucial role.

  4. Maximum initial growth-rate of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Z. R.; Pandian, A.; Bhowmick, A. K.; Swisher, N. C.; Stanic, M.; Stellingwerf, R. F.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    We focus on the classical problem of the dependence on the initial conditions of the initial growth-rate of strong shock driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by developing a novel empirical model and by employing rigorous theories and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations to describe the simulation data with statistical confidence in a broad parameter regime. For the given values of the shock strength, fluid density ratio, and wavelength of the initial perturbation of the fluid interface, we find the maximum value of the RMI initial growth-rate, the corresponding amplitude scale of the initial perturbation, and the maximum fraction of interfacial energy. This amplitude scale is independent of the shock strength and density ratio and is characteristic quantity of RMI dynamics. We discover the exponential decay of the ratio of the initial and linear growth-rates of RMI with the initial perturbation amplitude that excellently agrees with available data.

  5. Effects of shear flow and transverse magnetic field on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Jintao; Ren Haijun; Li Ding; Wu Zhengwei

    2008-04-15

    The effects of shear flow and transverse magnetic field on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are examined and the expression of the interface perturbation is obtained by analytically solving the linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics equations. It shows that the perturbation evolves exponentially rather than linearly in the presence of shear flow and magnetic field when v{sub a}<{radical}(1-A{sub T}{sup 2}){delta}{sub u}/2, where v{sub a} is the modified Alfven velocity, A{sub T} is the Atwood number, and {delta}{sub u} is the relative shear velocity, respectively. The shear flow acts as a destabilizing source, while the magnetic field is a stabilizing mechanism of the shocked corrugated interface problem. The whole analysis is based on the assumption that the fluid is incompressible.

  6. Accelerated inhomogeneous (e.g. Richtmyer-Meshkov) flows: A-dot at intermediate times, vortex-accelerated vortex deposition and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusky, Norman; Peng, Gaozhu; Zhang, Shuang

    2004-11-01

    We review our recent contributions [1,2,3,4] in the light of their omission in recent publications [5,6,7,8]. Included is the VAVD process ( also called: secondary baroclinic circulation generation) which yields more positive and negative circulation through intermediate times than the original shock-accelerated vortex deposition (SAVD). VAVD is due to the acceleration provided by the rolled up vortex from SAVD and more important, the strongly increased density gradients of the multiphase front, also caused by the roll-up process . In addition we quantify : the effect of the initial thickness of the interfacial transition layer; the approach to constant a-dot at intermediate-to-late times; the ubiquity of vortex projectiles and transition to turbulence. Refs: 1.Zabusky, N.J., Kotelnikov, A.D., Gulak, Y. & Peng, G. Amplitude growth rate of a Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable two-dimensional interface to intermediate times. J. Fluid Mechanics, 475, p. 147-162,2003. 2.N. J. Zabusky, S. Gupta and Y. Gulak. Localization and spreading of contact discontinuity layers in simulations of compressible dissipationless flows. J. Comput. Phys. 188 (2) (2003) 347-363, 2003. 3.G. Peng, N. J. Zabusky & S. Zhang. Vortex-accelerated secondary baroclinic vorticity deposition and late intermediate time dynamics of a two-dimensional RM interface. Phys. Fluids 15 (12), 3730-3744, 2003. 4. S. Zhang, N. J. Zabusky, G. Peng & S. Gupta. Shock Gaseous Cylinder Interactions: Dynamically validated initial conditions provide excellent agreement between experiments and Navier-Stokes simulations to late-intermediate time. Phys.Fluids 16(5), 1203-1216, 2004. 5.P. Vorobieff , N.-G. Mohamed, C. Tomkins, C. Goodenough, M. Marr-Lyon, and R. F. Benjamin Scaling evolution in shock-induced transition to turbulence PHYS REV. E 68, 065301.2003. 6.C. Matsuoka, K. Nishihara and Y. Fukuda,. Nonlinear evolution of an interface in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. PHYS. REV. E 67, 036301 2003!& erratum 7.K. Nishihara

  7. Effect of initial conditions and Mach number on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in ICF like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pooja; She, Dan; Lim, Hyunkyung; Glimm, James

    2015-11-01

    The qualitative and quantitative effect of initial conditions (linear and non-linear) and high Mach number (1.3 and 1.45) is studied on the turbulent mixing induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in idealized ICF conditions. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability seeds Rayleigh-taylor instabilities in ICF experiments and is one of the factors that contributes to reduced performance of ICF experiments. Its also found in collapsing cores of stars and supersonic combustion. We use the Stony Brook University code, FronTier, which is verified via a code comparison study against the AMR multiphysics code FLASH, and validated against vertical shock tube experiments done by the LANL Extreme Fluids Team. These simulations are designed as a step towards simulating more realistic ICF conditions and quantifying the detrimental effects of mixing on the yield.

  8. HOW DO NUMERICAL METHODS EFFECT STATISTICAL DETAILS OF RICHTMYER-MESHKOV INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. RIDER; J. R. KAMM; C. ZOLDI

    2001-05-01

    Over the past several years we have presented a less than glowing experimental comparison of hydrodynamic codes with the gas curtain experiment. Here, we discuss the manner in which the various details of the hydrodynamic integration techniques conspire to produce poor results. This also includes some progress in improving the results and agreement with experimental results. Our results are based upon the gas curtain, Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments conducted by Rightley et al. (Rightley et al. 1999) at Los Alamos. We also examine the results of a gas cylinder experiment conducted more recently by Prestridge and Zoldi which includes velocity data obtained via a PIV technique. Traditionally, the integral width of the mixing layer is used as a yardstick to measure the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This is also used when investigating the performance of numerical methods. Our focus has been on the details of the mixing below the integral scale. Because the flow is hydrodynamically unstable, we employ statistical measures in our comparisons. This is built upon a parallel effort by the experimentalists investigating the statistical nature of the mixing induced by shock waves. The principle tools we use to measure the spectral structure of the images of these flows are the fractal dimension and the continuous wavelet spectrum. The bottom line is that all the higher order methods used to simulate the gas curtain compare poorly with the experimental data when quantified with these spatial statistics. Moreover, the comparisons degrade under mesh refinement. This occurs despite the fact that the integral scale comparison is acceptable and consistent with the expectations from this class of methods. The most surprising result is that a first-order Godunov method does produce a good comparison relative to the assumed to be higher-order methods. We have examined a broad variety of methodologies associated with the high-order methods to illuminate this problematic result. In the

  9. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a flat interface subjected to a rippled shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liyong; Liu, Jinhong; Liao, Shenfei; Zheng, Xianxu; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a nominally flat interface (N2/SF6 ) subjected to a rippled shock, as the counterpart of a corrugated interface interacting with a planar shock, is studied experimentally in a vertical shock tube using both schlieren photography and fog visualization diagnostics. The nonplanar incident shock wave is produced by a planar shock diffracting around a rigid cylinder, and the flat interface is created by a membraneless technique. Three different distances η (the ratio of spacing from cylinder to interface over cylinder diameter) are considered. Schlieren images indicate that the nonplanar incident shock can be divided into three different segments separated by two triple points. Fog visualization pictures show the formation of overall "Λ " shaped interface structures and a N2 cavity at the center and two interface steps at both sides. With the increase of the dimensionless time, the dimensionless interface amplitude increases as well as the penetration depth of the cavity, and both curves exhibit reasonable collapse for different η numbers. Through equating the preinterface perturbation of the rippled shock with a preshock perturbation of a corrugated interface, the growth rate of this instability is found to be noticeably smaller than that of the standard RM instability.

  10. Linear Stability Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Cyindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Abeer; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations and analysis in Cartesian slab geometry for nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is suppressed in the presence of a magnetic field. An analytical solution of incompressible 2-D MHD RMI of an impulsively accelerated interface was investigated by Wheatley et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005; J. Fluid Mech. 2005) who found that, for a finite magnetic field, although the initial growth rate of the interface is unaffected by the presence of magnetic field, the late-time amplitude of the interface asymptotes to a constant value. In the framework of incompressible MHD, we examine analytically the behavior of an impulsively accelerated interface separating conducting fluids of different densities in cylindrical geometry. We investigate the stability properties of such a system and study the influence of the magnetic field on the growth rate of the interface. In converging cylindrical geometry, the RMI is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase. Our analysis does not account for the RT phase of the instability but is valid for the duration of the RMI phase. We compare results of the incompressible analysis with linear compressible MHD simulations. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  11. Effect of a seed magnetic field on two-fluid plasma Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Daryl; Wheatley, Vincent; Samtaney, Ravi; Pullin, Dale

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of a uniform seed magnetic field on the plasma Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) using two-fluid simulations. These couple sets of conservation equations for the ions and electrons to the full Maxwell's equations. We consider cases where the seed magnetic field is normal to the interface and where the reference Debye length and Larmor radius range from a tenth to a thousandth of the interface perturbation wavelength. In ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), it has been shown that in the presence of such a seed magnetic field, the growth of the RMI is suppressed by the transport of vorticity from the interface by MHD shocks. Our two-fluid plasma simulations reveal that while the RMI is suppressed in the presence of the seed field, the suppression mechanism varies depending on the plasma length-scales. Two-fluid plasma RMI simulations also reveal a secondary, high-wavenumber, electron-driven interface instability. This is not suppressed by the presence of the seed field. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  12. Simulations and model of the nonlinear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, Guy

    2009-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is investigated using numerical simulations with the FLASH code in two-dimensions (20). The purpose of the simulations is to develop a nonlinear model of the RM instability that is accurate to the regime of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and ejecta formation, namely, at large Atwood number A and initial amplitude kh{sub o} (k {triple_bond} wavenumber) of the perturbation. The FLASH code is first validated by obtaining excellent agreement with RM experiments well into the nonlinear regime. The results are then compared with a variety of nonlinear models that are based on potential flow. We find that the models agree with simulations for moderate values of A and kh{sub o} but not for the values characteristic of ICF and ejecta formation. As a result, a new nonlinear model is developed that captures the simulation results consistent with potential flow and for a broader range of A and kh{sub o}.

  13. Scale-to-scale energy transfer in mixing flow induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) mixing flow induced by a planar shock wave of Mach 1.6 is investigated using direct numerical simulation method. Interfacial perturbations of different scales between air and sulfur hexafluoride are introduced to study the effect of the initial conditions. Focus is placed on the analysis of the scale-to-scale transfer of kinetic energy in both Fourier and physical spaces. The kinetic energy injected from the perturbation scales is transferred to both larger and smaller scales in an average sense within the inner mixing zone (IMZ) at early times and is mainly passed down into smaller scales at the late stage. The physical-space energy flux due to the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress is studied using a filtering approach in order to shed light on the physical origin of the scale-to-scale kinetic energy transfer. It is found that the pointwise SGS energy flux is highly correlated with the local spike and bubble structures in the IMZ. Moreover, it turns out that the mean SGS energy flux is mainly ascribed to the component in the direction of shock wave propagation. An analysis using the method of conditional averaging manifests that the generation of local SGS energy flux is associated with the property of the surrounding flow induced by quadrupolar or dipolar vortex structures.

  14. Shock-interface interaction: Current research on the Richtmyer- Meshkov problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.

    1991-07-17

    The basis for the study of the evolution of a shocked interface stems from the question of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability (Taylor 1950). Starting in the late 18th century, the stability of an interface submitted to gravitational forces was investigated for the case in which the density of one of the materials across the interface was negligible compared to the other. Taylor analyzed the case in which the Atwood number (ratio of the difference of the densities to their sum) is less than 1, and the acceleration of the system is constant. He determined that the interface was unstable to small perturbations only if the direction of the acceleration normal to the interface coincides with that of the density gradient. Richtmyer (1960) extended Taylor's analysis to the case of an implusive acceleration. His results implied that the interface would be unstable irrespective of the relative orientation of the velocity impulse and the density gradient. His predictions were verified experimentally by Meshkov (1969), and the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability became a subject of research in its own right. Experimental, numerical, and theoretical works address this problem. The RM problem has been studied with both the shock-tube and laser experiments. In this paper, only shock-tube work is considered. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardo Bonazza

    2006-03-09

    The present research program is centered on the experimental and numerical study of two instabilities that develop at the interface between two different fluids when the interface experiences an impulsive or a constant acceleration. The instabilities, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability, respectively (RMI and RTI), adversely affect target implosion in experiments aimed at the achievement of nuclear fusion by inertial confinement by causing the nuclear fuel contained in a target and the ablated shell material to mix, leading to contamination of the fuel, yield reduction or no ignition at all. Specifically, our work is articulated in three main directions: study of impulsively accelerated spherical gas inhomogeneities; study of impulsively accelerated 2-D interfaces; study of a liquid interface under the action of gravity. The objectives common to all three activities are to learn some physics directly from our experiments and calculations; and to develop a database at previously untested conditions to be used to calibrate and verify some of the computational tools being developed within the RTI/RMI community at the national laboratories and the ASCI centers.

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Turbulent Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimonte, G.

    1998-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and its shock driven analog, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), affect a wide variety of important phenomena from sub-terrainian to astrophysical environments. The ``fluids" are equally varied from plasmas and magnetic fields to elastic-plastic solids. In most applications, the instabilities occur with a complex acceleration history and evolve to a highly nonlinear state, making the theoretical description formidable. We will link the fluid and plasma regimes while describing the theoretical issues and basic experiments in different venues to isolate key physics issues. RMI experiments on the Nova laser investigate the affects of compressibility with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 10) in near solid density plasmas of sub-millimeter scale. The growth of single sinusoidal and random 3-D perturbations are measured using backlit radiography. RTI experiments with the Linear Electric Motor (LEM) are conducted with a variety of acceleration (<< 10^4 m/s^2) histories and fluids of 10 cm scale. Turbulent RTI experiments with high Reynolds number liquids show self-similar growth which is characterized with laser induced fluorescence. LEM experiments with an elastic-plastic material (yogurt) exhibit a critical wavelength and amplitude for instability. The experimental results will be compared with linear and nonlinear theories and hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Experiments on Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the late-time imprint levels in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically and observed experimentally,(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). and in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with an x-ray framing camera through face-on x-ray radiography. Planar plastic targets with variable thickness (20 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses at maximum energy. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. Nonlinearity in the evolution of the preimposed mode, resulting in an enriched spectrum, was observed for initial amplitudes previously believed to develop linearly with time. Upcoming experiments with a high-resolution, streaked imager, will allow for the detailed recording of the evolution of the RM instability and the competing stabilization effect. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  18. Dimensional crossover in Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows in the presence of pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the Richtmyer-Meshkov interfacial dynamics instability in the presence pressure fluctuations. Pressure fluctuations are scale invariant and are modeled by an effective time dependent acceleration field with power law exponent -2. The group theory based analysis is applied to 3D rectangular p2mm, 3D square p4mm and 2D pm1 RM flows. From the symmetry analysis, we find that 3D square and 2D bubbles form a one parameter family and 3D rectangular bubbles form a two parameter family. The families are parametrized by the principal curvature(s). The bubble velocity and Fourier amplitude profiles exhibit RM type behavior for weak accelerations and RT type behavior for strong accelerations. Under the dimensional crossover, the bubbles elongated in one of the directions reduce to the 2D solutions, whereas the bubbles elongated in the other direction flatten. Stability analysis shows that 3D square bubbles are stable with respect to isotropic as well as anisotropic perturbations. 2D bubbles are unstable to 3D perturbations. No continuous transition is possible between 3D square and 2D bubbles and the dimensional crossover is discontinuous for both strong and weak pressure fluctuations. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  19. Dimensional crossover in Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows in the presence of pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We analyze Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interfacial dynamics in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The pressure fluctuations are scale invariant and are modeled by an effective time dependent acceleration field with power law exponent -2. The group theory based analysis is applied to 3D rectangular p2mm, 3D square p4mm and 2D pm1 RM flows. From the symmetry analysis, we find that 3D square and 2D bubbles form a one parameter family and 3D rectangular bubbles form a two parameter family. The families are parametrized by the principal curvature(s). The bubble velocity and Fourier amplitude profiles exhibit RM type behavior for weak accelerations and RT type behavior for strong accelerations. Under the dimensional crossover, the bubbles elongated in one of the directions reduce to the 2D solutions, whereas the bubbles elongated in the other direction flatten. Stability analysis shows that 3D square bubbles are stable with respect to isotropic as well as anisotropic perturbations. 2D bubbles are unstable to 3D perturbations. No continuous transition is possible between 3D square and 2D bubbles and the dimensional crossover is discontinuous for both strong and weak pressure fluctuations. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  20. Evolution of length scales and statistics of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, V K; Zubel, M; Hickel, S; Adams, N A

    2014-12-01

    In this study we present direct numerical simulation results of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) initiated by Ma=1.05,Ma=1.2, and Ma=1.5 shock waves interacting with a perturbed planar interface between air and SF(6). At the lowest shock Mach number the fluids slowly mix due to viscous diffusion, whereas at the highest shock Mach number the mixing zone becomes turbulent. When a minimum critical Taylor microscale Reynolds number is exceeded, an inertial range spectrum emerges, providing further evidence of transition to turbulence. The scales of turbulent motion, i.e., the Kolmogorov length scale, the Taylor microscale, and the integral length, scale are presented. The separation of these scales is found to increase as the Reynolds number is increased. Turbulence statistics, i.e., the probability density functions of the velocity and its longitudinal and transverse derivatives, show a self-similar decay and thus that turbulence evolving from RMI is not fundamentally different from isotropic turbulence, though nominally being only isotropic and homogeneous in the transverse directions.

  1. Scale-to-scale energy transfer in mixing flow induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) mixing flow induced by a planar shock wave of Mach 1.6 is investigated using direct numerical simulation method. Interfacial perturbations of different scales between air and sulfur hexafluoride are introduced to study the effect of the initial conditions. Focus is placed on the analysis of the scale-to-scale transfer of kinetic energy in both Fourier and physical spaces. The kinetic energy injected from the perturbation scales is transferred to both larger and smaller scales in an average sense within the inner mixing zone (IMZ) at early times and is mainly passed down into smaller scales at the late stage. The physical-space energy flux due to the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress is studied using a filtering approach in order to shed light on the physical origin of the scale-to-scale kinetic energy transfer. It is found that the pointwise SGS energy flux is highly correlated with the local spike and bubble structures in the IMZ. Moreover, it turns out that the mean SGS energy flux is mainly ascribed to the component in the direction of shock wave propagation. An analysis using the method of conditional averaging manifests that the generation of local SGS energy flux is associated with the property of the surrounding flow induced by quadrupolar or dipolar vortex structures.

  2. Simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with experimentally measured volumetric initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kevin; Sewell, Everest; Krivets, Vitaliy; Greenough, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are measured in three dimensions in the University of Arizona Vertical Shock Tube using a moving magnet galvanometer system. The resulting volumetric data is used as initial conditions for the simulation of the RMI using ARES at Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The heavy gas is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and the light gas is air. The perturbations are generated by harmonically oscillating the gasses vertically using two loudspeakers mounted to the shock tube which cause Faraday resonance, producing a random short wavelength perturbation on the interface. Planar Mie scattering is used to illuminate the flow field through the addition of propylene glycol particles seeded in the heavy gas. An M=1.2 shock impulsively accelerates the interface, initiating instability growth. Images of the initial condition and instability growth are captured at a rate of 6 kHz using high speed cameras. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results, mixing diagnostics, and mixing zone growth are presented.

  3. Influence of interference of perturbation waves on the dynamics of Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Arun; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of structures that are formed due to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the interface between two fluids with different densities when a strong shock wave refracts it [1]. While previous research in this area was focused on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation, the information was largely ignored on the influences of the relative phase of a multi-wave perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves on RMI evolution. Applying group theory analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, we study the effects of the relative phase of the interfacial sinusoidal waves on the structure of bubbles and spikes that is formed at the interface after the shock passage. A number of new qualitative and quantitative effects are found, and the effect of the wave interference on RMI evolution is observed. In particular, evidences so far indicate that the symmetry of the interface strongly influences the spike morphology as compared to asymmetric cases. We discuss how one may control the growth of RMI by controlling the phases of waves of the initial perturbation Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  4. Influence of interference of perturbation waves on the dynamics of Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Arun; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of structures that are formed due to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the interface between two fluids with different densities when a strong shock wave refracts it [1]. While previous research in this area was focused on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation, the information was largely ignored on the influences of the relative phase of a multi-wave perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves on RMI evolution. Applying group theory analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, we study the effects of the relative phase of the interfacial sinusoidal waves on the structure of bubbles and spikes that is formed at the interface after the shock passage. A number of new qualitative and quantitative effects are found, and the effect of the wave interference on RMI evolution is observed. In particular, evidences so far indicate that the symmetry of the interface strongly influences the spike morphology as compared to asymmetric cases. We discuss how one may control the growth of RMI by controlling the phases of waves of the initial perturbation. Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  5. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-01

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and a critical Mach number Mscritical of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mscritical . Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. We point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.

  6. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-13

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and a critical Mach number Mcriticals of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mcriticals. Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. Furthermore, we point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.

  7. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    DOE PAGES

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-13

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and amore » critical Mach number Mcriticals of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mcriticals. Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. Furthermore, we point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.« less

  8. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-13

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and a critical Mach number Mcriticals of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mcriticals. Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. Furthermore, we point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.

  9. Experimental Investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Through Simultaneous Measurements of Concentration and Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel; Ames, Alex; Noble, Chris; Oakley, Jason; Rothamer, Dave; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    The present work investigates the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability through simultaneous measurements of concentration and velocity. In the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, a broadband, shear-layer initial condition is created at the interface between helium and argon (Atwood number A = 0.7). The helium is seeded with acetone vapor for use in planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), while each gas in the shear layer cross flow is seeded with particulate TiO2, which is used to track the flow and allow for the Mie scattering of light. Once impulsively accelerated by a M = 1.57 shock wave, the interface is imaged twice in close succession using a planar laser sheet containing both the second and fourth harmonic output (532 nm and 266 nm, respectively) of a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser. Particle image pairs are captured on a dual-frame CCD camera, for use in particle image velocimetry (PIV), while PLIF images are corrected to show concentration. Velocity fields are obtained from particle images using the Insight 4G software package by TSI, and velocity field structure is investigated and compared against concentration images. Probability density functions (PDFs) and planar energy spectra (of both velocity fluctuations and concentration) are then calculated and results are discussed.

  10. Scale coupling in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, M.; Stellingwerf, R. F.; Cassibry, J. T.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2012-08-01

    We perform the first systematic study of the nonlinear evolution and scale coupling in Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) is employed to ensure accurate shock capturing, interface tracking and accounting for the dissipation processes. We find that in strong-shock-driven RMI the background motion is supersonic. The amplitude of the initial perturbation strongly influences the flow evolution and the interfacial mixing that can be sub-sonic or supersonic. At late times the flow remains laminar rather than turbulent, and RM bubbles flatten and decelerate. In the fluid bulk, reverse cumulative jets appear and "hot spots" are formed—local heterogeneous microstructures with temperature substantially higher than that in the ambient. Our numerical simulations agree with the zero-order, linear, weakly nonlinear, and highly nonlinear theoretical analyses as well as with the experiments and suggest that the evolution of RMI is a multi-scale and heterogeneous process with a complicated character of scale coupling.

  11. An experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2004-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a planar interface separating two fluids of different density is impulsively accelerated in the direction of its normal. It is one of the most fundamental fluid instabilities and is of importance to the fields of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Because RM instability experiments are normally carried out in shock tubes, where the generation of a sharp, well-controlled interface between gases is difficult, there is a scarcity of good experimental results. The experiments presented here use a novel technique that circumvents many of the experimental difficulties that have previously limited the study of RM instability in shock tubes. In these experiments, the instability is generated incompressibly, by bouncing a rectangular tank containing two liquids off of a fixed spring. These experiments, which utilize PLIF flow visualization, yield time-motion image sequences of the nonlinear development and transition to turbulence of the instability that are of a quality unattainable in shock tube experiments. Measurements obtained from these images, therefore, provide benchmark data for the evaluation of nonlinear models for the late-time growth of the instability. Because the run time in these experiments is limited, new experiments in the NASA Glenn 2.2 second drop tower, capable of achieving longer run times, are currently under way.

  12. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a flat interface subjected to a rippled shock wave.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liyong; Liu, Jinhong; Liao, Shenfei; Zheng, Xianxu; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a nominally flat interface (N_{2}/SF_{6}) subjected to a rippled shock, as the counterpart of a corrugated interface interacting with a planar shock, is studied experimentally in a vertical shock tube using both schlieren photography and fog visualization diagnostics. The nonplanar incident shock wave is produced by a planar shock diffracting around a rigid cylinder, and the flat interface is created by a membraneless technique. Three different distances η (the ratio of spacing from cylinder to interface over cylinder diameter) are considered. Schlieren images indicate that the nonplanar incident shock can be divided into three different segments separated by two triple points. Fog visualization pictures show the formation of overall "Λ" shaped interface structures and a N_{2} cavity at the center and two interface steps at both sides. With the increase of the dimensionless time, the dimensionless interface amplitude increases as well as the penetration depth of the cavity, and both curves exhibit reasonable collapse for different η numbers. Through equating the preinterface perturbation of the rippled shock with a preshock perturbation of a corrugated interface, the growth rate of this instability is found to be noticeably smaller than that of the standard RM instability.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Two Typical Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jingsong; Liu, Jinhong; Zou, Liyong; Wang, Tao

    2011-06-01

    Two typical Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities are investigated by experiments and simulations. One is the instability with double perturbation interface in nonuniform flows, and the other is the shock-accelerated elliptic heavy gas cylinder instability. The two experiments are conducted in the LSD's horizontal shock tube with 5 m long, 5 ×5 cm2 square cross section and is numerical simulated by our LES code of MVFT. Good agreements have been obtained between simulations and experiment in which the visualizations of mixing interface is tracked by Schlieren photography and multiple dynamics images technology. The results illuminates that the initial nonuniform flow would have a significant effect on the RM instability, and the shape of cylinder also have a significant effect on the cylindrical RM instability. The model of shock-accelerating along the major axis has a stronger convergent effect than the one of shock-accelerating along the minor axis for elliptic gas cylinder instability. The works are supported by the National Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11072228 and 11002129).

  14. Manipulation of three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability by initial interfacial principal curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ben; Zhai, Zhigang; Si, Ting; Lu, Xiyun; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-03-01

    The characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in the early stages are studied numerically. By designing 3D interfaces that initially possess various identical and opposite principal curvature combinations, the growth rate of perturbations can be effectively manipulated. The weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme and the level set method combined with the real ghost fluid method are used to simulate the flow. The results indicate that the interface development and the shock propagation in 3D cases are much more complicated than those in 2D case, and the evolution of 3D interfaces is heavily dependent on the initial interfacial principal curvatures. The 3D structure of wave patterns induces high pressure zones in the flow field, and the pressure oscillations change the local instabilities of interfaces. In the linear stages, the perturbation growth rate follows regularity as the interfacial principal curvatures vary, which is further predicted by the stability theory of 2D and 3D interfaces. It is also found that hysteresis effects exist at the onset of the linear stages in the 3D case for the same initial perturbations as the 2D case, resulting in different evolutions of 3D RMI in the nonlinear stages.

  15. Observations of the Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov Effect Relevant to Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Eric; Braun, Dave; Batha, Steve; Landen, Otto

    2013-10-01

    Recent simulations and experiments have shown that isolated features on the outer surface of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition capsules can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mixing into the hotspot. Controlling the growth of these artifacts is complicated due to uncertainties in equation of state (EOS) models used in simulation codes. Here we report on measurements pertaining to the growth and decay of isolated defects due to x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules in order to validate these models. Face-on transmission radiography was used to measure the evolution of Gaussian bump arrays in plastic targets. Au halfraums heated to radiation temperatures near 70 eV using 15 beams in a 7.5 ns pulse from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY) indirectly drove the samples while simultaneous radiographs from Ta and Y backlighter foils were recorded. Shock speed measurements were also made with Omega's Active Shock Break Out (ASBO) diagnostic in conjunction with the x-ray flux recorded by a soft x-ray power diagnostic (DANTE) were used to determine drive conditions in the target. Measurements of 5 micron tall, 17 micron wide bumps show a decrease in bump areal density between 4.5 and 7.5 ns while 33 micron wide bumps saturate near 3 ns consistent with LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 simulations.

  16. High order numerical simulations of the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability in a relativistic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.

    2015-07-01

    We study the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a relativistic perfect fluid by means of high order numerical simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The numerical scheme combines a finite volume reconstruction in space, a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method, a high order one-step time update scheme, and a "cell-by-cell" space-time AMR strategy with time-accurate local time stepping. In this way, third order accurate (both in space and in time) numerical simulations of the RM instability are performed, spanning a wide parameter space. We present results both for the case in which a light fluid penetrates into a higher density one (Atwood number A > 0) and for the case in which a heavy fluid penetrates into a lower density one (Atwood number A < 0). We find that for large Lorentz factors γs of the incident shock wave, the relativistic RM instability is substantially weakened and ultimately suppressed. More specifically, the growth rate of the RM instability in the linear phase has a local maximum which occurs at a critical value of γs ≈ [1.2, 2]. Moreover, we have also revealed a genuinely relativistic effect, absent in Newtonian hydrodynamics, which arises in three dimensional configurations with a non-zero velocity component tangent to the incident shock front. In particular, in A > 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net magnification effect, while in A < 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net suppression effect.

  17. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Zachary; Stellingwerf, Robert; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect initial perturbation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. Broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered (Mach=3,5,10, and Atwood=0.6,0.8,0.95). The amplitude of initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. We analyze the initial growth-rate of the RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. We find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the amplitude of the initial perturbation. This restrains the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends strongly and the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate increases with the increase of the Atwood number for a fixed Mach number, and decreases with the increase of the Mach number for a fixed Atwood number. We argue that the non-monotonicity of RMI growth-rate is a result of a combination of geometric effect and the effect of secondary shocks.

  18. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Zachary; Stellingwerf, Robert; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect initial perturbation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. Broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered (Mach=3,5,10, and Atwood=0.6,0.8,0.95). The amplitude of initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. We analyze the initial growth-rate of the RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. We find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the amplitude of the initial perturbation. This restrains the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends strongly and the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate increases with the increase of the Atwood number for a fixed Mach number, and decreases with the increase of the Mach number for a fixed Atwood number. We argue that the non-monotonicity of RMI growth-rate is a result of a combination of geometric effect and the effect of secondary shocks. Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  19. Growth-rate of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for small and large amplitude initial perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Nora C.; Pandian, Arun; Dell, Zachary; Stellingwerf, Robert; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of the amplitude of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by means of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations and by the rigorous theory and the newly developed empirical model. A broad parameter regime is analyzed. Initially, the interface has a single-mode sinusoidal perturbation with the amplitude varying from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. An empirical model is developed to describe the non-monotone dependence of the RMI growth-rate on the initial amplitude. The initial growth rate of the interface has a peak value. The position of the peak depends only weakly on the Mach and Atwood numbers, whereas the peak value depends strongly on Atwood number and weakly on Mach number. The ratio of initial growth rate to background velocity is related to the energy partitioning between the interface and the bulk. We find an upper bound of the ratio of the interfacial energy to the bulk energy, and identified its scaling with the Atwood number. This peak value of the energy ratio indicates that RM interfacial growth can be controlled by initial conditions. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  20. Growth-rate of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for small and large amplitude initial perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Nora; Pandian, Arun; Dell, Zachary; Stellingwerf, Robert; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We study the effect of the amplitude of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by means of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations and by the rigorous theory and the newly developed empirical model. A broad parameter regime is analyzed. Initially, the interface has a single-mode sinusoidal perturbation with the amplitude varying from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. An empirical model is developed to describe the non-monotone dependence of the RMI growth-rate on the initial amplitude. The initial growth rate of the interface has a peak value. The position of the peak depends only weakly on the Mach and Atwood numbers, whereas the peak value depends strongly on Atwood number and weakly on Mach number. The ratio of initial growth rate to background velocity is related to the energy partitioning between the interface and the bulk. We find an upper bound of the ratio of the interfacial energy to the bulk energy, and identified its scaling with the Atwood number. This peak value of the energy ratio indicates that RM interfacial growth can be controlled by initial conditions. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  1. Experimental study of Mach number effects on the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo; Wilson, Brandon; Craig, Alex; Prestridge, Kathy

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities from the initial linear growth stages, to the subsequent non-linear interactions and the eventual (sometimes elusive) transition to turbulence, is strongly dependent on a number of factors such as shock strength (Mach number), Atwood number, and the initial structure of the fluid interface. Mach number controls the effective value of the Atwood number after compression, and thus the distribution and total amount of kinetic energy deposited at shock interaction. The initial scale-content in the fluid interface defines how quickly and to what extent growing instabilities interact with each other, ultimately conditioning transition to turbulence. These effects are not entirely independent of each other, and the extent of their relative importance is not well understood. To shed light on this subject, we designed a parameter space consisting of three different Mach numbers (1.1, 1.3, and 1.45) and three different interface configurations of varying scale content. This parameter space is being explored experimentally by means of simultaneous PIV/PLIF measurements on a single air- SF6 interface as it evolves after shock interaction. This talk will focus on the observation of Mach number effects for an early stage of evolution.

  2. Nonlinear theory of classical cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for arbitrary Atwood numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wan Hai; Ping Yu, Chang; Hua Ye, Wen; Feng Wang, Li; Tu He, Xian

    2014-06-15

    A nonlinear theory is developed to describe the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of an impulsively accelerated interface between incompressible fluids, which is based on both a technique of Padé approximation and an approach of perturbation expansion directly on the perturbed interface rather than the unperturbed interface. When cylindrical effect vanishes (i.e., in the large initial radius of the interface), our explicit results reproduce those [Q. Zhang and S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Fluids 9, 1106 (1996)] related to the planar RMI. The present prediction in agreement with previous simulations [C. Matsuoka and K. Nishihara, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055304(R) (2006)] leads us to better understand the cylindrical RMI at arbitrary Atwood numbers for the whole nonlinear regime. The asymptotic growth rate of the cylindrical interface finger (bubble or spike) tends to its initial value or zero, depending upon mode number of the initial cylindrical interface and Atwood number. The explicit conditions, directly affecting asymptotic behavior of the cylindrical interface finger, are investigated in this paper. This theory allows a straightforward extension to other nonlinear problems related closely to an instable interface.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Velocity Evolution in the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel; Oakley, Jason; Rothamer, Dave; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2015-11-01

    The present work describes the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability through a focus on the development of velocity fluctuations. In the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, a broadband, shear-layer initial condition is created at the interface between helium and argon. This shear layer is seeded with particulate TiO2, which is used to track the flow and allow for the Mie scattering of light. Once impulsively accelerated by a M =1.4 shock wave, the interface is imaged twice in close succession using planar laser imaging to create particle image pairs. Velocity fields are obtained from these particle images using the Insight 4G software package from TSI. This process is repeated, capturing a total of four different times in the development of the instability, allowing for the study of velocity development in the RMI. For each post-shock time, velocity field structure is investigated, and probability density functions of velocity fluctuations are compared. Using known length scales from previous studies, these newfound RMS velocity values are also used to give an estimate of the Reynolds number.

  4. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    SciTech Connect

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J.; Metzler, N.

    2012-10-15

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the 'feedout' of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  5. Computational parametric study of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for an inclined interface.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Jacob A; Greenough, Jeffrey A; Ranjan, Devesh

    2011-08-01

    A computational study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for an inclined interface is presented. The study covers experiments to be performed in the Texas A&M University inclined shock tube facility. Incident shock wave Mach numbers from 1.2 to 2.5, inclination angles from 30° to 60°, and gas pair Atwood numbers of ∼0.67 and ∼0.95 are used in this parametric study containing 15 unique combinations of these parameters. Qualitative results are examined through a time series of density plots for multiple combinations of these parameters, and the qualitative effects of each of the parameters are discussed. Pressure, density, and vorticity fields are presented in animations available online to supplement the discussion of the qualitative results. These density plots show the evolution of two main regions in the flow field: a mixing region containing driver and test gas that is dominated by large vortical structures, and a more homogeneous region of unmixed fluid which can separate away from the mixing region in some cases. The interface mixing width is determined for various combinations of the parameters listed at the beginning of the Abstract. A scaling method for the mixing width is proposed using the interface geometry and wave velocities calculated using one-dimensional gas dynamic equations. This model uses the transmitted wave velocity for the characteristic velocity and an initial offset time based on the travel time of strong reflected waves. It is compared to an adapted Richtmyer impulsive model scaling and shown to scale the initial mixing width growth rate more effectively for fixed Atwood number.

  6. Streaked Imaging of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2003-10-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the seeds for subsequent growth of perturbations due to the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically,(V.N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82), 2091 (1999). observed in 2-D ORCHID hydrodynamic simulations, and measured experimentally.(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly, through face-on x-ray radiography. Experiments with a high-resolution, Ir-coated Kirkpatrick--Baez microscope, coupled to a high-current streak tube, provided a continuous record of the target areal density during shock transit, while it was dominated by the evolution of the RM instability. Planar plastic targets with variable thicknesses (30 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses with intensities---ranging from 5 × 10^13 W/cm^2 to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. The predicted dependence of the oscillation period on laser intensity and modulation wavelength was quantified. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  7. Experimental Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2002-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a low Atwood number, miscible, two-liquid system is investigated experimentally. The initially stratified fluids are contained within a rectangular tank mounted to a sled that rides on a vertical set of rails. The instability is generated by dropping the sled onto a coil spring, producing a nearly impulsive upward acceleration. The subsequent freefall that occurs as the container travels upward and then downward on the rails allows the instability to evolve in the absence of gravity. The interface separating the two liquids initially has a well-defined, sinusoidal perturbation that quickly inverts and then grows in amplitude after undergoing the impulsive acceleration. Disturbance amplitudes are measured and compared to theoretical predictions. Linear stability theory gives excellent agreement with the measured initial growth rate, a(sub 0), for single-mode perturbations with the predicted amplitudes differing by less than 10% from experimental measurements up to a nondimensional time ka(sub 0)t = 0.7, where k is the wavenumber. Linear stability theory also provides excellent agreement for the individual mode amplitudes of multi-mode initial perturbations up until the interface becomes multi-valued. Comparison with previously published weakly nonlinear single-mode models shows good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 3, while published nonlinear single-mode models provide good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 30. The effects of Reynolds number on the vortex core evolution and overall growth rate of the interface are also investigated. Measurements of the overall amplitude are found to be unaffected by the Reynolds number for the range of values studied here. However, experiments carried out at lower values of Reynolds numbers were found to have decreased vortex core rotation rates. In addition, an instability in the vortex cores is observed.

  8. Analytical scalings of the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a rarefaction is reflected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos-Campos, F.; Wouchuk, J. G.

    2017-07-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for the case of a reflected rarefaction is studied in detail following the growth of the contact surface in the linear regime and providing explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic velocities in different physical limits. This work is a continuation of the similar problem when a shock is reflected [Phys. Rev. E 93, 053111 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.053111]. Explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic normal velocity of the rippled surface (δ vi∞ ) are shown. The known analytical solution of the perturbations growing inside the rarefaction fan is coupled to the pressure perturbations between the transmitted shock front and the rarefaction trailing edge. The surface ripple growth (ψi) is followed from t =0 + up to the asymptotic stage inside the linear regime. As in the shock reflected case, an asymptotic behavior of the form ψi(t ) ≅ψ∞+δ vi∞t is observed, where ψ∞ is an asymptotic ordinate to the origin. Approximate expressions for the asymptotic velocities are given for arbitrary values of the shock Mach number. The asymptotic velocity field is calculated at both sides of the contact surface. The kinetic energy content of the velocity field is explicitly calculated. It is seen that a significant part of the motion occurs inside a fluid layer very near the material surface in good qualitative agreement with recent simulations. The important physical limits of weak and strong shocks and high and low preshock density ratio are also discussed and exact Taylor expansions are given. The results of the linear theory are compared to simulations and experimental work [R. L. Holmes et al., J. Fluid Mech. 389, 55 (1999), 10.1017/S0022112099004838; C. Mariani et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 254503 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.254503]. The theoretical predictions of δ vi∞ and ψ∞ show good agreement with the experimental and numerical reported values.

  9. Cylindrical effects on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for arbitrary Atwood numbers in weakly nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. H.; He, X. T.; Yu, C. P.

    2012-07-15

    When an incident shock collides with a corrugated interface separating two fluids of different densities, the interface is prone to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Based on the formal perturbation expansion method as well as the potential flow theory, we present a simple method to investigate the cylindrical effects in weakly nonlinear RMI with the transmitted and reflected cylindrical shocks by considering the nonlinear corrections up to fourth order. The cylindrical results associated with the material interface show that the interface expression consists of two parts: the result in the planar system and that from the cylindrical effects. In the limit of the cylindrical radius tending to infinity, the cylindrical results can be reduced to those in the planar system. Our explicit results show that the cylindrical effects exert an inward velocity on the whole perturbed interface, regardless of bubbles or spikes of the interface. On the one hand, outgoing bubbles are constrained and ingoing spikes are accelerated for different Atwood numbers (A) and mode numbers k'. On the other hand, for ingoing bubbles, when |A|k'{sup 3/2} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1, bubbles are considerably accelerated especially at the small |A| and k'; otherwise, bubbles are decelerated. For outgoing spikes, when |A|k' Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1, spikes are dramatically accelerated especially at large |A| and k'; otherwise, spikes are decelerated. Furthermore, the cylindrical effects have a significant influence on the amplitudes of the ingoing spike and bubble for large k'. Thus, it should be included in applications where the cylindrical effects play a role, such as inertial confinement fusion ignition target design.

  10. Suppression of the spherically converging magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instablity in an octahedrally symmetric seed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Wheatley, Vincent; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present results of ideal magnetohydrodynamics simulations investigating the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in near-spherical implosions in the presence of an octahedrally symmetric seed magnetic field. The problem is motivated by the desire to maintain a symmetrical collapse of the primary shock wave, minimally distorted by the effect of the seed magnetic field, while retaining the seed-field-induced suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The field is generated by a set of six current loops arranged around the target as on the faces of a cube. The instability is generated on a perturbed spherical density interface that is accelerated from the outside by imploding magnetohydrodynamic shocks, which are in turn generated by a spherical Riemann problem. The perturbation on the density interface is formed with a single-dominant-mode spherical harmonics expansion. We investigate the evolution of the interface and the transport of baroclinic vorticity near the interface, and examine the extent of the distortion to the primary magnetohydrodynamic shock system induced by the seed field. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  11. Normal velocity freeze-out of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a rarefaction is reflected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouchuk, J. G.; Sano, T.

    2015-02-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) develops when a shock front hits a rippled contact surface separating two different fluids. After the incident shock refraction, a transmitted shock is always formed and another shock or a rarefaction is reflected back. The pressure-entropy-vorticity fields generated by the rippled wave fronts are responsible for the generation of hydrodynamic perturbations in both fluids. In linear theory, the contact surface ripple reaches an asymptotic normal velocity which is dependent on the incident shock Mach number, fluids density ratio, and compressibilities. It was speculated in the past about the possibility of getting a zero value for the asymptotic normal velocity, a phenomenon that was called "freeze-out" [G. Fraley, Phys. Fluids 29, 376 (1986), 10.1063/1.865722; K. Mikaelian, Phys. Fluids 6, 356 (1994), 10.1063/1.868091, A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 592 (2001), 10.1063/1.1335829]. In a previous paper, freeze-out was studied for the case when a shock is reflected at the contact surface [J. G. Wouchuk and K. Nishihara, Phys. Rev. E 70, 026305 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.026305]. In this work the freeze-out of the RMI is studied for the case in which a rarefaction is reflected back. Two different regimes are found: nearly equal preshock densities at the interface at any shock intensity, and very large density difference for strong shocks. The contour curves that relate shock Mach number and preshock density ratio are obtained in both regimes for fluids with equal and different compressibilities. An analysis of the temporal evolution of different cases of freeze-out is shown. It is seen that the freeze-out is the result of the interaction between the unstable interface and the rippled wave fronts. As a general and qualitative criterion to look for freeze-out situations, it is seen that a necessary condition for freeze-out is the same orientation for the tangential velocities generated at each side of the contact

  12. Experiments to measure ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth of Gaussian bumps in plastic capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Batha, Steve; Sedillo, Tom; Evans, Scott; Sorce, Chuck; Landen, Otto; Braun, Dave

    2010-06-02

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities have been of primary concern to the ICF program since its inception. To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF, targets must be designed for high implosion velocities, which requires higher in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) and diminished shell stability. Controlling capsule perturbations is thus of the utmost importance. Recent simulations have shown that features on the outer surface of an ICF capsule as small as 10 microns wide and 100's of nanometers tall such as bumps, divots, or even dust particles can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Recent x-ray images of implosions on the NIF may be evidence of such mixing. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (Gaussian bumps) due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. The platform that has been developed uses halfraums with radiation temperatures near 75 eV (Rev. 4 foot-level) driven by 15-20 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sends a ~2.5 Mbar shock into a planar CH foil. Gaussian-shaped bumps (20 microns wide, 4-7 microns tall) are deposited onto the ablation side of the target. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα - 2.8 keV) backlighter is used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements will also be made with Omega's active shock breakout (ASBO) and streaked optical pyrometery (SOP) diagnostics in conjunction with filtered x-ray photodiode arrays (DANTE) to determine drive conditions in the target. These data will be used to discriminate between EOS models so

  13. An Experimental Study of the Turbulent Development of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jeffrey, W.

    2006-10-30

    The objective of this three-year research program is to study the development of turbulence in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. Incompressible RT and RM instabilities are studied in an apparatus in which a box containing two unequal density liquids is accelerated on a linear rail system either impulsively (by bouncing it off of a spring) to produce RM instability, or at a constant downward rate (using a weight and pulley system) to produce RT instability. These experiments are distinguished from others in the field in that they are initialized with well defined, measurable initial perturbations and are well visualized utilizing planar laser induced fluorescence imaging. New experiments are proposed aimed at generating fully turbulent RM and RT instabilities and quantifying the turbulent development once fully turbulent flows are achieved. The proposed experiments focus on the development and the subsequent application of techniques to accelerate the production of fully turbulent instabilities and the quantification of the turbulent instabilities once they are achieved. The proposed tasks include: the development of RM and RT experiments utilizing fluid combinations having larger density ratios than those previously used; the development of RM experiments with larger acceleration impulse than that previously used; and the investigation of the multi-mode and three-dimensional instabilities by the development of new techniques for generating short wavelength initial perturbations. Progress towards fulfilling these goals is currently well on track. Recent results have been obtained on experiments that utilize Faraday resonance for the production of a nearly single-mode three-dimensional perturbation with a short enough wavelength to yield a self-similar instability at late-times. Last year we reported that we can reliably generate Faraday internal waves on the interface in our experimental apparatus by oscillating the tank containing the

  14. Three dimensional simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in gas-curtain shock-tube experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-01-01

    It is not feasible to compute high Reynolds-number (Re) turbulent flows by directly resolving all scales of motion and material interfaces; instead, macroscale portions of the unsteady turbulent motion are computed while the rest of the flow physics including molecular diffusion and other micro scale physics (e.g., combustion) remains unresolved. In large eddy simulation (LES), the large energy containing structures are resolved whereas the smaller, presumably more isotropic, structures are filtered out and their unresolved subgrid scale (SGS) effects are modeled. The construction of SGS models for LES is pragmatic and based primarily on empirical information. Adding to the physics based difficulties in developing and validating SGS models, truncation terms due to discretization are comparable to SGS models in typical LES strategies, and LES resolution requirements become prohibitively expensive for practical flows and regimes. Implicit LES (ILES) - and monotone integrated LES (MILES) introduced earlier, effectively address the seemingly insurmountable issues posed to LES by underresolution, by relying on the use of SGS modeling and filtering provided implicitly by physics capturing numerics. Extensive work has demonstrated that predictive unresolved simulations of turbulent velocity fields are possible using any of the class of nonoscillatory finite-volume (NFV) numerical algorithms. Popular NFV methods such as flux-corrected transport (FCT), the piecewise parabolic method (PPM), total variation diminishing (TVD), and hybrid algorithms are being used for ILES. In many applications of interest, turbulence is generated by shock waves via Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities (RMI). The instability results in vorticity being introduced at material interfaces by the impulsive loading of the shock wave. A critical feature of this impulsive driving is that the turbulence decays as dissipation removes kinetic energy from the system. RMI add the complexity of shock waves and

  15. Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with an imposed, random initial perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklashvili, Vladimer

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied in vertical shock tube experiment. The instability is initiated by the passage of an incident shock wave over an interface between two dissimilar gases. The interface is formed by opposed gas flows in which air and SF6 enter the shock tube from the top and from the bottom of the shock tube driven section. The gases exit the test section through a series of small holes in the test section side walls, leaving behind a flat, diffuse membrane-free interface at that location. Random three-dimensional perturbations are imposed on the interface by oscillating the column of gases in the vertical direction, using two loud speakers mounted in the shock tube wall. The development of the turbulent mixing is observed as a result of the shock-interface interaction. The flow is visualized using planar Mie scattering in which the light from a laser sheet is scattered by smoke particles seeded in one of the experimental gases and image sequences are captured using high-speed CMOS cameras. The primary interest of the study is the determination of the growth rate of the turbulent mixing layer that develops after an impulsive acceleration of the perturbed interface between the two gases (air/SF6) by a weak M=1.2 incident shock wave. Measurements of the mixing layer width following the initial shock interaction show a power law growth h˜ tthetasimilar to the those observed in previous experiments and simulations with theta ≈ 0.40. The experiments reveal that the growth rate of the mixing width significantly varies from one experiment to another. This is attributed to the influence of initial perturbations imposed on the interface. However, better consistency for the mixing layer growth rate is obtained from the mixing generated by the reflected shock wave. A novel approach that is based on mass and linear momentum conservation laws in the moving reference frame leads to a new definition of the spike and bubble mixing layer widths, which

  16. Generation of plane shocks using intense heavy ion beams: Application to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Stoehlker, Th.; Shutov, A.; Zharkov, A. P.; Piriz, A. R.

    2011-03-15

    A design of a novel experiment that allows the generation of a well defined, steady, and strong plane shock wave employing an intense uranium ion beam that is incident on a wedge shaped compound target is presented. This technique will open up the possibility of carrying out unique high energy density physics experiments using these shock waves. One such experiment is to study the growth of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in fluids as well as in solids, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes, as shown by detailed numerical simulations presented in this paper. The ion beam parameters used in this study correspond to those that will be available at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt.

  17. Simultaneous PIV/PLIF measurements of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities from single- and multi-mode perturbed interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo; Wilson, Brandon; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    To support validation of RANS and LES codes for single-interface Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing, the Extreme Fluids Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory commissioned a Vertical Shock Tube. This facility has the capability of generating statistically stationary single- and multi-mode spatial perturbations on the fluid interface prior to shock-interface interaction. The present study focuses on comparing the evolution of shock-driven mixing under two different spatial perturbation conditions after interacting with a M = 1.2 shock wave. High resolution simultaneous PIV and PLIF are used for capturing 2D instantaneous realizations of velocity and density at different stages of the evolving interface. Multiple realizations of the flow at each one of these evolution stages are obtained to characterize the flow statistically. Also, a modal analysis via Singular Value Decomposition is performed on the density and velocity fields to elucidate the role of initial flow scales content on the transition to turbulent mixing.

  18. Scaling Laws of Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Two and Three Dimensions (IFSA 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvarts, D.; Oron, D.; Kartoon, D.; Rikanati, A.; Sadot, O.; Srebro, Y.; Yedvab, Y.; Ofer, D.; Levin, A.; Sarid, E.; Ben-Dor, G.; Erez, L.; Erez, G.; Yosef-Hai, A.; Alon, U.; Arazi, L.

    2016-10-01

    The late-time nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities for random initial perturbations is investigated using a statistical mechanics model based on single-mode and bubble-competition physics at all Atwood numbers (A) and full numerical simulations in two and three dimensions. It is shown that the RT mixing zone bubble and spike fronts evolve as h ~ α · A · gt2 with different values of a for the bubble and spike fronts. The RM mixing zone fronts evolve as h ~ tθ with different values of θ for bubbles and spikes. Similar analysis yields a linear growth with time of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing zone. The dependence of the RT and RM scaling parameters on A and the dimensionality will be discussed. The 3D predictions are found to be in good agreement with recent Linear Electric Motor (LEM) experiments.

  19. Feedout coupling of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in stratified, radiation-driven foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitherman, D. Palmer; Chrien, Robert E.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; Magelssen, Glenn R.

    1999-03-01

    Coupling between Richtmyer-Meshkov- and Rayleigh-Taylor-unstable surfaces of indirectly driven, stratified, planar foils composed of an aluminum ablator and a beryllium payload carrying a machined initial perturbation was studied using radiographic techniques. The beryllium was transparent to the x-ray backlighter, allowing clear observation of the perturbation transport into the aluminum. The maximum perturbation amplitude (areal-mass difference) was smaller in the aluminum/beryllium foils than in equivalent pure aluminum foils, which could have been the result of shorter growth time, a lower differential acceleration coupling, or the density discontinuity at the aluminum/beryllium interface. Second and third harmonics were not observed in the composite foils.

  20. Experimental investigation of the compressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from a broad-spectrum, multimode initial perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, D.; Peyser, T.; Miller, P.; Logory, L.; Stry, P.; Burke, E., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Experiments have been conducted using the Nova laser system to investigate the growth of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability resuling from a strong shock wave (M{approximately}30) crossing a prescribed well-defined initial multimode perturbation. The perturbation was a 100 mode superposition of 1 {micro}m amplitude sine waves with randomly generated phases between 0 and 2{pi}. The two working fluids were fluidized brominated plastic and carbon resorcinol foam, giving a post-shock Atwood number of approximately 0.6. The present experimental results give a power-law coefficient of 0.87 {+-} 0.2 for the growth of the interface. This value is higher than results previously published.

  1. The feed-out process: Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in thin, laser-driven foils

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, D.P.

    1998-04-01

    Eight beams carrying a shaped pulse from the NOVA laser were focused into a hohlraum with a total energy of about 25 kJ. A planar foil was placed on the side of the hohlraum with perturbations facing away from the hohlraum. All perturbations were 4 {micro}m in amplitude and 50 {micro}m in wavelength. Three foils of pure aluminum were shot with thicknesses and pulse lengths respectively of 86 {micro}m and 2. 2 ns, 50 {micro}m and 4.5 ns, and 35 {micro}m with both 2.2 ns and 4. 5 ns pulses. Two composite foils constructed respectively of 32 and 84 {micro}m aluminum on the ablative side and 10 {micro}m beryllium on the cold surface were also shot using the 2.2 ns pulse. X-ray framing cameras recorded perturbation growth using both face- and side-on radiography. The LASNEX code was used to model the experiments. A shock wave interacted with the perturbation on the cold surface generating growth from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and a strong acoustic mode. The cold surface perturbation fed-out to the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable ablation surface, both by differential acceleration and interface coupling, where it grew. A density jump did not appear to have a large effect on feed-out from interface coupling. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability`s vortex pairs overtook and reversed the direction of flow of the Richtmyer-Meshkov vortices, resulting in the foil moving from a sinuous to a bubble and spike configuration. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability may have acted as an ablative instability on the hot surface, and as a classical instability on the cold surface, on which grew second and third order harmonics.

  2. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a "V" shaped air/helium interface subjected to a weak shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhigang; Dong, Ping; Si, Ting; Luo, Xisheng

    2016-08-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a "V" shaped air/helium gaseous interface subjected to a weak shock wave is experimentally studied. A soap film technique is adopted to create a "V" shaped interface with accurate initial conditions. Five kinds of air/helium "V" shaped interfaces with different vertex angles (60°, 90°, 120°, 140°, and 160°), i.e., different amplitude-wavelength ratios, are formed to highlight the effects of initial conditions, especially the initial amplitude, on the flow characteristics. The interface morphologies identified by the high-speed schlieren photography show that a spike is generated from the vertex after the shock impact, and grows constantly with time accompanied by the occurrence of the phase reversal. As the vertex angle increases, vortices generated on the interface become less noticeable, and the spike develops less pronouncedly. The linear growth rate of the interface mixing width of a heavy/light interface configuration after compression phase is estimated by a linear model and a revised linear model, and the latter is proven to be more effective for the interface with high initial amplitudes. It is found for the first time in a heavy/light interface configuration that the linear growth rate of interface width is a non-monotonous function of the initial perturbation amplitude-wavelength ratio. In the nonlinear stage, it is confirmed that the width growth rate of interface with high initial amplitudes can be well predicted by a model proposed by Dimonte and Ramaprabhu ["Simulations and model of the nonlinear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability," Phys. Fluids 22, 014104 (2010)].

  3. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the 3D single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) (Commun. Pure Appl. Math 23, 297-319, 1960; Izv. Akad. Nauk. SSSR Maekh. Zhidk. Gaza. 4, 151-157, 1969) occurs due to an impulsive acceleration acting on a perturbed interface between two fluids of different densities. In the experiments presented in this thesis, single mode 3D RMI experiments are performed. An oscillating speaker generates a single mode sinusoidal initial perturbation at an interface of two gases, air and SF6. A Mach 1.19 shock wave accelerates the interface and generates the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability. Both gases are seeded with propylene glycol particles which are illuminated by an Nd: YLF pulsed laser. Three high-speed video cameras record image sequences of the experiment. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is applied to measure the velocity field. Measurements of the amplitude for both spike and bubble are obtained, from which the growth rate is measured. For both spike and bubble experiments, amplitude and growth rate match the linear stability theory at early time, but fall into a non-linear region with amplitude measurements lying between the modified 3D Sadot et al. model ( Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 1654-1657, 1998) and the Zhang & Sohn model (Phys. Fluids 9. 1106-1124, 1997; Z. Angew. Math Phys 50. 1-46, 1990) at late time. Amplitude and growth rate curves are found to lie above the modified 3D Sadot et al. model and below Zhang & Sohn model for the spike experiments. Conversely, for the bubble experiments, both amplitude and growth rate curves lie above the Zhang & Sohn model, and below the modified 3D Sadot et al. model. Circulation is also calculated using the vorticity and velocity fields from the PIV measurements. The calculated circulation are approximately equal and found to grow with time, a result that differs from the modified Jacobs and Sheeley's circulation model (Phys. Fluids 8, 405-415, 1996).

  4. Application of a Two-Scale Turbulence Transport Model to Mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliason, Donald; Cabot, William; Zhou, Ye; Rubinstein, Robert

    2002-11-01

    Turbulent mixing of the fluids in a multi-component system is of interest in situations such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and core-collapse supernovae [1]. We report results of a project to include a model of turbulent mixing in a multi-component hydrodynamics and physics model called KULL, which is used for ICF. Because KULL is a complex, multi-dimensional model, we have developed a simplified, one-dimensional version called sKULL to speed-up the development of the turbulent mixing model. Of primary interest in the development of a turbulent mixing model for a multi-component fluid is the question of whether it is necessary to allow each component of the fluid to retain its own velocity. Generally a multi-component, multi-velocity turbulent mixing model should allow separate velocities for each component of the fluid[2]. However, the necessity to carry separate velocities for each component of the fluid greatly increases the memory requirements and complexity of the computer implementation. In contrast, we present a new two-scale formulation of the K-epsilon turbulent mixing model, with production terms based on a recent scaling analysis, which treats all components of the fluid as if they had the same velocity. We also show that our new method for the initial conditions of the uncoupled two-scale K-epsilon model yields asymptotic growth, and that the growth of the inferred turbulence length scale is consistent with measured mix width growth from Rayleigh-Taylor experiments. Further comparisons will be made of results from the turbulent mixing model with Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments. *This study was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48. [1] Remington, B. A., D. Arnett, R. P. Drake, and H. Takabe, Modeling astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory with intense lasers, Science, 284, 1488 (1999). [2] Youngs, D. L., Numerical simulation of

  5. Testing an analytic model for Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, K. O.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a model for the evolution of the turbulent mixing width after a shock or a reshock passes through the interface between two fluids of densities and inducing a velocity jump . In this model, the initial growth rate is independent of the surface finish or initial mixing width , but its duration is directly proportional to it: for , and for . Here is the Atwood number and are dimensionless, -dependent parameters measured in past Rayleigh-Taylor experiments, and is a new dimensionless parameter we introduce via . The mixing width and its derivative remain continuous at since and . We evaluate at from air/SF experiments and propose that the transition at signals isotropication of turbulence. We apply this model to the recent experiments of Jacobs et al. (Shock Waves 23:407-413, 2013) on shock and reshock, and discuss briefly the third wave causing an unstable acceleration of the interface. We also consider the experiments of Weber et al. (Phys Fluids 24:074105, 2012) and argue that their smaller growth rates reflect density gradient stabilization.

  6. Analytical and numerical study on a vortex sheet in incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Chihiro; Nishihara, Katsunobu

    2006-12-01

    Motion of a fluid interface in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cylindrical geometry is examined analytically and numerically. Nonlinear stability analysis is performed in order to clarify the dependence of growth rates of a bubble and spike on the Atwood number and mode number n involved in the initial perturbations. We discuss differences of weakly and fully nonlinear evolution in cylindrical geometry from that in planar geometry. It is shown that the analytical growth rates coincide well with the numerical ones up to the neighborhood of the break down of numerical computations. Long-time behavior of the fluid interface as a vortex sheet is numerically investigated by using the vortex method and the roll up of the vortex sheet is discussed for different Atwood numbers. The temporal evolution of the curvature of a bubble and spike for several mode numbers is investigated and presented that the curvature of spikes is always larger than that of bubbles. The circulation and the strength of the vortex sheet at the fully nonlinear stage are discussed, and it is shown that their behavior is different for the cases that the inner fluid is heavier than the outer one and vice versa.

  7. An experimental study of the turbulent development of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with a random initial perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklashvili, Vladimer; Lokhatchev, Oleg; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is studied in a vertical shock tube experiment. The instability is observed between two gases of different densities accelerated by an incident planar shock wave. The stable stratification of the gases is created by introducing air seeded with smoke through a plenum at the top of the driven section, and SF6 through a plenum at the bottom. The gases are oscillated vertically using two loud speakers, located at the top and bottom of the driven section. Faraday waves created on the interface of the two gases results in a random initial perturbation from which the RM instability develops. The current study focuses on the development of the turbulent mixing layer width following the shock-interface interaction. In past experiments, a variety of growth behaviors has been observed. In some experiments the mixing layer width initially grows rapidly and then saturates later on. Other experiments have more gradual, almost linear growth behavior. In the new experiments views of the initial perturbation are captured along with the growth behavior in order to determine the effects of initial conditions on the mixing layers width's development.

  8. Model experiment of magnetic field amplification in laser-produced plasmas via the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Ohnishi, N.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Tanji, H.; Ide, T.; Nishio, K.; Gregory, C. D.; Waugh, J. N.; Booth, N.; Heathcote, R.; Murphy, C.; Gregori, G.; Smallcombe, J.; Barton, C.; Dizière, A.; Koenig, M.; Woolsey, N.; Matsumoto, Y.; Mizuta, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Matsukiyo, S.; Moritaka, T.; Sano, T.; Takabe, H.

    2016-03-01

    A model experiment of magnetic field amplification (MFA) via the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in supernova remnants (SNRs) was performed using a high-power laser. In order to account for very-fast acceleration of cosmic rays observed in SNRs, it is considered that the magnetic field has to be amplified by orders of magnitude from its background level. A possible mechanism for the MFA in SNRs is stretching and mixing of the magnetic field via the RMI when shock waves pass through dense molecular clouds in interstellar media. In order to model the astrophysical phenomenon in laboratories, there are three necessary factors for the RMI to be operative: a shock wave, an external magnetic field, and density inhomogeneity. By irradiating a double-foil target with several laser beams with focal spot displacement under influence of an external magnetic field, shock waves were excited and passed through the density inhomogeneity. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations show that the RMI evolves as the density inhomogeneity is shocked, resulting in higher MFA.

  9. Numerical simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in solid-vacuum interfaces using calibrated plasticity laws.

    PubMed

    López Ortega, A; Lombardini, M; Pullin, D I; Meiron, D I

    2014-03-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of interfaces separating elastic-plastic materials from vacuum (heavy-light configuration) is studied by means of computational techniques. A fully Eulerian multimaterial algorithm that solves consistently the Euler equations and the time evolution of the deformations in the material is applied to three distinct materials (copper, aluminum, and stainless steel). If a perfectly plastic constitutive relation is considered, an empirical law is computed that relates the long-term perturbation amplitude of the interface, its maximum growth rate, the initial density, and the yield stress of the material. It is shown that this linear relation can be extended to materials that follow more complex plastic behavior which can account for rate dependency, hardening, and thermal softening, and to situations in which small-perturbation theory is no longer valid. In effect, the yield stress computed from measurements of the long-term amplitude and maximum growth rate closely matches the von Mises stress found at the interface of solid materials for a wide range of cases with different initial parameters.

  10. Model experiment of magnetic field amplification in laser-produced plasmas via the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y. Moritaka, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Sano, T.; Tanji, H.; Ide, T.; Nishio, K.; Gregory, C. D.; Waugh, J. N.; Smallcombe, J.; Barton, C.; Woolsey, N.; Booth, N.; Heathcote, R.; Murphy, C.; Gregori, G.; Dizière, A.; Koenig, M.; and others

    2016-03-15

    A model experiment of magnetic field amplification (MFA) via the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in supernova remnants (SNRs) was performed using a high-power laser. In order to account for very-fast acceleration of cosmic rays observed in SNRs, it is considered that the magnetic field has to be amplified by orders of magnitude from its background level. A possible mechanism for the MFA in SNRs is stretching and mixing of the magnetic field via the RMI when shock waves pass through dense molecular clouds in interstellar media. In order to model the astrophysical phenomenon in laboratories, there are three necessary factors for the RMI to be operative: a shock wave, an external magnetic field, and density inhomogeneity. By irradiating a double-foil target with several laser beams with focal spot displacement under influence of an external magnetic field, shock waves were excited and passed through the density inhomogeneity. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations show that the RMI evolves as the density inhomogeneity is shocked, resulting in higher MFA.

  11. Validating equation of state models in the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov regime for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Eric; Braun, Dave; Batha, Steve; Sorce, Charles; Landen, Otto

    2011-10-01

    Recent simulations have shown that isolated features on the outer surface of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition capsules can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to mixing in the hotspot. Controlling the growth of these artifacts is complicated due to uncertainties in equation of state (EOS) models used in simulation codes. Here we report on measurements pertaining to the growth of isolated defects due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules in order to validate these models. Face-on transmission radiography was used to measure the evolution of Gaussian bump arrays in plastic targets. Au halfraums heated to radiation temperatures near 70 eV using 15 beams in a 5 ns pulse from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY) indirectly drove the samples. Shock speed measurements made with Omega's Active Shock BreakOut (ASBO) diagnostic in conjunction with the x-ray flux recorded by a soft x-ray power diagnostic (DANTE) were used to determine drive conditions in the target. These measurements show that SESAME 7592 is in closer agreement with shock speed and bump growth data compared to LEOS 5310.

  12. Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation from rear target ripples in plastic and plastic/aluminum laser targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental observations of jets produced from the rear surface of laser targets after a passage of the laser-driven shock wave. As in our previous work, Aglitskiy et al., Phys. Plasmas (2012), the jets are produced via the shaped-charge mechanism, a manifestation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a particular case of the Atwood number A =-1. The experiments done on the KrF Nike laser facility with laser wavelength 248 nm, a 4 ns pulse, and low-energy drive regime that used only 1 to 3 overlapping Nike beams and generated ablative pressure below 1 Mbar. Our 50 um thick planar targets were rippled on the rear side with wavelength 45 μm and peak-to-valley amplitude 15 μm. The targets were made either of solid plastic or of aluminum with a 10 μm thick plastic ablator attached to avoid the radiation preheat. The jets were extremely well collimated, which made possible our side-on observations with monochromatic x-ray imaging. We saw a regular set of jets, clearly separated along the 500 μm line of sight. Aluminum jets were found to be slightly better collimated than plastic jets. A quasi-spherical late-time expansion of Al jets starting from the tips has not been previously seen in experiments or simulations. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  13. Effect of a relative phase of waves constituting the initial perturbation and the wave interference on the dynamics of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Arun; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2017-07-01

    While it is a common wisdom that initial conditions influence the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), the research in this area is focused primarily on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation. The information has hitherto largely ignored the influences on RMI dynamics of the relative phase of waves constituting a multiwave initial perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves. In this work we systematically study the influence of the relative phase and the interference of waves constituting a multiwave initial perturbation on a strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface separating ideal fluids with contrast densities. We apply group theory analysis and smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulations. For verification and validation of the simulations, qualitative and quantitative comparisons are performed with rigorous zeroth-order, linear, and nonlinear theories as well as with gas dynamics experiments achieving good agreement. For a sample case of a two-wave (two-mode) initial perturbation we select the first-wave amplitude enabling the maximum initial growth rate of the RMI and we vary the second-wave amplitude from 1% to 100% of the first-wave amplitude. We also vary the relative phase of the first and second waves and consider the in-phase, the antiphase and the random-phase cases. We find that the relative phase and the interference of waves are important factors of RMI dynamics influencing qualitatively and quantitatively the symmetry, morphology, and growth rate of the Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface, as well as the order and disorder in strong-shock-driven RMI.

  14. Bump evolution driven by the x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov effect in plastic inertial confinement fusion Ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Eric; Braun, Dave; Batha, Steven H.; Landen, Otto L.

    2013-11-01

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities are a primary concern for the ICF program. Recently, observed jetting and parasitic mix into the fuel were attributed to isolated defects on the outer surface of the capsule. Strategies for mitigation of these defects exist, however, they require reduced uncertainties in Equation of State (EOS) models prior to invoking them. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (bumps) due to x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov in plastic ablators to validate these models. Experiments used hohlraums with radiation temperatures near 70 eV driven by 15 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sent a ˜1.25Mbar shock into a planar CH target placed over one laser entrance hole. Targets consisted of 2-D arrays of quasi-gaussian bumps (10 microns tall, 34 microns FWHM) deposited on the surface facing into the hohlraum. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα - 2.76keV) backlighter was used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements were also performed to determine target conditions. Simulations using the LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 models required the simulated laser power be turned down to 80 and 88%, respectively to match observed shock speeds. Both LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 simulations agreed with measured bump areal densities out to 6 ns where ablative RM oscillations were observed in previous laser-driven experiments, but did not occur in the x-ray driven case. The QEOS model, conversely, over predicted shock speeds and under predicted areal density in the bump.

  15. Effect of compressibility on the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced nonlinear structure at two fluid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M. R.; Roy, Sourav; Khan, Manoranjan; Pant, H. C.; Sarkar, Susmita; Srivastava, M. K.

    2009-03-15

    The effect of compressibility and of density variation on Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of the temporal development of two fluid interfacial structures such as bubbles and spikes have been investigated. It is seen that the velocity of the tip of the bubble or spike increases (destabilization) if the local Atwood number increases due to density variation of either of the fluids. The opposite is the result, i.e., the bubble or spike tip velocity decreases (stabilization) if the density variation leads to lowering of the value of the local Atwood number. The magnitude of stabilization or destabilization is an increasing function of the product of the wave number k and interfacial pressure p{sub 0}. The effect of compressibility is quite varied. If the heavier (upper) fluid alone is incompressible ({gamma}{sub h}{yields}{infinity}), but the lighter fluid is compressible the growth rate is higher (destabilization) than when both the fluids are incompressible. Moreover the heavier fluid remaining incompressible the growth rate decreases (stabilization) as {gamma}{sub l} (finite) increases and ultimately tends to the incompressible limit value as {gamma}{sub l}{yields}{infinity}. With {gamma}{sub l}{yields}{infinity} but {gamma}{sub h} finite the growth increases (destabilization) as {gamma}{sub h} increases. When both {gamma}{sub h} and {gamma}{sub l} are finite (density {rho}{sub h}>density {rho}{sub l}) the growth is reduced when {gamma}{sub h}<{gamma}{sub l} compared to that when both fluids are incompressible and enhanced when {gamma}{sub h}>{gamma}{sub l}. The set of nonlinear equations describing the dynamics of bubbles and spikes in the presence of fluid density variations are not analytically integrable in closed form. The results derived by numerical solution methods are represented and interpreted in corresponding figures.

  16. Reshocks, rarefactions, and the generalized Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2008-06-10

    We report numerical simulations and analytic modeling of shock tube experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We examine single interfaces of the type A/B where the incident shock is initiated in A and the transmitted shock proceeds into B. Examples are He/air and air/He. In addition, we study finite-thickness or double-interface A/B/A configurations like air/SF{sub 6}/air gas-curtain experiments. We first consider conventional shock tubes that have a 'fixed' boundary: A solid endwall which reflects the transmitted shock and reshocks the interface(s). Then we focus on new experiments with a 'free' boundary--a membrane disrupted mechanically or by the transmitted shock, sending back a rarefaction towards the interface(s). Complex acceleration histories are achieved, relevant for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. We compare our simulation results with a generalized Layzer model for two fluids with time-dependent densities, and derive a new freeze-out condition whereby accelerating and compressive forces cancel each other out. Except for the recently reported failures of the Layzer model, the generalized Layzer model and hydrocode simulations for reshocks and rarefactions agree well with each other, and remain to be verified experimentally.

  17. Three dimensional hydrodynamic calculations with adaptive mesh refinement of the evolution of Rayleigh Taylor and Richtmyer Meshkov instabilities in converging geometry: Multi-mode perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. |; Bell, J.; Pember, R.; Kelleher, T.

    1993-04-01

    The authors present results for high resolution hydrodynamic calculations of the growth and development of instabilities in shock driven imploding spherical geometries in both 2D and 3D. They solve the Eulerian equations of hydrodynamics with a high order Godunov approach using local adaptive mesh refinement to study the temporal and spatial development of the turbulent mixing layer resulting from both Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. The use of a high resolution Eulerian discretization with adaptive mesh refinement permits them to study the detailed three-dimensional growth of multi-mode perturbations far into the non-linear regime for converging geometries. They discuss convergence properties of the simulations by calculating global properties of the flow. They discuss the time evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and compare its development to a simple theory for a turbulent mix model in spherical geometry based on Plesset`s equation. Their 3D calculations show that the constant found in the planar incompressible experiments of Read and Young`s may not be universal for converging compressible flow. They show the 3D time trace of transitional onset to a mixing state using the temporal evolution of volume rendered imaging. Their preliminary results suggest that the turbulent mixing layer loses memory of its initial perturbations for classical Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities in spherically imploding shells. They discuss the time evolution of mixed volume fraction and the role of vorticity in converging 3D flows in enhancing the growth of a turbulent mixing layer.

  18. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Torczynski, John R.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-08-14

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Here, fully resolved two-dimensional DSMC RTI simulations are performed to quantify the growth of flat and single-mode perturbed interfaces between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases as a function of the Atwood number and the gravitational acceleration. The DSMC simulations reproduce all qualitative features of the RTI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models in the linear, nonlinear, and self-similar regimes. At late times, the instability is seen to exhibit a self-similar behavior, in agreement with experimental observations. For the conditions simulated, diffusion can influence the initial instability growth significantly.

  19. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    DOE PAGES

    Gallis, Michail A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Torczynski, John R.; ...

    2015-08-14

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Here, fully resolved two-dimensional DSMC RTI simulations are performed to quantify the growth of flat and single-mode perturbed interfaces between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases as a function of the Atwood number and the gravitational acceleration. The DSMC simulations reproduce all qualitative features of the RTI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models in the linear, nonlinear, and self-similar regimes. At late times, the instability is seen to exhibit a self-similar behavior, in agreement with experimental observations. Formore » the conditions simulated, diffusion can influence the initial instability growth significantly.« less

  20. Analytical model and MD simulation of nonlinear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Katsunobu; Abe, Motomi; Fukuda, Yuko; Zhakhovskii, Vasilii; Matsuoka, Chihiro

    2001-10-01

    We present two topics, an analytical model and moelrcular dynamic (MD) simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshokov instability (RMI). We have developled a selfconsistent analytical model that describes a nonlinear evolution of a vortex sheet in the two-dimensional RMI. The model consists of two kinematic boundary conditions, a modified Birkhoff-Rott equation and an equation for time evolution of circulation at the interface with a finite Atwood number. It is shown that the created vortcity on the interface has strong inhomogeneity, that causes locally streching and compression of the sheet. We discuss the dependence of the Atwood number on the nonlinear dynamics of the sheet. MD approache has been applied for converging shocks and RMI in a dense Lennard-Jones fluid in cylindrical geometry. MD method has fundamental advantages over hydrodymanic simulations such as no limitation of resolution in turbulent state. The appearance of Mach stems in the rippled shocks and turbulent mixing in RMI have been observed when the reflected shock passes through the unstable surface again. We discuss the mode number and Mach number dependence on the mixing.

  1. Numerical simulation of multi-material mixing in an inclined interface Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, high fidelity simulations of shock induced multi-material mixing between air and SF6 in a shock tube are performed for a Mach 1.5 shock interacting with a planar material interface that is inclined with respect to the shock propagating direction. In the current configuration, unlike the classical perturbed flat interface case, the evolution of the interface is fully non-linear from early time. The simulations attempt to replicate an experiment conducted at the Georgia Tech STAML. Tight coupling between numerics and flow physics and the large range of spatial scales make this a challenging problem to simulate numerically. Often, two dimensional simulations are performed to reduce the computational cost of these simulations. We show here that the effect of small three dimensional perturbations likely to be present in an experimental setting is not negligible. Full 3D simulations would have to be performed to do a proper comparison with experiments. Effect of grid resolution is also studied in the present work. Simulations shown are conducted with an extended version of the Miranda solver developed by Cook et. al [1] which combines high-order compact finite differences [2] with localized non-linear artificial properties for shock and interface capturing [3].

  2. Preliminary results of the redesigned Reshock experiment at the OMEGA laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Tiffany; di Stefano, Carlos; Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Flippo, Kirk; Kline, John

    2016-10-01

    The redesigned LANL OMEGA Reshock campaign is exploring the effects of turbulent mixing due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability as part of an ongoing effort to assess the LANL radiation-hydrocode the BHR mix model in the high-energy density regime. Platform improvements have been made to increase the precision of the instability growth measurements. The experiments are conducted in similar geometry to the previous Reshock campaigns. A cylindrical beryllium tube is filled with a low-density CH-foam (ρ 100-150 mg/cc) and a higher density tracer layer that is displaced from an endcap. Two tracer materials have been tested: a low-density plastic (ρ0 = 1.5 g/cc) layer 40µm thick, and an HDC layer (ρ0 = 3.2 g/cc) 15 µm thick. The tracer layers have been ρr matched to the previously used aluminum tracer (ρ0 = 2.43 g/cc). In this platform two shockwaves are generated from opposite ends of the shock tube by a 5 kJ laser pulse, with time delay Δt 3-6ns between them. The primary shockwave generates the initial mixing between the tracer layer and surrounding foam. The second shock leads to a compression of the initial mix layer and to increased turbulence. We will present both initial design simulations for shock timing and tracer choice and preliminary data from the first shot day.

  3. A platform for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in a planar geometry at high energy density at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Raman, K. S.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Barrios, M. A.; Baumann, T.; Bender, J. D.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Felker, S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Flippo, K. A.; Holder, J. P.; Kaczala, D. N.; Perry, T. S.; Seugling, R. M.; Savage, L.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-07-01

    A new experimental platform has been developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities in a planar geometry at high-energy-densities. The platform uses 60 beams of the NIF laser to drive an initially solid shock tube containing a pre-machined interface between dense and light materials. The strong shock turns the initially solid target into a plasma and the material boundary into a fluid interface with the imprinted initial condition. The interface evolves by action of the RT and RM instabilities, and the growth is imaged with backlit x-ray radiography. We present our first data involving sinusoidal interface perturbations driven from the heavy side to the light side. Late-time radiographic images show the initial conditions reaching the deeply nonlinear regime, and an evolution of fine structure consistent with a transition to turbulence. We show preliminary comparisons with post-shot numerical simulations and discuss the implications for future campaigns.

  4. Velocity measurements within a shock and reshock induced air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane; Joly, Laurent; Shock-induced mixing Team

    2012-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a shock tube (based in ISAE, DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a 1 μm thick plastic microfilm maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid of square spacing 1.8 mm imposes the nonlinear initial perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After interaction with a reshock and a rarefaction, the TMZ remains approximately stagnant but much more turbulent. High speed Schlieren visualizations enable the choice of abscissae for Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV) measurements. For a length of the SF6 section equal to 250 mm, the LDV abscissae are 43, 135 and 150 mm from the initial position of the interface. Because of numerous microfilm fragments in the flow and a limited number of olive oil droplets as seeding particles for the LDV, statistical convergence requires the superposition of a least 50 identical runs at each abscissa. The dependence of TMZ structure and velocity field on length of the SF6 section between 100 and 300 mm will be presented. This experimental investigation is carried out in support of modeling and multidimensional simulation efforts at CEA, DAM, DIF. Financial support from CEA is thanksfully appreciated by ISAE.

  5. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF_{6}-air interface with a minimum-surface feature.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF_{6}-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  6. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF6-air interface with a minimum-surface feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF6-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  7. Experimental investigation of reshocked spherical gas interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Yang, Jiming; Luo, Xisheng

    2012-05-01

    The evolution of a spherical gas interface under reshock conditions is experimentally studied using the high-speed schlieren photography with high time resolutions. A number of experimental sets of helium or SF6 bubble surrounded by air for seven different end wall distances have been performed. Distinct flow structures are observed due to the additional vorticity and wave configuration caused by the reshock. In the air/helium case, the deformation of the reshocked bubble is dependent on the development of the penetrating air jet along the symmetry axis of the bubble. In general, two separate vortex rings can be observed, i.e., one develops slowly, and the other approaches and eventually impinges on the shock tube end wall. In the air/SF6 case, two SF6 jets moving in opposite directions are generated and the oscillation of the interface is observed for small end wall distances, while small scale vortex morphologies on the gas interface are found for large end wall distances. The physical mechanisms of the baroclinic vorticity generation and the pressure perturbation are highlighted in the interface evolution process. Based on the sequence of the schlieren images obtained during a single run for each case, the x-t diagrams of the shock and reshock interacting with the helium or SF6 bubble are plotted and the velocities estimated in linear stages are compared with those calculated from one-dimensional gas dynamics. The changes with time in the characteristic bubble sizes including the interface length, height, and vortex diameter are also measured.

  8. The Reshock and Release Waves in PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanov, S. M.; Bordzilovsky, S. A.

    1999-06-01

    To study the deformation and destruction of PTFE polymer the specimens were loaded by the complex wave structure: shock, reshock and release wave. The transmitted stress-time profiles were recorded with the manganin gages. The Lagrange analysis of stress histories gave the stress-volume paths during reshock loading and unloading of PTFE in the stress range of 10 to 35 GPa. The data revealed the viscoelastic behavior typical for polymers. For a single shock loading the relaxation zone with the duration of about 0.3 μs was noticeable behind the first stress jump. The reshock-release stress pulse that started from the state behind the first shock attenuated with the rate greater than in hydrodynamic approximation. The correlation was noticed between the stress-time and electrical resistivity-time profiles in the relaxation zone. The reloading-unloading stress hysteresis gave the possibility to measure the critical shear stress (τ) in a shocked state. The data showed the decrease in τ at higher stresses. The authors suggested that the most probable mechanism of destruction of PTFE in the studied region of pressures and temperatures is thermodestruction of a polymer chain by the thermal fluctuations under load.

  9. Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability: Theory and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V.N.; Gotchev, O.V.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Skupsky, S.; Cherfils-Clerouin, C.

    2006-06-28

    Rayleigh–Taylor instability, the main source of symmetry degradation in ICF experiments, is seeded at the early stage of an implosion, during the shock transit through the shell. The ablation-front nonuniformities at such a time can be amplified by an instability, which is similar to the Richtmyer–Meshkov instability. In the presence of ablation, however, the dynamic overpressure (rocket effect) significantly reduces the perturbation growth. The modes localized inside the conduction zone between the laser-absorption region and the ablation front are totally stabilized. An analytical model is presented to describe the perturbation evolution at the ablation front during the shock propagation time. The model is compared against the results of both the multidimensional simulations and a series of experiments performed on the OMEGA Laser System.

  10. Numerical simulations of the process of multiple shock-flame interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hua; Dong, Gang; chen, Xiao; Wu, Jin-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Based on a weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme, the multiple interactions of a flame interface with an incident shock wave and its reshock waves are numerically simulated by solving the compressible reactive Navier-Stokes equations with a single-step Arrhenius chemical reaction. The two-dimensional sinusoidally perturbed premixed flames with different initial perturbed amplitudes are used to investigate the effect of the initial perturbation on the flame evolutions. The results show that the development of the flame interface is directly affected by the initial perturbed amplitudes before the passages of reshock waves, and the perturbation development is mainly controlled by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After the successive impacts of multiple reshock waves, the chemical reaction accelerates the consumption of reactants and leads to a gradual disappearance of the initial perturbed information. The perturbation developments in frozen flows with the same initial interface as those in reactive flows are also demonstrated. Comparisons of results between the reactive and frozen flows show that a chemical reaction changes the perturbation pattern of the flame interface by decreasing the density gradient, thereby weakening the baroclinic torque in the flame mixing region, and therefore plays a dominant role after the passage of reshock waves.

  11. Two-Dimensional Electrons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    linear electronic specific heat disappears in strong magnetic fields if Landau levels are not broadened. Thus, the amplitude of the magnetothermal...Molec. Crys. Liq. Crys. 121, 169 (1984). In consideration of mixing of low-lying Landau levels, the magneto- conductance of two-dimensional electrons...and narrowing can be explained when the Landau level filling factor v is larger than 1. Actually, we have shown that the resonance phenomena are

  12. Two dimensional vernier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional vernier scale is disclosed utilizing a cartesian grid on one plate member with a polar grid on an overlying transparent plate member. The polar grid has multiple concentric circles at a fractional spacing of the spacing of the cartesian grid lines. By locating the center of the polar grid on a location on the cartesian grid, interpolation can be made of both the X and Y fractional relationship to the cartesian grid by noting which circles coincide with a cartesian grid line for the X and Y direction.

  13. Reshock and Release Response of Lithium Flouride to 21 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, R. Stewart

    2011-06-01

    Lithium Fluoride (LiF) is a material of unparalleled utility in dynamic loading experiments due to its good transparency at high pressure and it's consequent utility as an optical window. In experiments involving reloading and release from initially compressed states, a LiF window can be essential to the measurements but its mechanical properties, such as its strength at high pressure, may complicate interpretation of the results. To address this issue, experiments studying the reshock and release response of [100]-oriented LiF have been conducted for initial shock stresses from 7 to 21 GPa. The combined reshock and release data, interpreted in the context of the self-consistent model [J. R. Asay and J. Lipkin, J. Appl. Phys. 49 (7), 4242--4247, 1978], indicate a substantial increase in the strength of LiF above 7 GPa. A quasi-elastic reloading and unloading behavior similar to other dynamically-compressed solids is observed. Sound velocities in shock compressed LiF have also been measured.

  14. Behaviour of rippled shocks from ablatively-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov in metals accounting for strength

    SciTech Connect

    Opie, S.; Gautam, S.; Fortin, E.; Lynch, J.; Peralta, P.; Loomis, E.

    2016-05-26

    While numerous continuum material strength and phase transformation models have been proposed to capture their complex dependences on intensive properties and deformation history, few experimental methods are available to validate these models particularly in the large pressure and strain rate regime typical of strong shock and ramp dynamic loading. In the experiments and simulations we present, a rippled shock is created by laser-ablation of a periodic surface perturbation on a metal target. The strength of the shock can be tuned to access phase transitions in metals such as iron or simply to study high-pressure strength in isomorphic materials such as copper. Simulations, with models calibrated and validated to the experiments, show that the evolution of the amplitude of imprinted perturbations on the back surface by the rippled shock is strongly affected by strength and phase transformation kinetics. Increased strength has a smoothing effect on the perturbed shock front profile resulting in smaller perturbations on the free surface. Finally, in iron, faster phase transformations kinetics had a similar effect as increased strength, leading to smoother pressure contours inside the samples and smaller amplitudes of free surface perturbations in our simulations.

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities and Mixing in Stratified Cylindrical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2004-04-15

    We study the linear stability of an arbitrary number N of cylindrical concentric shells undergoing a radial implosion or explosion.We derive the evolution equation for the perturbation {eta}{sub i} at interface i; it is coupled to the two adjacent interfaces via {eta}{sub i{+-}1}. For N=2, where there is only one interface, we verify Bell's conjecture as to the form of the evolution equation for arbitrary {rho}{sub 1} and {rho}{sub 2}, the fluid densities on either side of the interface. We obtain several analytic solutions for the N=2 and 3 cases. We discuss freeze-out, a phenomenon that can occur in all three geometries (planar, cylindrical, or spherical), and ''critical modes'' that are stable for any implosion or explosion history and occur only in cylindrical or spherical geometries. We present numerical simulations of possible gelatin-ring experiments illustrating perturbation feedthrough from one interface to another. We also develop a simple model for the evolution of turbulent mix in cylindrical geometry and define a geometrical factor G as the ratio h{sub cylindrical}/h{sub planar} between cylindrical and planar mixing layers. We find that G is a decreasing function of R/R{sub o}, implying that in our model h{sub cylindrical} evolves faster (slower) than h{sub planar} during an implosion (explosion).

  16. Turbulent non-premixed combustion driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshochi, Hilda; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Attal, Nitesh

    2016-11-01

    We report on 3D high resolution numerical simulations of a non-premixed, reacting Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability performed using the FLASH code. In the simulations, a Mach 1.6 shock traverses a diffuse, corrugated material interface separating Hydrogen at 1000 K and Oxygen at 300 K, so that local misalignments between pressure and density gradients induce baroclinic vorticity at the contact line. The vorticity deposition drives the RM instability, which in turn results in combustion and flame formation. We study the evolution of the interface and the flame as the resulting RM instability grows through linear, nonlinear and turbulent stages. We develop a detailed understanding of the effects of heat release and combustion on the underlying flow properties by comparing our results with a baseline non-reacting RM flow. We document the properties of the instability (growth rates, pdfs, spectra) and the flame (scalar dissipation rate, flame surface area, heat release rate) as well as the nature of the coupling between the two. Our findings are relevant to supernovae detonation, knocking in IC engines and scramjet performance, while the underlying flow problem defined here represents a novel canonical framework to understand the broader class of non-premixed turbulent flames.

  17. Behaviour of rippled shocks from ablatively-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov in metals accounting for strength

    DOE PAGES

    Opie, S.; Gautam, S.; Fortin, E.; ...

    2016-05-26

    While numerous continuum material strength and phase transformation models have been proposed to capture their complex dependences on intensive properties and deformation history, few experimental methods are available to validate these models particularly in the large pressure and strain rate regime typical of strong shock and ramp dynamic loading. In the experiments and simulations we present, a rippled shock is created by laser-ablation of a periodic surface perturbation on a metal target. The strength of the shock can be tuned to access phase transitions in metals such as iron or simply to study high-pressure strength in isomorphic materials such asmore » copper. Simulations, with models calibrated and validated to the experiments, show that the evolution of the amplitude of imprinted perturbations on the back surface by the rippled shock is strongly affected by strength and phase transformation kinetics. Increased strength has a smoothing effect on the perturbed shock front profile resulting in smaller perturbations on the free surface. Lastly, in iron, faster phase transformations kinetics had a similar effect as increased strength, leading to smoother pressure contours inside the samples and smaller amplitudes of free surface perturbations in our simulations.« less

  18. Basic Hydrodynamics of Richtmyer-Meshkov-type Growth and Oscillations in the ICF-Relevant Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    density foam targets rippled on the front ( Watari et al. 2008). It is more instructive, however, to see the effect of ablation velocity increase due...152-167. Watari , T., Nakai, M., Azechi, H., Sakaiya, T., Shiraga, H., Shigemori, K., Fujioka, S., Otani, K., Nagai, K., Sunahara, A. & Mima, K. 2008

  19. Single-interface Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing at the Los Alamos Vertical Shock Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Brandon Merrill; Mejia Alvarez, Ricardo; Prestridge, Katherine Philomena

    2016-04-12

    We studied Mach number and initial conditions effects on Richtmyer–Meshkov (RM) mixing by the vertical shock tube (VST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the VST, a perturbed stable light-to-heavy (air–SF6, A=0.64) interface is impulsively accelerated with a shock wave to induce RM mixing. We investigate changes to both large and small scales of mixing caused by changing the incident Mach number (Ma=1.3 and 1.45) and the three-dimensional (3D) perturbations on the interface. Simultaneous density (quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)) and velocity (particle image velocimetry (PIV)) measurements are used to characterize preshock initial conditions and the dynamic shocked interface. Initial conditions and fluid properties are characterized before shock. Using two types of dynamic measurements, time series (N=5 realizations at ten locations) and statistics (N=100 realizations at a single location) of the density and velocity fields, we calculate several mixing quantities. Mix width, density-specific volume correlations, density–vorticity correlations, vorticity, enstrophy, strain, and instantaneous dissipation rate are examined at one downstream location. Results indicate that large-scale mixing, such as the mix width, is strongly dependent on Mach number, whereas small scales are strongly influenced by initial conditions. Lastly, the enstrophy and strain show focused mixing activity in the spike regions.

  20. Single-interface Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing at the Los Alamos Vertical Shock Tube

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, Brandon Merrill; Mejia Alvarez, Ricardo; Prestridge, Katherine Philomena

    2016-04-12

    We studied Mach number and initial conditions effects on Richtmyer–Meshkov (RM) mixing by the vertical shock tube (VST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the VST, a perturbed stable light-to-heavy (air–SF6, A=0.64) interface is impulsively accelerated with a shock wave to induce RM mixing. We investigate changes to both large and small scales of mixing caused by changing the incident Mach number (Ma=1.3 and 1.45) and the three-dimensional (3D) perturbations on the interface. Simultaneous density (quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)) and velocity (particle image velocimetry (PIV)) measurements are used to characterize preshock initial conditions and the dynamic shocked interface.more » Initial conditions and fluid properties are characterized before shock. Using two types of dynamic measurements, time series (N=5 realizations at ten locations) and statistics (N=100 realizations at a single location) of the density and velocity fields, we calculate several mixing quantities. Mix width, density-specific volume correlations, density–vorticity correlations, vorticity, enstrophy, strain, and instantaneous dissipation rate are examined at one downstream location. Results indicate that large-scale mixing, such as the mix width, is strongly dependent on Mach number, whereas small scales are strongly influenced by initial conditions. Lastly, the enstrophy and strain show focused mixing activity in the spike regions.« less

  1. Behaviour of rippled shocks from ablatively-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov in metals accounting for strength

    SciTech Connect

    Opie, S.; Gautam, S.; Fortin, E.; Lynch, J.; Peralta, P.; Loomis, E.

    2016-05-26

    While numerous continuum material strength and phase transformation models have been proposed to capture their complex dependences on intensive properties and deformation history, few experimental methods are available to validate these models particularly in the large pressure and strain rate regime typical of strong shock and ramp dynamic loading. In the experiments and simulations we present, a rippled shock is created by laser-ablation of a periodic surface perturbation on a metal target. The strength of the shock can be tuned to access phase transitions in metals such as iron or simply to study high-pressure strength in isomorphic materials such as copper. Simulations, with models calibrated and validated to the experiments, show that the evolution of the amplitude of imprinted perturbations on the back surface by the rippled shock is strongly affected by strength and phase transformation kinetics. Increased strength has a smoothing effect on the perturbed shock front profile resulting in smaller perturbations on the free surface. Lastly, in iron, faster phase transformations kinetics had a similar effect as increased strength, leading to smoother pressure contours inside the samples and smaller amplitudes of free surface perturbations in our simulations.

  2. Experiments and simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with measured,volumetric initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Everest; Ferguson, Kevin; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Greenough, Jeff; Krivets, Vitaliy

    2016-11-01

    We describe experiments of single-shock Richtmyer-Meskhov Instability (RMI) performed on the shock tube apparatus at the University of Arizona in which the initial conditions are volumetrically imaged prior to shock wave arrival. Initial perturbations play a major role in the evolution of RMI, and previous experimental efforts only capture a single plane of the initial condition. The method presented uses a rastered laser sheet to capture additional images throughout the depth of the initial condition immediately before the shock arrival time. These images are then used to reconstruct a volumetric approximation of the experimental perturbation. Analysis of the initial perturbations is performed, and then used as initial conditions in simulations using the hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Experiments are presented and comparisons are made with simulation results.

  3. Mathematical model of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities for viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Bertrand; Andrews, Malcolm J

    2011-04-01

    We extended the Goncharov model [V. N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002)] for nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of perfect fluids to the case of Rivlin-Ericksen viscoelastic fluids [R. S. Rivlin and J. L. Ericksen, Rat. Mech. Anal. 4, 323 (1955)], with surface tension. For Rayleigh-Taylor instability, viscosity, surface tension, and viscoelasticity decrease the exponential growth rate predicted by linear stability analysis. In particular, we find that viscosity and surface tension decrease the terminal bubble velocity, whereas viscoelasticity is found to have no effect. All three properties increase the saturation height of the bubble. In Richmyer-Meshkov instability, the decay of the asymptotic velocity depends on the balance between viscosity and surface tension, and viscoelasticity tends to slow the asymptotic velocity decay.

  4. Behaviour of rippled shocks from ablatively-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov in metals accounting for strength

    DOE PAGES

    Opie, S.; Gautam, S.; Fortin, E.; ...

    2016-05-26

    While numerous continuum material strength and phase transformation models have been proposed to capture their complex dependences on intensive properties and deformation history, few experimental methods are available to validate these models particularly in the large pressure and strain rate regime typical of strong shock and ramp dynamic loading. In the experiments and simulations we present, a rippled shock is created by laser-ablation of a periodic surface perturbation on a metal target. The strength of the shock can be tuned to access phase transitions in metals such as iron or simply to study high-pressure strength in isomorphic materials such asmore » copper. Simulations, with models calibrated and validated to the experiments, show that the evolution of the amplitude of imprinted perturbations on the back surface by the rippled shock is strongly affected by strength and phase transformation kinetics. Increased strength has a smoothing effect on the perturbed shock front profile resulting in smaller perturbations on the free surface. Finally, in iron, faster phase transformations kinetics had a similar effect as increased strength, leading to smoother pressure contours inside the samples and smaller amplitudes of free surface perturbations in our simulations.« less

  5. Richtmyer-Meshkov induced turbulent mixing of air-SF6 multimode discontinuous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-François; Lassis, Alexandre; Montlaurent, Philippe; Rayer, Claude; Schwaederlé, Laurent

    2002-11-01

    We measure the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI)-induced turbulent mixing initiated by the interaction of an incident shock wave (typically Mach 1.2 in air at atmospheric condition) with a discontinuous multimode air-SF6 interface and amplified by the subsequent shock and rarefaction waves reverberating between the mixing zone and the end plate. This experiment is carried out in a shock tube (square internal cross section 13 cm by 13 cm) and the length of the downstream section filled with SF6 is about 30 cm. Initially, the gases are separated by a nitrocellulose microfilm (0,5 µm thick) in sandwich between two fine wire grids imposing a non-linear three-dimensional perturbation of fundamental wave length 1 mm but of unknown amplitude (we estimate 0.1 to 0.3 mm). We visualize the flow with conventional schlieren and shadow systems and aim at obtaining instantaneous concentration maps using a 0,5 mm thick laser sheet (from a single pulse ruby laser providing 1 Joule during 50 ns) shining through the transparent endplate. We seed either the SF6 with olive oil droplets or the air with smoke from the combustion of incense. As previouly for a SF6-air interface, the evolution of the axial and transversal components of the velocity field will be obtained with a laser doppler velocimeter, in which case both gases are seeded. We may also present the final results of constant temperature hot wire anemometer measurements on the same flows in a Marseille shock tube which provide the evolution of the concentration. The experimental results may be compared to the calculations using turbulent modelling or two or three dimensional simulations.

  6. Three dimensional simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in shock-tube experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J

    2010-01-01

    In the large eddy simulation (LES) approach large-scale energy-containing structures are resolved, smaller (presumably) more isotropic structures are filtered out, and unresolved subgrid effects are modeled. Extensive recent work has demonstrated that predictive simulations of turbulent velocity fields are possible based on subgrid scale modeling implicitly provided by a class of high-resolution finite-volume algorithms. This strategy is called implicit LES. The extension of the approach to the substantially more difficult problem of material mixing IS addressed, and progress in representative shock-driven turbulent mixing studies is reported.

  7. Cloaking two-dimensional fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, De-Hone

    2011-09-15

    A cloaking theory for a two-dimensional spin-(1/2) fermion is proposed. It is shown that the spinor of the two-dimensional fermion can be cloaked perfectly through controlling the fermion's energy and mass in a specific manner moving in an effective vector potential inside a cloaking shell. Different from the cloaking of three-dimensional fermions, the scaling function that determines the invisible region is uniquely determined by a nonlinear equation. It is also shown that the efficiency of the cloaking shell is unaltered under the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  8. Fast two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Guthrie, Paul D.; Thompson, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    A two dimensional (altitude and latitude) model of the atmosphere is used to investigate problems relating to the variability of the dynamics and temperature of the atmosphere on the ozone distribution, solar cycle variations of atmospheric constituents, the sensitivity of model results to tropospheric trace gas sources, and assessment computations of changes in ozone related to manmade influences. In a comparison between two dimensional model results in which the odd nitrogen family was transported together and model results in which the odd nitrogen species was transported separately, it was found that the family approximations are adequate for perturbation scenario calculations.

  9. Two-dimensional flexible nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Akinwande, Deji; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2014-12-17

    2014/2015 represents the tenth anniversary of modern graphene research. Over this decade, graphene has proven to be attractive for thin-film transistors owing to its remarkable electronic, optical, mechanical and thermal properties. Even its major drawback--zero bandgap--has resulted in something positive: a resurgence of interest in two-dimensional semiconductors, such as dichalcogenides and buckled nanomaterials with sizeable bandgaps. With the discovery of hexagonal boron nitride as an ideal dielectric, the materials are now in place to advance integrated flexible nanoelectronics, which uniquely take advantage of the unmatched portfolio of properties of two-dimensional crystals, beyond the capability of conventional thin films for ubiquitous flexible systems.

  10. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  11. Two-dimensional thermofield bosonization

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    The main objective of this paper was to obtain an operator realization for the bosonization of fermions in 1 + 1 dimensions, at finite, non-zero temperature T. This is achieved in the framework of the real-time formalism of Thermofield Dynamics. Formally, the results parallel those of the T = 0 case. The well-known two-dimensional Fermion-Boson correspondences at zero temperature are shown to hold also at finite temperature. To emphasize the usefulness of the operator realization for handling a large class of two-dimensional quantum field-theoretic problems, we contrast this global approach with the cumbersome calculation of the fermion-current two-point function in the imaginary-time formalism and real-time formalisms. The calculations also illustrate the very different ways in which the transmutation from Fermi-Dirac to Bose-Einstein statistics is realized.

  12. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  13. Two-Dimensional Potential Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Manfred; Tollmien, W.

    1949-01-01

    Contents include the following: Characteristic differential equations - initial and boundary conditions. Integration of the second characteristic differential equations. Direct application of Meyer's characteristic hodograph table for construction of two-dimensional potential flows. Prandtl-Busemann method. Development of the pressure variation for small deflection angles. Numerical table: relation between deflection, pressure, velocity, mach number and mach angle for isentropic changes of state according to Prandtl-Meyer for air (k = 1.405). References.

  14. Two-Dimensional Vernier Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    Modified vernier scale gives accurate two-dimensional coordinates from maps, drawings, or cathode-ray-tube displays. Movable circular overlay rests on fixed rectangular-grid overlay. Pitch of circles nine-tenths that of grid and, for greatest accuracy, radii of circles large compared with pitch of grid. Scale enables user to interpolate between finest divisions of regularly spaced rule simply by observing which mark on auxiliary vernier rule aligns with mark on primary rule.

  15. Two-Dimensional Colloidal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Adam D.; Buzza, D. Martin A.; Horozov, Tommy S.

    2011-03-01

    We study the structure of mixed monolayers of large (3μm diameter) and small (1μm diameter) very hydrophobic silica particles at an octane-water interface as a function of the number fraction of small particles ξ. We find that a rich variety of two-dimensional hexagonal super-lattices of large (A) and small (B) particles can be obtained in this system due to strong and long-range electrostatic repulsions through the nonpolar octane phase. The structures obtained for the different compositions are in good agreement with zero temperature calculations and finite temperature computer simulations.

  16. Two-dimensional colloidal alloys.

    PubMed

    Law, Adam D; Buzza, D Martin A; Horozov, Tommy S

    2011-03-25

    We study the structure of mixed monolayers of large (3 μm diameter) and small (1 μm diameter) very hydrophobic silica particles at an octane-water interface as a function of the number fraction of small particles ξ. We find that a rich variety of two-dimensional hexagonal super-lattices of large (A) and small (B) particles can be obtained in this system due to strong and long-range electrostatic repulsions through the nonpolar octane phase. The structures obtained for the different compositions are in good agreement with zero temperature calculations and finite temperature computer simulations.

  17. Two-dimensional cubic convolution.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Geng, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The paper develops two-dimensional (2D), nonseparable, piecewise cubic convolution (PCC) for image interpolation. Traditionally, PCC has been implemented based on a one-dimensional (1D) derivation with a separable generalization to two dimensions. However, typical scenes and imaging systems are not separable, so the traditional approach is suboptimal. We develop a closed-form derivation for a two-parameter, 2D PCC kernel with support [-2,2] x [-2,2] that is constrained for continuity, smoothness, symmetry, and flat-field response. Our analyses, using several image models, including Markov random fields, demonstrate that the 2D PCC yields small improvements in interpolation fidelity over the traditional, separable approach. The constraints on the derivation can be relaxed to provide greater flexibility and performance.

  18. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  19. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  20. Mix experiments using a two-dimensional convergent shock-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, D. A.; Smith, A. V.; Barton, C. J.; Youngs, D. L.

    2003-07-01

    This article reports the first Richtmyer Meshkov instability experiments using an improved version of the Atomic Weapons Establishment convergent shock tube. These investigate the shock-induced turbulent mixing across the interfaces of an air/dense gas/air region. Multipoint ignition of a detonatable gas mixture produces a cylindrically convergent shock that travels into a test cell containing the dense gas region. The mixing process is imaged with shadowgraphy. Sample results are presented from an unperturbed experiment and one with a notch perturbation imposed on one of the dense gas interfaces. The unperturbed experiment shows the mixing across the dense gas boundaries and the motion of the bulk dense gas region. Imposition of the notch perturbation produces a mushroom-shaped air void penetrating the dense gas region. Three-dimensional simulations performed using the AWE TURMOIL3D code are presented and compared with the sample experimental results. A very good agreement is demonstrated. Conducting these first turbulent mixing experiments has highlighted a number of areas for future development of the convergent shock-tube facility; these are also presented.

  1. Two-dimensional Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, Juri

    1998-10-01

    This Ph.D. thesis pursues two goals: The study of the geometrical structure of two-dimensional quantum gravity and in particular its fractal nature. To address these questions we review the continuum formalism of quantum gravity with special focus on the scaling properties of the theory. We discuss several concepts of fractal dimensions which characterize the extrinsic and intrinsic geometry of quantum gravity. This work is partly based on work done in collaboration with Jan Ambjørn, Dimitrij Boulatov, Jakob L. Nielsen and Yoshiyuki Watabiki (1997). The other goal is the discussion of the discretization of quantum gravity and to address the so called quantum failure of Regge calculus. We review dynamical triangulations and show that it agrees with the continuum theory in two dimensions. Then we discuss Regge calculus and prove that a continuum limit cannot be taken in a sensible way and that it does not reproduce continuum results. This work is partly based on work done in collaboration with Jan Ambjørn, Jakob L. Nielsen and George Savvidy (1997).

  2. Measuring Monotony in Two-Dimensional Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachapova, Farida; Kachapov, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    This note introduces a monotony coefficient as a new measure of the monotone dependence in a two-dimensional sample. Some properties of this measure are derived. In particular, it is shown that the absolute value of the monotony coefficient for a two-dimensional sample is between /"r"/ and 1, where "r" is the Pearson's…

  3. Two Dimensional Mechanism for Insect Hovering

    SciTech Connect

    Jane Wang, Z.

    2000-09-04

    Resolved computation of two dimensional insect hovering shows for the first time that a two dimensional hovering motion can generate enough lift to support a typical insect weight. The computation reveals a two dimensional mechanism of creating a downward dipole jet of counterrotating vortices, which are formed from leading and trailing edge vortices. The vortex dynamics further elucidates the role of the phase relation between the wing translation and rotation in lift generation and explains why the instantaneous forces can reach a periodic state after only a few strokes. The model predicts the lower limits in Reynolds number and amplitude above which the averaged forces are sufficient. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  5. Two-dimensional generalized Toda lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Perelomov, A. M.

    1981-12-01

    The zero curvature representation is obtained for the two-dimensional generalized Toda lattices connected with semisimple Lie algebras. The reduction group and conservation laws are found and the mass spectrum is calculated.

  6. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  7. Efficient Two-Dimensional-FFT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miko, J.

    1992-01-01

    Program computes 64 X 64-point fast Fourier transform in less than 17 microseconds. Optimized 64 X 64 Point Two-Dimensional Fast Fourier Transform combines performance of real- and complex-valued one-dimensional fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) to execute two-dimensional FFT and coefficients of power spectrum. Coefficients used in many applications, including analyzing spectra, convolution, digital filtering, processing images, and compressing data. Source code written in C, 8086 Assembly, and Texas Instruments TMS320C30 Assembly languages.

  8. Developments in two-dimensional regenerator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedeon, David

    The development status of the manifold-estimate, or 'MANIFEST', computer code for two-dimensional modeling of Stirling cycle engines' regenerator-element flow. MANIFEST can model oscillating compressible fluid internal flows in arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional regions, irrespective of whether these are filled with porous materials or empty. An interactive examination of the solution output can be conducted graphically, for ease of boundary condition specification and viewing of flow velocity, temperature, and pressure plots at various locations.

  9. Two-dimensional order and disorder thermofields

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L. V.

    2006-11-15

    The main objective of this paper was to obtain the two-dimensional order and disorder thermal operators using the Thermofield Bosonization formalism. We show that the general property of the two-dimensional world according with the bosonized Fermi field at zero temperature can be constructed as a product of an order and a disorder variables which satisfy a dual field algebra holds at finite temperature. The general correlation functions of the order and disorder thermofields are obtained.

  10. Interpolation by two-dimensional cubic convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jiazheng; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents results of image interpolation with an improved method for two-dimensional cubic convolution. Convolution with a piecewise cubic is one of the most popular methods for image reconstruction, but the traditional approach uses a separable two-dimensional convolution kernel that is based on a one-dimensional derivation. The traditional, separable method is sub-optimal for the usual case of non-separable images. The improved method in this paper implements the most general non-separable, two-dimensional, piecewise-cubic interpolator with constraints for symmetry, continuity, and smoothness. The improved method of two-dimensional cubic convolution has three parameters that can be tuned to yield maximal fidelity for specific scene ensembles characterized by autocorrelation or power-spectrum. This paper illustrates examples for several scene models (a circular disk of parametric size, a square pulse with parametric rotation, and a Markov random field with parametric spatial detail) and actual images -- presenting the optimal parameters and the resulting fidelity for each model. In these examples, improved two-dimensional cubic convolution is superior to several other popular small-kernel interpolation methods.

  11. Shock Front Distortion and Richtmyer-Meshkov-like Growth Caused by a Small Pre-Shock Non-Uniformity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    joint” and far from it therefore is ( )[ ]        >>      ∆+      − <<−∆+− ≅∞→ .1|| , || ln ;1|| , ln ),( 22 qy y DtQ

  12. TWO-DIMENSIONAL TOPOLOGY OF COSMOLOGICAL REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei; Park, Changbom; Kim, Juhan E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2015-11-20

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two-dimensional genus curve for the early, middle, and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometre Array.

  13. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  14. Two-Dimensional Motions of Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the…

  15. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  16. Valley excitons in two-dimensional semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Hongyi; Cui, Xiaodong; Xu, Xiaodong; ...

    2014-12-30

    Monolayer group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a new class of semiconductors in the two-dimensional limit. The attractive properties include: the visible range direct band gap ideal for exploring optoelectronic applications; the intriguing physics associated with spin and valley pseudospin of carriers which implies potentials for novel electronics based on these internal degrees of freedom; the exceptionally strong Coulomb interaction due to the two-dimensional geometry and the large effective masses. The physics of excitons, the bound states of electrons and holes, has been one of the most actively studied topics on these two-dimensional semiconductors, where the excitons exhibitmore » remarkably new features due to the strong Coulomb binding, the valley degeneracy of the band edges, and the valley dependent optical selection rules for interband transitions. Here we give a brief overview of the experimental and theoretical findings on excitons in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides, with focus on the novel properties associated with their valley degrees of freedom.« less

  17. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  18. Valley excitons in two-dimensional semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongyi; Cui, Xiaodong; Xu, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2014-12-30

    Monolayer group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a new class of semiconductors in the two-dimensional limit. The attractive properties include: the visible range direct band gap ideal for exploring optoelectronic applications; the intriguing physics associated with spin and valley pseudospin of carriers which implies potentials for novel electronics based on these internal degrees of freedom; the exceptionally strong Coulomb interaction due to the two-dimensional geometry and the large effective masses. The physics of excitons, the bound states of electrons and holes, has been one of the most actively studied topics on these two-dimensional semiconductors, where the excitons exhibit remarkably new features due to the strong Coulomb binding, the valley degeneracy of the band edges, and the valley dependent optical selection rules for interband transitions. Here we give a brief overview of the experimental and theoretical findings on excitons in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides, with focus on the novel properties associated with their valley degrees of freedom.

  19. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  20. Two-Dimensional Motions of Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the…

  1. VLSI Unit for Two-Dimensional Convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Universal logic structure allows same VLSI chip to be used for variety of computational functions required for two dimensional convolutions. Fast polynomial transform technique is extended into tree computational structure composed of two units: fast polynomial transform (FPT) unit and Chinese remainder theorem (CRT) computational unit.

  2. New two dimensional compounds: beyond graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebegue, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    In the field of nanosciences, the quest for materials with reduced dimensionality is only at its beginning. While a lot of effort has been put initially on graphene, the focus has been extended in the last past years to functionalized graphene, boron nitride, silicene, and transition metal dichalcogenides in the form of single layers. Although these two-dimensional compounds offer a larger range of properties than graphene, there is a constant need for new materials presenting equivalent or superior performances to the ones already known. Here I will present an approach that we have used to discover potential new two-dimensional materials. This approach corresponds to perform datamining in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database using simple geometrical criterias, and allowed us to identify nearly 40 new materials that could be exfoliated into two-dimensional sheets. Then, their electronic structure (density of states and bandstructure) was obtained with density functional theory to predict whether the two-dimensional material is metallic or insulating, as well as if it undergoes magnetic ordering at low temperatures. If time allows, I will also present some of our recent results concerning the electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenides bilayers.

  3. Measuring Hugoniot, reshock and release properties of natural snow and simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.

    1996-02-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for underdense materials (e.g. snow) over a stress range of roughly 0. 1 - 4 GPa. Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot states, reshock states and release paths. The underdense materials may pose three primary experimental difficulties. Snow in particular is perishable; it can melt or sublime during storage, preparation and testing. Many of these materials are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Finally, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and six proposed snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot states, somewhat less reliable reshock 3 states, and limited release property information. Natural snow of density {approximately}0.5 gm/cm{sup 3}, a lightweight concrete of density {approximately}0.7 gm/cm{sup 3} and a {open_quotes}snow-matching grout{close_quotes} of density {approximately}0.28 gm/cm 3 were the subjects of the majority of the tests. Hydrocode calculations using CTH were performed to elucidate sensitivities to edge effects as well as to assess the applicability of SESAME 2-state models to these materials. Simulations modeling snow as porous water provided good agreement for Hugoniot stresses to 1 GPa; a porous ice model was preferred for higher Hugoniot stresses. On the other hand, simulations of tests on snow, lightweight concrete and the snow-matching grout based on (respectively) porous ice, tuff and polyethylene showed a too-stiff response. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed. Based on the Hugoniot properties, the snow-matching grout appears to be a better snow simulant than does the lightweight concrete.

  4. Magnetization study of two dimensional helium three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei

    This dissertation discusses a magnetization study of a two dimensional Fermi system. Our group developed a SQUID NMR system to study the magnetization of two dimensional 3He on both GTA grafoil and ZYX Graphite substrates. Benefiting from SQUID technology, our NMR experiments were performed at very low applied magnetic field thus avoid the masking of ordering by strong external field. Monolayer 3He films adsorbed on crystalline graphite are considered a nearly ideal example of a two dimensional system of highly correlated fermions. By controlling the 3He areal density, adsorbed films exhibit a wide range of structures with different temperature- dependent magnetic properties and heat capacities. Our recent experiments on two dimensional 3He adsorbed on ZYX graphite focused on the anti-ferromagnetic 4/7 phase and the ferromagnetic incommensurate solid state of a second 3He monolayer. Ferromagnetic order was observed in two dimensional 3He films on both Grafoil and highly oriented ZYX grade exfoliated graphite. The dipolar field plays an important role in magnetic ordering in two dimensional spin systems. The dipole-dipole interaction leads to a frequency shift of the NMR absorption line. The resulting 3He NMR lineshape on Grafoil was a broad peak shifted towards lower frequency with a background from the randomly oriented regions extending to positive frequencies. Compared to Grafoil, ZYX graphite has a much greater structural coherence and is more highly oriented. When studying magnetism of 3He films on ZYX substrate we found that the features we observed in our original Grafoil experiment were much more pronounced on ZYX graphite. In addition, we observed some multi-peak structure on the 3He NMR lineshape, which suggest a series of spin wave resonances. We also studied the magnetic properties of the second layer of 3He films on ZYX substrate at density around 4/7 phase. To eliminate the paramagnetic signal of the first layer solid, we pre-plated a 4He layer on the

  5. Kirigami for Two-Dimensional Electronic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zenan; Bahamon, Dario; Campbell, David; Park, Harold

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials have recently drawn tremendous attention because of their unique properties. In this work, we introduce the notion of two-dimensional kirigami, where concepts that have been used almost exclusively for macroscale structures are applied to dramatically enhance their stretchability. Specifically, we show using classical molecular dynamics simulations that the yield and fracture strains of graphene and MoS2 can be enhanced by about a factor of three using kirigami as compared to standard monolayers. Finally, using graphene as an example, we demonstrate that the kirigami structure may open up interesting opportunities in coupling to the electronic behavior of 2D materials. Authors acknowledge Mechanical Engineering and Physics departments at Boston University, and Mackgrafe at Mackenzie Presbyterian University.

  6. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  7. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  8. Two-dimensional optimal sensor placement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.

    1995-05-01

    A method for determining the optimal two-dimensional spatial placement of multiple sensors participating in a robot perception task is introduced in this paper. This work is motivated by the fact that sensor data fusion is an effective means of reducing uncertainties in sensor observations, and that the combined uncertainty varies with the relative placement of the sensors with respect to each other. The problem of optimal sensor placement is formulated and a solution is presented in the two dimensional space. The algebraic structure of the combined sensor uncertainty with respect to the placement of sensor is studied. A necessary condition for optimal placement is derived and this necessary condition is used to obtain an efficient closed-form solution for the global optimal placement. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the solution. 11 refs.

  9. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions.

  10. Plasmonics with two-dimensional conductors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y M; Kim, Philip; Ham, Donhee

    2014-03-28

    A wealth of effort in photonics has been dedicated to the study and engineering of surface plasmonic waves in the skin of three-dimensional bulk metals, owing largely to their trait of subwavelength confinement. Plasmonic waves in two-dimensional conductors, such as semiconductor heterojunction and graphene, contrast the surface plasmonic waves on bulk metals, as the former emerge at gigahertz to terahertz and infrared frequencies well below the photonics regime and can exhibit far stronger subwavelength confinement. This review elucidates the machinery behind the unique behaviours of the two-dimensional plasmonic waves and discusses how they can be engineered to create ultra-subwavelength plasmonic circuits and metamaterials for infrared and gigahertz to terahertz integrated electronics.

  11. Electronics based on two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Gianluca; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Palacios, Tomás; Neumaier, Daniel; Seabaugh, Alan; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    The compelling demand for higher performance and lower power consumption in electronic systems is the main driving force of the electronics industry's quest for devices and/or architectures based on new materials. Here, we provide a review of electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials, outlining their potential as a technological option beyond scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor switches. We focus on the performance limits and advantages of these materials and associated technologies, when exploited for both digital and analog applications, focusing on the main figures of merit needed to meet industry requirements. We also discuss the use of two-dimensional materials as an enabling factor for flexible electronics and provide our perspectives on future developments.

  12. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-01-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots. PMID:28598421

  13. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope.

    PubMed

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-09

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  14. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermann, L.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  15. Two-dimensional lattice liquid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Murashima, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2012-09-01

    A family of models of liquid on a two-dimensional lattice (2D lattice liquid models) have been proposed as primitive models of soft-material membrane. As a first step, we have formulated them as single-component, single-layered, classical particle systems on a two-dimensional surface with no explicit viscosity. Among the family of the models, we have shown and constructed two stochastic models, a vicious walk model and a flow model, on an isotropic regular lattice and on some honeycomb lattices of various sizes. In both cases, the dynamics is governed by the nature of the frustration of the particle movements. By simulations, we have found the approximate functional form of the frustration probability and peculiar anomalous diffusions in their time-averaged mean-square displacements in the flow model. The relations to other existing statistical models and possible extensions of the models are also discussed.

  16. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-01-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions. PMID:27109776

  17. Cooperative two-dimensional directed transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhigang; Chen, Hongbin

    2010-11-01

    A mechanism for the cooperative directed transport in two-dimensional ratchet potentials is proposed. With the aid of mutual couplings among particles, coordinated unidirectional motion along the ratchet direction can be achieved by transforming the energy from the transversal rocking force (periodic or stochastic) to the work in the longitude direction. Analytical predictions on the relation between the current and other parameters for the ac-driven cases are given, which are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Stochastic driving forces can give rise to the resonant directional transport. The effect of the free length, which has been explored in experiments on the motility of bipedal molecular motors, is investigated for both the single- and double-channel cases. The mechanism and results proposed in this letter may both shed light on the collective locomotion of molecular motors and open ways on studies in two-dimensional collaborative ratchet dynamics.

  18. Two-dimensional plasmonic nanosurface for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polemi, Alessia; Shuford, Kevin L.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate a two-dimensional corrugated plasmonic nanosurface for efficient light trapping in a photovoltaic cell. Inspired by a well-known one-dimensional grating nanosurface, the present configuration is composed of two perpendicular gratings in the metal film that intersect to yield cross-shaped nanoelements. The surface corrugation is then covered by a silicon film. An additional degree of freedom can be introduced into the design by interrupting the grid in both directions. We show that this extra spacing between the array elements can be used to tune the absorption properties of the nanosurface. By including the effect of the solar spectrum, we demonstrate how this two-dimensional configuration is more efficient than its one-dimensional counterpart in terms of the actual short circuit photocurrent density. Finally, we propose possible extensions of this structure design, which can further enhance the solar cell performance.

  19. Plasmonics with two-dimensional conductors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y. M.; Kim, Philip; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of effort in photonics has been dedicated to the study and engineering of surface plasmonic waves in the skin of three-dimensional bulk metals, owing largely to their trait of subwavelength confinement. Plasmonic waves in two-dimensional conductors, such as semiconductor heterojunction and graphene, contrast the surface plasmonic waves on bulk metals, as the former emerge at gigahertz to terahertz and infrared frequencies well below the photonics regime and can exhibit far stronger subwavelength confinement. This review elucidates the machinery behind the unique behaviours of the two-dimensional plasmonic waves and discusses how they can be engineered to create ultra-subwavelength plasmonic circuits and metamaterials for infrared and gigahertz to terahertz integrated electronics. PMID:24567472

  20. Analytical calculation of two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua D; Conrad, Rebecca; Siemens, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an analytical calculation of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectra of electronic or vibrational resonances. Starting with the solution to the optical Bloch equations for a two-level system in the 2D time domain, we show that a fully analytical 2D Fourier transform can be performed if the projection-slice and Fourier-shift theorems of Fourier transforms are applied. Results can be fit to experimental 2D coherent spectra of resonances with arbitrary inhomogeneity.

  1. Two-dimensional supramolecular electron spin arrays.

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Nowakowski, Jan; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jaggi, Michael; Siewert, Dorota; Girovsky, Jan; Shchyrba, Aneliia; Hählen, Tatjana; Kleibert, Armin; Oppeneer, Peter M; Nolting, Frithjof; Decurtins, Silvio; Jung, Thomas A; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2013-05-07

    A bottom-up approach is introduced to fabricate two-dimensional self-assembled layers of molecular spin-systems containing Mn and Fe ions arranged in a chessboard lattice. We demonstrate that the Mn and Fe spin states can be reversibly operated by their selective response to coordination/decoordination of volatile ligands like ammonia (NH3). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Fully localized two-dimensional embedded solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jianke

    2010-11-15

    We report the prediction of fully localized two-dimensional embedded solitons. These solitons are obtained in a quasi-one-dimensional waveguide array which is periodic along one spatial direction and localized along the orthogonal direction. Under appropriate nonlinearity, these solitons are found to exist inside the Bloch bands (continuous spectrum) of the waveguide and thus are embedded solitons. These embedded solitons are fully localized along both spatial directions. In addition, they are fully stable under perturbations.

  3. Deeply subrecoil two-dimensional Raman cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, V.; Phillips, W.D.; Lising, L.J.; Rolston, S.L.

    2004-10-01

    We report the implementation of a two-dimensional Raman cooling scheme using sequential excitations along the orthogonal axes. Using square pulses, we have cooled a cloud of ultracold cesium atoms down to an rms velocity spread of 0.39(5) recoil velocities, corresponding to an effective transverse temperature of 30 nK (0.15T{sub rec}). This technique can be useful to improve cold-atom atomic clocks and is particularly relevant for clocks in microgravity.

  4. Two dimensional echocardiographic detection of intraatrial masses.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Soulen, R L; Kotler, M N; Mintz, G S

    1981-11-01

    With two dimensional echocardiography, a left atrial mass was detected in 19 patients. Of these, 10 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis had a left atrial thrombus. The distinctive two dimensional echocardiographic features of left atrial thrombus included a mass of irregular nonmobile laminated echos within an enlarged atrial cavity, usually with a broad base of attachment to the posterior left atrial wall. Seven patients had a left atrial myxoma. Usually, the myxoma appeared as a mottled ovoid, sharply demarcated mobile mass attached to the interatrial septum. One patient had a right atrial angiosarcoma that appeared as a nonmobile mass extending from the inferior vena caval-right atrial junction into the right atrial cavity. One patient had a left atrial leiomyosarcoma producing a highly mobile mass attached to the lateral wall of the left atrium. M mode echocardiography detected six of the seven myxomas, one thrombus and neither of the other tumors. Thus, two dimensional echocardiography appears to be the technique of choice in the detection, localization and differentiation of intraatrial masses.

  5. Physical Mechanisms of Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Turbulence has slowly yielded its mysteries through over 100 years of persistent effort. Recently experimental techniques and computation power have reached the stage where significant progress has been made on this very challenging problem. Two dimensional turbulence offers some real advantages in terms of reduced degrees of freedom such that the problem can now be thoroughly explored from many perspectives. Further, two-dimensional turbulence exhibits the basic phenomena of direct-enstrophy and inverse-energy cascades thought to apply to oceanic and atmospheric systems. We have investigated the properties of turbulence in two spatial dimensions using experimental measurements of the grid turbulence in a flowing soap film^1 and of the electromagnetically-forced turbulence in a thin salt layer floating on a dense immiscible fluid underlayer. We have also explored 2D turbulence using several different direct numerical simulations of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in a periodic box^2. The data for both consist of high resolution fields of velocity; some are statistically independent sets and others are temporally resolved for dynamics. From this data we construct conventional Eulerian statistics, directly measure energy and enstrophy transfer^1, identify coherent structures in the flow, determine Lagrangian quantities, and calculate stretching fields. This comprehensive experimental and numerical characterization elucidates the physical mechanisms of two-dimensional turbulence. ^1 M.K. Rivera, W.B. Daniel and R.E. Ecke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 104502 (2003). ^2 S. Chen, R.E. Ecke, G. Eyink, X. Wang, and Z. Xiao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 214501 (2003).

  6. Numerical investigation of 3D effects on a 2D-dominated shocked mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel; Weber, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    A nominally two-dimensional interface, unstable to the Rayleigh-Taylor or Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, will become three-dimensional at high Reynolds numbers due to the growth of background noise and 3D effects like vortex stretching. This three-dimensionality changes macroscopic features, such as the perturbation growth rate and mixing, as it enhances turbulent dissipation. In this study, a 2D perturbation with small-scale, 3D fluctuations is modeled using the hydrodynamics code Miranda. A Mach 1.95 shockwave accelerates a helium-over-SF6 interface, similar to the experiments of Motl et al. ["Experimental validation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov scaling law over large density ratio and shock strength ranges," Phys. Fluids 21(12), 126102 (2009)], to explore the regime where a 2D dominated flow will experience 3D effects. We report on the structure, growth, and mixing of the post-shocked interface in 2D and 3D.

  7. Dynamics of film. [two dimensional continua theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The general theory of films as two-dimensional continua are elaborated upon. As physical realizations of such a model this paper examines: inextensible films, elastic films, and nets. The suggested dynamic equations have enabled us to find out the characteristic speeds of wave propagation of the invariants of external and internal geometry and formulate the criteria of instability of their shape. Also included herein is a detailed account of the equation describing the film motions beyond the limits of the shape stability accompanied by the formation of wrinkles. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  8. Two-dimensional meniscus in a wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M.; Pinczewski, W.V.; Oren, P.E.

    1995-03-15

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical solution of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for the meniscus profile in a two-dimensional wedge-shaped capillary. The solution is valid for monotonic forms of disjoining pressure which are repulsive in nature. In the limit of negligible disjoining pressure, it is shown to reduce to the classical solution of constant curvature. The character of the solution is examined and examples of practical interest which demonstrate the application of the solution to the computation of the meniscus profile in a wedge-shaped capillary are discussed.

  9. Program For Two-Dimensional Thermoplastic Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, George E.

    1993-01-01

    SOLAS contains number of utility programs for use with finite-element simulations. Designed to handle two-dimensional problems of quasi-static thermoplastic deformation. Includes optional postprocessing software, independent of solution codes, generating unified element-by-element list of quantitative results of computation, plus file containing signed equivalent stresses, equivalent strains, and multiaxiality factor parameter. Signs of equivalent quantities expressed either with respect to maximum principal quantities or with respect to directions defined by user. Written in UNIX shell script and FORTRAN 77.

  10. Two dimensional thick center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2016-01-22

    The potential between static color source is calculated in the SU (3) gauge group by introducing a two dimensional vortex flux. To generalize the model, the length of the Wilson loop is equal to R oriented along the x axis, and the vortex flux is considered as a function of x and y. The comparison between the generalized model and the original one shows that the intermediate linear regime is increased significantly and better agreement with Casimir scaling is achieved. Furthermore, the model is applied to calculate the potential between baryons.

  11. Macroscopic Two-Dimensional Polariton Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Dario; Caputo, Davide; Muñoz, Carlos Sánchez; De Giorgi, Milena; Dominici, Lorenzo; Szymańska, Marzena H.; West, Kenneth; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Gigli, Giuseppe; Laussy, Fabrice P.; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    We report a record-size, two-dimensional polariton condensate of a fraction of a millimeter radius free from the presence of an exciton reservoir. This macroscopically occupied state is formed by the ballistically expanding polariton flow that relaxes and condenses over a large area outside of the excitation spot. The density of this trap-free condensate is <1 polariton /μ m2 , reducing the phase noise induced by the interaction energy. Moreover, the backflow effect, recently predicted for the nonparabolic polariton dispersion, is observed here for the first time in the fast-expanding wave packet.

  12. One- and two-dimensional hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassoun, G. Q.

    1981-02-01

    Certain one- and two-dimensional reductions of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation of the hydrogen atom are considered. These reductions are carried out from the point of view of the two common sets of space coordinates: Cartesian and spherical. The resulting systems have features that relate more readily to the old quantum theory models of Bohr and Sommerfeld than the general three-dimensional hydrogen atom. Furthermore, the considerations yield interesting insights into the quantum mechanics of the hydrogen atom and may serve as helpful intermediary preparation, in an introductory presentation of the subject, for the unreduced three-dimensional case.

  13. Pressure of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Wen-de

    2016-06-01

    A simple analytic expression for the pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid is found by fitting results from a molecular dynamics simulation. The results verify that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of the Wigner-Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytic expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochores, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to monolayer dusty plasmas.

  14. Universal absorption of two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, T.; Noriega-Pérez, D.; Schliemann, J.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the optical conductivity of several noninteracting two-dimensional semiconducting systems focusing on gapped Dirac and Schrödinger fermions as well as on a system mixing these two types. Close to the band gap, we can define a universal optical conductivity quantum of σ0=1/16 e/2ℏ for the pure systems. The effective optical conductivity then depends on the degeneracy factors gs (spin) and gv (valley) and on the curvature around the band gap ν , i.e., it generally reads σ =gsgvν σ0 . For a system composed of both types of carriers, the optical conductivity becomes nonuniversal.

  15. Macroscopic Two-Dimensional Polariton Condensates.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, Dario; Caputo, Davide; Muñoz, Carlos Sánchez; De Giorgi, Milena; Dominici, Lorenzo; Szymańska, Marzena H; West, Kenneth; Pfeiffer, Loren N; Gigli, Giuseppe; Laussy, Fabrice P; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2017-05-26

    We report a record-size, two-dimensional polariton condensate of a fraction of a millimeter radius free from the presence of an exciton reservoir. This macroscopically occupied state is formed by the ballistically expanding polariton flow that relaxes and condenses over a large area outside of the excitation spot. The density of this trap-free condensate is <1  polariton/μm^{2}, reducing the phase noise induced by the interaction energy. Moreover, the backflow effect, recently predicted for the nonparabolic polariton dispersion, is observed here for the first time in the fast-expanding wave packet.

  16. Can Two-Dimensional Boron Superconduct?

    PubMed

    Penev, Evgeni S; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2016-04-13

    Two-dimensional boron is expected to exhibit various structural polymorphs, all being metallic. Additionally, its small atomic mass suggests strong electron-phonon coupling, which in turn can enable superconducting behavior. Here we perform first-principles analysis of electronic structure, phonon spectra, and electron-phonon coupling of selected 2D boron polymorphs and show that the most stable structures predicted to feasibly form on a metal substrate should also exhibit intrinsic phonon-mediated superconductivity, with estimated critical temperature in the range of Tc ≈ 10-20 K.

  17. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  18. Superaging in two-dimensional random ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Paul, Raja; Schehr, Grégory; Rieger, Heiko

    2007-03-01

    We study the aging properties, in particular the two-time autocorrelations, of the two-dimensional randomly diluted Ising ferromagnet below the critical temperature via Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the autocorrelation function displays additive aging C(t,t{w})=C{st}(t)+C{ag}(t,t{w}), where the stationary part Cst} decays algebraically. The aging part shows anomalous scaling C{ag}(t,t{w})=C[h(t)h(t{w})], where h(u) is a nonhomogeneous function excluding a t/t{w} scaling.

  19. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices. PMID:27325441

  20. Two-dimensional swimming behavior of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhai, He; Sanchez, Sandra; Kearns, Daniel; Wu, Yilin

    Many bacteria swim by flagella motility which is essential for bacterial dispersal, chemotaxis, and pathogenesis. Here we combined single-cell tracking, theoretical analysis, and computational modeling to investigate two-dimensional swimming behavior of a well-characterized flagellated bacterium Bacillus subtilis at the single-cell level. We quantified the 2D motion pattern of B. subtilis in confined space and studied how cells interact with each other. Our findings shed light on bacterial colonization in confined environments, and will serve as the ground for building more accurate models to understand bacterial collective motion. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: ylwu@phy.cuhk.edu.hk.

  1. Rationally synthesized two-dimensional polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colson, John W.; Dichtel, William R.

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic polymers exhibit diverse and useful properties and influence most aspects of modern life. Many polymerization methods provide linear or branched macromolecules, frequently with outstanding functional-group tolerance and molecular weight control. In contrast, extending polymerization strategies to two-dimensional periodic structures is in its infancy, and successful examples have emerged only recently through molecular framework, surface science and crystal engineering approaches. In this Review, we describe successful 2D polymerization strategies, as well as seminal research that inspired their development. These methods include the synthesis of 2D covalent organic frameworks as layered crystals and thin films, surface-mediated polymerization of polyfunctional monomers, and solid-state topochemical polymerizations. Early application targets of 2D polymers include gas separation and storage, optoelectronic devices and membranes, each of which might benefit from predictable long-range molecular organization inherent to this macromolecular architecture.

  2. Methods of Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, F.

    One of the main fields of solar research is the study of dynamic processes of small-scale structures. For this purpose, time sequences of spectroscopic and polarimetric information in two spatial dimensions with best achievable quality are needed. The present contribution deals with the ways to obtain images in small wavelength bands. Among these are image scanners and the MSDP (Multi-Channel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph). Further potential instruments are scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI). The principles of such instruments are discussed. The results obtained hitherto from the FPI in the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Observatorio del Teide are promising. Small-band, two-dimensional spectroscopy with spatial resolution close to the telescopic diffraction limit seems possible in the near future.

  3. Two-dimensional motions of rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the descending parts of the trajectories tend to be gentler and straighter slopes than the ascending parts for relatively large launching angles due to the non-vanishing thrusts. We discuss the ranges, the maximum altitudes and the engine performances of the rockets. It seems that the exponential fuel exhaustion can be the most potent engine for the longest and highest flights.

  4. Two-dimensional Inductive Position Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional inductive position sensing system uses four drive inductors arranged at the vertices of a parallelogram and a sensing inductor positioned within the parallelogram. The sensing inductor is movable within the parallelogram and relative to the drive inductors. A first oscillating current at a first frequency is supplied to a first pair of the drive inductors located at ends of a first diagonal of the parallelogram. A second oscillating current at a second frequency is supplied to a second pair of the drive inductors located at ends of a second diagonal of the parallelogram. As a result, the sensing inductor generates a first output voltage at the first frequency and a second output voltage at the second frequency. A processor determines a position of the sensing inductor relative to the drive inductors using the first output voltage and the second output voltage.

  5. Two-dimensional heterostructures for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide slit-shaped ion diffusion channels that enable fast movement of lithium and other ions. However, electronic conductivity, the number of intercalation sites, and stability during extended cycling are also crucial for building high-performance energy storage devices. While individual 2D materials, such as graphene, show some of the required properties, none of them can offer all properties needed to maximize energy density, power density, and cycle life. Here we argue that stacking different 2D materials into heterostructured architectures opens an opportunity to construct electrodes that would combine the advantages of the individual building blocks while eliminating the associated shortcomings. We discuss characteristics of common 2D materials and provide examples of 2D heterostructured electrodes that showed new phenomena leading to superior electrochemical performance. We also consider electrode fabrication approaches and finally outline future steps to create 2D heterostructured electrodes that could greatly expand current energy storage technologies.

  6. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-10-25

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  7. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-09-03

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  8. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  9. Orthogonal grid generation in two dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulos, T.; Bergeles, G.; Athanassiadis, N.

    A generalization of a numerical technique for orthogonal mapping, used by Ryskin and Leal (1983) for the construction of boundary-fitted curvilinear coordinate systems in two-dimensional space, is proposed. The boundary-fitted orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are assumed to transform to Cartesian coordinates by Laplace equations. The scale factors involved in the Laplace equations are computed on boundaries and estimated on internal points by means of an interpolation formula. Three types of boundary conditions have been tested: Dirichlet, Cauchy-Riemann, and pseudo-Dirichlet. It is shown that, using this method, grids appropriate for the calculation of flow fields over sharp edges, complex boundary shapes, etc., can be easily constructed. Examples on various geometries are presented, together with a convenient method to check the orthogonality of the resulting meshes.

  10. Strategies for Interpreting Two Dimensional Microwave Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Buchanan, Zachary

    2017-06-01

    Microwave spectroscopy can uniquely identify molecules because their rotational energy levels are sensitive to the three principal moments of inertia. However, a priori predictions of a molecule's structure have traditionally been required to enable efficient assignment of the rotational spectrum. Recently, automated microwave double resonance spectroscopy (AMDOR) has been employed to rapidly generate two dimensional spectra based on transitions that share a common rotational level, which may enable automated extraction of rotational constants without any prior estimates of molecular structure. Algorithms used to date for AMDOR have relied on making several initial assumptions about the nature of a subset of the linked transitions, followed by testing possible assignments by "brute force." In this talk, we will discuss new strategies for interpreting AMDOR spectra, using eugenol as a test case, as well as prospects for library-free, automated identification of the molecules in a volatile mixture.

  11. Two-Dimensional Informative Array Testing

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Christopher S.; Tebbs, Joshua M.; Bilder, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Array-based group testing algorithms for case identification are widely used in infectious disease testing, drug discovery, and genetics. In this paper, we generalize previous statistical work in array testing to account for heterogeneity among individuals being tested. We first derive closed-form expressions for the expected number of tests (efficiency) and misclassification probabilities (sensitivity, specificity, predictive values) for two-dimensional array testing in a heterogeneous population. We then propose two “informative” array construction techniques which exploit population heterogeneity in ways that can substantially improve testing efficiency when compared to classical approaches which regard the population as homogeneous. Furthermore, a useful byproduct of our methodology is that misclassification probabilities can be estimated on a per-individual basis. We illustrate our new procedures using chlamydia and gonorrhea testing data collected in Nebraska as part of the Infertility Prevention Project. PMID:22212007

  12. Intrinsic two-dimensional features as textons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, E.; Zetzsche, C.; Rentschler, I.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that intrinsic two-dimensional (i2D) features, computationally defined as the outputs of nonlinear operators that model the activity of end-stopped neurons, play a role in preattentive texture discrimination. We first show that for discriminable textures with identical power spectra the predictions of traditional models depend on the type of nonlinearity and fail for energy measures. We then argue that the concept of intrinsic dimensionality, and the existence of end-stopped neurons, can help us to understand the role of the nonlinearities. Furthermore, we show examples in which models without strong i2D selectivity fail to predict the correct ranking order of perceptual segregation. Our arguments regarding the importance of i2D features resemble the arguments of Julesz and co-workers regarding textons such as terminators and crossings. However, we provide a computational framework that identifies textons with the outputs of nonlinear operators that are selective to i2D features.

  13. Tunneling in two-dimensional QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Poul

    2006-09-01

    The spectral density for two-dimensional continuum QCD has a non-analytic behavior for a critical area. Apparently this is not reflected in the Wilson loops. However, we show that the existence of a critical area is encoded in the winding Wilson loops: Although there is no non-analyticity or phase transition in these Wilson loops, the dynamics of these loops consists of two smoothly connected domains separated by the critical area, one domain with a confining behavior for large winding Wilson loops, and one (below the critical size) where the string tension disappears. We show that this can be interpreted in terms of a simple tunneling process between an ordered and a disordered state. In view of recent results by Narayanan and Neuberger this tunneling may also be relevant for four-dimensional QCD.

  14. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-06

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  15. Rationally synthesized two-dimensional polymers.

    PubMed

    Colson, John W; Dichtel, William R

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic polymers exhibit diverse and useful properties and influence most aspects of modern life. Many polymerization methods provide linear or branched macromolecules, frequently with outstanding functional-group tolerance and molecular weight control. In contrast, extending polymerization strategies to two-dimensional periodic structures is in its infancy, and successful examples have emerged only recently through molecular framework, surface science and crystal engineering approaches. In this Review, we describe successful 2D polymerization strategies, as well as seminal research that inspired their development. These methods include the synthesis of 2D covalent organic frameworks as layered crystals and thin films, surface-mediated polymerization of polyfunctional monomers, and solid-state topochemical polymerizations. Early application targets of 2D polymers include gas separation and storage, optoelectronic devices and membranes, each of which might benefit from predictable long-range molecular organization inherent to this macromolecular architecture.

  16. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  17. Local doping of two-dimensional materials

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Dillon; Velasco, Jr, Jairo; Ju, Long; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Germany, Chad E.; Zettl, Alexander K.; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to locally doping two-dimensional (2D) materials. In one aspect, an assembly including a substrate, a first insulator disposed on the substrate, a second insulator disposed on the first insulator, and a 2D material disposed on the second insulator is formed. A first voltage is applied between the 2D material and the substrate. With the first voltage applied between the 2D material and the substrate, a second voltage is applied between the 2D material and a probe positioned proximate the 2D material. The second voltage between the 2D material and the probe is removed. The first voltage between the 2D material and the substrate is removed. A portion of the 2D material proximate the probe when the second voltage was applied has a different electron density compared to a remainder of the 2D material.

  18. Engineering Two-dimensional Materials Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    2016-11-30

    This account reviews our recent research activities and achievements in the field of two-dimensional (2D) materials surface chemistry. 2D materials are atomically thin, so that carriers are less-restricted to move in the in-plane direction, whereas the out-of-plain motion is quantum-confined. Semiconductor quantum wells and graphene are two well-known examples. Applications of 2D materials in optoelectronics, surface modification, and complex materials must overcome engineering challenges associated with understanding and engineering surface chemistry of 2D materials, which essentially bridge multiscale physical phenomena. In my research group, we understand and engineer broad aspects of chemistry and physics at nanomaterials surfaces for advancing nanomaterials-based technologies. The three main topics covered in this account are as follows: i) colloidal synthesis of stacking-controlled 2D materials, ii) wetting properties of 2D materials, and iii) engineering electronic transport at 2D materials-semiconductor interfaces.

  19. Intrinsic two-dimensional features as textons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, E.; Zetzsche, C.; Rentschler, I.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that intrinsic two-dimensional (i2D) features, computationally defined as the outputs of nonlinear operators that model the activity of end-stopped neurons, play a role in preattentive texture discrimination. We first show that for discriminable textures with identical power spectra the predictions of traditional models depend on the type of nonlinearity and fail for energy measures. We then argue that the concept of intrinsic dimensionality, and the existence of end-stopped neurons, can help us to understand the role of the nonlinearities. Furthermore, we show examples in which models without strong i2D selectivity fail to predict the correct ranking order of perceptual segregation. Our arguments regarding the importance of i2D features resemble the arguments of Julesz and co-workers regarding textons such as terminators and crossings. However, we provide a computational framework that identifies textons with the outputs of nonlinear operators that are selective to i2D features.

  20. Two-dimensional virtual impactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forney, L.J.; Ravenhall, D.G.

    1980-12-01

    Theoretical predictions using both potential flow analyses and solutions to Navier-Stokes equations are made for the operating characteristics of a two-dimensional virtual impactor. Experiments were performed with 2.5 ..mu..m, uranine tagged, di-octylphthalate (DOP) oil droplets for a wide range of prototype geometries to measure the magnitude of internal losses and to fully characterize the instrument response. The influence of geometry including the throat angle (38/sup 0/ less than or equal to ..beta../sub 0/ less than or equal to 58.2/sup 0/) and normalized void width (0.7 less than or equal to h/w less than or equal to 1.5) on the particle cutoff diameter, efficiency curve steepness and properties of the internal particle loss factor are presented for fixed instrument Reynolds numbers Re = 1540 and bleed flow f = 0.1. The theory, supported by trends in the empirical data, predicts that internal particle losses reduce to zero as the normalized void width increases to h/w = 1.4 +- .1 while the data show a minimum at h/w = 1.6 +- .1. Increasing the void width, however, is shown to substantially reduce the steepness of the particle efficiency curves. Visual observations of the onset of fluid separation for two-dimensional jets impinging upon a void were conducted with a scaled-up water model and correlated with theory. It was found that the limiting void width h/sub lim//w marking the onset of fluid instabilities peaked for an intermediate value of the fluid deflecting plate angle ..beta.. approx. = 80/sup 0/ with larger values of h/sub lim//w corresponding to smaller throat angles ..beta../sub 0/. The limiting void width h/sub lim//w also increased with larger bleed flows into the void. These instabilities may make it difficult to correlate experimental virtual impactor data with theory.

  1. FPT Algorithm for Two-Dimensional Cyclic Convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Trieu-Kie; Shao, Howard M.; Pei, D. Y.; Reed, Irving S.

    1987-01-01

    Fast-polynomial-transform (FPT) algorithm computes two-dimensional cyclic convolution of two-dimensional arrays of complex numbers. New algorithm uses cyclic polynomial convolutions of same length. Algorithm regular, modular, and expandable.

  2. Implementations of two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Marchetti, Nicola; Mriziq, Khaled S; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Today scientists must deal with complex samples that either cannot be adequately separated using one-dimensional chromatography or that require an inordinate amount of time for separation. For these cases we need two-dimensional chromatography because it takes far less time to generate a peak capacity n{sub c} twice in a row than to generate a peak capacity n{sub c}{sup 2} once. Liquid chromatography has been carried out successfully on thin layers of adsorbents and along tubes filled with various adsorbents. The first type of separation sorts out the sample components in a physical separation space that is the layer of packing material. The analysis time is the same for all the components of the sample while their migration distance increases with decreasing retention. The resolution between two components having a certain separation factor (a) increases with increasing migration distance, i.e., from the strongly to the weakly retained compounds. In the second type of separation, the sample components are eluted from the column and separated in the time space, their migration distances are all the same while their retention times increase from the unretained to the strongly retained compounds. Separation efficiency varies little with retention, as long as the components are eluted from the column. We call these two types of separation the chromatographic separations in space (LC{sup x}) and the chromatographic separations in time (LC{sup t}), respectively. In principle, there are four ways to combine these two modes and do two-dimensional chromatographic separations, LC{sup t} x LC{sup t}, LC{sup x} x LC{sup t}, LC{sup t} x LC{sup x}, and LC{sup x} x LC{sup x}. We review, discuss and compare the potential performance of these combinations, their advantages, drawbacks, problems, perspectives and results. Currently, column-based combinations (LC{sup t} x LC{sup t}) are the most actively pursued. We suggest that the combination LC{sup x} x LC{sup t} shows exceptional

  3. About vortex equations of two dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Ryi, S.; Lim, H.

    2017-09-01

    A method to obtain a time-independent vortex solution of a nonlinear differential equation describing two-dimensional flow is investigated. In the usual way, starting from the Navier-Stokes equation the vortex equation is derived by taking a curl operation. After rearranging the equation of the vortex, we get a continuity equation or a divergence-free equation: partial _1V_1+partial _2V_2=0. Additional irrotationality of V_1 and V_2 leads us to the Cauchy-Riemann condition satisfied by a newly introduced stream function Ψ and velocity potential Φ. As a result, if we know V_1 and V_2 or a combination of two, the differential equation is mapped to a lower-order partial differential equation. This differential equation is the one satisfied by the stream function ψ where the vorticity vector ω is given by -(partial _1^2+partial _2^2) ψ. A simple solution is discussed for the two different limits of viscosity.

  4. Comparative Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Doreen; König, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) uses an internal standard to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots visualized on 2D polyacrylamide gels. This is particularly important for samples, which need to be compared without the availability of replicates and thus cannot be studied using differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). CoFGE corrects for gel-to-gel variability by co-running with the sample proteome a standardized marker grid of 80-100 nodes, which is formed by a set of purified proteins. Differentiation of reference and analyte is possible by the use of two fluorescent dyes. Variations in the y-dimension (molecular weight) are corrected by the marker grid. For the optional control of the x-dimension (pI), azo dyes can be used. Experiments are possible in both vertical and horizontal (h) electrophoresis devices, but hCoFGE is much easier to perform. For data analysis, commercial software capable of warping can be adapted.

  5. Two-dimensional topological photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Chen; He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The topological phase of matter, originally proposed and first demonstrated in fermionic electronic systems, has drawn considerable research attention in the past decades due to its robust transport of edge states and its potential with respect to future quantum information, communication, and computation. Recently, searching for such a unique material phase in bosonic systems has become a hot research topic worldwide. So far, many bosonic topological models and methods for realizing them have been discovered in photonic systems, acoustic systems, mechanical systems, etc. These discoveries have certainly yielded vast opportunities in designing material phases and related properties in the topological domain. In this review, we first focus on some of the representative photonic topological models and employ the underlying Dirac model to analyze the edge states and geometric phase. On the basis of these models, three common types of two-dimensional topological photonic systems are discussed: 1) photonic quantum Hall effect with broken time-reversal symmetry; 2) photonic topological insulator and the associated pseudo-time-reversal symmetry-protected mechanism; 3) time/space periodically modulated photonic Floquet topological insulator. Finally, we provide a summary and extension of this emerging field, including a brief introduction to the Weyl point in three-dimensional systems.

  6. Polaritons in layered two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Low, Tony; Chaves, Andrey; Caldwell, Joshua D; Kumar, Anshuman; Fang, Nicholas X; Avouris, Phaedon; Heinz, Tony F; Guinea, Francisco; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Koppens, Frank

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, enhanced light-matter interactions through a plethora of dipole-type polaritonic excitations have been observed in two-dimensional (2D) layered materials. In graphene, electrically tunable and highly confined plasmon-polaritons were predicted and observed, opening up opportunities for optoelectronics, bio-sensing and other mid-infrared applications. In hexagonal boron nitride, low-loss infrared-active phonon-polaritons exhibit hyperbolic behaviour for some frequencies, allowing for ray-like propagation exhibiting high quality factors and hyperlensing effects. In transition metal dichalcogenides, reduced screening in the 2D limit leads to optically prominent excitons with large binding energy, with these polaritonic modes having been recently observed with scanning near-field optical microscopy. Here, we review recent progress in state-of-the-art experiments, and survey the vast library of polaritonic modes in 2D materials, their optical spectral properties, figures of merit and application space. Taken together, the emerging field of 2D material polaritonics and their hybrids provide enticing avenues for manipulating light-matter interactions across the visible, infrared to terahertz spectral ranges, with new optical control beyond what can be achieved using traditional bulk materials.

  7. Braid Entropy of Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Nicolas; Xia, Hua; Punzmann, Horst; Faber, Benjamin; Shats, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The evolving shape of material fluid lines in a flow underlies the quantitative prediction of the dissipation and material transport in many industrial and natural processes. However, collecting quantitative data on this dynamics remains an experimental challenge in particular in turbulent flows. Indeed the deformation of a fluid line, induced by its successive stretching and folding, can be difficult to determine because such description ultimately relies on often inaccessible multi-particle information. Here we report laboratory measurements in two-dimensional turbulence that offer an alternative topological viewpoint on this issue. This approach characterizes the dynamics of a braid of Lagrangian trajectories through a global measure of their entanglement. The topological length of material fluid lines can be derived from these braids. This length is found to grow exponentially with time, giving access to the braid topological entropy . The entropy increases as the square root of the turbulent kinetic energy and is directly related to the single-particle dispersion coefficient. At long times, the probability distribution of is positively skewed and shows strong exponential tails. Our results suggest that may serve as a measure of the irreversibility of turbulence based on minimal principles and sparse Lagrangian data. PMID:26689261

  8. Buckled two-dimensional Xene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molle, Alessandro; Goldberger, Joshua; Houssa, Michel; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Akinwande, Deji

    2017-01-01

    Silicene, germanene and stanene are part of a monoelemental class of two-dimensional (2D) crystals termed 2D-Xenes (X = Si, Ge, Sn and so on) which, together with their ligand-functionalized derivatives referred to as Xanes, are comprised of group IVA atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice -- similar to graphene but with varying degrees of buckling. Their electronic structure ranges from trivial insulators, to semiconductors with tunable gaps, to semi-metallic, depending on the substrate, chemical functionalization and strain. More than a dozen different topological insulator states are predicted to emerge, including the quantum spin Hall state at room temperature, which, if realized, would enable new classes of nanoelectronic and spintronic devices, such as the topological field-effect transistor. The electronic structure can be tuned, for example, by changing the group IVA element, the degree of spin-orbit coupling, the functionalization chemistry or the substrate, making the 2D-Xene systems promising multifunctional 2D materials for nanotechnology. This Perspective highlights the current state of the art and future opportunities in the manipulation and stability of these materials, their functions and applications, and novel device concepts.

  9. Compact Two-Dimensional Spectrometer Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    2008-01-01

    The figure is a simplified depiction of a proposed spectrometer optical unit that would be suitable for incorporation into a remote-sensing instrumentation system. Relative to prior spectrometer optical assemblies, this unit would be compact and simple, largely by virtue of its predominantly two-dimensional character. The proposed unit would be a combination of two optical components. One component would be an arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) an integrated-optics device, developed for use in wavelength multiplexing in telecommunications. The other component would be a diffraction grating superimposed on part of the AWG. The function of an AWG is conceptually simple. Input light propagates along a single-mode optical waveguide to a point where it is split to propagate along some number (N) of side-by-side waveguides. The lengths of the optical paths along these waveguides differ such that, considering the paths in a sequence proceeding across the array of waveguides, the path length increases linearly. These waveguides launch quasi-free-space waves into a planar waveguide-coupling region. The waves propagate through this region to interfere onto an array of output waveguides. Through proper choice of key design parameters (waveguide lengths, size and shape of the waveguide coupling region, and lateral distances between waveguides), one can cause the input light to be channeled into wavelength bins nominally corresponding to the output waveguides.

  10. Two-dimensional bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharekhanlou, Behnaz; Khorasani, Sina; Sarvari, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Recent development in fabrication technology of planar two-dimensional (2D) materials has introduced the possibility of numerous novel applications. Our recent analysis has revealed that by definition of p-n junctions through appropriate patterned doping of 2D semiconductors, ideal exponential I-V characteristics may be expected. However, the theory of 2D junctions turns out to be very different to that of standard bulk junctions. Based on this theory of 2D diodes, we construct for the first time a model to describe 2D bipolar junction transistors (2D-BJTs). We derive the small-signal equivalent model, and estimate the performance of a 2D-BJT device based on graphone as the example material. A current gain of about 138 and maximum threshold frequency of 77 GHz, together with a power-delay product of only 4 fJ per 1 μm lateral width is expected at an operating voltage of 5 V. In addition, we derive the necessary formulae and a new approximate solution for the continuity equation in the 2D configuration, which have been verified against numerical solutions.

  11. Order Parameters for Two-Dimensional Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    We derive methods that explain how to quantify the amount of order in ``ordered'' and ``highly ordered'' porous arrays. Ordered arrays from bee honeycomb and several from the general field of nanoscience are compared. Accurate measures of the order in porous arrays are made using the discrete pair distribution function (PDF) and the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) from 2-D discrete Fourier transforms calculated from the real-space data using MATLAB routines. An order parameter, OP3, is defined from the PDF to evaluate the total order in a given array such that an ideal network has the value of 1. When we compare PDFs of man-made arrays with that of our honeycomb we find OP3=0.399 for the honeycomb and OP3=0.572 for man's best hexagonal array. The DWF also scales with this order parameter with the least disorder from a computer-generated hexagonal array and the most disorder from a random array. An ideal hexagonal array normalizes a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller parameter is derived which describes the disorder in the arrays. An order parameter S, defined by the DWF, takes values from [0, 1] and for the analyzed man-made array is 0.90, while for the honeycomb it is 0.65. This presentation describes methods to quantify the order found in these arrays.

  12. Extended Polymorphism of Two-Dimensional Material.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaro; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Nishizaki, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Norio; Nakano, Masaki; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2017-09-13

    When controlling electronic properties of bulk materials, we usually assume that the basic crystal structure is fixed. However, in two-dimensional (2D) materials, atomic structure or polymorph is attracting growing interest as a controlling parameter to functionalize their properties. Various polymorphs can exist in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) from which 2D materials are generated, and polymorphism has drastic impacts on the electronic states. Here we report the discovery of an unprecedented polymorph of a TMDC 2D material. By mechanical exfoliation, we made thin flakes from a single crystal of 2Ha-type tantalum disulfide (TaS2), a metallic TMDC with a charge-density-wave (CDW) phase. Microbeam X-ray diffraction measurements and electrical transport measurements indicate that thin flakes possess a polymorph different from any one known in TaS2 bulk crystals. Moreover, the flakes with the unique polymorph displayed the dramatically enhanced CDW ordering temperature. The present results suggest the potential existence of diverse structural and electronic phases accessible only in 2D materials.

  13. Photodetectors based on two dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lou; Zhongzhu, Liang; Guozhen, Shen

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with unique properties have received a great deal of attention in recent years. This family of materials has rapidly established themselves as intriguing building blocks for versatile nanoelectronic devices that offer promising potential for use in next generation optoelectronics, such as photodetectors. Furthermore, their optoelectronic performance can be adjusted by varying the number of layers. They have demonstrated excellent light absorption, enabling ultrafast and ultrasensitive detection of light in photodetectors, especially in their single-layer structure. Moreover, due to their atomic thickness, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and large breaking strength, these materials have been of great interest for use in flexible devices and strain engineering. Toward that end, several kinds of photodetectors based on 2D materials have been reported. Here, we present a review of the state-of-the-art in photodetectors based on graphene and other 2D materials, such as the graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and so on. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61377033, 61574132, 61504136) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5 Hz to 50 Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  15. Two-dimensional Dirac signature of germanene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Bampoulis, P.; Houselt, A. van; Zandvliet, H. J. W.

    2015-09-14

    The structural and electronic properties of germanene coated Ge{sub 2}Pt clusters have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at room temperature. The interior of the germanene sheet exhibits a buckled honeycomb structure with a lattice constant of 4.3 Å and a buckling of 0.2 Å. The zigzag edges of germanene are reconstructed and display a 4× periodicity. The differential conductivity of the interior of the germanene sheet has a V-shape, which is reminiscent of the density of states of a two-dimensional Dirac system. The minimum of the differential conductivity is located close to the Fermi level and has a non-zero value, which we ascribe to the metallic character of the underlying Ge{sub 2}Pt substrate. Near the reconstructed germanene zigzag edges the shape of the differential conductivity changes from a V-shape to a more parabolic-like shape, revealing that the reconstructed germanene zigzag edges do not exhibit a pronounced metallic edge state.

  16. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  17. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinfeng

    Ultrathin semiconductors present various novel electronic properties. The first experimental realized two-dimensional (2D) material is graphene. Searching 2D materials with heavy elements bring the attention to Si, Ge and Sn. 2D buckled Si-based silicene was realized by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. Ge-based germanene was realized by mechanical exfoliation. Sn-based stanene has its unique properties. Stanene and its derivatives can be 2D topological insulators (TI) with a very large band gap as proposed by first-principles calculations, or can support enhanced thermoelectric performance, topological superconductivity and the near-room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. For the first time, in this work, we report a successful fabrication of 2D stanene by MBE. The atomic and electronic structures were determined by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in combination with first-principles calculations. This work will stimulate the experimental study and exploring the future application of stanene. In cooperation with Fengfeng Zhu, Wei-jiong Chen, Yong Xu, Chun-lei Gao, Dan-dan Guan, Canhua Liu, Dong Qian, Shou-Cheng Zhang.

  18. Dynamics of two-dimensional dipole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Kenneth I.; Kalman, Gabor J.; Hartmann, Peter; Donko, Zoltan

    2010-09-15

    Using a combined analytical/molecular dynamics approach, we study the current fluctuation spectra and longitudinal and transverse collective mode dispersions of the classical two-dimensional (point) dipole system (2DDS) characterized by the {phi}{sub D}(r)={mu}{sup 2}/r{sup 3} repulsive interaction potential; {mu} is the electric dipole strength. The interest in the 2DDS is twofold. First, the quasi-long-range 1/r{sup 3} interaction makes the system a unique classical many-body system, with a remarkable collective mode behavior. Second, the system may be a good model for a closely spaced semiconductor electron-hole bilayer, a system that is in the forefront of current experimental interest. The longitudinal collective excitations, which are of primary interest for the liquid phase, are acoustic at long wavelengths. At higher wave numbers and for sufficiently high coupling strength, we observe the formation of a deep minimum in the dispersion curve preceded by a sharp maximum; this is identical to what has been observed in the dispersion of the zero-temperature bosonic dipole system, which in turn emulates so-called roton-maxon excitation spectrum of the superfluid {sup 4}He. The analysis we present gives an insight into the emergence of this apparently universal structure, governed by strong correlations. We study both the liquid and the crystalline solid state. We also observe the excitation of combination frequencies, resembling the roton-roton, roton-maxon, etc. structures in {sup 4}He.

  19. Nonlinear tunneling in two-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Brazhnyi, V. A.; Konotop, V. V.; Kuzmiak, V.; Shchesnovich, V. S.

    2007-08-15

    We present a thorough analysis of the nonlinear tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in static and accelerating two-dimensional lattices within the framework of the mean-field approximation. We deal with nonseparable lattices, considering different initial atomic distributions in highly symmetric states. For an analytical description of the condensate before instabilities develop, we derive several few-mode models, analyzing essentially both nonlinear and quasilinear regimes of tunneling. By direct numerical simulations, we show that two-mode models provide an accurate description of tunneling when either initially two states are populated or tunneling occurs between two stable states. Otherwise, a two-mode model may give only useful qualitative hints for understanding tunneling, but does not reproduce many features of the phenomenon. This reflects the crucial role of instabilities developed due to two-body interactions resulting in a non-negligible population of the higher bands. This effect becomes even more pronounced in the case of accelerating lattices. In the latter case we show that the direction of the acceleration is a relevant physical parameter which affects the tunneling by changing the atomic rates at different symmetric states and by changing the numbers of bands involved in the atomic transfer.

  20. Two-dimensional atomic crystals beyond graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures have been the center of intense research and development for more than two decades now. Of these materials, graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) layered material system, has had a significant impact on science and technology over the past decade after monolayers of this material were experimentally isolated in 2004. The recent emergence of other classes of 2D graphene-like layered materials has added yet more exciting dimensions for research in exploring the diverse properties and applications arising from these 2D material systems. For example, hexagonal-BN, a layered material closest in structure to graphene, is an insulator, while NbSe2, a transition metal di-chalcogenide, is metallic and monolayers of other transition metal di-chalcogenides such as MoS2 are direct band-gap semiconductors. The rich spectrum of properties that 2D layered material systems offer can potentially be engineered ondemand, and creates exciting prospects for using such materials in applications ranging from electronics, sensing, photonics, energy harvesting and flexible electronics over the coming years.

  1. Polaritons in layered two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Tony; Chaves, Andrey; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Kumar, Anshuman; Fang, Nicholas X.; Avouris, Phaedon; Heinz, Tony F.; Guinea, Francisco; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Koppens, Frank

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, enhanced light-matter interactions through a plethora of dipole-type polaritonic excitations have been observed in two-dimensional (2D) layered materials. In graphene, electrically tunable and highly confined plasmon-polaritons were predicted and observed, opening up opportunities for optoelectronics, bio-sensing and other mid-infrared applications. In hexagonal boron nitride, low-loss infrared-active phonon-polaritons exhibit hyperbolic behaviour for some frequencies, allowing for ray-like propagation exhibiting high quality factors and hyperlensing effects. In transition metal dichalcogenides, reduced screening in the 2D limit leads to optically prominent excitons with large binding energy, with these polaritonic modes having been recently observed with scanning near-field optical microscopy. Here, we review recent progress in state-of-the-art experiments, and survey the vast library of polaritonic modes in 2D materials, their optical spectral properties, figures of merit and application space. Taken together, the emerging field of 2D material polaritonics and their hybrids provide enticing avenues for manipulating light-matter interactions across the visible, infrared to terahertz spectral ranges, with new optical control beyond what can be achieved using traditional bulk materials.

  2. Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals: Disorder Matters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Markus R; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Reparaz, Juan Sebastian; El Sachat, Alexandros; Sledzinska, Marianna; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M

    2016-09-14

    The design and fabrication of phononic crystals (PnCs) hold the key to control the propagation of heat and sound at the nanoscale. However, there is a lack of experimental studies addressing the impact of order/disorder on the phononic properties of PnCs. Here, we present a comparative investigation of the influence of disorder on the hypersonic and thermal properties of two-dimensional PnCs. PnCs of ordered and disordered lattices are fabricated of circular holes with equal filling fractions in free-standing Si membranes. Ultrafast pump and probe spectroscopy (asynchronous optical sampling) and Raman thermometry based on a novel two-laser approach are used to study the phononic properties in the gigahertz (GHz) and terahertz (THz) regime, respectively. Finite element method simulations of the phonon dispersion relation and three-dimensional displacement fields furthermore enable the unique identification of the different hypersonic vibrations. The increase of surface roughness and the introduction of short-range disorder are shown to modify the phonon dispersion and phonon coherence in the hypersonic (GHz) range without affecting the room-temperature thermal conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we suggest a criteria for predicting phonon coherence as a function of roughness and disorder.

  3. Two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors beyond graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-12-01

    The rapid and successful development of the research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures has been substantially enlarged to include many other two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors (THS): phosphorene, silicene, germanene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 as well as the van der Waals heterostructures of various THSs (including graphene). The present article is a review of recent works on THSs beyond graphene and van der Waals heterostructures composed of different pairs of all THSs. One among the priorities of new THSs compared to graphene is the presence of a non-vanishing energy bandgap which opened up the ability to fabricate a large number of electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices on the basis of these new materials and their van der Waals heterostructures. Moreover, a significant progress in the research on TMDCs was the discovery of valley degree of freedom. The results of research on valley degree of freedom and the development of a new technology based on valley degree of freedom-valleytronics are also presented. Thus the scientific contents of the basic research and practical applications os THSs are very rich and extremely promising.

  4. Perspective: Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in complex systems. The 2DRR method can leverage electronic resonance enhancement to selectively probe chromophores embedded in complex environments (e.g., a cofactor in a protein). In addition, correlations between the two dimensions of the 2DRR spectrum reveal information that is not available in traditional Raman techniques. For example, distributions of reactant and product geometries can be correlated in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this perspective article, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. We also address key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies. Most notably, it has been shown that these two techniques are subject to a tradeoff between sensitivity to anharmonicity and susceptibility to artifacts. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest great potential for the future of the technique.

  5. Calculation of two-dimensional lambda modes

    SciTech Connect

    Belchior, A. Jr. ); Moreira, J.M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A system for on-line monitoring of power distribution in small reactors (known as MAP) is under development at COPESP-IPEN. Signals of self-powered neutron detectors are input to a program that estimates the power distribution as an expansion of lambda modes. The modal coefficients are obtained from a least-mean-squares technique adequate for real-time analysis. Three-dimensional lambda modes are synthesized out of one- and two-dimensional lambda modes. As a part of this project, a modification of a computer code was carried out in order to obtain the lambda modes. The results of this effort are summarized. The lambda modes are the solutions of the time-independent multigroup neutron diffusion equation, an eigenvalue equation. Normally, the computer codes produce the fundamental mode corresponding to the largest eigenvalue; their respective interpretations are neutron flux distribution and effective multiplication factor. For calculating higher order lambda modes it is usually necessary to eliminate the contribution of the lower modes from the fission source.

  6. Two-dimensional discrete Coulomb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yuqing; Thorpe, M. F.; Parkinson, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    We study an A1-xBx alloy on a two-dimensional triangular lattice. The ions A and B have different charges, with a background charge to ensure neutrality, and are constrained to lie at the discrete sites defined by a fixed triangular lattice. We study the various structures formed at different compositions x by doing computer simulations to find the lowest energy, using an energy minimization scheme, together with simulated annealing. Like ions try to avoid each other because of charge repulsion, which leads to structures, which are very different from those in a random alloy. At low concentrations, a triangular Wigner lattice is formed, which evolves continuously up to a concentration of x=1/3. For higher concentrations, 1/3<=x<=1/2 there are long polymer chains, with occasional branches. We show that there is a symmetry about x=1/2, which is the percolation point for nearest neighbors on the triangular lattice. At certain special stoichiometries, regular superlattices are formed, which usually have a slightly lower energy than a disordered configuration. The powder-diffraction patterns are calculated. The magnetic properties of this structure are also studied, and it is shown that the high-temperature susceptibility could be a useful diagnostic tool, in that it is very sensitive to the number of nearest-neighbor magnetic pairs. This work contributes to a better understanding of layered double hydroxides like Ni1-xAlx(OH)2(CO3)x/2.yH2O.

  7. Parallel Stitching of Two-Dimensional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing; Department of Electrical Engineering; Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Team

    Large scale integration of atomically thin metals (e.g. graphene), semiconductors (e.g. transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs)), and insulators (e.g. hexagonal boron nitride) is critical for constructing the building blocks for future nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. However, the construction of in-plane heterostructures, especially between two atomic layers with large lattice mismatch, could be extremely difficult due to the strict requirement of spatial precision and the lack of a selective etching method. Here, we developed a general synthesis methodology to achieve both vertical and in-plane ``parallel stitched'' heterostructures between a two-dimensional (2D) and TMD materials, which enables both multifunctional electronic/optoelectronic devices and their large scale integration. This is achieved via selective ``sowing'' of aromatic molecule seeds during the chemical vapor deposition growth. MoS2 is used as a model system to form heterostructures with diverse other 2D materials. Direct and controllable synthesis of large-scale parallel stitched graphene-MoS2 heterostructures was further investigated. Unique nanometer overlapped junctions were obtained at the parallel stitched interface, which are highly desirable both as metal-semiconductor contact and functional devices/systems, such as for use in logical integrated circuits (ICs) and broadband photodetectors.

  8. Two-dimensional heterostructures for energy storage

    DOE PAGES

    Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-06-12

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide slit-shaped ion diffusion channels that enable fast movement of lithium and other ions. However, electronic conductivity, the number of intercalation sites, and stability during extended cycling are also crucial for building high-performance energy storage devices. While individual 2D materials, such as graphene, show some of the required properties, none of them can offer all properties needed to maximize energy density, power density, and cycle life. Here we argue that stacking different 2D materials into heterostructured architectures opens an opportunity to construct electrodes that would combine the advantages of the individual building blocks while eliminating the associatedmore » shortcomings. We discuss characteristics of common 2D materials and provide examples of 2D heterostructured electrodes that showed new phenomena leading to superior electrochemical performance. As a result, we also consider electrode fabrication approaches and finally outline future steps to create 2D heterostructured electrodes that could greatly expand current energy storage technologies.« less

  9. Two-Dimensional Optical Proximity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanner, Philip D.; Subramanian, Shankar; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1986-08-01

    In projection printing the proximity effects between adjacent two-dimensional features such as concentric elbows can be the limiting factor in designing layout rules. An aerial image simulation code based on the imaging algorithms in SAMPLE has been developed and used to investigate these proximity effects. The program accepts arbitrary polygonal shapes constructed of rectangular and triangular patches. The image is calculated using Hopkins transmission cross coefficient formulation and uses rapid integral evaluation techniques. The cpu time for this FORTRAN F77 program depends on the size of the mask and the partial coherence factor as 0.25[(1 + σ) 2A(NA/λ)2]2 seconds on a DEC VAX 11/780 using double precision, where A is the mask area, σ the coherence factor, NA the numerical aperture and λ the wavelength. The output intensity can be displayed with graphics tools such as UNIGRAFIX or cross-sectioned for input to SAMPLE development simulation along critical paths. Proximity effects in critical regions between features such as nested elbows, contacts near contacts and lines, and lines near large pads are studied. For small contacts studies show that a contact hole can be placed as close as 0.5λ/NA microns to another contact hole. For nested elbows the critical effect is the variation in intensity in the straight regions just adjacent to the corner. This undesirable variation is primarily due to the intrafeature intensity interactions and is not greatly influenced by the proximity of another nested elbow. For general feature shapes the proximity effects are reduced by increasing the partial coherence factor to 0.5 or higher but at the cost of reducing contrast and peak intensity. For contact masks a partial coherence of 0.3 is recommended for higher edge slope and peak intensities. Proximity effects of small defects are also illustrated.

  10. Interaction of two-dimensional magnetoexcitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumanov, E. V.; Podlesny, I. V.; Moskalenko, S. A.; Liberman, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    We study interaction of the two-dimensional magnetoexcitons with in-plane wave vector k→∥ = 0 , taking into account the influence of the excited Landau levels (ELLs) and of the external electric field perpendicular to the surface of the quantum well and parallel to the external magnetic field. It is shown that the account of the ELLs gives rise to the repulsion between the spinless magnetoexcitons with k→∥ = 0 in the Fock approximation, with the interaction constant g decreasing inverse proportional to the magnetic field strength B (g (0) ∼ 1 / B) . In the presence of the perpendicular electric field the Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC), Zeeman splitting (ZS) and nonparabolicity of the heavy-hole dispersion law affect the Landau quantization of the electrons and holes. They move along the new cyclotron orbits, change their Coulomb interactions and cause the interaction between 2D magnetoexcitons with k→∥ = 0 . The changes of the Coulomb interactions caused by the electrons and by the holes moving with new cyclotron orbits are characterized by some coefficients, which in the absence of the electric field turn to be unity. The differences between these coefficients of the electron-hole pairs forming the magnetoexcitons determine their affinities to the interactions. The interactions between the homogeneous, semihomogeneous and heterogeneous magnetoexcitons forming the symmetric states with the same signs of their affinities are attractive whereas in the case of different sign affinities are repulsive. In the heterogeneous asymmetric states the interactions have opposite signs in comparison with the symmetric states. In all these cases the interaction constant g have the dependence g (0) 1 /√{ B} .

  11. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators

    PubMed Central

    Hermus, James R.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Liquid iodine, zinc chloride, cerium chloride, erbium oxide, iron oxide, and gadolinium chloride were studied. Gaseous xenon, uranium hexafluoride, tungsten hexafluoride, and nickel tetracarbonyl were also studied. Additionally, we performed a proof-of-concept experiment using a 96 cell array in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with erbium oxide allowing for the smallest thickness. For the gases, tungsten hexaflouride required the smallest pressure to compensate for 30 cm of soft tissue. The 96 cell iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter-to-primary ratio. For both liquids and gases, when k-edges were located within the diagnostic energy range used for imaging, the mean beam energy exhibited the smallest change with compensation amount. The thickness of liquids and the gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the space constraints of C-arm-based cone beam CT (CBCT) and diagnostic CT systems. The gas pressures also seem logistically implementable within the space and tube loading constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems. PMID:26835499

  12. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  13. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J. Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  14. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators.

    PubMed

    Hermus, James R; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Liquid iodine, zinc chloride, cerium chloride, erbium oxide, iron oxide, and gadolinium chloride were studied. Gaseous xenon, uranium hexafluoride, tungsten hexafluoride, and nickel tetracarbonyl were also studied. Additionally, we performed a proof-of-concept experiment using a 96 cell array in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with erbium oxide allowing for the smallest thickness. For the gases, tungsten hexaflouride required the smallest pressure to compensate for 30 cm of soft tissue. The 96 cell iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter-to-primary ratio. For both liquids and gases, when k-edges were located within the diagnostic energy range used for imaging, the mean beam energy exhibited the smallest change with compensation amount. The thickness of liquids and the gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the space constraints of C-arm-based cone beam CT (CBCT) and diagnostic CT systems. The gas pressures also seem logistically implementable within the space and tube loading constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems.

  15. Two-dimensional materials and their prospects in transistor electronics.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, F; Pezoldt, J; Granzner, R

    2015-05-14

    During the past decade, two-dimensional materials have attracted incredible interest from the electronic device community. The first two-dimensional material studied in detail was graphene and, since 2007, it has intensively been explored as a material for electronic devices, in particular, transistors. While graphene transistors are still on the agenda, researchers have extended their work to two-dimensional materials beyond graphene and the number of two-dimensional materials under examination has literally exploded recently. Meanwhile several hundreds of different two-dimensional materials are known, a substantial part of them is considered useful for transistors, and experimental transistors with channels of different two-dimensional materials have been demonstrated. In spite of the rapid progress in the field, the prospects of two-dimensional transistors still remain vague and optimistic opinions face rather reserved assessments. The intention of the present paper is to shed more light on the merits and drawbacks of two-dimensional materials for transistor electronics and to add a few more facets to the ongoing discussion on the prospects of two-dimensional transistors. To this end, we compose a wish list of properties for a good transistor channel material and examine to what extent the two-dimensional materials fulfill the criteria of the list. The state-of-the-art two-dimensional transistors are reviewed and a balanced view of both the pros and cons of these devices is provided.

  16. Molecular assembly on two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avijit; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Liljeroth, Peter

    2017-02-24

    Molecular self-assembly is a well-known technique to create highly functional nanostructures on surfaces. Self-assembly on two-dimensional (2D) materials is a developing field driven by the interest in functionalization of 2D materials in order to tune their electronic properties. This has resulted in the discovery of several rich and interesting phenomena. Here, we review this progress with an emphasis on the electronic properties of the adsorbates and the substrate in well-defined systems, as unveiled by scanning tunneling microscopy. The review covers three aspects of the self-assembly. The first one focuses on non-covalent self-assembly dealing with site-selectivity due to inherent moiré pattern present on 2D materials grown on substrates. We also see that modification of intermolecular interactions and molecule-substrate interactions influences the assembly drastically and that 2D materials can also be used as a platform to carry out covalent and metal-coordinated assembly. The second part deals with the electronic properties of molecules adsorbed on 2D materials. By virtue of being inert and possessing low density of states near the Fermi level, 2D materials decouple molecules electronically from the underlying metal substrate and allow high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of molecular orbitals. The moiré pattern on the 2D materials causes site-selective gating and charging of molecules in some cases. The last section covers the effects of self-assembled, acceptor and donor type, organic molecules on the electronic properties of graphene as revealed by spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements. Non-covalent functionalization of 2D materials has already been applied for their application as catalysts and sensors. With the current surge of activity on building van der Waals heterostructures from atomically thin crystals, molecular self-assembly has the potential to add an extra level of flexibility and functionality for applications ranging from

  17. Vortices of Two Dimensional Guiding Center Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio Chofai

    A system of two dimensional guiding center plasma in a square conducting boundary is used as a model to study the anomalous transport is magnetically confined plasma. An external gravitational force is introduced to simulate the curvature and gradient of the magnetic field. For finite boundaries, it is a Hamiltonian system with finite phase space and negative temperature states are allowed. The statistical equilibrium states of this system are described by the solutions of a Poisson's equation with self-consistently determined charge density. In the limit of zero gravity, it can be reduced to the sinh-Poisson equation (DEL)('2)u + (lamda)('2)sinh u = 0. Previous numerical efforts have found solutions with vortex structures. A novel method of generating general exact solutions to this nonlinear boundary value problem is presented. These solutions are given by. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). where E(,i)'s are constants and the dependence of (gamma)(,j)'s on x and y are given by a set of coupled first order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These equations can be linearized to give u(x,y) in terms of Riemann theta functions u(x,y) = 2ln (THETA)(l + 1/2)(THETA)(l) . The phases l evolve linearly in x and y while nonlinear superposition is displayed in the solution u(x,y). The self-consistent Poisson's equation with gravity is studied numerically. Different branches of solutions are obtained and their relations to the zero gravity solutions are discussed. The thermodynamically most favored structure of the system carries the feature of a heavy ion vortex on top of the light electron vortex. Branches of solutions are found to merge into each other as parameters in the equations were smoothly varied. A critical value of gravitational force exists such that below which there is a possibility of hysteresis between different equilibrium states. With the help of the nonzero gravity solutions, we also have a clearer picture of the transition from

  18. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  19. Ultrafast two dimensional infrared chemical exchange spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The method of ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is described. Three ultrashort IR pulses tuned to the frequencies of the vibrational transitions of interest are directed into the sample. The interaction of these pulses with the molecular vibrational oscillators produces a polarization that gives rise to a fourth pulse, the vibrational echo. The vibrational echo pulse is combined with another pulse, the local oscillator, for heterodyne detection of the signal. For fixed time between the second and third pulses, the waiting time, the first pulse is scanned. Two Fourier transforms of the data yield a 2D IR spectrum. The waiting time is increased, and another spectrum is obtained. The change in the 2D IR spectra with increased waiting time provides information on the time evolution of the structure of the molecular system under observation. In a 2D IR chemical exchange experiment, two species A and B, are undergoing chemical exchange. A's are turning into B's, and B's are turning into A's, but the overall concentrations of the species are not changing. The kinetics of the chemical exchange on the ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions can be obtained 2D IR spectroscopy. A vibration that has a different frequency for the two species is monitored. At very short time, there will be two peaks on the diagonal of the 2D IR spectrum, one for A and one for B. As the waiting time is increased, chemical exchange causes off-diagonal peaks to grow in. The time dependence of the growth of these off-diagonal peaks gives the chemical exchange rate. The method is applied to organic solute-solvent complex formation, orientational isomerization about a carbon-carbon single bond, migration of a hydrogen bond from one position on a molecule to another, protein structural substate interconversion, and water hydrogen bond switching between ions and water molecules. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific

  20. Two dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicka, Karolina

    2011-12-01

    Extraordinary phenomena can occur at the interface between two oxide materials. A spectacular example is a formation of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface. In this dissertation the properties of the 2DEG are investigated from first principles. The spatial extent of the 2DEG formed at the SrTiO3/LaAlO 3 n-type interface is studied. It is shown that the confinement of the 2DEG is controlled by metal induced gap states formed in the band gap of SrTiO 3. The confinement width is then determined by the attenuation length of the metal induced gap states into SrTiO3 which is governed by the lowest decay rate evanescent states of bulk SrTiO3 which in turn can be found from the complex band structure of bulk SrTiO3. Magnetic properties of the 2DEG formed at the n-type interface of the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices are investigated. It is found that for a thin SrTiO3 film the interface is ferromagnetic but for a thicker SrTiO3 film the magnetic moment decreases and eventually disappears. This is a result of delocalization of the 2DEG that spreads over thicker SrTiO3 film which leads to violation of the Stoner criterion. Further, it is shown that inclusion of the Hubbard U interaction enhances the Stoner parameter and stabilizes the magnetism. The effect of the 2DEG and the polar interfaces for the thin film ferroelectricity is investigated using both first principles and model calculations. Using a TiO2-terminated BaTiO3 film with LaO monolayers at the two interfaces it is shown that the intrinsic electric field produced by the polar interface forces ionic displacements in BaTiO3 to produce the electric polarization directed into the interior of the BaTiO 3 layer. This creates a ferroelectric dead layer near the interfaces that is non-switchable and thus detrimental to ferroelectricity. It is found that the effect is stronger for a larger effective ionic charge at the interface and longer screening length due to a stronger intrinsic electric

  1. Molecular assembly on two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avijit; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Liljeroth, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Molecular self-assembly is a well-known technique to create highly functional nanostructures on surfaces. Self-assembly on two-dimensional (2D) materials is a developing field driven by the interest in functionalization of 2D materials in order to tune their electronic properties. This has resulted in the discovery of several rich and interesting phenomena. Here, we review this progress with an emphasis on the electronic properties of the adsorbates and the substrate in well-defined systems, as unveiled by scanning tunneling microscopy. The review covers three aspects of the self-assembly. The first one focuses on non-covalent self-assembly dealing with site-selectivity due to inherent moiré pattern present on 2D materials grown on substrates. We also see that modification of intermolecular interactions and molecule–substrate interactions influences the assembly drastically and that 2D materials can also be used as a platform to carry out covalent and metal-coordinated assembly. The second part deals with the electronic properties of molecules adsorbed on 2D materials. By virtue of being inert and possessing low density of states near the Fermi level, 2D materials decouple molecules electronically from the underlying metal substrate and allow high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of molecular orbitals. The moiré pattern on the 2D materials causes site-selective gating and charging of molecules in some cases. The last section covers the effects of self-assembled, acceptor and donor type, organic molecules on the electronic properties of graphene as revealed by spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements. Non-covalent functionalization of 2D materials has already been applied for their application as catalysts and sensors. With the current surge of activity on building van der Waals heterostructures from atomically thin crystals, molecular self-assembly has the potential to add an extra level of flexibility and functionality for applications ranging

  2. Two-dimensional material confined water.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The interface between water and other materials under ambient conditions is of fundamental importance due to its relevance in daily life and a broad range of scientific research. The structural and dynamic properties of water at an interface have been proven to be significantly difference than those of bulk water. However, the exact nature of these interfacial water adlayers at ambient conditions is still under debate. Recent scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments, where two-dimensional (2D) materials as ultrathin coatings are utilized to assist the visualization of interfacial water adlayers, have made remarkable progress on interfacial water and started to clarify some of these fundamental scientific questions. In this Account, we review the recently conducted research exploring the properties of confined water between 2D materials and various surfaces under ambient conditions. Initially, we review the earlier studies of water adsorbed on hydrophilic substrates under ambient conditions in the absence of 2D coating materials, which shows the direct microscopic results. Subsequently, we focus on the studies of water adlayer growth at both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in the presence of 2D coating materials. Ice-like water adlayers confined between hydrophobic graphene and hydrophilic substrates can be directly observed in detail by SPM. It was found that the packing structure of the water adlayer was determined by the hydrophilic substrates, while the orientation of intercalation water domains was directed by the graphene coating. In contrast to hydrophilic substrates, liquid-like nanodroplets confined between hydrophobic graphene and hydrophobic substrates appear close to step edges and atomic-scale surface defects, indicating that atomic-scale surface defects play significant roles in determining the adsorption of water on hydrophobic substrates. In addition, we also review the phenomena of confined water between 2D hydrophilic MoS2 and

  3. Two-dimensional Phase Unwrapping for Digital Holography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Two-dimensional Phase Unwrapping for Digital Holography by Neal K. Bambha, Justin R. Bickford, and Karl K. Klett, Jr. ARL-TR-6225...1197 ARL-TR-6225 September 2012 Two-dimensional Phase Unwrapping for Digital Holography Neal K. Bambha, Justin R. Bickford, and Karl K...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Two-dimensional Phase Unwrapping for Digital Holography 5a. CONTRACT

  4. Lie algebra contractions on two-dimensional hyperboloid

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, G. S. Yakhno, A.

    2010-03-15

    The Inoenue-Wigner contraction from the SO(2, 1) group to the Euclidean E(2) and E(1, 1) group is used to relate the separation of variables in Laplace-Beltrami (Helmholtz) equations for the four corresponding two-dimensional homogeneous spaces: two-dimensional hyperboloids and two-dimensional Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean spaces. We show how the nine systems of coordinates on the two-dimensional hyperboloids contracted to the four systems of coordinates on E{sub 2} and eight on E{sub 1,1}. The text was submitted by the authors in English.

  5. Exploring two-dimensional electron gases with two-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Paul, J.; Dey, P.; Tokumoto, T.; ...

    2014-10-07

    The dephasing of excitons in a modulation doped single quantum well was carefully measured using time integrated four-wave mixing (FWM) and two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectroscopy. These are the first 2DFT measurements performed on a modulation doped single quantum well. The inhomogeneous and homogeneous excitonic line widths were obtained from the diagonal and cross-diagonal profiles of the 2DFT spectra. The laser excitation density and temperature were varied and 2DFT spectra were collected. A very rapid increase of the dephasing decay, and as a result, an increase in the cross-diagonal 2DFT linewidths with temperature was observed. Furthermore, the lineshapes of themore » 2DFT spectra suggest the presence of excitation induced dephasing and excitation induced shift.« less

  6. Exploring two-dimensional electron gases with two-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.; Dey, P.; Tokumoto, T.; Reno, J. L.; Hilton, D. J.; Karaiskaj, D.

    2014-10-07

    The dephasing of excitons in a modulation doped single quantum well was carefully measured using time integrated four-wave mixing (FWM) and two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectroscopy. These are the first 2DFT measurements performed on a modulation doped single quantum well. The inhomogeneous and homogeneous excitonic line widths were obtained from the diagonal and cross-diagonal profiles of the 2DFT spectra. The laser excitation density and temperature were varied and 2DFT spectra were collected. A very rapid increase of the dephasing decay, and as a result, an increase in the cross-diagonal 2DFT linewidths with temperature was observed. Furthermore, the lineshapes of the 2DFT spectra suggest the presence of excitation induced dephasing and excitation induced shift.

  7. Spatiotemporal surface solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2007-11-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal light localization in truncated two-dimensional photonic lattices and demonstrate the existence of two-dimensional surface light bullets localized in the lattice corners or the edges. We study the families of the spatiotemporal surface solitons and their properties such as bistability and compare them with the modes located deep inside the photonic lattice.

  8. Beginning Introductory Physics with Two-Dimensional Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2009-01-01

    During the session on "Introductory College Physics Textbooks" at the 2007 Summer Meeting of the AAPT, there was a brief discussion about whether introductory physics should begin with one-dimensional motion or two-dimensional motion. Here we present the case that by starting with two-dimensional motion, we are able to introduce a considerable…

  9. Beginning Introductory Physics with Two-Dimensional Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2009-01-01

    During the session on "Introductory College Physics Textbooks" at the 2007 Summer Meeting of the AAPT, there was a brief discussion about whether introductory physics should begin with one-dimensional motion or two-dimensional motion. Here we present the case that by starting with two-dimensional motion, we are able to introduce a considerable…

  10. New two-dimensional quantum models with shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional quantum models which obey the property of shape invariance are built in the framework of polynomial two-dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics. They are obtained using the expressions for known one-dimensional shape invariant potentials. The constructed Hamiltonians are integrable with symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta, and they are not amenable to the conventional separation of variables.

  11. Dynamics of two-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Bong June; Yethiraj, Arun

    2013-06-01

    The dynamic properties of dense two-dimensional (2D) polymer melts are studied using discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations. Both strictly 2D and quasi-2D systems are investigated. The strictly 2D model system consists of a fluid of freely jointed tangent hard disc chains. The translational diffusion coefficient, D, is strongly system size dependent with D ˜ ln L where L is the linear dimension of the square simulation cell. The rotational correlation time, τrot, is, however, independent of system size. The dynamics is consistent with Rouse behavior with D/ln L ˜ N-1 and τrot ˜ N2 for all area fractions. Analysis of the intermediate scattering function, Fs(k, t), shows that the dynamics becomes slow for N = 256 and the area fraction of 0.454 and that there might be a glass transition for long polymers at sufficiently high area fractions. The polymer mobility is not correlated with the conformation of the molecules. In the quasi-2D system hard sphere chains are confined between corrugated surfaces so that chains cannot go over each other or into the surfaces. The conformational properties are identical to the 2D case, but D and τrot are independent of system size. The scaling of D and τrot with N is similar to that of strictly 2D systems. The simulations suggest that 2D polymers are never entangled and follow Rouse dynamics at all densities.

  12. Exploring two-dimensional electron gases with two-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.; Dey, P.; Karaiskaj, D.; Tokumoto, T.; Hilton, D. J.; Reno, J. L.

    2014-10-07

    The dephasing of the Fermi edge singularity excitations in two modulation doped single quantum wells of 12 nm and 18 nm thickness and in-well carrier concentration of ∼4 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} was carefully measured using spectrally resolved four-wave mixing (FWM) and two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectroscopy. Although the absorption at the Fermi edge is broad at this doping level, the spectrally resolved FWM shows narrow resonances. Two peaks are observed separated by the heavy hole/light hole energy splitting. Temperature dependent “rephasing” (S{sub 1}) 2DFT spectra show a rapid linear increase of the homogeneous linewidth with temperature. The dephasing rate increases faster with temperature in the narrower 12 nm quantum well, likely due to an increased carrier-phonon scattering rate. The S{sub 1} 2DFT spectra were measured using co-linear, cross-linear, and co-circular polarizations. Distinct 2DFT lineshapes were observed for co-linear and cross-linear polarizations, suggesting the existence of polarization dependent contributions. The “two-quantum coherence” (S{sub 3}) 2DFT spectra for the 12 nm quantum well show a single peak for both co-linear and co-circular polarizations.

  13. Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2 -2 0 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway C oa st al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at...distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-12-20 September 2012 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway Stephen H. Scott, Jeremy A...A two-dimensional Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the Moose Creek Floodway. The Floodway is located

  14. Strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional dipolar fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Skinner, Brian; Fogler, Michael; Demler, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    We study the collective oscillations of strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional dipolar fermions at zero temperature. The correlation energy of the quasi-two-dimensional gas is obtained using a novel variational method based on the fixed-node diffusion Monte-Carlo analysis of strictly two-dimensional dipolar Fermi gas. As an application, we predict the dependence of the Wigner crystal transition point on the thickness of the layer, as well as the shift of the monopole oscillation frequency in harmonic traps.

  15. Spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-11-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices in the presence of gain and loss. In the framework of the continuous-discrete cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau model, we demonstrate the existence of novel classes of two-dimensional spatiotemporal dissipative lattice solitons, which also include surface solitons located in the corners or at the edges of the truncated two-dimensional photonic lattice. We find the domains of existence and stability of such spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in the relevant parameter space, for both on-site and intersite lattice solitons. We show that the on-site solitons are stable in the whole domain of their existence, whereas most of the intersite solitons are unstable. We describe the scenarios of the instability-induced dynamics of dissipative solitons in two-dimensional lattices.

  16. Pseudospectral solution of two-dimensional gas-dynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, D. A.; Zang, T. A.; Salas, M. D.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Chebyshev pseudospectral methods are used to compute two dimensional smooth compressible flows. Grid refinement tests show that spectral accuracy can be obtained. Filtering is not needed if resolution is sufficiently high and if boundary conditions are carefully prescribed.

  17. Model of a Negatively Curved Two-Dimensional Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction of models of two-dimensional surfaces with negative curvature that are used to illustrate differences in the triangle sum rule for the various Big Bang Theories of the universe. (JRH)

  18. String & Sticky Tape Experiments: Two-Dimensional Collisions Using Pendulums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D.

    1989-01-01

    Introduces a method for two-dimensional kinematics measurements by hanging marbles with long strings. Describes experimental procedures for conservation of momentum and obtaining the coefficient of restitution. Provides diagrams and mathematical expressions for the activities. (YP)

  19. A two-dimensional polymer prepared by organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kissel, Patrick; Erni, Rolf; Schweizer, W Bernd; Rossell, Marta D; King, Benjamin T; Bauer, Thomas; Götzinger, Stephan; Schlüter, A Dieter; Sakamoto, Junji

    2012-02-05

    Synthetic polymers are widely used materials, as attested by a production of more than 200 millions of tons per year, and are typically composed of linear repeat units. They may also be branched or irregularly crosslinked. Here, we introduce a two-dimensional polymer with internal periodicity composed of areal repeat units. This is an extension of Staudinger's polymerization concept (to form macromolecules by covalently linking repeat units together), but in two dimensions. A well-known example of such a two-dimensional polymer is graphene, but its thermolytic synthesis precludes molecular design on demand. Here, we have rationally synthesized an ordered, non-equilibrium two-dimensional polymer far beyond molecular dimensions. The procedure includes the crystallization of a specifically designed photoreactive monomer into a layered structure, a photo-polymerization step within the crystal and a solvent-induced delamination step that isolates individual two-dimensional polymers as free-standing, monolayered molecular sheets.

  20. Difficulties that Students Face with Two-Dimensional Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihas, P.; Gemousakakis, T.

    2007-01-01

    Some difficulties that students face with two-dimensional motion are addressed. The difficulties addressed are the vectorial representation of velocity, acceleration and force, the force-energy theorem and the understanding of the radius of curvature.

  1. Twinned growth behaviour of two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bei; Xu, Zhen; Mendes, Rafael G.; Xiao, Yao; Chen, Linfeng; Fang, Liwen; Gemming, Thomas; Chen, Shengli; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Fu, Lei

    2016-12-01

    Twinned growth behaviour in the rapidly emerging area of two-dimensional nanomaterials still remains unexplored although it could be exploited to fabricate heterostructure and superlattice materials. Here we demonstrate how one can utilize the twinned growth relationship between two two-dimensional materials to construct vertically stacked heterostructures. As a demonstration, we achieve 100% overlap of the two transition metal dichalcogenide layers constituting a ReS2/WS2 vertical heterostructure. Moreover, the crystal size of the stacked structure is an order of magnitude larger than previous reports. Such twinned transition metal dichalcogenides vertical heterostructures exhibit great potential for use in optical, electronic and catalytic applications. The simplicity of the twinned growth can be utilized to expand the fabrication of other heterostructures or two-dimensional material superlattice and this strategy can be considered as an enabling technology for research in the emerging field of two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures.

  2. Twinned growth behaviour of two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bei; Xu, Zhen; Mendes, Rafael G; Xiao, Yao; Chen, Linfeng; Fang, Liwen; Gemming, Thomas; Chen, Shengli; Rümmeli, Mark H; Fu, Lei

    2016-12-20

    Twinned growth behaviour in the rapidly emerging area of two-dimensional nanomaterials still remains unexplored although it could be exploited to fabricate heterostructure and superlattice materials. Here we demonstrate how one can utilize the twinned growth relationship between two two-dimensional materials to construct vertically stacked heterostructures. As a demonstration, we achieve 100% overlap of the two transition metal dichalcogenide layers constituting a ReS2/WS2 vertical heterostructure. Moreover, the crystal size of the stacked structure is an order of magnitude larger than previous reports. Such twinned transition metal dichalcogenides vertical heterostructures exhibit great potential for use in optical, electronic and catalytic applications. The simplicity of the twinned growth can be utilized to expand the fabrication of other heterostructures or two-dimensional material superlattice and this strategy can be considered as an enabling technology for research in the emerging field of two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures.

  3. Model of a Negatively Curved Two-Dimensional Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction of models of two-dimensional surfaces with negative curvature that are used to illustrate differences in the triangle sum rule for the various Big Bang Theories of the universe. (JRH)

  4. Twinned growth behaviour of two-dimensional materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bei; Xu, Zhen; Mendes, Rafael G.; Xiao, Yao; Chen, Linfeng; Fang, Liwen; Gemming, Thomas; Chen, Shengli; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Fu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Twinned growth behaviour in the rapidly emerging area of two-dimensional nanomaterials still remains unexplored although it could be exploited to fabricate heterostructure and superlattice materials. Here we demonstrate how one can utilize the twinned growth relationship between two two-dimensional materials to construct vertically stacked heterostructures. As a demonstration, we achieve 100% overlap of the two transition metal dichalcogenide layers constituting a ReS2/WS2 vertical heterostructure. Moreover, the crystal size of the stacked structure is an order of magnitude larger than previous reports. Such twinned transition metal dichalcogenides vertical heterostructures exhibit great potential for use in optical, electronic and catalytic applications. The simplicity of the twinned growth can be utilized to expand the fabrication of other heterostructures or two-dimensional material superlattice and this strategy can be considered as an enabling technology for research in the emerging field of two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures. PMID:27996005

  5. Power distribution in two-dimensional optical network channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xue; Karim, Mohammad A.

    1996-04-01

    The power distribution in two-dimensional optical network channels is analyzed. The maximum number of allowable channels as determined by the characteristics of optical detector is identified, in particular, for neural-network and wavelet-transform applications.

  6. String & Sticky Tape Experiments: Two-Dimensional Collisions Using Pendulums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D.

    1989-01-01

    Introduces a method for two-dimensional kinematics measurements by hanging marbles with long strings. Describes experimental procedures for conservation of momentum and obtaining the coefficient of restitution. Provides diagrams and mathematical expressions for the activities. (YP)

  7. Coherent Response of Two Dimensional Electron Gas probed by Two Dimensional Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jagannath

    Advent of ultrashort lasers made it possible to probe various scattering phenomena in materials that occur in a time scale on the order of few femtoseconds to several tens of picoseconds. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy techniques, such as pump-probe, transient four wave mixing (TFWM), etc., are very common to study the carrier dynamics in various material systems. In time domain, the transient FWM uses several ultrashort pulses separated by time delays to obtain the information of dephasing and population relaxation times, which are very important parameters that govern the carrier dynamics of materials. A recently developed multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy is an enhanced version of TFWM which keeps track of two time delays simultaneously and correlate them in the frequency domain with the aid of Fourier transform in a two dimensional map. Using this technique, the nonlinear complex signal field is characterized both in amplitude and phase. Furthermore, this technique allows us to identify the coupling between resonances which are rather difficult to interpret from time domain measurements. This work focuses on the study of the coherent response of a two dimensional electron gas formed in a modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well both at zero and at high magnetic fields. In modulation doped quantum wells, the excitons are formed as a result of the inter- actions of the charged holes with the electrons at the Fermi edge in the conduction band, leading to the formation of Mahan excitons, which is also referred to as Fermi edge singularity (FES). Polarization and temperature dependent rephasing 2DFT spectra in combination with TI-FWM measurements, provides insight into the dephasing mechanism of the heavy hole (HH) Mahan exciton. In addition to that strong quantum coherence between the HH and LH Mahan excitons is observed, which is rather surprising at this high doping concentration. The binding energy of Mahan excitons is expected to be greatly

  8. Nicked-sleeve interface for two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Ryan J; Huge, Bonnie J; Bruce, Spencer M; Dada, Oluwatosin O; Dovichi, Norman J

    2013-07-07

    We report an improved interface for two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis. This interface is based on capillary tubing and a Plexiglas chip, both of which were milled using a micro-dicing saw. The interface was evaluated and compared to a traditional interface design for both pseudo one-dimensional and two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis. We observe less than 70% transfer efficiency for the traditional design and greater than 90% transfer efficiency with this new interface.

  9. Nicked-sleeve interface for two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Ryan J.; Huge, Bonnie J.; Bruce, Spencer M.; Dada, Oluwatosin O.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an improved interface for two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis. This interface is based on capillary tubing and a Plexiglas chip, both of which were milled using a micro-dicing saw. The interface was evaluated and compared to a traditional interface design for both pseudo one-dimensional and two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis. We observe less than 70% transfer efficiency for the traditional design and greater than 90% transfer efficiency with this new interface. PMID:23702824

  10. Two-dimensional disordered Ising model within nonextensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodikhin, V. N.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the two-dimensional disordered Ising model with nonextensive Tsallis statistics has been studied for the first time. The critical temperatures and critical indices have been determined for both disordered and uniform models. A new type of critical behavior has been revealed for the disordered model with nonextensive statistics. It has been shown that, within the nonextensive statistics of the two-dimensional Ising model, the Harris criterion is also valid.

  11. Theory of a Nearly Two-Dimensional Dipolar Bose Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-11

    A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 453 Theory of a Nearly Two-Dimensional Dipolar Bose Gas by Midshipman 1/C Michael A. Woulfe...approved for public release and sale; its distribution is unlimited. U.S.N.A. --- Trident Scholar project report; no. 453 (2016) THEORY OF A...YYYY) 05-11-2016 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Theory of a Nearly Two-Dimensional Dipolar Bose Gas 5a

  12. Light evolution in arbitrary two-dimensional waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Szameit, Alexander; Pertsch, Thomas; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Tuennermann, Andreas; Peschel, Ulf; Lederer, Falk

    2007-05-15

    We introduce an analytical formula for the dynamics of light propagation in a two-dimensional waveguide lattice including diagonal coupling. A superposition of infinite arrays created by imaginary sources is used to derive an expression for boundary reflections. It is shown analytically that for large propagation distances the propagating field reaches uniformity. Furthermore, periodic field recovery is studied and discrete anomalous refraction and diffraction are investigated in arbitrary two-dimensional lattices.

  13. Quasinormal modes of a two-dimensional black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Jiménez, S.; Gómez-Díaz, J. R.; López-Ortega, A.

    2013-11-01

    For a two-dimensional black hole we determine the quasinormal frequencies of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields. In contrast to the well known examples whose spectrum of quasinormal frequencies is discrete, for this black hole we find a continuous spectrum of quasinormal frequencies, but there are unstable quasinormal modes. In the framework of the Hod and Maggiore proposals we also discuss the consequences of these results on the form of the entropy spectrum for the two-dimensional black hole.

  14. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional confined flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of two-dimensional confined flows is presented. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying conservation principles directly to the individual streams. A listing of a computer code based on this approach in FORTRAN 4 language is presented. The code computes two dimensional compressible turbulent flows in ducts when the duct area along the flow is specified and the pressure gradient is unknown.

  15. [A two-dimensional double dispersed hadamard transform spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shi, Lei; Li, Kai; Zheng, Xin-Wen; Zeng, Li-Bo; Wu, Qiong-Shui

    2012-06-01

    A kind of two-dimensional hadamard transform spectrometer was developed. A grating was used for chromatic dispersion of orders and a prism was used for spectral dispersion. Quite different from traditional CCD detection method, a digital micromirror device (DMD) was applied for optical modulation, and a simple point detector was used as the sensor. Compared with traditional two-dimensional spectrometer, it has the advantage of high resolution and signal-noise-ratio, which was proved by theoretical calculation and computer simulation.

  16. Two-Dimensional Grammars And Their Applications To Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edward T.

    1987-05-01

    During the past several years, the concepts and techniques of two-dimensional grammars1,2 have attracted growing attention as promising avenues of approach to problems in picture generation as well as in picture description3 representation, recognition, transformation and manipulation. Two-dimensional grammar techniques serve the purpose of exploiting the structure or underlying relationships in a picture. This approach attempts to describe a complex picture in terms of their components and their relative positions. This resembles the way a sentence is described in terms of its words and phrases, and the terms structural picture recognition, linguistic picture recognition, or syntactic picture recognition are often used. By using this approach, the problem of picture recognition becomes similar to that of phrase recognition in a language. However, describing pictures using a string grammar (one-dimensional grammar), the only relation between sub-pictures and/or primitives is the concatenation; that is each picture or primitive can be connected only at the left or right. This one-dimensional relation has not been very effective in describing two-dimensional pictures. A natural generaliza-tion is to use two-dimensional grammars. In this paper, two-dimensional grammars and their applications to artificial intelligence are presented. Picture grammars and two-dimensional grammars are introduced and illustrated by examples. In particular, two-dimensional grammars for generating all possible squares and all possible rhombuses are presented. The applications of two-dimensional grammars to solving region filling problems are discussed. An algorithm for region filling using two-dimensional grammars is presented together with illustrative examples. The advantages of using this algorithm in terms of computation time are also stated. A high-level description of a two-level picture generation system is proposed. The first level is the picture primitive generation using two-dimensional

  17. Two-dimensional analytic weighting functions for limb scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawada, D. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    Through the inversion of limb scatter measurements it is possible to obtain vertical profiles of trace species in the atmosphere. Many of these inversion methods require what is often referred to as weighting functions, or derivatives of the radiance with respect to concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. Several radiative transfer models have implemented analytic methods to calculate weighting functions, alleviating the computational burden of traditional numerical perturbation methods. Here we describe the implementation of analytic two-dimensional weighting functions, where derivatives are calculated relative to atmospheric constituents in a two-dimensional grid of altitude and angle along the line of sight direction, in the SASKTRAN-HR radiative transfer model. Two-dimensional weighting functions are required for two-dimensional inversions of limb scatter measurements. Examples are presented where the analytic two-dimensional weighting functions are calculated with an underlying one-dimensional atmosphere. It is shown that the analytic weighting functions are more accurate than ones calculated with a single scatter approximation, and are orders of magnitude faster than a typical perturbation method. Evidence is presented that weighting functions for stratospheric aerosols calculated under a single scatter approximation may not be suitable for use in retrieval algorithms under solar backscatter conditions.

  18. Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Two Dimensionally Periodic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tian-Lin

    1985-12-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in two dimensionally periodic structure is systematically investigated, to provide the basic theory for two dimensionally modulated dielectric waveguide. A canonical two dimensionally periodic medium of infinite extent, whose dielectic constant varies sinusoidally in two orthogonal directions, is first examined. The charact solutions are represented exactly by a double Fourier series which is known as the Floquet solution. The harmonic amplitudes of the Floquet solution are determined by a five-term recurrence relation in the vector form, properly taking into account the hybrid-mode nature of the propagation problem. The five-term recurrence relation is then treated by different approaches so that clear physical pictures and practical numerical methods can be obtained. The characteristic solutions for two dimensionally periodic medium are then applied to the boundary-value problem of multi-layer dielectric waveguides containing a finite layer of periodic medium. As an example, the guidance problems are analysed and the numerical analysis of the dispersion characteristics are then carried out. Besides the canonical medium as a model, more general two dimensionally periodic medium are also discussed.

  19. Classical and Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability and Other ICF-Relevant Plasma Flows Diagnosed With Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Sinars D B, Slutz S A, Smith I C, Struve K W, Stygar W A, Vesey R A, Weinbrecht E A, Wenger D F, and Yu E P 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 055503 [5...Wenger D F, Cuneo M E, Hanson D L, Porter J L, Adams R G, Rambo P K, Rovang D C, and Smith I C 2004 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 3672 [19] Loupias B...measurements,” Rutheford Appleton Laboratory Annual Report RAL-91-025 [26] Perry T S, Davidson S J, Serduke F J, Bach D. R, Smith C C, Foster J M

  20. Two dimensional convolute integers for machine vision and image recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision and image recognition require sophisticated image processing prior to the application of Artificial Intelligence. Two Dimensional Convolute Integer Technology is an innovative mathematical approach for addressing machine vision and image recognition. This new technology generates a family of digital operators for addressing optical images and related two dimensional data sets. The operators are regression generated, integer valued, zero phase shifting, convoluting, frequency sensitive, two dimensional low pass, high pass and band pass filters that are mathematically equivalent to surface fitted partial derivatives. These operators are applied non-recursively either as classical convolutions (replacement point values), interstitial point generators (bandwidth broadening or resolution enhancement), or as missing value calculators (compensation for dead array element values). These operators show frequency sensitive feature selection scale invariant properties. Such tasks as boundary/edge enhancement and noise or small size pixel disturbance removal can readily be accomplished. For feature selection tight band pass operators are essential. Results from test cases are given.

  1. A two-dimensional measuring equipment for electrical steel

    SciTech Connect

    Salz, W. . Inst. fuer Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik)

    1994-05-01

    The technical aspects of two-dimensional measuring equipment for electrical steel are described. The choice of the appropriate field sensors and the important point of the control of [rvec B](t) are described. The equipment described is designed to measure the two-dimensional properties of square shaped single sheets of all qualities of electrical steel covering the technical frequencies and induction ranges of the major applications. The equipment is useful for the manufacturers of electrical steel to control the texture of their material and for designers of machines to know about the properties of the material under two-dimensional excitation, which in case of rotational flux conditions are different from the one-dimensional properties measured with Epstein frame or single sheet testers.

  2. Two dimensional convolute integers for machine vision and image recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision and image recognition require sophisticated image processing prior to the application of Artificial Intelligence. Two Dimensional Convolute Integer Technology is an innovative mathematical approach for addressing machine vision and image recognition. This new technology generates a family of digital operators for addressing optical images and related two dimensional data sets. The operators are regression generated, integer valued, zero phase shifting, convoluting, frequency sensitive, two dimensional low pass, high pass and band pass filters that are mathematically equivalent to surface fitted partial derivatives. These operators are applied non-recursively either as classical convolutions (replacement point values), interstitial point generators (bandwidth broadening or resolution enhancement), or as missing value calculators (compensation for dead array element values). These operators show frequency sensitive feature selection scale invariant properties. Such tasks as boundary/edge enhancement and noise or small size pixel disturbance removal can readily be accomplished. For feature selection tight band pass operators are essential. Results from test cases are given.

  3. Two-dimensional convolute integers for analytical instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    As new analytical instruments and techniques emerge with increased dimensionality, a corresponding need is seen for data processing logic which can appropriately address the data. Two-dimensional measurements reveal enhanced unknown mixture analysis capability as a result of the greater spectral information content over two one-dimensional methods taken separately. It is noted that two-dimensional convolute integers are merely an extension of the work by Savitzky and Golay (1964). It is shown that these low-pass, high-pass and band-pass digital filters are truly two-dimensional and that they can be applied in a manner identical with their one-dimensional counterpart, that is, a weighted nearest-neighbor, moving average with zero phase shifting, convoluted integer (universal number) weighting coefficients.

  4. Melting of a two-dimensional crystal of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. C.

    1981-03-01

    Experiments show that a sheet of electrons in image-potential-induced states outside a helium surface forms at low temperatures a two-dimensional crystal (the classical, two-dimensional analog of a Wigner crystal). At higher temperatures the electron crystal melts to form a two-dimensional, classical, one-component plasma. The melting transition occurs at Γm = 131 ± 7 where Γ is a measure of the ratio of Coulomb potential energy to kinetic energy per electron. This measured value of Γm is consistent with a value obtained by Morf from a calculation based on the Kosterlitz and Thouless theory of dislocation mediated melting in two-dimensions.

  5. Complexity and efficient approximability of two dimensional periodically specified problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, M.V.; Hunt, H.B. III; Stearns, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    The authors consider the two dimensional periodic specifications: a method to specify succinctly objects with highly regular repetitive structure. These specifications arise naturally when processing engineering designs including VLSI designs. These specifications can specify objects whose sizes are exponentially larger than the sizes of the specification themselves. Consequently solving a periodically specified problem by explicitly expanding the instance is prohibitively expensive in terms of computational resources. This leads one to investigate the complexity and efficient approximability of solving graph theoretic and combinatorial problems when instances are specified using two dimensional periodic specifications. They prove the following results: (1) several classical NP-hard optimization problems become NEXPTIME-hard, when instances are specified using two dimensional periodic specifications; (2) in contrast, several of these NEXPTIME-hard problems have polynomial time approximation algorithms with guaranteed worst case performance.

  6. Hamiltonian formalism of two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Maxim V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the two-dimensional Benney system describing long wave propagation of a finite depth fluid motion and the multi-dimensional Russo–Smereka kinetic equation describing a bubbly flow are considered. The Hamiltonian approach established by J. Gibbons for the one-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is extended to a multi-dimensional case. A local Hamiltonian structure associated with the hydrodynamic lattice of moments derived by D. J. Benney is constructed. A relationship between this hydrodynamic lattice of moments and the two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is found. In the two-dimensional case, a Hamiltonian hydrodynamic lattice for the Russo–Smereka kinetic model is constructed. Simple hydrodynamic reductions are presented. PMID:25484603

  7. Hamiltonian formalism of two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Maxim V

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, the two-dimensional Benney system describing long wave propagation of a finite depth fluid motion and the multi-dimensional Russo-Smereka kinetic equation describing a bubbly flow are considered. The Hamiltonian approach established by J. Gibbons for the one-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is extended to a multi-dimensional case. A local Hamiltonian structure associated with the hydrodynamic lattice of moments derived by D. J. Benney is constructed. A relationship between this hydrodynamic lattice of moments and the two-dimensional Vlasov kinetic equation is found. In the two-dimensional case, a Hamiltonian hydrodynamic lattice for the Russo-Smereka kinetic model is constructed. Simple hydrodynamic reductions are presented.

  8. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent light: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel B; Howey, Dylan J; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2013-07-25

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I((4)) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and new opportunities.

  9. Electronics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing Hua; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Kis, Andras; Coleman, Jonathan N; Strano, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, two-dimensional materials with unique electronic and optical attributes. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into two-dimensional layers of single unit cell thickness. Although TMDCs have been studied for decades, recent advances in nanoscale materials characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities for two-dimensional layers of thin TMDCs in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. TMDCs such as MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2) and WSe(2) have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices. We review the historical development of TMDCs, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.

  10. A two-dimensional spin liquid in quantum kagome ice.

    PubMed

    Carrasquilla, Juan; Hao, Zhihao; Melko, Roger G

    2015-06-22

    Actively sought since the turn of the century, two-dimensional quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are exotic phases of matter where magnetic moments remain disordered even at zero temperature. Despite ongoing searches, QSLs remain elusive, due to a lack of concrete knowledge of the microscopic mechanisms that inhibit magnetic order in materials. Here we study a model for a broad class of frustrated magnetic rare-earth pyrochlore materials called quantum spin ices. When subject to an external magnetic field along the [111] crystallographic direction, the resulting interactions contain a mix of geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations in decoupled two-dimensional kagome planes. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we identify a set of interactions sufficient to promote a groundstate with no magnetic long-range order, and a gap to excitations, consistent with a Z2 spin liquid phase. This suggests an experimental procedure to search for two-dimensional QSLs within a class of pyrochlore quantum spin ice materials.

  11. Vortices in the Two-Dimensional Simple Exclusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, Joel L.

    2008-06-01

    We show that the fluctuations of the partial current in two dimensional diffusive systems are dominated by vortices leading to a different scaling from the one predicted by the hydrodynamic large deviation theory. This is supported by exact computations of the variance of partial current fluctuations for the symmetric simple exclusion process on general graphs. On a two-dimensional torus, our exact expressions are compared to the results of numerical simulations. They confirm the logarithmic dependence on the system size of the fluctuations of the partial flux. The impact of the vortices on the validity of the fluctuation relation for partial currents is also discussed in an Appendix.

  12. A two-dimensional adaptive mesh generation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altas, Irfan; Stephenson, John W.

    1991-05-01

    The present, two-dimensional adaptive mesh-generation method allows selective modification of a small portion of the mesh without affecting large areas of adjacent mesh-points, and is applicable with or without boundary-fitted coordinate-generation procedures. The cases of differential equation discretization by, on the one hand, classical difference formulas designed for uniform meshes, and on the other the present difference formulas, are illustrated through the application of the method to the Hiemenz flow for which the Navier-Stokes equation's exact solution is known, as well as to a two-dimensional viscous internal flow problem.

  13. Spectral analysis of two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, David; Hoffmann, Darius; Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models are well known to obey a transition from regular to quantum-chaotic spectral statistics. We are extending this concept to relatively simple two-dimensional many-body models. Also in two dimensions a transition from regular to chaotic spectral statistics is found and discussed. In particular, we analyze the dependence of the spectral properties on the bond number of the two-dimensional lattices and the applied boundary conditions. For maximal connectivity, the systems behave most regularly in agreement with the applicability of mean-field approaches in the limit of many nearest-neighbor couplings at each site.

  14. Two-dimensional signal reconstruction: The correlation sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, H. E.

    2007-12-15

    An accurate approach for reconstructing a time-dependent two-dimensional signal from non-synchronized time series recorded at points located on a grid is discussed. The method, denoted as correlation sampling, improves the standard conditional sampling approach commonly employed in the study of turbulence in magnetoplasma devices. Its implementation is illustrated in the case of an artificial time-dependent signal constructed using a fractal algorithm that simulates a fluctuating surface. A statistical method is also discussed for distinguishing coherent (i.e., collective) from purely random (noisy) behavior for such two-dimensional fluctuating phenomena.

  15. Density fluctuation spectrum of two-dimensional correlated fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Akihiro; Hirashima, Dai

    2012-12-01

    Density fluctuation spectrum of two-dimensional fermions that interact with short-range repulsive interaction is calculated with the self-consistent perturbation theory. The spectrum extends beyond the particle-hole continuum band in the noninteracting case because of the multiparticle excitations. At a large wave vector, a peak develops in the spectrum near the lower threshold of the particle-hole continuum. These results are compared with the recent inelastic neutron scattering experiment on two-dimensional 3He adsorbed on graphite.

  16. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  17. Equilibrium state of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, Steffen P.; Yefsah, Tarik; Guenter, Kenneth J.; Cheneau, Marc; Desbuquois, Remi; Dalibard, Jean; Holzmann, Markus; Krauth, Werner

    2010-07-15

    We study experimentally and numerically the equilibrium density profiles of a trapped two-dimensional {sup 87}Rb Bose gas and investigate the equation of state of the homogeneous system using the local density approximation. We find a clear discrepancy between in situ measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, which we attribute to a nonlinear variation of the optical density of the atomic cloud with its spatial density. However, good agreement between experiment and theory is recovered for the density profiles measured after time of flight, taking advantage of their self-similarity in a two-dimensional expansion.

  18. Two-dimensional temperature mapping using thermographic phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W. ); Turley, W.D. ); Cates, M.R.; Tobin, K.W. )

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of extending a point-temperature measurement method to two-dimensional mapping of temperature distributions on surfaces. The point-measurement method used the temperature-dependant characteristics of sharp emission lines from thermographic phosphors to measure temperature. The two-dimensional extrusion uses an ultraviolet light source to illuminate the phosphor-coated surface and a high-grain video camera filtered to select the desired emission line. By changing filters, we acquire video data that are over-laid and analyzed by a video processor, then displayed in contour or pseudocolor maps of the temperature distribution. 13 refs., 14 figs., 1 tabs.

  19. Two-dimensional spatial frequency response of SQUID planar gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, E. Andrade; Bruno, A. C.; Szczupak, J.

    1999-11-01

    Planar gradiometers can be modelled as two-dimensional spatial filters, taking into account area, baseline and shape of the coils. We associate a spatial frequency response with each configuration studied and show that planar gradiometers behave as band-pass spatial filters. Also, in order to determine a spatial frequency range for typical magnetic field sources, we calculate the two-dimensional Fourier transform of the field due to a current dipole for several liftoffs. Important issues such as gradiometer spatial cutoff frequencies, bandwidth and symmetry are discussed.

  20. Flow of rarefied gases over two-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Duen-Ren; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Chung, Chan-Hong

    1989-01-01

    A kinetic-theory analysis is made of the flow of rarefied gases over two-dimensional bodies of arbitrary curvature. The Boltzmann equation simplified by a model collision integral is written in an arbitrary orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, and solved by means of finite-difference approximation with the discrete ordinate method. A numerical code is developed which can be applied to any two-dimensional submerged body of arbitrary curvature for the flow regimes from free-molecular to slip at transonic Mach numbers. Predictions are made for the case of a right circular cylinder.

  1. Two-Dimensional Inlet Simulation Using a Diagonal Implicit Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, D.S.; Pulliam, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    A modification of an implicit approximate-factorization finite-difference algorithm applied to the two-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates is presented for supersonic freestream flow about and through inlets. The modification transforms the coupled system of equations Into an uncoupled diagonal form which requires less computation work. For steady-state applications the resulting diagonal algorithm retains the stability and accuracy characteristics of the original algorithm. Solutions are given for inviscid and laminar flow about a two-dimensional wedge inlet configuration. Comparisons are made between computed results and exact theory.

  2. The fractional Talbot effect of two-dimensional array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weijuan; Liu, Liren; Liu, De'an; Luan, Zu; Xu, Nan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we theoretically prove the fractional self-imaging effect of the two-dimensional array with arbitrary shape and symmetry, using scalar diffraction theory and the known periodic self-Fourier-Fresnel transform function comb(x , y). As a result, we also got a general equation to calculate the phase of the fractional Talbot image of the two-dimensional array. As an example, we numerically evaluate the intensity distribution of the diamond array in triangular symmetry in the fractional Talbot plane using Matlab, The result is a good agreement with the theory.

  3. Mapping two-dimensional polar active fluids to two-dimensional soap and one-dimensional sandblasting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leiming; Lee, Chiu Fan; Toner, John

    2016-07-25

    Active fluids and growing interfaces are two well-studied but very different non-equilibrium systems. Each exhibits non-equilibrium behaviour distinct from that of their equilibrium counterparts. Here we demonstrate a surprising connection between these two: the ordered phase of incompressible polar active fluids in two spatial dimensions without momentum conservation, and growing one-dimensional interfaces (that is, the 1+1-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation), in fact belong to the same universality class. This universality class also includes two equilibrium systems: two-dimensional smectic liquid crystals, and a peculiar kind of constrained two-dimensional ferromagnet. We use these connections to show that two-dimensional incompressible flocks are robust against fluctuations, and exhibit universal long-ranged, anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations of those fluctuations. We also thereby determine the exact values of the anisotropy exponent ζ and the roughness exponents χx,y that characterize these correlations.

  4. Mapping two-dimensional polar active fluids to two-dimensional soap and one-dimensional sandblasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leiming; Lee, Chiu Fan; Toner, John

    2016-07-01

    Active fluids and growing interfaces are two well-studied but very different non-equilibrium systems. Each exhibits non-equilibrium behaviour distinct from that of their equilibrium counterparts. Here we demonstrate a surprising connection between these two: the ordered phase of incompressible polar active fluids in two spatial dimensions without momentum conservation, and growing one-dimensional interfaces (that is, the 1+1-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation), in fact belong to the same universality class. This universality class also includes two equilibrium systems: two-dimensional smectic liquid crystals, and a peculiar kind of constrained two-dimensional ferromagnet. We use these connections to show that two-dimensional incompressible flocks are robust against fluctuations, and exhibit universal long-ranged, anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations of those fluctuations. We also thereby determine the exact values of the anisotropy exponent ζ and the roughness exponents χx,y that characterize these correlations.

  5. Mapping two-dimensional polar active fluids to two-dimensional soap and one-dimensional sandblasting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiming; Lee, Chiu Fan; Toner, John

    2016-01-01

    Active fluids and growing interfaces are two well-studied but very different non-equilibrium systems. Each exhibits non-equilibrium behaviour distinct from that of their equilibrium counterparts. Here we demonstrate a surprising connection between these two: the ordered phase of incompressible polar active fluids in two spatial dimensions without momentum conservation, and growing one-dimensional interfaces (that is, the 1+1-dimensional Kardar–Parisi–Zhang equation), in fact belong to the same universality class. This universality class also includes two equilibrium systems: two-dimensional smectic liquid crystals, and a peculiar kind of constrained two-dimensional ferromagnet. We use these connections to show that two-dimensional incompressible flocks are robust against fluctuations, and exhibit universal long-ranged, anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations of those fluctuations. We also thereby determine the exact values of the anisotropy exponent ζ and the roughness exponents χx,y that characterize these correlations. PMID:27452107

  6. Temperature maxima in stable two-dimensional shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon; Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1997-07-01

    We use molecular dynamics to study the structure of moderately strong shock waves in dense two-dimensional fluids, using Lucy's pair potential. The stationary profiles show relatively broad temperature maxima, for both the longitudinal and the average kinetic temperatures, just as does Mott-Smith's model for strong shock waves in dilute three-dimensional gases.

  7. Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Analysis of Helicopter Flyover Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SantaMaria, Odilyn L.; Farassat, F.; Morris, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    A method to separate main rotor and tail rotor noise from a helicopter in flight is explored. Being the sum of two periodic signals of disproportionate, or incommensurate frequencies, helicopter noise is neither periodic nor stationary. The single Fourier transform divides signal energy into frequency bins of equal size. Incommensurate frequencies are therefore not adequately represented by any one chosen data block size. A two-dimensional Fourier analysis method is used to separate main rotor and tail rotor noise. The two-dimensional spectral analysis method is first applied to simulated signals. This initial analysis gives an idea of the characteristics of the two-dimensional autocorrelations and spectra. Data from a helicopter flight test is analyzed in two dimensions. The test aircraft are a Boeing MD902 Explorer (no tail rotor) and a Sikorsky S-76 (4-bladed tail rotor). The results show that the main rotor and tail rotor signals can indeed be separated in the two-dimensional Fourier transform spectrum. The separation occurs along the diagonals associated with the frequencies of interest. These diagonals are individual spectra containing only information related to one particular frequency.

  8. Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Applied to Helicopter Flyover Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa Maria, Odilyn L.

    1999-01-01

    A method to separate main rotor and tail rotor noise from a helicopter in flight is explored. Being the sum of two periodic signals of disproportionate, or incommensurate frequencies, helicopter noise is neither periodic nor stationary, but possibly harmonizable. The single Fourier transform divides signal energy into frequency bins of equal size. Incommensurate frequencies are therefore not adequately represented by any one chosen data block size. A two-dimensional Fourier analysis method is used to show helicopter noise as harmonizable. The two-dimensional spectral analysis method is first applied to simulated signals. This initial analysis gives an idea of the characteristics of the two-dimensional autocorrelations and spectra. Data from a helicopter flight test is analyzed in two dimensions. The test aircraft are a Boeing MD902 Explorer (no tail rotor) and a Sikorsky S-76 (4-bladed tail rotor). The results show that the main rotor and tail rotor signals can indeed be separated in the two-dimensional Fourier transform spectrum. The separation occurs along the diagonals associated with the frequencies of interest. These diagonals are individual spectra containing only information related to one particular frequency.

  9. Dynamic two-dimensional beam-pattern steering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaomin; Yeh, Pochi; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1993-06-01

    A dynamic two-dimensional laser-beam-pattern steering technique using photorefractive holograms in conjunction with electrically addressed spatial light modulators is proposed and investigated. The experimental results demonstrate the dynamic steering of random combinations of basis beam patterns. The proposed method has the advantages of random beam-pattern combination, good beam intensity uniformity, and higher diffraction efficiency compared with conventional methods.

  10. Imperfect two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, William G.; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the challenge of using two-dimensional materials for nanoelectronic devices, we propose two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors that switch based on the modulation of scattering. We model transistors made of two-dimensional topological insulator ribbons accounting for scattering with phonons and imperfections. In the on-state, the Fermi level lies in the bulk bandgap and the electrons travel ballistically through the topologically protected edge states even in the presence of imperfections. In the off-state the Fermi level moves into the bandgap and electrons suffer from severe back-scattering. An off-current more than two-orders below the on-current is demonstrated and a high on-current is maintained even in the presence of imperfections. At low drain-source bias, the output characteristics are like those of conventional field-effect transistors, at large drain-source bias negative differential resistance is revealed. Complementary n- and p-type devices can be made enabling high-performance and low-power electronic circuits using imperfect two-dimensional topological insulators. PMID:28106059

  11. Two-Dimensional Grids About Airfoils and Other Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R.

    1982-01-01

    GRAPE computer program generates two-dimensional finite-difference grids about airfoils and other shapes by use of Poisson differential equation. GRAPE can be used with any boundary shape, even one specified by tabulated points and including limited number of sharp corners. Numerically stable and computationally fast, GRAPE provides aerodynamic analyst with efficient and consistant means of grid generation.

  12. Two-dimensional Manifold with Point-like Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, V. A.; Dmitriev, A. E.; Rubin, S. G.

    We study a class of two-dimensional compact extra spaces isomorphic to the sphere S 2 in the framework of multidimensional gravitation. We show that there exists a family of stationary metrics that depend on the initial (boundary) conditions. All these geometries have a singular point. We also discuss the possibility for these deformed extra spaces to be considered as dark matter candidates.

  13. Imperfect two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, William G.; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the challenge of using two-dimensional materials for nanoelectronic devices, we propose two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors that switch based on the modulation of scattering. We model transistors made of two-dimensional topological insulator ribbons accounting for scattering with phonons and imperfections. In the on-state, the Fermi level lies in the bulk bandgap and the electrons travel ballistically through the topologically protected edge states even in the presence of imperfections. In the off-state the Fermi level moves into the bandgap and electrons suffer from severe back-scattering. An off-current more than two-orders below the on-current is demonstrated and a high on-current is maintained even in the presence of imperfections. At low drain-source bias, the output characteristics are like those of conventional field-effect transistors, at large drain-source bias negative differential resistance is revealed. Complementary n- and p-type devices can be made enabling high-performance and low-power electronic circuits using imperfect two-dimensional topological insulators.

  14. Imperfect two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, William G; Fischetti, Massimo V

    2017-01-20

    To overcome the challenge of using two-dimensional materials for nanoelectronic devices, we propose two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors that switch based on the modulation of scattering. We model transistors made of two-dimensional topological insulator ribbons accounting for scattering with phonons and imperfections. In the on-state, the Fermi level lies in the bulk bandgap and the electrons travel ballistically through the topologically protected edge states even in the presence of imperfections. In the off-state the Fermi level moves into the bandgap and electrons suffer from severe back-scattering. An off-current more than two-orders below the on-current is demonstrated and a high on-current is maintained even in the presence of imperfections. At low drain-source bias, the output characteristics are like those of conventional field-effect transistors, at large drain-source bias negative differential resistance is revealed. Complementary n- and p-type devices can be made enabling high-performance and low-power electronic circuits using imperfect two-dimensional topological insulators.

  15. Two-dimensional vortex motion and 'negative temperatures.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1972-01-01

    Explanation of the novel phenomenon, tentatively identified as the 'ergodic boundary' in a space of initial conditions for turbulent flow, suggested by the recent numerical integration of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations at high Reynolds numbers reported by Deem and Zabusky (1971). The proposed explanation is presented in terms of negative temperatures for a point vortex model.

  16. Fluorescence two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis for biomaterial applications

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Laura E.; Dalby, Matthew J.; Riehle, Mathis O.; Burchmore, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) is rapidly becoming established as a powerful technique for the characterization of differences in protein expression levels between two or more conditions. In this review, we consider the application of DiGE—both minimal and saturation labelling—to biomaterials research, considering the challenges and rewards of this approach. PMID:19570793

  17. On the solvability of two dimensional semigroup gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Peter

    2010-06-15

    We study the solvability of two dimensional semigroup gauge theories by Migdal's link elimination method. We determine certain conditions that ensure that the partition sum corresponding to the join of two plaquettes depends only on the holonomy around the boundary of the joined plaquettes. These conditions are checked for a few types of semigroups: 0-groups, cyclic, inverse symmetric, and Brandt semigroups.

  18. Sound waves in two-dimensional ducts with sinusoidal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to analyze the wave propagation in two-dimensional hard-walled ducts with sinusoidal walls. For traveling waves, resonance occurs whenever the wall wavenumber is equal to the difference of the wavenumbers of any two duct acoustic modes. The results show that neither of these resonating modes could occur without strongly generating the other.

  19. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  20. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Haas, Roger A.

    1985-01-01

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  1. First principles calculation of two dimensional antimony and antimony arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, Sharad Babu Narayan, Som; Jha, Prafulla K.; Dabhi, Shweta D.

    2016-05-23

    This work focuses on the strain dependence of the electronic properties of two dimensional antimony (Sb) material and its alloy with As (SbAs) using density functional theory based first principles calculations. Both systems show indirect bandgap semiconducting character which can be transformed into a direct bandgap material with the application of relatively small strain.

  2. Geometry, topology, field theory and two-dimensional quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, E.C.M.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation presents geometrically a simplified theory of two-dimensional quantum gravity called topological gravity. The motivation for such a simplification is to shed light on the complicated problem of real quantum gravity. The author introduces new supermanifolds called semirigid super Riemann surfaces on which two-dimensional quantum field theories of topological (super) gravity are defined. It is shown that semirigid surfaces are integrable reductions from ordinary complex supermanifolds. Unlike other supergeometries, the semirigid moduli space of topological gravity is as well understood as that of ordinary Riemann surface. The author applies in semirigid gravity the operator formalism to construct correlation functions of observables in two-dimensional spacetime of arbitrarily complicated topology. A one-to-one correspondence is established between the equivalent BRST cohomology of the states in the Hilbert space and the deRham cohomology on the ordinary moduli space. Moreover, the couplings between the observables are topological, coming only through contact interactions. Two recursion relations of observables are derived in the semirigid framework. One involves in particular an observable associated to the two-dimensional cosmological constant and the other the string coupling constant. These are the same recursion relations that partially characterized the [open quotes]one matrix model,[close quotes] a discretized approach to quantum gravity, at its topological critical point. This lends strong support to the hypothesis that semirigid gravity and the one matrix model at the topological critical point are equivalent.

  3. Two-Dimensional Chirality in Three-Dimensional Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintner, Claude E.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of two-dimensional chirality is used to enhance students' understanding of three-dimensional stereochemistry. This chirality is used as a key to teaching/understanding such concepts as enaniotropism, diastereotopism, pseudoasymmetry, retention/inversion of configuration, and stereochemical results of addition to double bonds. (JN)

  4. Pressure Calculation for Two-Dimensional Flow Inside Hydraulic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    Englewood Cliffs, N. J., pp 525-530. Thompson , J . F . 1983 (Mar). "A Boundary-Fitted Coordinate Code for General Two-Dimensional Regions with Obstacles...and Boundary Intrusions," Technical Report E-83-8, US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Miss. V Thompson , J . F ., and Bernard, R

  5. Chaotic dynamics for two-dimensional tent maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumariño, Antonio; Ángel Rodríguez, José; Carles Tatjer, Joan; Vigil, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    For a two-dimensional extension of the classical one-dimensional family of tent maps, we prove the existence of an open set of parameters for which the respective transformation presents a strange attractor with two positive Lyapounov exponents. Moreover, periodic orbits are dense on this attractor and the attractor supports a unique ergodic invariant probability measure.

  6. Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Analysis of Helicopter Flyover Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SantaMaria, Odilyn L.; Farassat, F.; Morris, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    A method to separate main rotor and tail rotor noise from a helicopter in flight is explored. Being the sum of two periodic signals of disproportionate, or incommensurate frequencies, helicopter noise is neither periodic nor stationary. The single Fourier transform divides signal energy into frequency bins of equal size. Incommensurate frequencies are therefore not adequately represented by any one chosen data block size. A two-dimensional Fourier analysis method is used to separate main rotor and tail rotor noise. The two-dimensional spectral analysis method is first applied to simulated signals. This initial analysis gives an idea of the characteristics of the two-dimensional autocorrelations and spectra. Data from a helicopter flight test is analyzed in two dimensions. The test aircraft are a Boeing MD902 Explorer (no tail rotor) and a Sikorsky S-76 (4-bladed tail rotor). The results show that the main rotor and tail rotor signals can indeed be separated in the two-dimensional Fourier transform spectrum. The separation occurs along the diagonals associated with the frequencies of interest. These diagonals are individual spectra containing only information related to one particular frequency.

  7. Two-dimensional electrostatic lattices for indirect excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remeika, M.; Fogler, M. M.; Butov, L. V.; Hanson, M.; Gossard, A. C.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a method for the realization of two-dimensional electrostatic lattices for excitons using patterned interdigitated electrodes. Lattice structure is set by the electrode pattern and depth of the lattice potential is controlled by applied voltages. We demonstrate square, hexagonal, and honeycomb lattices created by this method.

  8. SAR Processing Based On Two-Dimensional Transfer Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Yung; Jin, Michael Y.; Curlander, John C.

    1994-01-01

    Exact transfer function, ETF, is two-dimensional transfer function that constitutes basis of improved frequency-domain-convolution algorithm for processing synthetic-aperture-radar, SAR data. ETF incorporates terms that account for Doppler effect of motion of radar relative to scanned ground area and for antenna squint angle. Algorithm based on ETF outperforms others.

  9. Exact two-dimensional superconformal R symmetry and c extremization.

    PubMed

    Benini, Francesco; Bobev, Nikolay

    2013-02-08

    We uncover a general principle dubbed c extremization, which determines the exact R symmetry of a two-dimensional unitary superconformal field theory with N=(0,2) supersymmetry. To illustrate its utility, we study superconformal theories obtained by twisted compactifications of four-dimensional N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory on Riemann surfaces and construct their gravity duals.

  10. Toward the Accurate Simulation of Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giussani, Angelo; Nenov, Artur; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Dumont, Elise; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional pump-probe electronic spectroscopy is a powerful technique able to provide both high spectral and temporal resolution, allowing the analysis of ultrafast complex reactions occurring via complementary pathways by the identification of decay-specific fingerprints. [1-2] The understanding of the origin of the experimentally recorded signals in a two-dimensional electronic spectrum requires the characterization of the electronic states involved in the electronic transitions photoinduced by the pump/probe pulses in the experiment. Such a goal constitutes a considerable computational challenge, since up to 100 states need to be described, for which state-of-the-art methods as RASSCF and RASPT2 have to be wisely employed. [3] With the present contribution, the main features and potentialities of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy are presented, together with the machinery in continuous development in our groups in order to compute two-dimensional electronic spectra. The results obtained using different level of theory and simulations are shown, bringing as examples the computed two-dimensional electronic spectra for some specific cases studied. [2-4] [1] Rivalta I, Nenov A, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 2014, 114, 85 [2] Nenov A, Segarra-Martí J, Giussani A, Conti I, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Jaiswal V K, Altavilla S, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Faraday Discuss. 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00175C [3] Nenov A, Giussani A, Segarra-Martí J, Jaiswal V K, Rivalta I, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, J. Chem. Phys. submitted [4] Nenov A, Giussani A, Fingerhut B P, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. Submitted [5] Krebs N, Pugliesi I, Hauer J, Riedle E, New J. Phys., 2013,15, 08501

  11. Stress Wave Propagation in Two-dimensional Buckyball Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zheng, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Orderly arrayed granular crystals exhibit extraordinary capability to tune stress wave propagation. Granular system of higher dimension renders many more stress wave patterns, showing its great potential for physical and engineering applications. At nanoscale, one-dimensionally arranged buckyball (C60) system has shown the ability to support solitary wave. In this paper, stress wave behaviors of two-dimensional buckyball (C60) lattice are investigated based on square close packing and hexagonal close packing. We show that the square close packed system supports highly directional Nesterenko solitary waves along initially excited chains and hexagonal close packed system tends to distribute the impulse and dissipates impact exponentially. Results of numerical calculations based on a two-dimensional nonlinear spring model are in a good agreement with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. This work enhances the understanding of wave properties and allows manipulations of nanoscale lattice and novel design of shock mitigation and nanoscale energy harvesting devices. PMID:27892963

  12. Entanglement Entropy in Two-Dimensional String Theory.

    PubMed

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Mazenc, Edward A

    2015-09-18

    To understand an emergent spacetime is to understand the emergence of locality. Entanglement entropy is a powerful diagnostic of locality, because locality leads to a large amount of short distance entanglement. Two-dimensional string theory is among the very simplest instances of an emergent spatial dimension. We compute the entanglement entropy in the large-N matrix quantum mechanics dual to two-dimensional string theory in the semiclassical limit of weak string coupling. We isolate a logarithmically large, but finite, contribution that corresponds to the short distance entanglement of the tachyon field in the emergent spacetime. From the spacetime point of view, the entanglement is regulated by a nonperturbative "graininess" of space.

  13. Vortices and antivortices in two-dimensional ultracold Fermi gases

    PubMed Central

    Bighin, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2017-01-01

    Vortices are commonly observed in the context of classical hydrodynamics: from whirlpools after stirring the coffee in a cup to a violent atmospheric phenomenon such as a tornado, all classical vortices are characterized by an arbitrary circulation value of the local velocity field. On the other hand the appearance of vortices with quantized circulation represents one of the fundamental signatures of macroscopic quantum phenomena. In two-dimensional superfluids quantized vortices play a key role in determining finite-temperature properties, as the superfluid phase and the normal state are separated by a vortex unbinding transition, the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Very recent experiments with two-dimensional superfluid fermions motivate the present work: we present theoretical results based on the renormalization group showing that the universal jump of the superfluid density and the critical temperature crucially depend on the interaction strength, providing a strong benchmark for forthcoming investigations. PMID:28374762

  14. Vortex annihilation and inverse cascades in two dimensional superfluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew; Chesler, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of a dilute mixture of vortices and antivortices in a turbulent two-dimensional superfluid at finite temperature is well described by first order Hall-Vinen-Iordanskii equations, or dissipative point vortex dynamics. These equations are governed by a single dimensionless parameter: the ratio of the strength of drag forces to Magnus forces on vortices. When this parameter is small, we demonstrate using numerical simulations that the resulting superfluid enjoys an inverse energy cascade where small scale stirring leads to large scale vortex clustering. We argue analytically and numerically that the vortex annihilation rate in a laminar flow may be parametrically smaller than the rate in a turbulent flow with an inverse cascade. This suggests a new way to detect inverse cascades in experiments on two-dimensional superfluid turbulence using cold atomic gases, where traditional probes of turbulence such as the energy spectrum are not currently accessible.

  15. Vortices and antivortices in two-dimensional ultracold Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bighin, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2017-04-01

    Vortices are commonly observed in the context of classical hydrodynamics: from whirlpools after stirring the coffee in a cup to a violent atmospheric phenomenon such as a tornado, all classical vortices are characterized by an arbitrary circulation value of the local velocity field. On the other hand the appearance of vortices with quantized circulation represents one of the fundamental signatures of macroscopic quantum phenomena. In two-dimensional superfluids quantized vortices play a key role in determining finite-temperature properties, as the superfluid phase and the normal state are separated by a vortex unbinding transition, the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Very recent experiments with two-dimensional superfluid fermions motivate the present work: we present theoretical results based on the renormalization group showing that the universal jump of the superfluid density and the critical temperature crucially depend on the interaction strength, providing a strong benchmark for forthcoming investigations.

  16. Electromagnetically induced two-dimensional grating assisted by incoherent pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Yuan; Liu, Zhuan-Zhuan; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2017-04-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing electromagnetically induced two-dimensional grating in a double-Λ system driven simultaneously by a coherent field and an incoherent pump field. In such an atomic configuration, the absorption is suppressed owing to the incoherent pumping process and the probe can be even amplified, while the refractivity is mainly attributed to the dynamically induced coherence. With the help of a standing-wave pattern coherent field, we obtain periodically modulated refractive index without or with gain, and therefore phase grating or gain-phase grating which diffracts a probe light into high-order direction efficiently can be formed in the medium via appropriate manipulation of the system parameters. The diffraction efficiency attainable by the present gratings can be controlled by tuning the coherent field intensity or the interaction length. Hence, the two-dimensional grating can be utilized as all-optical splitter or router in optical networking and communication.

  17. Stress Wave Propagation in Two-dimensional Buckyball Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Zheng, Bowen

    2016-11-01

    Orderly arrayed granular crystals exhibit extraordinary capability to tune stress wave propagation. Granular system of higher dimension renders many more stress wave patterns, showing its great potential for physical and engineering applications. At nanoscale, one-dimensionally arranged buckyball (C60) system has shown the ability to support solitary wave. In this paper, stress wave behaviors of two-dimensional buckyball (C60) lattice are investigated based on square close packing and hexagonal close packing. We show that the square close packed system supports highly directional Nesterenko solitary waves along initially excited chains and hexagonal close packed system tends to distribute the impulse and dissipates impact exponentially. Results of numerical calculations based on a two-dimensional nonlinear spring model are in a good agreement with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. This work enhances the understanding of wave properties and allows manipulations of nanoscale lattice and novel design of shock mitigation and nanoscale energy harvesting devices.

  18. Two-dimensional magnetostriction under vector magnetic characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, D.; Enokizono, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional magnetostriction of electrical steel sheet under vector magnetic characteristic. In conventional measurement method using Single Sheet Tester, the magnetic flux density, the magnetic field strength, and the magnetostriction have been measured in one direction. However, an angle between the magnetic flux density vector and the magnetic field strength vector exists because the magnetic property is vector quantity. An angle between the magnetic flux density vector and the direction of maximum magnetostriction also exists. We developed a new measurement method, which enables measurement of these angles. The vector magnetic characteristic and the two-dimensional magnetostriction have been measured using the new measurement method. The BH and Bλ curves considering the angles are shown in this paper. The analyzed results considering the angles are also made clear.

  19. Two-Dimensional Computational Model for Wave Rotor Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional (theta,z) Navier-Stokes solver for multi-port wave rotor flow simulation is described. The finite-volume form of the unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time on multi-block grids that represent the stationary inlet and outlet ports and the moving rotor passages of the wave rotor. Computed results are compared with three-port wave rotor experimental data. The model is applied to predict the performance of a planned four-port wave rotor experiment. Two-dimensional flow features that reduce machine performance and influence rotor blade and duct wall thermal loads are identified. The performance impact of rounding the inlet port wall, to inhibit separation during passage gradual opening, is assessed.

  20. Unshielded fetal magnetocardiography system using two-dimensional gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Yusuke; Kandori, Akihiko; Kumagai, Yukio; Ohnuma, Mitsuru; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Ishii, Tetsuko; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Horigome, Hitoshi; Chiba, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    We developed a fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) system that uses a pair of two-dimensional gradiometers to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio. The gradiometer, which is based on a low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device, detects the gradient of a magnetic field in two orthogonal directions. Gradiometer position is easy to adjust by operating the gantry to drive the cryostat in both the swinging and axial directions. As a result, a fMCG waveform for 25weeks' gestation was measured under an unshielded environment in real time. Moreover, the P and T waves for 25 and 34weeks' gestation, respectively, were obtained by averaging. These results indicate that this two-dimensional gradiometer is one of the most promising techniques for measuring fetal heart rate and diagnosing fetal arrhythmia.

  1. Vortices and antivortices in two-dimensional ultracold Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Bighin, G; Salasnich, L

    2017-04-04

    Vortices are commonly observed in the context of classical hydrodynamics: from whirlpools after stirring the coffee in a cup to a violent atmospheric phenomenon such as a tornado, all classical vortices are characterized by an arbitrary circulation value of the local velocity field. On the other hand the appearance of vortices with quantized circulation represents one of the fundamental signatures of macroscopic quantum phenomena. In two-dimensional superfluids quantized vortices play a key role in determining finite-temperature properties, as the superfluid phase and the normal state are separated by a vortex unbinding transition, the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Very recent experiments with two-dimensional superfluid fermions motivate the present work: we present theoretical results based on the renormalization group showing that the universal jump of the superfluid density and the critical temperature crucially depend on the interaction strength, providing a strong benchmark for forthcoming investigations.

  2. Manifestations of two-dimensional electron gas in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklja, Maija M.; Sharia, Onise; Tsyshevsky, Roman

    2017-03-01

    The existence of two-dimensional electron gas in molecular materials has not been reported or discussed. Intriguing properties of two-dimensional electron gas observed on interfaces of polar and nonpolar oxides spurred oxide electronics and advanced nanotechnology. Here we discover how an electrostatic instability occurs on polar surfaces of molecular crystals and explore its manifestations, chemical degradation of surfaces, charge separation, electrical conductivity, optical band-gap closure and surface metallization. A thin layer of polar surface of a dielectric molecular crystal becomes metallic due to interactions of polar molecules. Our findings are illustrated with two polymorphs of cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine crystals, the polar δ-phase and nonpolar β-phase. Our theory offers an explanation to a relative stability of the β-phase versus the explosive reactivity of δ-phase and to the experimentally observed difference in conductivity of these crystals. We predict that the electrostatic instability takes place on all polar molecular materials.

  3. Two dimensional disorder in black phosphorus and layered monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Mehboudi, Mehrshad; Kumar, Pradeep; Harriss, Edmund O.; Churchill, Hugh O. H.; Dorio, Alex M.; Zhu, Wenjuan; van der Zande, Arend; Pacheco Sanjuan, Alejandro A.

    The degeneracies of the structural ground state of materials with a layered orthorhombic structure such as black phosphorus and layered monochalcogenides GeS, GeSe, SnS, and SnSe, lead to an order/disorder transition in two dimensions at finite temperature. This transition has consequences on applications based on these materials requiring a crystalline two-dimensional structure. Details including a Potts model that explains the two-dimensional transition, among other results, will be given in this talk. References: M. Mehboudi, A.M. Dorio, W. Zhu, A. van der Zande, H.O.H. Churchill, A.A. Pacheco Sanjuan, E.O.H. Harris, P. Kumar, and S. Barraza-Lopez. arXiv:1510.09153.

  4. Numerical analysis of a two-dimensional nonsteady detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taki, S.; Fujiwara, T.

    1976-01-01

    In the present work a system of two-dimensional nonsteady hydrodynamic and chemical kinetic equations was numerically integrated for an exothermic system. Assumed two-step reaction model simulates practically an oxyhydrogen mixture. The calculation starts from a plane Chapman-Jouguet detonation as an initial condition. Two-dimensional disturbances are generated by artificially placing nonuniformities ahead of the detonation front. Regardless of the difference of the given initial disturbances, a fixed number of triple shock waves were produced for a fixed combination of mixture model and geometry when the transition period was over. This shows that for a given detonation tube geometry any exothermic system has its own characteristic multidimensional structure. The obtained number of triple shock waves contained in the detonation front was in agreement with existing experimental observations under the same condition.

  5. Two-dimensional semi-parametric alignment of chromatograms.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Wim P H; Lankelma, Jan

    2014-06-06

    We present a comprehensive alignment algorithm that extends the semi-parametric approach to two dimensions. The algorithm is based on modeling shifts with a two-dimensional "warp function" such that the sample chromatogram - its shifts corrected with the warp function - is adjusted to the reference chromatogram by minimizing the squared intensity difference. A warp function approach has the advantage that overlapping peaks are easily dealt with compared to other proposed two-dimensional algorithms. Another advantage is that missing peaks are allowed if the absence of these peaks has little numerical effect on the warp function computation and if these peaks occur between existing peaks. Performance of the algorithm is demonstrated using GC×GC data from three batches of three diesel oil samples and LC-MS data from a mouse breast cancer data set.

  6. Two-dimensional implosion simulations with a kinetic particle code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, I.; Even, W. P.; Strother, T. T.

    2017-05-01

    We perform two-dimensional implosion simulations using a Monte Carlo kinetic particle code. The application of a kinetic transport code is motivated, in part, by the occurrence of nonequilibrium effects in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions, which cannot be fully captured by hydrodynamic simulations. Kinetic methods, on the other hand, are able to describe both continuum and rarefied flows. We perform simple two-dimensional disk implosion simulations using one-particle species and compare the results to simulations with the hydrodynamics code rage. The impact of the particle mean free path on the implosion is also explored. In a second study, we focus on the formation of fluid instabilities from induced perturbations. We find good agreement with hydrodynamic studies regarding the location of the shock and the implosion dynamics. Differences are found in the evolution of fluid instabilities, originating from the higher resolution of rage and statistical noise in the kinetic studies.

  7. Directional detection of dark matter with two-dimensional targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kahn, Yonatan; Lisanti, Mariangela; Tully, Christopher G.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-09-01

    We propose two-dimensional materials as targets for direct detection of dark matter. Using graphene as an example, we focus on the case where dark matter scattering deposits sufficient energy on a valence-band electron to eject it from the target. We show that the sensitivity of graphene to dark matter of MeV to GeV mass can be comparable, for similar exposure and background levels, to that of semiconductor targets such as silicon and germanium. Moreover, a two-dimensional target is an excellent directional detector, as the ejected electron retains information about the angular dependence of the incident dark matter particle. This proposal can be implemented by the PTOLEMY experiment, presenting for the first time an opportunity for directional detection of sub-GeV dark matter.

  8. Novel hybrid C/BN two-dimensional heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvashnin, Dmitry G.; Kvashnina, Olga P.; Avramov, Pavel V.; Sorokin, Pavel B.; Kvashnin, Alexander G.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present an investigation of new quasi-two-dimensional heterostructures based on the alternation of bounded carbon and boron nitride layers (C/BN). We carried out a theoretical study of the atomic structure, stability and electronic properties of the proposed heterostructures. Such ultrathin quasi-two-dimensional C/BN films can be synthesized by means of chemically induced phase transition by connection of the layers of multilayered h-BN/graphene van der Waals heterostructures, which is indicated by the negative phase transition pressure in the calculated phase diagrams (P, T) of the films. It was shown that the band gap value of the C/BN films spans the infrared and visible spectrum. We hope that the proposed films and fabrication method can be considered as a possible route to obtain nanostructures with a controllable band gap in wide energy range. This makes these materials potentially suitable for a variety of applications, including photovoltaics, photoelectronics and more.

  9. Unshielded fetal magnetocardiography system using two-dimensional gradiometers.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yusuke; Kandori, Akihiko; Kumagai, Yukio; Ohnuma, Mitsuru; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Ishii, Tetsuko; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Horigome, Hitoshi; Chiba, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    We developed a fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) system that uses a pair of two-dimensional gradiometers to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio. The gradiometer, which is based on a low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device, detects the gradient of a magnetic field in two orthogonal directions. Gradiometer position is easy to adjust by operating the gantry to drive the cryostat in both the swinging and axial directions. As a result, a fMCG waveform for 25 weeks' gestation was measured under an unshielded environment in real time. Moreover, the P and T waves for 25 and 34 weeks' gestation, respectively, were obtained by averaging. These results indicate that this two-dimensional gradiometer is one of the most promising techniques for measuring fetal heart rate and diagnosing fetal arrhythmia.

  10. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng

    2014-11-14

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  11. Entanglement and Decoherence in Two-Dimensional Coherent State Superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Y.

    2017-03-01

    A detailed investigation of entanglement in the generalized two-dimensional nonorthogonal states, which are expressed in the framework of superposed coherent states, is presented. In addition to quantifying entanglement of the generalized two-dimensional coherent states superposition, necessary and sufficient conditions for maximality of entanglement of these states are found. We show that a large class of maximally entangled coherent states can be constructed, and hence, some new maximally entangled coherent states are explicitly manipulated. The investigation is extended to the mixed system states and entanglement properties of such mixed states are investigated. It is shown that in some cases maximally entangled mixed states can be detected. Furthermore, the effect of decoherence, due to both cavity losses and noisy channel process, on such entangled states are studied and its features are discussed.

  12. Preliminary results on two-dimensional interferometry of HL Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollestrup, Eric V.; Harvey, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary two-dimensional speckle interferometry results of HL Tau were found to be qualitatively similar to those found with one-dimensional slit scanning techniques; results consist of a resolved component (approximately 0.7 arcsec in size) and an unresolved component. Researchers are currently reducing the rest of the data (taken on three different telescopes and at three different wavelengths) and are also exploring other high resolution methods like the shift and add technique and selecting only the very best images for processing. The availability of even better two-dimensional arrays within the next couple of years promises to make speckle interferometry and other high resolution techniques very powerful and exiting tools for probing a variety of objects in the subarcsec regime.

  13. Extension of modified power method to two-dimensional problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Hyunsuk; Lee, Deokjung

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the generalized modified power method was extended to two-dimensional problems. A direct application of the method to two-dimensional problems was shown to be unstable when the number of requested eigenmodes is larger than a certain problem dependent number. The root cause of this instability has been identified as the degeneracy of the transfer matrix. In order to resolve this instability, the number of sub-regions for the transfer matrix was increased to be larger than the number of requested eigenmodes; and a new transfer matrix was introduced accordingly which can be calculated by the least square method. The stability of the new method has been successfully demonstrated with a neutron diffusion eigenvalue problem and the 2D C5G7 benchmark problem. - Graphical abstract:.

  14. Novel hybrid C/BN two-dimensional heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Kvashnina, Olga P; Avramov, Pavel V; Sorokin, Pavel B; Kvashnin, Alexander G

    2017-02-24

    Here we present an investigation of new quasi-two-dimensional heterostructures based on the alternation of bounded carbon and boron nitride layers (C/BN). We carried out a theoretical study of the atomic structure, stability and electronic properties of the proposed heterostructures. Such ultrathin quasi-two-dimensional C/BN films can be synthesized by means of chemically induced phase transition by connection of the layers of multilayered h-BN/graphene van der Waals heterostructures, which is indicated by the negative phase transition pressure in the calculated phase diagrams (P, T) of the films. It was shown that the band gap value of the C/BN films spans the infrared and visible spectrum. We hope that the proposed films and fabrication method can be considered as a possible route to obtain nanostructures with a controllable band gap in wide energy range. This makes these materials potentially suitable for a variety of applications, including photovoltaics, photoelectronics and more.

  15. Two-dimensional attosecond electron wave-packet interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  16. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy for application in biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Carsten; Marose, S.; Scheper, Thomas-Helmut; Nielsen, Hans O.; Hitzmann, Bernd; Belgardt, K.-H.

    1999-02-01

    A wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths is measured using the technique of two-dimensional (2D-) fluorescence spectroscopy. In a single, so called, two- dimensional fluorescence spectrum several biogenic fluorophors like proteins, vitamins and coenzymes can be detected simultaneously. This can give important information for bioprocess monitoring and control. An optical sensor (BioViewR) for on line fluorescence measurements at industrial (bio)-processes was used to get the results presented in this paper. This BioViewR-sensor is optimized to work in the harsh environment of production sites in biotechnological industry and -- using an optical light guide system with open-end detection -- it is very well suited for in vivo measurements, because it is non-invasive and the on line data can be performed in-situ.

  17. Topological Phonon Modes in a Two-Dimensional Wigner Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wen-Cheng; Shi, Jun-Ren

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the spin-orbit coupling effect in a two-dimensional Wigner crystal. We show that sufficiently strong spin-orbit coupling and an appropriate sign of g-factor could transform the Wigner crystal to a topological phonon system. We demonstrate the existence of chiral phonon edge modes in finite size samples, as well as the robustness of the modes in the topological phase. We explore the possibility of realizing the topological phonon system in two-dimensional Wigner crystals confined in semiconductor quantum wells/heterostructure. We find that the spin-orbit coupling is too weak for driving a topological phase transition in these systems. We argue that one may look for the topological phonon system in correlated Wigner crystals with emergent effective spin-orbit coupling.

  18. Phase separation under two-dimensional Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Kiwata, H

    2001-05-01

    The spinodal decomposition of a two-dimensional binary fluid under Poiseuille flow is studied by numerical simulation. We investigated time dependence of domain sizes in directions parallel and perpendicular to the flow. In an effective region of the flow, the power-law growth of a characteristic length in the direction parallel to the flow changes from the diffusive regime with the growth exponent alpha=1/3 to a new regime. The scaling invariance of the growth in the perpendicular direction is destroyed after the diffusive regime. A recurrent prevalence of thick and thin domains which determines log-time periodic oscillations has not been observed in our model. The growth exponents in the infinite system under two-dimensional Poiseuille flow are obtained by the renormalization group.

  19. On two-dimensional flows of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Stefan

    1945-01-01

    This report is devoted to the study of two-dimensional steady motion of a compressible fluid. It is shown that the complete flow pattern around a closed obstacle cannot be obtained by the method of Chaplygin. In order to overcome this difficulty, a formula for the stream-function of a two-dimensional subsonic flow is derived. The formula involves an arbitrary function of a complex variable and yields all possible subsonic flow patterns of certain types. Conditions are given so that the flow pattern in the physical plane will represent a flow around a closed curve. The formula obtained can be employed for the approximate determination of a subsonic flow around an obstacle. The method can be extended to partially supersonic flows.

  20. Two-dimensional localized chaotic patterns in parametrically driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzagasti, Deterlino; Laroze, David; Pleiner, Harald

    2017-05-01

    We study two-dimensional localized patterns in weakly dissipative systems that are driven parametrically. As a generic model for many different physical situations we use a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation that contains parametric forcing, damping, and spatial coupling. The latter allows for the existence of localized pattern states, where a finite-amplitude uniform state coexists with an inhomogeneous one. In particular, we study numerically two-dimensional patterns. Increasing the driving forces, first the localized pattern dynamics is regular, becomes chaotic for stronger driving, and finally extends in area to cover almost the whole system. In parallel, the spatial structure of the localized states becomes more and more irregular, ending up as a full spatiotemporal chaotic structure.

  1. A two-dimensional dam-break flood plain model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.; Berenbrock, C.E.; Freckleton, J.R.; Guymon, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional dam-break model is developed for flood plain study purposes. Both a finite difference grid and an irregular triangle element integrated finite difference formulation are presented. The governing flow equations are approximately solved as a diffusion model coupled to the equation of continuity. Application of the model to a hypothetical dam-break study indicates that the approach can be used to predict a two-dimensional dam-break flood plain over a broad, flat plain more accurately than a one-dimensional model, especially when the flow can break-out of the main channel and then return to the channel at other downstream reaches. ?? 1985.

  2. Two-dimensional Raman-terahertz spectroscopy of water

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Janne; Ahmed, Saima; Hamm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional Raman-terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is presented as a multidimensional spectroscopy directly in the far-IR regime. The method is used to explore the dynamics of the collective intermolecular modes of liquid water at ambient temperatures that emerge from the hydrogen-bond networks water forming. Two-dimensional Raman-THz spectroscopy interrogates these modes twice and as such can elucidate couplings and inhomogeneities of the various degrees of freedoms. An echo in the 2D Raman-THz response is indeed identified, indicating that a heterogeneous distribution of hydrogen-bond networks exists, albeit only on a very short 100-fs timescale. This timescale appears to be too short to be compatible with more extended, persistent structures assumed within a two-state model of water. PMID:24297930

  3. Strong localization effect in magnetic two-dimensional hole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wurstbauer, U.; Knott, S.; Zolotaryov, A.; Hansen, W.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.

    2010-01-11

    We report an extensive study of the magnetotransport properties of magnetically doped two-dimensional hole systems. Inverted manganese modulation doped InAs quantum wells with localized manganese ions providing a magnetic moment of S=5/2 were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Strong localization effect found in low-field magnetotransport measurements on these structures can either be modified by the manganese doping density or by tuning the two-dimensional hole density p via field effect. The data reveal that the ratio between p and manganese ions inside or in close vicinity to the channel enlarges the strong localization effect. Moreover, asymmetric broadening of the doping layer due to manganese segregation is significantly influenced by strain in the heterostructure.

  4. Controlling chaotic transport in two-dimensional periodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Chacón, R; Lacasta, A M

    2010-10-01

    We uncover and characterize different chaotic transport scenarios in perfect two-dimensional periodic potentials by controlling the chaotic dynamics of particles subjected to periodic external forces in the absence of a ratchet effect (i.e., with no directed transport by symmetry breaking of zero-mean forces). After identifying relevant symmetries of the equations of motion, analytical estimates in parameter space for the occurrence of different transport scenarios are provided and confirmed by numerical simulations. These scenarios are highly sensitive to variations of the system's asymmetry parameters, including the eccentricity of the two-dimensional periodic potential and the direction of dc and ac forces, which could be useful for particle sorting purposes in those cases where chaos is unavoidable.

  5. Recombination in one- and two-dimensional fitness landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetisyan, Zh.; Saakian, David B.

    2010-05-01

    We consider many-site mutation-recombination models of molecular evolution, where fitness is a function of a Hamming distance from one (one-dimensional case) or two (two-dimensional case) sequences. For the one-dimensional case, we calculate the population distribution dynamics for a model with zero fitness and an arbitrary symmetric initial distribution and find an error threshold transition point in the single-peak fitness model for a given initial symmetric distribution. We calculate the recombination period in the case of a single-peak fitness function, when the original population is located at one sequence, at some Hamming distance from the peak configuration. Steady-state fitness is calculated with finite genome length corrections. We derive analytical equations for the two-dimensional mutation-recombination model.

  6. No-hair conjecture in two-dimensional dilaton supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, J.; Georgelin, Y.

    1993-11-01

    We study two-dimensional (2D) dilaton gravity and supergravity following Hamiltonian methods. First, we consider the structure of constraints of 2D dilaton gravity, and then the 2D dilaton supergravity theory is obtained taking the square root of the bosonic constraints. We integrate exactly the equations of motion in both cases, and we show that the solutions of the equation of motion of 2D dilaton supergravity differ from the solutions of 2D dilaton gravity only by boundary conditions on the fermionic variables; i.e., the black holes of 2D dilaton supergravity theory are exactly the same black holes of 2D bosonic dilaton gravity modulo supersymmetry transformations. This result is the two-dimensional analogue of the no-hair theorem for supergravity.

  7. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna; Freire Soler, Victor M.; Brökers, Lara; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS2 and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS2 does not.

  8. Strong localization effect in magnetic two-dimensional hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, U.; Knott, S.; Zolotaryov, A.; Schuh, D.; Hansen, W.; Wegscheider, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report an extensive study of the magnetotransport properties of magnetically doped two-dimensional hole systems. Inverted manganese modulation doped InAs quantum wells with localized manganese ions providing a magnetic moment of S=5/2 were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Strong localization effect found in low-field magnetotransport measurements on these structures can either be modified by the manganese doping density or by tuning the two-dimensional hole density p via field effect. The data reveal that the ratio between p and manganese ions inside or in close vicinity to the channel enlarges the strong localization effect. Moreover, asymmetric broadening of the doping layer due to manganese segregation is significantly influenced by strain in the heterostructure.

  9. On comparing helioseismic two-dimensional inversion methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schou, J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Thompson, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We consider inversion techniques for investigating the structure and dynamics of the solar interior as functions of radius and latitude. In particular, we look at the problem of inferring the radial and latitudinal dependence of the Sun's internal rotation, using a fully two-dimensional least-squares inversion algorithm. Concepts such as averaging kernels, measures of resolution, and trade-off curves, which have previously been used in the one-dimensional case, are generalized to facilitate a comparison of two-dimensional methods. We investigate the weighting given to different modes and discuss the implications of this for observational strategies. As an illustration we use a mode set whose properties are similar to those expected for data from the GONG network.

  10. Thermodynamics of two-dimensional Yukawa systems across coupling regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchkov, Nikita P.; Khrapak, Sergey A.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2017-04-01

    Thermodynamics of two-dimensional Yukawa (screened Coulomb or Debye-Hückel) systems is studied systematically using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations cover very broad parameter range spanning from weakly coupled gaseous states to strongly coupled fluid and crystalline states. Important thermodynamic quantities, such as internal energy and pressure, are obtained and accurate physically motivated fits are proposed. This allows us to put forward simple practical expressions to describe thermodynamic properties of two-dimensional Yukawa systems. For crystals, in addition to numerical simulations, the recently developed shortest-graph interpolation method is applied to describe pair correlations and hence thermodynamic properties. It is shown that the finite-temperature effects can be accounted for by using simple correction of peaks in the pair correlation function. The corresponding correction coefficients are evaluated using MD simulation. The relevance of the obtained results in the context of colloidal systems, complex (dusty) plasmas, and ions absorbed to interfaces in electrolytes is pointed out.

  11. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario; Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng; Larcher, Luca; Wu, Ernest

    2016-01-04

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO{sub 2}, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  12. The line tension of two-dimensional ionic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustaquio-Armenta, María del Rosario; Méndez-Maldonado, Gloria Arlette; González-Melchor, Minerva

    2016-04-01

    Pressure tensor components are very useful in the calculation of the tension associated with a liquid-vapor interface. In this work, we present expressions for the pressure tensor components of two-dimensional ionic fluids, modeled at the level of the primitive model. As an application, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-vapor interfaces to calculate the line tension of the 1:1 two-dimensional ionic fluid, whose liquid-vapor coexistence curve had already been obtained in a previous work. The pressure tensor components were validated by simulating states of one phase and reproducing the scalar pressure, previously obtained from bulk simulations and reported in the literature. The effects on the line tension and the coexisting densities, originated by the choice of the Ewald parameters, the cutoff radius, and the interfacial length were also evaluated.

  13. Two-dimensional localized structures in harmonically forced oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.-P.; Knobloch, E.

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional spatially localized structures in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with 1:1 resonance are studied near the simultaneous presence of a steady front between two spatially homogeneous equilibria and a supercritical Turing bifurcation on one of them. The bifurcation structures of steady circular fronts and localized target patterns are computed in the Turing-stable and Turing-unstable regimes. In particular, localized target patterns grow along the solution branch via ring insertion at the core in a process reminiscent of defect-mediated snaking in one spatial dimension. Stability of axisymmetric solutions on these branches with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is determined, and parameter regimes with stable axisymmetric oscillons are identified. Direct numerical simulations reveal novel depinning dynamics of localized target patterns in the radial direction, and of circular and planar localized hexagonal patterns in the fully two-dimensional system.

  14. Mode conversion in plasmas with two-dimensional inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri-Mofakham, Nora; Sabzevari, Bijan Sh.

    2006-02-01

    Most of the mode conversion theories considered so far assume only a plane-layered medium, i.e. a medium where the parameters depend on one spatial coordinate. We generalize the mode-conversion method of Cairns and Lashmore-Davies to plasmas with two-dimensional inhomogeneities. In the method presented here, the frequencies ω_1 and ω_2 of the uncoupled modes belonging to two different dispersion equations are considered as functions of the space variable r and the wave vector k and are coupled together via a small quantity η. We calculate the energy transmission and conversion coefficients analytically by solving two coupled wave amplitude equations in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies. The results are applicable to electron Bernstein wave heating of plasmas with two-dimensional inhomogeneity, e.g. spherical tokamaks.

  15. SU(1,2) invariance in two-dimensional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonos, Sergey; Nersessian, Armen

    2017-02-01

    Performing the Hamiltonian analysis we explicitly established the canonical equivalence of the deformed oscillator, constructed in arXiv:1607.03756, with the ordinary one. As an immediate consequence, we proved that the SU(1, 2) symmetry is the dynamical symmetry of the ordinary two-dimensional oscillator. The characteristic feature of this SU(1, 2) symmetry is a non-polynomial structure of its generators written in terms of the oscillator variables.

  16. Two-dimensional SU( N) Higgs theory . An instanton approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-08-01

    The two-dimensional non-abelian Higgs model is studied by employing a dilute gas of Z N vortices. The results obtained are similar to the corresponding results of the abelian model, studied by Callan, Dashen and Gross, and Raby and Ukawa. The most interesting conclusion is that in the presence of some number, NF, of massless fermion flavors, the theory behaves differently for N > Ncrit or N < Ncrit where Ncrit = NF/( NF-2).

  17. The scaling state in two-dimensional grain growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mulheran, P.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-11-01

    A new model of normal grain growth in two-dimensional systems is derived from considerations of Potts model simulations. This Randomly Connected Bubble model is based on Hillert's theory and combines the essential topological features of the grain boundary network with the action of capillarity. It successfully predicts what the scaling state of the network should be and explains why the system evolves into this state. The implications for grain growth in real materials are also discussed.

  18. Two dimensional thermal and charge mapping of power thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S. P.; Rabinovici, B. M.

    1975-01-01

    The two dimensional static and dynamic current density distributions within the junction of semiconductor power switching devices and in particular the thyristors were obtained. A method for mapping the thermal profile of the device junctions with fine resolution using an infrared beam and measuring the attenuation through the device as a function of temperature were developed. The results obtained are useful in the design and quality control of high power semiconductor switching devices.

  19. CBEAM. 2-D: a two-dimensional beam field code

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, K.A.

    1985-05-01

    CBEAM.2-D is a two-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations for the case of an electron beam propagating through an air medium. Solutions are performed in the beam-retarded time frame. Conductivity is calculated self-consistently with field equations, allowing sophisticated dependence of plasma parameters to be handled. A unique feature of the code is that it is implemented on an IBM PC microcomputer in the BASIC language. Consequently, it should be available to a wide audience.

  20. Spatially resolved two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, Uwe; Crepeau, Richard H.; Lee, Sanghyuk; Dunnam, Curt R.; Xu, Dajiang; Freed, Jack H.

    1991-09-01

    Fourier transform ESR methods have been extended to permit spatially resolved two-dimensional (2D)-ESR experiments. This is illustrated for the case of 2D-electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) spectra of nitroxides in a liquid that exhibits appreciable cross-peaks due to Heisenberg spin exchange. The use of spin-echo decays in spatially resolved FT-ESR is also demonstrated.

  1. Boundary Critical Behaviour of Two-Dimensional Layered Ising Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzola, Alessandro

    Layered models are models in which the coupling constants depend in an arbitrary way on one spatial coordinate, usually the distance from a free surface or boundary. Here the theory of the boundary critical behaviour of two-dimensional layered Ising models, including the Hilhorst-van Leeuwen model and models for aperiodic systems, is reviewed, with a particular attention to exact results for the critical behaviour and the boundary order parameter.

  2. Intermittency in two-dimensional Ekman-Navier-Stokes turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, G.; Celani, A.; Musacchio, S.; Vergassola, M.

    2002-08-01

    We study the statistics of the vorticity field in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence with linear Ekman friction. We show that the small-scale vorticity fluctuations are intermittent, as conjectured by Bernard [Europhys. Lett. 50, 333 (2000)] and Nam et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5134 (2000)]. The small-scale statistics of vorticity fluctuations coincide with that of a passive scalar with finite lifetime transported by the velocity field itself.

  3. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Truckee River Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    ANALYSIS: The Truckee River originates from Lake Tahoe , flowing 140 miles (225 km) through Reno, NV, to Pyramid Lake . The downstream boundary of the...riverine restoration design. A two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic model was applied to the McCarran Ranch reach of the Truckee River to evaluate...existing condition and future restoration plan condition hydraulics. The impact of the restoration design is presented in terms of the difference in the

  4. Suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kazazis, D.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Gennser, U.; Bourgeois, O.; Antoni, T.

    2013-12-04

    We report on the fabrication of fully suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases in III-V heterostructures. Low temperature transport measurements verify that the properties of the suspended gases are only slightly degraded with respect to the non-suspended gases. Focused ion beam technology is used to pattern suspended nanostructures with minimum damage from the ion beam, due to the small width of the suspended membrane.

  5. Structural transitions in laterally compressed two-dimensional Coulomb clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, O.; Anisimovas, E.; Varanavicius, T.

    2011-03-15

    We model structural transitions of small-size Wigner crystals in laterally compressed two-dimensional traps. Ground and metastable configurations are calculated and their transformations are linked to conspicuous changes in the heat capacity of the system. We show that various types of structural transitions are reflected by characteristic features in the behavior of the heat capacity. For deeper understanding, results produced by the Monte Carlo numerical calculations are compared to predictions of simple one-dimensional models.

  6. Itinerant ferromagnetism in a two-dimensional atomic gas

    SciTech Connect

    Conduit, G. J.

    2010-10-15

    Motivated by the first experimental evidence of ferromagnetic behavior in a three-dimensional ultracold atomic gas, we explore the possibility of itinerant ferromagnetism in a trapped two-dimensional atomic gas. Firstly, we develop a formalism that demonstrates how quantum fluctuations drive the ferromagnetic reconstruction first order, and consider the consequences of an imposed population imbalance. Secondly, we adapt this formalism to elucidate the key experimental signatures of ferromagnetism in a realistic trapped geometry.

  7. Magnetotransport in two-dimensional electron gas in helical nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Vorobyova, Julia S; Vorob'ev, Alexander B; Prinz, Victor Y; Toropov, Alexander I; Maude, Duncan K

    2015-03-11

    Heterostructures containing high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas were rolled into freestanding helically shaped contacted Hall bars. Magnetotransport measurements in these structures at high magnetic fields revealed minima in the longitudinal magnetoresistance corresponding to integer and fractional filling factors. A strong asymmetry of the longitudinal magnetoresistance with respect to the external magnetic field direction was observed. For this new type of structures, an edge state picture was considered, and calculations based on the Landauer-Büttiker formalism are performed.

  8. Exact analytic flux distributions for two-dimensional solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Fraidenraich, Naum; Henrique de Oliveira Pedrosa Filho, Manoel; Vilela, Olga C; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    A new approach for representing and evaluating the flux density distribution on the absorbers of two-dimensional imaging solar concentrators is presented. The formalism accommodates any realistic solar radiance and concentrator optical error distribution. The solutions obviate the need for raytracing, and are physically transparent. Examples illustrating the method's versatility are presented for parabolic trough mirrors with both planar and tubular absorbers, Fresnel reflectors with tubular absorbers, and V-trough mirrors with planar absorbers.

  9. Two Dimensional Compressibility of Electrochemically Adsorbed Lead on Silver (111).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-28

    electrode surface, occur at electrode potentials positive of the reversible thermodynamic potential for bulk deposition and hence are termed underpotential ...monolayer formation and bulk deposition , the 1J near neighbor distance of the lead monolayer decreases linearly with applied potential, (proportional to the...report the two dimensional compressibility of electrochemically deposited lead on silver (111). Measurements were made in-situ (in contact with solution

  10. Thermal diode from two-dimensional asymmetrical Ising lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Li, Baowen

    2011-06-01

    Two-dimensional asymmetrical Ising models consisting of two weakly coupled dissimilar segments, coupled to heat baths with different temperatures at the two ends, are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The heat rectifying effect, namely asymmetric heat conduction, is clearly observed. The underlying mechanisms are the different temperature dependencies of thermal conductivity κ at two dissimilar segments and the match (mismatch) of flipping frequencies of the interface spins.

  11. Two-dimensional chiral anomaly in differential regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. F.

    1999-07-01

    The two-dimensional chiral anomaly is calculated using differential regularization. It is shown that the anomaly emerges naturally in the vector and axial Ward identities on the same footing as the four-dimensional case. The vector gauge symmetry can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the mass scales without introducing the seagull term. We have analyzed the reason why such a universal result can be obtained in differential regularization.

  12. In vivo two-dimensional NMR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    The poor resolution of in-vivo one- dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has limited its clinical potential. Currently, only the large singlet methyl resonances arising from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine are quantitated in a clinical setting. Other metabolites such as myo- inositol, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, and γ- amino butyric acid (GABA) are of clinical interest but quantitation is difficult due to the overlapping resonances and limited spectral resolution. To improve the spectral resolution and distinguish between overlapping resonances, a series of two- dimensional chemical shift correlation spectroscopy experiments were developed for a 1.5 Tesla clinical imaging magnet. Two-dimensional methods are attractive for in vivo spectroscopy due to their ability to unravel overlapping resonances with the second dimension, simplifying the interpretation and quantitation of low field NMR spectra. Two-dimensional experiments acquired with mix-mode line shape negate the advantages of the second dimension. For this reason, a new experiment, REVOLT, was developed to achieve absorptive mode line shape in both dimensions. Absorptive mode experiments were compared to mixed mode experiments with respect to sensitivity, resolution, and water suppression. Detailed theoretical and experimental calculations of the optimum spin lock and radio frequency power deposition were performed. Two-dimensional spectra were acquired from human bone marrow and human brain tissue. The human brain tissue spectra clearly reveal correlations among the coupled spins of NAA, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, GABA, aspartate and myo-inositol obtained from a single experiment of 23 minutes from a volume of 59 mL. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  13. Dirac Points in Two-Dimensional Inverse Opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2013-10-01

    The electron energy states and energy bands are calculated for a two-dimensional inverse opal structure. Assume that the opal structure is closed-packed circles, the inverse opal has the honeycomb lattice. The honeycomb lattice in two dimensions has a Dirac point. Its properties can be manipulated by altering the structure of the inverse opal: the radius of the circle, and the small gap between circles.

  14. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeremy N; Coy, Andrew; Dykstra, Robin; Eccles, Craig D; Hunter, Mark W; Callaghan, Paul T

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate the first two-dimensional correlation NMR (COSY) spectra obtained at ultra low frequencies (ULF) using the Earth's magnetic field. Using a specially developed spectrometer with multiple audio-frequency pulses under controlled pulse phase, we observe magnetisation transfer arising from heteronuclear J-couplings in trifluoroethanol and para-difluorobenzene. The 2D COSY spectra exhibit all diagonal and off-diagonal multiplets consistent with known J-couplings in these molecules.

  15. Two-Dimensional Laser-Speckle Surface-Strain Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, John P.; Lant, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Extension of Yamaguchi's laser-speckle surface-strain-gauge method yields data on two-dimensional surface strains in times as short as fractions of second. Laser beams probe rough spot on surface of specimen before and after processing. Changes in speckle pattern of laser light reflected from spot indicative of changes in surface strains during processing. Used to monitor strains and changes in strains induced by hot-forming and subsequent cooling of steel.

  16. Multiple Potts models coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, C. F.; Johnston, D. A.

    1992-07-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of multiple q=2, 3, 4 state Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology in order to investigate the c>1 region of two-dimensional quantum gravity. Contrary to naive expectation we find no obvious signs of pathological behaviour for c>1. We discuss the results in the light of suggestions that have been made for a modified DDK ansatz for c>1.

  17. Acoustic Bloch oscillations in a two-dimensional phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaojian; Peng, Shasha; Cai, Feiyan; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2007-11-01

    We report the observation of acoustic Bloch oscillations at megahertz frequency in a two-dimensional phononic crystal. By creating periodically arrayed cavities with a decreasing gradient in width along one direction in the phononic crystal, acoustic Wannier-Stark ladders are created in the frequency domain. The oscillatory motion of an incident Gaussian pulse inside the sample is demonstrated by both simulation and experiment.

  18. Collision dynamics of two-dimensional non-Abelian vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawson, Thomas; Petersen, Timothy C.; Simula, Tapio

    2017-09-01

    We study computationally the collision dynamics of vortices in a two-dimensional spin-2 Bose-Einstein condensate. In contrast to Abelian vortex pairs, which annihilate or pass through each other, we observe non-Abelian vortex pairs to undergo rungihilation—an event that converts the colliding vortices into a rung vortex. The resulting rung defect subsequently decays to another pair of non-Abelian vortices of different type, accompanied by a magnetization reversal.

  19. Tricritical behavior in a two-dimensional field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamber, Herbert

    1980-05-01

    The critical behavior of a two-dimensional scalar Euclidean field theory with a potential term that allows for three minima is analyzed using an approximate position-space renormalization-group transformation on the equivalent quantum spin Hamiltonian. The global phase diagram shows a tricritical point separating a critical line from a line of first-order transitions. Other critical properties are examined, and good agreement is found with results on classical spin models belonging to the same universality class.

  20. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in polymer study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeonju; Noda, Isao; Jung, Young Mee

    2015-01-01

    This review outlines the recent works of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in polymer study. 2DCOS is a powerful technique applicable to the in-depth analysis of various spectral data of polymers obtained under some type of perturbation. The powerful utility of 2DCOS combined with various analytical techniques in polymer studies and noteworthy developments of 2DCOS used in this field are also highlighted. PMID:25815286