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Sample records for residential care education

  1. Residential Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia care Programs and Services Appropriate services and programming based on specific health and behavioral care needs ... of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272-3900 Find Your Local Chapter Get ...

  2. Education Secured? The School Performance of Adolescents in Secure Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Annemiek T.; Huyghen, Anne-Marie N.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana; Kalverboer, Margrite E.; Köngeter, Stefan; Zeller, Maren; Knorth, Erik J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite poor school performance by adolescents in secure residential care and the potential importance of education during care, little is known about how to achieve academic success with these adolescents. Objective: Therefore, the aim of the present study is to assess adolescents' academic achievement during secure residential…

  3. A Social Pedagogy Approach to Residential Care: Balancing Education and Placement in the Development of an Innovative Child Welfare Residential Program in Ontario, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras; Groskleg, Ron

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the exploration and development of a residential program of the child welfare authority of Renfrew County in Ontario, Canada. Recognizing that virtually its entire population of youth in care was failing to achieve positive outcomes in education, Renfrew County Family and Children Services embarked on a program development…

  4. The Impact of Child Sexual Abuse on the Education of Boys in Residential Care between 1950 and 1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Andrew; Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2012-01-01

    Children's education may be adversely impacted by external factors during their childhood. For example, learning to learn, critical reflection, experiential learning and self-direction may be permanently impaired. Many children in out-of-home residential care during the last century suffered ongoing child abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse,…

  5. Substance use by adolescents in special education and residential youth care institutions.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Annelies; Monshouwer, Karin; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2011-06-01

    This study examined substance use rates and related background factors among adolescents in special education (SE) and in residential youth care institutions (RYC). Information on substance use from 531 adolescents in RYC, 603 adolescents in SE for students with behavioral problems (SEB) and 1,905 adolescents in SE for students with learning disabilities (SEL) was compared with information from 7,041 adolescents who attended mainstream education. Results show that substance use rates are particularly high among adolescents in RYC and in SEB. For example, 22% of the 12-13 years old in RYC and 16% in SEB was a daily smoker compared with 1% of their counterparts in mainstream education. Background factors, including age, ethnic background and family situation, partly explained the differences in substance use between mainstream education on the one hand and SE and RYC on the other hand, but differences between the groups remained substantial and significant. Several interaction effects were found in the relation between SE/RYC and substance use that were all in line with the risk paradox: some subgroups that are normally at lower risk for problem behavior are at higher risk when they are subjected to high-risk indicators. The elevated risk of substance use among adolescents in RYC/SE was in some cases particularly marked for those who would normally be at lower risk for substance use (girls in SEB for heavy alcohol drinking and cannabis use, ethnic minority adolescents and adolescents with a stable family situation in RYC for respectively heavy weekly alcohol drinking and daily use of tobacco). Results of this study have important implications for health education and intervention programs for adolescents in RYC and SE.

  6. Residential Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Cyril O.

    The theme of this discursive essay is residential continuing education: its definition, its development along somewhat different lines in Europe and in America, and its practice in university centers in the United States. Continuing education includes any learning or teaching program that is based on the assumptions that the learners have studied…

  7. Characteristics of Owners of Residential Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Dianne D.; And Others

    Although researchers have investigated quality and cost of residential care, little is known about the people who own and manage residential care facilities. In an attempt to find out more about these managers, members of the National Association of Residential Care Facilities (NARCF) were surveyed. Members (N=175) responded to questionnaires…

  8. Staff supervision in residential care.

    PubMed

    Myers, Peter G; Bibbs, Tonya; Orozco, Candy

    2004-04-01

    Residential care workers must be offered opportunities for formalized and systematic supervision in individual and group formats to provide the highest possible level of care to children and adolescents whom they serve. Effective supervision with residential care staff should be open to exploring issues at all levels of their experience and in relation to each component of the broader organizational structure within which they work. Systems theory offers a useful lens through which to view supervising staff in residential treatment. Systems theory proposes that human behavior is shaped by interactional processes and internal factors. Although the development of the individual occurs within intrinsic cognitive and emotional spheres, it also is believed to be related to several other elements. These additional variables include the point at which the family and system function in their own life cycle, the historical and current emotional context, the current and changing structure of the system, narratives, and the cultural context. This article discussed how methods of training and supervision would be most effective if they were designed specifically for the developmental level of the participants. Some literature reviews have concluded that youth care workers, like all professionals, pass through developmental stages and progress through them in their work. To assist youth care workers in their jobs, supervisors must understand these stages and the ways in which they may be enacted in the workplace. PMID:15062348

  9. Residential Care: Back to First Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, David A.

    Residential care must be redefined, free from jargon and rhetoric. Over the past 20 years, the social welfare approach, which encompasses the medical model, has dominated legislative and practical thinking about residential care. This theoretical thinking reached its culmination in the concept of the therapeutic community. The therapeutic…

  10. 78 FR 32124 - Community Residential Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... approval is revoked. On May 13, 1996, 61 FR 21965, VA redesignated Sec. 17.51n as Sec. 17.67. We are... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO62 Community Residential Care AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... concerning approval of non-VA community residential care facilities to allow VA to waive such...

  11. Children with ADHD in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Kathryn J.; Hagaman, Jessica L.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Reid, Robert; Chmelka, Beth; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics or functioning of children with ADHD in residential care as compared to their non-ADHD peers. This study evaluated data on 538 children with (n = 125) and without (n = 413) ADHD in residential care to determine demographic, mental health, behavioral, and treatment (i.e., medication use) characteristics.…

  12. Intercultural residential care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Kiata, Liz; Kerse, Ngaire

    2004-03-01

    Along with other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, New Zealand's society is aging such that an increase in the number of older people requiring residential care is predicted. What cannot be foreseen is how culturally defined health beliefs affect the care given to older people in residential care. In this article, the authors describe and discuss the culturally based health beliefs of some Pacific Islands caregivers and predominately European (Pakeha) older people resident at one long-term care facility in Auckland, New Zealand. The delivery of care is influenced by culturally related beliefs about "being old." Racism is evident in residential care, and the authors discuss the reactions of caregivers, residents, and management. This research extends the discussion of caregiving and receiving in to the cross-cultural setting, and the findings highlight a number of elements in cultural differences between carer and cared-for that might affect care practices at the residential facility studied.

  13. The assessment and management of falls in residential care settings.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Anita

    Care of the older person has become more specialised in Ireland particularly since the introduction of national and international healthcare standards. In this regard, older people are receiving more evidence-based quality care when living in long-term healthcare facilities in Ireland. Assessment and management of falls is currently high on the quality agenda in terms of measuring quality outcomes. Clinical practice is being standardised using evidence-based practice and research. Residential care nurses caring for older people in Ireland are required to demonstrate clinical competence when assessing and managing falls in the residential care setting. Healthcare legislation, policy and in-service education, occurring in both the public and private sector, require a multidisciplinary-team approach. This article addresses the nursing priorities regarding falls assessment and management strategies that residential nurses should consider when caring for the older person at risk of falling. PMID:23545551

  14. College Students' Attitudes toward Residential Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Erin M.; Mosher-Ashley, Pearl M.

    2000-01-01

    College students (n=131) interviewed residents of 96 long-term care facilities. Students perceived nursing homes more negatively than other facilities. Residential care was viewed more positively by those with personal experience of elder care and those whose interviewees were satisfied with their lives or mentally alert. (SK)

  15. Small Child Care Facilities in Residential Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giegerich & Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    One part of a three-part investigation prepared for the Montgomery County Planning Board in Silver Spring, Maryland, this study addresses planning and site planning issues arising from the location of child care facilities in residential settings. The study, which emphasizes homes and centers which care for 7 to 20 children, provides a detailed…

  16. Measuring Group Care Worker Interventions in Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastiaanssen, Inge L. W.; Kroes, Gert; Nijhof, Karin S.; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Veerman, Jan Willem

    2012-01-01

    Background: By interacting with children, group care workers shape daily living environments to influence treatment. Current literature provides little knowledge about the content of youth residential care. Objective: In this study, a questionnaire called the Group care worker Intervention Checklist was developed. Method: Group care workers…

  17. Assessing the Effectiveness of Residential Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafka, James J.; Griffith, William S.

    1984-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the aspects of residential adult education that might account for differences among the participants in residential programs. An analysis of the claims advanced by advocates of residential adult education led to the identification of three factors that appeared to account for the alleged superiority of this…

  18. End-of-Life Care Policies in Flemish Residential Care Facilities Accommodating Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Haene, I.; Pasman, H. R. W.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.; Mortier, F.; Stichele, R. Vander

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article aims to describe the presence, content and implementation strategies of written policies on end-of-life decisions in Flemish residential care facilities (RCFs) accommodating persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), and to describe training, education and quality assessments of end-of-life care. Methods: A…

  19. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 6, Number 2, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "CWLA's Position on Residential Care"; (2) "The View of Adolescent Life: Perceptions and Realities" ( Lisa Moore Willis); (3) "Assessing Youth Preferences for Adult Behavior in Residential Care: A Replication" (Jack T. Bowers, III, Robert J. Jones, Gary D.…

  20. An examination of the health profile, service use and care needs of older adults in residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, F; Dalziel, W B; Molnar, F J; Alie, J

    2004-01-01

    Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile, patterns of service use, and medical/care needs of a representative sample of 178 older adults in residential care facilities in the City of Ottawa. The results indicate great diversity in resident and facility profiles in this setting and confirm earlier impressions that special care units in the residential care sector have become increasingly close to being unlicensed pseudo-nursing homes. Despite the heavy burden of care, the evidence suggests that the care needs of the majority of residents are adequately met in the residential care environment. The results can inform future research, case finding, educational, and policy planning initiatives in this setting.

  1. Understanding the elevated risk of substance use by adolescents in special education and residential youth care: the role of individual, family and peer factors.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Annelies; van den Eijnden, Regina; Monshouwer, Karin; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents who attend special education for behavioural problems (SEB) and adolescents who live in a residential youth care institution (RYC) are characterised by behavioural disorders and problematic family backgrounds and have an increased risk for substance use. Though it is likely that the high rates of substance use in SEB/RYC settings might be inherent to the risk profile of these adolescents, little is known about the actual role the risk profile has in explaining substance use. The present study examined the extent to which the elevated risk of substance use in SEB/RYC can be explained by high levels of individual, family, and peer risk indicators that are known to characterise their risk profile. Self-report questionnaires from 531 adolescents in RYC (50 % male; mean age 14.7) and 603 adolescents in SEB (81 % male; mean age 14.1) were compared with information from 1,905 adolescents attending special education for students with learning disabilities (SEL) (56 % male; mean age 14.1). Results show that adolescents in SEB/RYC reported higher levels of daily smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, cannabis and hard drug use, as well as greater prevalence of individual, family and peer factors. Though individual, family and in particular peer risk indicators all explain some of the variance in substance use, the differences between adolescents in SEB/RYC compared with SEL remained significant and substantial, with the exception of heavy alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that deviant peer affiliation, in particular, plays a role in explaining high substance use levels in SEB/RYC and those factors relevant to the residential settings and special education schools might also contribute to substance use in these high-risk groups.

  2. Determinants of Residential Adult Education Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafka, James J.

    Advocates of residential education have isolated three determinants of residential adult education effectiveness: isolation from the outside environment; concentration on content; and group support. This study investigated the independent and collective relationships of different levels of these determinants with cognitive gain and posttest…

  3. Documentation for Students in Residential Care: Network of Relations of Human and Non-Human Actants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinsson, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Swedish and international research points to serious problems for the education of students with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in the care of social welfare, for example, in residential care. The aim of this article is to elucidate how documentation, care plans (CPs) and individual educational plans (IEPs) outline the…

  4. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 3, Winter 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "Promising Practices for Adequately Funding and Reimbursing Residential Services" (Lloyd Bullard); (2) "Closing the Gender Gap" (Erin Andersen); (3) "Residential Child Care: Guidelines for Physical Techniques, Crisis Prevention, and Management" (Kurk Lalemand);…

  5. Medication safety in residential aged-care facilities: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas M; March, Lyn M; Sambrook, Philip N; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2010-10-01

    Medication safety must be tailored to the distinctive issues in residential aged-care facilities (RACFs). The health and functional characteristics of their residents are different to those of hospital inpatients and community-dwelling older adults, and there are unique staffing and management issues. Understanding the aetiology and epidemiology of drug-related problems is vital in developing methods to improve patient safety. In this perspective review, we discuss tools that are used to quantify exposure to 'high-risk' medications and their evaluation in residential aged-care settings. Drug withdrawal interventions are described as a potential way to reduce adverse drug events in RACFs. Multidisciplinary professional interventions, education programs and improved communication between health professionals have been shown to improve medication safety in RACFs. Technological advances and other administrative strategies may also improve resident safety. This perspective addresses issues in medication safety facing RACFs and methods to improve the safety of medicines for their residents.

  6. Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction among Residential Child Care Workers: The Role of Personality Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerach, Gadi

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed compassion fatigue (CF) and compassion satisfaction (CS) among Israeli residential child-care workers (RCWs) working in residential treatment facilities for children and youth at risk (N = 147) as compared to educational boarding schools workers (BSWs; N = 74). Furthermore, we assessed the relationship of potential…

  7. Bullying in Adolescent Residential Care: The Influence of the Physical and Social Residential Care Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekol, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date, no study examined possible contributions of environmental factors to bullying and victimization in adolescent residential care facilities. Objective: By testing one part of the Multifactor Model of Bullying in Secure Setting (MMBSS; Ireland in "Int J Adolesc Med Health" 24(1):63-68, 2012), this research examined the…

  8. Experiential Education, Outdoor Adventure As a Modality in Youth Care and Residential Treatment. A Survey of Programs, Principles, Research and Practice on the European Continent, Especially the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton

    Orthopedagogisch Centrum Michiel is a multifunctional institution in the eastern Netherlands for youth with emotional problems. The staff of the institution's residential treatment center has gradually become involved with outdoor experiential education through training programs, conferences, special projects, and supervised programs. Activities…

  9. The implementation of life space crisis intervention in residential care and special education for children and adolescents with EBD: an effect study.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Bram; Volckaert, Annelies; D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2014-09-01

    When working with children and adolescents with emotional and behavioural disorders, conflicts are a part of daily life. At present, a variety of conflict resolution or conflict management programs, that can be divided into three categories, are described in the literature. A first category contains programs that focus on training for children and adolescents, and are often curriculum-based. The second category focuses on training for parents, and the third category contains programs that focus on training for professionals. The presents study was designed to evaluated the effectiveness of Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI), a therapeutic and verbal strategy developed by Long that fits into this third category of conflict management programs. Throughout a four-year project, al staff in a Flemish centre offering residential care and special education were trained in LSCI. On a yearly basis, data with regard to time in program, academic achievement, behavioural problems and anxiety problems were collected. The results show an increase in time spent in program and in academic achievement, and a decrease in youths' anxiety, indicating that the implementation of LSCI contributes constructively to the treatment of children and adolescents with EBD.

  10. Positive behavioral interventions and supports: using strength-based approaches to enhance the culture of care in residential and day treatment education environments.

    PubMed

    Kalke, Thomas; Glanton, Ann; Cristalli, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports model, first introduced into public schools, has been extended to alternative settings. This article highlights applying PBIS to day treatment and residential treatment education programs increasingly challenged to serve seriously emotionally disturbed youth whose risk factors have become more complex. The results demonstrate a more positive environment enhancing children's treatment and education along with decreasing numbers of safety holds and need for out-of-classroom supports. PMID:18422053

  11. Positive behavioral interventions and supports: using strength-based approaches to enhance the culture of care in residential and day treatment education environments.

    PubMed

    Kalke, Thomas; Glanton, Ann; Cristalli, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports model, first introduced into public schools, has been extended to alternative settings. This article highlights applying PBIS to day treatment and residential treatment education programs increasingly challenged to serve seriously emotionally disturbed youth whose risk factors have become more complex. The results demonstrate a more positive environment enhancing children's treatment and education along with decreasing numbers of safety holds and need for out-of-classroom supports.

  12. Should we educate care staff to improve the oral health and oral hygiene of people with intellectual disability in residential care? Real world lessons from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin; Guerin, Suzanne; Nunn, June

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of a multitiered oral health educational program on the oral health and oral hygiene of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In a controlled pretest, posttest trial, with cluster randomization, a pyramidal training program was delivered to residential staff who cared for a randomly allocated, purposively stratified intervention group of people with ID living in community care homes. A control group lived in centers where staff received no training. Clinical measures were carried out pre- and posttest. Difference in Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and Plaque Index (PI) was measured posttest using ANCOVA. Seventy-six participants took part, representing 49.0% of the invited sample (n = 155). Fourteen did not receive clinical examination. There was one dropout 6-9 months later. A 10.5% and 8.5% reduction in mean MGI and PI was evident at posttest but did not show statistically significant difference, when controlling for baseline covariates (p > 0.05, ANCOVA). Mean MGI and PI scores were not significantly different among people with ID whose care staff had and had not received oral health training. Limitations are discussed. The results indicate that this program failed to significantly improve oral health or oral hygiene, despite the intervention being "educationally" successful. More research is needed.

  13. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 1, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) Building Bridges between Service Delivery Providers, Families, and Youth (Lloyd Bullard); (2) The Promise of Professionalism Arrives in Practice:…

  14. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 2, Fall 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, Kathy, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) Whatever Happened to Sound Clinical Reasoning? (Elizabeth Kohlstaedt); (2) Minorities as Majority Disproportionality in Child Welfare and Juvenile…

  15. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 6, Number 1, Summer 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" includes the following articles: (1) "Residential Treatment: Finding the Appropriate Level of Care" (Shay Bilchik); (2) "Family-Centered Practices" (Rodger McDaniel and Brenden McKinney); and (3) "Can the Community Serve Sex Offenders?" (Point/Counterpoint--Daniel Wallach and Wayne D. Parks).…

  16. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 1, Summer 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Scott, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "National Definitions and Data Collection for Residential Care Facilities' Use of Restraint and Seclusion" (Lloyd Bullard); (2) "CWLA Publishes Best Practices in Behavior Support and Intervention Assessment Instrument" (Nupur Gupta); (3) "Initial Findings of an…

  17. A residential aged care end-of-life care pathway (RAC EoLCP) for Australian aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Liz; Israel, Fiona J; Charles, Margaret A

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate an end-of-life (terminal) care pathway and associated infrastructure suitable for Australian residential aged care facilities that improves resident and health system outcomes. The residential aged care end-of-life care pathway was developed by a multidisciplinary collaboration of government and non-government professionals and incorporated best clinical management for dying residents to guide care and increase palliative care capacity of generalist staff. Implementation included identifying and up-skilling Link Nurses to champion the pathway, networking facilities with specialist palliative care services, delivering education to generalists and commencing a Palliative Care Medication Imprest System in each facility. The primary outcome measure for evaluation was transfer to hospital; secondary measures included staff perceived changes in quality of palliative care provided and family satisfaction with care. Results indicated that the pathway, delivered within a care framework that guides provision of palliative care, resulted in improved resident outcomes and decreased inappropriate transfers to acute care settings. PMID:21871198

  18. Medical Service Utilization among Youth with School-Identified Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Matthew C.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Epstein, Michael H.; W. Thompson, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Behavioral, social, emotional, and educational risks among children and youth with school identified disabilities served in residential care have been well documented. However, the health care needs and medical service utilization of this high-risk population are less well known. Given the risks associated with children with…

  19. Validating a Marking Rubric for Evaluating Staff Knowledge of Dementia for Competency in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberdeen, Suzanne M.; Leggat, Sandra G.; Barraclough, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The shift to Vocational Education and Training (VET) for the training of the Australian residential aged care workforce has resulted in significant variance in the competencies at graduation of those caring for people with dementia. Competence may be also be enhanced, or conversely, decline over time as a result of implicit learning gained from…

  20. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  1. A Curriculum for the Residential Educable Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Wisconsin Colony and Training School, Union Grove.

    Organized so that each teacher may use some latitude in planning teaching approaches, the guide describes the sequential curriculum used with educable mentally retarded children in a residential setting. Arithmetic, language arts, science, and social studies are outlined separately for preprimary, primary, and intermediate levels. Vocational units…

  2. Songs for Residential Outdoor Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Diane, Comp.

    A collection of songs for residential outdoor education programs gives the lyrics to 42 recent and traditonal songs. Recent songs include "Leaving on a Jet Plane,""Blowin' in the Wind,""Country Roads,""Last Thing on My Mind,""City of New Orleans,""Me and Bobby McGee,""Moon River," and "I Shall be Released." Modern folk songs included are "Jamaica…

  3. Factors Associated with Abuse in Residential Child Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    Examines factors associated with abuse of children in residential child care institutions including: failings in staff recruitment, training, and supervision; ineffective management and accountability; development of inappropriate institutional cultures; public ambivalence toward children in care; slow response to threats posed to children in…

  4. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  5. Victim or Troublemaker? Young People in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Young people who live in residential care are caught between discourses of being a victim of abuse and inadequate care or being a troublemaker by their own conduct. Both discourses are rooted in the reasons for placement, and they will offer subject positions that are experienced as troubled. Repeated interviews with young people living in…

  6. Resident Satisfaction and Its Components in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of resident satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine if the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e., nursing home and hostel). Briefly, a hostel is a low-care facility in which…

  7. Handbook for Residential Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, KY.

    The handbook contains information for teachers, students, and parents which should assist in making Jefferson County Public Schools' resident environmental education program a beneficial experience for all concerned. Descriptions of the various camping facilities near Lexington are presented to aid in camp selection. A check list is given for the…

  8. Children and Residential Experiences: A Comprehensive Strategy for Implementing a Research-Informed Program Model for Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Martha J.; Izzo, Charles; Nunno, Michael; Smith, Elliott G.; Endres, Thomas; Holden, Jack C.; Kuhn, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to bridge research and practice in residential care through implementing a program model titled Children and Residential Experiences (CARE). The strategy involves consulting at all levels of the organization to guide personnel to incorporate CARE evidence-based principles into daily practice, and fostering an…

  9. Nosocomial infections in a pediatric residential care facility

    PubMed Central

    Abdolahi, Amir; Fisher, Susan G.; Aquino, Carla; Beydoun, Hind A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infections have rarely been characterized in pediatric residential care facilities. The purpose of this study is to assess the frequency of and risk factors for infectious diseases in pediatric residential care facilities over a 1-year period and to contrast them with other pediatric extended care facilities. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed at a pediatric residential care facility dedicated exclusively to children with severe physical and mental disabilities. Incidence rates of infection were collected on a census of 109 residents from January 1 through December 31, 2009. Infectious diseases were classified using ICD-9-CM codes. PubMed, Web of Science and CINAHL databases were searched to identify similar studies. Results In 2009, the overall incidence rate of infection was 6.21 per 1,000 resident-days of care, with the most frequent being streptococcal or staphylococcal skin infections (1.11 per 1,000 resident-days) and the least frequent being conjunctivitis (0.16 per 1,000 resident-days). Extensive literature reviews yielded two published studies that evaluated infections in pediatric extended care facilities; these studies exhibited distinct prevalences of infectious diseases when compared to the current study. Conclusions Studies examining nosocomial infections should not consider pediatric extended care facilities as one single entity given the heterogeneity among these facilities. PMID:22055458

  10. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 2, Fall 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Scott, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "Achieving Better Outcomes for Children and Families: Reducing the Use of Restraint and Seclusion" (Katherine Johnson); (2) "STAR Project Outcomes" (Nancy Campbell); (3) "The Devereux Glenholme School" (Mary Guilfoile); (4) "Lessons Learned in the Reduction of…

  11. When Staff Members Sexually Abuse Children in Residential Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Presents practical suggestions for managing a protective service agency for children when one of its staff members is accused of sexually abusing a child in residential care. The agency must balance the tasks of protecting the child, supporting the staff, and maintaining the integrity and reputation of the agency. (GLR)

  12. Residential Child Care Institutions (RCCI) Food Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    This food manual for small Idaho residential child care institutions with 10-15 students and no full-time cook, is designed to help directors serve meals that promote healthy eating behavior in their residents, serve meals that meet the USDA's Healthy School Meals Initiative, and manage the food service to assure the fiscal integrity of the…

  13. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 3, Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Emily, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue contains the following articles: (1) Building a Lasting Agency: The Leadership Institute (Letitia Howland); (2) For Our Safety: Examining High-Risk Interventions for Children and Youth (Michael A. Nunno, Lloyd Bullard, and…

  14. Lessons Learned from Evaluating Residential Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ameen, Christine A.

    Program evaluation guidelines are drawn from experience evaluating residential child-care programs at the Starr Commonwealth Schools (Michigan). Delinquent and behaviorally disadvantaged youth participate in treatment based on the Psychoeducational Model (Brendtro and Ness), including full-time school, service learning projects, physical education…

  15. Shifting Gears: From Coercion to Respect in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Leslie T.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Hall Youth Services (CHYS), a residential foster-care provider in Bismarck, North Dakota, desired to move from an adult-centered, punitive program model to a strength-based model with an emphasis on teaching critical life skills and behaviors to young clients. Through a partnership with the Teel Institute of Kansas City, Missouri, the…

  16. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 4, Spring 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Emily, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). The Child Welfare League of America is the nation's oldest and largest membership-based child welfare organization. It is committed to engaging people everywhere in promoting the wellbeing of children, youth, and their families, and…

  17. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  18. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  19. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  20. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  1. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  2. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  3. [Residential care for elderly dependent people].

    PubMed

    Neyen, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Today, nursing homes increasingly offer different care solutions to elderly people with Alzheimer's or related forms of dementia. This policy of support forms part of an approach to prevent the risk factors of the loss of autonomy of elderly people. Different types of care within the same nursing home demonstrate their real importance.

  4. The Transition Status of Youth Departing Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Kathryn J.; Reid, Robert; Trout, Alexandra L.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Chmelka, M. Beth; Thompson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the characteristics related to a successful reintegration among youth from a residential facility. Specifically, this study describes the transition skills of youth at departure in five areas: (a) education and employment goals, (b) self-determination skills, (c) social support, (d) life skills, and (e) hopefulness. Further,…

  5. Proficiency in Basic Educational Skills as Related to Program Outcome and Escape Risk among Juvenile Offenders in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMackin, Robert A.; Tansi, Robert; Hartwell, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of basic educational skills in Vocabulary, Reading Comprehension and Math to program outcome and escape risk among male juvenile offenders in residential care. The records of 144 youth who were treated in a residential treatment center between 1978 and 1996 were reviewed along with subsequent adult and juvenile…

  6. Residential Adult Education: Trends and Prospects. Discussion Paper in Continuing Education, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John, Ed.; Normie, Gerald, Ed.

    These papers on the role of residential adult education were first presented at a July 1991 conference at Somerville College, Oxford University, England. After an introduction (Field), the first paper, "Residential Adult Education: History, Concept, and Evaluation" (Bron), offers an historical perspective and recommends defining "residentiality"…

  7. Middle Class Education Strategies and Residential Segregation in Athens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloutas, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses census data to investigate educational inequality in different types of residential areas in Athens, focusing on drop-out rates from secondary education, access to higher education and to particular degrees within it. The unequal socio-spatial distribution of educational attainment is linked to antagonistic middle class education…

  8. Integrated Payment and Delivery Models Offer Opportunities and Challenges for Residential Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Dean, Katie M.; Stevenson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Under health care reform, a series of new financing and delivery models are being piloted to integrate health and long-term care services for older adults. To date, these programs have not encompassed residential care facilities, with most programs focusing on long-term care recipients in the community or the nursing home. Our analyses indicate that individuals living in residential care facilities have similarly high rates of chronic illness and Medicare utilization when compared with similar populations in the community and nursing home. These results suggest the residential care facility population could benefit greatly from models that coordinate health and long-term care. However, few providers have invested in integrated delivery models. Several challenges exist toward greater integration including the private payment of residential care facility services and the fact that residential care facilities do not share in any Medicare savings due to improved coordination of care. PMID:26438740

  9. Looking beyond the Residential Education and Distance Education Debate, What Matters in Education Is . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bediako Asare, Kwame

    2014-01-01

    The value of education is widely acknowledged. Evidence from literature indicates that some perceptions or rather misconceptions are expressed about distance education visà- vis traditional, residential education particularly in higher education institutions (HEIs). In this article, the author offers some reflections on traditional education and…

  10. Comparative Costs of Home Care and Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Havens, Betty; Honorary, Dlitt; Hollander, Marcus J.; Miller, Jo Ann; McWilliam, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on Canadian research that examined the cost effectiveness of home care for seniors as a substitute for long-term institutional services. Design and Methods: Two Canadian cities were included in the research: Victoria, British Columbia, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. The research computes the costs of formal care and informal…

  11. Cooperative Programs in Residential Outdoor Environmental Education: Teacher's Materials Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Superintendent of Schools, Corte Madera, CA.

    Serving as teacher orientation materials for the cooperative programs in residential outdoor education located in Marin County, California, this guide includes the following: (1) "This I Believe" (a philosophical statement on outdoor environmental education); (2) "Outdoor Science and Conservation Education Report" (a brief history of outdoor…

  12. Getting Them Back to School--Touchstones of Good Practice in the Residential Care of Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Meg; Foley, Tim

    1999-01-01

    Describes the approach of the Sycamore Project, a residential child care project in Scotland, which assists difficult and damaged young people to remain in mainstream schooling. Discusses the six principles of the approach: mutual professional respect, clear philosophy, attention to detail, a culture which values education, joint planning, and…

  13. Building Bridges between the School and the Home: Understanding the Literacy Practices of Children Living in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jennifer Poh Sim

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that children in residential care fall behind at school. This proves a great challenge for educators who have to cater to the students' needs to ensure no one is left behind. Studies investigating family literacy practices of different social classes show a positive implication if the home literacy practices are…

  14. Experiments in International Residential Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schacht, Robert H.

    1970-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin has offered summer residential seminars for adults in North America and Europe--in Ireland, England, and Scotland; in The Netherlands, Scandinavia, and West Germany; and in Greece, Romania, and Yugoslavia. (EB)

  15. Citizenship Education as an Educational Outcome for Young People in Care: A Phenomenological Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiteri, Damian

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study presents a retrospective analysis of how a cohort of young men, who as boys were assigned to residential care in Malta, perceive the citizenship education that they received while "in care" as having empowered them--as boys, adolescents, and eventually as young adults. Rather than focusing on citizenship education that is…

  16. Neighbourhood Based Residential Child Care: A Local Residential Child Care Unit as a Resource for Integrated and Flexible Child and Family Care in Dublin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilligan, Robbie

    A pioneering residential child care project in inner city Dublin began operations in July 1981. The project was designed to function as a resource for seriously deprived or at-risk children and their families. The community served is one characterized by exceptionally high unemployment, a 10 percent rate of heroin addiction among local 15- to…

  17. Memories as Useful Outcomes of Residential Outdoor Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Kendra R.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Residential outdoor environmental education (ROEE) programs for youth have been shown to yield lasting autobiographical episodic memories. This article explores how past program participants have used such memories, and draws on the memory psychology literature to offer a new perspective on the long-term impacts of environmental education.…

  18. Care Ethics in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelby, Candice L.

    2003-01-01

    Difficulties with current models of ethics education (correct reasoning, virtue theory, directive moral education) include emphasis on reward/punishment and a presumptive bias toward abstract reasoning. Teaching a care-based ethics would promote a fuller notion of mature moral agents and broaden the school climate beyond compliance. (Contains 19…

  19. Moral Education and Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2010-01-01

    Michael Slote's very interesting work on moral sentimentalism and moral education raises some important questions on the meaning of empathy, the limitations of "inductions", and the development of moral education from the perspective of care ethics. These questions are addressed in this commentary. (Contains 5 notes.)

  20. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for

  1. A Challenging Job: Physical and Sexual Violence towards Group Workers in Youth Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Euser, Saskia; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Residential or group care social workers appear to be at increased risk for experiencing physical violence at work. However, little is known about "sexual harassment" in addition to physical victimization of social workers in "youth" residential or group care. Objective We investigated the prevalence of physical and…

  2. Residential Care for Youth in the Child Welfare System: Stop-Gap Option or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Sigrid S.; Zhang, Jin Jin; Landsverk, John

    2012-01-01

    This study provides national estimates for length of stay in residential care and examines within-group variability along salient predictors. Using data from the National Study on Child and Adolescent Well-Being, the sample included 254 youth with episodes in residential care. Descriptive analyses provided estimates for length of stay over the…

  3. Young People's Satisfaction with Residential Care: Identifying Strengths and Weaknesses in Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwell, Jenni; Fraser, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a landmark Australian study investigating the experiences and perspectives of young people in residential care. Data from a representative sample are analyzed to identify young people's satisfaction with various aspects of their residential care experience: their sense of safety, normality, support, comfort in…

  4. Changing Residential Child Care: A Systems Approach to Consultation Training and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Johnnie; Leonard, Marcella; Wilson, Mena

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe and illustrate their approach to consultancy, development and training in residential child care. When working together the authors form the MOSAIC Consortium and provide training and consultancy to residential child care services. The article draws on systems theory, systems thinking and the politics of child…

  5. Children in Residential Care: Development and Validation of a Group Climate Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijbosch, E. L. L.; van der Helm, G. H. P.; van Brandenburg, M. E. T.; Mecking, M.; Wissink, I. B.; Stams, G. J. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the development and validation of the Group Climate Instrument for Children aged 8 to 15 years (GCIC 8-15), which purports to measure the quality of group climate in residential care. Methods: A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on data of 117 children in Dutch residential youth care. Reliability analysis was…

  6. Attachment Style, Home-Leaving Age and Behavioral Problems among Residential Care Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shechory, Mally; Sommerfeld, Eliane

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective study, the attachment style, home-leaving age, length of time in residential care, and behavioral problems among Israeli residential care children (N=68), were studied. Data analyses showed that children removed from their homes at a later age suffered from higher levels of anxiety, depression and social problems compared to…

  7. The Experience of Living with Dementia in Residential Care: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Linda; Rowlands, Julia; Bruce, Errollyn; Surr, Claire; Downs, Murna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The subjective psychological experience of people with moderate to severe dementia living in residential care is insufficiently understood. In the present study we aimed to explore the subjective experience of life with dementia in residential care from the perspective of the person with dementia, and to understand the psychological…

  8. [The Relationship Between Burnout Symptoms and Work Satisfaction Among Child Welfare Workers in Residential Care].

    PubMed

    Steinlin, Célia; Dölitzsch, Claudia; Fischer, Sophia; Schmeck, Klaus; Fegert, Jörg M; Schmid, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Working in residential care is associated with high demands and high stress. As a result, employees may develop symptoms of burnout. These symptoms lead to absence from work and have a negative effect on the continuity and quality of the residential care. Until now, little is known about burnout risks in child welfare workers, although children and adolescents are especially dependent on continuous relationships and healthy caregivers. A better understanding of the relationship between burnout symptoms and work satisfaction may help to identify starting points for prevention and intervention. The present study assessed symptoms of burnout in a sample of 319 social education workers in residential care in Switzerland using the burnout-screening-scales (BOSS). Work satisfaction was assessed with a newly developed questionnaire based on concepts of trauma-sensitive care. The questionnaire was tested for reliability and factorial validity in the present study. In order to estimate the relationship between burnout symptoms and work satisfaction, correlations and relative risks were calculated. Almost one fifth (18 %) of the sample showed a risk of burnout. The principal component analysis of the questionnaire on work satisfaction revealed four factors: support by superiors, participation and transparency; communication and support within the team; gratification in the work; and institutional structures and resources. All four factors as well as the total score showed significant correlations with burnout symptoms. Among employees with a comparably lower work satisfaction, the risk of burnout was 5.4 times higher than among employees with a comparably higher work satisfaction. It is discussed how work satisfaction could be promoted and how, as a result, the quality and continuity of care for the children and adolescents could be improved.

  9. [The Relationship Between Burnout Symptoms and Work Satisfaction Among Child Welfare Workers in Residential Care].

    PubMed

    Steinlin, Célia; Dölitzsch, Claudia; Fischer, Sophia; Schmeck, Klaus; Fegert, Jörg M; Schmid, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Working in residential care is associated with high demands and high stress. As a result, employees may develop symptoms of burnout. These symptoms lead to absence from work and have a negative effect on the continuity and quality of the residential care. Until now, little is known about burnout risks in child welfare workers, although children and adolescents are especially dependent on continuous relationships and healthy caregivers. A better understanding of the relationship between burnout symptoms and work satisfaction may help to identify starting points for prevention and intervention. The present study assessed symptoms of burnout in a sample of 319 social education workers in residential care in Switzerland using the burnout-screening-scales (BOSS). Work satisfaction was assessed with a newly developed questionnaire based on concepts of trauma-sensitive care. The questionnaire was tested for reliability and factorial validity in the present study. In order to estimate the relationship between burnout symptoms and work satisfaction, correlations and relative risks were calculated. Almost one fifth (18 %) of the sample showed a risk of burnout. The principal component analysis of the questionnaire on work satisfaction revealed four factors: support by superiors, participation and transparency; communication and support within the team; gratification in the work; and institutional structures and resources. All four factors as well as the total score showed significant correlations with burnout symptoms. Among employees with a comparably lower work satisfaction, the risk of burnout was 5.4 times higher than among employees with a comparably higher work satisfaction. It is discussed how work satisfaction could be promoted and how, as a result, the quality and continuity of care for the children and adolescents could be improved. PMID:26947529

  10. Optimising nutrition in residential aged care: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ekta; Marshall, Skye; Miller, Michelle; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    In developed countries the prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition increases with age and multi-morbidities increase nutritional risk in aged care residents in particular. This paper presents a narrative review of the current literature on the identification, prevalence, associated risk factors, consequences, and management of malnutrition in the residential aged care (RAC) setting. We performed searches of English-language publications on Medline, PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane Library from January 1, 1990 to November 25, 2015. We found that, on average, half of all residents in aged care are malnourished as a result of factors affecting appetite, dietary intake and nutrient absorption. Malnutrition is associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes, including increased risk of infections, falls, pressure ulcers and hospital admissions, all of which can lead to increased health care costs and poorer quality of life. A number of food and nutrition strategies have demonstrated positive nutritional and clinical outcomes in the RAC setting. These strategies extend beyond simply enhancing the nutritional value of foods and hence necessitate the involvement of a range of committed stakeholders. Implementing a nutritional protocol in RAC facilities that comprises routine nutrition screening, assessment, appropriate nutrition intervention, including attention to food service systems, and monitoring by a multidisciplinary team can help prevent decline in residents' nutritional status. Food and nutritional issues should be identified early and managed on admission and regularly in the RAC setting. PMID:27621242

  11. Observations of Group Care Worker-Child Interaction in Residential Youth Care: Pedagogical Interventions and Child Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastiaanssen, Inge L. W.; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; Geijsen, Luuk; Kroes, Gert; Veerman, Jan W.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The work of group care workers in residential youth care is often described as professional parenting. Pedagogical interventions of group care workers influence the quality of care for looked-after children. Objective: The aim of the current study was to observe the pedagogical interventions of group care workers within residential…

  12. Job Satisfaction among Care Aides in Residential Long-Term Care: A Systematic Review of Contributing Factors, Both Individual and Organizational.

    PubMed

    Squires, Janet E; Hoben, Matthias; Linklater, Stefanie; Carleton, Heather L; Graham, Nicole; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing literature on professional nurses' job satisfaction, job satisfaction by nonprofessional nursing care providers and, in particular, in residential long-term care facilities, is sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the evidence on which factors (individual and organizational) are associated with job satisfaction among care aides, nurse aides, and nursing assistants, who provide the majority of direct resident care, in residential long-term care facilities. Nine online databases were searched. Two authors independently screened, and extracted data and assessed the included publications for methodological quality. Decision rules were developed a priori to draw conclusions on which factors are important to care aide job satisfaction. Forty-two publications were included. Individual factors found to be important were empowerment and autonomy. Six additional individual factors were found to be not important: age, ethnicity, gender, education level, attending specialized training, and years of experience. Organizational factors found to be important were facility resources and workload. Two additional factors were found to be not important: satisfaction with salary/benefits and job performance. Factors important to care aide job satisfaction differ from those reported among hospital nurses, supporting the need for different strategies to improve care aide job satisfaction in residential long-term care. PMID:26345545

  13. Job Satisfaction among Care Aides in Residential Long-Term Care: A Systematic Review of Contributing Factors, Both Individual and Organizational

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Janet E.; Hoben, Matthias; Linklater, Stefanie; Carleton, Heather L.; Graham, Nicole; Estabrooks, Carole A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing literature on professional nurses' job satisfaction, job satisfaction by nonprofessional nursing care providers and, in particular, in residential long-term care facilities, is sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the evidence on which factors (individual and organizational) are associated with job satisfaction among care aides, nurse aides, and nursing assistants, who provide the majority of direct resident care, in residential long-term care facilities. Nine online databases were searched. Two authors independently screened, and extracted data and assessed the included publications for methodological quality. Decision rules were developed a priori to draw conclusions on which factors are important to care aide job satisfaction. Forty-two publications were included. Individual factors found to be important were empowerment and autonomy. Six additional individual factors were found to be not important: age, ethnicity, gender, education level, attending specialized training, and years of experience. Organizational factors found to be important were facility resources and workload. Two additional factors were found to be not important: satisfaction with salary/benefits and job performance. Factors important to care aide job satisfaction differ from those reported among hospital nurses, supporting the need for different strategies to improve care aide job satisfaction in residential long-term care. PMID:26345545

  14. The need for a social revolution in residential care.

    PubMed

    Theurer, Kristine; Mortenson, W Ben; Stone, Robyn; Suto, Melinda; Timonen, Virpi; Rozanova, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Loneliness and depression are serious mental health concerns across the spectrum of residential care, from nursing homes to assisted and retirement living. Psychosocial care provided to residents to address these concerns is typically based on a long-standing tradition of 'light' social events, such as games, trips, and social gatherings, planned and implemented by staff. Although these activities provide enjoyment for some, loneliness and depression persist and the lack of resident input perpetuates the stereotype of residents as passive recipients of care. Residents continue to report lack of meaning in their lives, limited opportunities for contribution and frustration with paternalistic communication with staff. Those living with dementia face additional discrimination resulting in a range of unmet needs including lack of autonomy and belonging-both of which are linked with interpersonal violence. Research suggests, however, that programs fostering engagement and peer support provide opportunities for residents to be socially productive and to develop a valued social identity. The purpose of this paper is to offer a re-conceptualization of current practices. We argue that residents represent a largely untapped resource in our attempts to advance the quality of psychosocial care. We propose overturning practices that focus on entertainment and distraction by introducing a new approach that centers on resident contributions and peer support. We offer a model-Resident Engagement and Peer Support (REAP)-for designing interventions that advance residents' social identity, enhance reciprocal relationships and increase social productivity. This model has the potential to revolutionize current psychosocial practice by moving from resident care to resident engagement. PMID:26568229

  15. Use of information technology for medication management in residential care facilities: correlates of facility characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Powell, M Paige; Kim, Jungyoon; Shiyanbola, Olayinka; Zhu, He; Shiyanbola, Oyewale

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of information technology in resolving medication problems has been well documented. Long-term care settings such as residential care facilities (RCFs) may see the benefits of using such technologies in addressing the problem of medication errors among their resident population, who are usually older and have numerous chronic conditions. The aim of this study was two-fold: to examine the extent of use of Electronic Medication Management (EMM) in RCFs and to analyze the organizational factors associated with the use of EMM functionalities in RCFs. Data on RCFs were obtained from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The association between facility, director and staff, and resident characteristics of RCFs and adoption of four EMM functionalities was assessed through multivariate logistic regression. The four EMM functionalities included were maintaining lists of medications, ordering for prescriptions, maintaining active medication allergy lists, and warning of drug interactions or contraindications. About 12% of the RCFs adopted all four EMM functionalities. Additionally, maintaining lists of medications had the highest adoption rate (34.5%), followed by maintaining active medication allergy lists (31.6%), ordering for prescriptions (19.7%), and warning of drug interactions or contraindications (17.9%). Facility size and ownership status were significantly associated with adoption of all four EMM functionalities. Medicaid certification status, facility director's age, education and license status, and the use of personal care aides in the RCF were significantly associated with the adoption of some of the EMM functionalities. EMM is expected to improve the quality of care and patient safety in long-term care facilities including RCFs. The extent of adoption of the four EMM functionalities is relatively low in RCFs. Some RCFs may strategize to use these functionalities to cater to the increasing demands from the market and also to

  16. Does residential mobility improve educational outcomes? Evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haelermans, Carla; De Witte, Kristof

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of residential mobility on educational outcomes. By considering a large Dutch city with substantial internal residential mobility, we examine how residential mobility influences the decision of students to drop out of school. The paper exploits a rich administrative dataset with extensive information on educational, individual, family, housing and moving characteristics of students. It combines a matching design with a multivariate regression analysis, such that the evaluation draws on a well-comparable control group for the treated students. Accounting for individual, family, educational, neighborhood and housing characteristics, as well as for school and year fixed effects, we observe that residential mobility increases the probability of school dropout in the first few years after moving. The estimated effect changes, however, to a lower risk of early school leaving after an initial period, and then changes again to a higher risk after 6years. This effect remains, regardless the level of education the students attended, or whether the student moves to a better or a worse neighborhood. PMID:26004467

  17. RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION CENTRES IN CANADA, A DIRECTORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Association for Adult Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    CANADIAN RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION CENTERS ARE LISTED BY PROVINCE, WITH INFORMATION GIVEN ON THE CENTER NAME, ADDRESS, CONTACT OFFICE, SPONSORING ORGANIZATION, NUMBER ACCOMMODATED, USER DAYS IN 1965, TYPES OF PROGRAMS OFFERED, AND GENERAL COMMENTS. PROGRAMS TAILORED TO NEEDS CHARACTERIZE CANADIAN CENTERS. IT IS EXPECTED THAT AS PROVINCIAL…

  18. Residential Environmental Education Center Program Evaluation: An Ongoing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Nicholas; Buskist, Connie; Herron, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Residential environmental education centers (REECs) have been criticized for their lack of quality program evaluation. However, the last national study done on the practices of REECs was Chenery and Hammerman's (1985) research. This article presents the results of a national survey of directors of REECs (n = 114) that gives insight into the…

  19. Integrating prevention in residential and community care settings: a multidimensional program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher G; Perloff, Judy; McVicker, Jason; Ebbert, Shelly; Petersen, Laird; Oltean, Anthony

    2005-02-01

    As people with HIV live longer and healthier lives, ongoing prevention with positive individuals has become a new focus of care. Effective prevention with positives interventions are emerging and new interventions continue to be developed. This article discusses the development and evaluation of the prevention for positives intervention developed for a large AIDS service organization in Chicago. The intervention consists of case manager based HIV prevention education and support within residential and community settings. The article describes the intervention and presents the methods and findings of the program evaluation. The multidimensional evaluation includes formative and process evaluation elements as well as qualitative and quantitative measures (N = 94). The article concludes with a discussion of the challenges and opportunities associated with integrating prevention into care.

  20. Compassion Fatigue Risk and Self-Care Practices among Residential Treatment Center Childcare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwood, Callum D.; Ecklund, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of the presence of risk for compassion fatigue among residential childcare workers (RCW) at residential treatment facilities and the relationship between self-care practices and compassion fatigue were explored. Using the Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL-R III) to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion…

  1. The Role of Therapeutic Alliance in Therapy Outcomes for Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handwerk, Michael L.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Ringle, Jay L.; Howard, Brigid K.; Soper, Stephen H.; Almquist, Julie K.; Chmelka, M. Beth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of therapeutic alliance (TA) on therapy outcomes for youth with behavioral and emotional problems residing in residential care. Study participants were 71 youth in an out-of-home family-style residential treatment facility who were referred to an onsite psychotherapy clinic. A therapeutic alliance scale was completed…

  2. What Do They Do at Home? The Literacies of Children Living in Residential Care in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic study of the out of school literacy practices of children living in residential care in Malaysia. Although residential homes generate much publicity, especially during the festive seasons, not much is known about the children living within the confines of these homes. Even more lacking is research on their…

  3. The Academic, Behavioral, and Mental Health Status of Children and Youth at Entry to Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Hagaman, Jessica L.; Chmelka, M. Beth; Gehringer, Robert; Epstein, Michael H.; Reid, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Often considered a "last resort placement," residential settings serve a broad range of children who present significant risks. While much is known about emotional and behavioral functioning, less is known about academic strengths and limitations. This study evaluated 127 children at intake into a residential care program to determine demographic,…

  4. Residential Behavior Therapy Treatment as an Intensive Care Approach to the Development of Community Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eun, Bong-soo; And Others

    The Pendleton Project residential service is a short term intensive care alternative to the long term, costly, and ineffective non-community based institutional model for treating children and families suffering from behavior problems. The residential services are designed to develop community competency from the vantage point of its unique…

  5. Redefining Residential: Family-Driven Care in Residential Treatment--Family Members Speak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Residential Treatment for Children & Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This is the sixth in a series of papers issued by the American Association of Children's Residential Centers (AACRC) regarding emerging and best practices in the field of residential treatment for children, youth, and families. AACRC is a long standing national association focused exclusively on practice and policy issues related to the provision…

  6. Examining the role of information exchange in residential aged care work practices-a survey of residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The provision of residential aged care is underpinned by information, and is reliant upon systems that adequately capture and effectively utilise and communicate this information. The aim of this study was to explicate and quantify the volume and method by which information is collected, exchanged within facilities and with external providers, and retrieved from facility information systems and hospitals. Methods A survey of staff (n = 119), including managers, health informatics officers (HIOs), quality improvement staff, registered nurses (RNs), enrolled nurses (ENs)/endorsed enrolled nurses (EENs) and assistants in nursing (AINs) was carried out in four residential aged care facilities in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Sites varied in size and displayed a range of information technology (IT) capabilities. The survey investigated how and by whom information is collected, retrieved and exchanged, and the frequency and amount of time devoted to these tasks. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS, and open responses to questions were coded into key themes. Results Staff completed a median of six forms each, taking a median of 30 min per shift. 68.8% of staff reported transferring information from paper to a computer system, which took a median of 30 min per shift. Handover and face-to-face communication was the most frequently used form of information exchange within facilities. There was a large amount of faxing and telephone communication between facility staff and General Practitioners and community pharmacists, with staff reporting sending a median of 2 faxes to pharmacy and 1.5 faxes to General Practitioners, and initiating 2 telephone calls to pharmacies and 1.5 calls to General Practitioners per shift. Only 38.5% of respondents reported that they always had information available at the point-of-care and only 35.4% of respondents reported that they always had access to hospital stay information of residents after hospital

  7. Validation of the symptoms and functioning severity scale in residential group care.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Matthew C; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Gross, Thomas J; Epstein, Michael H; Stevens, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    Tests that measure the emotional and behavioral problems of children and youth are typically not normed and standardized on youth diagnosed with disruptive behavior, particularly those youth in residential care. Yet professional standards mandate that before instruments are used with a specific population the psychometric properties need to be studied and re-established: specifically, psychometric properties, including validity, need to be evaluated (AERA, APA, and NCME, The standards for educational and psychological testing. AERA, Washington, DC, 1999). The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity characteristics of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman et al., Manual of the Peabody Treatment Progress Battery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2010), a widely used test developed for use in outpatient clinics, with youth in a residential care program. The convergent validity of the SFSS was established with the large correlations (0.78-0.86) with the CBCL. Several binary classification analyses including specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and the Youden Index supported the validity of the SFSS. However, the sensitivity index was somewhat low indicating the test may produce a high level of false negatives. Limitations, future research and implications are discussed.

  8. Supporting residents’ expression of sexuality: the initial construction of a sexuality assessment tool for residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexuality is a key component of quality of life and well-being and a need to express one’s sexuality continues into old age. Staff and families in residential aged care facilities often find expressions of sexuality by residents, particularly those living with dementia, challenging and facilities often struggle to address individuals’ needs in this area. This paper describes the development of an assessment tool which enables residential aged care facilities to identify how supportive their organisation is of all residents’ expression of their sexuality, and thereby improve where required. Methods Multi-phase design using qualitative methods and a Delphi technique. Tool items were derived from the literature and verified by qualitative interviews with aged care facility staff, residents and families. The final item pool was confirmed via a reactive Delphi process. Results A final item pool of sixty-nine items grouped into seven key areas allows facilities to score their compliance with the areas identified as being supportive of older people’s expression of their sexuality in a residential aged care environment. Conclusions The sexuality assessment tool (SexAT) guides practice to support the normalization of sexuality in aged care homes and assists facilities to identify where enhancements to the environment, policies, procedures and practices, information and education/training are required. The tool also enables facilities to monitor initiatives in these areas over time. PMID:24980463

  9. Residential and Health Care Transition Patterns among Older Medicare Beneficiaries over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Masayo; Shaffer, Thomas; Arbaje, Alicia I.; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe annual care transition patterns across residential and health care settings and assess consistency in care transition patterns across years. Design and Methods: This retrospective cohort study used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2000-2005). The sample comprised beneficiaries aged 65 years and older (N = 57,684…

  10. Health-related quality of life among adolescents in residential care: description and correlates.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Timothy D; Kidwell, Katherine M; Hoffman, Steven; Trout, Alexandra L; Epstein, Michael H; Thompson, Ronald W

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of adolescents in residential care and to examine selected correlates. A sample of 229 adolescents (mean age=17 years) living in a residential care setting completed a validated measure of HRQoL (PedsQL 4.0 Generic Scales). Mean-level scores for Total HRQoL, Physical HRQoL, and Psychosocial HRQoL were examined, and the percentage of youth scoring below a clinical cutoff value was reported. Demographic and psychotropic medication data for each youth were accessed from an electronic database maintained by the residential care program and used to examine correlates of HRQoL. Approximately 25% of youth had at least 1 HRQoL score in the "at risk" range, indicating a significant proportion of youth in residential care have significant impairments in HRQoL. Younger age and female gender were associated with poorer HRQoL. Psychotropic medication prescriptions were associated with poorer HRQoL. A significant percentage of adolescents in residential care may experience suboptimal HRQoL, and certain demographic and clinical factors appear to be associated with greater risk. Systematic assessment of HRQoL is recommended for youth in residential care, and interventions to promote better HRQoL among youth at particularly high risk may be beneficial. PMID:24827017

  11. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students.

  12. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students. PMID:24972402

  13. Implementation of a Program of Outcomes Research in Residential Care Settings: Outcomes for Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portwood, Sharon G.; Boyd, A. Suzanne; Murdock, Tamera B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a need to examine behavioral and mental health outcomes for children in out-of-home care across settings. Objective: Using a participatory research approach, researchers and agency personnel aimed to implement a program of scientific outcomes research in residential care settings. Data were used to examine children's…

  14. School Functioning of Children in Residential Care: The Contributions of Multilevel Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar-Schwartz, Shalhevet

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study, using an ecological approach, examines the relationships between problems in school functioning (including academic and behavior problems) of children in residential care with a number of variables describing the child and the care setting. Methods: The study reports on 4,061 children and youth (ages 6-20) in 54 Israeli…

  15. Measuring Therapeutic Alliance with Children in Residential Treatment and Therapeutic Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roest, Jesse; van der Helm, Peer; Strijbosch, Eefje; van Brandenburg, Mariëtte; Stams, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the construct validity and reliability of a therapeutic alliance measure (Children's Alliance Questionnaire [CAQ]) for children with psychosocial and/or behavioral problems, receiving therapeutic residential care or day care in the Netherlands. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis of a one-factor model ''therapeutic…

  16. Prevalence of Weight Problems among Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Lambert, Matthew C.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Thompson, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of weight problems among youth in general and youth in out-of-home care has been well documented; however, the prevalence of obesity/overweight among youth with high-incidence disabilities in more restrictive settings, such as residential care, has not been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of…

  17. Children in Residential Group Care with No Family Ties: Facing Existential Aloneness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvir, Orly; Weiner, Anita; Kupermintz, Hagai

    2012-01-01

    The issue of children living in residential group care in Israel completely without family ties is studied in order to explore the feelings of staff and uncover possible characteristics of these children. Data were collected through focus groups, questionnaires, and life stories of children who left group care at 18 years of age. Results reveal…

  18. Increasing the Efficiency of Program Status Reporting by Residential Direct Care Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastien, James S.; Burns, William J.; Kelly, Francis D.; Schumm, Patricia A.; Allen, Theresa P.

    2005-01-01

    In large residential treatment centers for adolescent youth, program administrators and clinical staff rely on the information imparted to them by direct care staff to make appropriate decisions regarding administrative and clinical support functions so that the residents in care can receive the best treatment possible. This study was designed to…

  19. Residential Treatment of Substance Abusing Adolescents: Trends in the Post-Managed Care Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMaster, Samuel A.; Ellis, Rodney A.; Cooper, Lyle

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores historical and recent trends in the delivery of residential adolescent substance abuse treatment, looking specifically at the impact of managed care on the service delivery system. Three historical eras are conceptualized by the authors: (1) an era prior to managed care in which services were provided on a fee for service basis…

  20. An Empirical Typology of Residential Care/Assisted Living Based on a Four-State Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Nan Sook; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Eckert, J. Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Residential care/assisted living describes diverse facilities providing non-nursing home care to a heterogeneous group of primarily elderly residents. This article derives typologies of assisted living based on theoretically and practically grounded evidence. Design and Methods: We obtained data from the Collaborative Studies of Long-Term…

  1. An innovative educational program for residential energy efficiency. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Laquatra, J.; Chi, P.S.K.

    1996-09-01

    Recognizing the importance of energy conservation, under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Cornell University conducted a research and demonstration project entitled An Innovative Educational Program for Residential Energy Efficiency. The research project examined the amount of residential energy that can be saved through changes in behavior and practices of household members. To encourage these changes, a workshop was offered to randomly-selected households in New York State. Two surveys were administered to household participants (Survey 1 and Survey 2, Appendix A) and a control group; and a manual was developed to convey many easy but effective ways to make a house more energy efficient (see Residential Manual, Appendix B). Implementing methods of energy efficiency will help reduce this country`s dependence on foreign energy sources and will also reduce the amount of money that is lost on inefficient energy use. Because Cornell Cooperative Extension operates as a component of the land-grant university system throughout the US, the results of this research project have been used to develop a program that can be implemented by the Cooperative Extension Service nationwide. The specific goals and objectives for this project will be outlined, the population and sample for the research will be described, and the instruments utilized for the survey will be explained. A description of the workshop and manual will also be discussed. This report will end with a summary of the results from this project and any observed changes and/or recommendations for future surveys pertaining to energy efficiency.

  2. Circle of Courage: Reaching Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bethany; Perales, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    The Circle of Courage, based on traditional Native American philosophy, emphasizes belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity. This study assessed the prevalence of the Circle of Courage values among youth in a residential facility and examined the relationship between these ideals and indicators of placement success. After 12 weeks in…

  3. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  4. Aging, health and place in residential care facilities in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yang; Rosenberg, Mark W; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Hairong

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, residential care has become an alternative option for elder care in Beijing, China. Little is known, however, about the well-being of elderly residents and the relationship between their health and living in residential care facilities (RCFs). Hence this research aims to understand the well-being of elderly residents in RCFs and how the environment of RCFs affects elderly people's everyday activities and health. The concepts of therapeutic landscapes, active aging, and well-being contribute to understanding the relationships among aging, health, and environment within RCF settings. Qualitative data from 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews with RCF managers, elderly residents, and family members in Beijing were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. The results show that most of the elderly residents are satisfied with their lives in RCFs, but a few of them feel isolated and depressed after their relocation. Each RCF, as a place with its unique physical and social environment, has a significant influence on the elderly residents' physical and psychological well-being. Individual factors such as characteristics of elderly residents, their attitudes on aging and residential care, and family support also play important roles in their adaptation and well-being after relocation from home to RCFs. Although this study focuses on residential care at the local level, it sheds light on future research on geographical and socio-cultural meanings of elder care at local, regional, and national levels in China. PMID:21109338

  5. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal.

  6. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal. PMID:25808936

  7. Attachment and Aspiration: What Influences Rural Youths' Educational and Residential Plans? White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Caitlin; Hambrick, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Building on recent research, ICF sought to explore how socioeconomic status and attachment to place influence rural youths' educational and residential preferences across a wider geographic region. Our research questions included: What are rural high school students' educational and residential plans? And what factors influence rural youths' plans…

  8. The Development of an Instrument for Evaluating Residential Outdoor Education Centres in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelba, Nestor N.

    The study's purpose was to develop a valid instrument for evaluating residential outdoor education centres in Canada. Using published and unpublished literature, a preliminary instrument consisting of 206 criteria was constructed. Twenty-five recognized Canadian experts in residential outdoor education were randomly selected from 3 subsample areas…

  9. Residential Care Provision in Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Waivers: A National Study of Program Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchner, Martin; Hernandez, Mauro; Ng, Terence; Harrington, Charlene

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: While state policy and market factors are known to have contributed to the increased supply of residential care, little is known about efforts to accommodate demand from lower-income consumers. This study describes participation and expenditure trends for residential care services funded by Medicaid waivers and examines variation across…

  10. Racial composition of residential areas associates with access to pre-ESRD nephrology care.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Suma; Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Austin, Peter C; Saskin, Refik; Fernandez, Alicia; Moist, Louise M; O'Hare, Ann M

    2010-07-01

    Referral to a nephrologist before initiation of chronic dialysis occurs less frequently for blacks than whites, but the reasons for this disparity are incompletely understood. Here, we examined the contribution of racial composition by zip code on access and quality of nephrology care before initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). We retrospectively studied a cohort study of 92,000 white and black adults who initiated RRT in the United States between June 1, 2005, and October 5, 2006. The percentage of patients without pre-ESRD nephrology care ranged from 30% among those who lived in zip codes with <5% black residents to 41% among those who lived in areas with >50% black residents. In adjusted analyses, as the percentage of blacks in residential areas increased, the likelihood of not receiving pre-ESRD nephrology care increased. Among patients who received nephrology care, the quality of care (timing of care and proportion of patients who received a pre-emptive renal transplant, who initiated therapy with peritoneal dialysis, or who had a permanent hemodialysis access) did not differ by the racial composition of their residential area. In conclusion, racial composition of residential areas associates with access to nephrology care but not with quality of the nephrology care received.

  11. Operating characteristics of residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Christine; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren; Rome, Vincent; Sengupta, Manisha

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, the majority of residential care communities had 4–25 beds, yet 71% of residents lived in communities with more than 50 beds. A lower percentage of communities with 4–25 beds were chain-affiliated, nonprofit, and in operation 10 years or more, compared with communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. Dementia-exclusive care or dementia care units were more common as community size increased. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for cognitive impairment and offered dementia-specific programming compared with communities with 4–25 and 26–50 beds. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for depression compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Compared with communities with 4–25 beds, a higher percentage of communities with 26–50 beds and more than 50 beds provided therapeutic, hospice, mental health, and dental services; but a lower percentage of communities with more than 50 beds provided skilled nursing services than did smaller communities. This report presents national estimates of residential care communities, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care communities provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residential care communities across different sizes. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/ nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care.

  12. Initiation of Substance Use by Adolescents after One Year in Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monshouwer, Karin; Kepper, Annelies; van den Eijnden, Regina; Koning, Ina; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that substance use levels among adolescents living in residential youth care are high. However, it is not clear to what extent adolescents initiate (heavy) substance during their stay and to what extent these rates are higher than would be expected based on their risk profile. Objective: The aim of the…

  13. Increasing Emotional Regulation for Youths in Residential Care: Phases of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimmarusti, Rocco A.

    2011-01-01

    Youths in residential care have likely experienced trauma as they have had atypical and disruptive events occur in their lives that has contributed to their out-of-home placement. For people who have been traumatized, the regulation of emotions is an important feature of their recovery. This article presents a model that traces phases from…

  14. Maintaining Basic Skills through Summer Thematic Tutoring with Exceptional Students in Residential Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombey, Hanna

    A thematic teaching program and portfolio assessment were used to maintain basic academic language arts and mathematics skills during the summer for 21 elementary students placed in residential foster care settings as victims of physical and/or sexual abuse. All activities were designed around the selected theme of a safari. Students listened to…

  15. Aggressive Adolescents in Residential Care: A Selective Review of Treatment Requirements and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knorth, Erik J.; Klomp, Martin; Van den Bergh, Peter M.; Noom, Marc J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a selective inventory of treatment methods of aggressive behavior. Special attention is paid to types of intervention that, according to research, are frequently used in Dutch residential youth care. These methods are based on (1) principles of (cognitive) behavior management and control, (2) the social competence model, and…

  16. A Study of Behaviour Profiles among Intellectually Disabled People in Residential Care in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csorba, Janos; Radvanyi, Katalin; Regenyi, Eniko; Dinya, Elek

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the behavioural dimensions of 269 intellectually disabled (ID) people in residential care in specialized institutions in Tolna county (South-West Hungary) with the aim of screening the frequency and severity of the relevant behavioural symptoms associated with intellectual disability and depending on the level of…

  17. Day Hospital and Residential Addiction Treatment: Randomized and Nonrandomized Managed Care Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witbrodt, Jane; Bond, Jason; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Weisner, Constance; Jaeger, Gary; Pating, David; Moore, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Male and female managed care clients randomized to day hospital (n=154) or community residential treatment (n=139) were compared on substance use outcomes at 6 and 12 months. To address possible bias in naturalistic studies, outcomes were also examined for clients who self-selected day hospital (n=321) and for clients excluded from randomization…

  18. Deliberate Self-Harm among Children in Tertiary Care Residential Treatment: Prevalence and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shannon L.; Baiden, Philip; Theall-Honey, Laura; den Dunnen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined deliberate self-harm (DSH) among children in residential treatment in Canada. Most of the existing studies examined adolescent students or children from pediatric emergency departments. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of DSH among children in tertiary care residential…

  19. Hazards of Immobility: Bedsores. Adult Residential Care Home, Lesson Plan No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kathleen

    Developed as part of a 104-hour course on adult residential care homes (ARCHs), this 50-minute lesson is designed to enable a student to: (1) define a bedsore; (2) list and describe three major causes of bedsores; (3) identify potential bedsore sites in the back-lying, side-lying, and sitting positions; and (4) calculate the risk for developing…

  20. Invited Review: Challenges of Residential and Community Care--"The Times They Are a-Changin"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to examine a number of issues which relate to the provision of appropriate and high-quality residential and community care for people with an intellectual disability. A number of key themes emerging from this Special Issue of the "Journal of Intellectual Disability Research" are identified and explored: (1) normalisation; (2)…

  1. Insomnia, Sleepiness, and Depression in Adolescents Living in Residential Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Vincent; Belanger, Lynda; Begin, Gilles; Morin, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to document sleep patterns and disturbances reported by youths temporarily living in residential care facilities. A secondary objective was to examine the relationships between sleep disturbances and mood and daytime sleepiness. A self-reported questionnaire on sleep patterns and habits assessing duration,…

  2. Trauma Experiences, Maltreatment-Related Impairments, and Resilience among Child Welfare Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin-Vezina, Delphine; Coleman, Kim; Milne, Lise; Sell, Jody; Daigneault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a description of the trauma experiences, trauma-related sequels, and resilience features of a sample of Canadian youth in residential care facilities, as well as to explore the impact of gender and of the number of different traumas experienced on trauma-related sequels and resilience features. A convenience…

  3. An Ethnographic Study of Stigma and Ageism in Residential Care or Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Debra; Eckert, J. Kevin; Rubinstein, Bob; Keimig, Lynn; Clark, Leanne; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored aspects of stigmatization for older adults who live in residential care or assisted living (RC-AL) communities and what these settings have done to address stigma. Design and Methods: We used ethnography and other qualitative data-gathering and analytic techniques to gather data from 309 participants (residents, family…

  4. Nurse-led management of chronic disease in a residential care setting.

    PubMed

    Neylon, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role has enabled nurses to develop their clinical knowledge and skills, providing greater service provision and improved access to healthcare services. It can also help with the challenges of providing care to an ageing population in primary care. This article reports on the evaluation of an ANP-led clinic in two residential care homes that provides annual reviews for chronic disease management (CDM). A mixed method approach was used to evaluate the service using clinical data obtained from the electronic patient record system and software and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The number of patients receiving CDM reviews in the homes increased as a result of the clinic. Completed satisfaction questionnaires further demonstrated patients' satisfaction and willingness to engage with the service. The service highlights the ANP's effectiveness in managing residential care home patients with chronic diseases and improving their access to healthcare services.

  5. Resilience and Its Contributing Factors in Adolescents in Long-Term Residential Care Facilities Affiliated to Tehran Welfare Organization

    PubMed Central

    Nourian, Manijeh; Mohammadi Shahboulaghi, Farahnaz; Nourozi Tabrizi, Kian; Rassouli, Maryam; Biglarrian, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Resilience is a quality that affects an individual’s ability to cope with tension. The present study was conducted to determine resilience and its contributing factors in high-risk adolescents living in residential care facilities affiliated to Tehran Welfare Organization in order to help develop effective preventive measures for them. Methods: The present descriptive study was conducted on 223 adolescents living in 15 different governmental residential care centers in 2014. Participants were selected through convenience sampling. The data required were collected via the Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale with content validity (S-CVI=0.92) and a reliability of α=0.77 and r=0.83 (P<0.001). The data obtained were analyzed in SPSS-20 using descriptive and inferential statistics including Chi-square test, independent t-test and ANOVA. Results: The adolescents’ mean score of resilience was 84.41±11.01. The level of resilience was moderate in 46.2% of the participants and was significantly higher in the female than in the male adolescents (P=0.006); moreover, the score obtained was lower in primary school children as compared to middle school and high school students (P<0.001). Conclusion: Directors of care facilities and residential care personnel should adopt preventive resilience-based strategies in order to optimize resilience among adolescents, particularly the male. It is important to provide a basis to prevent adolescents’ academic failure and place a stronger value on education than the past. PMID:27713901

  6. Educating Students in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Students who are in foster care need principals who are informed about policy, aware of their needs, and willing to be advocates for them. Multiple school placements often result in significant gaps in the education of students in foster care. If they also have disabilities, they may lose special programs and services when they change placements.…

  7. Educating Transient Youth: Influence of Residential Instability on Educational Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald Edward

    2009-01-01

    Homeless youth face many barriers that limit their ability to complete a high school diploma and transition to postsecondary education. The federal government passed the McKinney-Vento Act over 20 years ago to address issues of access to public education for homeless youth. The most recent reauthorization of the law expanded the definition of…

  8. Educating to Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortari, Luigina

    2004-01-01

    The root of the ecological crisis lies in an ethic of nature consumption. In order to reconstruct our cultural framework, it is necessary to cultivate another ethical approach, an ethic of care. It is the responsibility of school to encourage students to learn how to care for not only the human world, but also for the natural world. This paper is…

  9. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David C M; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions.

  10. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... billing purposes, does this facility use electronic health records? This is a computerized version of the resident's health and personal information used in the management of the resident's health care." All providers were ...

  11. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute. 2005. Spillman BC, Black KJ. The size ...

  12. Designing a Residential Environment for Adventure Education and Personal Development. A Basic Needs Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Residential, challenging, learning experiences can provide a powerful and essential education in environmental values and interpersonal relationships. Presents a basic-needs planning guide for residential adventure programs that considers the need for water, air, food, clothing, accommodation, waste disposal, health, energy, resources, love of…

  13. Feasibility and impact of a post–discharge geriatric evaluation and management service for patients from residential care: the Residential Care Intervention Program in the Elderly (RECIPE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Geriatric evaluation and management has become standard care for community dwelling older adults following an acute admission to hospital. It is unclear whether this approach is beneficial for the frailest older adults living in permanent residential care. This study was undertaken to evaluate (1) the feasibility and consumer satisfaction with a geriatrician-led supported discharge service for older adults living in residential care facilities (RCF) and (2) its impact on the uptake of Advanced Care Planning (ACP) and acute health care service utilisation. Methods In 2002–4 a randomised controlled trial was conducted in Melbourne, Australia comparing the geriatrician–led outreach service to usual care for RCF residents. Patients were recruited during their acute hospital stay and followed up at the RCF for six months. The intervention group received a post-discharge home visit within 96 hours, at which a comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed and a care plan developed. Participants and their families were also offered further meetings to discuss ACPs and document Advanced Directives (AD). Additional reviews were made available for assessment and management of intercurrent illness within the RCF. Consumer satisfaction was surveyed using a postal questionnaire. Results The study included 116 participants (57 intervention and 59 controls) with comparable baseline characteristics. The service was well received by consumers demonstrated by higher satisfaction with care in the intervention group compared to controls (95% versus 58%, p = 0.006). AD were completed by 67% of participants/proxy decision makers in the intervention group compared to 13% of RCF residents prior to service commencement. At six months there was a significant reduction in outpatient visits (intervention 21 (37%) versus controls 45 (76%), (p < 0.001), but no difference in readmissions rates (39% intervention versus 34% control, p = 0.6). There was a trend towards

  14. Independent Living & Disability Policy in the Netherlands: Three Models of Residential Care & Independent Living. Monograph Number Twenty-Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, Gerben

    The monograph examines the way in which the Netherlands' three-part system of residential care and independent living (IL) for people with physical disabilities interacts with the country's health and social welfare systems. The three-part system comprises: the residential center model, the clustered housing model, and the independent housing…

  15. 29 CFR 516.23 - Employees of hospitals and residential care facilities compensated for overtime work on the basis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employees of hospitals and residential care facilities compensated for overtime work on the basis of a 14-day work period pursuant to section 7(j) of the Act. 516.23... Exemptions Under the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.23 Employees of hospitals and residential...

  16. Predictors of positive psychosocial functioning of older adults in residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Schanowitz, Jeff Y; Nicassio, Perry M

    2006-04-01

    This research examined the contributions of active and passive coping for health problems, and meaning-based coping, to positive psychosocial functioning in a sample of 100 individuals in residential care with a mean age of 83.11 years old. Study participants resided in skilled care, intermediate care, or assisted living facilities. Based on interview data collected on site in participants' residential settings, hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that active and passive coping and meaning-based coping had separate influences on measures of positive psychosocial functioning. Active coping was correlated with higher positive affect, whereas passive coping was associated with higher negative affect and self-acceptance. Positive reappraisal, a meaning-based coping strategy, was uniquely associated with higher positive affect, positive social relations, and self-acceptance. Positive religious coping was not independently associated with positive psychosocial functioning indices, whereas negative religious coping was related to higher negative affect. Health functioning did not contribute to positive psychosocial functioning in this sample. The results confirm the separate importance of health-related and meaning-based coping strategies in explaining positive psychosocial functioning in older adults living in residential care settings. PMID:16453068

  17. The use of acute hospital services by elderly residents of nursing and residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Godden, S; Pollock, A M

    2001-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare hospitalisation rates by cause of admission, hospital death rates and length of stay for residents from nursing and residential care homes with those in the community. This is a retrospective study of acute hospital emergency admissions in one health district, Merton, Sutton and Wandsworth between April 1996 and March 1997. Data linkage and manual look up were used to derive emergency hospital admissions for residents of care homes aged 65 and over. Admission rates were calculated for cause, length of stay and hospital death for residents of care homes and in the community with relative risks. The relative risk of emergency admission from a care home compared with the community was 1.39 for all diagnoses, 2.68 for all injuries, and 3.96 for fracture of neck of femur. The relative risk of dying in hospital for care home residents was 2.58 overall, and 3.64 in the first 48 hours of a hospital stay (all P-values <0.0001). Admission rates were higher from residential than from nursing homes. There was some increase in admissions from homes during holiday periods and over Christmas. In conclusion, there are major difficulties in monitoring admissions from nursing and residential care homes due to poor quality recording and inaccuracies in NHS coding. This was compounded by an absence of data on the age and sex profile and healthcare needs of the resident population in care homes. Prospective studies are required to ascertain when admission is avoidable and when it is appropriate. The information strategy needs to ensure that routine data sources are capable of monitoring the use of hospital services by residents of care homes.

  18. Making Sense of Varying Standards of Care: The Experiences of Staff Working in Residential Care Environments for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Andrew; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence reveals that adults with learning disabilities who live in residential care facilities are being exposed to considerable variation in the standards of care they receive. High profile cases of substandard care have also raised concerns regarding the appropriateness of existing care provisions and practices. While attempts have…

  19. Addressing the nutritional needs of older people in residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Merrell, Joy; Philpin, Susan; Warring, Joanne; Hobby, Debra; Gregory, Vic

    2012-03-01

    In the UK and Europe, malnutrition in older people is a significant and continuing problem. Malnutrition predisposes to disease, impedes recovery from illness, increases mortality and is costly to society. Despite the high number of older people potentially at risk, malnutrition in care homes has been under explored. There is concern that national guidelines regarding the nutritional care of older people in residential care homes are not always implemented. This qualitative study explored the factors that influence the nutritional care provided to residents in two different types of local authority residential care homes (providing personal care) in Wales. One home had communal dining rooms; the other had eight bedded units with their own kitchen and dining facilities. The sample of 45 participants, comprised 19 staff (managers, care and catering staff), 16 residents and 10 residents' relatives. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, focus groups, observation and documentary review between August 2009 and January 2010. This paper focuses on how staff assessed and addressed residents' nutritional needs. In both care homes, staff strove to be responsive to residents' dietary preferences, provided person-centred care and worked in partnership with residents and their families to provide nutritious food in a homely environment. Neither home conducted nutritional screening to identify those at risk of malnutrition, contrary to national guidelines, but relied on ad hoc observation and monitoring. The staff's knowledge of special dietary needs was limited. A need for further training for care home staff regarding the importance of nutrition in maintaining health in older people, use of nutritional screening and special dietary needs was identified. Shared nutrition training between health and social care staff needs expansion and policy implications in terms of an enhanced regulatory focus on maintaining nutritional needs in care homes are proposed. PMID

  20. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs) and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors) was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52%) of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p < 0.001) in nursing homes as in residential homes. The level of non-compliance with system alerts was very low in both settings (0.075% of administrations). The pre-study survey revealed that only 12

  1. Self Care for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Trauma takes a toll on children, families, schools, and communities. Trauma can also take a toll on school professionals. Any educator who works directly with traumatized children and adolescents is vulnerable to the effects of trauma--referred to as "compassion fatigue" or "secondary traumatic stress"--being physically, mentally, or emotionally…

  2. Risky or Needy? Dynamic Risk Factors and Delinquent Behavior of Adolescents in Secure Residential Youth Care.

    PubMed

    Harder, Annemiek T; Knorth, Erik J; Kalverboer, Margrite E

    2015-09-01

    Although it is known that adolescents in secure residential care often show multiple behavior problems, it is largely unknown which dynamic risk factors are associated with their problems. The aim of the present study is to examine dynamic risk factors for 164 Dutch adolescents in secure residential care. Results show that a majority reports multiple risk factors in both an individual and contextual domain but that about a fifth shows relatively few risk factors. Substance abuse and delinquent friends were among the five most prevalent risk factors and predicted the seriousness of the adolescents' delinquent behavior prior to admission. The four groups that were found by cluster analysis could be distinguished by problem type and seriousness. The findings indicate that treatment for some adolescents should be mainly focused on their individual needs, while other adolescents need intensive, multimodal treatment focusing on both risks in the individual, family, and peer domains.

  3. An outbreak of norovirus infection in an Italian residential-care facility for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Medici, M C; Morelli, A; Arcangeletti, M C; Calderaro, A; De Conto, F; Martinelli, M; Abelli, L A; Dettori, G; Chezzi, C

    2009-01-01

    On December 2006, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred at a residential-care facility for the elderly in northern Italy. Thirty-five of 61 individuals interviewed (attack rate, 57.4%) fell ill. In 94.3% of cases, the onset of illness was within 48 h of a Christmas party at the facility. Norovirus (NoV) was detected by RT-PCR in 24 of 31 individuals examined, including three asymptomatic food-handlers, in whom there was evidence of long-lasting excretion of viral particles. The identification of a sequence referring to the '2006a GII.4 NoV variant' in all examined strains supported the hypothesis of a common point source. This retrospective cohort study is the first report on an outbreak of NoV gastroenteritis in an Italian residential-care facility for the elderly.

  4. Autonomy for older people in residential care: a selective literature review.

    PubMed

    Welford, Claire; Murphy, Kathy; Rodgers, Vivien; Frauenlob, Theresia

    2012-03-01

    Autonomy is an important concept because it brings dignity to peoples' lives, regardless of physical circumstances. The United Nations (UN) Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing emphasises the need to include older adults in autonomous decision-making processes. However, many older people living in residential care find that their autonomy is curtailed. This is largely because autonomy for older people is poorly understood, and hence, nurses working with older people need to become clear about what autonomy is and how it can be facilitated. In this, the first of three papers, the literature is reviewed specifically to establish the meaning of autonomy for older people in residential care as opposed to autonomy in a wider context. This important distinction may help nurses working with older people to begin to facilitate autonomy more effectively. PMID:22348264

  5. Attitudes, Perceptions, and Utilization of Evidence-Based Practices in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid; Thompson, Ronald; Sternberg, Neal; Schnur, Elizabeth; Ross, Jordan; Butler, Linda; Triplett, Dawn; Puett, Lesley; Muirhead, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on results of a national survey conducted in the United States about the attitudes, perceptions and utilization of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in residential care settings. Seventy-five of 118 member agencies (63.6% response rate) of a voluntary national residential care association responded to a web-administered structured survey, which included the Evidence-Based Practices Attitude Scale (Aarons, 2004). Results show overwhelmingly positive attitudes toward EBPs. Concerns were reported mainly with regard to cost and impeding a client-driven practice approach. The study also showed a high degree of utilization of EBPs with over 88 percent of programs reporting the use of at least one practice they considered to be evidence-based. Altogether 53 different practices were reported although it is unknown at this point whether practices were delivered with fidelity. Behaviorally-based and trauma-focused interventions constituted the most common interventions used by residential care agencies. Practices were subsequently validated against four national clearinghouse sites, indicating that only slightly over half of all reported practices had been evaluated by at least one clearinghouse and rated as having some research evidence for effectiveness. Divergent views about what practices are evidence-based point to the need for continued discussion between the practice and research fields about conceptualizations of evidence.

  6. The professional development needs of registered nurses in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; McMillan, Margaret; Conway, Jane

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports on research which used a multiple-case study approach to investigate the responses of aged care nurses to changes in Australian health care policy following the introduction of the Aged Care Act 1997. Significant fiscal, social and environmental issues for Residential Aged Care (RAC) are the: need to respond to policy changes emphasizing efficiency in RAC facilities, nature of the needs of residents with increasing acuity, impact of decreasing numbers of Registered Nurses (RNs) working in the RAC environment, changing composition of the care team and RAC RN functions. The study explored the phenomenon of the contemporary practice of (RNs) within six RAC settings, focusing on changes in the practice of RNs. As a result of the research a number of issues pertinent to staff and role development of RNs were identified. PMID:17679262

  7. Introducing reflective narratives into palliative care home care education.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Elizabeth M; Garon, Maryanne

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the research project was to determine the impact of palliative care education and the writing of a reflective narrative on nurses' self-awareness of their attitudes toward death and care of the dying. Findings support integration of narrative reflection into palliative care education as an effective teaching strategy.Only qualitative findings of a larger study are presented; quantitative results have been published in the Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing (Home care and hospice nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for the dying: effects of palliative care education. 2005;7[4], 212-218).

  8. Structural violence in long-term, residential care for older people: comparing Canada and Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Albert; Daly, Tamara; Armstrong, Pat; Szebehely, Marta; Armstrong, Hugh; Lafrance, Stirling

    2012-02-01

    Canadian frontline careworkers are six times more likely to experience daily physical violence than their Scandinavian counterparts. This paper draws on a comparative survey of residential careworkers serving older people across three Canadian provinces (Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario) and four countries that follow a Scandinavian model of social care (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden) conducted between 2005 and 2006. Ninety percent of Canadian frontline careworkers experienced physical violence from residents or their relatives and 43 percent reported physical violence on a daily basis. Canadian focus groups conducted in 2007 reveal violence was often normalized as an inevitable part of elder-care. We use the concept of "structural violence" (Galtung, 1969) to raise questions about the role that systemic and organizational factors play in setting the context for violence. Structural violence refers to indirect forms of violence that are built into social structures and that prevent people from meeting their basic needs or fulfilling their potential. We applied the concept to long-term residential care and found that the poor quality of the working conditions and inadequate levels of support experienced by Canadian careworkers constitute a form of structural violence. Working conditions are detrimental to careworker's physical and mental health, and prevent careworkers from providing the quality of care they are capable of providing and understand to be part of their job. These conditions may also contribute to the physical violence workers experience, and further investigation is warranted. PMID:22204839

  9. Introducing an Equal Rights Framework for Older Persons in Residential Care.

    PubMed

    Jönson, Håkan; Harnett, Tove

    2016-10-01

    This article reconceptualizes residential care for older persons by introducing a framework developed from a rights-based principle of disability policies: the normalization principle. This principle is part of the social model and states that society should make available for people who have impairments living conditions that are as close as possible to those of "others." Using the framework on the case of eldercare in Sweden shows that although disability policies have used people without impairments as a comparative (external) reference group for claiming rights, eldercare policies use internal reference groups, basing comparisons on other care users. The article highlights the need for external comparisons in eldercare and suggests that the third age, which so far has been a normative reference group for older people, could be a comparative reference group when older persons in need of care claim rights to equal conditions.

  10. Introducing an Equal Rights Framework for Older Persons in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Jönson, Håkan; Harnett, Tove

    2016-01-01

    This article reconceptualizes residential care for older persons by introducing a framework developed from a rights-based principle of disability policies: the normalization principle. This principle is part of the social model and states that society should make available for people who have impairments living conditions that are as close as possible to those of “others.” Using the framework on the case of eldercare in Sweden shows that although disability policies have used people without impairments as a comparative (external) reference group for claiming rights, eldercare policies use internal reference groups, basing comparisons on other care users. The article highlights the need for external comparisons in eldercare and suggests that the third age, which so far has been a normative reference group for older people, could be a comparative reference group when older persons in need of care claim rights to equal conditions. PMID:26035884

  11. Living Doubled-Up: Influence of Residential Environment on Educational Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth face many barriers that limit success in the educational process. Subgroups of homeless youth frequently experience the educational process differently depending upon their residential context. Recent years witness the federal government's expanding the definition of homelessness to include youth living doubled-up. This residential…

  12. Occupational conditions of ward staff and quality of residential care for individuals with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Duker, P C; Seys, D; van Leeuwe, J; Prins, L W

    1991-01-01

    Effects of occupational conditions of ward staff on the quality of residential care for individuals with mental retardation was assessed. Three questions were asked: (a) Does type of contract under which staff members are employed differentially affect their distribution of activities? (b) Does length of duty have an effect on their distribution of activities? (c) Does the number of staff members present on the living group influence quality of care? Over a 40-week period, data were collected on 30 ward staff members who were responsible for 39 residents with severe and profound mental retardation. Results show that staff differentially distributed their activities, especially with respect to organizational activities and the amount of custodial care, depending on the type of contract they were employed under and the number of consecutive days they worked. Number of staff present on the living group appeared to be a major factor in terms of distribution of activities. Implications for staff managers and administrators of residential facilities were discussed. PMID:2003908

  13. Drumming as a Medium to Promote Emotional and Social Functioning of Children in Middle Childhood in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Kim; van Niekerk, Caroline; le Roux, Liana

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the potential of drumming to enhance emotional and social functioning of children in residential care. Fifteen children (aged 7-12) from a child and youth care centre in South Africa attended four months of weekly drumming sessions. Gestalt theory principles informed the workshops' theoretical foundation and interpretation of…

  14. Assisted Living and Residential Care in Oregon: Two Decades of State Policy, Supply, and Medicaid Participation Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The study describes Oregon state policy and supply developments for licensed long-term-care settings, particularly apartment-style assisted living facilities and more traditional residential care facilities. Design and Methods: Data came from a variety of sources, including state agency administrative records, other secondary data…

  15. "Careworkers don't have a voice:" epistemological violence in residential care for older people.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Albert; Armstrong, Pat; Daly, Tamara; Armstrong, Hugh; Braedley, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Drawing on feminist epistemologies, this paper attends to the way the reductionist assumptions have shaped the organization of nursing home carework in manners that are insufficient to the needs of relational care. This paper is informed by a study involving nine focus groups and a survey of Canadian residential care workers (141 RNs, 139 LPNs and 415 frontline careworkers). Four major themes were identified. Reductionist assumptions contributed to routinized, task-based approaches to care, resulting in what careworkers termed "assembly line care." Insufficient time and emphasis on the relational dimensions of care made it difficult to "treat residents as human beings." Accountability, enacted as counting and documenting, led to an "avalanche of paperwork" that took time away from care. Finally, hierarchies of knowledge contributed to systemic exclusions and the perception that "careworkers' don't have a voice." Careworkers reported distress as a result of the tensions between the organization of work and the needs of relational care. We theorize these findings as examples of "epistemological violence," a concept coined by Vandana Shiva (1988) to name the harm that results from the hegemony of reductionist assumptions. While not acting alone, we argue that reductionism has played an important role in shaping the context of care both at a policy and organizational level, and it continues to shape the solutions to problems in nursing home care in ways that pose challenges for careworkers. We conclude by suggesting that improving the quality of both work and care will require respecting the specificities of care and its unique epistemological and ontological nature. PMID:25841727

  16. Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    An alternative to character education is care ethics. The ethics of care can be seen as fundamentally relational, not individual-agent-based in the way of virtue ethics, and the ethics of care is more indirect than character education. After an introductory chapter that outlines the similarities and differences between character education and care…

  17. Residential care facilities: a key sector in the spectrum of long-term care providers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Park-Lee, Eunice; Caffrey, Christine; Sengupta, Manisha; Moss, Abigail J; Rosenoff, Emily; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D

    2011-12-01

    RCFs in the United States totaled 31,100 in 2010, with 971,900 state-licensed, certified, or registered residential care beds. About one-half of RCFs were small facilities which served one-tenth of all RCF residents. The remaining RCFs were medium-sized facilities (16%) which served about one-tenth of all RCF residents, large facilities (28%) which served about one-half of all RCF residents, and extra large facilities (7%) which housed about three-tenths of all RCF residents. RCFs were predominantly for profit (82%), not part of a chain (62%), and located in an MSA (81%). Small RCFs were more likely to be for profit than larger RCFs. The proportion of chain-affiliated RCFs grew with increasing facility size. Small and extra large RCFs were most likely to be located in an MSA, while medium RCFs were least likely to be in an MSA. RCFs were most commonly located in the West. The mix of facility sizes varied by region. The West had almost twice as many residential care beds per 1,000 persons aged 85 and over as the Northeast (245 to 131). Comparing the supply of RCF beds with nursing home beds (data compiled by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) shows that the supply of RCF beds (245) and nursing home beds (203) per 1,000 persons aged 85 and over was relatively comparable in the West, but nursing home beds far outnumbered RCF beds in all other regions. There were about twice as many nursing home beds as RCF beds per 1,000 persons aged 85 and over in the South (325 to 164), Midwest (390 to 177), and Northeast (303 to 131). More research is needed to identify and examine factors that may explain these regional differences in both the supply of residential care beds, including variations in state regulation and financing of different types of LTC providers, and in consumer preferences for different kinds of long-term services and support. RCFs serve primarily a private-pay adult population (6). However, the use of Medicaid financing for services in residential care

  18. Variables Associated with the Educational Development of Residential Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Gerald; Oakland, Thomas

    Relationships between 15 family, psychological and demographic variables and reading and math achievement are reported for more than 500 hearing impaired children (8 to 15 years old) in a residential state school. The data are also examined for subgroups of children (i.e., hereditary and nonhereditary deafness, rubella, nonrubella, and those with…

  19. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... special care units offered dementia-specific activities and programming (91%) and had doors with alarms (90%) ( Figure ... special care units had dementia-specific activities and programming, while only 19% had closed circuit TV monitoring. ...

  20. Health-promoting residential aged care: a pilot project in Austria.

    PubMed

    Krajic, Karl; Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria

    2015-09-01

    Long-term care for the aged is an area that has not been in the focus of health promotion so far. The paper describes context, concept and project plan of a 2-year pilot project of comprehensive health-promoting setting development in residential aged care in Austria, and provides an overview over main experiences and results. Austria's most relevant health promotion agencies, a specialized scientific institute and Austria's largest provider of aged care acted as partners. The project aimed at developing elements of a comprehensive approach, but also providing evidence for the effectiveness of health promotion. Therefore, the project combined an organizational development approach with a scientific, randomized controlled study on mobility enhancement for residents. A comprehensive settings approach turned out acceptable for the main stakeholders of aged care (owners and management, staff, residents and residents' relatives). Strategy development, based on a systematic needs assessment, found staff health to be of special interest for the organization (ergonomics, workability over life course), and residents' relatives, got more attention. The mobility study was able to achieve positive results on occupational performance, concerning quality-of-life indicators and reached also formerly inactive groups. After the end of the project, health promotion is still on the agenda of the organization; further developments will be monitored. Good support from the policy level and well-established networking between the aged care provider, health promotion agencies and a network for health promotion in health care seems to have been an important resource for success.

  1. What Works in Group Care? – A Structured Review of Treatment Models for Group Homes and Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a structured review of treatment models that are relevant to group care and residential treatment settings for children involved with the child welfare system. Initiated and guided by The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare, five treatment models – Positive Peer Culture, Teaching Family Model, Sanctuary Model, Stop-Gap Model, and Re-ED – were reviewed for effectiveness. In this paper, each model s treatment features are described and relevant outcome studies reviewed in terms of their effectiveness as well as relevance for child welfare practice. Findings indicate that four of the models are either supported or promising in terms of evidence for effectiveness. Implications for group care practice and research are discussed. PMID:22468014

  2. A social work practice reflection on issues arising for LGBTI older people interfacing with health and residential care: rights, decision making and end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Francis; Healy, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article is a social work practice reflection on issues arising for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) older people interfacing with health and residential care in Australia; focusing on clients, families, and carers in relation to rights, decision making, and end-of-life care. The article explores relevant case examples from social work practice in a health and residential care setting that highlight some specific complexities of working with this client group. This article brings greater attention to issues arising for older LBGTI when interfacing with health and residential care and has the potential to improve practice for social workers and other health professionals and improve outcomes for LGBTI older people.

  3. The Impact of Brief Play Therapy Training on the Emotional Awareness of Care Workers in a Young Children's Residential Care Setting in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Kathryn Frances

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an account of, and reflection on, the author's six-month ethnographic study of a residential care home for severely traumatised and abused children in Australia. During the stay she designed and offered a short six-day course for the care staff and foster carers in the use of play for emotional and therapeutic support. Prior to this,…

  4. Intervening at the Setting Level to Prevent Behavioral Incidents in Residential Child Care: Efficacy of the CARE Program Model.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Charles V; Smith, Elliott G; Holden, Martha J; Norton, Catherine I; Nunno, Michael A; Sellers, Deborah E

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined the impact of a setting-level intervention on the prevention of aggressive or dangerous behavioral incidents involving youth living in group care environments. Eleven group care agencies implemented Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a principle-based program that helps agencies use a set of evidence-informed principles to guide programming and enrich the relational dynamics throughout the agency. All agencies served mostly youth referred from child welfare. The 3-year implementation of CARE involved intensive agency-wide training and on-site consultation to agency leaders and managers around supporting and facilitating day-to-day application of the principles in both childcare and staff management arenas. Agencies provided data over 48 months on the monthly frequency of behavioral incidents most related to program objectives. Using multiple baseline interrupted time series analysis to assess program effects, we tested whether trends during the program implementation period declined significantly compared to the 12 months before implementation. Results showed significant program effects on incidents involving youth aggression toward adult staff, property destruction, and running away. Effects on aggression toward peers and self-harm were also found but were less consistent. Staff ratings of positive organizational social context (OSC) predicted fewer incidents, but there was no clear relationship between OSC and observed program effects. Findings support the potential efficacy of the CARE model and illustrate that intervening "upstream" at the setting level may help to prevent coercive caregiving patterns and increase opportunities for healthy social interactions.

  5. Impact of the Relocation of a Long-term Residential Care Facility on Staff.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Anne J; Grainger, Patricia; Compton, Glenda; Morgan, Arthur F

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the relocation of residents and staff of a long-term residential care facility into a new state-of-the-art building in a Canadian province. All staff were surveyed about their perceptions of the moving process 2 months after the move occurred using a newly created 51-item questionnaire containing both open-ended and closed questions (5-point Likert scale). The results were positive for the 3 subscales of the survey, with average scores for premove, midmove, and postmove items of 3.67, 3.94, and 3.66, respectively. There was no significant difference in the means when comparing staff position, years of employment, or assignment to 1 or more units. Staff were very positive about the move itself, the orientation provided and overall planning, and support from coworkers and management. Some concerns were raised about staffing shortages, involvement of residents, and preparedness of the units and building. In addition, it is evident that relocation is an ongoing process, with many supports required in the months after the move. This article describes a very well planned and executed relocation of a long-term residential care facility and can provide guidance and lessons learned to assist other administrators who are planning a similar endeavor.

  6. Substitute Decision-Making for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Care: Learning Through Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Michael C.; Clare, Isabel C. H.; Holland, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, current policies and services for people with mental disorders, including those with intellectual disabilities (ID), presume that these men and women can, do, and should, make decisions for themselves. The new Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales) 2005 (MCA) sets this presumption into statute, and codifies how decisions relating to health and welfare should be made for those adults judged unable to make one or more such decisions autonomously. The MCA uses a procedural checklist to guide this process of substitute decision-making. The personal experiences of providing direct support to seven men and women with ID living in residential care, however, showed that substitute decision-making took two forms, depending on the type of decision to be made. The first process, ‘strategic substitute decision-making’, paralleled the MCA’s legal and ethical framework, whilst the second process, ‘relational substitute decision-making’, was markedly different from these statutory procedures. In this setting, ‘relational substitute decision-making’ underpinned everyday personal and social interventions connected with residents’ daily living, and was situated within a framework of interpersonal and interdependent care relationships. The implications of these findings for residential services and the implementation of the MCA are discussed. PMID:18240026

  7. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:27137741

  8. Iodine Status of New Zealand Elderly Residents in Long-Term Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jody C.; MacDonell, Sue O.; Gray, Andrew R.; Reid, Malcolm R.; Barr, David J.; Thomson, Christine D.; Houghton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in New Zealand, in 2009 the government mandated that all commercially made breads be fortified with iodized salt. There has been no evaluation of the impact of the program on iodine status of the elderly, despite this population group being vulnerable to iodine deficiency or excess. The aim of this study was to describe the iodine status of elderly New Zealanders in residential aged-care homes following the implementation of the bread fortification program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, involving 309 residents (median age 85 years) from 16 aged-care homes throughout NZ. Information on socio-demographic, anthropometric, dietary and health characteristics were collected. Casual spot urine samples were analysed for urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Blood samples were analysed for serum thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, and other biochemical indices. The median UIC (MUIC) of the residents was 72 μg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency, and 29% had a UIC < 50 μg/L. Median thyroglobulin concentration was 18 ng/mL and 26% had elevated thyroglobulin concentration (>40 ng/mL), suggesting iodine insufficiency. Diuretic use was associated with lower MUIC (p = 0.043). Synthetic thyroxine use was associated with lower odds of having a UIC < 50 μg/L (OR 0.32, p = 0.030)) and lower median thyroglobulin (−15.2 ng/mL, p = 0.001), compared with untreated participants. Frailty was associated with elevated thyroglobulin (p = 0.029), whereas anemia was associated with lower thyroglobulin (p = 0.016). Iodine insufficiency persists in New Zealanders residing in residential aged-care homes despite increasing iodine intake from fortified bread. Research is required to establish optimal iodine intake and status in the elderly. PMID:27455319

  9. Evaluation in Residential Environmental Education: An Applied Literature Review of Intermediary Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; Biedenweg, Kelly; O'Connor, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Residential environmental education aims to enhance proenvironmental attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, as well as attain outcomes related to personal and interpersonal skills. Although these outcomes may not be evident for months or even years afterward, few program evaluations investigate how the experience and context affect intended outcomes…

  10. What Difference Does It Make? Assessing Outcomes from Participation in a Residential Environmental Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Marc J.; Powell, Robert B.; Ardoin, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored the influences of 3- and 5-day residential environmental education programs at the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont (TN) on participants' connections with nature, environmental stewardship, interest in learning and discovery, and awareness of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and biodiversity. The authors found…

  11. Woven into the Fabric of Experience: Residential Adventure Education and Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randall

    2013-01-01

    Residential adventure education is a surprisingly powerful developmental experience. This paper reports on a mixed-methods study focused on English primary school pupils aged 9-11, which used complexity theory to throw light on the synergistic inter-relationships between the different aspects of that experience. Broadly expressed, the research…

  12. Leader Anxiety during an Adventure Education Residential Experience: An Exploratory Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunyan, Peter S.; Boniface, Margaret R.

    2000-01-01

    A study evaluated changes in an outdoor leader's anxiety during an 8-day residential adventure program for physical education majors in England. Analysis of variations in the leader's self-confidence found higher cognitive and somatic anxiety before group activities in the morning and last thing at night. Anxiety increased and self-confidence…

  13. Adaptation to Early Adulthood by a Sample of Youth Discharged from a Residential Education Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Loring

    2008-01-01

    Three years of outcome data for foster youth (n = 106) discharged from a one-of-kind residential education service are presented. Findings were that 50% of respondents attended college at some point. Youth reported having 2 or 3 jobs a year with at least one bout of unemployment. Most of the non-college bound youth reported working in low-wage…

  14. The "no man's" land of home weekends for children in residential care.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Z

    1994-11-01

    Home Weekends are the main channel of contact between children in placement and their parents. This practice is of special interest because of both the hopes it raises and the risk it entails. The present research examines public welfare agency practice in this domain. Interviews were held with 45 social workers (from 32 agencies) who were responsible for case-managing 74 families with children in residential care (n = 105). Findings clearly indicate that the practice of home weekends is characterized by the following: an absence of professional access to the children and their parent(s) and neglect in assuring the well-being of children; a lack of differential patterns of children's visits or intensity of social worker-parent contact in relation to parents' dysfunctioning; and a lack of implementation of family-oriented intervention. It was also found that, for 50% of the children, the well-being score while at home does not manifest serious distress. This raises the question of whether the conditions obligate placement in a residential setting. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:7850600

  15. Physical and psychosocial function in residential aged-care elders: effect of Nintendo Wii Sports games.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Power, Nicola; Wooller, Leslie; Lucas, Patricia; Whatman, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This mixed-methods, quasi-experimental pilot study examined whether the Nintendo Wii Sports (NWS) active video game (exergame) system could significantly improve the functional ability, physical activity levels, and quality of life of 34 older adults (4 men and 30 women, 83 ± 8 yr) living in 2 residential aged-care (RAC) centers. Change score analyses indicated the intervention group had significantly greater increases in bicep curl muscular endurance, physical activity levels, and psychological quality of life than the control group (p < .05). Analysis of the quotes underlying the 3 themes (feeling silly, feeling good; having fun; and something to look forward to) suggested that intervention group participants developed a sense of empowerment and achievement after some initial reluctance and anxiousness. They felt that the games were fun and provided an avenue for greater socialization. These results add some further support to the utilization of NWS exergames in the RAC context. PMID:23752164

  16. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  17. Vitamin B12 deficiency in persons with intellectual disability in a vegetarian residential care community.

    PubMed

    Morad, Mohammed; Gringols, Mark; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2005-01-21

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among intellectually disabled persons in a vegetarian remedial community in Israel. In this community, 47 individuals with intellectual disability (ID) live in 7 enlarged families in a kibbutz style agricultural setting. These 47 individuals and 17 of their caregivers were screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. There were 25.5% of the disabled vs. 11.8% of the caregivers found to have levels of vitamin B12 lower than 157 pg/ml. It is concluded that persons with ID in this vegetarian residential care community seemed to be at a higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  18. Physical and psychosocial function in residential aged-care elders: effect of Nintendo Wii Sports games.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Power, Nicola; Wooller, Leslie; Lucas, Patricia; Whatman, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This mixed-methods, quasi-experimental pilot study examined whether the Nintendo Wii Sports (NWS) active video game (exergame) system could significantly improve the functional ability, physical activity levels, and quality of life of 34 older adults (4 men and 30 women, 83 ± 8 yr) living in 2 residential aged-care (RAC) centers. Change score analyses indicated the intervention group had significantly greater increases in bicep curl muscular endurance, physical activity levels, and psychological quality of life than the control group (p < .05). Analysis of the quotes underlying the 3 themes (feeling silly, feeling good; having fun; and something to look forward to) suggested that intervention group participants developed a sense of empowerment and achievement after some initial reluctance and anxiousness. They felt that the games were fun and provided an avenue for greater socialization. These results add some further support to the utilization of NWS exergames in the RAC context.

  19. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities? 20.502 Section 20.502 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How Child Assistance Funds Can Be Used §...

  20. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to... Assistance funds to pay only for room and board. You must pay for other services that may be...

  1. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to... Assistance funds to pay only for room and board. You must pay for other services that may be...

  2. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to... Assistance funds to pay only for room and board. You must pay for other services that may be...

  3. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to... Assistance funds to pay only for room and board. You must pay for other services that may be...

  4. Knowledge of Staff Members of Residential Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disability on Medication Administration via Enteral Feeding Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joos, E.; Mehuys, E.; Van Bocxlaer, J.; Remon, J. P.; Van Winckel, M.; Boussery, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Guidelines for the safe administration of drugs through enteral feeding tube (EFT) are an important tool to minimise the risk of errors. This study aimed to investigate knowledge of these guidelines among staff of residential care facilities (RCF) for people with ID. Method: Knowledge was assessed using a 13-item self-administered…

  5. A Long-Term Leisure Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Residential Care Settings: Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert A.; Burke, Amie M.; Fung, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effectiveness of an individually-tailored leisure program implemented by direct care staff in a residential program for 28 adults with severe to profound intellectual disability using a multiple baseline design across two homes over a 1.5 year baseline and treatment period followed by another nearly 1.5 year maintenance phase. The…

  6. Determinants and Effects of Nurse Staffing Intensity and Skill Mix in Residential Care/Assisted Living Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Sally C.; Park, Jeongyoung; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Konrad, Thomas R.; Sloane, Philip D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Residential care/assisted living facilities have become an alternative to nursing homes for many individuals, yet little information exists about staffing in these settings and the effect of staffing. This study analyzed the intensity and skill mix of nursing staff using data from a four-state study, and their relationship to outcomes.…

  7. Physical Training and Well-Being in Older Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Residential Care Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmeli, Eli; Orbach, Iris; Zinger-Vaknin, Tzvia; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    Background: Exercise is important for health and well-being. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of physical training on general well-being and self-image in older people with intellectual disability. Methods: This study evaluated older adults with intellectual disability in residential care in Israel. The concept of well-being…

  8. Intervening at the Setting Level to Prevent Behavioral Incidents in Residential Child Care: Efficacy of the CARE Program Model.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Charles V; Smith, Elliott G; Holden, Martha J; Norton, Catherine I; Nunno, Michael A; Sellers, Deborah E

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined the impact of a setting-level intervention on the prevention of aggressive or dangerous behavioral incidents involving youth living in group care environments. Eleven group care agencies implemented Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a principle-based program that helps agencies use a set of evidence-informed principles to guide programming and enrich the relational dynamics throughout the agency. All agencies served mostly youth referred from child welfare. The 3-year implementation of CARE involved intensive agency-wide training and on-site consultation to agency leaders and managers around supporting and facilitating day-to-day application of the principles in both childcare and staff management arenas. Agencies provided data over 48 months on the monthly frequency of behavioral incidents most related to program objectives. Using multiple baseline interrupted time series analysis to assess program effects, we tested whether trends during the program implementation period declined significantly compared to the 12 months before implementation. Results showed significant program effects on incidents involving youth aggression toward adult staff, property destruction, and running away. Effects on aggression toward peers and self-harm were also found but were less consistent. Staff ratings of positive organizational social context (OSC) predicted fewer incidents, but there was no clear relationship between OSC and observed program effects. Findings support the potential efficacy of the CARE model and illustrate that intervening "upstream" at the setting level may help to prevent coercive caregiving patterns and increase opportunities for healthy social interactions. PMID:27138932

  9. Leadership Choices in Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffin, Stacie G.; Washington, Valora

    2008-01-01

    After more than a century of evolution, early care and education is in transition. No longer is it a narrow endeavor of relative obscurity and of limited interest to leaders from outside the field. Early care and education has become of interest to K-12 leaders seeking to bolster school reform efforts; to corporate entrepreneurs and stockholders…

  10. Early Care and Education (ECE) Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents several facts about the early care and education in Minnesota. These facts are organized according to the following topics: (1) Children age 5 and younger in Minnesota; (2) Number of early care and education programs and providers; (3) Children ages 0-2 and 3-5 enrolled in quality early childhood programs; (4) Number of…

  11. We CARE About In-Service Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Mary M.

    Presented in this paper is a description of the Computer Assisted Renewal Education (CARE) program, which uses computer-assisted instruction to reach teachers for inservice education. The CARE program utilizes a mobile van to transport the computer and equipment from one location to another. The system includes a television tube, a set of…

  12. The Educational Day Care Consultation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Melinda; Valenstein, Thelma

    A research and training program for family day care mothers at the University of Michigan involves both group meetings and individual home consultations by educational consultants, trained community para-professionals. The program is directed toward low income and working class licensed day care mothers and is conducted by the School of Education.…

  13. Who Cares? Infant Educators' Responses to Professional Discourses of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Belinda; Degotardi, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the construction of "care" in early childhood curriculum and practice. An increasing number of infants are attending formal early childhood settings in Australia (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011. "Childhood education and care, Australia, June 2011." (4402.0). Retrieved from…

  14. Family Foster Care, Kinship Networks, and Residential Care of Abandoned Infants in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megahead, Hamido A.; Cesario, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    While infant abandonment has occurred in all segments of society, on all continents, and across all generations, the motivations for this practice are varied and depend upon the social norms of a specific geographic region at a given point in time. Western approaches addressing the care of abandoned infants focus on terminating parental rights and…

  15. An "Experiment in the Wilderness": Newbattle Abbey College and the Idea of Residential Adult Education in Scotland 1931-1955

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Neil Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Newbattle Abbey College, Scotland's only adult residential college, was founded in the 1930s by Philip Kerr, 11th Marquis of Lothian. This paper traces the debates concerning the college and the rationale for adult residential education until the 1950s, focusing on the difficulties that Newbattle faced in establishing itself as a central part of…

  16. Improving compassionate care skills with education.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mhairi; Quinn, Isabel; Corder, Karen

    The ability to show compassion in practice is a crucial nursing skill. This article discusses how education can change the culture around the delivery of compassionate care. It focuses on using education as a tool and integrating other strategies such as communication, recruitment and leadership, which not only underpin the use of education, but are inextricably linked to bringing about change in the delivery of compassionate care.

  17. Improving compassionate care skills with education.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mhairi; Quinn, Isabel; Corder, Karen

    The ability to show compassion in practice is a crucial nursing skill. This article discusses how education can change the culture around the delivery of compassionate care. It focuses on using education as a tool and integrating other strategies such as communication, recruitment and leadership, which not only underpin the use of education, but are inextricably linked to bringing about change in the delivery of compassionate care. PMID:27337790

  18. State Regulation of Medication Administration by Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Residential Care and Adult Day Services Settings.

    PubMed

    Carder, Paula C; O'Keeffe, Janet

    2016-09-01

    Residential care settings and adult day services are two community-based care options used by older adults with chronic health conditions. Most states have regulatory provisions that allow unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) to administer medications. The current national policy study examined state regulations to identify which states permit UAP to administer medications, as well as staffing and training requirements. Key findings include states lack clear and adequate provisions for nurse oversight of UAP who administer medications, although adult day service regulations provide a greater level of nurse oversight than residential care settings. Specifically, 32 states require residential care to hire a nurse, but only six include provisions regarding nurse availability (e.g., on-call, on-site, number of hours). In contrast, 10 of 20 states that require adult day service programs to hire a nurse provide availability provisions. Nurse oversight of UAP is an important means of assuring quality care and reducing errors; thus, state regulatory agencies might need to strengthen nurse oversight provisions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(5):209-222.]. PMID:27054368

  19. Poly-victimization and psychopathology among Spanish adolescents in residential care.

    PubMed

    Segura, Anna; Pereda, Noemí; Guilera, Georgina; Abad, Judit

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of poly-victimization on symptom severity among adolescents being cared for by the child welfare system in a southwestern European country. The sample consisted of 127 youths (62 males and 65 females) aged 12-17 years (M=14.60, SD=1.61) who were recruited from short- and long-term residential centers. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (Finkelhor, Hamby, Ormrod, & Turner, 2005) and the Youth Self-Report (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) were used to assess interpersonal victimization experiences and psychopathology, respectively. Victim (n=68), low poly-victim (n=48), and high poly-victim (n=18) groups had comparable rates of psychopathology severity, with the exception of rule-breaking behavior, which was more severe among those with more victimization experiences (Cramer's V=.342). Poly-victimization was shown to be a significant predictor of clinically severe rule-breaking behavior, thought problems, and anxiety/depression symptoms. Among victimization types, sexual and electronic victimization significantly predicted withdrawn/depressed and aggressive behavior, and attention problems, respectively. The results of this study highlight the importance of assessing a wide range of victimization experiences among adolescents in care, since poly-victimization seems to underlie the serious psychological problems these youth present. PMID:27082753

  20. Poly-victimization and psychopathology among Spanish adolescents in residential care.

    PubMed

    Segura, Anna; Pereda, Noemí; Guilera, Georgina; Abad, Judit

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of poly-victimization on symptom severity among adolescents being cared for by the child welfare system in a southwestern European country. The sample consisted of 127 youths (62 males and 65 females) aged 12-17 years (M=14.60, SD=1.61) who were recruited from short- and long-term residential centers. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (Finkelhor, Hamby, Ormrod, & Turner, 2005) and the Youth Self-Report (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) were used to assess interpersonal victimization experiences and psychopathology, respectively. Victim (n=68), low poly-victim (n=48), and high poly-victim (n=18) groups had comparable rates of psychopathology severity, with the exception of rule-breaking behavior, which was more severe among those with more victimization experiences (Cramer's V=.342). Poly-victimization was shown to be a significant predictor of clinically severe rule-breaking behavior, thought problems, and anxiety/depression symptoms. Among victimization types, sexual and electronic victimization significantly predicted withdrawn/depressed and aggressive behavior, and attention problems, respectively. The results of this study highlight the importance of assessing a wide range of victimization experiences among adolescents in care, since poly-victimization seems to underlie the serious psychological problems these youth present.

  1. [Methodological education and care strategies in basic health care].

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marta Julia Marques; da Silva, João Luis Almeida

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses methodological and care strategies or tools used in basic health care practice. It is based on the dialogue established between what we think and what we carry out at the Life Quality Promotion Outpatient Centers (APQVs). These centers are located at two basic health care centers in Porto Alegre/RS, Brazil. Its users are mostly adult and elderly patients with long-term illnesses. The proposal of this discussion arose from a research project financed by the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development--CNPq, and integrates a thematic network called Education and Care Methodologies to Promote Life Quality. Starting from this empirical and conceptual base, methodological tools were built to develop nursing consulting services in outpatient health care to individuals and groups. This article aims to present relational and operational concepts used in care at these services.

  2. Adolescents' reports of physical violence by peers in residential care settings: an ecological examination.

    PubMed

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona; Attar-Schwartz, Shalhevet

    2014-03-01

    Physical victimization by peers was examined among 1,324 Jewish and Arab adolescents, aged 11 to 19, residing in 32 residential care settings (RCS) for children at-risk in Israel. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to examine the relationships between physical victimization and adolescents' characteristics (age, gender, self-efficacy, adjustment difficulties, maltreatment by staff, and perceived social climate) as well as institution-level characteristics (care setting type, size, structure, and ethnic affiliation). For this study, we define physical violence as being grabbed, shoved, kicked, punched, hit with a hand, or hit with an object. Over 50% (56%) of the adolescents surveyed reported having experienced at least one form of physical violence by peers. Boys and younger adolescents were more likely to be victimized than girls and older adolescents. The results show that adolescents with adjustment difficulties or low social self-efficacy, and adolescents who perceive an institution's staff as strict and/or had experienced maltreatment by staff, are vulnerable groups for peer victimization. Lower levels of victimization were found in RCS with a familial element than in traditional group settings. Institutions with high concentrations of young people with adjustment difficulties and violent staff behaviors had higher levels of violence among residents. Applying an ecological perspective to an investigation of peer victimization in RCS enables the identification of risk factors at adolescent and institution levels. This type of examination has implications for child welfare practice and policy that can help in the development of prevention and intervention methods designed to tackle the involvement in violence of youth in care.

  3. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medication incident reporting (MIR) is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation) in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a) design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b) integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c) support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes. PMID:23122411

  4. Interprofessional education in practice: Evaluation of a work integrated aged care program.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, Tanya; Wicks, Alison; Jamieson, Maggie; Haughey, Amy; Grealish, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Health professional clinical education is commonly conducted in single discipline modes, thus limiting student collaboration skills. Aged care residential facilities, due to the chronic and complex health care needs of residents, provide an ideal placement to provide a collaborative experience. Interprofessional education is widely acknowledged as the pedagogical framework through which to facilitate collaboration. The aim of the evaluation was to assess student attitudes towards collaboration after active involvement in an interprofessional education program. Students studying nursing, occupational therapy, and aged care were invited to complete a version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale before and after participating in a three-week pilot interprofessional program. A positive change in student attitudes towards other health professionals and the importance of working in interprofessional teams was reported with significant differences between two statements indicated: Learning with health-care students before qualifications would improve relationships after qualifications; and I learned a lot from the students from the other disciplines. The innovative pilot project was found to enhance student learning in interprofessional teams and the aged care environment. Further development of this and similar interprofessional programs is required to develop sustainable student projects that have health benefits for residents in aged care residential facilities. PMID:26733460

  5. An Ethic of Care and Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Marcia; Blenkinsop, Sean

    2006-01-01

    This article explicates the theoretical framework of an ethic of care and outlines recommendations for applying the framework to practice in adventure education, offering possibilities for re-imagining organizations as centrally concerned with compassion and care. Focusing on the work of Gilligan and Noddings, we suggest an understanding of an…

  6. Education and changes in residential nonpoint source pollution.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Michael E; Clausen, John C; Filchak, Karen K

    2004-11-01

    Urban areas contribute pollutants such as excess nitrogen and bacteria to receiving water bodies. The objective of this project was to determine if stormwater quality could be improved by educating homeowners and implementing best management practices (BMPs) in a suburban neighborhood. The paired watershed design was used, where a control and treatment watershed are monitored during a calibration and treatment period. Treatment consisted of the education of homeowners and structural changes designed to minimize nonpoint pollution. Some changes in measured behavior were reported. According to the treatment period survey, 11% of respondents in the treatment watershed began fertilizing their lawn based on the results of a soil test, whereas none had done so previously. In addition, 82% of respondents in the treatment watershed stated that they left clippings on the lawn compared to 62% from the initial survey. Twelve of 34 lots (35%) adopted some BMPs following education efforts, indicating a significant (P = 0.001) increase in BMP use overall. However, a chi2 analysis of survey data indicated no significant changes in measured behavior with regard to specific questions. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) results indicated that a 75% reduction in nitrite + nitrate - N (change in intercept, P = 0.001) and a 127% reduction in fecal coliform bacteria (change in slope, P = 0.05) concentrations occurred. However, the treatment period regression was non-significant for bacteria. Total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and ammonia-N concentrations did not change significantly. Intensive education efforts produced BMP implementation and measurable water quality improvements.

  7. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  8. Promoting psychosocial adaptation of youths in residential care through animal-assisted psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balluerka, Nekane; Muela, Alexander; Amiano, Nora; Caldentey, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP) on the psychosocial adaptation of a group of adolescents in residential care who had suffered traumatic childhood experiences and who presented with mental health problems. This study recruited 63 youths (mean age=15.27, SD=1.63) who were divided into two groups: a treatment group of 39 youths (19 female and 20 male; mean age=15.03, SD=0.51) and a control group of 24 (five female and 19 male; mean age=15.67, SD=1.63). The youths who underwent the AAP program had higher school adjustment in comparison to their peers who did not receive treatment. Their hyperactive behavior decreased, and they showed better social skills, more leadership, and fewer attention problems. They also showed a more positive attitude toward their teachers in comparison to controls. No differences were observed in other variables associated with clinical symptoms or personal adjustment. These results suggest that AAP can be effective with teenagers who have suffered childhood traumas and who present with problems of psychosocial adaptation. PMID:26443670

  9. A study of behaviour profiles among intellectually disabled people in residential care in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Janos; Radvanyi, Katalin; Regenyi, Eniko; Dinya, Elek

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the behavioural dimensions of 269 intellectually disabled (ID) people in residential care in specialized institutions in Tolna county (South-West Hungary) with the aim of screening the frequency and severity of the relevant behavioural symptoms associated with intellectual disability and depending on the level of intellectual impairment. Only 120 residents had an International Classification of Disease (ICD) diagnosis of "mental retardation (MR)" and a valid IQ grading either by means of the Hungarian standard version of the HAWIK or by the coloured Raven test. 4 IQ groups were created: borderline (B), mild (MID), moderate (MOD) and profound (PID) intellectual disability subgroups. The Hungarian pilot version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI) was used. seventy-two percent of the residents displayed behavioural problems. All scale score means exhibited an enhancing tendency with IQ loss, as both frequency and Seventy increased linearly towards the more severe groups, but significantly only in the category of stereotyped behaviour. The authors focussed on problems of patient recruitment and discussed the measurement of behavioural and other psychiatric symptoms when researchers reported on the increased occurrence of behaviour and psychiatric symptoms in ID populations.

  10. Promoting psychosocial adaptation of youths in residential care through animal-assisted psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balluerka, Nekane; Muela, Alexander; Amiano, Nora; Caldentey, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP) on the psychosocial adaptation of a group of adolescents in residential care who had suffered traumatic childhood experiences and who presented with mental health problems. This study recruited 63 youths (mean age=15.27, SD=1.63) who were divided into two groups: a treatment group of 39 youths (19 female and 20 male; mean age=15.03, SD=0.51) and a control group of 24 (five female and 19 male; mean age=15.67, SD=1.63). The youths who underwent the AAP program had higher school adjustment in comparison to their peers who did not receive treatment. Their hyperactive behavior decreased, and they showed better social skills, more leadership, and fewer attention problems. They also showed a more positive attitude toward their teachers in comparison to controls. No differences were observed in other variables associated with clinical symptoms or personal adjustment. These results suggest that AAP can be effective with teenagers who have suffered childhood traumas and who present with problems of psychosocial adaptation.

  11. Indirect and verbal victimization by peers among at-risk youth in residential care.

    PubMed

    Attar-Schwartz, Shalhevet; Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2015-04-01

    Verbal and indirect violence among peers in residential care settings (RCSs) are understudied social problems. This study, based on a sample of 1,324 Jewish and Arab adolescents aged 11-19 in 32 RCSs, examines the prevalence and multilevel correlates of verbal (such as cursing) and indirect (such as social exclusion) forms of victimization by peers in RCSs. Adolescents completed a self-report anonymous questionnaire in their facility. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) is used to examine the links between adolescents' victimization, individual-level characteristics (gender, age, adjustment difficulties, self-efficacy, staff maltreatment experiences and perceived institutional social climate), and RCS-level characteristics (setting type of care, size, structure, and ethnic affiliation). Most adolescents reported having been verbally (73%) and indirectly (62%) victimized by their peers at least once in the month prior to filling out the questionnaire. Vulnerability to indirect violence is higher among girls and those with low perception of their social self-efficacy. Younger adolescents, adolescents with higher levels of overall adjustment difficulties, those experiencing high levels of physical maltreatment by RCS staff and those perceiving levels of child friendliness in their RCS as poor, were all more vulnerable to verbal and indirect victimization by peers. Verbal victimization is positively associated with residence in Jewish RCSs and indirect victimization is positively associated with residence in therapeutic settings which contain higher concentrations of vulnerable youth compared with rehabilitative settings. The findings can assist in designing anti-bullying intervention and prevention programs tailored for the at-risk children and institutions identified in the study.

  12. Indirect and verbal victimization by peers among at-risk youth in residential care.

    PubMed

    Attar-Schwartz, Shalhevet; Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2015-04-01

    Verbal and indirect violence among peers in residential care settings (RCSs) are understudied social problems. This study, based on a sample of 1,324 Jewish and Arab adolescents aged 11-19 in 32 RCSs, examines the prevalence and multilevel correlates of verbal (such as cursing) and indirect (such as social exclusion) forms of victimization by peers in RCSs. Adolescents completed a self-report anonymous questionnaire in their facility. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) is used to examine the links between adolescents' victimization, individual-level characteristics (gender, age, adjustment difficulties, self-efficacy, staff maltreatment experiences and perceived institutional social climate), and RCS-level characteristics (setting type of care, size, structure, and ethnic affiliation). Most adolescents reported having been verbally (73%) and indirectly (62%) victimized by their peers at least once in the month prior to filling out the questionnaire. Vulnerability to indirect violence is higher among girls and those with low perception of their social self-efficacy. Younger adolescents, adolescents with higher levels of overall adjustment difficulties, those experiencing high levels of physical maltreatment by RCS staff and those perceiving levels of child friendliness in their RCS as poor, were all more vulnerable to verbal and indirect victimization by peers. Verbal victimization is positively associated with residence in Jewish RCSs and indirect victimization is positively associated with residence in therapeutic settings which contain higher concentrations of vulnerable youth compared with rehabilitative settings. The findings can assist in designing anti-bullying intervention and prevention programs tailored for the at-risk children and institutions identified in the study. PMID:25626336

  13. Assessing the homogenization of urban land management with an application to US residential lawn care

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Colin; Grove, J. Morgan; Knudson, Chris; Groffman, Peter M.; Bettez, Neil; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Hall, Sharon J.; Heffernan, James B.; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Larson, Kelli L.; Morse, Jennifer L.; Neill, Christopher; Nelson, Kristen C.; Ogden, Laura A.; O’Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; Pataki, Diane E.; Roy Chowdhury, Rinku; Steele, Meredith K.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in land use, land cover, and land management present some of the greatest potential global environmental challenges of the 21st century. Urbanization, one of the principal drivers of these transformations, is commonly thought to be generating land changes that are increasingly similar. An implication of this multiscale homogenization hypothesis is that the ecosystem structure and function and human behaviors associated with urbanization should be more similar in certain kinds of urbanized locations across biogeophysical gradients than across urbanization gradients in places with similar biogeophysical characteristics. This paper introduces an analytical framework for testing this hypothesis, and applies the framework to the case of residential lawn care. This set of land management behaviors are often assumed—not demonstrated—to exhibit homogeneity. Multivariate analyses are conducted on telephone survey responses from a geographically stratified random sample of homeowners (n = 9,480), equally distributed across six US metropolitan areas. Two behaviors are examined: lawn fertilizing and irrigating. Limited support for strong homogenization is found at two scales (i.e., multi- and single-city; 2 of 36 cases), but significant support is found for homogenization at only one scale (22 cases) or at neither scale (12 cases). These results suggest that US lawn care behaviors are more differentiated in practice than in theory. Thus, even if the biophysical outcomes of urbanization are homogenizing, managing the associated sustainability implications may require a multiscale, differentiated approach because the underlying social practices appear relatively varied. The analytical approach introduced here should also be productive for other facets of urban-ecological homogenization. PMID:24616515

  14. An Outcomes Perspective of the Role of Residential Treatment in the System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John S.; Woltman, Heather; Martinovich, Zoran; Hancock, Brian

    2009-01-01

    A variety of factors are putting great pressure on residential treatment centers to justify their role in the child serving system through evidence of impact on the lives of children, youth, and families. The present study describes the role of residential treatment from an outcomes perspective in a midsized state over the course of a 5 year…

  15. The Associations between Structural Treatment Characteristics and Post-Treatment Functioning in Compulsory Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Karin S.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Veerman, Jan W.; van Dam, Coleta; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2005 a new compulsory residential treatment program was developed for adolescents in need for protection against themselves or their environment. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the association of structural treatment characteristics of this new residential treatment program (i.e., duration of treatment,…

  16. Impact of a pharmacist-prepared interim residential care medication administration chart on gaps in continuity of medication management after discharge from hospital to residential care: a prospective pre- and post-intervention study (MedGap Study)

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tim; Taylor, Simone E; Harvey, Penelope A; Belfrage, Mary K; Jennings, Rhonda J; Marriott, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the impact of a hospital pharmacist-prepared interim residential care medication administration chart (IRCMAC) on medication administration errors and use of locum medical services after discharge from hospital to residential care. Design Prospective pre-intervention and post-intervention study. Setting One major acute care hospital and one subacute aged-care hospital; 128 residential care facilities (RCF) in Victoria, Australia. Participants 428 patients (median age 84 years, IQR 79–88) discharged to a RCF from an inpatient ward over two 12-week periods. Intervention Seven-day IRCMAC auto-populated with patient and medication data from the hospitals' pharmacy dispensing software, completed and signed by a hospital pharmacist and sent with the patient to the RCF. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary end points were the proportion of patients with one or more missed or significantly delayed (>50% of prescribed dose interval) medication doses, and the proportion of patients whose RCF medication chart was written by a locum doctor, in the 24 h after discharge. Secondary end points included RCF staff and general practitioners' opinions about the IRCMAC. Results The number of patients who experienced one or more missed or delayed doses fell from 37/202 (18.3%) to 6/226 (2.7%) (difference in percentages 15.6%, 95% CI 9.5% to 21.9%, p<0.001). The number of patients whose RCF medication chart was written by a locum doctor fell from 66/202 (32.7%) to 25/226 (11.1%) (difference in percentages 21.6%, 95% CI 13.5% to 29.7%, p<0.001). For 189/226 (83.6%) discharges, RCF staff reported that the IRCMAC improved continuity of care; 31/35 (88.6%) general practitioners said that the IRCMAC reduced the urgency for them to attend the RCF and 35/35 (100%) said that IRCMACs should be provided for all patients discharged to a RCF. Conclusions A hospital pharmacist-prepared IRCMAC significantly reduced medication errors and use of locum medical services

  17. Early Education and Care, and Reconceptualizing Play. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Brown, Mac H., Ed.

    Providing a forum for current thought about the field of early education and care, this book reviews efforts worldwide to educate young children. The book examines child care quality, presents a cultural feminist perspective on caregiving, discusses curricular issues, and considers the role of play in early childhood practice. The chapters are:…

  18. Using the tidal model of mental health recovery to plan primary health care for women in residential substance abuse recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Brenda B

    2010-09-01

    Women currently are 30% of the substance abuse recovery population in North America and have gender specific treatment needs as they enter the difficult work of recovery. Important among women's specific needs as they enter recovery is the need for a focus on primary health care. Few models designed to guide the provision of health care for this population are available in the literature. The Tidal Model of Mental Health Recovery and Reclamation is based on the concept of nursing as "caring with" persons in the experience of distress. Given the emphasis in this model on developing a partnership between caregiver and client, it is especially appropriate for women in recovery for substance abuse. The Tidal Model, integrated with the United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services' CSAT model for comprehensive alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse treatment, is used to guide planning for delivery of primary health care in a residential women's substance abuse recovery center in the Midwest. This article describes the Tidal Model, and identifies how the model can improve the delivery of primary care to women in residential substance abuse treatment. Strategies for implementation of the model are proposed. Evaluation and outcome criteria are identified.

  19. Improving educational preparation for transcultural health care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M

    1998-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that the health care needs of people from black and ethnic minority groups in England are not being met. A growing number of initiatives are being undertaken to remedy the situation. Many of them are focused on health care delivery at local and national levels. However, unless the preparation of health care professionals in the area of multi-cultural health care is appropriate and effective, a great deal of corrective action will continue to have to be taken. Despite 1997 having been the European Year Against Racism, it is still necessary to consider what educational preparation should be like. The article draws on identified inadequacies in health care provision as well as examples of initiatives taken to improve care provision. The author identifies deficiencies in educational preparation and proposes a range of actions to be taken. The article is focused on nursing, midwifery and health visiting education in England, but is deemed to be relevant to all health care professionals not only in Europe but other continents, as they become increasingly international and multi-ethnic.

  20. Caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD.

    PubMed

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Larsson, Lise-Lotte Franklin; Norberg, Astrid

    2014-06-01

    Caring for people with dementia and working in dementia care is described as having both rewarding and unpleasant aspects and has been studied to a minor extent. This study aims to explore care providers' narrated experiences of caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD. Nine care providers were interviewed about their experiences, the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that participants were struggling to perform person-centred care, which meant trying to see the person behind the disease, dealing with troublesome situations in the daily care, a two-edged interaction with relatives, feelings of shortcomings and troubled conscience, and the need for improvements in dementia care. The analysis also revealed an ambiguous work situation, which meant a challenging value base, the differently judged work environment, feelings of job satisfaction and the need for a functional leadership and management. The results illuminate participants' positive as well as negative experiences and have identified areas requiring improvements. It seems of great importance to strive for a supportive and attendant leadership, a leadership which aims to empower care providers in their difficult work. Using conscience as a driving force together in the work group may benefit care providers' health.

  1. Why are some care homes better than others? An empirical study of the factors associated with quality of care for older people in residential homes in Surrey, England.

    PubMed

    Gage, Heather; Knibb, Wendy; Evans, Joanne; Williams, Peter; Rickman, Neil; Bryan, Karen

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports an empirical study that investigated associations between the quality of care received by older people in residential settings and features of the care homes in which they live. Data were gathered from the first announced inspection reports (2002-2003) of all 258 care homes for older people in one county of England (Surrey). The number of inspected standards failed in each home was used as the main indicator of quality of care. Independent variables (for each home) were: size, type, specialist registration, on-site nursing, ownership, year registered, location, maximum fee, vacancies, resident dependency, whether the home took publicly funded residents, care staff qualifications and managerial quality. Quality of care was modelled using a Poisson count maximum likelihood method based on 245 (91%) of the inspected homes for which relevant data were available. The results showed that quality of care (as defined by failures on national standards) was statistically associated with features of care homes and their residents. A higher probability of failing a standard was significantly associated with being a home that: was a for-profit small business (adjusted risk ratio (RR) = 1.17); was registered before 2000 (adj. RR = 1.22), accommodated publicly funded residents (adj. RR = 1.12); was registered to provide nursing care (adj. RR = 1.12). Fewer failures were associated with homes that were corporate for-profit (adj. RR = 0.82); held a specialist registration (adj. RR = 0.91); charged higher maximum fees (adj. RR = 0.98 per 100 pound sterling unit). A secondary analysis revealed a stronger model: higher scores on managerial standards correlated with fewer failures on other standards (r = 0.65, P < 0.001). The results of this study may help inform future policy. They are discussed in the context of alternative approaches to measuring quality of residential care, and in terms of their generalisability.

  2. Education for sexual health care.

    PubMed

    Katzman, E M

    1990-03-01

    I have described the content of a sexuality course in a college of nursing and its professional application for 78 female and male nursing students. Responses to open-ended questions indicated that the course helped the students better deal with the sexual concerns of their patients and clients. As one participant said, "This class has led me to believe in sexual health care by nurses. I would have been content to leave it to the doctors or social workers who I thought were taking care of it. However, I was not aware of how little attention was given to the patients' sexual concerns by any health professional until I started looking for it. I now believe that nurses, more than anyone, can help bring about positive changes in these areas." Another student said, "I think more resources for sexuality teaching should be available for nurses. I have cared for many patients who could have used this type of intervention, but I was not prepared to give it." Given the AIDS epidemic, it is vital that nurses be prepared to deal with the sensitive aspects of sexuality in AIDS prevention, with people with AIDS, and with their significant others and caregivers. Of all health care professionals, nurses are in a unique position to help such patients and clients. A sexuality course can help nurses explore their own values and feelings as well as learn the effects of illness on patients' sexuality. Patients, their families, and nurses will all benefit.

  3. The Predicaments of Non-Residential Students in Ghanaian Institutions of Higher Education: A Micro-Level Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addai, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    This paper in the field of capacity building and students' affairs used the external survey assessment techniques of the probit model to examine the predicaments of non-resident students of the College of Technology Education, University of Education, Winneba. Considering the very limited residential facilities and the growing demand for tertiary…

  4. Educating primary care clinicians about health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Chiapa, Ana L

    2007-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health disparities inarguably exist in the United States. It is important to educate primary care clinicians regarding this topic because they have the ability to have an impact in the reduction of health disparities. This article presents the evidence that disparities exist, how clinicians contribute to these disparities, and what primary care clinicians can do to reduce disparities in their practice. Clinicians are able to impact health disparities by receiving and providing cross-cultural education, communicating effectively with patients, and practicing evidence-based medicine. The changes suggested herein will have an impact on the current state of health of our nation. PMID:17371577

  5. The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Saravanakumar, Padmapriya; Higgins, Isabel Johanna; Van Der Riet, Pamela Jane; Marquez, Jodie; Sibbritt, David

    2014-07-23

    Abstract Falls amongst older people is a global public health concern. Whilst falling is not a typical feature of ageing, older people are more likely to fall. Fall injuries amongst older people are a leading cause of death and disability. Many older people do not do regular exercise so that they lose muscle tone, strength, and flexibility which affect balance and predispose them to falls. The management of falls in residential care settings is a major concern with strategies for prevention and monitoring a focus in this setting. Yoga and tai chi have shown potential to improve balance and prevent falls in older adults. They also have potential to improve pain and quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting a 3-arm RCT with frail older people in a residential care setting to test the hypothesis that a 14 week modified tai chi or yoga program is more effective than usual care activity in improving balance function, quality of life, pain experience and in reducing number of falls. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups in the occurrence of falls. Yoga demonstrated a slight decrease in fall incidence; quality of life improved for the tai chi group. Only the yoga group experienced a reduction in average pain scores though not statistically significant. The findings of the study suggest it is possible to safely implement modified yoga and tai chi in a residential care setting and evaluate this using RCT design. They show positive changes to balance, pain and quality of life and a high level of interest through attendance amongst the older participants. The results support offering tai chi and yoga to older people who are frail and dependent with physical and cognitive limitations.

  6. Teachers' Care in Higher Education: Contesting Gendered Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariskind, Clare

    2014-01-01

    There is little research on care in higher education, and yet for many of those who teach in higher education institutions, care is an important part of their work. Care in the compulsory education sector has traditionally been linked to the feminine, and this paper considers whether this is also the case in higher education. It investigates how…

  7. Exploring Parental Preferences: Care or Education: What Do Greek Parents Aspire from Day Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care is a multifaceted institution. Based on children's age, a number of different settings operate, which have usually two distinct aims. Kindergartens provide mainly education whereas day care centres provide care. Yet, in recent years, the need to establish programmes which provide both education and care to…

  8. Scabies outbreaks in residential care homes: factors associated with late recognition, burden and impact. A mixed methods study in England.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, K A; Nalabanda, A; Cassell, J A

    2015-05-01

    Scabies is an important public health problem in residential care homes. Delayed diagnosis contributes to outbreaks, which may be prolonged and difficult to control. We investigated factors influencing outbreak recognition, diagnosis and treatment, and staff experiences of outbreak control, identifying areas for intervention. We carried out a semi-structured survey of managers, affected residents and staff of seven care homes reporting suspected scabies outbreaks in southern England over a 6-month period. Attack rates ranged from 2% to 50%, and most cases had dementia (37/39, 95%). Cases were diagnosed clinically by GPs (59%) or home staff (41%), none by dermatologists. Most outbreaks were attributable to avoidably late diagnosis of the index case. Participants reported considerable challenges in managing scabies outbreaks, including late diagnosis and recognition of outbreaks; logistically difficult mass treatment; distressing treatment processes and high costs. This study demonstrates the need for improved support for care homes in detecting and managing these outbreaks. PMID:25195595

  9. Incorporating educational theory into critical care orientation.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Judy; Thomas, Margot

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of a critical care total education system, which includes an orientation program. The educational process in this unit reflects Benner's model of novice to expert integrated with Schon's theory of reflective practice and Cranton's transformational learning theory. This program reflects an educational philosophy that facilitates learning on entry into the new workplace, and an established continuum of expected acquisition of knowledge, practice skills, attitudes, and critical thinking abilities promoting the transition from novice to expert. PMID:12046715

  10. Online Collaborative Learning in Health Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    At our University, the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education has delivered a variety of undergraduate and postgraduate courses via flexible distance learning for many years. Distance learning can be a lonely experience for students who may feel isolated and unsupported. However e-learning provides an opportunity to use technology to…

  11. Leadership in Early Care and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon L., Ed.; Bowman, Barbara T., Ed.

    Despite recent attention to leadership in early care and education, the field does not have a commonly accepted definition of leadership, nor has it engaged in a systematic and collaborative discussion of the properties of leadership. This volume is intended to address these and other shortcomings. In addition to defining leadership and presenting…

  12. Faculty Development for Ambulatory Care Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William A.; Carline, Jan D.; Ambrozy, Donna M.; Irby, David M.

    1997-01-01

    A study documented the practices of 14 peer-nominated medical educators who conduct faculty development programs in ambulatory care settings. Results indicate the programs were delivered almost exclusively in workshop format, with great similarities in topics and strategies. Evaluation was generally limited to satisfaction ratings. Makes…

  13. The decision of out-of-home placement in residential care after parental neglect: Empirically testing a psychosocial model.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Leonor; Calheiros, Manuela; Pereira, Cícero

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-home placement decisions in residential care are complex, ambiguous and full of uncertainty, especially in cases of parental neglect. Literature on this topic is so far unable to understand and demonstrate the source of errors involved in those decisions and still fails to focus on professional's decision making process. Therefore, this work intends to test a socio-psychological model of decision-making that is a more integrated, dualistic and ecological version of the Theory of Planned Behavior's model. It describes the process through which the decision maker takes into account personal, contextual and social factors of the Decision-Making Ecology in the definition of his/her decision threshold. One hundred and ninety-five professionals from different Children and Youth Protection Units, throughout the Portuguese territory, participated in this online study. After reading a vignette of a (psychological and physical) neglect case toward a one-year-old child, participants were presented with a group of questions that measured worker's assessment of risk, intention, attitude, subjective norm, behavior control and beliefs toward residential care placement decision, as well as worker's behavior experience, emotions and family/child-related-values involved in that decision. A set of structural equation modeling analyses have proven the good fit of the proposed model. The intention to propose a residential care placement decision was determined by cognitive, social, affective, value-laden and experience variables and the perceived risk. Altogether our model explained 61% of professional's decision toward a parental neglect case. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed, namely the importance of raising awareness about the existence of these biased psychosocial determinants.

  14. The decision of out-of-home placement in residential care after parental neglect: Empirically testing a psychosocial model.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Leonor; Calheiros, Manuela; Pereira, Cícero

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-home placement decisions in residential care are complex, ambiguous and full of uncertainty, especially in cases of parental neglect. Literature on this topic is so far unable to understand and demonstrate the source of errors involved in those decisions and still fails to focus on professional's decision making process. Therefore, this work intends to test a socio-psychological model of decision-making that is a more integrated, dualistic and ecological version of the Theory of Planned Behavior's model. It describes the process through which the decision maker takes into account personal, contextual and social factors of the Decision-Making Ecology in the definition of his/her decision threshold. One hundred and ninety-five professionals from different Children and Youth Protection Units, throughout the Portuguese territory, participated in this online study. After reading a vignette of a (psychological and physical) neglect case toward a one-year-old child, participants were presented with a group of questions that measured worker's assessment of risk, intention, attitude, subjective norm, behavior control and beliefs toward residential care placement decision, as well as worker's behavior experience, emotions and family/child-related-values involved in that decision. A set of structural equation modeling analyses have proven the good fit of the proposed model. The intention to propose a residential care placement decision was determined by cognitive, social, affective, value-laden and experience variables and the perceived risk. Altogether our model explained 61% of professional's decision toward a parental neglect case. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed, namely the importance of raising awareness about the existence of these biased psychosocial determinants. PMID:25882668

  15. Medical education and indigent patient care.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Deborah S

    2003-12-01

    The 20th century model of medical education has focused on a network of urban medical centers serving primarily indigent patients in an unspoken contract of medical services in exchange for student and resident education. The improvement in federal and state reimbursement for indigent care services, along with the decline in reimbursement rates from the private sector, has led to competition for these patients from nonacademic providers. As numbers of patients seeking care at urban teaching centers have steadily declined, concerns about adequate teaching volume and revenue generation have led to very creative problem-solving. Bringing marketing concerns into the indigent care environment is not a straightforward undertaking, but the rewards might far exceed the simple goal of "getting our numbers back up." PMID:14613672

  16. Funding child care and public education.

    PubMed

    Zigler, E F; Finn-Stevenson, M

    1996-01-01

    Ensuring the availability of high-quality, affordable child care to all families who need it is a goal of national importance. The authors suggest that a comprehensive financing and service delivery system for child care is needed to achieve this goal, and the system should ideally be grounded in an existing institution, already present in every community--the public school. The linkage of child care with the public education system would eliminate the false distinction between child care and education, and would create a universally accessible system of child care services for children. The School of the 21st Century is an example of such a system. Initially conceptualized by Zigler, it has now been implemented in 400 schools across 13 states, with the leadership and direction of Finn-Stevenson. This article describes how school districts that have implemented the program employ a mixture of parent fees and local, state, federal, and private dollars to fund it, and then proposes an ideal financing model for the program. In the ideal model, the same mix of funding sources would be retained, but a per-pupil expenditure of about $9,000 per year is advocated to deliver child care and other social services to three- and four-year-olds. Funds for initial start-up could be derived from reallocation of existing dollars, especially state prekindergarten programs, but eventually new funds would be needed to support ongoing operations.

  17. Exploratory Investigation of Communication Management in Residential-Aged Care: A Comparison of Staff Knowledge, Documentation and Observed Resident-Staff Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michelle K.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high prevalence of communication difficulty among older people living in residential-aged care. Such functional deficits can have a negative impact on resident quality of life, staff workplace satisfaction and the provision of quality care. Systematic research investigating the nature of communication management in…

  18. Mapping the Rural Adolescent Girls' Participation in Residential Non-Formal Education Program--A Study in Lunkaransar Block, Rajasthan, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Shilpa

    2002-01-01

    The present study, "Mapping Rural Adolescent Girl's Participation in Residential Non- Formal Education Program--A Study in Lunkaransar Block, Rajasthan", was an attempt to understand the dimensions of rural adolescent girls' participation in the "Balika Shivir" Program. It is a six month residential non-formal education program being organized by…

  19. Special Education in the Residential Setting. Proceedings of the Special Study Institute (Columbia University, New York, New York, June 30-July 18, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younie, William J., Ed.; Goldberg, I. Ignacy, Ed.

    Reported are the proceedings of a three-week conference for special education administrators working with educational programs for the institutionalized mentally handicapped. Conference papers included are: The Role of a Residential Facility in Modern Society, by Robert Dentler; The Present Nature of Residential Populations, by Harvey Dingman;…

  20. Health Education in Child Care: Opportunities and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalle, Maureen A.

    1996-01-01

    This article addresses the health and safety risks associated with child care facilities, including injuries and infectious diseases. Related health education needs for child care providers, parents, and children are examined, and recommendations for health educators are provided. (SM)

  1. Brainwashing and Psychotherapy: The Care of Children in Residential Treatment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, Ayala; Solomon, Trudy

    The purpose of this paper is to present the reader with an indepth study of the special plight of children currently confined in our nation's residential treatment centers. Several of the fundamental legal issues involved in the coercive commitment of minors to such institutions will be discussed, especially those concerning due process and…

  2. AgedCare+GP: description and evaluation of an in-house model of general practice in a residential aged-care facility.

    PubMed

    Pain, Tilley; Stainkey, Lesley; Chapman, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a medical model to provide in-house GP services to residents of aged-care facilities. Access to GP services for aged-care residents is decreasing, partially due to the changing demographic of the Australian GP workforce. The model we have developed is an in-house GP (AgedCare+GP) trialled in a publicly funded residential aged-care facility (RACF). The service model was based on the GP cooperative used in our after-hours general practice (AfterHours+GP). Briefly, the service model involves rostering a core group of GPs to provide weekly sessional clinics at the RACF. Financial contributions from appropriate Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) items for aged-care planning (including chronic conditions) provided adequate funds to operate the clinic for RACF residents. Evaluation of the service model used the number of resident transfers to the local emergency department as the primary outcome measure. There were 37 transfers of residents in the 3 months before the commencement of the AgedCare+GP and 11 transfers over a 3-month period at the end of the first year of operation; a reduction of almost 70%. This project demonstrates that AgedCare+GP is a successful model for GP service provision to RACF residents, and it also reduces the number of emergency department transfers. PMID:24134857

  3. District of Columbia Early Care and Education Strategic Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Univ., Washington, DC. Center for Applied Research and Urban Policy.

    This report details the early care and education strategic plan for the District of Columbia. Following an executive summary, the report provides the rationale for developing an early care and education strategic plan and describes the process used to develop the plan. The top 10 early care and education issues in the district are then delineated…

  4. Workforce Development in Early Childhood Education and Care. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherton, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    The early childhood education and care industry in Australia is undergoing a shift in philosophy. Changes in policy are driving the industry towards a combined early childhood education and care focus, away from one on child care only. This move has implications for the skilling of the child care workforce. This research overview describes the…

  5. Care and Education of Orphaned Children in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna

    2004-01-01

    Poland is going through tremendous changes in its educational and health-care systems. These changes may bring reforms in the care of orphaned children, because the new politics and economy are forcing educators to look for new solutions and forms of care. There are many problems with the care of orphan children in Poland in both Children's Homes…

  6. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement III to Volume 7. Preparing the Student: The Education Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutterer, Richard H.

    One of three supplements which accompany chapter 7 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the mobility and transportation component and marketing and tourism component of the educational services division.…

  7. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-01-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  8. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  9. Effectiveness of a low-threshold physical activity intervention in residential aged care – results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria; Zeiler, Michael; Adamcik, Tanja; Manousek, Matthias; Stamm, Tanja; Krajic, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Research on effectiveness of low-threshold mobility interventions that are viable for users of residential aged care is scarce. Low-threshold is defined as keeping demands on organizations (staff skills, costs) and participants (health status, discipline) rather low. The study explored the effectiveness of a multi-faceted, low-threshold physical activity program in three residential aged-care facilities in Austria. Main goals were enhancement of mobility by conducting a multi-faceted training program to foster occupational performance and thus improve different aspects of health-related quality of life (QoL). Participants and methods The program consisted of a weekly session of 60 minutes over a period of 20 weeks. A standardized assessment of mobility status and health-related QoL was applied before and after the intervention. A total of 222 of 276 participants completed the randomized controlled trial study (intervention group n=104, control group n=118; average age 84 years, 88% female). Results Subjective health status (EuroQoL-5 dimensions: P=0.001, d=0.36) improved significantly in the intervention group, and there were also positive trends in occupational performance (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure). No clear effects were found concerning the functional and cognitive measures applied. Conclusion Thus, the low-threshold approach turned out to be effective primarily on subjective health-related QoL. This outcome could be a useful asset for organizations offering low-threshold physical activity interventions. PMID:26056438

  10. Medical education and health care in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kiely, J M

    1980-10-01

    Health care and medical education in Uganda, once the best in Black Africa, have been adversely affected by the economic, political, and social upheavals in this developing country during the past decade. Crop failures, inadequate public health measures, shortage of medical equipment and essential drugs, and lack of sufficient medical school faculty have resulted in a major crisis. Substantial aid from the medical profession in developed countries will be necessary to help restore medical practice and education to the level present before the regime of Idi Amin.

  11. Innovative strategies in critical care education.

    PubMed

    Tainter, Christopher R; Wong, Nelson L; Bittner, Edward A

    2015-06-01

    The cadre of information pertinent to critical care medicine continues to expand at a tremendous pace, and we must adapt our strategies of medical education to keep up with the expansion. Differences in learners' characteristics can contribute to a mismatch with historical teaching strategies. Simulation is increasingly popular, but still far from universal. Emerging technology has the potential to improve our knowledge translation, but there is currently sparse literature describing these resources or their benefits and limitations. Directed strategies of assessment and feedback are often suboptimal. Even strategies of accreditation are evolving. This review attempts to summarize salient concepts, suggest resources, and highlight novel strategies to enhance practice and education in the challenging critical care environment.

  12. Effects of Pre- and Posttrip Activities Associated with a Residential Environmental Education Experience on Students' Attitudes toward the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Sebasto, N. J.; Cavern, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    The authors measured the impact of adding pre- and posttrip in-class activities to the residential environmental education program at the New Jersey School of Conservation (NJSOC). Seventh-grade students (N = 169) from a suburban, northern New Jersey school district participated in a 3-day, 2-night experience. The Environmental Adaptation,…

  13. State Developments in Child Care, Early Education, and School-Age Care, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewen, Danielle; Blank, Helen; Hart, Katherine; Schulman, Karen

    This report provides highlights and updates regarding state actions on child care, early education, and school-age care issues during 2001. It is intended to serve as a supplement to "State Developments in Child Care, Early Education, and School-Age Care 2000" and various reports published on this issue between 1997 and 1999. Information in the…

  14. QuickStats: Percentages* of Residential Care Communities and Adult Day Services Centers That Provided(†) Selected Services - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, a greater percentage of residential care communities than adult day service centers provided five of seven selected services. The majority of residential care communities provided pharmacy services (82%); followed by transportation for social activities (79%); physical, occupational, or speech therapy (69%); hospice (62%); skilled nursing (59%); and mental health services (52%). Fewer than half provided social work services (48%). The majority of adult day services centers provided transportation for social activities (69%); skilled nursing (66%); and social work (52%). %). Fewer than half provided physical, occupational, or speech therapy (49%). One third or less provided mental health (33%), pharmacy (27%), and hospice services (12%). PMID:27607333

  15. Providing Safe Health Care: The Role of Educational Support Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Julie

    This handbook is written for the educational support person (ESP) who may or may not be a trained or licensed health care provider, but whose job has come to include caring for students with disabilities with special health care needs. Section 1, "The Laws Governing the ESP and the Care of the Student with Special Health Care Needs," discusses the…

  16. The lived experiences of resilience in Iranian adolescents living in residential care facilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Nourian, Manijeh; Nourozi Tabrizi, Kian; Rassouli, Maryam; Biglarrian, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is one of the main factors affecting human health, and perceiving its meaning for high-risk adolescents is of particular importance in initiating preventive measures and providing resilience care. Objectives This qualitative study was conducted to explain the meaning of resilience in the lived experiences of Iranian adolescents living in governmental residential care facilities. Materials and methods This study was conducted using the hermeneutic phenomenological method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight adolescents aged 13–17 living in governmental residential care facilities of Tehran province affiliated to the Welfare Organization of Iran who articulated their experiences of resilience. Sampling lasted from May 2014 to July 2015 and continued until new themes were no longer emerging. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using Van Manen's six-step method of phenomenology. Results The themes obtained in this study included “going through life's hardships,” “aspiring for achievement,” “self-protection,” “self-reliance,” and “spirituality.” Conclusion Our study indicates that the meaning of resilience coexists with self-reliance in adolescents’ lived experiences. Adolescents look forward to a better future. They always trust God in the face of difficulties and experience resilience by keeping themselves physically and mentally away from difficulties. Adverse and bitter experiences of the past positively affected their positive view on life and its difficulties and also their resilience. The five themes that emerged from the findings describe the results in detail. The findings of this study enable nurses, health administrators, and healthcare providers working with adolescents to help this vulnerable group cope better with their stressful life conditions and improve their health through increasing their capacity for resilience. PMID:26942909

  17. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Risk Management of Information Systems in Australian Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David; Ma, Jun; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    To obtain indications of the influence of electronic health records (EHR) in managing risks and meeting information system accreditation standard in Australian residential aged care (RAC) homes. The hypothesis to be tested is that the RAC homes using EHR have better performance in meeting information system standards in aged care accreditation than their counterparts only using paper records for information management. Content analysis of aged care accreditation reports from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency produced between April 2011 and December 2013. Items identified included types of information systems, compliance with accreditation standards, and indicators of failure to meet an expected outcome for information systems. The Chi-square test was used to identify difference between the RAC homes that used EHR systems and those that used paper records in not meeting aged care accreditation standards. 1,031 (37.4%) of 2,754 RAC homes had adopted EHR systems. Although the proportion of homes that met all accreditation standards was significantly higher for those with EHR than for homes with paper records, only 13 RAC homes did not meet one or more expected outcomes. 12 used paper records and nine of these failed the expected outcome for information systems. The overall contribution of EHR to meeting aged care accreditation standard in Australia was very small. Risk indicators for not meeting information system standard were no access to accurate and appropriate information, failure in monitoring mechanisms, not reporting clinical incidents, insufficient recording of residents' clinical changes, not providing accurate care plans, and communication processes failure. The study has provided indications that use of EHR provides small, yet significant advantages for RAC homes in Australia in managing risks for information management and in meeting accreditation requirements. The implication of the study for introducing technology innovation in RAC in

  18. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Risk Management of Information Systems in Australian Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David; Ma, Jun; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    To obtain indications of the influence of electronic health records (EHR) in managing risks and meeting information system accreditation standard in Australian residential aged care (RAC) homes. The hypothesis to be tested is that the RAC homes using EHR have better performance in meeting information system standards in aged care accreditation than their counterparts only using paper records for information management. Content analysis of aged care accreditation reports from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency produced between April 2011 and December 2013. Items identified included types of information systems, compliance with accreditation standards, and indicators of failure to meet an expected outcome for information systems. The Chi-square test was used to identify difference between the RAC homes that used EHR systems and those that used paper records in not meeting aged care accreditation standards. 1,031 (37.4%) of 2,754 RAC homes had adopted EHR systems. Although the proportion of homes that met all accreditation standards was significantly higher for those with EHR than for homes with paper records, only 13 RAC homes did not meet one or more expected outcomes. 12 used paper records and nine of these failed the expected outcome for information systems. The overall contribution of EHR to meeting aged care accreditation standard in Australia was very small. Risk indicators for not meeting information system standard were no access to accurate and appropriate information, failure in monitoring mechanisms, not reporting clinical incidents, insufficient recording of residents' clinical changes, not providing accurate care plans, and communication processes failure. The study has provided indications that use of EHR provides small, yet significant advantages for RAC homes in Australia in managing risks for information management and in meeting accreditation requirements. The implication of the study for introducing technology innovation in RAC in

  19. Development and testing of a work measurement tool to assess caregivers' activities in residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Munyisia, Esther; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of computerized information systems into health care practices may cause changes to the way healthcare workers conduct their routine work activities, such as work flow and the time spend on each activity. To date the available work measurement tools are confined to activities in hospitals and do not cover residential aged care facilities (RACFs). There is little evidence about the effects of technology on caregivers' work practices, including the distribution of time on activities in a RACF. This requires the measurement of caregivers' activities using a valid and reliable measurement tool. The contribution of this research is to develop and test such a tool. The tool was developed based on literature research and validation in two RACFs. The final instrument contains 48 activities that are grouped into seven categories. They include direct care, indirect care, communication, documentation, personal activities, in-transit and others. This measurement tool can be used to measure the changes in caregivers' work activities associated with the introduction of computerized information systems in RACFs, including the efficiency gains of such systems. PMID:20841879

  20. Treating Children and Adolescents in Residential and Inpatient Settings. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry. Volume 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Robert D.; Campbell, Nancy R.

    This book examines the various components of hospital, residential, and outpatient treatments for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Options and settings for residential care are presented, including the principles and practical issues, such as providing continuing education, that underlie the decision making for placement of youth in…

  1. Client incentives versus contracting and staff incentives: how care continuity interventions in substance abuse treatment can improve residential to outpatient transition.

    PubMed

    Acquavita, Shauna P; Stershic, Sandra; Sharma, Rajni; Stitzer, Maxine

    2013-07-01

    Interventions for improving transition from short-term residential to outpatient treatment were examined. Usual care (UC; n=114) was referral to a preferred outpatient program with advance appointment optional. Client incentive (CI; n=97) offered up to $100 in gift cards for intake and attendance during the first 30days of treatment. Contracting with staff incentives (CSI; n=49) consisted of meeting with an outpatient counselor prior to residential discharge, signing an attendance contract, receiving an appointment and payment to staff if clients attended. CSI significantly improved rates of successful transition (84%) and admission (74%) compared to UC (64% contact; 49% admitted). CI did not result in significantly improved outcomes (74%; 60%). CSI was likely mediated by the reliability (92 versus 52% in UC) and immediacy (1.0 versus 3.9days) of appointment scheduling. This study supports use of CSI for improving rates of transition between residential and outpatient continuing care treatment. PMID:23375361

  2. Client Incentives versus Contracting and Staff Incentives: How Care Continuity Interventions in Substance Abuse Treatment can improve Residential to Outpatient Transition

    PubMed Central

    Acquavita, Shauna P.; Stershic, Sandra; Sharma, Rajni; Stitzer, Maxine

    2013-01-01

    Interventions for improving transition from short-term residential to outpatient treatment were examined. Usual care (UC; N = 114) was referral to a preferred outpatient program with advance appointment optional. Client Incentive (CI; N = 97) offered up to $100 in gift cards for intake and attendance during the first 30 days of treatment. Contracting with staff incentives (CSI; N = 49) consisted of meeting with an outpatient counselor prior to residential discharge, signing an attendance contract, receiving an appointment and payment to staff if clients attended. CSI significantly improved rates of successful transition (84%) and admission (74%) compared to UC (64% contact; 49% admitted). CI did not result in significantly improved outcomes (74%; 60%). CSI was likely mediated by the reliability (92% vs 52% in UC) and immediacy (1.0 vs 3.9 days) of appointment scheduling. This study supports use of CSI for improving rates of transition between residential and outpatient continuing care treatment. PMID:23375361

  3. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved.

  4. A System for Planning and Achieving Comprehensive Health Care in Residential Institutions for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Harold A.

    Based on a view of health care intertwining medicine intimately with other components of institutional care, the monograph presents a system of concepts and operating techniques for providing comprehensive health care to institutionalized retardates. Background of the system is explained in terms of its research basis (two studies by the author of…

  5. Health care professional education and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Bartnof, H S

    1988-01-01

    The pandemic of AIDS and related infections due to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has associated issues which present specific needs for health care professional education. These include (a) the spectrum of an evolving incurable infectious disease epidemic with new concepts in pathobiology and treatment; (b) specific phobias generated by the pandemic, including fear of the risk (albeit low) of occupational transmission, phobia of death and dying young, homonegativism and substance abuse phobia, fear of helplessness, and transference and countertransference issues; (c) the traditional role of health professionals as health information resources in the face of newly generated clinical and biopsychosocial information, which is often skewed by media presentation and patient consumerism; and (d) occupational stress associated with (a), (b), and (c) and the potential for practice "burnout." These problems are addressed by specific health professional education in traditional and novel forms. Before- and after-AIDS-HIV education knowledge and attitude assessment and AIDS-HIV knowledge documentation will improve health professional and community response to the epidemic, optimize patient care and related interactions, and decrease nosocomial transmission of HIV.

  6. The Learning Organisation and Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abri, Rashid K; Al-Hashmi, Intisar S

    2007-01-01

    The ‘Learning Organisation’ is a concept first described by Peter Senge as an organisation where people continuously learn and enhance their capabilities to create. It consists of five main disciplines: team learning, shared vision, mental models, personal mastery and systems thinking. These disciplines are dynamic and interact with each other. System thinking is the cornerstone of a true learning organisation and is described as the discipline used to implement the disciplines. In a learning organisation, health care education aims to educate its members with up to date knowledge to produce competent and safe personnel, who can promote quality in health care services. In addition, there are some educational concepts and theoretical models, which are of relevance to the learning organisation, and can provide a framework for managerial decisions. The stages required to achieve the principles of a learning organisation will be described in detail. Moreover, in a proper culture which supports the learning organisation, members continuously learn to improve the environment and never remain passive recipients. PMID:21748105

  7. Mothers' Emotional Care Work in Education and Its Moral Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maeve

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to build on feminist and egalitarian critiques of the traditional allocation of care work to mothers, particularly in relation to understandings of educational care work. It seeks to locate the emotional support work carried out by mothers in the educational field within their daily routines of care, and to make visible the…

  8. Asthma Information Handbook for Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2004

    2004-01-01

    With proper care, most children with asthma can lead normal, active lives and can enter school with the same abilities as other children. For this purpose, the Asthma Information Packet for Early Care and Education Providers was designed to cover the following topics: (1) Basic information; (2) How to improve early care and education environments…

  9. Higher Education and Health Care at a Crossroads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.

    2011-01-01

    As major providers and consumers of health care, higher-education institutions have an important role to play in improving health and the nation's health-care system. Health care is a complex issue for colleges and universities. Not only do institutions of higher education provide health insurance to faculty members, staff members, and students,…

  10. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  11. Elder abuse in residential long-term care: an update to the 2003 National Research Council report.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas; Ferguson-Rome, Jamie C; Teresi, Jeanne A

    2015-06-01

    A synthesis of the last decade of literature on elder abuse in residential long-term care (i.e., Nursing Homes and Assisted Living) is discussed. Presented are definitions of abuse, theoretical and conceptual models, prevalence rates of abuse, outcomes and costs, and sources of abuse. The synthesis represents an update to the literature in the influential 2003 National Research Council report. We identify many of the same issues and concerns exist that were surfaced in this prior report. Many theoretical and conceptual models need further elaboration. Conflicting definitions of abuse are pervasive. Rates of abuse are generally inaccurate, and probably under-reported. However, we also identify progress in many areas. An increase in empirical studies that exist in this area (although very few in Assisted Living). Other forms and types of abuse have also been identified as important, such as resident-to-resident abuse. These areas are discussed, along with potential suggestions for additional research.

  12. Taking Control: An Exploratory Study of the Use of Tilt-in-Space Wheelchairs in Residential Care.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sneha; Mortenson, W Ben; Wallace, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Tilt-in-space (TIS) wheelchairs are common in residential care, but little empirical evidence exists regarding how they are used by residents and staff in these settings. As part of a larger study exploring the use of wheeled mobility in these facilities, we conducted a substudy to examine how TIS wheelchairs are used in practice and to explore the experiences of the residents who use them. We conducted a series of three participant observations and interviews with 6 residents or their family members and interviewed 10 staff. Our analysis identified taking control as the main overarching theme, subsuming two subthemes: promoting comfort and mobilizing to participate. Findings suggest that power TIS wheelchairs enable user control, whereas manual TIS wheelchairs promote staff control. These findings illustrate how TIS wheelchairs may enable or inhibit occupational engagement and suggest that vigilance is necessary to prevent their use as a restraint.

  13. Decreasing disruptive behavior by adolescent boys in residential care by increasing their positive to negative interactional ratios.

    PubMed

    Friman, P C; Jones, M; Smith, G; Daly, D L; Larzelere, R

    1997-10-01

    An intervention for disruptive boys in residential care involving increases in positive to negative interactional ratios is described. The target of the intervention was daily problem behavior. Results from a pooled time series analysis of the data revealed a significant decrease in behavior problems (one problem per boy per day) during the intervention for the boys as a group. Results from comparisons of mean behavior problems during baseline and intervention revealed decreases for five of the six boys. Results from a multiple baseline across boys revealed experimental control for three of the six. The results are discussed in terms of response contingent reinforcement and systemic behavior analyses. The benefits of combined group and single subject data analyses are also discussed.

  14. Examining Needs and Referrals to Mental Health Services for Children in Residential Care in Spain: An Empirical Study in an Autonomous Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainero, Ana; Bravo, Amaia; del Valle, Jorge F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of mental health disorders in children living in residential care and their use of therapeutic services, including the relationship between these factors and social-family and intervention process variables, as well as the relationship among the disorders identified by professionals and the…

  15. Family Life and the Impact of Previous and Present Residential and Day Care Support for Children with Major Cognitive and Behavioural Challenges: A Dilemma for Services and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. I.; Geider, S.; Primrose, A.; Jokinen, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Since the development of inclusion and integration, parents have increasingly become the major, and sometimes the only, carers of their children with disabilities. Many families speak of stress and frustration with service and community support, and some have turned to residential and specialised day care services to overcome…

  16. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Hong Kong's Residential Care Facilities: A Descriptive Analysis of Health and Disease Patterns by Sex, Age, and Presence of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Chi Wai

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the health status profile and identify the healthcare needs of adults with intellectual disability (ID) residing in 18 of Hong Kong's residential care facilities. The author employed a cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire survey to collect data on 811 persons with ID (432 males, 53.3%, and…

  17. Meeting the Needs of GLB Youth in Residential Care Settings: A Framework for Assessing the Unique Needs of a Vulnerable Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Rebecca G.; Matthews, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores uses for strengths-based assessment of gay, lesbian and bisexual youth in residential care. Gay, lesbian and bisexual (GLB) youth face unique challenges such as stigma management and disclosure. In addition, GLB youth are also at increased risk for drug use, suicide and unprotected sex. Consequently, the needs of GLB youth…

  18. Mom and pop versus the big boys: adult family homes as providers of Medicaid-funded residential care.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Susan C; Sullivan, Jean H; Sales, Anne E B; Gray, Shelly L

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares assisted living apartments (ALs), adult residential care facilities (ARCs), and small adult family homes (AFHs) for Medicaid residents in Washington State, with particular emphasis on the settings, staffing, services, and policies of AFHs. We targeted for enrollment all residents entering an AFH, ARC, or AL setting on Medicaid/state funding in a three-county area of Washington State. We obtained information on 199 settings, interviewing administrative and direct care providers. AFHs are smaller than ARCs and ALs and less likely to be part of a chain, with no significant difference in staffing ratios of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Sixty-four percent of AFH residents were receiving public funds compared to 32% of AL residents. AFHs report admitting residents with more activities of daily living needs, health conditions, and behavior problems. They are less likely to have autonomy-related policies, and they provide more services and fewer activities. While attention should continue to be paid to staff supports, policy and practice should support the continued role of AFHs, which are of special interest because of their potential to provide more homelike, less costly care but with possible trade-offs compared to larger facilities.

  19. Re-Imagining the Care Home: A Spatially Responsive Approach to Arts Practice with Older People in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers some of the spatial challenges of doing arts projects with older people in care homes, including those living with dementia. It reflects on the author's own experience of running a performance project with residents with at a care home in North London. Drawing on Lefebvre's concept of socially produced space, it argues that…

  20. Social Care in Adult Education: Resisting a Marketplace Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research study about the experiences of adult educators in which the stories of three of the participants were central in exploring the issue of social care in adult education. It proposes that the adult educators with a social care orientation in this study acknowledge the importance of, and work to provide for, human…

  1. When Care Trumps Justice: The Operationalization of Black Feminist Caring in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, I discuss the benefits of Black feminist caring (BFC) in educational leadership. I suggest that the ethic of care in educational leadership is a manifestation of strength when serving disadvantaged student populations. This article is based on a qualitative, exploratory, multicase study that examines the ethic of care in the…

  2. The Ecology of Day Care: Building a Model for an Integrated System of Care and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Lenira

    In the past few years, the care and education dimensions of day care have occupied a prominent place in scientific and political debate in Brazil and internationally. This study used an ecological perspective to examine the interconnections surrounding the dimensions of early care and childhood education and the forces that promote or restrain…

  3. Education in stroke: strategies to improve stroke patient care.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Patrick; Slack, Andrew; Vogel, Mira; Burrows, Sharon; Clark, Philippa

    2002-07-01

    'Stroke units save lives', but organized care requires expert staff and regular training to be effective. However, the quality of inpatient care for stroke remains poor, and stroke education is often fragmented between the health-care professions. This review describes some national and local strategies aimed at ensuring that all patients are cared for by expert staff.

  4. Education before School: Investing in Quality Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galinsky, Ellen; Friedman, Dana E.

    This book presents a comprehensive collection of information concerning different forms of child care, the quality and availability of care, the functioning of the child care market, and programs that the government uses to support this market. Following an introduction that outlines the negative consequences of splitting education and child care,…

  5. Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH).

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anette; Berg, Lars-Erik; Hellström Muhli, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence. PMID:27131273

  6. Primary Health Care and Nursing Education in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manfredi, Maricel

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the history of health care in Latin America in the twentieth century. Indicates that nurses provide most of the health care and that there is a need to enhance the nursing education programs in Latin America. (JOW)

  7. Work satisfaction and intention to leave among direct care workers in community and residential aged care in Australia.

    PubMed

    King, Debra; Wei, Zhang; Howe, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Turnover in the Australian aged-care workforce is lower than in the United States but is still of concern. This research examined the effects of worker satisfaction, worker characteristics, work conditions, and workplace environment on intention to leave, using data from a 2007 national census of the aged-care workforce. A probit model was used to estimate the probability of care workers leaving their jobs in the next 12 months. While workers were satisfied, overall, with their work, improving some components of satisfaction and converting casual contracts to permanent work would reduce intention to leave. To these ends, a shift in focus is required away from worker characteristics and the nature of care work to job conditions and organizational matters amenable to management and policy action.

  8. At the crossroads of higher education and health care.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    The availability of educational opportunity and health care services has played a fundamental role in U.S. development as a nation of global significance. This review analytically examines the intersections of health care and higher education in the United States as they exist in 2011. Such examination, particularly as it relates to the recent Affordable Care Act, is critical for health and education professionals, legislators, and the public to better understand which interventions, for example, will work most effectively.

  9. Nature connection, outdoor play, and environmental stewardship in residential environmental education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrejewski, Robert G.

    A lack of exposure to the natural world has led to a generation of children disconnected from nature. This phenomenon has profound negative implications for the physical and psychological well being of today's youth. Residential environmental education provides one avenue to connect children to nature. One purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Outdoor School, a residential environmental education program, on ecological knowledge, children's connection to nature, school belonging, outdoor play attitude, environmental stewardship attitude, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior, as reported by participants. A quasi-experimental research design was utilized in the study. A total of 228 fifth grade students (156 treatment, 72 control) from central Pennsylvania participated. The results of the program evaluation indicated that Outdoor School was successful in achieving significant, positive gains in the areas of ecological knowledge, connection to nature, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior. No change was found from pretest to post-test in outdoor play attitudes, environmental stewardship attitudes, and school belonging. Additionally, the study addressed gaps in the literature regarding the relationship between connection to nature, environmental stewardship, and outdoor play using two different approaches. An adaptation of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used to predict outdoor play behavior in children. In this model, favorable attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control lead to intentions to perform a given behavior. Intention to perform the behavior is the best predictor for behavior performance. For this study, participants' feeling of connection to nature was added as an affective independent variable. This model explained 45% of the variance in outdoor play. The hypothesis that a connection to nature would be a significant predictor of both attitudes toward outdoor play was

  10. Residential Workers' Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Alan, Ed.

    The packet of information is intended to help residential workers with disturbed children in the United Kingdom. The first section on theory contains two papers: "Which Children Come Into Residential Care?" (Robin Benians); and "Models of Treatment: Behavioral, Psychodynamic, Cognitive" (Daphne Lennox). The next section contains practical guidance…

  11. Patient Education and Self-Care: How Do They Differ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Lowell S.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses health education for the patient and the differences between patient education and the concept of self-care. Both types of programs may contribute to the public's health at different points on the same continuum. (MF)

  12. Residential Stability Reduces Unmet Health Care Needs and Emergency Department Utilization among a Cohort of Homeless and Vulnerably Housed Persons in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jaworsky, Denise; Gadermann, Anne; Duhoux, Arnaud; Naismith, Trudy E; Norena, Monica; To, Matthew J; Hwang, Stephen W; Palepu, Anita

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the association of housing status over time with unmet physical health care needs and emergency department utilization among homeless and vulnerably housed persons in Canada. Homeless and vulnerably housed individuals completed interviewer-administered surveys on housing, unmet physical health care needs, health care utilization, sociodemographic characteristics, substance use, and health conditions at baseline and annually for 4 years. Generalized logistic mixed effects regression models examined the association of residential stability with unmet physical health care needs and emergency department utilization, adjusting for potential confounders. Participants were from Vancouver (n = 387), Toronto (n = 390), and Ottawa (n = 396). Residential stability was associated with lower odds of having unmet physical health needs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 0.82; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.67, 0.98) and emergency department utilization (AOR, 0.74; 95 % CI, 0.62, 0.88) over the 4-year follow-up period, after adjusting for potential confounders. Residential stability is associated with fewer unmet physical health care needs and lower emergency department utilization among homeless and vulnerably housed individuals. These findings highlight the need to address access to stable housing as a significant determinant of health disparities. PMID:27457795

  13. An evaluation of the benefits and challenges of video consulting between general practitioners and residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Wade, Victoria; Whittaker, Frank; Hamlyn, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    This research evaluated a project that provided video consultations between general practitioners (GPs) and residential aged care facilities (RACFs), with the aim of enabling faster access to medical care and avoidance of unnecessary hospital transfers. GPs were paid for video consultations at a rate equivalent to existing insurance reimbursement for supporting telehealth services. Evaluation data were gathered by direct observation at the project sites, semi-structured interviews and video call data from the technical network. Three pairs of general practices and RACFs were recruited to the project. 40 video consultations eligible for payment occurred over a 6 month period, three of which were judged to have avoided hospital attendance. The process development and change management aspects of the project required substantially more effort than was anticipated. This was due to problems with RACF technical infrastructure, the need for repeated training and awareness raising in RACFs, the challenge of establishing new clinical procedures, the short length of the project and broader difficulties in the relationships between GPs and RACFs. Video consulting between GPs and RACFs was clinically useful and avoided hospital attendance on a small scale, but further focus on process development is needed to embed this as a routine method of service delivery. PMID:26556062

  14. Up Close and Personal: Theorising Care Work in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Vaughn M.

    2016-01-01

    How do we account for the close personal bonds and deeply caring relationships forged by educators with learners in many adult educational encounters? The literature is relatively silent on the emotional and relational basis to adult educator work. This is a serious silence, given the stressful nature of adult education in developing contexts such…

  15. An Assessment of How Nurse Practitioners Create Access to Primary Care in Canadian Residential Long-Term Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nancy; Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Ploeg, Jenny; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail; Kaasalainen, Sharon; McAiney, Carrie; Brazil, Kevin; Taniguchi, Alan; Martin, Lori Schindel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the role and activities of nurse practitioners (NPs) working in long-term care (LTC) to understand concepts of access to primary care for residents. Utilizing the "FIT" framework developed by Penchanksy and Thomas, we used a directed content analysis method to analyze data from a pan-Canadian study of NPs in LTC. Individual and focus group interviews were conducted at four sites in western, central and eastern regions of Canada with 143 participants, including NPs, RNs, regulated and unregulated nursing staff, allied health professionals, physicians, administrators and directors and residents and family members. Participants emphasized how the availability and accessibility of the NP had an impact on access to primary and urgent care for residents. Understanding more about how NPs affect access in Canadian LTC will be valuable for nursing practice and healthcare planning and policy and may assist other countries in planning for the introduction of NPs in LTC settings to increase access to primary care. PMID:27673401

  16. Planning and Decision Making about the Future Care of Older Group Home Residents and Transition to Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, C.; Bowers, B.; Webber, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Planning for future care after the death of parental caregivers and adapting disability support systems to achieve the best possible quality of life for people with intellectual disability as they age have been important issues for more than two decades. This study examined perceptions held by family members, group home staff and…

  17. An interprofessional education project to address the health care needs of women transitioning from prison to community reentry.

    PubMed

    Busen, Nancy H

    2014-01-01

    With the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the need for health care providers to work collaboratively in teams to provide cost-effective, quality health care has become even more apparent because an estimated additional 22 million Americans gain health care coverage by 2014. The need for evidenced-based care that combines the expertise of various disciplines has been acknowledged by policy makers and health educators. With support from national Association for Prevention, Teaching and Research, an interprofessional education course was designed and implemented by health professionals in nursing, nutrition, and dentistry, in collaboration with a local community agency, to address the health care needs of women transitioning from prison to the community. Health care needs of women in prison are often overlooked, and access to care is limited. When released from prison, utilization of even basic health services is rare. Four interactive teaching-learning sessions were offered at a residential facility for women in transition over a 12-week period. Topics were selected based on feedback from the participants and included stress reduction, self-beast examination, hypertension, and common dental conditions. Teaching methods and materials were interactive and designed for sustainability. The model for this interprofessional education project, which employed a service-learning approach, can be adapted for other communities. Working with our communities requires innovative thinking to be effective but provides an enriching life experience to those involved. A community-based reciprocal learning environment benefits all partners in the real-world environment.

  18. Key Concepts in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutbrown, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    This book aims to provide a series of starting points which will help readers to understand more about many key topics in early childhood education and care. In the rapidly changing field of early childhood education and care, it is becoming increasingly important for students and practitioners to have an awareness of the many topics that relate…

  19. Community Endowment Funds for Early Care and Education. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Helen

    Noting that most early care and education programs do not have adequate resources to achieve high quality, this report examines the potential of community-based endowment funds for early care and education. Section 1 of the report provides general background information about endowments, their uses, characteristics of successful endowment-building…

  20. Researcher's and Parents' Perspectives on Quality of Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina; Sakellariou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Based on arguments according to which the concept of quality is multifaceted, difficult to be defined and defined differently by various stakeholders, it has been suggested that the quality of care and education be evaluated from different perspectives if one aims to create a global picture of the early childhood education and care programmes. The…

  1. Toward an Early Care and Education Agenda for Hispanic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ray; Ribeiro, Rose

    2004-01-01

    The age distribution and growth of the Latino population have critical implications for the present and future of social and economic policy, with particular emphasis on early care and education. Following a discussion of the demographic trends involving Latino children and families, this paper discusses the child care and early education needs of…

  2. In Defence of Care: Gilligan's Relevance for Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the main, writing about care seems to contrast the ethics of justice with the ethics of care. Whilst the former deploys objectivity, the latter holds that individuals are connected. Problematically, contemporary primary education seemingly holds a-personal, justice conceptions as its basis and rationale. In turn, primary education, in parts,…

  3. Theme with Variations: Social Policy, Community Care and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Changes in British social policy regarding community health care has implications for local education agency (LEA) providers of adult continuing education. LEAs will either have a role in providing staff training and other learning opportunities, will be forced to provide cheaper forms of community care, or will be ignored altogether. (SK)

  4. Before Five: Early Childhood Care and Education in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Zealand Dept. of Education, Wellington.

    This publication outlines the Government of New Zealand's new plans and policies for the administration of early childhood care and education. Specific features are discussed in detail in sections concerning: (1) early childhood care and education at the local level, specifically management structures and responsibilities, the use of Crown land,…

  5. Caring as an Imperative for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Patricia R.; Cullen, Janice A.

    2003-01-01

    An associate nursing degree program threads caring across the curriculum using Watson's framework of interpersonal/transpersonal processes for caring and a taxonomy of affective competencies. Ways of caring are integrated into classroom and clinical experiences. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  6. The limitations and promise of health education in managed care.

    PubMed

    Golaszewski, T

    2000-08-01

    Managed care has become the predominant form of health insurance in the United States. With its features of capitation, provider monetary risk, and population perspective, managed care represents a huge growth opportunity for advocates of disease prevention and health promotion, including those in the field of health education. In reality, however, health education's role has fallen far short of expectations. This article is presented to initiate a dialogue on the role of health education and its subset, worksite health promotion, within managed care. The worksite is emphasized because of its attractiveness as a site in delivering population-based medicine. Furthermore, employers exercise considerable influence in shaping the health care marketplace. A list of recommendations is presented, offering suggestions on what health education needs to do to increase its impact in the managed care movement. These arguments are posed to better position this profession in a changing health care environment. PMID:10929748

  7. Caring perspectives in nursing education: liberation, transformation and meaning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J A

    1993-04-01

    The author's personal journey through many years of nursing education as both a student and faculty member lead to a theoretical exploration of a caring pedagogy between students and teachers. The author places this exploration in a historical context and examines education, feminist and nursing literature to evolve common themes in describing caring pedagogy within nursing. Finally, the author suggests a model that forms the foundation for nursing curricula based on caring values.

  8. Measuring the performance of electronic health records: a case study in residential aged care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Qian, Siyu; Yu, Hui; Lei, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the performance of electronic health records (EHR) is an important, yet un-resolved challenge. Various measurements have addressed different aspects of EHR success, yet a holistic, comprehensive measurement tool needs to be developed to capture the potential EHR success variables completely. A self-administered questionnaire survey instrument was developed based on the theoretical framework of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model. It measures nigh variables of EHR success: system quality, information quality, service quality, training, self efficacy, intention to use, use, user satisfaction and net benefits. The instrument was used to measure the performance of aged care EHR systems in three aged care organizations. The results suggest that the instrument was reliable. PMID:23920809

  9. Situational Analysis of Palliative Care Education in Thai Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    Suvarnabhumi, Krishna; Sowanna, Non; Jiraniramai, Surin; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kanitsap, Nonglak; Soorapanth, Chiroj; Thanaghumtorn, Kanate; Limratana, Napa; Akkayagorn, Lanchasak; Staworn, Dusit; Praditsuwan, Rungnirand; Uengarporn, Naporn; Sirithanawutichai, Teabaluck; Konchalard, Komwudh; Tangsangwornthamma, Chaturon; Vasinanukorn, Mayuree; Phungrassami, Temsak

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Thai Medical School Palliative Care Network conducted this study to establish the current state of palliative care education in Thai medical schools. Methods A questionnaire survey was given to 2 groups that included final year medical students and instructors in 16 Thai medical schools. The questionnaire covered 4 areas related to palliative care education. Results An insufficient proportion of students (defined as fewer than 60%) learned nonpain symptoms control (50.0%), goal setting and care planning (39.0%), teamwork (38.7%), and pain management (32.7%). Both medical students and instructors reflected that palliative care education was important as it helps to improve quality of care and professional competence. The percentage of students confident to provide palliative care services under supervision of their senior, those able to provide services on their own, and those not confident to provide palliative care services were 57.3%, 33.3%, and 9.4%, respectively. Conclusions The lack of knowledge in palliative care in students may lower their level of confidence to practice palliative care. In order to prepare students to achieve a basic level of competency in palliative care, each medical school has to carefully put palliative care content into the undergraduate curriculum. PMID:25278759

  10. Who Cares about Caring in Early Childhood Teacher Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail; Mercurio, Mia; Peloso, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to care for oneself, near and distant others, animals, plants, human-made objects, and even ideas is an antidote for violence in its many forms as experienced in childhood as well as adulthood. This article makes a case for facilitating the development of the ability to care as children develop. The authors emphasize the importance of…

  11. A qualitative exploration of resilience in pre-adolescent AIDS orphans living in a residential care facility.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Anja; Swanepoel, Zendré; van Rensburg, Hendrik; Heunis, Christo

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study among a small group of South African AIDS orphans living in a residential care facility, Lebone Land. The research was conducted between June and September 2006. A qualitative, exploratory study consisting of in-depth, semistructured interviews with eight children and seven key informants aimed to identify and investigate developmental assets operating in the children's lives to help them cope amid exposure to adversities. The findings indicate that the developmental assets that facilitate coping and foster resilience in these children relate to four main components: external stressors and challenges, external supports, inner strengths and interpersonal and problem-solving skills. Emerging key themes relate to the experience of illness, death, poverty and violence, as well as the important roles of morality, social values, resistance skills, religion and faith in assisting these children in defining their purpose in life. To this end, constructive use of time, commitment to learning, goal-setting, problem-solving ability and self-efficacy are fundamental in the children's attainment of their future projections. Therefore, qualities such as optimism, perseverance and hope seem to permeate the children's process of recovery. Strong networks of support, particularly friendships with other children, also seem to contribute to developing and sustaining resilience. PMID:23237727

  12. Working for Quality Child Care: An Early Childhood Education Text from the Child Care Employee Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy, Comp.; And Others

    This early childhood education text was designed to help students and child care staff become effective advocates for the improvement of quality, salaries, and working conditions in child care programs. Unit I provides literature on the issues affecting the child care field and focuses on strategies to improve salaries and working conditions.…

  13. Improving the oral health of older adults with dementia/cognitive impairment living in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Georg, Diana

    2006-03-01

    Background  Studies conducted in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) indicate that high levels of oral diseases and conditions are prevalent in older adults who have dementia. Poor oral health impacts on eating ability, weight, speech, hydration, severity of behavioural problems, appearance and social interactions. This study looked at a group of older adults with dementia in a RACF site in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. It is known that in nursing home residents with dementia dental pain and problems are under-detected and under-treated. Strategy  An audit was conducted to assess the level of compliance of the RACFs oral hygiene care practices with established best practice. The audit questions were based on current best practice as identified from a rigorous international systematic review of the subject. A clinical audit software program (The Joanna Briggs Institute, Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (JBI PACES)) was used to manage the audit. An audit, feedback, re-audit cycle was followed. Stakeholders of the project were identified from which a Project team was formed. The Project team analysed the results of the first audit, conducted a situational analysis and formulated and implemented a strategic plan to target specific criteria for a change management process. Short-term and longer-term strategies were identified. Those criteria targeted as achievable in the short term were then re-audited after 6 weeks to determine the effectiveness of the change management process. Findings  The criterion Daily cleaning and night-time removal of dentures are documented was re-audited and although there was a slight increase in compliance across the site this increase was not statistically significant. The criterion Resident's dentures are individually marked was re-audited and showed a large increase in compliance across the site, this increase was statistically significant.

  14. Supporting Staff to Identify Residents in Pain: A Controlled Pretest-Posttest Study in Residential Aged Care.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Haydon, Deborah; Wollin, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Practical strategies are needed to improve pain awareness among aged care staff and promote a systematic approach to pain identification using evidence-based tools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pain identification tool for use by nursing and nonprofessional staff in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A controlled pretest-posttest intervention design was conducted in two RACFs in Brisbane, Australia. Completed surveys were returned by 216 staff and 74 residents at baseline and 218 staff and 94 residents at 3-month follow-up. Chart audits were conducted on 308 residents at baseline and 328 at follow-up. Groups were compared on: (1) staff knowledge and attitudes regarding pain, perceived confidence and skills for pain assessment, and perceived quality of pain management; (2) frequency of pain assessments and use of pain interventions; and (3) residents' perceptions of the quality of pain management. Both groups had high knowledge scores and reported high levels of confidence, skills, and perceived quality of pain management at baseline and follow-up. The intervention group showed significant improvement in routine pain assessment and use of nonpharmacological pain interventions. However, due to unexpected changes in control group conditions, both groups increased episodic pain assessment. Overall, staff believed the intervention was clinically useful and fostered a team approach to pain assessment. We found the introduction of pain identification resources with implementation strategies to support frontline staff was partially effective in improving staff and resident outcomes. Nonetheless, our findings confirm the need for change and importance of translational pain research in RACFs. PMID:26700721

  15. Improving the oral health of older adults with dementia/cognitive impairment living in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Georg, Diana

    2006-03-01

    Background  Studies conducted in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) indicate that high levels of oral diseases and conditions are prevalent in older adults who have dementia. Poor oral health impacts on eating ability, weight, speech, hydration, severity of behavioural problems, appearance and social interactions. This study looked at a group of older adults with dementia in a RACF site in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. It is known that in nursing home residents with dementia dental pain and problems are under-detected and under-treated. Strategy  An audit was conducted to assess the level of compliance of the RACFs oral hygiene care practices with established best practice. The audit questions were based on current best practice as identified from a rigorous international systematic review of the subject. A clinical audit software program (The Joanna Briggs Institute, Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (JBI PACES)) was used to manage the audit. An audit, feedback, re-audit cycle was followed. Stakeholders of the project were identified from which a Project team was formed. The Project team analysed the results of the first audit, conducted a situational analysis and formulated and implemented a strategic plan to target specific criteria for a change management process. Short-term and longer-term strategies were identified. Those criteria targeted as achievable in the short term were then re-audited after 6 weeks to determine the effectiveness of the change management process. Findings  The criterion Daily cleaning and night-time removal of dentures are documented was re-audited and although there was a slight increase in compliance across the site this increase was not statistically significant. The criterion Resident's dentures are individually marked was re-audited and showed a large increase in compliance across the site, this increase was statistically significant. PMID:21631755

  16. Elder mistreatment in U.S. residential care facilities: the scope of the problem.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Linda R; Guo, Guifang; Kim, Haesook

    2013-01-01

    Many in the United States believe elder mistreatment in long-term care is serious and widespread, but until recently few studies focused on the problem. This study was designed to describe the scope of mistreatment in assisted living facilities (ALFs) in Arizona during a 3-year period. Findings showed that receiving citations for elder mistreatment was relatively rare. However, analysis of narrative reports from only 7% of facilities showed 598 allegations of mistreatment in complaint investigations, of which 372 (62.2%) were substantiated and given citations for something other than mistreatment. Results show that elder mistreatment in ALFs is seriously underidentified, even by state inspectors.

  17. Educating Health Care Professionals on Human Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Aimee M.; Lippert, Suzanne; Collins, Kristin; Pineda, Noelle; Tolani, Alisha; Walker, Rebecca; Jeong, Monica; Trounce, Milana Boukhman; Graham-Lamberts, Caroline; Bersamin, Melina; Martinez, Det. Jeremy; Dotzler, Det. Jennifer; Vanek, Lt John; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Chamberlain, Lisa J.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The US Department of State estimates that there are between 4 and 27 million individuals worldwide in some form of modern slavery. Recent studies have demonstrated that 28% to 50% of trafficking victims in the United States encountered health care professionals while in captivity, but were not identified and recognized. This study aimed to determine whether an educational presentation increased emergency department (ED) providers' recognition of human trafficking (HT) victims and knowledge of resources to manage cases of HT. Methods The 20 largest San Francisco Bay Area EDs were randomized into intervention (10 EDs) or delayed intervention comparison groups (10 EDs) to receive a standardized educational presentation containing the following: background about HT, relevance of HT to health care, clinical signs in potential victims, and referral options for potential victims. Participants in the delayed intervention group completed a pretest in the period the immediate intervention group received the educational presentation, and all participants were assessed immediately before (pretest) and after (posttest) the intervention. The intervention effect was tested by comparing the pre–post change in the intervention group to the change in 2 pretests in the delayed intervention group adjusted for the effect of clustering within EDs. The 4 primary outcomes were importance of knowledge of HT to the participant's profession (5-point Likert scale), self-rated knowledge of HT (5-point Likert scale), knowledge of who to call for potential HT victims (yes/no), and suspecting that a patient was a victim of HT (yes/no). Findings There were 258 study participants from 14 EDs; 141 from 8 EDs in the intervention group and 117 from 7 EDs in the delayed intervention comparison group, of which 20 served as the delayed intervention comparison group. Participants in the intervention group reported greater increases in their level of knowledge about HT versus those in the

  18. Comparison of Four Probabilistic Models (CARES, Calendex, ConsEspo, SHEDS) to Estimate Aggregate Residential Exposures to Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two deterministic models (US EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs Residential Standard Operating Procedures (OPP Residential SOPs) and Draft Protocol for Measuring Children’s Non-Occupational Exposure to Pesticides by all Relevant Pathways (Draft Protocol)) and four probabilistic mo...

  19. The Influence of Background Music on Task Engagement in Frail, Older Persons in Residential Care.

    PubMed

    Otto; Cochran; Johnson; Clair

    1999-01-01

    Colmery-O'Neil Veterans Affairs Medical CenterThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of preferred background music on the engagement of residents of a nursing care facility in therapeutic recreation tasks. Eighteen subjects were assigned to one of two groups and both groups participated in a series of 12 weekly sessions in which the background conditions were randomly ordered. All subjects experienced four sessions each of 10 minutes of (a) silence, (b) preferred background music, and (c) nonpreferred background music. Videotapes were made of all sessions and an observer recorded the number of 30-second time intervals in which each subject was on task. A one-way analysis of variance calculated for frequencies of time intervals for the three conditions revealed no statistically significant differences. It was noted, however, that the therapist tended to prompt more conversations during the preferred music, and when subjects responded they generally dropped their task participation. The investigators concluded that background music may influence the therapists' behaviors which may, in turn, influence responses of their program participants. Further study of the effects of background music on task engagement among care home residents is recommended.

  20. To Be Cared for and to Care: Understanding Theoretical Conceptions of Care as a Framework for Effective Inclusion in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that incorporating theoretical conceptions of care into Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programmes creates a foundation for achieving the effective inclusion of children with disabilities. Critical examinations of the origins of care theory and current conceptions of care are used to consider the differing valuation…

  1. Educational challenges to the health care professional in heart failure care.

    PubMed

    Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Protopapas, Andreas; Kalogirou, Fotini

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the educational challenges faced by health care professionals in the care and management of patients with heart failure (HF). Self-care is a vital component in HF management, and promotion of self-care through education is a fundamental aspect of patient-centered care and supports patients' right to autonomy. The ultimate goal is not simply to convey knowledge, but to promote patients' understanding and to enhance their self-care skills by assuming an active role in their care. As such, health care professionals are confronted with a number of patient-related issues as they strive to provide high-quality education. Beyond assessing patients' individual information needs and preferences, they are tasked with addressing several obstacles that impede patients' ability to engage in self-care. Factors such as cognitive impairment and low health literacy have a major impact on patients' ability to understand, absorb, and recall information. Moreover, the existence of negative beliefs, which are strong determinants of patients' attitudes towards their disease and treatment, may also influence their response to educational messages. Health care professionals must not only identify and overcome these obstacles, but they must act effectively within the limitations of their working environment and of the health care system. PMID:24890899

  2. Teaching excellence in nursing education: a caring framework.

    PubMed

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Enns, Carol L; Ashcroft, Terri J; Davis, Penny L; Harder, B Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education plays a central role in the ability to practice effectively. It follows that an optimally educated nursing workforce begets optimal patient care. A framework for excellence in nursing education could guide the development of novice educators, establish the basis for evaluating teaching excellence, and provide the impetus for research in this area. However, a review of the social sciences and nursing literature as well as a search for existing models for teaching excellence revealed an apparent dearth of evidence specific to excellence in nursing education. Therefore, we developed the Caring Framework for Excellence in Nursing Education. This framework evolved from a review of the generic constructs that exemplify teaching excellence: excellence in teaching practice, teaching scholarship, and teaching leadership. Nursing is grounded in the ethic of caring. Hence, caring establishes the foundation for this uniquely nursing framework. Because a teaching philosophy is intimately intertwined with one's nursing philosophy and the ethic of caring, it is also fundamental to the caring framework. Ideally, this framework will contribute to excellence in nursing education and as a consequence excellence in nursing practice and optimal patient care.

  3. Reflecting Caring and Power in Early Childhood Education: Recalling Memories of Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylitapio-Mantyla, Outi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine how early childhood education teachers recall educational situations concerning caring and power in their childhoods and in their work. The purpose is to study how caring and power are constructed and intertwined in educational practices. The intention is to examine how teachers reflect their work concerning…

  4. Preparing the Early Education and Care Workforce: The Capacity of Massachusetts' Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Nancy L.; Dennehy, Julie; Starr, Elizabeth; Robeson, Wendy Wagner

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses the current capacity of Massachusetts' institutions of higher education (IHE) to prepare the early education and care (EEC) workforce, as well as the current state of progress on the elements identified in the Report of the Early Education and Care Advisory Committee as critical to advancing a professional development system.…

  5. Special Education Administrators' Response to the Educational Needs of Foster Care Youth: Collaborative or Disjointed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, John; Haar, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Although the literature discusses the deleterious educational outcomes that foster care students endure, little attention has focused on school personnel's responses to the phenomenon. Despite the documented relationship between foster care and special education, a missing contribution is the voice of special education administrators. In turn, the…

  6. A quantitative and qualitative inquiry of the impact of a residential environmental education program on student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Mary Claire

    Quantitative and qualitative research methods were utilized in a two-phase design approach to describe the impact of a residential environmental education program on student learning and provide a profile of program participants. In phase one, within a nonequivalent pre-posttest control group design, fourth and fifth-grade students (N = 490) were administered learner-outcome-based instruments in terms of ecological knowledge and environmental attitude. The treatment group consisted of students who participated in the 4-6th grade level curriculum of the residential environmental education program at Cuyahoga Valley Environmental Education Center. A teacher survey was implemented to provide a profile of the teachers participating in the residential program with their students. Major findings indicate a statistically significant impact on student ecological knowledge (p ≤.05); no statistically significant impact on environmental attitude was found. Data collected from the teacher survey provided a profile of the contact teachers who participated in the study. Eighty-eight percent of these primarily fourth and fifth grade teachers teach science. The majority have a Master's Degree and all have had some coursework related to environmental education. Ninety-two percent have attended at least one workshop related to environmental education and seventy-five percent have attended up to five environmental education related workshops within the last five years. All of these teachers use environmental education techniques and content in the classroom and all report a high level of environmental concern. In the second phase of the study, a purposeful sample of students, teachers, and parents was interviewed; data were collected through program observation, interviews, and program document collection. Content analysis yielded the following patterns in regard to student, teacher, and parent perceptions of what students learned: (1) natural history; (2) environmental awareness

  7. Improving Educational Preparation for Transcultural Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Var, Rita M. H.

    1998-01-01

    Nurses and health care professionals must be prepared for transcultural health care because society is becoming increasingly multicultural and current health services are not meeting the needs of minority ethnic groups in Britain. (SK)

  8. LPN-BSN: education for a reformed health care system.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G M

    1997-03-01

    Nursing practice has experienced a paradigm shift in health care delivery from hospitals to community-based models of health care. Nursing education must respond to accommodate the shift through curriculum reform. This article discusses a LPN-BSN program to promote educational mobility for LPNs while educating them for a reformed health care system. The needs assessment and curriculum implementation are discussed. Student comments and experiences are included throughout. Student academic support and recruiting which addresses the special needs of the LPN-BSN student are also described. The evaluation of the project thus far indicates student success. PMID:9067870

  9. Developments in spiritual care education in German - speaking countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article examines spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The paper reveals the current extent of available training while defining the target group(s) and teaching aims. In addition to those, we will provide an analysis of delivered competencies, applied teaching and performance assessment methods. Methods In 2013, an anonymous online survey was conducted among the members of the International Society for Health and Spiritual Care. The survey consisted of 10 questions and an open field for best practice advice. SPSS21 was used for statistical data analysis and the MAXQDA2007 for thematic content analysis. Results 33 participants participated in the survey. The main providers of spiritual care training are hospitals (36%, n = 18). 57% (n = 17) of spiritual care training forms part of palliative care education. 43% (n = 13) of spiritual care education is primarily bound to the Christian tradition. 36% (n = 11) of provided trainings have no direct association with any religious conviction. 64% (n = 19) of respondents admitted that they do not use any specific definition for spiritual care. 22% (n = 14) of available spiritual care education leads to some academic degree. 30% (n = 19) of training form part of an education programme leading to a formal qualification. Content analysis revealed that spiritual training for medical students, physicians in paediatrics, and chaplains take place only in the context of palliative care education. Courses provided for multidisciplinary team education may be part of palliative care training. Other themes, such as deep listening, compassionate presence, bedside spirituality or biographical work on the basis of logo-therapy, are discussed within the framework of spiritual care. Conclusions Spiritual care is often approached as an integral part of grief management, communication/interaction training, palliative care, (medical) ethics

  10. Filipinas as residential long-term care providers: influence of cultural values, structural inequity, and immigrant status on choosing this work.

    PubMed

    Browne, Colette V; Braun, Kathryn L; Arnsberger, Pam

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated reasons why Filipinas in Hawai'i have become the primary caregivers of elders in residential care homes and if they thought their children would follow them in this profession. A random sample of 173 Filipina care home operators (CHO), of which 95% were first-generation immigrants, was interviewed using telephone survey methods. Data were collected: to profile caregivers; to identify motivations for becoming a care home operator; and to gauge if they or their children would continue in this line of work. The sample was composed of middle-aged Filipina CHO with training and experience in elder care who concurred that the job fit their cultural values. About a third also felt that this job was open to immigrants and helped them buy a house. Twenty percent or less felt discriminated against because of this work. Although half the sample felt that women were better caregivers than men, only 38% felt that caregiving was primarily the responsibility of women. Almost 90% planned to continue with this work, but only 12% said it was likely that their children or grandchildren would become CHO, supporting the notion that choosing this profession had less to do with cultural values and gender expectations than with economic opportunities available to the current cohort of CHO. Given these findings, Hawai'i's capacity to meet future residential long-term care needs is discussed. PMID:17210542

  11. Principle-based concept analysis: Caring in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Mazloom, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this principle-based concept analysis was to analyze caring in nursing education and to explain the current state of the science based on epistemologic, pragmatic, linguistic, and logical philosophical principles. Methods A principle-based concept analysis method was used to analyze the nursing literature. The dataset included 46 English language studies, published from 2005 to 2014, and they were retrieved through PROQUEST, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID scientific databases. The key dimensions of the data were collected using a validated data-extraction sheet. The four principles of assessing pragmatic utility were used to analyze the data. The data were managed by using MAXQDA 10 software. Results The scientific literature that deals with caring in nursing education relies on implied meaning. Caring in nursing education refers to student-teacher interactions that are formed on the basis of human values and focused on the unique needs of the students (epistemological principle). The result of student-teacher interactions is the development of both the students and the teachers. Numerous applications of the concept of caring in nursing education are available in the literature (pragmatic principle). There is consistency in the meaning of the concept, as a central value of the faculty-student interaction (linguistic principle). Compared with other related concepts, such as “caring pedagogy,” “value-based education,” and “teaching excellence,” caring in nursing education does not have exact and clear conceptual boundaries (logic principle). Conclusion Caring in nursing education was identified as an approach to teaching and learning, and it is formed based on teacher-student interactions and sustainable human values. A greater understanding of the conceptual basis of caring in nursing education will improve the caring behaviors of teachers, create teaching-learning environments, and help experts in curriculum development

  12. Education of trainees in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Croley, W Christopher; Rothenberg, David M

    2007-02-01

    The focus on improving education in critical care medicine must begin early in medical school training and further be promoted during residency if there is to be an increase in intensivists in the hospital workforce. This is "critical" to healthcare reform movements that are endorsing full-time critical care coverage in U.S. urban intensive care units. There is, therefore, a need for more novel approaches in educating trainees in critical care medicine to better prepare future physicians to manage acutely ill patients and improve patient safety. This article will review methods to improve educational designs in teaching critical care medicine to medical students, residents, and fellows, including the use of simulation technology to enhance cognition and procedural skills. PMID:17242600

  13. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  14. Caring in nursing education: reducing anxiety in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Audet, M C

    1995-01-01

    It has been well-documented that the clinical experience is one of the most anxiety-producing aspects of nursing education. When feelings of anxiety become severe, they present a clear threat to the student's success in the program. This article explores the role of "caring" in nursing education as a means of reducing student anxiety. Caring, described at length by Jean Watson, has become one of the most popular trends in the education of young nurses. When caring behaviors are demonstrated in a meaningful way by clinical instructors, the student may experience a sense of comfort and belonging, which may in turn be effective in reducing anxiety and enabling the student to successfully complete a clinical rotation. The aim of this article is to inspire nurses, not only those in the educational setting but in all settings and at all levels of their careers, to reconsider the effects and benefits of displaying a caring attitude.

  15. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students.

  16. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  17. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  18. Teaching in crisis. Patient and family education in critical care.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, M O

    2001-03-01

    Although the critical care setting is not always a positive teaching environment, it is possible to achieve the goal of optimal patient and family education. The critical care nurse must understand the unique learning needs of patients and families who are experiencing a life crisis a recognize that there are substantial obstacles to overcome to educate in this setting. In addition, it takes experience and resources to develop the teaching skills of the bedside nurse, so that those teachable moments are easily recognized and suitably used to give patients and family members valuable information in small doses. The advanced practice nurse is an essential nursing resource who can spearhead the development of teaching skills for all members of the health care team. In addition, the advanced practice nurse is a clinical expert who can assess the educational needs of patients and their families and provide more detailed and individualized health information from a different perspective. Achieving good patient and family education outcomes is possible when patient care continuity is a priority and the advanced practice nurse is an active part of the nursing team. Exploring the use of new technologies and resources to meet patient and family education needs is absolutely necessary. As hospitals continue to evolve and react to the financial demands placed on them, nursing leadership and critical care nurses will need to articulate clearly all of the essential components of patient care, including patient and family education. In keeping with the rich nursing tradition of patient and family education, critical care nurses and advanced practice nurses have the opportunity to demonstrate their unique teaching skills and continue to promote health education as a priority of patient care.

  19. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  20. Distance education for the health care supervisor.

    PubMed

    Brownson, K

    1997-12-01

    Health care supervisors are being driven by the rapid changes in health care today. One demand is to complete their undergraduate degree or even a graduate degree. Few of us are able to devote the many hours required to attend on-campus classes full time. Now there is an alternative. Busy health care supervisors can now complete their undergraduate or graduate degrees from the comfort of their home--maintaining a job and family life. PMID:10174445

  1. [Sensitize: a way of education for care].

    PubMed

    Vianna, A C

    2000-01-01

    This article proposes to reflect about human care and ways of teaching it to future caregivers. The author describes a teaching experience in which she tried to sensitise the students--future nurse aides--for care, through "Meditation for the cure", proposed by Weiss (1998). Since it is a belief that there is a need to sensitise the caregivers to human care, the author stimulates the search for creative solutions to reach it.

  2. EDUCATION OF "GOOD CARE": LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE DIGNITY IN CARE PROJECT.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Olaf; De; Klerk-; Jolink, Nicolette; Boitte, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This paper defends a pragmatist ethical approach in education. Such an approach has fuelled a pedagogical experimentation approach within the scope the "Dignity in care" (www.dignity-in-care.eu) European project, focusing on ethical practice in health and social care. Its key objective was to enhance 'good care', by reinforcing health care workers'ability to conduct an ethical reflection on the way they would deliver care. Nevertheless, 'good care'is a concept that may seem hard to define and to implement. To clarify and validate the characteristics and conditions of such a good care, and to explore the way to educate the concept of what "good care" is in a more concrete way, this paper presents a summary of findings across which we have come during the final conference of this three-year project and through a focus-group organized by the Lille Dignity-in-Care partners. The results show that a self-assessment work regarding pedagogical practices reveals necessary for an adaptation to the evolution of the socio-professional context. It is not just a matter of developing new pedagogical skills, but also of becoming able to understand the care context and situations. Future work on "what is good care" and the need for empowerment will have to leave from daily practices in order to suggest how to prepare/train caregivers to become responsive professionals. Both the matter of finding a way to enhance good care in existing care-settings, and the matter of finding and testing appropriate educational methods to help caregivers handle communication and deliver good care. PMID:27305796

  3. Outdoor Experiential Education in Residential Treatment Centres: Methodological Approach and the Czech Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton; Keus, Bart

    Outdoor activities in residential programs aim to promote personal growth and to develop a healthy personality in troubled youth for whom other interventions have been unsuccessful. In the Netherlands, experiential outdoor programs consist of activities such as mountain climbing and rapelling, flat and white water canoeing, biking, sailing,…

  4. Residential Adult Education and the "Problem of Uniqueness": Newbattle Abbey College 1960-1989

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Neil Kevin

    2011-01-01

    In December 2007 Newbattle Abbey College, Scotland's only Adult Residential College, celebrated its seventieth anniversary. Its survival during this relatively short span has always been contingent. Its greatest crisis occurred in 1987, when the Scottish Office announced its intention to withdraw public funding from the college. This event reveals…

  5. The unmet educational agenda in integrated care.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, William T; Cummings, Nicholas A; Cummings, Janet L

    2009-03-01

    One of the reasons integrated care has not become a dominant service delivery model is the unmet training agenda. This article argues that the typical mental health professional is not trained to adequately address the challenges of integrated care. To insure competency both a macro and clinical training agenda are needed. At the macro-level, mental health professionals need to understand healthcare economics and basic business principles as any integrated care service delivery system is embedded and driven by economic forces. Integrated care practitioners also need some basic business skills to understand these forces and to create and manage a financially viable system, given the future flux of the system. Traditional mental health professionals also do not have the clinical skills to implement integrated care. Integrated care is not simply placing a traditionally trained mental health professional and letting them practice specialty mental health in a medical setting. Thus, the special skills needed in integrated care are enumerated and discussed. Finally, a new degree program is described as it is time given the huge need and advantages of integrated care to develop specialty training in integrated care.

  6. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

  7. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  8. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  9. Whither Education for Health Care Delivery. A Florida Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret K., Ed.; Filson, Dolores, Ed.

    The conference summarized in this monograph grew out of two expressed concerns of health care personnel educators: their desire for more information about future trends in health care delivery, and their desire for better articulation of the various levels of programs preparing health related personnel. Papers presented include these: Future…

  10. Early Childhood Care and Education Reforms in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garden, Carol F.

    In response to parents' needs, New Zealand has developed a diverse range of early childhood care and education services. These services include kindergarten programs; child care centers with trained staff; play centers that are parent cooperatives; Te Kohanga Reo (Maori speaking centers) located on tribal property; home-based networks (clusters of…

  11. Child Care Choices, Consumer Education, and Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; And Others

    In 1991, the National Center for Children in Poverty undertook a study of low-income parents as child care consumers. The study involved a review of current research findings, interviews with staff of child resource and referral agencies, and an examination of child care consumer education provided in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS)…

  12. Child Care Assistance for Post-Secondary Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Higher Education Services Office, St. Paul.

    This booklet describes the Post-Secondary Child Care Grant Program in Minnesota and provides suggestions in evaluating child care options. The Minnesota Higher Education Services Office administers the program. It allocates funds to eligible colleges, which then select and make awards to students. A resident of Minnesota with a child of 12 years…

  13. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  14. Strategies for Creating a Caring Learning Climate in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Teacher-student interactions are at the core of the teaching-learning process. There is research evidence showing that a teacher's caring behavior is strongly related to students' attitudes and engagement in physical education (PE). This article discusses practical strategies that PE teachers can employ to create a caring learning environment,…

  15. Views on Pre-School Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambusch, Nancy McCormick

    There is a clear need in our country today for early education programs aimed at accelerating the cognitive development of disadvantaged children. Another need is for centers to care for the children of working mothers. Our traditional nursery schools have deemphasized early cognitive development while day care programs have been focused on…

  16. [Education on caring for children with inherited epidermolysis bullosa].

    PubMed

    Corset, Isabelle; Bourdon-Lanoy, Eva; Bodemer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa is a rare dermatological disease that requires specific daily care. An education programme teaches parents how to bathe their children in optimal conditions described in a care protocol that encourages contact and promotes the parent-child relationship.

  17. Media-Educational Habitus of Future Educators in the Context of Education in Day-Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs-Liesenkötter, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    This research explores these questions: (1) How are the forms of media-educational habitus of future educators shaped? (2) What conditions influence whether or not media education is done in day-care centers? The qualitative study consists of six semi-structured interviews with media education teachers in educator training, four focus group…

  18. Interprofessional education: preparing psychologists for success in integrated primary care.

    PubMed

    Cubic, Barbara; Mance, Janette; Turgesen, Jeri N; Lamanna, Jennifer D

    2012-03-01

    Rapidly occurring changes in the healthcare arena mean time is of the essence for psychology to formalize a strategic plan for training in primary care settings. The current article articulates factors affecting models of integrated care in Academic Health Centers (AHCs) and describes ways to identify and utilize resources at AHCs to develop interprofessional educational and clinical integrated care opportunities. The paper asserts that interprofessional educational experiences between psychology and other healthcare providers are vital to insure professionals value one another's disciplines in health care reform endeavors, most notably the patient-centered initiatives. The paper highlights ways to create shared values and common goals between primary care providers and psychologists, which are needed for trainee internalization of integrated care precepts. A developmental perspective to training from pre-doctoral, internship and postdoctoral levels for psychologists in integrated care is described. Lastly, a call to action is given for the field to develop more opportunities for psychology trainees to receive education and training within practica, internships and postdoctoral fellowships in primary care settings to address the reality that most patients seek their mental health treatment in primary care settings.

  19. Project WE CARE (Workers' Education and Community Awareness of Resources for Education). [August 1980-June 1981].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogoros, Anne Walsh

    Project WE CARE (Workers' Education and Community Awareness of Resources for Education), in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, developed, implemented, and documented the process of implementing adult basic education program linkage/outreach with business, industry, and human service organizations. The project emphasis was on educating human service…

  20. 'Troubled conscience related to deficiencies in providing individualised meal schedule in residential care for older people--a participatory action research study'.

    PubMed

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    Food and mealtimes should be adapted to the older person's individual needs and desires, a fact that is often ignored in favour of a functional mealtime organisation. This study was grounded in participatory action research (PAR), and the aim of the study was to illuminate a PAR process to assist care providers in constructively dealing with their troubled conscience generated from perceived shortcomings in providing an individualised meal schedule in residential care for older people. Care providers and their manager participated in twelve PAR sessions. The participants' troubled conscience was eased by reflecting on and sharing their thoughts about their perception of a lack of individualised meal schedule and a lack of opportunities for meaningful interventions. The researchers in PAR became the bridge between the care providers and the management that was needed to improve individualised mealtime schedule. This study pinpoints how difficult it can be to make small changes in a rigid organisation that is run by a management that does not have the hands-on knowledge about the daily care provided by the organisation. This study points to the need of creating communication arenas wherein all personnel involved in care for older people, at all organisational levels, together meet to create a good care for older people. However, the care providers have been provided with tools, uncomplicated to use, to continue to let their voices being heard. PMID:25622910

  1. Evolution of self-care education.

    PubMed

    Ambizas, Emily M; Bastianelli, Karen M S; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Haines, Seena L; Orr, Katherine Kelly; Stutz, Misty M; Vanamburgh, Jenny A; Wilhelm, Miranda

    2014-03-12

    During the past 15 years, the curriculum content for nonprescription medication and self-care therapeutics has expanded significantly. Self-care courses ranging from stand-alone, required courses to therapeutic content and skills laboratories, have evolved in colleges and schools of pharmacy to accommodate rapid changes related to nonprescription medications and to meet the needs of students. The design of and content delivery methods used in self-care courses vary among institutions. Teaching innovations such as team-based learning, role playing/vignettes, videos, and social media, as well as interdisciplinary learning have enhanced delivery of this content. Given that faculty members train future pharmacists, they should be familiar with the new paradigms of Nonprescription Safe Use Regulatory Expansion (NSURE) Initiative, nonprescription medications for chronic diseases, and the growing trends of health and wellness in advancing patient-care initiatives. This paper reviews the significant changes that may be impacting self-care curriculums in the United States.

  2. Foster Care and College: The Educational Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the Foster Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Chris M.; Lewis, Rhonda K.; Nilsen, Corinne; Colvin, Deltha Q.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an overall increase in college attendance, low-income youth and particularly those in the foster care system are less likely to attend college (Wolanin, 2005). Although youth in foster care report high educational aspirations, as little as 4% obtain a 4-year college degree (Nixon & Jones, 2007). The purpose of this study is to explore…

  3. Foster Care Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Young Adults Formerly Placed in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havalchak, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Sepulveda, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the body of research on the educational outcomes of young adults who were formerly placed in foster care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 359 young adults (a 54.6% response rate). Participants must have been served for at least one year by one private foster care agency in one of its twenty-two offices. Results…

  4. Reflection and critical thinking of humanistic care in medical education.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Shu-Jen; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance and learning issues of humanistic care in medical education. This article will elaborate on the following issues: (1) introduction; (2) reflection and critical thinking; (3) humanistic care; (4) core values and teaching strategies in medical education; and (5) learning of life cultivation. Focusing on a specific approach used in humanistic care, it does so for the purpose of allowing the health professional to understand and apply the concepts of humanistic value in their services.

  5. Breaking Silence: Educating Citizens for Love, Care and Solidarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kathleen; Lyons, Maureen; Cantillon, Sara

    2007-01-01

    An indifference to the affective domain and an allegiance to the education of the rational autonomous subject and public citizen are at the heart of formal education. The impact of Cartesian rationalism is intensifying with the glorification of performativity measured by league tables and rankings. The citizen carer and the care recipient citizen…

  6. Human Caring as Moral Context for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jean

    1988-01-01

    Argues for moral context in nursing education. Discusses steps taken at the University of Colorado School of Nursing to emphasize human caregiving in the curriculum. Also argues that the preferred future for nursing education is a postbaccalaureate program in human caring, health, and healing that leads to the nursing doctorate. (CH)

  7. Tickle Your Appetite: Team Nutrition's Education Kit for Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Consumer Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Adapted for child care and Head Start providers, this educator's kit contains activities and information to improve nutrition experiences for preschool-age children. In addition to the educator's guide, the kit includes a short videotape and audiotape with three segments that teach about trying different types of foods; about the taste, touch, and…

  8. Educational Psychologists and Children in Care: Practices and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwich, Brahm; Richards, Andrew; Nash, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the extent and nature of educational psychologist (EP) work related to children in care in five local authority educational psychology services in the south-west region. The study involved an initial internet-based questionnaire for the 107 EPs in these services (86% response rate), followed up by in-depth…

  9. A Nordic Perspective on Early Childhood Education and Care Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karila, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    The national policies and historical roots of early childhood education (ECE) vary from society to society. In the Nordic countries, early childhood education and care (ECEC) policies have been built in the context of the welfare state. As such, they are closely connected to other welfare policy areas such as social policy, family policy and…

  10. Educating Home Healthcare Nurses About Heart Failure Self-Care.

    PubMed

    Ekong, Joyce; Radovich, Patti; Brown, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The ability of home healthcare nurses to effectively educate patients with heart failure (HF) on appropriate self-care is key to lowering the hospital readmission rates and other adverse outcomes. Evidence indicates, however, that nurses often lack current knowledge about HF self-care. Furthermore, patient education often fails to produce health literacy. Thus, this educational intervention for home healthcare nurses included content about key aspects of managing HF (e.g., diet, medications), as well as how to use the teach-back method during patient education. Pre- and posttesting (using the Nurses' Knowledge of HF Education Principles Questionnaire) and role-playing were used to evaluate the intervention delivered to 33 home care nurses. Findings exposed knowledge deficits regarding high-sodium foods, symptoms indicating deterioration, problematic weight gain, fluid management, as well as other topics related to HF. The education was partially effective in addressing these nurses' knowledge gaps. The evidence-based education for home healthcare nurses suggests that not only may nurses lack knowledge essential to teaching HF self-care; they may also lack effective patient education skills such as using the teach-back method. PMID:27677064

  11. Education in Young Offender Institutions and Secure Youth Care Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeets, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight into efforts made to provide optimum education to juveniles in young offender institutions and in secure youth care institutions, and into barriers with which educators are confronted in this process. Results show that for a substantial number of juveniles insufficient information is…

  12. An Investigation of Japanese and American Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagayama, Mariko; Gilliard, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Staff interviews and classroom observations based on predetermined observation criteria and open-ended questions were conducted at early care and education programs in Kakunodate, Akita, Japan; Tazawako, Akita, Japan; Butte, Montana; and Missoula, Montana. Differences in curriculum, classroom structure and educational strategies were found. For…

  13. Educating and Caring for Very Young Children: The Infant/Toddler Curriculum. Early Childhood Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris; Reid, Rebecca; Torelli, Louis

    Noting an increasing consensus that meeting care and education goals for infants and toddlers is a societal as well as a family responsibility, this book provides an "educare" curriculum for infants and toddlers, emphasizing both education and care perspectives. Part 1 of the book provides basic principles of good infant and toddler curriculum in…

  14. Motivation for Attending Higher Education from the Perspective of Early Care and Education Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huss-Keeler, Rebecca; Peters, Michelle; Moss, Joy Marie

    2013-01-01

    The field of early care and education has been challenged to raise the level of quality for young children by increasing the number of practitioners with college degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of early care and education professionals working in the field and enrolled in community college early childhood classes,…

  15. Should we provide oral health training for staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities in community based residential care? A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin; Nunn, June; Guerin, Suzanne; Normand, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Oral health training is often introduced into community-based residential settings to improve the oral health of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a lack of appropriate evaluation of such programs, leading to difficulty in deciding how best to allocate scarce resources to achieve maximum effect. This article reports an economic analysis of one such oral health program, undertaken as part of a cluster randomized controlled trial. Firstly, we report a cost-effectiveness analysis of training care-staff compared to no training, using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Effectiveness was measured as change in knowledge, reported behaviors, attitude and self-efficacy, using validated scales (K&BAS). Secondly, we costed training as it was scaled up to include all staff within the service provider in question. Data were collected in Dublin, Ireland in 2009. It cost between €7000 and €10,000 more to achieve modest improvement in K&BAS scores among a subsample of 162 care-staff, in comparison to doing nothing. Considering scaled up first round training, it cost between €58,000 and €64,000 to train the whole population of staff, from a combined dental and disability service perspective. Less than €15,000-€20,000 of this was additional to the cost of doing nothing (incremental cost). From a dental perspective, a further, second training cycle including all staff would cost between €561 and €3484 (capital costs) and €5815 (operating costs) on a two yearly basis. This study indicates that the program was a cost-effective means of improving self-reported measures and possibly oral health, relative to doing nothing. This was mainly due to low cost, rather than the large effect. In this instance, the use of cost effectiveness analysis has produced evidence, which may be more useful to decision makers than that arising from traditional methods of evaluation. There is a need for CEAs of effective interventions to allow comparison

  16. Challenges to neurology residency education in today's health care environment.

    PubMed

    Bega, Danny; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Residency training has had to adapt to higher patient volumes, increased complexity of medical care, and the commercialized system of health care. These changes have led to a concerning culture shift in neurology. We review the relationship between the emerging health care delivery system and residency training, highlighting issues related to duty hours and work-life balance, the changing technological landscape, high patient volumes, and complex service obligations. We propose that the current challenges in health care delivery offer the opportunity to improve neurology residency through faculty development programs, bringing teaching back to the bedside, increasing resident autonomy, utilizing near-peer teaching, and rewarding educators who facilitate an environment of inquiry and scholarship, with the ultimate goal of better alignment between education and patient care. Ann Neurol 2016;80:315-320. PMID:27422739

  17. Living 'a life like ours': support workers' accounts of substitute decision-making in residential care homes for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Dunn, M C; Clare, I C H; Holland, A J

    2010-02-01

    In England and Wales, the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) provides a new legal framework to regulate substitute decision-making relating to the welfare of adults who lack the capacity to make one or more autonomous decisions about their care and support. Any substitute decision made on behalf of an adult lacking capacity must be in his/her 'best interests'. However, the value of adopting established principles and procedures for substitute decision-making in practice is uncertain, and little is known about the legal or ethical dynamics of social care support, including the day-to-day residential support provided to adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Methods This paper reports a qualitative, grounded theory analysis of 21 interviews with support workers working in residential care homes for adults with ID, and observations of care practices. Results In contrast to the narrow legal responsibilities placed upon them, it is argued that support workers interpret substitute decision-making within a broad moral account of their care role, orientating their support towards helping residents to live 'a life like ours'. In so doing, support workers describe how they draw on their own values and life experiences to shape the substitute decisions that they make on behalf of residents. Conclusions Support workers' accounts reveal clear discrepancies between the legal regulation of substitute decision-making and the ways that these support workers make sense of their work. Such discrepancies have implications both for the implementation of the MCA, and for the role of support workers' values in the conceptualisation and delivery of 'good' care.

  18. Palliative care providers' perspectives on service and education needs.

    PubMed

    Sellick, S M; Charles, K; Dagsvik, J; Kelley, M L

    1996-01-01

    To obtain the information necessary for coordinated regional program development, we examined (a) the multidisciplinary viewpoint of palliative care service provision and (b) the continuing education needs reported by non-physician service providers. Of 146 surveys distributed to care providers from multiple settings, 135 were returned. Respondents cited these problems: fragmented services, poor pain and symptom control, lack of education for providers, lack of public awareness, problems with the continuity and coordination of care, lack of respite, and lack of hospice beds. Stress management for caregivers, pain management, communication skills, and symptom assessment were rated as priorities in continuing education. Lectures, small group discussions, practicum, and regular medical centre rounds were the preferred learning formats, while costs and staff shortages were cited as educational barriers.

  19. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care.

  20. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care. PMID:20642055

  1. [Approaching intrusive care in nursing education].

    PubMed

    Flament, Nathalie; Godon, Guillaume; Henon, Nathalie; Witzak, Elisabeth; Grousset, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    The initial representations of the profession and of proper care of student nurses beginning their training, will, throughout their course, come up against the reality of nursing practice. At the heart of the complexity of potentially intrusive care procedures and the relational approach in which they are players or witnesses, their practical work experience becomes a modelling tool for their career. This is facilitated when the teaching team structures the reflexive analysis through pedagogical approaches favouring expression and objectivity between peers.

  2. What It Means to Care: How Educators Conceptualize and Actualize Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Robin Haskell

    2007-01-01

    Seeking to put a face on educators' conceptualizations of caring, this study examines findings from open-ended surveys of 144 teacher candidates, classroom teachers, and college faculty associated with a mid-Atlantic university's teacher education program. Reflecting theoretical constructs described in the literature on resilience,…

  3. Care-Sickness: Black Women Educators, Care Theory, and a Hermeneutic of Suspicion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseboro, Donyell L.; Ross, Sabrina N.

    2009-01-01

    This article builds upon earlier work exploring the implications of care theory for Black women educators by exploring the issue of colorblindness more broadly, as it relates to libratory education. Using the work of Freire (1970, 1998a, 1998b) and Noddings (1992a, 1995, 2001, 2005b), the authors revisit the relationship between libratory…

  4. Managed Care Education: A Needs Assessment of Employers and Educators of Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brzytwa, Ellen; Copeland, Liesel; Hewson, Mariana

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 152 employers and 140 nurse educators (28% from high managed care states) rated graduating nurses as competent in patient care but deficient in business-of-nursing competencies, although they considered the latter less important. However, employers in high managed care states were particularly concerned with business competencies. (SK)

  5. Challenge to Care: Educating Teen Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proweller, Amira

    2001-01-01

    Explores the need to restore social and relational aspects to education for youth at risk. Anti-youth mass media discourses present negative images of pregnant and parenting teens. Labeled at risk, they are set up for academic and social failure. Describes an alternative public school serving the educational and social support needs of pregnant…

  6. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

  7. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Katoue, Maram G.; Awad, Abdelmoneim I.; Schwinghammer, Terry L.; Kombian, Samuel B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients’ quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. Objective To investigate pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126) was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD) were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. Results The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%), lack of pharmacist time (83.3%), organizational obstacles (82.6%), and pharmacists’ physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%). Conclusion Pharmacy students’ attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University understand and

  8. Evolution of self-care education.

    PubMed

    Ambizas, Emily M; Bastianelli, Karen M S; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Haines, Seena L; Orr, Katherine Kelly; Stutz, Misty M; Vanamburgh, Jenny A; Wilhelm, Miranda

    2014-03-12

    During the past 15 years, the curriculum content for nonprescription medication and self-care therapeutics has expanded significantly. Self-care courses ranging from stand-alone, required courses to therapeutic content and skills laboratories, have evolved in colleges and schools of pharmacy to accommodate rapid changes related to nonprescription medications and to meet the needs of students. The design of and content delivery methods used in self-care courses vary among institutions. Teaching innovations such as team-based learning, role playing/vignettes, videos, and social media, as well as interdisciplinary learning have enhanced delivery of this content. Given that faculty members train future pharmacists, they should be familiar with the new paradigms of Nonprescription Safe Use Regulatory Expansion (NSURE) Initiative, nonprescription medications for chronic diseases, and the growing trends of health and wellness in advancing patient-care initiatives. This paper reviews the significant changes that may be impacting self-care curriculums in the United States. PMID:24672061

  9. Global Health Education in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Siddharthan, Trishul; North, Crystal M; Attia, Engi F; Christiani, David C; Checkley, William; West, T Eoin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs in the United States offer global health training opportunities. Formal, integrated global health programs within pulmonary and critical care fellowships are relatively new but are built on principles and ideals of global health that focus on the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and social justice. Although core competencies consistent with these overarching themes in global health education have not been formalized for pulmonary and critical care trainees, relevant competency areas include clinical knowledge, international research training, cultural competency, and clinical and research capacity building. Existing global health education in U.S. pulmonary and critical care medicine training programs can generally be classified as one of three different models: integrated global health tracks, global health electives, and additional research years. Successful global health education programs foster partnerships and collaborations with international sites that emphasize bidirectional exchange. This bidirectional exchange includes ongoing, equitable commitments to mutual opportunities for training and professional development, including a focus on the particular knowledge and skill sets critical for addressing the unique priorities of individual countries. However, barriers related to the availability of mentorship, funding, and dedicated time exist to expanding global health education in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The implementation of global health training within pulmonary and critical care medicine programs requires continued optimization, but this training is essential to prepare the next generation of physicians to address the global aspects of respiratory disease and critical illness. PMID:26974557

  10. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement I to Volume 5. Operational Support: Administrative Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Newell B.; And Others

    One of two supplements which accompany chapter 5 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the reprographic and personnel components of the administrative services division. Several job descriptions and sample…

  11. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement Four to Volume Three. Measurement and Evaluation: The Research Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, David A.; And Others

    One of five supplements which accompany chapter 3 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains a master listing of all Mountain-Plains curriculum, compiled by job title, course, unit, and Learning activity package (LAPS) and arranged in…

  12. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement II to Volume 5. Operational Support: Administrative Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Newell B.; And Others

    One of two supplements which accompany chapter 5 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the following components of the administrative services division: purchasing, property control, and operations and…

  13. An Analysis of Associations between Residential and School Mobility and Educational Outcomes in South African Urban Children: The Birth to Twenty Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Carren; Richter, Linda M.; Fleisch, Brahm; Norris, Shane A.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from Birth to Twenty, a cohort of South African urban children, the current paper investigates the relationships between residential and school mobility and a set of educational outcomes. The findings provide some evidence of a positive association between changes in residence and numeracy and literacy scores, and school mobility was…

  14. Educational Strategies to Improve Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Ross, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Performance of the periodic health examination and related preventive maneuvers has been shown to be suboptimal by both residents and faculty. Research into methods of improving performance of the periodic health examination shows that a number of methods are available to remedy the lack of effective delivery of prevention by health professionals. An educational prescription based on a literature review is outlined. Specific educational objectives are discussed. PMID:21221260

  15. Dying in a rural residential aged care facility: an action research and reflection project to improve end-of-life care to residents with a non-malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Joanne; Taylor, Beverley

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a qualitative research project that explored issues around end-of-life care provided to residents dying from non-malignant diseases in two, rural Australian, residential aged care facilities. Reflective processes and action research were combined to work in collaboration with 14 aged nurses, associated staff and relatives of dying residents. Reflection featured in the research and included group reflection on practice stories, critical reflection during thematic analysis and reflection on action research cycles. Themes and subthemes emerged, indicating that aspects of end-of-life care needed further improvement. Major thematic concerns were prioritized for action and included the need for better pain management practices which will be discussed. Identifying these clinical issues was an important step in creating, implementing and evaluating actions. Participants reported varying degrees of success in attempting to improve end-of-life care.

  16. On Marcuse and Caring in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shel, Tammy

    2006-01-01

    Can caring and standardized testing coincide? Marcuse criticized the misuse of science because it also legitimizes social and economic hierarchy. By the same token, scholars develop standardized testing, claiming these tests are scientific and can measure objectively individuals' learning and intelligence capabilities. However, if inclusive caring…

  17. Promoting Diversity in Early Child Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Michal; Kankesan, Tharsni; Zhang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are aware of differences in the race and abilities of the people around them. Given this awareness it is important to promote children's acceptance of diversity in the preschool period. The goals of this study were to assess the extent to which child care centres provide diversity instruction through classroom activities,…

  18. The Cost of Public and Community Residential Care for Mentally Retarded People in the United States. Project Report No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen A.; Bruininks, Robert H.

    The direction and scope of deinstitutionalization in 75 public and 161 community residential programs for mentally retarded people in the Unites States were examined by analysis of current levels of expenditures, projected costs, efficacy of existing funding mechanisms, and identification of critical factors affecting cost variation. Results of a…

  19. Standardized Individual Therapy: A Contradiction in Terms?--Professional Principles and Social Practices in Danish Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egelund, Tine; Jakobsen, Turf Bocker

    2009-01-01

    This article explores a paradox that was identified during an ethnographic study of two Danish therapeutic residential institutions for children with emotional and behavioural problems. The key objective of these institutions is to provide specialized treatment for the individual child. However, the task of organizing everyday life for a group of…

  20. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  1. Early Childhood Care and Education in Zambia: An Integral Part of Educational Provision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carolyn M.; Thomas, Matthew A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The field of international development has recently been consumed by a shift in contemporary educational discourse, one that moves Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) closer to the forefront of what is considered progressive policy formation. In Zambia, the current educational environment seems to indicate that the creation and continued…

  2. Characteristics of Swedish Preschools That Provide Education and Care to Children with Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundqvist, Johanna; Westling, Mara Allodi; Siljehag, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool inclusion is embraced and preschools are open for children both with and without special educational needs. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of a number of preschool units in Sweden that provide education and care to children with special educational needs with regard to organisation, resources and…

  3. [Educational practice expressing the care in public health].

    PubMed

    Acioli, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    This study is a reflection about the educative practices importance as a care form in Public Health Nursing, from the experience developed in the Project of University Extension: Learning and Teaching with the Alto Simão, of the College of Nursing of the University of the State of the River of Janeiro - UERJ. The recital theoretician-methodological is based on the critical pedagogy in a Paulo Freire perspective and proposal the Shared Construction of the Knowledge. The results points to many forms to perceive the care and its relation with the educative action. Concluding, perceives that it has a potentiality in the extension as a space of formation directed to the care and as knowledge production and also shows the importance of educative action to the Nursing in Public Health.

  4. [From anthropocentrism to ecocentrism: educating for ecological care in health].

    PubMed

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Backes, Dirce Stein; Drago, Lívia Crespo; Koerich, Magda Santos; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2011-06-01

    The focus of the paper is the meaning of ecological care as understood by students and educators and how this issue is addressed in programs in the fields of health sciences and health care in a federal public institution in southern Brazil. Our goal is to discuss the central category. The methodology adopted was Grounded Theory. Ten interviews were carried out among two sample groups between September, 2008, and April, 2009. The results led to the design of the theory: considering ecological care as broad and complex phenomenon, and the core category: the ecological care that results from relations, interactions and associations within the global environment. We concluded that rejecting anthropocentrism is not enough for the survival of all forms of life in the planet. This survival demands educating for ecocentrism and for systemic-functional interactivity and adaptability. We must go beyond speeches and world conferences and redo the web of interdependence of all beings and elements of nature. PMID:21987986

  5. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used.

  6. The relationship between the quality of the built environment and the quality of life of people with dementia in residential care.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Richard; Goodenough, Belinda; Low, Lee-Fay; Chenoweth, Lynn; Brodaty, Henry

    2016-07-01

    While there is considerable evidence on the impact of specific design features on problems associated with dementia, the link between the quality of the built environment and quality of life of people with dementia is largely unexplored. This study explored the environmental and personal characteristics that are associated with quality of life in people with dementia living in residential aged care. Data were obtained from 275 residents of 35 aged care homes and analysed using linear regression. The quality of the built environment was significantly associated with the quality of life of the resident measured by global self-report. Environmental ratings were not associated with proxy or detailed self-report ratings. Higher quality of life is associated with buildings that facilitate engagement with a variety of activities both inside and outside, are familiar, provide a variety of private and community spaces and the amenities and opportunities to take part in domestic activities.

  7. "The Red Dress or the Blue?": How Do Staff Perceive That They Support Decision Making for People With Dementia Living in Residential Aged Care Facilities?

    PubMed

    Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre; Tarzia, Laura; Bauer, Michael; Nay, Rhonda; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    Respect for a person's right to make choices and participate in decision making is generally seen as central to quality of life and well-being. When a person moves into a residential aged care facility (RACF), however, decision making becomes more complicated, particularly if the person has a diagnosis of dementia. Little is known about how staff in RACFs perceive that they support decision making for people with dementia within their everyday practice, and this article seeks to address this knowledge gap. The article reports on the findings of a qualitative study conducted in the states of Victoria and Queensland, Australia with 80 direct care staff members. Findings revealed that the participants utilized a number of strategies in their intention to support decision making for people with dementia, and had an overall perception that "a little effort goes a long way."

  8. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries.

  9. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries. PMID:12492943

  10. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early care and…

  11. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  12. ABCs: A Basic Guide to Early Care and Education in New York City. Child Care Primer Series, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care, Inc., New York, NY.

    This primer presents key facts about child care and early education in New York City and delineates issues related to the current status of child care and early education. Specifically, the primer provides information on the number of children served by child care programs, Head Start, the Universal Prekindergarten program, preschool special…

  13. Patient education preferences in ophthalmic care

    PubMed Central

    Rosdahl, Jullia A; Swamy, Lakshmi; Stinnett, Sandra; Muir, Kelly W

    2014-01-01

    Background The learning preferences of ophthalmology patients were examined. Methods Results from a voluntary survey of ophthalmology patients were analyzed for education preferences and for correlation with race, age, and ophthalmic topic. Results To learn about eye disease, patients preferred one-on-one sessions with providers as well as printed materials and websites recommended by providers. Patients currently learning from the provider were older (average age 59 years), and patients learning from the Internet (average age 49 years) and family and friends (average age 51 years) were younger. Patients interested in cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eye were older; patients interested in double vision and glasses were younger. There were racial differences regarding topic preferences, with Black patients most interested in glaucoma (46%), diabetic retinopathy (31%), and cataracts (28%) and White patients most interested in cataracts (22%), glaucoma (22%), and macular degeneration (19%). Conclusion Most ophthalmology patients preferred personalized education: one-on-one with their provider or a health educator and materials (printed and electronic) recommended by their provider. Age-related topics were more popular with older patients, and diseases with racial risk factors were more popular with high risk racial groups. PMID:24812493

  14. Training and Continuing Education; A Handbook for Health Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, IL.

    This basic handbook for personnel development through training and continuing education within health care institutions describes the techniques involved in developing programs, from needs determination to evaluation. It covers how to make a skill inventory and a survey of learning needs; how to state learning objectives; how to design a specific…

  15. Competence Requirements in Early Childhood Education and Care. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Mathias; Vandenbroeck, Michel; Lazzari, Arianna; Van Laere, Katrien; Peeters, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a European research project jointly conducted by the University of East London (UEL) and the University of Ghent (UGent). The "study on competence requirements in early childhood education and care" (CoRe) explored conceptualisations of "competence" and professionalism in early childhood practice, and…

  16. Early Childhood Education and Care: An Issue for All Canadians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Martha

    Arguing that quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) contributes to meeting goals that strengthen Canadians and Canadian society, this paper discusses the support found for ECEC within the nation; maintains that ECEC is a broad issue that bridges socioeconomic, ethnic, and regional divisions; and addresses the main problems and issues in…

  17. Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Christina; Kabler, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Recent statistics estimate that there are 783,000 children living in foster care in the United States. This vulnerable population is at risk for academic failure as well as internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems. Compared to their peers, foster youth face significant educational difficulties, including lower levels of academic…

  18. Evaluation of Health Educator Consults in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Stacia; Lopez, Patricia; McKee, M. Diane; Deen, Darwin; Fornari, Alice; Fletcher, Jason; Blank, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to evaluate a primary care obesity prevention intervention, targeting low-income minority parents in the USA. The first objective is to describe the barriers to behavior change experienced by families. The second objective is to understand the types of strategies that were used by the health educator to empower families to…

  19. Internet Continuing Education for Health Care Professionals: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan Copley

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to review key articles and research studies on practices, preferences, and evaluation of on-line continuing education used by health care professionals. Methods: Data sources included searches of the "MEDLINE," "CINAHL," and "ERIC" databases (January 1990 to June 2004) and manual searches of the "Journal of…

  20. Hide and Seek: Values in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sacha

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood education and care settings in England and the people who work in them constitute an important sphere of influence, shaping young children's characters and values. But the values and dispositions expected of the early years workforce are missing from statutory policy documentation despite its clear requirement that practitioners…

  1. Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan

    2013-01-01

    In this short essay I express my own deep sympathy with Nel Noddings's ethic of care and applaud her stubborn resistance in "Happiness and Education" to what John Dewey would have called false dualisms, such as those between intelligence and emotion, theory and practice, or vocation and academic studies.However, I question whether…

  2. Assessing Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Tayler, Collette

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC) service internationally is increasingly important. Research to date indicates that it is "high-quality" programmes that boost and sustain children's achievement outcomes over time. There is also growing interest in the accountability of public funds used for ECEC…

  3. Integrating Cultural Humility into Health Care Professional Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, E-shien; Simon, Melissa; Dong, XinQi

    2012-01-01

    As US populations become increasing diverse, healthcare professionals are facing a heightened challenge to provide cross-cultural care. To date, medical education around the world has developed specific curricula on cultural competence training in acknowledgement of the importance of culturally sensitive and grounded services. This article…

  4. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  5. Inclusive Education for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janz, Janice; And Others

    This paper discusses issues concerning inclusion of children with special health care needs in the regular classroom. Six categories of health conditions are discussed in terms of their implications for the educational setting. These are: (1) "hidden" conditions (e.g., juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, sickle cell anemia, asthma, and cystic…

  6. Education for primary health care: accommodating the new realities.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, J E

    1994-01-01

    The didactic, authoritarian model in which learners are lectured by teachers cannot meet the needs of people intending to work in health systems where equity, self-reliance, community participation and intersectoral collaboration are the watchwords. The author discusses how the education of health professionals for roles in primary health care should be conducted. PMID:8018277

  7. Foster Care Children Need Better Educational Opportunities. Backgrounder No. 2039

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lips; Dan

    2007-01-01

    The estimated 518,000 children in foster care in the United States are among the most at-risk children in American society. Research shows that foster children are more likely to be at risk of poor life outcomes. The quality of a foster child's primary and secondary education is a major factor in future life success. Early warning signs of these…

  8. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  9. Starting Strong II: Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This review of early childhood education and care (ECEC) in twenty OECD countries describes the social, economic, conceptual and research factors that influence early childhood policy. These include increasing women's labour market participation; reconciling work and family responsibilities on a more equitable basis for women; confronting the…

  10. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) has become a policy priority in many countries. A growing body of research recognises that it provides a wide range of benefits, including social and economic benefits, better child well-being and learning outcomes as a foundation for lifelong learning, more equitable outcomes and reduction of poverty, and…

  11. Global Early Care and Education: Challenges, Responses, and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Michelle J.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents some pressing challenges facing early care and education policy and practice around the world and then highlights diverse country responses to these challenges with the goal of informing American decision-making. It focuses on three key cross-national challenges that are particularly relevant to current debates in the United…

  12. Constructions of Early Childhood Education and Care Provision: Negotiating Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Barr, Verity

    2014-01-01

    Drives to increase the number of early childhood education and care places in England have relied on a mixed economy of providers. Yet this is not a free market as policy makers have sought to create a discursive truth of an entrepreneurial provider in order to secure their initial pump priming investment. However, there remain sustainability…

  13. Parents' Views on Preschool Care and Education in Local Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devjak, Tatjana; Bercnik, Sanja

    2009-01-01

    In this text, the authors are analyzing preschool care and education in local community. They are focusing on the problem of information transfer between the kindergarten, parents and local community, as well as the model of relationship participation. Cooperation between parents, kindergarten and local community is an important element in the…

  14. Bolstering medical education to enhance critical care capacity in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Albert, Tyler J; Fassier, Thomas; Chhuoy, Meng; Bounchan, Youttiroung; Tan, Sokhak; Ku, No; Chhor, Nareth; LoGerfo, James P; West, T Eoin

    2015-04-01

    The capacity to care for the critically ill has long been viewed as a fundamental element of established and comprehensive health care systems. Extending this capacity to health care systems in low- and middle-income countries is important given the burden of disease in these regions and the significance of critical care in overall health system strengthening. However, many practicalities of improving access and delivery of critical care in resource-limited settings have yet to be elucidated. We have initiated a program to build capacity for the care of critically ill patients in one low-income Southeast Asian country, Cambodia. We are leveraging existing international academic partnerships to enhance postgraduate critical care education in Cambodia. After conducting a needs assessment and literature review, we developed a three-step initiative targeting training in mechanical ventilation. First, we assessed and revised the current resident curriculum pertaining to mechanical ventilation. We addressed gaps in training, incorporated specific goals and learning objectives, and decreased the hours of lectures in favor of additional bedside training. Second, we are incorporating e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment into the curriculum, with both live, interactive and independent, self-paced online instruction. Third, we are developing a train-the-trainer program defined by bidirectional international faculty exchanges to provide hands-on, case-based, and bedside training to achieve competency-based outcomes. In targeting specific educational needs and a key population-the next generation of Cambodian intensivists-this carefully designed approach should address some existing gaps in the health care system and hopefully yield a lasting impact.

  15. Les Centres Residentiels (Residential Centers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Inst. for Adult Education, Montreal (Quebec).

    Results of a survey of residential adult education in the Province of Quebec are presented in this report. The existence of widespread financial difficulties is documented, together with a frequent lack of adequate community services and suitable facilities. Chapter I reviews the need of nonprofit groups for residential facilities and indicates…

  16. Attitudes toward care of the terminally ill: an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Katherine H Murray

    2003-01-01

    This quasiexperimental study examined the effect of an educational program on attitudes toward caring for terminally ill persons and their families. Participants were 115 undergraduate students: intervention group, N = 49; control group, N = 66. Pre- and post-intervention measurements were done with the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD, Form B). Students in the intervention group participated in a semester-long (15-week, 45-hour) educational program. Demographic variables, including age, gender, religion, major area of study, influence of religious beliefs, profession, previous education, and past or present experience with loss were evaluated. Statistical analyses (t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and APVs) indicated a significant positive change in the attitude scores of the intervention group and no significant change in the attitude scores of the control group.

  17. Caring and Learning Together: Exploring the Relationship between Parental Leave and Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Parental leave and early childhood education and care (ECEC) are two policies widely proposed and implemented to support working parents with young children. This article examines entitlement to leave and ECEC in 25 European countries, including 22 EU Member and Accession States, and the relationship between them, in particular to what degree…

  18. CARES: AACN's New Competencies and Recommendations for Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students to Improve Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Malloy, Pam; Mazanec, Polly; Virani, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Nurses spend the most time of any health care professional caring for patients and families dealing with the challenges of serious illness. The demand for nursing expertise in palliative care is growing as more people are living with chronic, life-limiting illnesses. Nursing faculty must prepare future nurses to meet this demand. The new American Association of Colleges of Nursing Palliative Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document, released February 2016, identifies the 17 competencies that all undergraduate nursing students should achieve by the time of graduation. This historic document is a revision of the 1998 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Peaceful Death document and is now the guiding framework for undergraduate nursing education. In an effort to support nursing faculty and prepare nursing students to deliver quality palliative care, an innovative, interactive on-line undergraduate End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) curriculum is under development and will be released in January 2017. This new curriculum will meet the competencies and recommendations for achieving those competencies outlined in the Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document. PMID:27649590

  19. CARES: AACN's New Competencies and Recommendations for Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students to Improve Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Malloy, Pam; Mazanec, Polly; Virani, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Nurses spend the most time of any health care professional caring for patients and families dealing with the challenges of serious illness. The demand for nursing expertise in palliative care is growing as more people are living with chronic, life-limiting illnesses. Nursing faculty must prepare future nurses to meet this demand. The new American Association of Colleges of Nursing Palliative Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document, released February 2016, identifies the 17 competencies that all undergraduate nursing students should achieve by the time of graduation. This historic document is a revision of the 1998 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Peaceful Death document and is now the guiding framework for undergraduate nursing education. In an effort to support nursing faculty and prepare nursing students to deliver quality palliative care, an innovative, interactive on-line undergraduate End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) curriculum is under development and will be released in January 2017. This new curriculum will meet the competencies and recommendations for achieving those competencies outlined in the Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document.

  20. Family Policy and Practice in Early Child Care. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Dunst, Carl J., Ed.; Wolery, Mark, Ed.

    Family issues are an abiding concern for members of the profession of early education, and debate regarding government policies about families and child care continues to be timely. This volume provides a foundation for understanding programs, families, and the current social context, as well as particular areas of concern for families and child…

  1. California Alliance For Radiotracer Education, CARE

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, Julie

    2015-02-19

    The report contains a summary of the accomplishments made during the CARE proposal. The overall goal of this proposal was to train graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the field of radiochemistry. The goal was to expose trainees to the fundamentals of radioisotope production, radiochemistry synthesis, synthetic organic chemistry as well as applications and hands on experience in small animal imaging. In summary approximately 30 trainees were involved including trainees both at the graduate and postdoctoral levels. This funding has to date resulted in publications in high impact journals such as Med Chem Comm, Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and Biology. Trainees have gone on to further their careers in both academia, industry and the private sector. The funding will result in seven Master’s and six Ph.D dissertations. Without the DOE funding it simply would not have been possible to continue to train the next generation of radiochemists needed to assure a future US-based Nuclear and Radiochemistry Expertise.

  2. Teleconferenced Educational Detailing: Diabetes Education for Primary Care Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stewart B.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Van, Daphne M.; O'Neill, Colleen

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Formal didactic continuing medical education (CME) is relatively ineffective for changing physician behavior. Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent disease, and interventions to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are needed. Methods: A stratified, cluster-randomized, controlled trial design was used to…

  3. National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) at the University of Colorado College of ... Safety Performance Standards; Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3 rd Edition ( CFOC3 ) As a collaborator ...

  4. Educational Neglect: The Delivery of Educational Services to Children in New York City's Foster Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advocates for Children of New York, Inc., Long Island City.

    Children in foster care are the most educationally at risk population in New York City, and the longstanding failure of the responsible agencies to address the educational needs of foster children in New York City is a problem that has, for the most part, been ignored. This paper reports on a study aimed at creating a database to inform the…

  5. Enhancing Palliative Care Education in Medical School Curricula: Implementation of the Palliative Education Assessment Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Emily B.; Meekin, Sharon Abele; Fins, Joseph J.; Fleischman, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated a project to catalyze New York State medical schools to develop and implement strategic plans for curricular change to enhance palliative care education. Found that the project's process of self-assessment and curriculum mapping with the Palliative Education Assessment Tool, along with strategic planning for change, appears to have…

  6. Utilizing education infrastructure for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Hope, R; Carter, C A; Rai, I M

    1988-01-01

    Sahar Matha Secondary School and Ghoretar Health Post serve approximately 30,000 people living in scattered communities over the steep foothills of the Himalaya in East Nepal. A pilot health education and sanitation project was implemented with the objectives of giving the secondary school students the knowledge and skills necessary for building domestic pit latrines in their villages. It was hoped that the students could be motivated to create enough awareness of the need for domestic pit latrines so that latrines would continue to be built after the pilot phase of the project. At the end of the 4 week building period there were 150 completed domestic pit latrines and 45 pits or partially complete latrines. Seeing pit latrine in Ghoretar at the school and health post had not been enough to motivate people to build their own domestic pit latrine. It seemed that people could understand the convenience of privacy in an area where there was no jungle cover, but did not appreciate the hygiene reasons for using pit latrines. It is now planned to extend the project into the 19 schools which feed the 2ndarty school, with the 2ndary school boy and girl scouts taking the health messages to the primary schools. Particular attention will be given to the teaching of modes disease transmission. So that the villagers can use their latrines hygienically.

  7. Utilizing education infrastructure for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Hope, R; Carter, C A; Rai, I M

    1988-01-01

    Sahar Matha Secondary School and Ghoretar Health Post serve approximately 30,000 people living in scattered communities over the steep foothills of the Himalaya in East Nepal. A pilot health education and sanitation project was implemented with the objectives of giving the secondary school students the knowledge and skills necessary for building domestic pit latrines in their villages. It was hoped that the students could be motivated to create enough awareness of the need for domestic pit latrines so that latrines would continue to be built after the pilot phase of the project. At the end of the 4 week building period there were 150 completed domestic pit latrines and 45 pits or partially complete latrines. Seeing pit latrine in Ghoretar at the school and health post had not been enough to motivate people to build their own domestic pit latrine. It seemed that people could understand the convenience of privacy in an area where there was no jungle cover, but did not appreciate the hygiene reasons for using pit latrines. It is now planned to extend the project into the 19 schools which feed the 2ndarty school, with the 2ndary school boy and girl scouts taking the health messages to the primary schools. Particular attention will be given to the teaching of modes disease transmission. So that the villagers can use their latrines hygienically. PMID:3341089

  8. Assessing the effectiveness and acceptability of interprofessional palliative care education.

    PubMed

    Koffman, Jonathan; Higginson, Irene J

    2005-01-01

    Interprofessional education in health care in general and palliative care has been the focus of increasing attention in recent years. However, there is still controversy about its outcomes and few courses have been evaluated. The aims of this evaluation were to explore (1) the career progression of former students who attended an interprofessional MSc in palliative care; (2) the activities former students were engaged in as a result of attending the course; and (3) the experience of attending an interprofessional postgraduate course in palliative care. Former students who attended the course between January 1998 and January 2004 were surveyed using a postal questionnaire. Of the 56 students who completed the course, 44 (79%) responded; 23 (52%) were doctors, 20 (45%) nurses, and one an occupational therapist. Career progression was significant for doctors (Z=-2.08, p=0.04) and for nurses (Z=-2.4, p=0.017). Thirty-nine (89%) former students believed this was due to attending the course. Former students described a wide range of clinical, research, and service development activities they were involved in as a result of attending the course. Qualitative data highlighted the benefits of attending an interprofessional course where the following themes became evident: lateral thinking, challenging misconceptions, enhancing teamwork opportunities, and professional networks and confidence. Funding should be made available to extend interprofessional education to a wide range of professionals who care for patients with advanced disease and their families.

  9. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from the hospitals and practising on plastic dummies. Despite the apparent artificiality of the skills lab, this article will show that it is possible to analyse some of the fundamental aspects of care in nursing by ethnographically following this phenomenon of simulation-based training. These particular aspects of care are not explicated in the curriculum or textbooks; however, they surfaced once this crooked approach to studying care in a simulated practice was applied. The article start from the assertion that detached engagements are not recognized within the field of nursing education as an equal component to attachments. Yet empirical cases from the skills lab and hospitals illustrate how students sometimes felt emotionally attached to plastic dummies and how experienced nurses sometimes practised a degree of detachment in relation to human patients. Detached engagements will therefore be presented as part of care practices of nurses - rendering the ability to detach in engagement with patients a professional skill that students also need to learn. In the analysis to follow, attached and detached engagements are located on an equal plane by integrating both into the same conceptual framework, rather than imposing a priori notions about their dialectic relation. The analysis shows that it is the particular intertwinement of attachment and detachment that gives care its fundamental meaning. In conclusion, the need for a conceptual shift from a strong emphasis on attached engagement to a more balanced analytical approach to care work, as involving both attached and detached engagement within Danish nursing education, is advocated.

  10. Veteran Affairs Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education: transforming nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Rugen, Kathryn Wirtz; Watts, Sharon A; Janson, Susan L; Angelo, Laura A; Nash, Melanie; Zapatka, Susan A; Brienza, Rebecca; Gilman, Stuart C; Bowen, Judith L; Saxe, JoAnne M

    2014-01-01

    To integrate health care professional learners into patient-centered primary care delivery models, the Department of Veterans Affairs has funded five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCEs). The main goal of the CoEPCEs is to develop and test innovative structural and curricular models that foster transformation of health care training from profession-specific "silos" to interprofessional, team-based educational and care delivery models in patient-centered primary care settings. CoEPCE implementation emphasizes four core curricular domains: shared decision making, sustained relationships, interprofessional collaboration, and performance improvement. The structural models allow interprofessional learners to have longitudinal learning experiences and sustained and continuous relationships with patients, faculty mentors, and peer learners. This article presents an overview of the innovative curricular models developed at each site, focusing on nurse practitioner (NP) education. Insights on transforming NP education in the practice setting and its impact on traditional NP educational models are offered. Preliminary outcomes and sustainment examples are also provided.

  11. The 'voice of care': implications for bioethical education.

    PubMed

    Carse, A L

    1991-02-01

    This paper examines the 'justice' and 'care' orientations in ethical theory as characterized in Carol Gilligan's research on moral development and the philosophical work it has inspired. Focus is placed on challenges to the justice orientation--in particular, to the construal of impartiality as the mark of the moral point of view, to the conception of moral judgment as essentially principle-driven and dispassionate, and to models of moral responsibility emphasizing norms of formal equality and reciprocity. Suggestions are made about the implications of these challenges, and of the care orientation in ethics, for the ethical theory taught, the issues addressed, and the skills and sensitivities encouraged through bioethical education.

  12. Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Spratt, John M., Jr. [D-SC-5

    2010-03-17

    03/30/2010 Became Public Law No: 111-152. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: The bill makes a number of health-related financing and revenue changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act enacted by H.R.3590 and modifies higher education assistance provisions. Read together, H.R.3590 and the health care-related provisions of this bill are commonly... Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Education and career opportunities for nurses in offender health care.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jane; Bennett, Clare; Lapworth, Tracy

    This article, the last in a five-part series, examines the education opportunities and career pathways available to nurses who work in the criminal justice system. The five articles in this series reflect the many challenges faced by nurses who provide health care in the prison setting and the varied complex and specialist skills needed to perform their role. These skills range from early intervention, health promotion, health needs assessment, nurse-led services and acute care, to advanced practice and non-medical prescribing.

  14. Adolescents in secure residential care: the role of active and passive coping on general well-being and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Barendregt, Charlotte S; Van der Laan, André M; Bongers, Ilja L; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs

    2015-07-01

    Coping, general well-being and self-esteem play an important role during the process of adaptation to turning points in life-course. This study aimed to investigate the effect of coping on both the development of general well-being and self-esteem of adolescents with severe psychiatric problems in secure residential care. In addition, risk and protective factors were taken into account. Adolescents between the age of 16 and 18 (N = 172) were followed for 1.5 years. General well-being and self-esteem were assessed with the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile and the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, respectively. In addition, the Utrecht Coping List for Adolescents and the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth were administered. Results showed that the longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem is no longer significant after adding active and passive coping to the model. The use of active coping strategies was associated with a higher self-esteem. The use of passive coping strategies was associated with a lower self-esteem and also a lower perceived general well-being. Having multiple risks in the individual and/or social/contextual domain affected the developmental pattern of general well-being. During treatment of adolescents with severe psychiatric problems in secure residential care, attention should be paid for enhancing those capabilities and skills, like coping, which help adolescents to fulfill their needs and consequently enhance their well-being. Enhancing the well-being of adolescents might in the long run decrease the chance of reoffending and/or psychiatric relapse.

  15. Education and Training. Do They "Really, Really" Want It? A Comparative Study of Care Home Staff in England and Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyers, Ingrid

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of residential care staff in England and Germany showed that, in the care industry, England has a training framework that is not yet widely used. Despite its strong vocational policies, Germany has none. Care assistants are not expected to have formal skills and rarely participate in training. "Emotional labor" is undervalued in both…

  16. Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe: Tackling Social and Cultural Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delhaxhe, Arlette; Motiejunaite, Akvile; Coghlan, Misia; Huart, Thierry; Manni, Gentile; Leseman, Paul P.M.; Crahay, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the available cross-national data and national policies on early childhood education and care (later--ECEC) in Europe. Early childhood education and care in this study refers to publicly subsidised and accredited provision for children under compulsory school age. "Education" and "care" are combined in the phrase to underline…

  17. Key Facts about Child Care and Early Education: A Briefing Book, 1997 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina C.; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

    This briefing book from the Children's Defense Fund contains factsheets on child care and early education issues. Areas covered include basic facts about early childhood education and care; their importance to children, families, and communities; some of the challenges facing families who need day care; and key child care and early education…

  18. The introduction of a targeted user-pays approach to funding high-level residential aged care in Australia: an empirical investigation of the impact on price.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Susan

    2010-10-01

    In response to predictions that population ageing will increase government spending over the coming decades, in 1997-98, the Australian Government introduced means-tested income fees and accommodation charges for those admitted to nursing homes with income and assets above set threshold levels. Immediately prior, all residents paid the same price for their care and were not required to contribute towards the cost of their accommodation. In addition, in relation to those eligible to pay a higher price, the Government reduced its subsidisation of the cost of their care. The Government anticipated that the initiative would more equitably share the cost of age-related services across the public and private sectors, and result in some cost savings for itself. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the policy on the average price paid by residents. The findings suggest that the policy may have contributed to an increase in the average price paid, but statistical evidence is limited due to a number of data issues. Results also indicate that the rate of increase in the price was greater after the Residential Aged Care Structural Reform package was introduced. The study contributes to the economic analysis of the sector by evaluating time series estimates of prices paid by residents since the early 1970s. PMID:20122304

  19. The introduction of a targeted user-pays approach to funding high-level residential aged care in Australia: an empirical investigation of the impact on price.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Susan

    2010-10-01

    In response to predictions that population ageing will increase government spending over the coming decades, in 1997-98, the Australian Government introduced means-tested income fees and accommodation charges for those admitted to nursing homes with income and assets above set threshold levels. Immediately prior, all residents paid the same price for their care and were not required to contribute towards the cost of their accommodation. In addition, in relation to those eligible to pay a higher price, the Government reduced its subsidisation of the cost of their care. The Government anticipated that the initiative would more equitably share the cost of age-related services across the public and private sectors, and result in some cost savings for itself. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the policy on the average price paid by residents. The findings suggest that the policy may have contributed to an increase in the average price paid, but statistical evidence is limited due to a number of data issues. Results also indicate that the rate of increase in the price was greater after the Residential Aged Care Structural Reform package was introduced. The study contributes to the economic analysis of the sector by evaluating time series estimates of prices paid by residents since the early 1970s.

  20. Does progressive resistance and balance exercise reduce falls in residential aged care? Randomized controlled trial protocol for the SUNBEAM program

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Jennifer; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Goodall, Stephen; Henwood, Timothy; Clemson, Lindy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls are common among older adults. It is reported that approximately 60% of residents of aged care facilities fall each year. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden for health care providers and the health system. Among community dwelling older adults, exercise appears to be an effective countermeasure, but data are limited and inconsistent among studies in residents of aged care communities. This trial has been designed to evaluate whether the SUNBEAM program (Strength and Balance Exercise in Aged Care) reduces falls in residents of aged care facilities. Research question Is the program more effective and cost-effective than usual care for the prevention of falls? Design Single-blinded, two group, cluster randomized trial. Participants and setting 300 residents, living in 20 aged care facilities. Intervention Progressive resistance and balance training under the guidance of a physiotherapist for 6 months, then facility-guided maintenance training for 6 months. Control Usual care. Measurements Number of falls, number of fallers, quality of life, mobility, balance, fear of falling, cognitive well-being, resource use, and cost-effectiveness. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis The number of falls will be analyzed using a Poisson mixed model. A logistic mixed model will be used to analyze the number of residents who fall during the study period. Intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion This study addresses a significant shortcoming in aged care research, and has potential to impact upon a substantial health care problem. Outcomes will be used to inform care providers, and guide health care policies. PMID:24591821

  1. Expanding physician education in health care fraud and program integrity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Tarzy, Bruce; Hunt, Lauren; Taitsman, Julie; Budetti, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Program integrity (PI) spans the entire spectrum of improper payments from fraud to abuse, errors, and waste in the health care system. Few physicians will perpetrate fraud or abuse during their careers, but nearly all will contribute to the remaining spectrum of improper payments, making preventive education in this area vital. Despite the enormous impact that PI issues have on government-sponsored and private insurance programs, physicians receive little formal education in this area. Physicians' lack of awareness of PI issues not only makes them more likely to submit inappropriate claims, generate orders that other providers and suppliers will use to submit inappropriate claims, and document improperly in the medical record but also more likely to become victims of fraud schemes themselves.In this article, the authors provide an overview of the current state of PI issues in general, and fraud in particular, as well as a description of the state of formal education for practicing physicians, residents, and fellows. Building on the lessons from pilot programs conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and partner organizations, the authors then propose a model PI education curriculum to be implemented nationwide for physicians at all levels. They recommend that various stakeholder organizations take part in the development and implementation process to ensure that all perspectives are included. Educating physicians is an essential step in establishing a broader culture of compliance and improved integrity in the health care system, extending beyond Medicare and Medicaid.

  2. At the crossroad of higher education and health care.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2011-01-01

    Health care and higher education intersect in important fundamental ways. This essay focuses on the crossroad where the two entities meet, which may be envisioned as constituting two intersecting multilane highways complete with on ramps, off ramps, passing lanes, and breakdown lanes. Some lanes also may be characterized by the movement of vehicles that only can be sighted periodically. For example, federal budgets and decisions on appropriations usually are seen at specific intervals during the year. PMID:21695364

  3. [Nursing students and mental health education in primary care].

    PubMed

    Miyai, Fernanda Tiemi; Barros, Sônia; Cortes, Jandro Moraes

    2014-03-01

    The University of Sao Paulo School of Nursing (EEUSP) went through a period of transition from undergraduate syllabus between the years 2009 and 2010. This change was made to integrate basic and clinical cycles and to reduce fragmentation of the disciplines. The mental health nursing education was included in many modules including the primary care. This qualitative study aimed to identify how the service offered to people with mental illness was performed by 20 undergraduate students in the context of primary care and how they were prepared. Data collection was conducted through semi-structured interviews, in August 2012, in EEUSP After thematic analysis, we separated in categories: Teaching-learning process, Basic Health Unit and Mental health-illness process. The socially constructed conception of madness added to the problems related to academic training may result in lack of preparation in nursing mental health care. PMID:24930278

  4. A Decade of Data: The Compensation and Credentials of Arizona's Early Care and Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Action Alliance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    As Arizona strives for a first-rate educational system, the foundation of care and education for our youngest children remains far too weak. This new report, "A Decade of Data: The Compensation and Credentials of Arizona's Early Care and Education Workforce," marks ten years of data on trends in the wages, benefits, and education levels of…

  5. Tobacco Education in U.S. Respiratory Care Programs

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Michael; Livin, Adam L.; Corelli, Robin L.; Schroeder, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Exposure to tobacco smoke impacts the onset or exacerbation of most respiratory disorders, and respiratory therapists are well positioned to identify tobacco use and provide cessation assistance. The purpose of this study was to characterize the level of tobacco cessation education provided to students in U.S. respiratory care training programs. Methods: A national survey of 387 respiratory care programs assessed the extent to which tobacco is addressed in required coursework, methods of instruction, perceived importance, and adequacy of current levels of tobacco education in curricula and perceived barriers to enhancing the tobacco-related education. Results: A total of 244 surveys (63.0% response) revealed a median of 165min (IQR, 88–283) of tobacco education throughout the degree program. Pathophysiology of tobacco-related disease (median, 45min) is the most extensively covered content area followed by aids for cessation (median, 20min), assisting patients with quitting (median, 15min), and nicotine pharmacology and principles of addiction (median, 15min). More than 40% of respondents believed that latter 3 content areas are inadequately covered in the curriculum. Key barriers to enhancing tobacco training are lack of available curriculum time, lack of faculty expertise, and lack of access to comprehensive evidence-based resources. Nearly three-fourths of the respondents expressed interest in participating in a nationwide effort to enhance tobacco cessation training. Conclusions: Similar to other disciplines, enhanced tobacco cessation education is needed in respiratory care programs to equip graduates with the knowledge and the skills necessary to treat tobacco use and dependence. PMID:25031314

  6. The Art Association/Higher Education Partnership: Implementing Residential Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charland, William

    2006-01-01

    In-service professional development in education began informally in the early nineteenth-century as a means of disseminating classroom management techniques, specifically addressing ways in which corporal punishment could be delivered to a child without inflicting serious injury. This initial effort paralleled a concern regarding children's…

  7. Residential summer camp: a new venue for nutrition education and physical activity promotion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Millions of children attend residential summer camps each year. However, few studies have examined the potential of camps for obesity prevention efforts. Research in the domain of positive youth development has shown that camp programs as short as one week have both short- and long-term positive effects on self-esteem, self-efficacy and other youth outcomes. The objective of the present study was to highlight the potential of resident camps as promising venues for the promotion of healthy eating and physical activity behaviors in the children who attend. Methods Data for this study came from the American Camp Association 2007 Emerging Issues Survey. This survey assessed camp professionals’ perspectives on a diverse array of issues, including the healthy eating and physical activity of children. Data analysis focused on responses from 247 camp professionals whose camps offered resident camp programs. Results Descriptive and Chi-square statistics were calculated. Ninety-two percent of camp professionals reported that the healthy eating and physical activity of campers was an “important” or “very important” issue for camps. The majority of camps reported offering vegetarian options, healthy snacks and salad bars, and allergen-free options. Additionally, 86% of camp professionals indicated that they had implemented one or more strategies to address concerns related to the unhealthy eating behaviors of children, with top strategies including increasing the availability of fruits and vegetables, increasing the availability of healthy drink options, and improving the nutritional quality of menus. Fewer camp professionals (50%) indicated they had implemented strategies to increase children’s physical activity levels, but many professionals indicated that their camp programs were inherently active and additional strategies to promote physical activity were not necessary. Associations were found between camp affiliation and food options available to

  8. A Child Care Primer, 2000: Key Facts about Child Care and Early Education Services in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letts, Kenea; Simpson, Kristen; Torres, Marlyn; Kolben, Nancy

    This Child Care Primer provides a detailed overview of child care funding, supply, and demand in New York City. The Primer utilizes data available from public agencies to create a picture of the availability of child care and early education services. The statistical portrait covers New York City demographics, enrollment in regulated child care…

  9. Care for the Other's Selfhood: A View on Child Care and Education through Heidegger's Analytic of Dasein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joensuu, Kosti

    2012-01-01

    Philosophical analysis concerning selfhood and care is of fundamental importance for child care and education. Martin Heidegger's analytic of Dasein introduces the concepts of self and care within the ontological domain while structuring the holistic understanding of human existence. Because of the ontological emphasis, Heidegger's concepts of…

  10. Learning to Care during Storytime in the Current Context: Moral Education from the Perspective of Care Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabin, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Through an examination of storytelling in the present context, this study addresses the teaching of moral education from the standpoint of care ethics. Through observations, interviews, and surveys in one school committed to care ethics, this study aims to show how the philosophical perspective of care ethics can inform practice. Teachers engaged…

  11. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and

  12. The impact of health care economics on surgical education.

    PubMed

    Margolin, David A

    2012-09-01

    Just like the world economy in 2012, health care is in a state of flux. The current economic environment will impact not only current colorectal surgery residents, but also future generations of surgical trainees. To understand the economic impact of the current health care environment on colorectal surgery residencies, we need to know the basics of graduate medical education (GME) funding for all residents. Since the 1960s with the initiation of Medicare, the federal government through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been the largest source of GME funding. There are two types of costs associated with GME. Direct GME (DME) funding covers costs directly attributed to the training of residents. These costs include residents' stipends, salaries, and benefits; cost of supervising faculty; direct program administration costs; overhead; and malpractice coverage. Indirect GME (IME) costs are payments to hospitals as an additional or add-on payment for the increased cost of care that is generally found in teaching hospitals. In 2010, President Barak Obama signed into law H.R. 3200, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). In 2011, the Supreme Court held that the majority of the PPACA is constitutional. Although the true impact of this bill is unknown, it will change the formula for Medicare GME reimbursement as well as shift unused residency positions to primary care. PMID:23997674

  13. The impact of health care economics on surgical education.

    PubMed

    Margolin, David A

    2012-09-01

    Just like the world economy in 2012, health care is in a state of flux. The current economic environment will impact not only current colorectal surgery residents, but also future generations of surgical trainees. To understand the economic impact of the current health care environment on colorectal surgery residencies, we need to know the basics of graduate medical education (GME) funding for all residents. Since the 1960s with the initiation of Medicare, the federal government through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been the largest source of GME funding. There are two types of costs associated with GME. Direct GME (DME) funding covers costs directly attributed to the training of residents. These costs include residents' stipends, salaries, and benefits; cost of supervising faculty; direct program administration costs; overhead; and malpractice coverage. Indirect GME (IME) costs are payments to hospitals as an additional or add-on payment for the increased cost of care that is generally found in teaching hospitals. In 2010, President Barak Obama signed into law H.R. 3200, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). In 2011, the Supreme Court held that the majority of the PPACA is constitutional. Although the true impact of this bill is unknown, it will change the formula for Medicare GME reimbursement as well as shift unused residency positions to primary care.

  14. Education in methodology for health care--EuroMISE.

    PubMed

    Zvárová, J

    1994-06-01

    In January 1993 the Joint European Project "Education in the methodology field of health care", EuroMISE (European Education in Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology) started under the European TEMPUS program. Training and education in EuroMISE consist of three overlapping methodology branches: medical informatics, medical statistics, and epidemiology. A teaching scheme has been developed in cooperation between Charles University, Prague, and EC universities and organizations involved in the EuroMISE project. One of the main tasks of the project is to design a modularly structured EuroMISE course set, to develop teaching materials and tools in the English language, and to link the EuroMISE project with other programs and projects in this field. Running EuroMISE courses, firstly for university teachers, will have a major impact in disseminating the acquired knowledge and skills.

  15. Building Resilience in Students at the Intersection of Special Education and Foster Care: Challenges, Strategies, and Resources for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Parker; Folkman, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform educators (general educators, special educators, teacher educators, and administrators) about ways to teach, advocate for, and empower students with disabilities who are also engaged in the foster care system. The conclusion includes authors' suggestions for how teacher educators might incorporate the…

  16. Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project.

    PubMed

    Buck, Harleah G; Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna; Baronner, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project," found on pages 306-313, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until June 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the unique nursing challenges that occur in caring for older adults in rural areas. Discuss the

  17. Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project.

    PubMed

    Buck, Harleah G; Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna; Baronner, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project," found on pages 306-313, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until June 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the unique nursing challenges that occur in caring for older adults in rural areas. Discuss the

  18. The impact of a palliative care educational component on attitudes toward care of the dying in undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Judy L

    2003-01-01

    Nurse educators have identified that historically nurses have not been prepared to care for dying patients. Research also has identified that nursing students have anxieties about death, dying, and caring for dying patients. Several factors have been identified as affecting nurses' and nursing students' attitudes toward care of the dying. Factors addressed in this research were current and previous death education. This research incorporated experiential learning using a model of death education and transformative learning theory. The educational experiences were geared to help students understand the skills needed to care competently and compassionately for the dying. The use of the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) education package along with experiences at the hospice, the funeral home, the anatomy laboratory, and role play helped facilitate transformative learning in the nursing students. The study examined the effects of an educational experience to determine if a one-time educational experience provides sufficient, lasting effects in a 6-week format. Results of this study indicate that education can have a positive effect on nursing students' attitudes toward care of the dying. Nursing students in the intervention group had a significant positive increase in their attitudes toward care of the dying after the intervention. The attitude change increased slightly after a 4-week period.

  19. Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, E; Selmser, P; Pereira, J; Brenneis, C

    1997-01-01

    Increasingly, patients with cancer are dying at home and in continuing care facilities. The purpose of bus rounds is to provide continuing education to physicians and nurse palliative care consultants, to familiarize family physicians with the delivery of care in these settings and to educate family medicine and specialty residents as well as medical students. A total of 18 4-hour bus rounds took place during 1996. A mean of 13 (range 9 to 17) participants attended, to discuss a mean of 3.5 (range 2 to 4) patients and 4.5 (range 3 to 8) journal articles. A questionnaire was filled out anonymously by 18 first-time medical and 24 first-time nursing participants. On a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best), they gave the rounds an overall rating of 5 (range 4 to 5). The mean cost per round was $245.40. The authors conclude that bus rounds provide an opportunity for intensive exposure to community-based learning for physicians, nurses and students and are highly satisfactory from the participants' perspective. PMID:9307561

  20. Education of patients with chronic kidney disease at the interface of primary care providers and nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Wright Nunes, Julie A

    2013-07-01

    Patient education is promoted as an integral part of effective kidney disease management. Programs and tools are available for providers and patients to support patient CKD education in primary care and nephrology. Challenges to providing patient education across practice settings include patients' lack of awareness of CKD as a medical entity, physician perceptions of their own lack of skill and ability to educate patients, differences in how primary care and nephrology physicians perceive collaborative care, and shortage of staff and time to support educational efforts. In addition, there is little research available to guide evidence-based practices for implementing early patient CKD education interventions across medical disciplines. Development and testing of patient education programs using early CKD multidisciplinary care, educational websites, and phone-based applications are all areas of growing research. More work is needed to provide evidence and support that physicians and other health professionals need to ensure a seamless patient education experience across the continuum of care.