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Sample records for residual damage gsi

  1. DNA-DSB in CHO-K1 cells induced by heavy-ions: Break rejoining and residual damage (GSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.; Becher, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) are the critical lesions involved in cellular effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, the evaluation of DSB induction in mammalian cells after heavy ion irradiation is an essential task for the assessment of high-LET radiation risk in space. Of particular interest has been the question of how the biological efficiency for the cellular inactivation endpoint relates to the initial lesions (DSBs) at varying LETs. For cell killing, an increased Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) has been determined for highLET radiation around 100-200 keV/mu m. At higher LET, the RBE's decrease again to values below one for the very heavy particles. At GSI, DSB-induction was measured in CHO-K1 cells following irradiation with accelerated particles covering a wide LET range. The electrophoretic elution of fragmented DNA out of agarose plugs in a constant electrical field was applied for the detection of DSB's. The fraction of DNA retained was determined considering the relative intensities of ethidium bromide fluorescence in the well and in the gel lane. Dose-effect curves were established, from which the RBE for DSB induction was calculated at a fraction of 0.7 of DNA retained In summary, these rejoining studies are in line with an enhanced severity of the DNA DSB's at higher LET's, resulting in a decreased repairability of the induced lesions. However, no information concerning the fidelity of strand breaks rejoining is provided in these studies. To assess correct rejoining of DNA fragments an experimental system involving individual DNA hybridization bands has been set up. In preliminary experiments Sal I generated DNA fragments of 0.9 Mbp were irradiated with xrays and incubated for repair However, restitution of the original signals was not observed, probably due to the high radiation dose necessary for breakage of a fragment of this size. A banding pattern with NotI hybridization signals in a higher MW range (3Mbp) has been obtained by varying

  2. Mechanical relaxation of localized residual stresses associatedwith foreign object damage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B.L.; Chen, X.; Peters, J.O.; Hutchinson, J.H.; Ritchie,R.O.

    2002-05-01

    Foreign-object damage associated with the ingestion ofdebris into aircraft turbine engines can lead to a marked degradation inthe high-cycle fatigue life of turbine components. This degradation isgenerally considered to be associated with the premature initiation offatigue cracks at or near the damage sites; this is suspected to be dueto, at least in part, the impact-induced residual stress state, which canbe strongly tensile in these locations.

  3. FAIR project at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Oliver; Spiller, Peter; Stoecker, Horst

    FAIR -- the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe -- constructed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research (FBTR, 2006). FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated and cost efficient accelerator system, which delivers parallel beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations -- APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA. The accelerated primary beams will then be employed to create new, often highly exotic particles in a series of parallel experimental programs. Experiments with exotic particles will explore fundamental processes which are expected to have taken place in the early phases and still happen in the on-going evolution of the Universe. These processes produced the basic constituents of matter and overall structure we observe today...

  4. Geodetic VLBI Activities at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro

    2001-03-01

    The Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) has been performing geodetic VLBI observations to correct the positions of geodetic control points in Japan and to detect plate motion and crustal deformation around Japan. In 1981, GSI began development of a mobile VLBI system in cooperation with the Communications Research Laboratory, and used this system from 1986 to 1993 in the VLBI Experiment for Geodetic Application (VEGA) project. The most remarkable achievement of the VEGA project was the first detection of motion of the Philippine Sea plate. The GSI also carried out VLBI observations between Japan and Korea in 1995 by transporting a mobile system with a 3.8-m antenna to Korea. In 1994, ownership of the Kashima 26-m antenna was transferred from CRL to GSI, and with this antenna, GSI started to participate in international global observations, The coordinates of the Kashima 26-m antenna in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) have become the primary point of a new Japanese Geodetic Datum, At present, GSI's VLBI network in Japan consists of five stations that are used to perform regular VLBI observations. More than 30 years have passed, however, since the construction of the Kashima 26-m antenna, and its role has been passed on to the Tsukuba station, which will now participate in international global observations and act as the key station of the Japanese VLBI network.

  5. A methodology to predict damage initiation, damage growth and residual strength in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    In this research, a methodology to predict damage initiation, damage growth, fatigue life, and residual strength in titanium matrix composites (TMC) is outlined. Emphasis was placed on micromechanics-based engineering approaches. Damage initiation was predicted using a local effective strain approach. A finite element analysis verified the prevailing assumptions made in the formulation of this model. Damage growth, namely, fiber-bridged matrix crack growth, was evaluated using a fiber bridging (FB) model which accounts for thermal residual stresses. This model combines continuum fracture mechanics and micromechanics analyses yielding stress-intensity factor solutions for fiber-bridged matrix cracks. It is assumed in the FB model that fibers in the wake of the matrix crack are idealized as a closure pressure, and an unknown constant frictional shear stress is assumed to act along the debond length of the bridging fibers. This frictional shear stress was used as a curve fitting parameter to the available experimental data. Fatigue life and post-fatigue residual strength were predicted based on the axial stress in the first intact 0 degree fiber calculated using the FB model and a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

  6. Damage detection using successive parameter subset selections and multiple modal residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titurus, B.; Friswell, M. I.

    2014-03-01

    The use of modal response residuals and parameterized models forms the framework for parameter subset selection based damage detection. This research explores the novel approach in this class of methods which is characterized by the successive application of the homogeneous modal response residuals. The motivation behind this approach is to restrict the use of unknown weighting factors which are employed in cases with mixed response residuals. Particular attention is given to the parameter-effect symmetry issues and large nonlinear changes in response residuals due to increasing damage observed across multiple damage levels. A case study involving a real aluminum three-dimensional frame structure with a loose joint connection is used to demonstrate the approach and its ability to localize the damaged area.

  7. The FIRST experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleskac, R.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, C.; Golosio, B.; Gallardo, M. I.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Piersanti, L.; Quesada, J. M.; Raciti, G.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.; Patera, V.

    2012-06-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at the SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt has been designed for the measurement of ion fragmentation cross-sections at different angles and energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in several fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The start of the scientific program of the FIRST experiment was on summer 2011 and was focused on the measurement of 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8 mm) graphite target. The detector is partly based on an already existing setup made of a dipole magnet (ALADiN), a time projection chamber (TP-MUSIC IV), a neutron detector (LAND) and a time of flight scintillator system (TOFWALL). This pre-existing setup has been integrated with newly designed detectors in the Interaction Region, around the carbon target placed in a sample changer. The new detectors are a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger scintillator system optimized for the detection of light fragments emitted at large angles. In this paper we review the experimental setup, then we present the simulation software, the data acquisition system and finally the trigger strategy of the experiment.

  8. Mouse bone marrow cytogenetic damage produced by residues of tequila.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Bujaidar, E; Rojas, A; Ramos, A; Rosas, E; Díaz Barriga-Arceo, S

    1990-06-01

    Five concentrations (50-860 mg/kg) of residues obtained after distillation and lyophilization of commercial tequila were injected into mice for evaluation of chromosome aberrations, sister-chromatid exchanges, and proliferation kinetics in mouse bone marrow cells. Appropriate positive and negative controls were included. Our results showed significant dose-related increases of chromosomal aberrations starting at 50 mg/kg and for sister-chromatid exchanges at 430 mg/kg. Cellular proliferation kinetics showed no alterations. With these data we demonstrated that the residues of tequila are genotoxic in vivo.

  9. Impact damage and residual tension strength of a thick graphite/epoxy rocket motor case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    Impacters of various masses were dropped from various heights onto thick graphite/epoxy filament-wound cylinders. The cylinders represented filament-wound cases made for the booster motors of the Space Shuttle. Tups of various shapes were affixed to the impacters. Some of the cylinders were filled with inert propellant, and some were empty. The cylinders were impacted numerous times around the circumference and then cut into tension coupons, each containing an impact site. The size of the damage and the residual tension strength were measured. For hemispherical tups, strength was reduced as much as 30 percent by nonvisible damage. The damage consisted of matrix cracking and broken fibers. Analytical methods were used to predict the damage and residual tension strength. A factor of safety to account for nonvisible damage was determined. For corner and rod shaped tups, any damage that resulted in strength loss was readily visible.

  10. A Progressive Damage Methodology for Residual Strength Predictions of Notched Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1998-01-01

    The translaminate fracture behavior of carbon/epoxy structural laminates with through-penetration notches was investigated to develop a residual strength prediction methodology for composite structures. An experimental characterization of several composite materials systems revealed a fracture resistance behavior that was very similar to the R-curve behavior exhibited by ductile metals. Fractographic examinations led to the postulate that the damage growth resistance was primarily due to fractured fibers in the principal load-carrying plies being bridged by intact fibers of the adjacent plies. The load transfer associated with this bridging mechanism suggests that a progressive damage analysis methodology will be appropriate for predicting the residual strength of laminates with through-penetration notches. A progressive damage methodology developed by the authors was used to predict the initiation and growth of matrix cracks and fiber fracture. Most of the residual strength predictions for different panel widths, notch lengths, and material systems were within about 10% of the experimental failure loads.

  11. Response surface characterization of impact damage and residual strength degradation in composite sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarah, Issam Khder

    2003-06-01

    The influence of material configuration and impact parameters on the damage tolerance characteristics of sandwich composites comprised of carbon-epoxy woven fabric facesheets and Nomex honeycomb cores was investigated using empirically based response surfaces. A series of carefully selected tests were used to isolate the coupled influence of various combinations of the number of facesheet plies, core density, core thickness, impact energy, impactor diameter, and impact velocity on the damage formation and residual strength degradation due to normal impact. The ranges of selected material parameters were typical of those found in common aircraft applications. The diameter of the planar damage area associated with Through Transmission Ultrasonic C-scan measurements and the peak residual facesheet indentation depth were used to describe the extent of internal and detectable surface damage, respectively. Standard analysis of variance techniques were used to assess the significance of the regression models, individual model terms, and model lack-of-fit. In addition, the inherent variability associated with given types of experimental measurements was evaluated. Response surface estimates of the size of the planar damage region and compressive residual strength as a continuous function of material system and impact parameters correlated reasonably well with experimentally determined values. For a fixed set of impact parameters, regression results suggest that impact damage development and residual strength degradation is highly material and lay-up configuration dependent. Increasing the number of facesheet plies and the thickness of the core material generally resulted in the greatest improvement in the damage tolerance characteristics. An increase in the impact energy can result in a significant decrease in the estimated residual strength, particularly for those sandwich panels with thicker facesheets. The effects of variable impact velocity on damage formation and loss

  12. Glucose autoxidation induces functional damage to proteins via modification of critical arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A; McDonald, W Hayes; Hachey, David L; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-07-12

    Nonenzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to α(V)β(3) integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while nonoxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation.

  13. Damage detection in elastic structures using vibratory residual forces and weighted sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricles, J. M.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is presented for detecting structural damage in elastic structures by nondestructive means. Measured modal test data along with a correlated analytical structural model are used to locate potentially damaged regions using residual modal force vectors and to conduct a weighted sensitivity analysis to assess the extent of mass and/or stiffness variations, where damage is characterized as a stiffness reduction. The current approach is unique among other approaches in that it accounts for (1) variations in system mass, system stiffness, and mass center (locations), (2) perturbations of both the natural frequencies and modal vectors, and (3) statistical confidence factors for the structural parameters and potential experimental instrumentation error. Moreover, this procedure can be used with either full or reduced models. A wide variety of numerical examples are presented that show that the current method provides a precise indication of both the location and the extent of structural damage.

  14. On Using Residual Voltage to Estimate Electrode Model Parameters for Damage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ashwati; Kelly, Shawn K.

    2016-01-01

    Current technology has enabled a significant increase in the number of electrodes for electrical stimulation. For large arrays of electrodes, it becomes increasingly difficult to monitor and detect failures at the stimulation site. In this paper, we propose the idea that the residual voltage from a biphasic electrical stimulation pulse can serve to recognize damage at the electrode-tissue interface. We use a simple switch circuit approach to estimate the relaxation time constant of the electrode model, which essentially models the residual voltage in biphasic electrical stimulation, and compare it with standard electrode characterization techniques. Out of 15 electrodes in a polyimide-based SIROF array, our approach highlights 3 damaged electrodes, consistent with measurements made using cyclic voltammetry and electrode impedance spectroscopy. PMID:27231725

  15. Vision restoration after brain and retina damage: the "residual vision activation theory".

    PubMed

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Fedorov, Anton; Gall, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Vision loss after retinal or cerebral visual injury (CVI) was long considered to be irreversible. However, there is considerable potential for vision restoration and recovery even in adulthood. Here, we propose the "residual vision activation theory" of how visual functions can be reactivated and restored. CVI is usually not complete, but some structures are typically spared by the damage. They include (i) areas of partial damage at the visual field border, (ii) "islands" of surviving tissue inside the blind field, (iii) extrastriate pathways unaffected by the damage, and (iv) downstream, higher-level neuronal networks. However, residual structures have a triple handicap to be fully functional: (i) fewer neurons, (ii) lack of sufficient attentional resources because of the dominant intact hemisphere caused by excitation/inhibition dysbalance, and (iii) disturbance in their temporal processing. Because of this resulting activation loss, residual structures are unable to contribute much to everyday vision, and their "non-use" further impairs synaptic strength. However, residual structures can be reactivated by engaging them in repetitive stimulation by different means: (i) visual experience, (ii) visual training, or (iii) noninvasive electrical brain current stimulation. These methods lead to strengthening of synaptic transmission and synchronization of partially damaged structures (within-systems plasticity) and downstream neuronal networks (network plasticity). Just as in normal perceptual learning, synaptic plasticity can improve vision and lead to vision restoration. This can be induced at any time after the lesion, at all ages and in all types of visual field impairments after retinal or brain damage (stroke, neurotrauma, glaucoma, amblyopia, age-related macular degeneration). If and to what extent vision restoration can be achieved is a function of the amount of residual tissue and its activation state. However, sustained improvements require repetitive

  16. Vision restoration after brain and retina damage: the "residual vision activation theory".

    PubMed

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Fedorov, Anton; Gall, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Vision loss after retinal or cerebral visual injury (CVI) was long considered to be irreversible. However, there is considerable potential for vision restoration and recovery even in adulthood. Here, we propose the "residual vision activation theory" of how visual functions can be reactivated and restored. CVI is usually not complete, but some structures are typically spared by the damage. They include (i) areas of partial damage at the visual field border, (ii) "islands" of surviving tissue inside the blind field, (iii) extrastriate pathways unaffected by the damage, and (iv) downstream, higher-level neuronal networks. However, residual structures have a triple handicap to be fully functional: (i) fewer neurons, (ii) lack of sufficient attentional resources because of the dominant intact hemisphere caused by excitation/inhibition dysbalance, and (iii) disturbance in their temporal processing. Because of this resulting activation loss, residual structures are unable to contribute much to everyday vision, and their "non-use" further impairs synaptic strength. However, residual structures can be reactivated by engaging them in repetitive stimulation by different means: (i) visual experience, (ii) visual training, or (iii) noninvasive electrical brain current stimulation. These methods lead to strengthening of synaptic transmission and synchronization of partially damaged structures (within-systems plasticity) and downstream neuronal networks (network plasticity). Just as in normal perceptual learning, synaptic plasticity can improve vision and lead to vision restoration. This can be induced at any time after the lesion, at all ages and in all types of visual field impairments after retinal or brain damage (stroke, neurotrauma, glaucoma, amblyopia, age-related macular degeneration). If and to what extent vision restoration can be achieved is a function of the amount of residual tissue and its activation state. However, sustained improvements require repetitive

  17. A Progressive Damage Methodology for Residual Strength Predictions of Center-Crack Tension Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of translaminate fracture and a progressive damage methodology was conducted to evaluate and develop a residual strength prediction capability for laminated composites with through penetration notches. This is relevant to the damage tolerance of an aircraft fuselage that might suffer an in-flight accident such as an uncontained engine failure. An experimental characterization of several composite materials systems revealed an R-curve type of behavior. Fractographic examinations led to the postulate that this crack growth resistance could be due to fiber bridging, defined here as fractured fibers of one ply bridged by intact fibers of an adjacent ply. The progressive damage methodology is currently capable of predicting the initiation and growth of matrix cracks and fiber fracture. Using two difference fiber failure criteria, residual strength was predicted for different size panel widths and notch lengths. A ply discount fiber failure criterion yielded extremely conservative results while an elastic-perfectly plastic fiber failure criterion showed that the fiber bridging concept is valid for predicting residual strength for tensile dominated failure loads. Furthermore, the R-curves predicted by the model using the elastic-perfectly plastic fiber criterion compared very well with the experimental R-curves.

  18. Dependence of the Perpendicular Residual Leakage Magnetic Flux Density on Fatigue Damage in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.; Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.

    2003-03-01

    In order to estimate the amount of plane bending fatigue damage in an austenitic stainless steel (SUS304), we were investigating the relationship between plane bending fatigue damage and the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density caused by martensitic structure induced by plane bending fatigue. A specimen such as SUS304 had been excited in a constant external magnetic field perpendicularly to measure dependence of the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density on plane bending fatigue damage accurately. The Z component of the magnetic flux density at 1 mm above a specimen is measured by using a thin-film flux-gate (FG) magnetic sensor. Residual magnetization is caused by partial martensitic structure in an austenitic stainless steel induced by cyclic bending stress. From our experiments, we can evaluate dependence of the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density on plane bending fatigue damage and know the relationship between growth of a crack and the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density.

  19. A damage-softening statistical constitutive model considering rock residual strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-liang; Li, Yong-chi; Wang, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    Under stress, the microcracks in rock evolve (initiation, growth and coalescence) from damage to fracture with a continuous process. In order to describe this continuous process, a damage-softening statistical constitutive model for rock was proposed based on the Weibull distribution of mesoscopic element strength. This model usually adopts the Drucker-Prager criterion as its distribution parameter of mesoscopic element strength, which may produce larger damage zone in numerical simulations. This paper mainly studies the effects of strength criteria and residual strength on the performance of this damage-softening statistical constitutive model of rock. Main works include following three aspects: Firstly, the mechanical behaviors of rock are comparatively studied when the Drucker-Prager and the Mohr-Coulomb criteria are employed, respectively, as the distribution parameter. Then, a coefficient is introduced to make this constitutive model be capable of describing the residual strength of rock. Finally, a user-defined subroutine is concisely developed for this model and checked through typical strain paths. The current work lays a good foundation for further application of this model in geotechnics and geosciences.

  20. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

    2009-11-02

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  1. Residual radiation damage in the mouse foot after exposure to heavy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    Mice receiving a first treatment with graded doses of various heavy charged particles to one of their hind legs were re-exposed to a fixed dose of x rays eight months later to study the memory of residual damage from the first treatment. No significant memory of the first radiation exposure was observed for acute skin reaction. However, there is an indication of memory for foot deformity. The results do not seem to indicate any significant differences in memory after exposure to /sup 60/Co gamma rays compared with protons or heavy ions, if biological effectiveness of the doses is taken into consideration.

  2. Residual radiation damage in the mouse foot after exposure to heavy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    Mice receiving a first treatment with graded doses of various heavy charged particles (protons and heavy ions) to one of their hind legs were re-exposed to a fixed dose of x rays eight months later to study the memory of residual damage from the first treatment. No significant memory of the first radiation exposure was observed for acute skin reaction. However, there is an indication of memory for foot deformity. The results do not seem to indicate any significant differences in memory after exposure to 60Co gamma rays compared with protons or heavy ions, if biological effectiveness of the doses is taken into consideration.

  3. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compression Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compression strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compression loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  4. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compressive strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compressive loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  5. Residual skin damage in rats 1 year after exposure to x rays or accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, J.T.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with a study on the biological effects of accelerated heavy ions on rat spinal cord, we were able to assess the residual skin damage remaining 1 year postirradiation. In this study, rats were irradiated with 230-kVp fractionated doses of either X rays, carbon ions, or neon ions. Four radiation fractions were given at daily intervals. For the carbon and neon ion exposures, rats were irradiated in both the plateau and spread Bragg peak (4 cm) regions of ionization. Comparing doses that produced complete epilation with a slight suggestion of a residual radiation scar, it was found that the relative biological effectivesness (RBE) values 1 year postirradiation for the four fraction irradiations were: carbon ions (plateau ionization region), 1.06; carbon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 1.88; neon ions (plateau region of ionization), 1.55; and neon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 2.26. RBE values for production of paralysis after spinal cord irradiation (using the same X-ray total dose levels for comparison purposes) were in all cases higher than the RBE values obtained from assessment of residual skin injury.

  6. Vacuum arc ion source development at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Emig, H.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Ion beams produced by the Mevva ion source are well suited for the injection into a synchrotron accelerator due to the low repetition rate (0.2 ... 5 Hz, the higher repetition rate is for the optimization of the linear accelerator only) and the short pulse length (up to 0.5ms). From the beginning of the authors experience with the Mevva ion source at GSI they tried to improve the reliability of pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and to minimize the noise on the extracted ion beam. For accelerator application this is highly necessary, otherwise the accelerator tuning and optimization becomes very difficult or even impossible. Already the beam transport becomes difficult for a noisy beam, because space charge compensation can be destroyed (at least partially). Furthermore a noisy dc-beam results in some rf-buckets which might be even empty.

  7. Two glycosylase families diffusively scan DNA using a wedge residue to probe for and identify oxidatively damaged bases.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shane R; Dunn, Andrew R; Kathe, Scott D; Warshaw, David M; Wallace, Susan S

    2014-05-20

    DNA glycosylases are enzymes that perform the initial steps of base excision repair, the principal repair mechanism that identifies and removes endogenous damages that occur in an organism's DNA. We characterized the motion of single molecules of three bacterial glycosylases that recognize oxidized bases, Fpg, Nei, and Nth, as they scan for damages on tightropes of λ DNA. We find that all three enzymes use a key "wedge residue" to scan for damage because mutation of this residue to an alanine results in faster diffusion. Moreover, all three enzymes bind longer and diffuse more slowly on DNA that contains the damages they recognize and remove. Using a sliding window approach to measure diffusion constants and a simple chemomechanical simulation, we demonstrate that these enzymes diffuse along DNA, pausing momentarily to interrogate random bases, and when a damaged base is recognized, they stop to evert and excise it.

  8. The influence of tensile fatigue damage on residual compressive strength of woven composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrovic, M.; Carman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    The long term mechanical fatigue of a Celion G30-500/PMR-15 woven composite system is investigated to study the interrelationship between thermo-mechanical properties, namely the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and the compressive strength. Residual compressive strength measurements (IITRI fixture) conducted on specimens subjected to tension-tension fatigue cycling indicate that this material property is sensitive to cracks and delaminations which form during mechanical cycling. Measured compressive strength degradation are as large as 49% for this material undergoing mechanical fatigue cycling with TEC degradation as large as 61%. Experimental results show that a correlation exists between TEC measurements and compressive strength. This correlation suggests that TEC measurements may be used as a damage evaluation technique.

  9. Damage of composite structures: Detection technique, dynamic response and residual strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Wahyu

    2001-10-01

    Reliable and accurate health monitoring techniques can prevent catastrophic failures of structures. Conventional damage detection methods are based on visual or localized experimental methods and very often require prior information concerning the vicinity of the damage or defect. The structure must also be readily accessible for inspections. The techniques are also labor intensive. In comparison to these methods, health-monitoring techniques that are based on the structural dynamic response offers unique information on failure of structures. However, systematic relations between the experimental data and the defect are not available and frequently, the number of vibration modes needed for an accurate identification of defects is much higher than the number of modes that can be readily identified in the experiment. These motivated us to develop an experimental data based detection method with systematic relationships between the experimentally identified information and the analytical or mathematical model representing the defective structures. The developed technique use changes in vibrational curvature modes and natural frequencies. To avoid misinterpretation of the identified information, we also need to understand the effects of defects on the structural dynamic response prior to developing health-monitoring techniques. In this thesis work we focus on two type of defects in composite structures, namely delamination and edge notch like defect. Effects of nonlinearity due to the presence of defect and due to the axial stretching are studied for beams with delamination. Once defects are detected in a structure, next concern is determining the effects of the defects on the strength of the structure and its residual stiffness under dynamic loading. In this thesis, energy release rate due to dynamic loading in a delaminated structure is studied, which will be a foundation toward determining the residual strength of the structure.

  10. Impact damage resistance and residual property assessment of (0/+/-45/90)s SCS-6/Timetal 21S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Portanova, Marc A.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1995-01-01

    The impact damage resistance and residual mechanical properties of (0/ +/- 45/90)s SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites were evaluated. Both quasi-static indentation and drop-weight impact tests were used to investigate the impact behavior at two nominal energy levels (5.5 and 8.4 J) and determine the onset of internal damage. Through x-ray inspection, the extent of internal damage was characterized non-destructively. The composite strength and constant amplitude fatigue response were evaluated to assess the effects of the sustained damage. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize internal damage from impact in comparison to damage that occurs during mechanical loading alone. The effect of stacking sequence was examined by using specimens with the long dimension of the specimen both parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to the 0 deg fiber direction. Damage in the form of longitudinal and transverse cracking occurred in all longitudinal specimens tested at energies greater than 6.3 J. Similar results occurred in the transverse specimens tested above 5.4 J. Initial load drop, characteristic of the onset of damage, occurred on average at 6.3 J in longitudinal specimens and at 5.0 J in transverse specimens. X-ray analysis showed broken fibers in the impacted region in specimens tested at the higher impact energies. At low impact energies, visible matrix cracking may occur, but broken fibers may not. Matrix cracking was noted along fiber swims and it appeared to depend on the surface quality of composite. At low impact energies, little damage has been incurred by the composite and the residual strength and residual life is not greatly reduced as compared to an undamaged composite. At higher impact energies, more damage occurred and a greater effect of the impact damage was observed.

  11. S1219 residue of 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase upon DNA damage and required for proper execution of DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haemi; Kwak, Hee-Jin; Cho, Il-taeg; Park, Seok Hee; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2009-01-02

    53BP1 is phosphorylated by the protein kinase ATM upon DNA damage. Even though several ATM phosphorylation sites in 53BP1 have been reported, those sites have little functional implications in the DNA damage response. Here, we show that ATM phosphorylates the S1219 residue of 53BP1 in vitro and that the residue is phosphorylated in cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Transfection with siRNA targeting ATM abolished IR-induced phosphorylation at this residue, supporting the theory that this process is mediated by the kinase. To determine the functional relevance of this phosphorylation event, a U2OS cell line expressing S1219A mutant 53BP1 was established. IR-induced foci formation of MDC1 and {gamma}H2AX, DNA damage signaling molecules, was reduced in this cell line, implying that S1219 phosphorylation is required for recruitment of these molecules to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, overexpression of the mutant protein impeded IR-induced G2 arrest. In conclusion, we have shown that S1219 phosphorylation by ATM is required for proper execution of DNA damage response.

  12. Experimental Investigations on Fatigue Damage and Residual Properties of Interacting Notched Woven E-Glass/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskara Rao, Pathakokila; Rama Krishna, Avasarala; Ramji, Koona; Satya Devi, Ambadipudi

    2015-10-01

    The interacting notched laminates of plain weave E-glass fiber reinforced with epoxy were fatigued at predetermined frequency in tension-tension to investigate the fatigue damage and residual properties. The results from stress-life curves summarize that damage growing around the notches due to stress concentration is the underlying cause for the variation in fatigue strengths among the geometrically different specimens considered. The residual strength and modulus decay with respect to cycle number at 50 % of the ultimate tensile strength were investigated. It is evident from the experimental data that the residual strength decreases with cycle number and increases due to redistribution of stress around the notches. The detailed study of the damage development under cyclic loads also explains the causes of modulus reduction for all the laminate geometries.

  13. Relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and residual tensile strength of a thick graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made to determine the relevance of impacter shape to nonvisible damage and tensile residual strength of a 36 mm (1.4 in.) thick graphite/epoxy motor case. The shapes of the impacters were as follows: 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemispheres, a sharp corner, and a 6.3 mm (0.25 in.) diameter bolt-like rod. The investigation revealed that damage initiated when the contact pressure exceeded a critical level. However, the damage was not visible on the surface until an even higher pressure was exceeded. The damage on the surface consisted of a crater shaped like the impacter, and the damage below the surface consisted of broken fibers. The impact energy to initiate damage or cause visible damage on the surface increased approximately with impacter diameter to the third power. The reduction in strength for nonvisible damage increased with increasing diameter, 9 and 30 percent for the 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemispheres, respectively. The corner impacter made visible damage on the surface for even the smallest impact energy. The rod impacter acted like a punch and sliced through the composite. Even so, the critical level of pressure to initiate damage was the same for the rod and hemispherical impacters. Factors of safety for nonvisible damage increased with increasing kinetic energy of impact. The effects of impacter shape on impact force, damage size, damage visibility, and residual tensile strength were predicted quite well assuming Hertzian contact and using maximum stress criteria and a surface crack analysis.

  14. Proton microscopy at GSI and FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Frank E; Mariam, Fesseha G; Golubev, A A; Turtikov, V I; Varentsov, D

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and facilities have been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international collaboration was formed to develop a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR (PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. These dynamic experiments will be driven with many energy sources including heavy ions, high explosives and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  15. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  16. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  17. Luminescence Studies of Residual Damage in Low-Dose Arsenic Implanted Silicon after High-Temperature Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagara, Akihiko; Hiraiwa, Miori; Shibata, Satoshi; Sugie, Ryuichi; Yamada, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    In order to prevent the degradation of device performance, it is necessary to detect and reduce residual damage remaining after ion implantation and annealing. In this study, we focused on the high-temperature annealing process after low-dose arsenic (As) implantation in silicon (Si) and evaluated the correlation of annealing conditions and damage by cathodoluminescence (CL) compared to Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Junction Photo-Voltage (JPV) results. Increasing the annealing temperature with the high-heat-up rate, As profile and the sheet resistance didn't change. However, the intensity of the band-to-band transition increased with temperature. This implies the some kind of residual damage remains after low-temperature annealing and it is removed with increasing annealing temperature. On the other hand, with increasing the annealing time at 1200 °C, more As was piled-up at the SiO2/Si interface and the luminescence intensity decreased. We guess this piled-up As is inactive and it may create some kind of damage combined with the defects around the interface, and these damage types cause the suppression of the luminescence intensity. We concluded that the luminescence intensity reflects the various kinds of damage and optical characterization methods have a potential to evaluate defect evolution in annealing process.

  18. Residual strength and repair of dent-damaged tubulars and the implication on offshore platform reassessment and requalification

    SciTech Connect

    Ricles, J.M.; Bruin, W.M.; Sooi, T.K.

    1994-12-31

    Presently there are over 3,500 major offshore platforms in United States waters. A majority of these structures were designed for a 20-year life period, and are still in operation today after 30 and even 40 years of service. This paper discusses an ongoing research study on the evaluation of the residual strength and grout repair of dent-damaged offshore platform steel tubular bracing. This study is highly relevant to the rehabilitation and requalification of offshore platforms, since dent-damage due to dropped objects or vessel collisions is a common occurrence in these structures and shown to cause a reduction in member strength.

  19. Simulation of balloon angioplasty in residually stressed blood vessels-Application of a gradient-enhanced fibre damage model.

    PubMed

    Polindara, César; Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    In this contribution we study the balloon angioplasty in a residually stressed artery by means of a non-local gradient-enhanced fibre damage model. The balloon angioplasty is a common surgical intervention used to extend or reopen narrowed blood vessels in order to restore the continuous blood flow in, for instance, atherosclerotic arteries. Inelastic, i.e. predominantly damage-related and elastoplastic processes are induced in the artery during its inflation resulting in an irreversible deformation. As a beneficial consequence, provided that the inelastic deformations do not exceed a specific limit, higher deformations can be obtained within the same pressure level and a continuous blood flow can be guaranteed. In order to study the mechanical response of the artery in this scenario, we make use of the non-local gradient-enhanced model proposed in Waffenschmidt et al. (2014). In this contribution, we extend this model to make use of an incompressible format in connection with a Q1Q1P0 finite element implementation. The residual stresses in the artery are also taken into account following the framework presented in Waffenschmidt (2015). From the results it becomes apparent that, when the artery is subjected to radial stresses beyond the physiological range, damage evolution is triggered in the collagen fibres. The impact of the residual stresses on the structural response and on the circumferential stress distribution along the thickness of the arterial wall is also studied. It is observed that the residual stresses have a beneficial effect on the mechanical response of the arterial wall.

  20. Simulation of balloon angioplasty in residually stressed blood vessels-Application of a gradient-enhanced fibre damage model.

    PubMed

    Polindara, César; Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    In this contribution we study the balloon angioplasty in a residually stressed artery by means of a non-local gradient-enhanced fibre damage model. The balloon angioplasty is a common surgical intervention used to extend or reopen narrowed blood vessels in order to restore the continuous blood flow in, for instance, atherosclerotic arteries. Inelastic, i.e. predominantly damage-related and elastoplastic processes are induced in the artery during its inflation resulting in an irreversible deformation. As a beneficial consequence, provided that the inelastic deformations do not exceed a specific limit, higher deformations can be obtained within the same pressure level and a continuous blood flow can be guaranteed. In order to study the mechanical response of the artery in this scenario, we make use of the non-local gradient-enhanced model proposed in Waffenschmidt et al. (2014). In this contribution, we extend this model to make use of an incompressible format in connection with a Q1Q1P0 finite element implementation. The residual stresses in the artery are also taken into account following the framework presented in Waffenschmidt (2015). From the results it becomes apparent that, when the artery is subjected to radial stresses beyond the physiological range, damage evolution is triggered in the collagen fibres. The impact of the residual stresses on the structural response and on the circumferential stress distribution along the thickness of the arterial wall is also studied. It is observed that the residual stresses have a beneficial effect on the mechanical response of the arterial wall. PMID:26924658

  1. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven: Evaluating the Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knodell, Claire; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven seeks to empower the girls of today to shape the science of tomorrow. Funded by the NSF and Yale University and held at Yale, this program was designed to motivate, empower, and interest middle school girls in developing the skills required to pursue a career in science during a day-long investigation of the session's featured topic in science. Yale students and female professors act as mentors and guide younger girls through an environment for understanding and exploring various disciplines of science through hands-on activities in a laboratory setting. GSI strives to close the gap between males and females one action-packed Saturday at a time. This paper evaluates the success of the program. Student participant evaluations over the past 2 years coupled with student testimony and GSI coordinator, instructors', and volunteers' interviews allowed for an analysis of GSI's ability to inspire girls to pursue careers in science. The data indicates that a majority of girls who attended the program were more inclined to continue their study of science. The positive results are detailed in the following paper which points to the hands-on activities and enthusiasm of instructors as integral to the program's success.

  2. Search for Two-Proton Emitters at FRS-GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuetzner, M.

    2000-12-31

    A project of studying proton drip-line nuclei in vicinity of {sup 48}Ni, running at GSI Darmstadt, is shortly reviewed. Prospects for spectroscopy studies on {sup 45}Fe, presently identified as the best candidate for the 2p radioactivity, are briefly discussed.

  3. Proton Emission Studies at GSI in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    2000-12-31

    This article describes the experiments that were performed during the first decade of the operation of UNILAC, GSI-Darmstadt, at the recoil separator SHIP and the on-line mass separator. The measurements resulted in the discovery of the first radioactive ground state proton emitters, {sup 151}Lu and {sup 147}Tm.

  4. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1990-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in a composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  5. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.; Farley, Gary L.; Maiden, Janice; Coogan, Dreux; Moore, Judith G.

    1991-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  6. Evaluation of residual strength in the basalt fiber reinforced composites under impact damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Jin-Woo; Moon, Kyung-Man; Yoon, Sung-Won; Baek, Tae-Sil; Hwang, Kwang-Il

    2015-03-01

    Composites are vulnerable to the impact damage by the collision as to the thickness direction, because composites are being manufactured by laminating the fiber. The understanding about the retained strength after the impact damage of the material is essential in order to secure the reliability of the structure design using the composites. In this paper, we have tried to evaluate the motion of the material according to the kinetic energy and potential energy and the retained strength after impact damage by testing the free fall test of the basalt fiber reinforced composite in the limelight as the environment friendly characteristic.

  7. Ultrasonic method to evaluate the residual properties of thermally damaged sandstone based on time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Jin-yu; Liu, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the residual properties of thermally damaged rocks is of vital importance for rock engineering. For this study, uniaxial compression experiments and ultrasonic tests were conducted on sandstone specimens which experienced temperature treatments of different levels, including 25, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000°C. Time-frequency analysis methods were applied to evaluate the deformation and strength properties of sandstone after being exposed to high temperature, confirming the effectiveness of the ultrasonic evaluation method. Linear correlations between the peak stress, deformation modulus and the longitudinal wave velocity confirm the effectiveness of ultrasonic time-domain properties in estimating the deformation behaviour of the thermally damaged sandstone. Synchronisation in the change of the peak stress and the kurtosis of frequency spectrum as temperature rises, defined in this paper to describe the spectrum distribution, as well as the centroid frequency, demonstrates the feasibility of ultrasonic frequency-domain properties in estimating the residual strength of the thermally damaged sandstone. The results have certain guiding significance for rock engineering in a high-temperature environment.

  8. Towards the Handing of Cloud-Affected Infrared Radiances in the GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, William

    2012-01-01

    In the gridpoint statistical interpolation (GSI) data assimilation algorithm, only thermal infrared measurements determined to be uncontaminated by clouds are assimilated. Using this approach, typically only 19-29% of footprints are deemed to have no cloud affects through the measured spectra. This study will discuss the efforts underway at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in conjunction with the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA), to actively assimilate these morecomplicated observations by using a graybody assumption. In the GSI, cloud top pressure and effective cloud amount are retrieved concurrently using a minimum residual method. This study will address the limitations and advantages of the technique and the modifications underway to the assimilation system to incorporate those two parameters into the radiative transfer forward operators and TL/AD calculations. Furthermore, it will explain the efforts underway to incorporate these parameters into the control vector so that they can be altered variationally as part of the minimization.

  9. Mapping residual stresses after foreign object damage using the contour method

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, M. B.; Martineau, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    A 51-mm thick plate of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA-100) steel was impacted by a 6.4 mm diameter tungsten carbide sphere traveling at 2.2 km/sec. The projectile penetration left a 10 mm diameter and 12 mm deep crater. A residual stress map over a cross-section through the crater was measured by the contour method. The predominant feature of the stress map was a peak compressive stress of 900 MPa, or 1.3 times the yield strength, centered about 1.5 crater radii below the crater floor. The results were compared with an explicit finite element simulation of the impact event. The model has good agreement with the measured residual stresses. As part of the study, residual stresses in the as-received HSLA-100 plate were also measured and found to be a typical quenching stress distribution with peak compressive stress of about 165 MPa a few mm below the surface and tensile stress of 200 MPa in the center of the plate thickness.

  10. Nondestructive indication of fatigue damage and residual lifetime in ferromagnetic construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomáš, Ivan; Kovářík, Ondřej; Vértesy, Gábor; Kadlecová, Jana

    2014-06-01

    A new revolutionary attitude toward investigation of fatigue damage in cyclically loaded steel samples is reported. The measurement is based on the method of magnetic adaptive testing, which--in contrast to traditional magnetic hysteresis investigations--picks up the relevant information from systematic measurement and evaluation of whole minor magnetic hysteresis loops and their derivatives. Satisfactory correlations between nondestructively measured magnetic descriptors and actual lifetime of the fatigued material were found. The presented method is able to serve as a powerful tool for indication of changes, which occur in the structure of the inspected objects during their industrial service lifetime, as long as they are manufactured from ferromagnetic materials.

  11. Relieved residual damage in the hematopoietic system of mice rescued by radiation-induced adaptive response (Yonezawa Effect).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Varès, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Existence of adaptive response (AR) was previously demonstrated in C57BL/6J mice. Irradiations were performed by delivering a priming low dose of X-rays (0.50 Gy) in combination with a challenge high dose of accelerated carbon or neon ion particles. AR was characterized by significantly decreased mortality in the 30-day survival test. This mouse AR model ('Yonezawa Effect') was originally established by using X-rays as both the priming and challenge irradiations. The underlying mechanism was due to radio-resistance occurring in blood-forming tissues. In this study, we verified the existence of AR and further investigated residual damage in the hematopoietic system in surviving animals. Results showed that the priming low dose of X-rays could relieve the detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system. We observed both an improvement in the blood platelet count and the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) to the sum of PCEs and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) and a marked reduction of the incidences of micronucleated PCEs and micronucleated NCEs. These findings suggest that the priming low dose of low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays induced a protective effect on the hematopoietic system, which may play an important role in both rescue from acute lethal damage (mouse killing) and prevention of late detrimental consequences (residual anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) caused by exposure to a high challenge dose from low-LET (X-ray) or high-LET (carbon and neon ion) irradiations. These findings provide new knowledge of the characterization of the Yonezawa Effect by providing new insight into the mechanistic study of AR in vivo. PMID:22923746

  12. Assimilation of GPM GMI Rainfall Product with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide. The GPM built on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) legacy, while the core observatory will extend the observations to higher latitudes. The GPM observations can help advance our understanding of precipitation microphysics and storm structures. Launched on February 27th, 2014, the GPM core observatory is carrying advanced instruments that can be used to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. Therefore, the use of GPM data in numerical modeling work is a new area and will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The goal of this research is to examine the methodology of assimilation of the GPM retrieved products. The data assimilation system used in this study is the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed by the Development Testbed Center (DTC). The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this research explores regional assimilation of the GPM products with case studies. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on the assimilation of the GPM product 2AGPROFGMI, the retrieved Microwave Imager (GMI) rainfall rate data for initializing a real convective storm. WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast of precipitation fields and processes. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to other GPM products. Further details of the methodology of data assimilation, preliminary result and test on the impact of GPM data and the

  13. Considerations for a Collector Ring of Nuclear Fragments at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Nolden, F.; Dolinsky, A.; Franzke, B.

    2000-12-31

    A possible scenario for an extension of the present GSI accelerator complex would include a dedicated ring for the collection and cooling of secondary beams. Both radioactive ions from the upgraded Fragment Separator FRS and optionally antiprotons from a source yet to be built are possible beams to be treated in the ring. After injection and subsequent active debunching, fast stochastic cooling in all three phase space dimensions will be applied. Very short overall cooling times of {le} 100 ms are envisaged for highly charged nuclear fragments.

  14. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Fehnel, Traci; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, more accurate estimate of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation can be provided. The upgrade of the traditional NWS WSR-88D radar to include dual-pol capabilities will soon be completed for the entire NEXRAD network. Therefore, the use of dual-pol radar network will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is especially challenging as few guidelines have been provided by previous research. It is our goal to examine how to best use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast of severe storm and forecast initialization. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this study explores regional assimilation of the dual-pol radar variables from the WSR-88D radars for real case storms. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on incorporating the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms, with a significant focus being on an improved representation of hydrometeor fields. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to dual-pol variables. Beyond the dual-pol variable assimilation procedure developing within a GSI framework, highresolution (=1 km) WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast

  15. Nonlinear Response and Residual Strength of Damaged Stiffened Shells Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Britt, Vicki O.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Rankin, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear response of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks are presented. The shells are modeled with a hierarchical modeling strategy and analyzed with a nonlinear shell analysis code that maintains the shell in a nonlinear equilibrium state while the crack is grown. The analysis accurately accounts for global and local structural response phenomena. Fuselage skins, frames stringers and failsafe straps are included in the models. Results are presented for various combinations of internal pressure and mechanical bending, vertical shear and torsion loads, and the effects of crack orientation and location on the shell response are described. These results indicate that the nonlinear interaction between the in-plane stress resultants and the out-of-plane displacements near a crack can significantly affect the structural response of the shell, and the stress-intensity factors associated with a crack that are used to predict residual strength. The effects of representative combined loading conditions on the stress-intensity factors associated with a crack are presented. The effects of varying structural parameters on the stress-intensity factors associated with a crack, and on self-similar and non-self-similar crack-growth are also presented.

  16. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  17. CORED RUTHERFORD CABLES FOR THE GSI FAST RAMPING SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,M.N.; GHOSH,A.K.; TEN HAKEN,B.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; KAUGERTS,J.; MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; DEN OUDEN,A.; SOIKA,R.; WANDERER,P.; WESSEL,W.A.J.

    2002-08-04

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 200T-m and 100T.m. Fast ramp times are needed, which can cause significant problems for the magnets, particularly in the areas of s c loss and field distortion. This paper discusses the 200T.m ring, which will use Cos0 magnets based on the RHIC dipole design. We discuss the reasons for choosing Rutherford cable with a resistive core and report loss measurements carried out on cable samples. These measurements are compared with theoretical calculations using measured values of inter-strand resistance. Reasonably good agreement is found, but there are indications of non-uniformity in the adjacent resistance R,. Using these measured parameters, losses and temperature rise are calculated for a RHIC dipole in the operating cycle of the accelerator. A novel insulation scheme designed to promote efficient cooling is described.

  18. TRB for HADES and FAIR experiments at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, I.; Schrader, C.; Stroeble, H.; Stroth, J.; Tarantrola, A.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemień, W.; Palka, M.; Salabura, P.; TrȨBACZ, R.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2008-06-01

    TRB module is a multi-purpose Trigger and Readout Board with on-board DAQ functionality developed for the upgrade of the HADES experiment. It contains single computer chip (Etrax) running Linux and the 100 Mbit/s Ethernet interface. It has been orginally designed as the 128-channel Time to Digital Converter based on the HPTDC chip from CERN. The new version of TRB contains 2 Gbit/s optical link and interface connector (15 Gbit/s) implementing the add-on card concept and making the board more flexible. Moreover, FPGA chip (Xilinx, Virtex 4 LX 40) and TigerSharc DSP provide new computing resources which can be used to run on-line analysis algorithms. The TRB is proposed as a prototype of base readout module for the planned detector systems PANDA and CBM at the future FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt.

  19. Effects of overlap and pass number in CO2 laser skin resurfacing: preliminary results of residual thermal damage, cell death, and wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, E. V.; Glatter, Robert D.; Duke, Daniella; Grevelink, Joop M.

    1997-05-01

    Newer carbon-dioxide laser systems incorporating short pulse and scanning technology have been used effectively to resurface the skin. Although scarring is rare, as the number of resurfacing cases has increased, some hypertrophic scarring has been observed. Previous dermabrasion and continuous wave (cw) carbon-dioxide studies suggest that depth of injury and/or thermal damage are important predictors of scarring for a given anatomic region. To determine if overlapping laser pulses/scans significantly altered wound healing, we examined residual thermal damage, cell death, and histologic and clinical wound healing in a farm pig. The Ultrapulse and SilkTouch systems were used with various radiant exposures, degrees of overlap, and numbers of passes. Thermal damage was assessed by histology, and dermal cell viability was measured with nitrotetrazolium blue staining. Presence or absence of clinical scarring was determined by noting textural change and loss of skin markings. We observed that thermal damage and cell death depth did not increase significantly with pass number; however, by double-pulsing or double-scanning sites, residual thermal damage and cell death depth were increased as much as 100% over areas without immediate overlap of laser impacts. Also, scarring was increased focally in areas with overlap. We conclude that immediate overlapping of carbon- dioxide laser pulses/scans is a significant risk factor in increasing thermal damage, cell death, and scarring.

  20. Community Service and User Support for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) Data Assimilation and Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Hu, M.; Stark, D.; Newman, K.; Zhou, C.; Derber, J.; Lueken, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system is a unified variational data assimilation and analysis system for both global and regional applications. It is currently used as a data assimilation system by various operational centers, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) (e.g., Global Forecasting System (GFS), North American Mesoscale (NAM) system, the Hurricane WRF (HWRF), and the RAPid Refresh (RAP) system), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Model), and the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). This analysis system is also used to generate certain analysis products, such as output from NOAA's GFS reanalysis and the Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) (e.g., 2m temperature, 10m winds gust, surface pressure and surface visibility). GSI can also be used to generate analyses for climate studies (e.g., ozone and sea surface temperature (SST) analyses) or assimilate non-'traditional' fields (e.g., aerosol data assimilation) for air quality studies (e.g., dust storms). Lately, an effort was initiated to use GSI for data assimilation throughout the entire atmosphere. One example of such an effort is the development of a data assimilation system for the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) at NCEP. Over the past few years, GSI has been transitioned to a community resource through a joint effort led by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), in collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) and other GSI partners. The DTC is a distributed facility with a goal of serving as a bridge between the research and operational communities by transitioning the operational capability to a community resource and committing the contributions from the research community to the operational repository. The DTC has hosted four Community GSI tutorials and released five versions of the community GSI system with a corresponding User's Guide

  1. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot

    2004-06-30

    Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  2. Damage to DNA thymine residues in CHO cells by hydrogen peroxide and copper, ascorbate and copper, hypochlorite, or other oxidants: Protection by low MW polyethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) MW 200-600, has been shown to protect animals against oxidant and radiation damage. In order to study the mechanism the authors examined the effect of PEG on damage to thymine residues in the DNA of living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. After growing to confluence in the presence of (methyl{sup 3}H)thymidine, the cells were treated, usually for 1 hr, with various combinations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Cu{sup ++}, Fe{sup ++}, Ocl{sup {minus}}, ascorbate UV or X-irradiation, and PEG MW 300. The oxidants H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Cu{sup ++}, and OCL{sup {minus}} released {sup 3}H into the medium from DNA thymine, and also formed thymine glycol residues in the DNA that were assayed by alkaline borohydride. The presence of 10% PEG during treatment significantly reduced the release of {sup 3}H into the medium but did not prevent formation of thymine glycol residues bound to the DNA. PEG at 10% had no effect on the cloning efficiency of CHO cells.

  3. Summary of a study to determine low-velocity impact damage and residual tension strength for a thick graphite/epoxy motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Impacters of various shapes and masses were dropped from various heights onto 36 mm (1.4 in.) thick graphite/epoxy cylinders, which represented filament wound cases (FWC) for the booster motors of the Space Shuttle. Insert solid propellant was cast into some of the cylinders. The cylinders were impacted numerous times around the circumference and then cut into 51 mm (2.0 in.) wide tension specimens, each containing an impact site. Four indenters were used: a sharp corner, two hemispheres, and a bolt-like rod. The diameters of the hemispheres were 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.), and the diameter of the rod was 6.3 mm (0.25 in.). Impacts with the rod were simulated by pressing the rod against the face of specimens. For the hemispheres, the damage initiated beneath the surface at a critical contact pressure and was not visible on the surface until an even larger pressure was exceeded. The damage consisted of matrix cracking and broken fiber. The rod and corner made visible surface damage in all tests. For the hemispheres, the tension strength was reduced considerably before the damage was visible on the surface, 30 percent for the 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemisphere and 10 percent for the 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) diameter hemisphere. Analytical methods were used to predict the damage and residual tension strength. A factor of safety to account for nonvisible damage was determined.

  4. Summary of a study to determine low-velocity impact damage and residual tension strength for a thick graphite/epoxy motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Impacters of various shapes and masses were dropped from various heights onto 36 mm (1.4 in.) thick graphite/epoxy cylinders, which represented filament wound cases (FWC) for the booster motors of the Space Shuttle. Insert solid propellant was cast into some of the cylinders. The cylinders were impacted numerous times around the circumference and then cut into 51 mm (2.0 in.) wide tension specimens, each containing an impact site. Four indenters were used: a sharp corner, two hemispheres, and a bolt-like rod. The diameters of the hemispheres were 12.7 mm mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.), and the diameter of the rod was 6.3 mm (0.25 in.). Impacts with the rod were simulated by pressing the rod against the face of specimens. For the hemispheres, the damage initiated beneath the surface at a critical contact pressure and was not visible on the surface until an even larger pressure was exceeded. The damage consisted of matrix cracking and broken fiber. The rod an corner made visible surface damage in all tests. For the hemispheres, the tension strength was reduced considerably before the damage was visible on the surface, 30 percent for the 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemisphere and 10 percent for the 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) diameter hemisphere. Analytical methods were used to predict the damage and residual tension strength. A factor of safety to account for nonvisible damage was determined.

  5. Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

    1996-02-21

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described.

  6. Development and Implementation of Dynamic Scripts to Execute Cycled GSI/WRF Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily; Li, Xuanli; Watson, Leela

    2014-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model and Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation (DA) are the operational systems that make up the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model and the NAM Data Assimilation System (NDAS) analysis used by National Weather Service forecasters. The Developmental Testbed Center (DTC) manages and distributes the code for the WRF and GSI, but it is up to individual researchers to link the systems together and write scripts to run the systems, which can take considerable time for those not familiar with the code. The objective of this project is to develop and disseminate a set of dynamic scripts that mimic the unique cycling configuration of the operational NAM to enable researchers to develop new modeling and data assimilation techniques that can be easily transferred to operations. The current version of the SPoRT GSI/WRF Scripts (v3.0.1) is compatible with WRF v3.3 and GSI v3.0.

  7. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites. PMID:24555676

  8. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites.

  9. An Evaluation of the Use of X-ray Residual Stress Determination as a Means of Characterizing Oxidation Damage of Nickel-Based, Cr2O3-Forming Superalloys Subjected to Various Oxidizing Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Bryan R; Watkins, Thomas R; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    The use of X-ray residual stress determination as a technique for evaluating the damage incurred by nickel-based, Cr2O3-forming superalloy materials under various service conditions (isothermal heating, thermal cycling, applied stress, stressed and cycled) was investigated. Large and small compressive residual stresses were observed for the oxides and the near surface substrates, respectively. It was expected that the applied stresses and thermal cycling would cause an enhanced degree of oxidation damage that would translate into appreciable differences in residual stress values. Differences in the magnitude of residual stress values were not appreciable condition-to-condition, however. An increase in the severity of the oxidizing conditions in the form of longer oxidation times, higher oxidizing temperatures, and a much greater frequency of thermal cycling is suggested for future studies.

  10. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers-Schoene, L. ); Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 60]Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants.

  11. GSI experiments on the synthesis of superheavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Ninov, V.; Armbruster, P.; Folger, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Stodel, Ch.; Lavrentev, A.; Popeko, A. G.; Yeremin, A. N.; Leino, M. E.; Saro, S.

    1998-02-15

    Evaporation residue production was investigated at SHIP in cold fusion reactions of Pb- and Bi-target nuclei with projectiles of elements between Ti (Z=22) and Se (Z=34) leading to compound nuclei Z{sub CN}=104-116. The isotopes {sup 269}110, {sup 271}110, {sup 272}111, and {sup 277}112 of the elements Z=110, Z=111 and Z=112 were unambiguously identified for the first time in bombardments of {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi with {sup 62,64}Ni and {sup 70}Zn. Excitation functions for {sup 50}Ti+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb were measured with high precision, three new spontaneous fission (sf) activities {sup 253}104, {sup 254}104, {sup 258}106 were identified. A small {alpha}-decay branch of the even-even nucleus {sup 256}104 (b{sub {alpha}}{approx_equal}0.003) was confirmed, allowing to estimate mass excesses {delta}mc{sup 2} for N-Z=48 nuclei up to {sup 264}Hs (Z=108). An analysis of the {alpha}-decay chains observed in a bombardment of {sup 209}Bi with {sup 58}Fe projectiles showed evidence for an isomeric state in {sup 266}Mt (Z=109). We further report on an attempt to produce element 116 and a second isotope of element 112 by the reactions {sup 82}Se+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 68}Zn+{sup 208}Pb, respectively.

  12. Assimilation of NUCAPS Retrieved Profiles in GSI for Unique Forecasting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily Beth; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral IR profiles can be assimilated in GSI as a separate observation other than radiosondes with only changes to tables in the fix directory. Assimilation of profiles does produce changes to analysis fields and evidenced by: Innovations larger than +/-2.0 K are present and represent where individual profiles impact the final temperature analysis.The updated temperature analysis is colder behind the cold front and warmer in the warm sector. The updated moisture analysis is modified more in the low levels and tends to be drier than the original model background Analysis of model output shows: Differences relative to 13-km RAP analyses are smaller when profiles are assimilated with NUCAPS errors. CAPE is under-forecasted when assimilating NUCAPS profiles, which could be problematic for severe weather forecasting Refining the assimilation technique to incorporate an error covariance matrix and creating a separate GSI module to assimilate satellite profiles may improve results.

  13. Mechanism of 'GSI oscillations' in electron capture by highly charged hydrogen-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    We suggest a qualitative explanation of oscillations in electron capture decays of hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions observed recently in an ion experimental storage ring (ESR) of Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) mbH, Darmstadt, Germany. This explanation is based on the electron multiphoton Rabi oscillations between two Zeeman states of the hyperfine ground level with the total angular momentum F = 1/2. The Zeeman splitting is produced by a constant magnetic field in the ESR. Transitions between these states are produced by the second, sufficiently strong alternating magnetic field that approximates realistic fields in the GSI ESR. The Zeeman splitting amounts to only about 10{sup -5} eV. This allows explaining the observed quantum beats with the period 7 s.

  14. Digital geological information delivery in the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Digital information is delivered though a web portal with other spatial data from the Department of Communications Energy and Natural Resources. Individual viewers specific to major GSI topics can be access for a central web page on the GSI website. Most data is available to download from our data download site the Interactive Web Data Delivery System (IWDDS) which is interactively linked to our main viewers. More recent viewers include 3D viewers able to show the topography of a selected area, as well as dynamic legends for some layers and the ability to choose from a selection of basemaps and choose the transparency of each basemap. The hardware infrastructure for web delivery is based on virtual server technology and SAN technology, this maximises uptime and ease of administration as well as providing a flexible scaling of architecture as the need arises.

  15. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with stored, highly-charged ions at FRS-ESR at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2010-08-12

    At the FRS-ESR complex of GSI a nuclear physics program with exotic nuclei has been established in last 18 years, which also addresses key questions and nuclear properties relevant in nuclear astrophysics. The paper summarizes production of exotic nuclei, lifetime studies of highly-charged ions, direct mass measurements and reactions at internal targets. A few comments on the analysis of two-body weak decays are given.

  16. Real-time Aerosol Forecasting over North America using RAP-Chem and the GSI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    RAP-Chem is an implementation of WRF-Chem meteorology-chemistry model that is run daily at NOAA/ESRL over continental domain for air-quality forecasting. The chemical forecasts are combined with observations of species using three-dimensional variational data assimilation procedure implemented in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). In the presentation we detail the method of the assimilation and show verification statistics of the model performance.

  17. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE@CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  18. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Radiances from hyperspectral sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are routinely assimilated both globally and regionally in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system. However, only thinned, cloud-free radiances from a 281-channel subset are used, so the overall percentage of these observations that are assimilated is somewhere on the order of 5%. Cloud checks are performed within GSI to determine which channels peak above cloud top; inaccuracies may lead to less assimilated radiances or introduction of biases from cloud-contaminated radiances.Relatively large footprint from AIRS may not optimally represent small-scale cloud features that might be better resolved by higher-resolution imagers like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Objective of this project is to "swap" the MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) for that designated by the AIRS-only quality control within GSI to test the hypothesis that better representation of cloud features will result in higher assimilated radiance yields and improved forecasts.

  19. Spectroscopy of η'-nucleus bound states at GSI and FAIR — very preliminary results and future prospects —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Friedrich, S.; Geissel, H.; Gellanki, J.; Guo, C.; Gutz, E.; Haettner, E.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Higashi, Y.; Hirenzaki, S.; Hornung, C.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeno, N.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Jido, D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurz, N.; Metag, V.; Mukha, I.; Nagae, T.; Nagahiro, H.; Nanova, M.; Nishi, T.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rappold, C.; Reiter, M. P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Suzuki, K.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Widmann, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.; Yamakami, H.; Zhao, J.

    2015-08-01

    The possible existence of η'-nucleus bound states has been put forward through theoretical and experimental studies. It is strongly related to the η' mass at finite density, which is expected to be reduced because of the interplay between the U A (1) anomaly and partial restoration of chiral symmetry. The investigation of the C( p, d) reaction at GSI and FAIR, as well as an overview of the experimental program at GSI and future plans at FAIR are discussed.

  20. A regional GSI-based EnKF system for the Rapid Refresh configuration: Tests for Satellite Radiance Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kefeng; Xue, Ming

    2015-04-01

    A regional ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation (EnKF) system based on the NCEP operational Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system has been established for the target Rapid Refresh (RAP) applications. The EnKF system borrows the data processing and observation operators from the GSI system, and pre-calculates observation priors using the GSI. The filter is based on the serial ensemble square-root Kalman filter (EnSRF) and updates both the state vector and observation priors and its distributed memory parallelization is carried out at the state vector level. In this study, the impact of satellite radiance including AMSU, AIRS, MHS and HIRS within the established EnKF-RAP framework was examined. Testing is performed at the ~40 km grid spacing, and its performance is compared to the GSI system which uses three dimensional variation method. The performance is evaluated in terms of short-range (up to 18 hours) forecast errors verified again soundings. The assimilation of AMSU-A data improved the forecast accuracy for all the verified variables especially for the wind components; the assimilation of AIRS data greatly improved the forecast accuracy of relative humidity; when all the radiance data were assimilated, the forecast is the best. The forecast started from EnKF analysis is consistently better than from GSI analysis though the relative improvement is smaller than GSI. In additional, the configurations like bias correction and thinning for radiance assimilation within ENKF-RAP will be presented and discussed.

  1. Upgrading the GSI beamline microscope with a confocal fluorescence lifetime scanner to monitor charged particle induced chromatin decondensation in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Elham; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Durante, Marco; Jakob, Burkhard

    2015-12-01

    We report the upgrade of the GSI beamline microscope coupled to the linear accelerator UNILAC by a confocal FLIM scanner utilizing time correlated single photon counting technique (TCSPC). The system can now be used to address the radiation induced chromatin decondensation in more detail and with higher sensitivity compared to intensity based methods. This decondensation of heterochromatic areas is one of the early DNA damage responses observed after charged particle irradiation and might facilitate the further processing of the induced lesions. We describe here the establishment of different DNA dyes as chromatin compaction probes usable for quantification of the DNA condensation status in living cells utilizing lifetime imaging. In addition, we find an evidence of heterochromatic chromatin decondensation in ion irradiated murine chromocenters detected after subsequent fixation using FLIM measurements.

  2. Possible role of glutamine synthetase of the prokaryotic type (GSI-like) in nitrogen signaling in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana S; Seabra, Ana R; Leitão, José N; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-11-01

    Genes containing domains related to glutamine synthetase of the prokaryotic type (GSI-like) are widespread in higher plants, but their function is currently unknown. To gain insights into the possible role of GSI-like proteins, we characterized the GSI-like gene family of Medicago truncatula and investigated the functionality of the encoded proteins. M. truncatula contains two-expressed GSI-like genes, MtGSIa and MtGSIb, encoding polypeptides of 454 and 453 amino acids, respectively. Heterologous complementation assays of a bacterial glnA mutant indicate that the proteins are not catalytically functional for glutamine synthesis. Gene expression was investigated by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis in different organs of the plant and under different nitrogen (N) regimes, revealing that both genes are preferentially expressed in roots and root nodules, and that their expression is influenced by the N-status of the plant. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing MtGSI-like-promoter-gusA fusion, indicate that the two genes are strongly expressed in the root pericycle, and interestingly, the expression is enhanced at the sites of nodule emergence being particularly strong in specific cells located in front of the protoxylem poles. Taken together, the results presented here support a role of GSI-like proteins in N sensing and/or signaling, probably operating at the interface between perception of the N-status and the developmental processes underlying both root nodule and lateral root formation. This study indicates that GSI-like genes may represent a novel class of molecular players of the N-mediated signaling events. PMID:26475191

  3. Possible role of glutamine synthetase of the prokaryotic type (GSI-like) in nitrogen signaling in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana S; Seabra, Ana R; Leitão, José N; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-11-01

    Genes containing domains related to glutamine synthetase of the prokaryotic type (GSI-like) are widespread in higher plants, but their function is currently unknown. To gain insights into the possible role of GSI-like proteins, we characterized the GSI-like gene family of Medicago truncatula and investigated the functionality of the encoded proteins. M. truncatula contains two-expressed GSI-like genes, MtGSIa and MtGSIb, encoding polypeptides of 454 and 453 amino acids, respectively. Heterologous complementation assays of a bacterial glnA mutant indicate that the proteins are not catalytically functional for glutamine synthesis. Gene expression was investigated by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis in different organs of the plant and under different nitrogen (N) regimes, revealing that both genes are preferentially expressed in roots and root nodules, and that their expression is influenced by the N-status of the plant. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing MtGSI-like-promoter-gusA fusion, indicate that the two genes are strongly expressed in the root pericycle, and interestingly, the expression is enhanced at the sites of nodule emergence being particularly strong in specific cells located in front of the protoxylem poles. Taken together, the results presented here support a role of GSI-like proteins in N sensing and/or signaling, probably operating at the interface between perception of the N-status and the developmental processes underlying both root nodule and lateral root formation. This study indicates that GSI-like genes may represent a novel class of molecular players of the N-mediated signaling events.

  4. RECENT TEST RESULTS OF THE FAST-PULSED 4 T COS DIPOLE GSI 001.

    SciTech Connect

    MORITZ, G.; KAUGERTS, J.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; THOMAS, R.; WANDERER, P.; ET AL.

    2005-05-26

    For the FAIR-project at GSI a model dipole was built at BNL with the nominal field of 4 T and a nominal ramp rate of 1 T/S. The magnet design was similar to the RHIC dipole, with some changes for loss reduction and better cooling. The magnet was already successfully tested in a vertical cryostat, with good training behavior. Cryogenic losses were measured and first results of field harmonics were published. However, for a better understanding of the cooling process, quench currents at several ramp rates were investigated. Detailed measurements of the field harmonics at 2 T/S between 0 and 4 T were performed.

  5. The SHIPTRAP project: A capture and storage facility at GSI for heavy radionuclides from SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, J.; Ackermann, D.; Bernard, J.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Hornung, W.; Kluge, H. J.; Lamour, E.; Maier, M.; Mann, R.; Marx, G.; Moore, R. B.; Münzenberg, G.; Quint, W.; Rodriguez, D.; Schädel, M.; Schönfelder, J.; Sikler, G.; Toader, C.; Vermeeren, L.; Weber, C.; Bollen, G.; Engels, O.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P.; Backe, H.; Dretzke, A.; Lauth, W.; Ludolphs, W.; Sewtz, M.

    2000-08-01

    SHIPTRAP is an ion trap facility which is being set up to deliver very clean and cool beams of singly-charged recoil ions produced at the SHIP velocity filter at GSI Darmstadt. SHIPTRAP consists of a gas cell for stopping and thermalizing high-energy recoil ions from SHIP, a rf ion guide for extraction of the ions from the gas cell, a linear rf trap for accumulation and bunching of the ions, and a Penning trap for isobaric purification. The physics programme of the SHIPTRAP facility comprises mass spectrometry, nuclear spectroscopy, laser spectroscopy and chemistry of transeinsteinium elements.

  6. Study of she at GSI - Status and Perspectives for the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessberger, F. P.

    2011-03-01

    An extensive program on synthesis of superheavy elements (SHE) and investigating their nuclear structure as well as their chemical properties has been performed at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI during the past three decades. Highlights of this research program were the identification of the new elements with atomic numbers Z = 107-112, detailed nuclear structure investigations and discovery of new K isomers in the transfermium region, first chemical characterization of element 108 (hassium) and identification of the deformed doubly magic nucleus 270Hs. Part of the latest results are presented and discussed. Current and prospected upgrades of the facility and the experimental set-ups are presented.

  7. Production of high current proton beams using complex H-rich molecules at GSI.

    PubMed

    Adonin, A; Barth, W; Heymach, F; Hollinger, R; Vormann, H; Yakushev, A

    2016-02-01

    In this contribution, the concept of production of intense proton beams using molecular heavy ion beams from an ion source is described, as well as the indisputable advantages of this technique for operation of the GSI linear accelerator. The results of experimental investigations, including mass-spectra analysis and beam emittance measurements, with different ion beams (CH3(+),C2H4(+),C3H7(+)) using various gaseous and liquid substances (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and iodoethane) at the ion source are summarized. Further steps to improve the ion source and injector performance with molecular beams are depicted. PMID:26932072

  8. Production of high current proton beams using complex H-rich molecules at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adonin, A.; Barth, W.; Heymach, F.; Hollinger, R.; Vormann, H.; Yakushev, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this contribution, the concept of production of intense proton beams using molecular heavy ion beams from an ion source is described, as well as the indisputable advantages of this technique for operation of the GSI linear accelerator. The results of experimental investigations, including mass-spectra analysis and beam emittance measurements, with different ion beams (CH3+,C2H4+,C3H7+) using various gaseous and liquid substances (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and iodoethane) at the ion source are summarized. Further steps to improve the ion source and injector performance with molecular beams are depicted.

  9. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Previously, it has been shown that cloud top designation associated with quality control procedures within the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used operationally by a number of Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) partners may not provide the best representation of cloud top pressure (CTP). Because this designated CTP determines which channels are cloud-free and, thus, available for assimilation, ensuring the most accurate representation of this value is imperative to obtaining the greatest impact from satellite radiances. This paper examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing analysis increments and numerical forecasts generated using operational techniques with a research technique that swaps CTP from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the value of CTP calculated from the radiances within GSI.

  10. Performance of upstream interaction region detectors for the FIRST experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Anelli, M.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, C.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le F{èvre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2012-02-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at GSI has been designed to study carbon fragmentation, measuring 12C double differential cross sections (∂2σ/∂θ∂E) for different beam energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/u. The experimental setup integrates newly designed detectors in the, so called, Interaction Region around the graphite target. The Interaction Region upstream detectors are a 250 μm thick scintillator and a drift chamber optimized for a precise measurement of the ions interaction time and position on the target. In this article we review the design of the upstream detectors along with the preliminary results of the data taking performed on August 2011 with 400 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at GSI. Detectors performances will be reviewed and compared to those obtained during preliminary tests, performed with 500 MeV electrons (at the BTF facility in the INFN Frascati Laboratories) and 80 MeV/u protons and carbon ions (at the INFN LNS Laboratories in Catania).

  11. Towards detailed knowledge of atomic nuclei—the past, present and future of nuclear structure investigations at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerl, J.; Gόrska, M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2016-10-01

    Selected experimental nuclear structure physics results are presented which have been obtained at GSI since the mid 70ties employing the UNILAC and the SIS/FRS accelerator facility. It is shown how stable heavy-ion beams as well as radioactive isotope beams of this facility together with state-of-the-art instrumentation produced many discoveries and led to a multitude of important results covering many aspects of nuclear structure. Finally, we discuss the future directions of nuclear structure research at GSI with the FAIR/NUSTAR project.

  12. Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, at the GSI site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2006-11-01

    FAIR is a new large-scale particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research pursued at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, as well as high density plasma physics, atomic and antimatter physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. The working horse of FAIR will be a 1.1km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of short-lived radioactive ions or antiprotons. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experimental facilities are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  13. Lognormal Assimilation of Water Vapor in a WRF-GSI Cycled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. J.; Kliewer, A.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have shown the viability of both detecting a lognormally-distributed signal for water vapor mixing ratio and the improved quality of satellite retrievals in a 1DVAR mixed lognormal-Gaussian assimilation scheme over a Gaussian-only system. This mixed scheme is incorporated into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) assimilation scheme with the goal of improving forecasts from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model in a cycled system. Results are presented of the impact of treating water vapor as a lognormal random variable. Included in the analysis are: 1) the evolution of Tropical Storm Chris from 2006, and 2) an analysis of a "Pineapple Express" water vapor event from 2005 where a lognormal signal has been previously detected.

  14. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedemann, D.; Stiebing, K. E.; Winters, D. F. A.; Quint, W.; Varentsov, V.; Warczak, A.; Malarz, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-11-01

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×1012 atoms/cm3 for helium and 8.1×1012 atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  15. New Spill Structure Analysis Tools for the VME Based Data Acquisition System ABLASS at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T.; Forck, P.; Liakin, D. A.

    2006-11-01

    During the last years, a comprehensive VME-based data acquisition system for counter applications was developed. This package called ABLASS (A Beam Loss measurement And Scaling System) is used at the GSI heavy ion synchrotron (SIS18), at the high energy beam transfer lines (HEBT) and at the connected experiments. To achieve a maximum of experimental rate capability and to protect sensitive targets from significant intensity peaks, the particle distribution within the slowly extracted bunched beam has to be qualified. To analyze this spill-microstructure by means of scintillator pulses, new sophisticated tools were invented, such as Q-Analysis, which generates evaluated data in the μS-region. To measure the time distribution of the particles relative to the bunching RF-phase and the probability curve of consecutive particle hits in the ns-regime, a VME Multihit TDC with 25ps time resolution was implemented into ABLASS. The principle and outcome of these new methods substantiated by actual ion beam data will be presented.

  16. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  17. Current Status of the Development of a Transportable and Compact VLBI System by NICT and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Atsutoshi; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kurihara, Shinobu; Miura, Yuji; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometer for Baseline Length Evaluation) is under development by NICT and GSI. The main part of MARBLE is a transportable VLBI system with a compact antenna. The aim of this system is to provide precise baseline length over about 10 km for calibrating baselines. The calibration baselines are used to check and validate surveying instruments such as GPS receiver and EDM (Electro-optical Distance Meter). It is necessary to examine the calibration baselines regularly to keep the quality of the validation. The VLBI technique can examine and evaluate the calibration baselines. On the other hand, the following roles are expected of a compact VLBI antenna in the VLBI2010 project. In order to achieve the challenging measurement precision of VLBI2010, it is well known that it is necessary to deal with the problem of thermal and gravitational deformation of the antenna. One promising approach may be connected-element interferometry between a compact antenna and a VLBI2010 antenna. By measuring repeatedly the baseline between the small stable antenna and the VLBI2010 antenna, the deformation of the primary antenna can be measured and the thermal and gravitational models of the primary antenna will be able to be constructed. We made two prototypes of a transportable and compact VLBI system from 2007 to 2009. We performed VLBI experiments using theses prototypes and got a baseline length between the two prototypes. The formal error of the measured baseline length was 2.7 mm. We expect that the baseline length error will be reduced by using a high-speed A/D sampler.

  18. The stability of mRNA from the gsiB gene of Bacillus subtilis is dependent on the presence of a strong ribosome binding site.

    PubMed

    Jürgen, B; Schweder, T; Hecker, M

    1998-06-01

    In Bacillus subtilis IS58 starved of glucose or exposed to heat shock, ethanol or salt stress, the sigmaB-dependent general stress protein GsiB is accumulated to a higher level than other general stress proteins. This high-level accumulation of GsiB can at least partially be attributed to the remarkably long half-life (approximately 20 min) of the gsiB mRNA. Analysis of different gsiB-lacZ fusions revealed that this stability is not determined by sequences at the 3' end of the transcript but rather by sequences upstream of the translational start codon. Site-directed mutagenesis established that a strong ribosome binding site was crucial for the increased stability of the gsiB mRNA. A comparison of the sequences upstream of the translational start codons of three general stress genes, gsiB, gspA and ctc, revealed a direct correlation between mRNA stability and the strength of their translational signals.

  19. Optimizing expression and purification of an ATP-binding gene gsiA from Escherichia coli k-12 by using GFP fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Wang, Guangjun; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2011-01-01

    The cloning, expression and purification of the glutathione (sulfur) import system ATP-binding protein (gsiA) was carried out. The coding sequence of Escherichia coli gsiA, which encodes the ATP-binding protein of a glutathione importer, was amplified by PCR, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pWaldo-GFPe harboring green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The resulting recombinant plasmid pWaldo-GFP-GsiA was transformed into various E. coli strains, and expression conditions were optimized. The effect of five E. coli expression strains on the production of the recombinant gsiA protein was evaluated. E. coli BL21 (DE3) was found to be the most productive strain for GsiA-GFP fusion-protein expression, most of which was insoluble fraction. However, results from in-gel and Western blot analysis suggested that expression of recombinant GsiA in Rosetta (DE3) provides an efficient source in soluble form. By using GFP as reporter, the most suitable host strain was conveniently obtained, whereby optimizing conditions for overexpression and purification of the proteins for further functional and structural studies, became, not only less laborious, but also time-saving. PMID:22215971

  20. NASA SPoRT Modeling and Data Assimilation Research and Transition Activities Using WRF, LIS and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Blankenship, Clay B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    weather research and forecasting ===== The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has numerous modeling and data assimilation (DA) activities in which the WRF model is a key component. SPoRT generates realtime, research satellite products from the MODIS and VIIRS instruments, making the data available to NOAA/NWS partners running the WRF/EMS, including: (1) 2-km northwestern-hemispheric SST composite, (2) daily, MODIS green vegetation fraction (GVF) over CONUS, and (3) NASA Land Information System (LIS) runs of the Noah LSM over the southeastern CONUS. Each of these datasets have been utilized by specific SPoRT partners in local EMS model runs, with select offices evaluating the impacts using a set of automated scripts developed by SPoRT that manage data acquisition and run the NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package. SPoRT is engaged in DA research with the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter in LIS for soil moisture DA. Ongoing DA projects using GSI include comparing the impacts of assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances versus retrieved profiles, and an analysis of extra-tropical cyclones with intense non-convective winds. As part of its Early Adopter activities for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, SPoRT is conducting bias correction and soil moisture DA within LIS to improve simulations using the NASA Unified-WRF (NU-WRF) for both the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity and upcoming SMAP mission data. SPoRT has also incorporated real-time global GVF data into LIS and WRF from the VIIRS product being developed by NOAA/NESDIS. This poster will highlight the research and transition activities SPoRT conducts using WRF, NU-WRF, EMS, LIS, and GSI.

  1. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  2. Composite heat damage assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A.; Philpot, H.E.; Powell, G.L.

    1993-12-31

    The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

  3. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  4. Development of high current Bi and Au beams for the synchrotron operation at the GSI accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adonin, A.; Hollinger, R.

    2012-02-15

    In this work, the latest results of developing high current ion beams of Au and Bi at GSI facility are described. The difficulties in the production of required charge state in vacuum arc discharge ion sources using the pure materials in the cathodes are discussed. As a possible solution, admix of a small amount of more refractory metal to the cathode material is considered. As a significant result, a dramatic improvement in the production of high charge state Bi ions using the mixed Bi-Cu cathodes (with 8%-15% of Cu admixed) compared to pure Bi cathodes is presented. The preliminary results of investigation of the material structure of Bi-Cu cathodes are discussed. As a next step, it is planned to test the composition of Au with Pd, Zr, and Fe as cathode materials.

  5. Data-flow coupling and data-acquisition triggers for the PreSPEC-AGATA campaign at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralet, D.; Pietri, S.; Aubert, Y.; Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Dosme, N.; Gadea, A.; Gerl, J.; Golubev, P.; Grave, X.; Johansson, H. T.; Karkour, N.; Korichi, A.; Kurz, N.; Lafay, X.; Legay, E.; Linget, D.; Pietralla, N.; Rudolph, D.; Schaffner, H.; Stezowski, O.; Travers, B.; Wieland, O.

    2015-06-01

    The PreSPEC setup for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy using radioactive ion beams was employed for experimental campaigns in 2012 and 2014. The setup consisted of the state of the art Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) and the High Energy γ deteCTOR (HECTOR+) positioned around a secondary target at the final focal plane of the GSI FRagment Separator (FRS) to perform in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy of exotic nuclei. The Lund York Cologne CAlorimeter (LYCCA) was used to identify the reaction products. In this paper we report on the trigger scheme used during the campaigns. The data-flow coupling between the Multi-Branch System (MBS) based Data AcQuisition (DAQ) used for FRS-LYCCA and the "Nouvelle Acquisition temps Réel Version 1.2 Avec Linux" (NARVAL) based acquisition system used for AGATA are also described.

  6. Stacking of 3 GeV Antiprotons with a Moving Barrier Bucket Method at the GSI-RESR

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, T.; Beller, P.; Franzke, B.; Nesmiyan, I.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Moehl, D.; Kikuchi, T.

    2006-03-20

    At the FAIR project at GSI, 3GeV pbar beams are to be accumulated in the RESR ring up to the intensity of 1.0e11. Every 5 seconds a new batch of 1.0e8 pbars is transferred from a Collector Ring (CR) where the pbar beams are pre-cooled to the momentum spread of 0.1% with stochastic cooling. The main task of the RESR is the accumulation of 1000 batches from the CR. In the classical way established at CERN's AA/AC, a new batch is injected on the injection orbit and is stacked in the radially separated stacking region. In the present paper, an alternative way, azimuthal separation with barrier bucket is proposed. The process is simulated up to 1000 injections and the emittance growth and the intra-beam scattering effects are evaluated.

  7. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis of proposed heavy-ion-matter experiments at the GSI Darmstadt accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Maruhn, J. A.; Lutz, K.-J.; Bock, R.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents one- and two-dimensional computer simulations of the hydrodynamic response of solid cylindrical targets made of different materials that are irradiated by intense beams of energetic ions. The beam parameters considered in this study correspond to the design parameters of the heavy ion beam that will be produced at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt heavy ion synchrotron facility (SIS) in 1999. A few calculations, however, were also done using the beam parameters that are currently available at the SIS. Different values for specific energy deposition including 1, 10, 50, and 100 kJ/g, respectively, have been considered, whereas a number of different pulse lengths, namely, 10, 50, 100, and 200 ns, have been assumed. Various target materials, for example, solid lead, solid neon, and solid hydrogen, have been used. It is expected that this simulation study will be very helpful in the design of efficient targets for the future experiments at the GSI. These experiments will hopefully provide very useful information about many important basic physics phenomena, such as enhanced energy loss of heavy ions in hot dense plasmas, equation-of state (EOS) of matter under extreme conditions, material opacity and shock wave propagation. Another very interesting experiment with important practical implications that could be done at this facility may be the creation of metallic hydrogen by imploding appropriately designed multilayered targets containing a layer of frozen hydrogen. This paper presents the design of such a target, together with implosion simulations of this target using a hydrodynamic simulation model. These simulations show that it may be possible to compress the frozen hydrogen to achieve the theoretically predicted physical conditions necessary for hydrogen metallization (a density of the order of 1 to 2 g/cm3, a temperature of a few 0.1 eV and a pressure of about 2-5 megabar). In some cases, compression of frozen

  8. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Holger; Mathers, Steve; Sobisch, Hans-Georg

    2009-06-01

    The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists have learned to use the software that is now routinely deployed in building systematic and commercial 3D geological models. The success of the GSI3D methodology and software is based on its intuitive design and the fact that it utilises exactly the same data and methods, albeit in digital forms, that geologists have been using for two centuries in order to make geological maps and cross-sections. The geologist constructs models based on a career of observation of geological phenomena, thereby incorporating tacit knowledge into the model. This knowledge capture is a key element to the GSI3D approach. In BGS GSI3D is part of a much wider set of systems and work processes that together make up the cyberinfrastructure of a modern geological survey. The GSI3D software is not yet designed to cope with bedrock structures in which individual stratigraphic surfaces are repeated or inverted, but the software is currently being extended by BGS to encompass these more complex geological scenarios. A further challenge for BGS is to enable its 3D geological models to become part of the semantic Web using GML application schema like GeoSciML. The biggest benefits of widely available systematic geological models will be an enhanced public understanding of the sub-surface in 3D, and the teaching of geoscience students.

  9. Residual microstructure and damage geometry associated with high speed impact crater in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiB{sub 2} particles reinforced 2024 Al composite

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.; Sun, D.L. Jiang, L.T.; Wu, G.H.; Chen, G.Q.

    2012-04-15

    The resistance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/2024Al composite to hypervelocity impact was tested by a two-stage light gas gun. The impact damage behaviors of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/2024Al composite by different-sized Al projectiles with a velocity of 2.49 km/s and the residual microstructures associated with the crater impacted by a 1.2 mm aluminum projectile were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Both the diameters of craters at front face and spalling areas at back face increased with the aluminum projectile diameter. The diameter of perforation on the 2 mm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/Al composite target was zero when impacted by 1.2 mm aluminum projectile and it increased to 2.4 mm when the projectile diameter was 1.5 mm, indicating that the critical perforation diameter of the aluminum projectile was between 1.2 mm and 1.5 mm when the 2 mm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/Al composite target was impacted by 2.49 km/s aluminum projectiles. The diameter of perforation increases with the diameter of Al projectile. In addition, under each impact condition, the diameters of craters at front face were smaller than that of spalling areas at back face. Microstructure observations by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated four characteristics: stacking faults around TiB{sub 2} particle and dislocations within the TiB{sub 2} particle; twins in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle; recrystal grains in 2024 Al matrix; and mixture of amorphous microstructure and nanograins in the matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stacking faults were produced around the edge of TiB{sub 2} particle after impact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twins with the twin plane of (2{sup Macron }112) were observed in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle after impact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recrystal grains with size of 100 nm were formed in aluminum matrix after impact. Black

  10. Performance of the AGATA γ-ray spectrometer in the PreSPEC set-up at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalović, N.; Louchart, C.; Michelagnoli, C.; Perez-Vidal, R. M.; Ralet, D.; Gerl, J.; Rudolph, D.; Arici, T.; Bazzacco, D.; Clément, E.; Gadea, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Korichi, A.; Labiche, M.; Ljungvall, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Nyberg, J.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Stezowski, O.

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary nuclear physics, the European Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) represents a crucial detection system for cutting-edge nuclear structure studies. AGATA consists of highly segmented high-purity germanium crystals and uses the pulse-shape analysis technique to determine both the position and the energy of the γ-ray interaction points in the crystals. It is the tracking algorithms that deploy this information and enable insight into the sequence of interactions, providing information on the full or partial absorption of the γ ray. A series of dedicated performance measurements for an AGATA set-up comprising 21 crystals is described. This set-up was used within the recent PreSPEC-AGATA experimental campaign at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Using the radioactive sources 56Co, 60Co and 152Eu, absolute and normalized efficiencies and the peak-to-total of the array were measured. These quantities are discussed using different data analysis procedures. The quality of the pulse-shape analysis and the tracking algorithm are evaluated. The agreement between the experimental data and the Geant4 simulations is also investigated.

  11. X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Celona, L.; Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Castro, G.; Romano, F. P.; Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source - operating at GSI, Darmstadt - has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD - Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe - hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (2-30 keV) and hot (30-500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

  12. Summary of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment and future plans with FRS at GSI (FAIR Phase 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T. R.; Rappold, C.; Bertini, O.; Bianchin, S.; Bozkurt, V.; Geissel, H.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kim, E.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.; Minami, S.; Nakajima, D.; Nociforo, C.; Özel-Tashenov, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Scheidenberger, C.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-10-01

    Results of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment with the reaction of 6Li+12C at 2 A GeV are summarised. Invariant mass distributions as well as the lifetime measurements for 3ΛH and 4ΛH are discussed. The lifetime values for both the hypernuclei are respectively observed to be 183+42-32 ps and 140+48-33 ps, being significantly shorter than those of the Λ-hyperon. Statistical analyses of existing lifetime data for 3ΛH up to 2014 confirm a significantly short lifetime of 3ΛH, which is not explained by present models. Observed hypernuclear production cross section values for 3ΛH and 4ΛH are also summarised. In addition, observed signals for the final states of d +π- and t +π- are discussed. All the discussions on the results of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment in this article are based on [1-4]. We also present a new proposed experiment with the FRS (FRagment Separator) at GSI (FAIR Phase 0) to improve the precision of the hypernuclear spectroscopy with peripheral heavy ion induced reactions.

  13. The TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) at GSI Optimization of ion-optical structures and magnet designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenkov, A.; Brüchle, W.; Jäger, E.; Schimpf, E.; Schädel, M.; Mühle, C.; Klos, F.; Türler, A.; Yakushev, A.; Belov, A.; Belyakova, T.; Kaparkova, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sytchevsky, S.

    2008-10-01

    The new, highly efficient gas-filled TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) was designed and built at GSI with the aim to study chemical and physical properties of superheavy elements with atomic numbers 104 and higher produced in heavy-ion reactions with actinide targets. To reach the highest possible transmission, while exploiting an existing dipole magnet and two quadrupoles of a previously used gas-filled separator, an optimization of the ion-optical structure of TASCA was performed with the program TRANSPORT. Two modes of TASCA operation, the "High Transmission Mode" and the "Small Image-size Mode" were selected. Magnetic field measurements were carried out with the dipole and were compared with KOMPOT model calculations. Magnetic field model calculations of the dipole and the quadrupoles, including a duct and a large exit valve, were performed to optimize the pole pieces of the dipole and the ducts. This increased the efficiency up to 50%. Both modes of operation were successfully tested in first commissioning experiments.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D. Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R.; Romano, F. P.; Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.

    2014-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source – operating at GSI, Darmstadt – has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD – Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe – hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (2–30 keV) and hot (30–500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

  15. Crop residue and residue management effects on Armadillidium vulgare (Isopoda: Armadillidiidae) populations and soybean stand densities.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W A; Alfaress, S; Whitworth, R J; McCornack, B P

    2012-10-01

    In general, Armadillidium vulgare (Latreille) are considered nonpests of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill], but changes in soil conservation practices have shifted the pest status of this organism from an opportunistic to a perennial, early-season pest in parts of central Kansas. As a result, soybean producers that rotate with corn (Zea mays L.) under conservation tillage practices have resorted to removing excess corn residue by using controlled burns. In a 2-yr field study (2009-2010), we demonstrated that residue removal in burned compared with unburned plots (measured as previous crop residue weights) had minimal impact on numbers of live and dead A. vulgare, soybean seedling emergence, and isopod feeding damage over time. Specifically, removal of residue by burning did not result in higher emergence rates for soybean stands or less feeding damage by A. vulgare. In a separate study, we found that number of live A. vulgare and residue weights had no consistent relationship with seedling emergence or feeding damage. Furthermore, seedling emergence was not impacted by higher numbers ofA. vulgare in unburned plots, indicating that emergence in this study may have been influenced by factors other than A. vulgare densities. These studies demonstrate that removing residue through controlled burning did not impact seedling emergence in presence of A. vulgare and that residue and feeding damage to seedlings did not consistently relate to A. vulgare densities. Other factors that may have influenced a relationship between residue and live isopod numbers, such as variable moisture levels, are discussed. PMID:23156159

  16. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Bélier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric; Alvarez-Pol, Héctor; Audouin, Laurent; Aumann, Thomas; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Casarejos, Enrique; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamaño, Manuel; Farget, Fanny; Fernández Domínguez, Beatriz; Heinz, Andreas; Jurado, Beatriz; Kelić-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Paradela, Carlos; Pietri, Stéphane; Ramos, Diego; Rodríguez-Sànchez, Jose-Luis; Rodríguez-Tajes, Carme; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Vargas, Jossitt; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut

    2015-12-01

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism.

  17. Damage Tolerance of Composite Laminates from an Empirical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    Damage tolerance consists of analysis and experimentation working together. Impact damage is usually of most concern for laminated composites. Once impacted, the residual compression strength is usually of most interest. Other properties may be of more interest than compression (application dependent). A damage tolerance program is application specific (not everyone is building aircraft). The "Building Block Approach" is suggested for damage tolerance. Advantage can be taken of the excellent fatigue resistance of damaged laminates to save time and costs.

  18. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  19. β-decay and β-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Cortès, G.; Taín, J.L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ameil, F.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Davinson, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them ({sup 208-211}Hg, {sup 211-215}Tl, {sup 214-218}Pb) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, Pn.

  20. Analysis of the GSI A+p and A+A spallation, fission, and fragmentation measurements with the LANL CEMsk and LAQGSM codes

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, S. G.; Gudima, K. K.; Prael, R. E.; Sierk, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    The CEM2k and LAQGSM codes have been recently developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to simulate nuclear reactions induced by particles and nuclei for a number of applications. They have benchmarked our codes against most available measured data at projectile energies from 10 MeV/A to 800 GeV/A and have compared their results with predictions of other current models used by the nuclear community. Here, they present a brief description of their codes and show illustrative results obtained with CEM2k and LAQGSM for A+p and A+A spallation, fission, and fragmentation reactions measured recently at GSI compared with predictions by other models. Further necessary work is outlined.

  1. Compressive residual strength of graphite/epoxy laminates after impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, Teresa A.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    The issue of damage tolerance after impact, in terms of the compressive residual strength, was experimentally examined in graphite/epoxy laminates using Hercules AS4/3501-6 in a (+ or - 45/0)(sub 2S) configuration. Three different impactor masses were used at various velocities and the resultant damage measured via a number of nondestructive and destructive techniques. Specimens were then tested to failure under uniaxial compression. The results clearly show that a minimum compressive residual strength exists which is below the open hole strength for a hole of the same diameter as the impactor. Increases in velocity beyond the point of minimum strength cause a difference in the damage produced and cause a resultant increase in the compressive residual strength which asymptotes to the open hole strength value. Furthermore, the results show that this minimum compressive residual strength value is independent of the impactor mass used and is only dependent upon the damage present in the impacted specimen which is the same for the three impactor mass cases. A full 3-D representation of the damage is obtained through the various techniques. Only this 3-D representation can properly characterize the damage state that causes the resultant residual strength. Assessment of the state-of-the-art in predictive analysis capabilities shows a need to further develop techniques based on the 3-D damage state that exists. In addition, the need for damage 'metrics' is clearly indicated.

  2. Impact damage assessment by using peridynamic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oterkus, Erkan; Guven, Ibrahim; Madenci, Erdogan

    2012-12-01

    This study presents an application of peridynamic theory for predicting residual strength of impact damaged building components by considering a reinforced panel subjected to multiple load paths. The validity of the approach is established first by simulating a controlled experiment resulting in mixed-mode fracture of concrete. The agreement between the PD prediction and the experimentally observed behavior is remarkable especially considering the simple material model used for the concrete. Subsequently, the PD simulation concerns damage assessment and residual strength of a reinforced panel under compression after impact due to a rigid penetrator.

  3. Numerical analysis of impact-damaged sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Youngkeun

    Sandwich structures are used in a wide variety of structural applications due to their relative advantages over other conventional structural materials in terms of improved stability, weight savings, and ease of manufacture and repair. Foreign object impact damage in sandwich composites can result in localized damage to the facings, core, and core-facing interface. Such damage may result in drastic reductions in composite strength, elastic moduli, and durability and damage tolerance characteristics. In this study, physically-motivated numerical models have been developed for predicting the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich composites comprised of woven-fabric graphite-epoxy facesheets and Nomex honeycomb cores subjected to compression-after-impact loading. Results from non-destructive inspection and destructive sectioning of damaged sandwich panels were used to establish initial conditions for damage (residual facesheet indentation, core crush dimension, etc.) in the numerical analysis. Honeycomb core crush test results were used to establish the nonlinear constitutive behavior for the Nomex core. The influence of initial facesheet property degradation and progressive loss of facesheet structural integrity on the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels was examined. The influence of damage of various types and sizes, specimen geometry, support boundary conditions, and variable material properties on the estimated residual strength is discussed. Facesheet strains from material and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses correlated relatively well with experimentally determined values. Moreover, numerical predictions of residual strength are consistent with experimental observations. Using a methodology similar to that presented in this work, it may be possible to develop robust residual strength estimates for complex sandwich composite structural components with varying levels of in-service damage. Such studies may facilitate sandwich

  4. Damaged Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  5. New results from isochronous mass measurements of neutron-rich uranium fission fragments with the FRS-ESR-facility at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöbel, R.; Diwisch, M.; Geissel, H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Patyk, Z.; Plaß, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sun, B.; Weick, H.; Bosch, F.; Boutin, D.; Chen, L.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Matoš, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Nakajima, S.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Stadlmann, J.; Steck, M.; Suzuki, T.; Walker, P. M.; Winkler, M.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-05-01

    Masses of uranium fission fragments have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) combined with the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. A 410-415 MeV/u 238U projectile beam was fast extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 with an average intensity of 109/spill. The projectiles were focused on a 1g/cm2 beryllium target at the entrance of the FRS to create neutron-rich isotopes via abrasion-fission. The fission fragments were spatially separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for fast mass measurements without applying cooling. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B ρ-tagging at the high-resolution dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. The evaluation has been done for the combined data sets from both experiments with a new method of data analysis. The use of a correlation matrix has provided experimental mass values for 23 different neutron-rich isotopes for the first time and 6 masses with improved values. The new masses were obtained for nuclides in the element range from Se to Ce. The applied analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with an intensity of a few atoms per week. The novel data analysis and systematic error determination are described and the results are compared with extrapolations of experimental values and theoretical models.

  6. Antioxidant properties of roasted coffee residues.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wen-Jye; Wang, Bor-Sen; Chang, Lee-Wen; Duh, Pin-Der

    2005-04-01

    The antioxidant activity of roasted coffee residues was evaluated. Extraction with four solvents (water, methanol, ethanol, and n-hexane) showed that water extracts of roasted coffee residues (WERCR) produced higher yields and gave better protection for lipid peroxidation. WERCR showed a remarkable protective effect on oxidative damage of protein. In addition, WERCR showed scavenging of free radicals as well as the reducing ability and to bind ferrous ions, indicating that WERCR acts as both primary and secondary antioxidants. The HPLC analyses showed that phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and nonphenolic compounds [caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfuraldehyde] remained in roasted coffee residues. These compounds showed a protective effect on a liposome model system. The concentrations of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds in roasted coffee residues were 8,400 and 20,400 ppm, respectively. In addition, the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) remaining in roasted coffee residues were believed to show antioxidant activity. These data indicate that roasted coffee residues have excellent potential for use as a natural antioxidant source because the antioxidant compounds remained in roasted coffee residues. PMID:15796608

  7. Impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bidinger, G. M.; Lou, M. C.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental investigation was made to study the impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts made of both brittle epoxy and toughened epoxy based composite materials. Damage parameters such as barely visible surface damage and internal damage represented by the ultrasonic C-scan, and residual compressive strengths were evaluated against impact energy for two impactor sizes. From both a damage resistance (internal damage vs. impact energy) and a damage tolerance (residual compressive strength vs. internal damage) point of view, the toughened IM7/977-2 struts exhibited better performance than the brittle epoxy based T50/934 struts. This is attributed to the toughening mechanism in 977-2 which impedes delamination initiation from impact, and delamination growth and subsequent buckling under a compression loading. At barely visible damage thresholds, regardless of the impactor sizes, a maximum strength reduction of 45-55 percent was observed for the T50/934 struts, and approximately 10 percent for IM7/977-2 struts. This is of great interest for developing a damage tolerance design approach and risk assessment methodology in which the design allowable would be defined by the residual strength at the threshold of barely visible damage.

  8. Impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bidinger, G. M.; Lou, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to study the impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts made of both brittle epoxy and toughened epoxy based composite materials. Damage parameters such as barely visible surface damage and internal damage represented by the ultrasonic C-scan, and residual compressive strengths were evaluated against impact energy for two impactor sizes. From both a damage resistance (internal damage vs. impact energy) and a damage tolerance (residual compressive strength vs. internal damage) point of view, the toughened IM7/977-2 struts exhibited better performance than the brittle epoxy based T50/934 struts. This is attributed to the toughening mechanism in 977-2 which impedes delamination initiation from impact, and delamination growth and subsequent buckling under a compression loading. At barely visible damage thresholds, regardless of the impactor sizes, a maximum strength reduction of 45-55 percent was observed for the T50/934 struts, and approximately 10 percent for IM7/977-2 struts. This is of great interest for developing a damage tolerance design approach and risk assessment methodology in which the design allowable would be defined by the residual strength at the threshold of barely visible damage.

  9. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. Materials and Methods 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. Results As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. Conclusion The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol. PMID:26079259

  10. Pesticide residues in eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Cromartie, E.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.

    1969-01-01

    Bald and golden eagles found sick or dead in 18 States and Canada during 1964-1965 were analyzed for pesticide residues. Residues in bald eagles were considerably higher than in golden eagles. Residues of DDE, DDD, and dieldrin were detected in all samples of bald eagle carcasses; other compounds found, less frequently were heptachlor epoxide, endrin, and DCBP, a metabolite of DDT. DDE was detected in all samples of golden eagle carcasses; DDD, DDT, dieldrin, and heptachlor epoxide were detected less frequently.

  11. Plasma steroid hormone concentrations, aromatase activities and GSI in ranid frogs collected from agricultural and non-agricultural sites in Michigan (USA).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M B; Hecker, M; Coady, K K; Tompsett, A R; Higley, E B; Jones, P D; Du Preez, L H; Solomon, K R; Carr, J A; Smith, E E; Kendall, R J; Van Der Kraak, G; Giesy, J P

    2006-05-01

    The triazine herbicide atrazine has been hypothesized to disrupt sexual development in frogs by up-regulating aromatase activity, resulting in greater estradiol (E2) concentrations and causing feminization in males. The goal of this study was to collect native ranid frogs from atrazine-exposed ponds and determine whether relationships exist between measured atrazine concentrations and the gonadosomatic index (GSI), plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), E2 or 11-ketotestosterone (KT), or with aromatase activity. In the summer of 2002 and 2003, adult and juvenile green frogs (Rana clamitans), bullfrogs (R. catesbeiana) and Northern leopard frogs (R. pipiens) were collected from areas with extensive corn cultivation and areas where there was little agricultural activity in south-central Michigan. Atrazine concentrations were below the limit of quantification at non-agricultural sites. Atrazine concentrations did not exceed 2 microg/L at most agricultural sites, but a concentration of 250 microg atrazine/L was measured in one sample from one site in 2002. Plasma steroid concentrations varied among locations. Aromatase activity was measurable in less than 11% of testes in adult males, and in less than 4% of testes in juvenile males. Median aromatase activities in ovaries of adult females ranged from 3 to 245 pmol/h/mg protein, and maximum activities were 2.5-fold greater in juveniles than in adults. Atrazine concentrations were not significantly correlated with any of the parameters measured in this study. These results indicate that atrazine does not up-regulate aromatase in green frogs in the wild, and does not appear to affect plasma steroid hormone concentrations.

  12. New elements produced at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    1998-12-21

    In two series of experiments at SHIP, six new elements (Z=107-112) were synthesized via fusion reactions using lead or bismuth targets and 1n-deexcitation channels. The isotopes were unambiguously identified by means of {alpha}-{alpha} correlations. Not fission, but alpha decay is the dominant decay mode. Cross-sections decrease by two orders of magnitude from bohrium (Z=107) to element 112, for which a cross-section of 1 pb was measured. Based on our results, it is likely that the production of isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical SuperHeavy Elements (SHE) could be achieved by fusion reactions using {sup 208}Pb targets. Systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that the transfer of nucleons is an important process for the initiation of fusion. The data allow for the fixing of a narrow energy window for the production of SHE using 1n-emission channels. The likelihood of broadening the energy window by investigation of radiative capture reactions, use of neutron deficient projectile isotopes and use of actinide targets is discussed.

  13. Dynamic response of damaged angleplied fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of low level damage induced by monotonic load, cyclic load and/or residual stresses on the vibration frequencies and damping factors of fiber composite angleplied laminates were investigated. Two different composite systems were studied - low modulus fiber and ultra high modulus fiber composites. The results obtained show that the frequencies and damping factors of angleplied laminates made from low modulus fiber composites are sensitive to low level damage while those made from ultra high modulus composites are not. Vibration tests may not be sufficiently sensitive to assess concentrated local damage in angleplied laminates. Dynamic response determined from low-velocity impact coupled with the Fast Fourier Transform and packaged in a minicomputer can be a convenient procedure for assessing low-level damage.

  14. Surrogate Modeling of High-Fidelity Fracture Simulations for Real-Time Residual Strength Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, Ashley D.; Priest, Amanda R.; Veilleux, Michael G.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    A surrogate model methodology is described for predicting in real time the residual strength of flight structures with discrete-source damage. Starting with design of experiment, an artificial neural network is developed that takes as input discrete-source damage parameters and outputs a prediction of the structural residual strength. Target residual strength values used to train the artificial neural network are derived from 3D finite element-based fracture simulations. A residual strength test of a metallic, integrally-stiffened panel is simulated to show that crack growth and residual strength are determined more accurately in discrete-source damage cases by using an elastic-plastic fracture framework rather than a linear-elastic fracture mechanics-based method. Improving accuracy of the residual strength training data would, in turn, improve accuracy of the surrogate model. When combined, the surrogate model methodology and high-fidelity fracture simulation framework provide useful tools for adaptive flight technology.

  15. Residue chemistry guidelines.

    PubMed

    Olinger, C L; Schmitt, R D; Zager, E

    1993-01-01

    Residue chemistry guidelines are designed to determine what the potential residues in food are and how much may be present as a result of pesticide application, so that a tolerance level may be established. Some requirements are established to assist in the enforcement of tolerances by the USDA, FDA, and the states. I realize I have given you a quick overview of the residue chemistry requirements. There are many documents which are available if you should require more information, such as the Subdivision O Residue Chemistry Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Procedures (which are used by reviewers when evaluating the studies), the Data Reporting Guidelines (which provide guidance on preparing final reports), and the Technical Guidance from Phase III of Reregistration. We have also released various papers on studies when additional guidance is required. Most of these documents are available from NTIS. I hope you will consider this information when auditing residue chemistry studies. As I see the efforts that you, the QA professionals, have made to educate yourselves on residue chemistry studies through programs such as this meeting, I have a little more confidence in answering the question "Do you trust them?" with a "Yes." Thank you.

  16. Decays of the Three Top Contributors to the Reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} High-Energy Spectrum, ^{92}Rb, ^{96gs}Y, and ^{142}Cs, Studied with Total Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rasco, B C; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Fijałkowska, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Karny, M; Grzywacz, R K; Goetz, K C; Gross, C J; Stracener, D W; Zganjar, E F; Batchelder, J C; Blackmon, J C; Brewer, N T; Go, S; Heffron, B; King, T; Matta, J T; Miernik, K; Nesaraja, C D; Paulauskas, S V; Rajabali, M M; Wang, E H; Winger, J A; Xiao, Y; Zachary, C J

    2016-08-26

    We report total absorption spectroscopy measurements of ^{92}Rb, ^{96gs}Y, and ^{142}Cs β decays, which are the most important contributors to the high energy ν[over ¯]_{e} spectral shape in nuclear reactors. These three β decays contribute 43% of the ν[over ¯]_{e} flux near 5.5 MeV emitted by nuclear reactors. This ν[over ¯]_{e} energy is particularly interesting due to spectral features recently observed in several experiments including the Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO Collaborations. Measurements were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by means of proton-induced fission of ^{238}U with on-line mass separation of fission fragments and the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer. We observe a β-decay pattern that is similar to recent measurements of ^{92}Rb, with a ground-state to ground-state β feeding of 91(3)%. We verify the ^{96gs}Y ground-state to ground-state β feeding of 95.5(20)%. Our measurements substantially modify the β-decay feedings of ^{142}Cs, reducing the β feeding to ^{142}Ba states below 2 MeV by 32% when compared with the latest evaluations. Our results increase the discrepancy between the observed and the expected reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} flux between 5 and 7 MeV, the maximum excess increases from ∼10% to ∼12%. PMID:27610847

  17. Decays of the Three Top Contributors to the Reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} High-Energy Spectrum, ^{92}Rb, ^{96gs}Y, and ^{142}Cs, Studied with Total Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rasco, B C; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Fijałkowska, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Karny, M; Grzywacz, R K; Goetz, K C; Gross, C J; Stracener, D W; Zganjar, E F; Batchelder, J C; Blackmon, J C; Brewer, N T; Go, S; Heffron, B; King, T; Matta, J T; Miernik, K; Nesaraja, C D; Paulauskas, S V; Rajabali, M M; Wang, E H; Winger, J A; Xiao, Y; Zachary, C J

    2016-08-26

    We report total absorption spectroscopy measurements of ^{92}Rb, ^{96gs}Y, and ^{142}Cs β decays, which are the most important contributors to the high energy ν[over ¯]_{e} spectral shape in nuclear reactors. These three β decays contribute 43% of the ν[over ¯]_{e} flux near 5.5 MeV emitted by nuclear reactors. This ν[over ¯]_{e} energy is particularly interesting due to spectral features recently observed in several experiments including the Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO Collaborations. Measurements were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by means of proton-induced fission of ^{238}U with on-line mass separation of fission fragments and the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer. We observe a β-decay pattern that is similar to recent measurements of ^{92}Rb, with a ground-state to ground-state β feeding of 91(3)%. We verify the ^{96gs}Y ground-state to ground-state β feeding of 95.5(20)%. Our measurements substantially modify the β-decay feedings of ^{142}Cs, reducing the β feeding to ^{142}Ba states below 2 MeV by 32% when compared with the latest evaluations. Our results increase the discrepancy between the observed and the expected reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} flux between 5 and 7 MeV, the maximum excess increases from ∼10% to ∼12%.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMAGED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Dehaven, M; McClelland, M; Chidester, S; Maienschein, J L

    2006-06-23

    Thermal damage experiments were conducted on LX-04, LX-10, and LX-17 at high temperatures. Both pristine and damaged samples were characterized for their material properties. A pycnometer was used to determine sample true density and porosity. Gas permeability was measured in a newly procured system (diffusion permeameter). Burn rate was measured in the LLNL strand burner. Weight losses upon thermal exposure were insignificant. Damaged pressed parts expanded, resulting in a reduction of bulk density by up to 10%. Both gas permeabilities and burn rates of the damaged samples increased by several orders of magnitude due to higher porosity and lower density. Moduli of the damaged materials decreased significantly, an indication that the materials became weaker mechanically. Damaged materials were more sensitive to shock initiation at high temperatures. No significant sensitization was observed when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature.

  19. Size Effects in Impact Damage of Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobyns, Alan; Jackson, Wade

    2003-01-01

    Panel size has a large effect on the impact response and resultant damage level of honeycomb sandwich panels. It has been observed during impact testing that panels of the same design but different panel sizes will show large differences in damage when impacted with the same impact energy. To study this effect, a test program was conducted with instrumented impact testing of three different sizes of sandwich panels to obtain data on panel response and residual damage. In concert with the test program. a closed form analysis method was developed that incorporates the effects of damage on the impact response. This analysis method will predict both the impact response and the residual damage of a simply-supported sandwich panel impacted at any position on the panel. The damage is incorporated by the use of an experimental load-indentation curve obtained for the face-sheet/honeycomb and indentor combination under study. This curve inherently includes the damage response and can be obtained quasi-statically from a rigidly-backed specimen or a specimen with any support conditions. Good correlation has been obtained between the test data and the analysis results for the maximum force and residual indentation. The predictions can be improved by using a dynamic indentation curve. Analyses have also been done using the MSC/DYTRAN finite element code.

  20. A Coupled Approach for Structural Damage Detection with Incomplete Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Cao, Timothy; Kaouk, Mo; Zimmerman, David

    2013-01-01

    This historical work couples model order reduction, damage detection, dynamic residual/mode shape expansion, and damage extent estimation to overcome the incomplete measurements problem by using an appropriate undamaged structural model. A contribution of this work is the development of a process to estimate the full dynamic residuals using the columns of a spring connectivity matrix obtained by disassembling the structural stiffness matrix. Another contribution is the extension of an eigenvector filtering procedure to produce full-order mode shapes that more closely match the measured active partition of the mode shapes using a set of modified Ritz vectors. The full dynamic residuals and full mode shapes are used as inputs to the minimum rank perturbation theory to provide an estimate of damage location and extent. The issues associated with this process are also discussed as drivers of near-term development activities to understand and improve this approach.

  1. Surrogate Modeling of High-Fidelity Fracture Simulations for Real-Time Residual Strength Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, Ashley D.; Priest, Amanda R.; Veilleux, Michael G.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    A surrogate model methodology is described for predicting, during flight, the residual strength of aircraft structures that sustain discrete-source damage. Starting with design of experiment, an artificial neural network is developed that takes as input discrete-source damage parameters and outputs a prediction of the structural residual strength. Target residual strength values used to train the artificial neural network are derived from 3D finite element-based fracture simulations. Two ductile fracture simulations are presented to show that crack growth and residual strength are determined more accurately in discrete-source damage cases by using an elastic-plastic fracture framework rather than a linear-elastic fracture mechanics-based method. Improving accuracy of the residual strength training data does, in turn, improve accuracy of the surrogate model. When combined, the surrogate model methodology and high fidelity fracture simulation framework provide useful tools for adaptive flight technology.

  2. Damage Pre-Cursors Based Assessment of Accrued Thermo-Mechanical Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Field Deployed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Pradeep; Harsha, Mahendra; Goebel, Kai; Jones, Jim

    Field deployed electronics may accrue damage due to environmental exposure and usage after finite period of service but may not often have any o-indicators of failure such as cracks or delamination. A method to interrogate the damage state of field deployed electronics in the pre-failure space may allow insight into the damage initiation, progression, and remaining useful life of the deployed system. Aging has been previously shown to effect the reliability and constitutive behavior of second-level leadfree interconnects. Prognostication of accrued damage and assessment of residual life can provide valuable insight into impending failure. In this paper, field deployed parts have been extracted and prognosticated for accrued damage and remaining useful life in an anticipated future deployment environment. A subset of the field deployed parts have been tested to failure in the anticipated field deployed environment to validate the assessment of remaining useful life. In addition, some parts have been subjected to additional known thermo-mechanical stresses and the incremental damage accrued validated with respect to the amount of additional damage imposed on the assemblies. The presented methodology uses leading indicators of failure based on micro-structural evolution of damage to identify accrued damage in electronic systems subjected to sequential stresses of thermal aging and thermal cycling. Damage equivalency methodologies have been developed to map damage accrued in thermal aging to the reduction in thermo-mechanical cyclic life based on damage proxies. The expected error with interrogation of system state and assessment of residual life has been quantified. Prognostic metrics including α-λmetric, sample standard deviation, mean square error, mean absolute percentage error, average bias, relative accuracy, and cumulative relative accuracy have been used to compare the performance of the damage proxies.

  3. Prediction of residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Ashhad; Azad, Abul Kalam

    2016-09-01

    With the aim of providing experimental data on the shear capacity and behavior of corroded reinforced concrete beams that may help in the development of strength prediction models, the test results of 13 corroded and four un-corroded beams are presented. Corrosion damage was induced by accelerated corrosion induction through impressed current. Test results show that loss of shear strength of beams is mostly attributable to two important damage factors namely, the reduction in stirrups area due to corrosion and the corrosion-induced cracking of concrete cover to stirrups. Based on the test data, a method is proposed to predict the residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams in which residual shear strength is calculated first by using corrosion-reduced steel area alone, and then it is reduced by a proposed reduction factor, which collectively represents all other applicable corrosion damage factors. The method seems to yield results that are in reasonable agreement with the available test data.

  4. Residual force enhancement in humans: Current evidence and unresolved issues.

    PubMed

    Seiberl, Wolfgang; Power, Geoffrey A; Hahn, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Following an active lengthening contraction while maintaining activation constant, isometric force is elevated above that of a purely isometric contraction at the same final muscle length. This fundamental property of skeletal muscle is referred to as residual force enhancement. While the contractile mechanisms of residual force enhancement are still highly-debated, from an applied perspective this review focuses on the potential physiological relevance of residual force enhancement in human movement. Moreover, this work aims to highlight commonalities as well as discrepancies to well accepted history-dependent properties analyzed in muscle preparations. This will help to identify aspects of residual force enhancement in vivo requiring further research. In the first part of this review a phenomenological description of residual force enhancement in vivo as observed in numerous experiments will be presented. These include voluntary as well as electrically stimulated contractions of isolated small muscles up to coordinated multi-joint contractions of humans at maximal and submaximal activation level. Secondly, we show that residual force enhancement during voluntary contractions is not necessarily purely mechanical in nature, but also influenced by neural control in terms of more efficient activation, increased excitability, saving of metabolic energy, and maintains muscle function in acutely and chronically altered neuromuscular states like fatigue, muscle damage and aging. Finally, this review focuses on implications of residual force enhancement for human movement and future directions for research on residual force enhancement in the context of human motor control.

  5. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  6. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  7. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  9. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  10. Water treatment residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    Solutions to an environmental problem often create other environmental problems. That surely is the case in the water supply field. By providing new or expanded water treatment systems to comply with the maximum contaminant levels and treatment mandates of the Safe Drinking Water Act, water purveyors are generating large volumes of residuals that must be managed, ultimately disposed of, or recycled. Numerous federal, state, and local laws govern the management, transport, disposal, and recycling of wastes produced by water treatment systems. Because these laws can result in exorbitant waste disposal costs, restricting some projects entirely, water suppliers need to consider residual disposal early in the siting, selection, and design of treatment projects. To inform water suppliers about residual laws, AWWA commissioned a study published as a Water Industry Technical Action Fund report. In addition to identifying and describing applicable laws at the federal level and in six of the states, the study revealed a series of findings as to the consequences of those laws to water suppliers. This article is a brief overview of the findings of the report.

  11. First superheavy element experiments at the GSI recoil separator TASCA: The production and decay of element 114 in the {sup 244}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3-4n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, J. M.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Schaedel, M.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Bruechle, W.; Essel, H. G.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Steiner, J.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments with the new recoil separator, Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA), at the GSI were performed by using beams of {sup 48}Ca to irradiate targets of {sup 206-208}Pb, which led to the production of {sup 252-254}No isotopes. These studies allowed for evaluation of the performance of TASCA when coupled to a new detector and electronics system. By following these studies, the isotopes of element 114 ({sup 288-291}114) were produced in irradiations of {sup 244}Pu targets with {sup 48}Ca beams at compound nucleus excitation energies around 41.7 and 37.5 MeV, demonstrating TASCA's ability to perform experiments with picobarn-level cross sections. A total of 15 decay chains were observed and were assigned to the decay of {sup 288-291}114. A new {alpha}-decay branch in {sup 281}Ds was observed, leading to the new nucleus {sup 277}Hs.

  12. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  13. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  14. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  15. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  16. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  17. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William T.

    2014-02-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10-12 Pa-1. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  18. The residual caries dilemma.

    PubMed

    Weerheijm, K L; Groen, H J

    1999-12-01

    Restorative dentistry is based on the assumption that bacterial infection of demineralized dentine should prompt operative intervention. One of the concepts of practical dentistry is to create a favourable environment for caries arrest with minimal operative intervention. The progress of remaining primary caries is key to any discussion of this concept. This discussion is important for the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach, since the removal of all carious dentine is sometimes difficult using hand instruments only. In this paper the results of possible measures to guard against the effects of residual carious and its consequences are reviewed, in order to obtain an impression of the justification for (in)complete excavation of occlusal dentinal caries. Three types of measure are considered: isolating the caries process from the oral environment, excavating the carious dentine, and using a cariostatic filling material. Each of these measures contributes to the arrest of the caries process. However, none of these measures can arrest this process by itself. A combination of all three seems necessary. It is concluded that although residual caries does not seem to be the criterion for rerestoration, one has to strive for as complete caries removal as possible. If this cannot be fulfilled the sealing capacities of the filling material seem to be more important than its cariostatic properties. PMID:10600078

  19. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  20. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  1. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  2. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  3. Impact damage in filament wound composite bottles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly, composite materials are being used in advanced structural applications because of the significant weight savings they offer when compared to more traditional engineering materials. The higher cost of composites must be offset by the increased performance that results from reduced structural weight if these new materials are to be used effectively. At present, there is considerable interest in fabricating solid rocket motor cases out of composite materials, and capitalizing on the reduced structural weight to increase rocket performance. However, one of the difficulties that arises when composite materials are used is that composites can develop significant amounts of internal damage during low velocity impacts. Such low velocity impacts may be encountered in routine handling of a structural component like a rocket motor case. The ability to assess the reduction in structural integrity of composite motor cases that experience accidental impacts is essential if composite rocket motor cases are to be certified for manned flight. While experimental studies of the post-impact performance of filament wound composite motor cases haven been proven performed (2,3), scaling impact data from small specimens to full scale structures has proven difficult. If such a scaling methodology is to be achieved, an increased understanding of the damage processes which influence residual strength is required. The study described herein was part of an ongoing investigation of damage development and reduction of tensile strength in filament wound composites subjected to low velocity impacts. The present study, which focused on documenting the damage that develops in filament wound composites as a result of such impacts, included two distinct tasks. The first task was to experimentally assess impact damage in small, filament wound pressure bottles using x-ray radiography. The second task was to study the feasibility of using digital image processing techniques to assist in

  4. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  5. Experimental determination of residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1991-01-01

    Residual stresses in finished parts have often been regarded as factors contributing to premature part failure and geometric distortions. Currently, residual stresses in welded structures and railroad components are being investigated. High residual stresses formed in welded structures due primarily to the differential contractions of the weld material as it cools and solidifies can have a profound effect on the surface performance of the structure. In railroad wheels, repeated use of the brakes causes high residual stresses in the rims which may lead to wheel failure and possible derailment. The goals of the study were: (1) to develop strategies for using x-ray diffraction to measure residual stress; (2) to subject samples of Inconel 718 to various mechanical and heat treatments and to measure the resulting stress using x-ray diffraction; and (3) to measure residual stresses in ferromagnetic alloys using magnetoacoustics.

  6. 43 CFR 11.84 - Damage determination phase-implementation guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the damage assessment. (2) Natural resource damages are the residual to be determined by incorporating... estimates of natural recovery rates as well as recovery rates that reflect management actions or resource... actions or resource acquisitions, including a “No Action-Natural Recovery” alternative. After the...

  7. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... material variability and environmental conditions on the strength and durability properties of the... established that ensure the strength of each joint. (6) Structural components for which the damage tolerance... supported by test evidence. The extent of damage for residual strength evaluation at any time within...

  8. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  9. Effect of scanned quasi-cw CO2 laser irradiation on tissue thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domankevitz, Yacov; Bua, Dominic; Chung, Jina; Hanel, Edward; Silver, Geoffrey; Nishioka, Norman S.

    1994-08-01

    Residual thermal damage produced by a scanned quasi cw CO2 laser was measured in pig skin. The effects of scan speed on thermal damage distribution for laser dwell times ranging between 1 and 150 msec were examined. Significantly larger thermal damage zones were produced along the crater wall for laser dwell times longer than 50 msec. Thermal damage along the crater base was constant independent of dwell time. The preliminary experimental results suggest that quasi cw CO2 can consistently produce less than 200 micrometers zones of thermal damage if laser parameters are carefully chosen.

  10. Surface state reconstruction in ion-damaged SmB6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wakeham, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Fisk, Z.; Ronning, F.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-12

    We have used ion-irradiation to damage the (001) surfaces of SmB₆ single crystals to varying depths, and have measured the resistivity as a function of temperature for each depth of damage. We observe a reduction in the residual resistivity with increasing depth of damage. Our data are consistent with a model in which the surface state is not destroyed by the ion-irradiation, however instead the damaged layer is poorly conducting and the initial surface state is reconstructed below the damage. This behavior is consistent with a surface state that is topologically protected.

  11. Effects of oil and oil burn residues on seabird feathers.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Linnebjerg, Jannie Fries; Sørensen, Martin X; Brogaard, Nicholas L; Rigét, Frank F; Kristensen, Paneeraq; Jomaas, Grunde; Boertmann, David M; Wegeberg, Susse; Gustavson, Kim

    2016-08-15

    It is well known, that in case of oil spill, seabirds are among the groups of animals most vulnerable. Even small amounts of oil can have lethal effects by destroying the waterproofing of their plumage, leading to loss of insulation and buoyancy. In the Arctic these impacts are intensified. To protect seabirds, a rapid removal of oil is crucial and in situ burning could be an efficient method. In the present work exposure effects of oil and burn residue in different doses was studied on seabird feathers from legally hunted Common eider (Somateria mollissima) by examining changes in total weight of the feather and damages on the microstructure (Amalgamation Index) of the feathers before and after exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that burn residues from in situ burning of an oil spill have similar or larger fouling and damaging effects on seabird feathers, as compared to fresh oil.

  12. Effects of oil and oil burn residues on seabird feathers.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Linnebjerg, Jannie Fries; Sørensen, Martin X; Brogaard, Nicholas L; Rigét, Frank F; Kristensen, Paneeraq; Jomaas, Grunde; Boertmann, David M; Wegeberg, Susse; Gustavson, Kim

    2016-08-15

    It is well known, that in case of oil spill, seabirds are among the groups of animals most vulnerable. Even small amounts of oil can have lethal effects by destroying the waterproofing of their plumage, leading to loss of insulation and buoyancy. In the Arctic these impacts are intensified. To protect seabirds, a rapid removal of oil is crucial and in situ burning could be an efficient method. In the present work exposure effects of oil and burn residue in different doses was studied on seabird feathers from legally hunted Common eider (Somateria mollissima) by examining changes in total weight of the feather and damages on the microstructure (Amalgamation Index) of the feathers before and after exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that burn residues from in situ burning of an oil spill have similar or larger fouling and damaging effects on seabird feathers, as compared to fresh oil. PMID:27234369

  13. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  14. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade Jr., J. S.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties. PMID:27173442

  15. Crumpling Damaged Graphene.

    PubMed

    Giordanelli, I; Mendoza, M; Andrade, J S; Gomes, M A F; Herrmann, H J

    2016-05-13

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties.

  16. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  17. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties.

  18. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  19. Spectrometry researches on interaction and sonodynamic damage of riboflavin (RF) to bovine serum albumin (BSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiu; Li, Jushi; Wang, Jun; Zou, Mingming; Wang, Siyu; Li, Ying; Kong, Yumei; Xia, Lixin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the riboflavin (RF) was used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to bovine serum albumin (BSA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to BSA in aqueous solution. Under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the BSA. In addition, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the RF showed more accessible to tryptophan (Trp) residues than to tyrosine (Tyr) residues. Also, it damaged Trp residues more seriously than Tyr residues under ultrasonic irradiation. At last, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sonodynamic process was estimated by the method of Oxidation-Extraction Spectrometry (OES). And then, several radical scavengers were used to determine the kind of ROS. It was found that at least the singlet oxygen ( 1O 2) and hydroxyl radicals ( rad OH) were generated.

  20. Fungicide residues in strawberry processing.

    PubMed

    Will, F; Krüger, E

    1999-03-01

    The fate of three fungicides (dichlofluanid, procymidone, and iprodione) applied under field conditions was studied during strawberry processing to juice, wine, and jam. An untreated control was compared to raw material treated with fungicides according to recommended doses and to a sample with 6-fold higher application rates. The highest residue values were found in the pomace after pressing. Residue values in readily produced juices and fruit wines were very low and did not exceed legally required maximum residue levels. Generally, processing steps such as pressing and clarification diminished fungicide residues from 50 to 100%. If the whole fruit is processed, as in fruit preparations or jam, the residue levels remain higher due to missing processing steps. PMID:10552381

  1. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  2. Loss and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  3. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  4. DNA damage phenotype and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Kosti, O.; Goldman, L.; Saha, D.T.; Orden, R.A.; Pollock, A.J.; Madej, H.L.; Hsing, A.W.; Chu, L.W.; Lynch, J.H.; Goldman, R.

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of an individual to process DNA damage is considered a crucial factor in carcinogenesis. The comet assay is a phenotypic measure of the combined effects of sensitivity to a mutagen exposure and repair capacity. In this paper, we evaluate the association of the DNA repair kinetics, as measured by the comet assay, with prostate cancer risk. In a pilot study of 55 men with prostate cancer, 53 men without the disease, and 71 men free of cancer at biopsy, we investigated the association of DNA damage with prostate cancer risk at early (0-15 min) and later (15-45 min) stages following gamma-radiation exposure. Although residual damage within 45 min was the same for all groups (65% of DNA in comet tail disappeared), prostate cancer cases had a slower first phase (38% vs 41%) and faster second phase (27% vs 22%) of the repair response compared to controls. When subjects were categorized into quartiles, according to efficiency of repairing DNA damage, high repair-efficiency within the first 15 min after exposure was not associated with prostate cancer risk while higher at the 15-45 min period was associated with increased risk (OR for highest-to-lowest quartiles = 3.24, 95% CI=0.98-10.66, p-trend =0.04). Despite limited sample size, our data suggest that DNA repair kinetics marginally differ between prostate cancer cases and controls. This small difference could be associated with differential responses to DNA damage among susceptible individuals. PMID:21095241

  5. Quantification of Residual Stress from Photonic Signatures of Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 +/- 0.54 x 10(exp -12)/Pa. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented. Keywords: Glass, fused silica, photoelasticity, residual stress

  6. Nile blue can photosensitize DNA damage through electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ota, Kazuhiro; Hirayama, Junya; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2014-04-21

    The mechanism of DNA damage photosensitized by Nile blue (NB) was studied using (32)P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments. NB bound to the DNA strand was possibly intercalated through an electrostatic interaction. Photoirradiated NB caused DNA cleavage at guanine residues when the DNA fragments were treated with piperidine. Consecutive guanines, the underlined G in 5'-GG and 5'-GGG, were selectively damaged through photoinduced electron transfer. The fluorescence lifetime of NB was decreased by guanine-containing DNA sequence, supporting this mechanism. Single guanines were also slightly damaged by photoexcited NB, and DNA photodamage by NB was slightly enhanced in D2O. These results suggest that the singlet oxygen mechanism also partly contributes to DNA photodamage by NB. DNA damage photosensitized by NB via electron transfer may be an important mechanism in medicinal applications of photosensitizers, such as photodynamic therapy in low oxygen. PMID:24576317

  7. Prediction of residual tensile strength of transversely impacted composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    The response to low velocity impact of graphite-epoxy T300/5208 composite laminates is discussed. Steel balls of 3/8 inch, 5/8 inch, and 1 inch diameter were the projectiles. Impact energy was limited to 1.2 joules. Impacted specimens were ultrasonically C scanned to determine the impact damaged region. The threshold value of impact energy for impact damage was found to be approximately 0.3 joules. A model was developed to predict the tensile residual strength of impact damaged specimens from fracture mechanics concepts. Impacted specimens were tested in tension to provide a fracture data base. The experimental results agreed well with the predictions from fracture mechanics. In this study, the maximum impact velocity used to simulate the low velocity transverse impact from common objects like tool drops was 10 m/s.

  8. Safety assessment of drug residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.A.

    1980-05-15

    The safety assessment of drug residues is part of the process for defining the conditions for the safe use of drugs in food-producing animals. The information needed to assess the safety of drug residues is provided by chemical and toxicity tests. Toxicity tests are conducted to identify the type of effect produced and to determine the exposure concentrations that would be expected not to produce the effect. These tests include acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity tests, as well as reproduction studies and other special tests. The results are used to find an acceptable daily intake for drug residues that can be used to set a tolerance.

  9. Tornado damage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, T.A.; Ellingwood, B.

    1982-09-01

    Several proposed models were evaluated for predicting tornado wind speed probabilities at nuclear plant sites as part of a program to develop statistical data on tornadoes needed for probability-based load combination analysis. A unified model was developed which synthesized the desired aspects of tornado occurrence and damage potential. The sensitivity of wind speed probability estimates to various tornado modeling assumptions are examined, and the probability distributions of tornado wind speed that are needed for load combination studies are presented.

  10. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  11. Earthquake damage to schools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    These unusual slides show earthquake damage to school and university buildings around the world. They graphically illustrate the potential danger to our schools, and to the welfare of our children, that results from major earthquakes. The slides range from Algeria, where a collapsed school roof is held up only by students' desks; to Anchorage, Alaska, where an elementary school structure has split in half; to California and other areas, where school buildings have sustained damage to walls, roofs, and chimneys. Interestingly, all the United States earthquakes depicted in this set of slides occurred either on a holiday or before or after school hours, except the 1935 tremor in Helena, Montana, which occurred at 11:35 am. It undoubtedly would have caused casualties had the schools not been closed days earlier by Helena city officials because of a damaging foreshock. Students in Algeria, the People's Republic of China, Armenia, and other stricken countries were not so fortunate. This set of slides represents 17 destructive earthquakes that occurred in 9 countries, and covers more than a century--from 1886 to 1988. Two of the tremors, both of which occurred in the United States, were magnitude 8+ on the Richter Scale, and four were magnitude 7-7.9. The events represented by the slides (see table below) claimed more than a quarter of a million lives.

  12. Residual fatigue life estimation using a nonlinear ultrasound modulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piero Malfense Fierro, Gian; Meo, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Predicting the residual fatigue life of a material is not a simple task and requires the development and association of many variables that as standalone tasks can be difficult to determine. This work develops a modulated nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy method for the evaluation of a metallic components residual fatigue life. An aluminium specimen (AA6082-T6) was tested at predetermined fatigue stages throughout its fatigue life using a dual-frequency ultrasound method. A modulated nonlinear parameter was derived, which described the relationship between the generation of modulated (sideband) responses of a dual frequency signal and the linear response. The sideband generation from the dual frequency (two signal output system) was shown to increase as the residual fatigue life decreased, and as a standalone measurement method it can be used to show an increase in a materials damage. A baseline-free method was developed by linking a theoretical model, obtained by combining the Paris law and the Nazarov-Sutin crack equation, to experimental nonlinear modulation measurements. The results showed good correlation between the derived theoretical model and the modulated nonlinear parameter, allowing for baseline-free material residual fatigue life estimation. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed, as well as presenting further methods that would lead to increased accuracy of residual fatigue life detection.

  13. Influence of Impactor Mass on the Damage Characteristics and Failure Strength of Laminated Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Kemmerly, Heather L.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the effect of impactor mass on the low-speed impact response of laminated flat composite plates is presented. Dropped weight impact response, damage characteristics, and residual strengths of quasi-isotropic flat plates are presented for a range of energy levels by systematically varying the mass of the impactor. Measured contact forces and damage areas are also presented. The results indicate that the contact force and damage area are nonlinear functions of the impactor mass and vary considerably over the entire range of energy levels considered. The different damage levels induced in a plate specimen when impacted at a given energy level with impactors of different masses significantly influence its compressive residual strength. The results provide clear and consistent trends in contact force, damage area, and compression-after-impact strength when the data are expressed as a function of the impactor momentum.

  14. The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P E; Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Feit, M D; Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, R A

    2005-11-21

    Managing subsurface damage during the shaping process and removing subsurface damage during the polishing process is essential in the production of low damage density optical components, such as those required for use on high peak power lasers. Removal of subsurface damage, during the polishing process, requires polishing to a depth which is greater than the depth of the residual cracks present following the shaping process. To successfully manage, and ultimately remove subsurface damage, understanding the distribution and character of fractures in the subsurface region introduced during fabrication process is important. We have characterized the depth and morphology of subsurface fractures present following fixed abrasive and loose abrasive grinding processes. At shallow depths lateral cracks and an overlapping series of trailing indentation fractures were found to be present. At greater depths, subsurface damage consists of a series of trailing indentation fractures. The area density of trailing fractures changes as a function of depth, however the length and shape of individual cracks remain nearly constant for a given grinding process. We have developed and applied a model to interpret the depth and crack length distributions of subsurface surface damage in terms of key variables including abrasive size and load.

  15. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  16. Predicting The Compression Strength Of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James; Jackson, Wade; Schaff, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a technique for predicting the residual compression strength of sandwich panels containing impact damage in one facesheet. The technique was tailored to predict the strength of specimens that exhibit a failure mode involving the formation of kink bands at locations of peak strain in the region of impact damage. Under continued compression loading, the kink bands propagate in a stable manner perpendicular to the applied load. When a critical kink-band length is reached, growth becomes unstable corresponding to panel failure. The analysis follows in two sections. The first section calculates the far-field stress required for stable kink-band growth and the second calculates that required for unstable growth. The residual strength prediction is made when the stress for stable growth becomes equal to that for unstable kink-band growth. Initial comparisons between analysis and experiment show good agreement.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  18. Damage tolerance of candidate thermoset composites for use on single stage to orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D.; Hodge, A.

    1994-01-01

    Four fiber/resin systems were compared for resistance to damage and damage tolerance. One toughened epoxy and three toughened bismaleimide (BMI) resins were used, all with IM7 carbon fiber reinforcement. A statistical design of experiments technique was used to evaluate the effects of impact energy, specimen thickness, and impactor diameter on the damage area, as computed by C-scans, and residual compression-after-impact (CAI) strength. Results showed that two of the BMI systems sustained relatively large damage zones yet had an excellent retention of CAI strength.

  19. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  20. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  1. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  2. Experimental validation of an ambient vibration-based multiple damage identification method using statistical modal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ouafi Bahlous, S.; Smaoui, H.; El-Borgi, S.

    2009-08-01

    For civil engineering structures, ambient vibration tests are preferred over forced vibration ones because the artificially excitation of large structures having low natural frequencies is quite difficult and expensive. In the ambient vibration tests, operation disturbances can be avoided and the measured response is representative of the actual operating conditions of the structures which vibrate due to natural excitation. The proposed damage identification method is intended for moderate degrees of damage and requires vibration data relative to the current and reference states of the structure as well as a parametric finite element model. It is based on a residual generated from a modal filtering approach by the calculation of the error between the measurements at the current state and their projections onto the incomplete modal basis of the structure as identified at reference state. To detect and locate damage, the residual is evaluated by means of global, sensitivity and rejection tests, modified to allow only physically feasible simple and multiple damage scenarios. The mean of the residual, which turns out to be normally distributed, is used in the final phase of damage quantification. The proposed damage diagnosis method is validated experimentally via ambient vibration tests conducted on full-scale reinforced concrete beams and slabs which contain various simple and multiple damage configurations. With damage expressed in terms of loss of flexural stiffness, the damage detection, localization and quantification are found to be successful for degrees of damage less than about 28% of the initial flexural stiffness of the tested specimens. The exception is that, for multiple damage scenarios, the relative quantification errors may be unacceptable in locations where poor accuracy is expected.

  3. Vibration-based damage detection for filament wound pressure vessel filled with fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Wu, Z.; Li, H.

    2008-03-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels have been extensively used in industry and engineering. The existing damage detection and health monitoring methods for these vessels, such as X-ray and ultrasonic scan, can not meet the requirement of online damage detection; moreover optical grating fibre can only sense the local damage, but not the damage far away from the location of sensors. Vibration-based damage detection methods have the potential to meet such requirements. There methods are based on the fact that damages in a structure results in a change in structural dynamic characteristics. A damage detection method based on a residual associated with output-only subspace-based modal identification and global or focused chi^2-tests built on that residual has been proposed and successfully experimented on a variety of test cases. The purpose of this work is to describe the damage detection method and apply this method to assess the composite structure filled with fluid. The results of identification and damage detection will be presented.

  4. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  5. Surface state reconstruction in ion-damaged SmB6

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeham, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Fisk, Z.; Ronning, F.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-12

    We have used ion-irradiation to damage the (001) surfaces of SmB₆ single crystals to varying depths, and have measured the resistivity as a function of temperature for each depth of damage. We observe a reduction in the residual resistivity with increasing depth of damage. Our data are consistent with a model in which the surface state is not destroyed by the ion-irradiation, however instead the damaged layer is poorly conducting and the initial surface state is reconstructed below the damage. This behavior is consistent with a surface state that is topologically protected.

  6. An empirical modified fatigue damage model for impacted GFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, S.; Hassan, M. A.; Bushroa, A. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the residual strength of GFRP laminates following a low-velocity impact event under cyclic loading. The residual strength is calculated using a linear fatigue damage model. According to an investigation into the effect of low-velocity impact on the fatigue behavior of laminates, it seems laminate fatigue life decreases after impact. By normalizing the fatigue stress against undamaged static strength, the Fatigue Damage parameter “FD” is presented with a linear relationship as its slope which is a linear function of the initial impact energy; meanwhile, the constants were attained from experimental data. FD is implemented into a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for GFRP composite laminates, in order to predict damage threshold in composite structures. An S-N curve is implemented to indicate the fatigue behavior for 2 mm thickness encompassing both undamaged and impacted samples. A decline in lifespan is evident when the impact energy level increases. Finally, the FD is intended to capture the unique GFRP composite characteristics.

  7. DNA damage, repair and photoadaptation in a Xiphophorus fish hybrid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David L; Paniker, Lakshmi; Douki, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight is responsible for most cutaneous malignant melanomas in the human population. It is very likely that DNA damage is an initial event in melanomagenesis, however, the role played by this damage is an open question. To this end, we used a hemipigmented F(1) hybrid of the fish genus Xiphophorus and HPLC tandem mass spectrometry to examine the effects of melanin on the induction and repair of the predominant UV-induced photoproducts formed in skin cell DNA. We found that heavily pigmented skin cells had about half the damage of nonpigmented cells and the relative induction of the major photoproducts was independent of the degree of pigmentation. The efficiency of photoenzymatic repair was the same in nonpigmented and pigmented areas of the fish. We found no evidence of residual damage at 10 days after the last exposure. Most striking was that repeated exposure to multiple doses of UVB caused a very significant photoadaptive response. Rather than an accumulation of damage after five doses of UVB we saw a significant reduction in the amount of damage induced after the final dose compared with the initial dose. The relevance of these observations is discussed in the context of melanoma susceptibility and UVB thresholds.

  8. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  9. Non-repair pathways for minimizing protein isoaspartyl damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patananan, Alexander N; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P; Clarke, Steven G

    2014-06-13

    The spontaneous degradation of asparaginyl and aspartyl residues to isoaspartyl residues is a common type of protein damage in aging organisms. Although the protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the repair of l-isoaspartyl residues to l-aspartyl residues in most organisms, no gene homolog or enzymatic activity is present in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we used biochemical approaches to elucidate how proteins containing isoaspartyl residues are metabolized in this organism. Surprisingly, the level of isoaspartyl residues in yeast proteins (50-300 pmol of isoaspartyl residues/mg of protein extract) is comparable with organisms with protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase, suggesting a novel regulatory pathway. Interfering with common protein quality control mechanisms by mutating and inhibiting the proteasomal and autophagic pathways in vivo did not increase isoaspartyl residue levels compared with wild type or uninhibited cells. However, the inhibition of metalloproteases in in vitro aging experiments by EDTA resulted in an ∼3-fold increase in the level of isoaspartyl-containing peptides. Characterization by mass spectrometry of these peptides identified several proteins involved in metabolism as targets of isoaspartyl damage. Further analysis of these peptides revealed that many have an N-terminal isoaspartyl site and originate from proteins with short half-lives. These results suggest that one or more metalloproteases participate in limiting isoaspartyl formation by robust proteolysis.

  10. Damage scenarios and an onboard support system for damaged ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Lee, Dongkon; Kang, Hee Jin; Kim, Soo-Young; Shin, Sung-Chul

    2014-06-01

    Although a safety assessment of damaged ships, which considers environmental conditions such as waves and wind, is important in both the design and operation phases of ships, in Korea, rules or guidelines to conduct such assessments are not yet developed. However, NATO and European maritime societies have developed guidelines for a safety assessment. Therefore, it is required to develop rules or guidelines for safety assessments such as the Naval Ship Code (NSC) of NATO. Before the safety assessment of a damaged ship can be performed, the available damage scenarios must be developed and the safety assessment criteria must be established. In this paper, the parameters related to damage by accidents are identified and categorized when developing damage scenarios. The need for damage safety assessment criteria is discussed, and an example is presented. In addition, a concept and specifications for the DB-based supporting system, which is used in the operation phases, are proposed.

  11. Collection of sugarcane crop residue for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Eiland, B.R.; Clayton, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    Crop residue left after sugarcane harvesting was recovered using a forage harvester and a large round baler. The quantity, bulk density and moisture content of the crop residue was determined in four fields. Crop residue from 7 ha was burned in boilers at a sugar mill. Samples of this residue were tested by a laboratory and compared to sugarcane bagasse.

  12. Nondestructive damage evaluation in ceramic matrix composites for aerospace applications.

    PubMed

    Dassios, Konstantinos G; Kordatos, Evangelos Z; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Matikas, Theodore E

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  13. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Kordatos, Evangelos Z.; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately. PMID:23935428

  14. The effect of yield strength and ductility to fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The cumulative damage of aluminium alloys with different yield strength and various ductility due to seismic loads was studied. The responses of an idealized beam with a centered mass at one end and fixed at the other end to El Centro's and Taft's earthquakes are computed by assuming that the alloys are perfectly elastoplastic materials and by using numerical technique. Consequently, the corresponding residual plastic strain can be obtained from the stress-strain relationship. The revised Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage theorem is utilized to calculate the fatigue damage. The numerical results show that in certain cases, the high ductility materials are more resistant to seismic loads than the high yield strength materials. The results also show that if a structure collapse during the earthquake, the collapse always occurs in the very early stage.

  15. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  16. High residue amounts of kaolin further increase photosynthesis and fruit color in 'Empire' apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kaolin (Surround WP, NovaSource, Phoenix, AZ, USA) is commonly used to reduce sunburn damage in fruit crops and to reduce heat stress on foliage. It is typically applied at rates of 3% to 6%, resulting in leaf and fruit residue levels of 1-3 g/m2. Crop modeling of the effect of kaolin on leaf/cano...

  17. Potential hazards of fumigant residues.

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, L

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of fumigants (primarily ethylene dibromide, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, ethylene oxide, symdibromotetetrachloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorovos, carbon tetrachloride, methyl bromide) as well as their degradation products in foodstuffs and soil have been examined mainly in regard to the potential mutagenicity of their residues. PMID:789068

  18. Solidification process for sludge residue

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-09-10

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria.

  19. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  20. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  1. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  2. Antioxidant potential of Phyllanthus fraternus Webster on cyclophosphamide induced changes in sperm characteristics and testicular oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sangita; Lata, Swarn; Tiwari, Kavindra Nath

    2015-10-01

    Cyclophasphamide (CPA) is used to treat various types of cancer. It is a cytotoxic alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapeutic regimen. However, the clinical efficacy of CPA is marred by its side effects. In clinical applications of CPA, it becomes necessary to prevent the oxidative stress and reproductive toxicity induced thereby in normal cells. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of aqueous extract of Phyllanthus fraternus (AEPF) on CPA (200 mg/kg body wt., i.p.) induced changes in sperm characteristics and testicular oxidative damage in male mice. The CPA treated group showed significant decrease in gonadosomatic index (GSI), epididymal sperm count, sperm motility and sperm viability compared to control group, while the CPA + AEPF treated group had significant increase with respect to these variables compared to the CPA-treated group. The elevated levels of lipid peroxidation by CPA were effectively reduced with AEPF. It also exhibited protective action against the CPA induced depletion of antioxidants like catalase and superoxide dismutase. DNA damage was measured by comet assay, biomonitoring with comet assay elicited significant increase in genotoxicity. Genotoxicity caused by CPA was counteracted by aqueous extract of Phyllanthus fraternus. Administration of the plant extract along with CPA restored the histopathological architecture of testis. Thus, the aqueous extract of P. fraternus by virtue of its antioxidant potential can be used as an effective agent to reduce CPA-induced oxidative stress in male mice. PMID:26665295

  3. Alleviating inequality in climate policy costs: an integrated perspective on mitigation, damage and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cian, E.; Hof, A. F.; Marangoni, G.; Tavoni, M.; van Vuuren, D. P.

    2016-07-01

    Equity considerations play an important role in international climate negotiations. While policy analysis has often focused on equity as it relates to mitigation costs, there are large regional differences in adaptation costs and the level of residual damage. This paper illustrates the relevance of including adaptation and residual damage in equity considerations by determining how the allocation of emission allowances would change to counteract regional differences in total climate costs, defined as the costs of mitigation, adaptation, and residual damage. We compare emission levels resulting from a global carbon tax with two allocations of emission allowances under a global cap-and-trade system: one equating mitigation costs and one equating total climate costs as share of GDP. To account for uncertainties in both mitigation and adaptation, we use a model-comparison approach employing two alternative modeling frameworks with different damage, adaptation cost, and mitigation cost estimates, and look at two different climate goals. Despite the identified model uncertainties, we derive unambiguous results on the change in emission allowance allocation that could lessen the unequal distribution of adaptation costs and residual damages through the financial transfers associated with emission trading.

  4. Measurement of residual stress in bent pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alers, G. A.; McColskey, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Buried gas and oil pipelines can be subjected to unexpected bending loads caused by such earth movements as earthquakes, wash-outs, road building, or mining subsidence as well as by denting from unintentional digging. In order to make a fitness-for-service assessment, it is necessary to measure any residual stresses that are left in the pipe wall as well as the degree of plastic flow within regions of severe damage. A portable instrument that uses EMATs to rapidly measure ultrasonic shear wave birefringence in the wall of a pipe has been developed and applied to a 5 m (15 ft) long section of 0.56 m (22 in) diameter linepipe loaded in three point bending by a 22 MN (five million pound) load frame. The results showed that: (1) a large correction for shear wave anisotropy caused by texture in the steel had to be introduced and (2) the degree of plastic flow could be deduced from changes in the texture contribution alone. An attempt to separate the stress and texture effects by using SH wave modes in the pipe wall proved unreliable because of magnetostrictive effects in the periodic permanent magnet EMATs used for these experiments.

  5. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction.

  6. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction. PMID:23995700

  7. Prediction of tissue thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Subic, Aleksandar; Jazar, Reza; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2016-04-29

    This paper presents a method to characterize tissue thermal damage by taking into account the thermal-mechanical effect of soft tissues for thermal ablation. This method integrates the bio-heating conduction and non-rigid motion dynamics to describe thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and further extends the traditional tissue damage model to characterize thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively predict tissue thermal damage and it also provides reliable guidelines for control of the thermal ablation procedure. PMID:27163325

  8. Prediction of tissue thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Subic, Aleksandar; Jazar, Reza; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2016-04-29

    This paper presents a method to characterize tissue thermal damage by taking into account the thermal-mechanical effect of soft tissues for thermal ablation. This method integrates the bio-heating conduction and non-rigid motion dynamics to describe thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and further extends the traditional tissue damage model to characterize thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively predict tissue thermal damage and it also provides reliable guidelines for control of the thermal ablation procedure.

  9. Crack arrest and residual strength of composite panels with softening strips

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The residual strength and crack-arresting capabilities of laminates with softening strips of either E-glass, Kevlar, or S-glass are investigated. Sixteen-ply panels (with strips replacing the 0 deg-ply fibers) are tested under different conditions including fatigue cycling (before and after an initial damage is introduced), and exposure to environmental moisture. It is found that S-glass functions better than Kevlar and E-glass in the crack-arrest and residual strength test (even though it experiences greater delamination than the other two materials); that the residual strength is not influenced by the size of the initial damage; and that moisture significantly affects the crack-arrest capability. It is concluded that these materials cannot be used as a crack-arrest mechanism for the fail-safe design of composite aircraft structures. 8 refs.

  10. Isothermal Fatigue, Damage Accumulation, and Life Prediction of a Woven PMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of the fully reversed fatigue behavior exhibited by a carbon fiber/polyimide resin, woven laminate at room and elevated temperatures. Nondestructive video edge view microscopy and destructive sectioning techniques were used to study the microscopic damage mechanisms that evolved. The residual elastic stiffness was monitored and recorded throughout the fatigue life of the coupon. In addition, residual compressive strength tests were conducted on fatigue coupons with various degrees of damage as quantified by stiffness reduction. Experimental results indicated that the monotonic tensile properties were only minimally influenced by temperature, while the monotonic compressive and fully reversed fatigue properties displayed noticeable reductions due to the elevated temperature. The stiffness degradation, as a function of cycles, consisted of three stages; a short-lived high degradation period, a constant degradation rate segment composing the majority of the life, and a final stage demonstrating an increasing rate of degradation up to failure. Concerning the residual compressive strength tests at room and elevated temperatures, the elevated temperature coupons appeared much more sensitive to damage. At elevated temperatures, coupons experienced a much larger loss in compressive strength when compared to room temperature coupons with equivalent damage. The fatigue damage accumulation law proposed for the model incorporates a scalar representation for damage, but admits a multiaxial, anisotropic evolutionary law. The model predicts the current damage (as quantified by residual stiffness) and remnant life of a composite that has undergone a known load at temperature. The damage/life model is dependent on the applied multiaxial stress state as well as temperature. Comparisons between the model and data showed good predictive capabilities concerning stiffness degradation and cycles to failure.

  11. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.; Hayward, Maurice

    2014-02-18

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup −12} Pa{sup −1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... by reference in § 1065.1010). (2) Phosphorus is at or below 15 mg per kg of fuel based on the... 0.15 ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3) % 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg) % 3.50 4.00...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3)% 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg)% 3.50 4.00 4.50 4.50 4... the elements zinc, phosphorus, or calcium is at or below the specified limits. We consider a fuel...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3)% 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg)% 3.50 4.00 4.50 4.50 4... the elements zinc, phosphorus, or calcium is at or below the specified limits. We consider a fuel...

  15. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  16. Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non- isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

  17. Road Damage Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of water-saturated sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and slit, which moved from right to left towards the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed lateral spreading, is a principal cause of liquefaction-related earthquake damage caused by the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: S.D. Ellen, U.S. Geological Survey

  18. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  19. Endothelial damage and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2009-11-01

    This issue of Autoimmunity reviews the mechanisms that lead to vascular damage in systemic autoimmune diseases. In addition, this issue explores recent advances in the understanding of how abnormalities in angiogenesis present in autoimmune diseases may lead to tissue damage and/or to premature vascular disease.

  20. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  1. Pesticidal residues in animal tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Menzie, C.M.; Adomaitis, V.A.; Reichel, W.L.

    1960-01-01

    Tests with penned starlings, rats, pheasants, and ducks indicated that each species differs in sensitivity to the various pesticides. Residues in tissues are proportional to the degree of exposure during area treatment and they are also found in animals shot six or more months after treatment. The presence of more than 20-30 ppm of DDT, 20 ppm of chlordan, and 6-20 ppm of heptachlor epoxide in quail tissues indicated that the birds had ingested lethal dosages of the pesticides.

  2. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O`Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination.

  3. Residue management at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Olencz, J.

    1995-12-31

    Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

  4. Residue gasification tests at TVA

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.

    1984-11-01

    The Texaco gasification process was identified as an attractive way to utilise vacuum bottoms from the Exxon Donor Solvent liquefaction process to generate synthesis gas. This gas can then be upgraded to produce the hydrogen required by the EDS plant. Gasification tests were carried out at TVA's 200 t/day Muscle Shoals plant and are reported here. As a result, Texaco expects that a plant could be designed to handle EDS residue from any high-rank coal.

  5. Geotechnical characteristics of residual soils

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Residual soils are products of chemical weathering and thus their characteristics are dependent upon environmental factors of climate, parent material, topography and drainage, and age. These conditions are optimized in the tropics where well-drained regions produce reddish lateritic soils rich in iron and aluminum sesquioxides and kaolinitic clays. Conversely, poorly drained areas tend towards montmorillonitic expansive black clays. Andosols develop over volcanic ash and rock regions and are rich in allophane (amorphous silica) and metastable halloysite. The geological origins greatly affect the resulting engineering characteristics. Both lateritic soils and andosols are susceptible to property changes upon drying, and exhibit compaction and strength properties not indicative of their classification limits. Both soils have been used successfully in earth dam construction, but attention must be given to seepage control through the weathered rock. Conversely, black soils are unpopular for embankments. Lateritic soils respond to cement stabilization and, in some cases, lime stabilization. Andosols should also respond to lime treatment and cement treatments if proper mixing can be achieved. Black expansive residual soils respond to lime treatment by demonstrating strength gains and decreased expansiveness. Rainfall induced landslides are typical of residual soil deposits.

  6. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  7. Swift heavy ion-induced radiation damage in isotropic graphite studied by micro-indentation and in-situ electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christian; Voss, Kay Obbe; Bender, Markus; Kupka, Katharina; Romanenko, Anton; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Tomut, Marilena

    2015-12-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-physical properties and radiation hardness, isotropic graphite is presently the most promising material candidate for new high-power ion accelerators which will provide highest beam intensities and energies. Under these extreme conditions, specific accelerator components including production targets and beam protection modules are facing the risk of degradation due to radiation damage. Ion-beam induced damage effects were tested by irradiating polycrystalline, isotropic graphite samples at the UNILAC (GSI, Darmstadt) with 4.8 MeV per nucleon 132Xe, 150Sm, 197Au, and 238U ions applying fluences between 1 × 1011 and 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The overall damage accumulation and its dependence on energy loss of the ions were studied by in situ 4-point resistivity measurements. With increasing fluence, the electric resistivity increases due to disordering of the graphitic structure. Irradiated samples were also analyzed off-line by means of micro-indentation in order to characterize mesoscale effects such as beam-induced hardening and stress fields within the specimen. With increasing fluence and energy loss, hardening becomes more pronounced.

  8. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong; Brannon, Rebecca Moss

    2009-08-01

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material

  9. PESTICIDE RESIDUE RECOVERIES FROM SURFACE WIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors with a primary source resulting from residue deposition on household surfaces. Accurate measurements of surface residues is essential for estimating exposure from different routes. Various procedures have been developed ...

  10. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  11. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  12. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  13. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  14. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  15. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  16. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  17. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  18. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  19. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  20. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  1. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  2. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  3. Multi-level damage detection with nonlinear ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    The nonlinear ultrasonic method of second harmonic generation is used to detect multiple levels of damage on a single specimen. There is a breadth of research in the literature that measures the second harmonic and the resulting nonlinear parameter to monitor increasing amounts of uniform damage, but for this method to be applicable as an in situ technique, it must be able to scan an area of a structure with varying amounts of damage over a region. To investigate this, an aluminum alloy sample is shot-peened to two intensity levels along its length, to produce different sections of cold work and residual stress as a function of spatial location. Previous research has shown that the residual stress and cold work introduced in a material from shot peening causes an increase in the nonlinear parameter. Rayleigh waves are generated in the sample and the first and second harmonic amplitudes are measured at increasing propagation distances that encompass an undamaged section and two sections, each with different levels of shot peening. Results show that the nonlinear parameter increases as the Rayleigh wedge sensor is scanned over the shot peening sections.

  4. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density. PMID:27139628

  5. A Basic Study of Controlled Closing for Transformers with Residual Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutada, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Takashi; Kohyama, Haruhiko; Ito, Hiroki

    Energizing of transformers generates high amplitude inrush currents that reduce power quality and can potentially damage the transformers. Controlled closing for transformers taking account of the residual flux is studied to eliminate the inrush current. Since the residual flux must be precisely acquired before controlled closing to determine the optimum instant for energizing, a new method of estimating the residual flux by using the measured transformer voltage is proposed. The optimum closing target taking account of the dielectric and mechanical characteristics of a gas circuit breaker is also studied. The verification using a single phase transformer showed that the maximum error of the estimated residual flux was less than 10%, and the controlled closing using the proposed method eliminated the inrush current to less than 15% of random closing.

  6. Equivalent damage: A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflen, J. R.; Cook, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts in equivalent damage were evaluated to determine their applicability to the life prediction of hot path components of aircraft gas turbine engines. Equivalent damage was defined as being those effects which influence the crack initiation life-time beyond the damage that is measured in uniaxial, fully-reversed sinusoidal and isothermal experiments at low homologous temperatures. Three areas of equivalent damage were examined: mean stress, cumulative damage, and multiaxiality. For each area, a literature survey was conducted to aid in selecting the most appropriate theories. Where possible, data correlations were also used in the evaluation process. A set of criteria was developed for ranking the theories in each equivalent damage regime. These criteria considered aspects of engine utilization as well as the theoretical basis and correlative ability of each theory. In addition, consideration was given to the complex nature of the loading cycle at fatigue critical locations of hot path components; this loading includes non-proportional multiaxial stressing, combined temperature and strain fluctuations, and general creep-fatigue interactions. Through applications of selected equivalent damage theories to some suitable data sets it was found that there is insufficient data to allow specific recommendations of preferred theories for general applications. A series of experiments and areas of further investigations were identified.

  7. 3(omega) Damage: Growth Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, M; Demos, S; Wu, Z-L; Wong, J; Penetrante, B; Hrubesh, L

    2001-02-22

    The design of high power UV laser systems is limited to a large extent by the laser-initiated damage performance of transmissive fused silica optical components. The 3{omega} (i.e., the third harmonic of the primary laser frequency) damage growth mitigation LDRD effort focused on understanding and reducing the rapid growth of laser-initiated surface damage on fused silica optics. Laser-initiated damage can be discussed in terms of two key issues: damage initiated at some type of precursor and rapid damage growth of the damage due to subsequent laser pulses. The objective of the LDRD effort has been the elucidation of laser-induced damage processes in order to quantify and potentially reduce the risk of damage to fused silica surfaces. The emphasis of the first two years of this effort was the characterization and reduction of damage initiation. In spite of significant reductions in the density of damage sites on polished surfaces, statistically some amount of damage initiation should always be expected. The early effort therefore emphasized the development of testing techniques that quantified the statistical nature of damage initiation on optical surfaces. This work led to the development of an optics lifetime modeling strategy that has been adopted by the NIF project to address damage-risk issues. During FY99 interest shifted to the damage growth issue which was the focus of the final year of this project. The impact of the remaining damage sites on laser performance can be minimized if the damage sites did not continue to grow following subsequent illumination. The objectives of the final year of the LDRD effort were to apply a suite of state-of-the-art characterization tools to elucidate the nature of the initiated damage sites, and to identify a method that effectively mitigates further damage growth. Our specific goal is to understand the cause for the rapid growth of damage sites so that we can develop and apply an effective means to mitigate it. The

  8. Drug-induced corneal damage.

    PubMed

    2014-04-01

    Corneal damage can have a variety of causes, including infections, chemical splashes, environmental factors (radiation, trauma, contact lenses, etc.), and systemic diseases (genetic, autoimmune, inflammatory, metabolic, etc.). A wide range of drugs can also damage the cornea. The severity of drug-induced corneal changes can range from simple asymptomatic deposits to irreversible, sight-threatening damage. Several factors can influence the onset of corneal lesions. Some factors, such as the dose, are treatment-related, while others such as contact lenses, are patient-related. A variety of mechanisms may be involved, including corneal dryness, changes in the corneal epithelium, impaired wound healing and deposits. Many drugs can damage the cornea through direct contact, after intraocular injection or instillation, including VEGF inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, local anaesthetics, glaucoma drugs, fluoroquinolones, and preservatives. Some systemically administered drugs can also damage the cornea, notably cancer drugs, amiodarone and isotretinoin. Vulnerable patients should be informed of this risk if they are prescribed a drug with the potential to damage the cornea so that they can identify problems in a timely manner. It may be necessary to discontinue the suspect drug when signs and symptoms of corneal damage occur.

  9. Estimating bird damage from damage incidence in wine grape vineyards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeHaven, R.W.; Hothem, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Bird damage was measured during 1977 and 1978 at 32 wine grape vineyards in the San Joaquin Valley and North Coastal Region of California. Both the percentage bird loss (PBL) and the percentage of bunches damaged (BDI = bird damage incidence) were determined during 55 total-damage assessments, and the resulting data pairs were used to develop a regression of PBL on BDI. The final prediction equation was loge (PBL + 1) = 0.0385 BDI, for which the SE = 9.6297 10-4, and it accounted for 97% of the observed variation. We conclude that by using that equation, reasonably accurate predictions of PBL can be obtained from relatively quick and inexpensive estimates of BDI. Guidelines for the use of the prediction method and the accuracy of some PBL predictions are discussed.

  10. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  11. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  12. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  13. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  14. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  15. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  16. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  17. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  18. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  19. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  20. Impact damage in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1988-01-01

    Damage tolerance requirements have become an important consideration in the design and fabrication of composite structural components for modern aircraft. The ability of a component to contain a flaw of a given size without serious loss of its structural integrity is of prime concern. Composite laminates are particularly susceptible to damage caused by transverse impact loading. The ongoing program described is aimed at developing experimental and analytical methods that can be used to assess damage tolerance capabilities in composite structures subjected to impulsive loading. Some significant results of this work and the methodology used to obtain them are outlined.

  1. Laser-induced damage of fused silica on high-power laser: beam intensity modulation, optics defect, contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongfeng; Sun, Mingyin; Wu, Rong; Lu, Xinqiang; Lin, Zunqi; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    The wedged focus lens of fused silica, one of the final optics assembly's optics, focuses the 351 nm beam onto target and separates the residual 1053 and 527 nm light with 351 nm light. After the experiment with beam energies at 3ω range from 3 to 5KJ, and pulse shapes about 3ns, the wedged focus lens has laser-induced damage at particular area. Analysis the damage result, there are three reasons to induce these damages. These reasons are beam intensity modulation, optics defect and contamination that cause different damage morphologies. The 3ω beam intensity modulation, one of three factors, is the mostly import factor to induce damage. Here, the n2 nonlinear coefficient of fused silica material can lead to small-scale self-focusing filament because of optics thickness and beam intensity. And some damage-filaments' tails are bulk damage spots because there are subsurface scratches or metal contaminations.

  2. Impact Damage and Strain Rate Effects for Toughened Epoxy Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    Structural integrity of composite systems under dynamic impact loading is investigated herein. The GENOA virtual testing software environment is used to implement the effects of dynamic loading on fracture progression and damage tolerance. Combinations of graphite and glass fibers with a toughened epoxy matrix are investigated. The effect of a ceramic coating for the absorption of impact energy is also included. Impact and post impact simulations include verification and prediction of (1) Load and Impact Energy, (2) Impact Damage Size, (3) Maximum Impact Peak Load, (4) Residual Strength, (5) Maximum Displacement, (6) Contribution of Failure Modes to Failure Mechanisms, (7) Prediction of Impact Load Versus Time, and (8) Damage, and Fracture Pattern. A computer model is utilized for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Results show the damage progression sequence and the changes in the structural response characteristics due to dynamic impact. The fundamental premise of computational simulation is that the complete evaluation of composite fracture requires an assessment of ply and subply level damage/fracture processes as the structure is subjected to loads. Simulation results for the graphite/epoxy composite were compared with the impact and tension failure test data, correlation and verification was obtained that included: (1) impact energy, (2) damage size, (3) maximum impact peak load, (4) residual strength, (5) maximum displacement, and (6) failure mechanisms of the composite structure.

  3. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... damage can be expected to occur. The evaluation must incorporate repeated load and static analyses... demonstrated by tests, or by analysis supported by tests, that the structure is capable of carrying ultimate... analysis supported by tests. (3) The structure must be shown by residual strength tests, or...

  4. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... damage can be expected to occur. The evaluation must incorporate repeated load and static analyses... demonstrated by tests, or by analysis supported by tests, that the structure is capable of carrying ultimate... analysis supported by tests. (3) The structure must be shown by residual strength tests, or...

  5. Glucose Autoxidation Induces Functional Damage to Proteins via Modification of Critical Arginine Residues†

    PubMed Central

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Hachey, David L.; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Non-enzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to αVβ3 integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while non-oxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation. PMID:21661747

  6. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-04

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction.Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge registered software, is based on data taken from Outeiro and al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature.Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R and D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  7. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction. Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge® software, is based on data taken from Outeiro & al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature. Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R&D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  8. Analysis of Residual DSBs in Ataxia-Telangiectasia Lymphoblast Cells Initiating Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Anglada, Teresa; Terradas, Mariona; Hernández, Laia; Genescà, Anna; Martín, Marta

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the relationship between accumulation of residual DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and cell death, we have used a control and an ATM (Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated) defective cell line, as Ataxia-Telangiectasia (AT) cells tend to accumulate residual DSBs at long times after damage infliction. After irradiation, AT cells showed checkpoint impairment and a fraction of cells displayed an abnormal centrosome number and tetraploid DNA content, and this fraction increased along with apoptosis rates. At all times analyzed, AT cells displayed a significantly higher rate of radiation-induced apoptosis than normal cells. Besides apoptosis, 70–85% of the AT viable cells (TUNEL-negative) carried ≥10 γH2AX foci/cell, while only 12–27% of normal cells did. The fraction of AT and normal cells undergoing early and late apoptosis were isolated by flow cytometry and residual DSBs were concretely scored in these populations. Half of the γH2AX-positive AT cells undergoing early apoptosis carried ≥10 γH2AX foci/cell and this fraction increased to 75% in late apoptosis. The results suggest that retention of DNA damage-induced γH2AX foci is an indicative of lethal DNA damage, as cells undergoing apoptosis are those accumulating more DSBs. Scoring of residual γH2AX foci might function as a predictive tool to assess radiation-induced apoptosis. PMID:27057549

  9. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  10. Clinical light damage to the eye

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four sections: The Nature of Light and of Light Damage to Biological Tissues; Light Damage to the Eye; Protecting the Eye from Light Damage; and Overview of Light Damage to the Eye. Some of the paper titles are: Ultraviolet-Absorbing Intraocular Lens Implants; Phototoxic Changes in the Retina; Light Damage to the Lens; and Radiation, Light, and Sight.

  11. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  12. Automating a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrie, W. F.; Westfall, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA), a device for measuring the amounts and species of various gases present in a vacuum system is discussed. In a recent update of the RGA, it was shown that the use of microprocessors could revolutionize data acquisition and data reduction. This revolution is exemplified by the Inficon 1Q200 RGA which was selected to meet the needs of this update. The Inficon RGA and the Zilog microcomputer were interfaced in order the receive and format the digital data from the RGA. This automated approach is discussed in detail.

  13. Concepts for improving the damage tolerance of composite compression panels. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The residual strength of specimens with damage and the sensitivity to damage while subjected to an applied inplane compression load were determined for flatplate specimens and blade-stiffened panels. The results suggest that matrix materials that fail by delamination have the lowest damage tolerance capability. Alternate matrix materials or laminates which are transversely reinforced suppress the delamination mode of failure and change the failure mode to transverse shear crippling which occurs at a higher strain value. Several damage-tolerant blade-stiffened panel design concepts are evaluated. Structural efficiency studies conducted show only small mass penalties may result from incorporating these damage-tolerant features in panel design. The implication of test results on the design of aircraft structures was examined with respect to FAR requirements.

  14. Loss and damage post Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2016-08-01

    The Paris Agreement gave the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage a permanent and potentially prominent place in climate negotiations, but beyond that its impact remains wide open for interpretation.

  15. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  16. BDS thin film damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2008-10-24

    A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

  17. Radiolytic Damage to Genetic Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, John F.

    1981-01-01

    Describes some basic findings in the radiation chemistry of genetic material derived from studies of model systems. Uses these findings to extrapolate the consequences of radiation damage to DNA within cells. (CS)

  18. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Program (FATIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    FATIG computes fatigue damage/fatigue life using the stress rms (root mean square) value, the total number of cycles, and S-N curve parameters. The damage is computed by the following methods: (a) traditional method using Miner s rule with stress cycles determined from a Rayleigh distribution up to 3*sigma; and (b) classical fatigue damage formula involving the Gamma function, which is derived from the integral version of Miner's rule. The integration is carried out over all stress amplitudes. This software solves the problem of probabilistic fatigue damage using the integral form of the Palmgren-Miner rule. The software computes fatigue life using an approach involving all stress amplitudes, up to N*sigma, as specified by the user. It can be used in the design of structural components subjected to random dynamic loading, or by any stress analyst with minimal training for fatigue life estimates of structural components.

  19. Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

  20. Damage progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    A computational simulation tool is used to evaluate the various stages of damage progression in composite materials during Iosipescu sheat testing. Unidirectional composite specimens with either the major or minor material axis in the load direction are considered. Damage progression characteristics are described for each specimen using two types of boundary conditions. A procedure is outlined regarding the use of computational simulation in composites testing. Iosipescu shear testing using the V-notched beam specimen is a convenient method to measure both shear strength and shear stiffness simultaneously. The evaluation of composite test response can be made more productive and informative via computational simulation of progressive damage and fracture. Computational simulation performs a complete evaluation of laminated composite fracture via assessment of ply and subply level damage/fracture processes.

  1. Damaging effects of visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. P.; Baker, B. N.

    1982-02-01

    The right eyes of anesthetized, ten week old albino rats are exposed to constant photon fluxes at 6 wavelengths for 6 hours. The left eye of each animal is patched during the exposure and is used as control. Histologic examination of retinal sections disclosed a region in the superior retina which is more damaged than are other areas. Attempting to ascertain an action spectrum by measuring outer nuclear layer (ONL) lost in this sensitive region fails. However, it is shown that when ONL thickness is integrated over the entire retinal sections, a rhodopsin action-spectrum emerges. It is concluded that retinal light damage in the albina rat under these conditions is rhodopsin mediated; and assessment of the extent of damage is best made by some method which integrates over the entire retinal section. The latter methodology is not routinely incorporated into studies of retinal light-damage but probably should be.

  2. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  3. Climate change: Unattributed hurricane damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallegatte, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    In the United States, hurricanes have been causing more and more economic damage. A reanalysis of the disaster database using a statistical method that accounts for improvements in resilience opens the possibility that climate change has played a role.

  4. Fiber-optic polymer residue monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Jarecki, R.L. Jr.; Dalton, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    Semiconductor processing tools that use a plasma to etch polysilicon or oxides produce residue polymers that build up on the exposed surfaces of the processing chamber. These residues are generally stressed and with time can cause flaking onto wafers resulting in yield loss. Currently, residue buildup is not monitored, and chambers are cleaned at regular intervals resulting in excess downtime for the tool. In addition, knowledge of the residue buildup rate and index of refraction is useful in determining the state of health of the chamber process. The authors have developed a novel optical fiber-based robust sensor that allows measurement of the residue polymer buildup while not affecting the plasma process.

  5. Managing residual limb hyperhidrosis in wounded warriors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Kentosh, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Residual limb dermatologic problems are a common concern among young active traumatic amputee patients who strive to maintain an active lifestyle. Hyperhidrosis of residual limbs is a recognized inciting factor that often contributes to residual limb dermatoses and is driven by the design of the prosthetic liner covering the residual limb. Treatment of hyperhidrosis in this population presents a unique challenge. Several accepted treatments of hyperhidrosis can offer some relief but have been limited by lack of results or side-effect profiles. Microwave thermal ablation has presented an enticing potential for residual limb hyperhidrosis. PMID:27416083

  6. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  7. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  8. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  9. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  10. Biochemical suitability of crop residues for cellulosic ethanol: disincentives to nitrogen fertilization in corn agriculture.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Morgan E; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Snapp, Sieglinde; McSwiney, Claire P; Baldock, Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Concerns about energy security and climate change have increased biofuel demand, particularly ethanol produced from cellulosic feedstocks (e.g., food crop residues). A central challenge to cropping for cellulosic ethanol is the potential environmental damage from increased fertilizer use. Previous analyses have assumed that cropping for carbohydrate in residue will require the same amount of fertilizer as cropping for grain. Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that increases in biomass in response to fertilization are not uniform across biochemical classes (carbohydrate, protein, lipid, lignin) or tissues (leaf and stem, grain, reproductive support). Although corn grain responds vigorously and nonlinearly, corn residue shows only modest increases in carbohydrate yields in response to high levels of fertilization (25% increase with 202 kg N ha(-1)). Lignin yields in the residue increased almost twice as much as carbohydrate yields in response to nitrogen, implying that residue feedstock quality declines as more fertilizer is applied. Fertilization also increases the decomposability of corn residue, implying that soil carbon sequestration becomes less efficient with increased fertilizer. Our results suggest that even when corn is grown for grain, benefits of fertilization decline rapidly after the ecosystem's N demands are met. Heavy application of fertilizer yields minimal grain benefits and almost no benefits in residue carbohydrates, while degrading the cellulosic ethanol feedstock quality and soil carbon sequestration capacity. PMID:21348531

  11. Measurement of Damage Velocities in Bullet Impacts of Transparent Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Charles; Bigger, Rory; Weiss, Carl

    2013-06-01

    A series of impact experiments have been conducted to examine the response of transparent material to ballistic impact. The experiments consisted of impacting 15 mm of borosilicate glass back by 9.5 mm of Lexan. The projectile was a 0.30-cal hard steel bullet designed specifically for the experiments. Residual velocities and the residual length of the bullets (which were soft-recovered in a catch box) were measured as a function of impact velocity. High-speed imaging of the impact event and post-test analysis has permitted quantification of damage propagation and the rate of propagation. The results of several experiments are presented and compared to edge-on impact experiments that have been conducted by Strassburger et al..

  12. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome’s integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used. Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  13. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome's integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used.Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  14. Replicating Damaged DNA in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail. PMID:24296172

  15. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  16. Heat transfer in damaged material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, J.

    2013-10-01

    Fully coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of civil engineering problems is studied. The mechanical analysis is based on damage mechanics which is useful for modeling of behaviour of quasi-brittle materials, especially in tension. The damage is assumed to be isotropic. The heat transfer is assumed in the form of heat conduction governed by the Fourier law and heat radiation governed by the Stefan-Boltzmann law. Fully coupled thermo-mechanical problem is formulated.

  17. Nav Channels in Damaged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Morris, C E; Joos, B

    2016-01-01

    Sick excitable cells (ie, Nav channel-expressing cells injured by trauma, ischemia, inflammatory, and other conditions) typically exhibit "acquired sodium channelopathies" which, we argue, reflect bleb-damaged membranes rendering their Nav channels "leaky." The situation is excitotoxic because untreated Nav leak exacerbates bleb damage. Fast Nav inactivation (a voltage-independent process) is so tightly coupled, kinetically speaking, to the inherently voltage-dependent process of fast activation that when bleb damage accelerates and thus left-shifts macroscopic fast activation, fast inactivation accelerates to the same extent. The coupled g(V) and availability(V) processes and their window conductance regions consequently left-shift by the same number of millivolts. These damage-induced hyperpolarizing shifts, whose magnitude increases with damage intensity, are called coupled left shift (CLS). Based on past work and modeling, we discuss how to test for Nav-CLS, emphasizing the virtue of sawtooth ramp clamp. We explain that it is the inherent mechanosensitivity of Nav activation that underlies Nav-CLS. Using modeling of excitability, we show the known process of Nav-CLS is sufficient to predict a wide variety of "sick excitable cell" phenomena, from hyperexcitability through to depolarizing block. When living cells are mimicked by inclusion of pumps, mild Nav-CLS produces a wide array of burst phenomena and subthreshold oscillations. Dynamical analysis of mild damage scenarios shows how these phenomena reflect changes in spike thresholds as the pumps try to counteract the leaky Nav channels. Smart Nav inhibitors designed for sick excitable cells would target bleb-damaged membrane, buying time for cell-mediated removal or repair of Nav-bearing membrane that has become bleb-damaged (ie, detached from the cytoskeleton). PMID:27586295

  18. Isothermal fatigue behavior and damage modeling of a high temperature woven PMC[Polymer Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Gyekenyesi, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    This study focuses on the fully reversed fatigue behavior exhibited by a carbon fiber/polyimide resin woven laminate at room and elevated temperatures. Nondestructive video edge view microscopy and destructive sectioning techniques were used to study the microscopic damage mechanisms that evolved. The elastic stiffness was monitored and recorded throughout the fatigue life of the coupon. In addition, residual compressive strength tests were conducted on fatigue coupons with various degrees of damage as quantified by stiffness reduction. Experimental results indicated that the monotonic tensile properties were only minimally influenced by temperature, while the monotonic compressive and fully reversed fatigue properties displayed greater reductions due to the elevated temperature. The stiffness degradation as a function of cycles, consisted of three stages; a short-lived high degradation period, a constant degradation rate segment covering the majority of the life, and a final stage demonstrating an increasing rate of degradation up to failure. Concerning the residual compressive strength tests at room and elevated temperatures, the elevated temperature coupons appeared much more sensitive to damage. At elevated temperatures, coupons experienced a much larger loss in compressive strength when compared to room temperature coupons with equivalent damage. The fatigue damage accumulation law proposed for the model incorporates a scalar representation for damage, but admits a multiaxial, anisotropic evolutionary law. The model predicts the current damage (as quantified by residual stiffness) and remnant life of a composite that has undergone a known load at temperature. The damage/life model is dependent on the applied multiaxial stress state as well as temperature. Comparisons between the model and data showed good predictive capabilities concerning stiffness degradation and cycles to failure.

  19. Residual Strength Analyses of Monolithic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott (Technical Monitor); Ambur, Damodar R. (Technical Monitor); Seshadri, B. R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Finite-element fracture simulation methodology predicts the residual strength of damaged aircraft structures. The methodology uses the critical crack-tip-opening-angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to characterize the fracture behavior of the material. The CTOA fracture criterion assumes that stable crack growth occurs when the crack-tip angle reaches a constant critical value. The use of the CTOA criterion requires an elastic- plastic, finite-element analysis. The critical CTOA value is determined by simulating fracture behavior in laboratory specimens, such as a compact specimen, to obtain the angle that best fits the observed test behavior. The critical CTOA value appears to be independent of loading, crack length, and in-plane dimensions. However, it is a function of material thickness and local crack-front constraint. Modeling the local constraint requires either a three-dimensional analysis or a two-dimensional analysis with an approximation to account for the constraint effects. In recent times as the aircraft industry is leaning towards monolithic structures with the intention of reducing part count and manufacturing cost, there has been a consistent effort at NASA Langley to extend critical CTOA based numerical methodology in the analysis of integrally-stiffened panels.In this regard, a series of fracture tests were conducted on both flat and curved aluminum alloy integrally-stiffened panels. These flat panels were subjected to uniaxial tension and during the test, applied load-crack extension, out-of-plane displacements and local deformations around the crack tip region were measured. Compact and middle-crack tension specimens were tested to determine the critical angle (wc) using three-dimensional code (ZIP3D) and the plane-strain core height (hJ using two-dimensional code (STAGS). These values were then used in the STAGS analysis to predict the fracture behavior of the integrally-stiffened panels. The analyses modeled stable tearing, buckling, and crack

  20. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which represent three of the most common neurodegenerative pathologies in humans. PMID:26255941

  1. Damage Assessment Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapico, J. L.; González, M. P.; Worden, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method of damage assessment based on neural networks (NNs) is presented and applied to the Steelquake structure. The method is intended to assess the overall damage at each floor in composite frames caused by seismic loading. A neural network is used to calibrate the initial undamaged structure, and another to predict the damage. The natural frequencies of the structure are used as inputs of the NNs. The data used to train the NNs were obtained through a finite element (FE) model. Many previous approaches have exhibited a relatively poor capacity of generalisation. In order to overcome this problem, a FE model more suitable to the definition of damage is tried herein. Further work in this paper is concerned with the validation of the method. For this end, the damage levels of the structure were obtained through the trained NNs from the available experimental modal data. Then, the stiffness matrices of the structure predicted by the method were compared with those identified from pseudo-dynamic tests. Results are excellent. The new FE model definition allows the NNs to have a much better generalisation. The obtained values of the terms of the stiffness matrix of the undamaged structure are almost exact when comparing with the experimental ones, while the absolute differences are lower than 8.6% for the damaged structure.

  2. Mechanism of DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin

    2015-08-26

    DNA damage may compromise genome integrity and lead to cell death. Cells have evolved a variety of processes to respond to DNA damage including damage repair and tolerance mechanisms, as well as damage checkpoints. The DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathway promotes the bypass of single-stranded DNA lesions encountered by DNA polymerases during DNA replication. This prevents the stalling of DNA replication. Two mechanistically distinct DDT branches have been characterized. One is translesion synthesis (TLS) in which a replicative DNA polymerase is temporarily replaced by a specialized TLS polymerase that has the ability to replicate across DNA lesions. TLS is mechanistically simple and straightforward, but it is intrinsically error-prone. The other is the error-free template switching (TS) mechanism in which the stalled nascent strand switches from the damaged template to the undamaged newly synthesized sister strand for extension past the lesion. Error-free TS is a complex but preferable process for bypassing DNA lesions. However, our current understanding of this pathway is sketchy. An increasing number of factors are being found to participate or regulate this important mechanism, which is the focus of this editorial. PMID:26322163

  3. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  4. Elevated Temperature, Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Structure Manufactured Out-of-Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Burke, Eric R.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2012-01-01

    Several 1/16th-scale curved sandwich composite panel sections of a 10 m diameter barrel were fabricated to demonstrate the manufacturability of large-scale curved sections using minimum gauge, [+60/-60/0]s, toughened epoxy composite facesheets co-cured with low density (50 kilograms per cubic meters) aluminum honeycomb core. One of these panels was fabricated out of autoclave (OoA) by the vacuum bag oven (VBO) process using Cycom(Registered Trademark) T40-800b/5320-1 prepreg system while another panel with the same lay-up and dimensions was fabricated using the autoclave-cure, toughened epoxy prepreg system Cycom(Registered Trademark) IM7/977-3. The resulting 2.44 m x 2 m curved panels were investigated by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) to determine initial fabrication quality and then cut into smaller coupons for elevated temperature wet (ETW) mechanical property characterization. Mechanical property characterization of the sandwich coupons was conducted including edge-wise compression (EWC), and compression-after-impact (CAI) at conditions ranging from 25 C/dry to 150 C/wet. The details and results of this characterization effort are presented in this paper.

  5. Effects of Combined Loads on the Nonlinear Response and Residual Strength of Damaged Stiffened Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Rankin, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear response of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks are presented. The shells are modeled with a hierarchical modeling strategy and analyzed with a nonlinear shell analysis code that maintains the shell in a nonlinear equilibrium state while the crack is grown. The analysis accurately accounts for global and local structural response phenomena. Results are presented for various combinations of internal pressure and mechanical loads, and the effects of crack orientation on the shell response are described. The effects of combined loading conditions and the effects of varying structural parameters on the stress-intensity factors associated with a crack are presented.

  6. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  7. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  8. 7 CFR 51.3748 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3748 Damage. Damage means any... considered as damage: (1) Sunburn which causes the rind to become brownish in color, hard, tough, or...

  9. Analysis Methods for Progressive Damage of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides an overview of recent accomplishments and lessons learned in the development of general progressive damage analysis methods for predicting the residual strength and life of composite structures. These developments are described within their State-of-the-Art (SoA) context and the associated technology barriers. The emphasis of the authors is on developing these analysis tools for application at the structural level. Hence, modeling of damage progression is undertaken at the mesoscale, where the plies of a laminate are represented as a homogenous orthotropic continuum. The aim of the present effort is establish the ranges of validity of available models, to identify technology barriers, and to establish the foundations of the future investigation efforts. Such are the necessary steps towards accurate and robust simulations that can replace some of the expensive and time-consuming "building block" tests that are currently required for the design and certification of aerospace structures.

  10. Thermal fatigue damage of Cu-Cr-Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arya; Mitra, R.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Rotti, C.; Ray, K. K.

    2013-11-01

    The primary aim of this investigation is to examine thermal fatigue damage (TFD) in Cu-Cr-Zr alloys used in High Heat Flux components of Tokamak and its subsystems. Thermal fatigue experiments have been carried out between 290 °C and 30 °C, which is analogous to the condition of service application on two Cu-Cr-Zr alloys having different aging treatments. The extents of TFD have been examined by standard measurements of electrical conductivity, lattice strain, residual stress and dynamic elastic modulus, supplemented by characterizations of microstructure and determination of hardness and tensile properties. The results lead to infer that the relative amounts of damage are different in the two alloys which are further dependent on their aging conditions; the reasons for the observed difference have been explained. The operative mechanisms of TFD are revealed to be as formation and subsequent coalescence of microvoids, and/or initiation and growth of microcracks.

  11. An apparatus for in situ spectroscopy of radiation damage of polymers by bombardment with high-energy heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Baake, Olaf; Seidl, Tim; Hossain, Umme Habiba; Delgado, Adriana O; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A new target station providing Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and residual gas analysis (RGA) for in situ observation of ion-induced changes in polymers has been installed at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research. The installations as well as first in situ measurements at room temperature are presented here. A foil of polyimide Kapton HN(®) was irradiated with 1.1 GeV Au ions. During irradiation several in situ FT-IR spectra were recorded. Simultaneously outgassing degradation products were detected with the RGA. In the IR spectra nearly all bands decrease due to the degradation of the molecular structure. In the region from 3000 to 2700 cm(-1) vibration bands of saturated hydrocarbons not reported in literature so far became visible. The outgassing experiments show a mixture of C(2)H(4), CO, and N(2) as the main outgassing components of polyimide. The ability to combine both analytical methods and the opportunity to measure a whole fluence series within a single experiment show the efficiency of the new setup.

  12. An apparatus for in situ spectroscopy of radiation damage of polymers by bombardment with high-energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, Olaf; Seidl, Tim; Hossain, Umme Habiba; Delgado, Adriana O.; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A new target station providing Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and residual gas analysis (RGA) for in situ observation of ion-induced changes in polymers has been installed at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research. The installations as well as first in situ measurements at room temperature are presented here. A foil of polyimide Kapton HN® was irradiated with 1.1 GeV Au ions. During irradiation several in situ FT-IR spectra were recorded. Simultaneously outgassing degradation products were detected with the RGA. In the IR spectra nearly all bands decrease due to the degradation of the molecular structure. In the region from 3000 to 2700 cm-1 vibration bands of saturated hydrocarbons not reported in literature so far became visible. The outgassing experiments show a mixture of C2H4, CO, and N2 as the main outgassing components of polyimide. The ability to combine both analytical methods and the opportunity to measure a whole fluence series within a single experiment show the efficiency of the new setup.

  13. Boulder damage symposium annual thin film laser damage competition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-11-28

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed betweenmore » different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. The resulting series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity were used in each of the competitions so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. Laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.« less

  14. Boulder damage symposium annual thin film laser damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-11-28

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed between different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. The resulting series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity were used in each of the competitions so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. Laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.

  15. Boulder Damage Symposium annual thin-film laser damage competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-12-01

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed between different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. This series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). For each of the competitions, a double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. In summary, laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.

  16. Residual Stress Measurements After Proof and Flight: ETP-0403

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Ronald L..

    1997-01-01

    The intent of this testing was to evaluate the residual stresses that occur in and around the attachment details of a case stiffener segment that has been subjected to flight/recovery followed by proof loading. Not measured in this test were stresses relieved at joint disassembly due to out-of-round and interference effects, and those released by cutting the specimens out of the case segment. The test article was lightweight case stiffener segment 1U50715, S/N L023 which was flown in the forward stiffener position on flight SRM 14A and in the aft position on flight SRM24A. Both of these flights were flown with the 3 stiffener ring configuration. Stiffener L023 had a stiffener ring installed only on the aft stub in its first flight, and it had both rings installed on its second flight. No significant post flight damage was found on either flight. Finally, the segment was used on the DM-8 static test motor in the forward position. No stiffener rings were installed. It had only one proof pressurization prior to assignment to its first use, and it was cleaned and proof tested after each flight. Thus, the segment had seen 3 proof tests, two flight pressurizations, and two low intensity water impacts prior to manufacturing for use on DM-8. On DM-8 it received one static firing pressurization in the horizontal configuration. Residual stresses at the surface and in depth were evaluated by both the x-ray diffraction and neutron beam diffraction methods. The x-ray diffraction evaluations were conducted by Technology for Energy Corporation (TEC) at their facilities in Knoxville, TN. The neutron beam evaluations were done by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario. The results showed general agreement with relatively high compressive residual stresses on the surface and moderate to low subsurface tensile residual stresses.

  17. Full-Scale Test and Analysis of a PRSEUS Fuselage Panel to Assess Damage-Containment Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew; Bakuckas, John G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Linton, Kim A.; Korkosz, Gregory; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2011-01-01

    Stitched composite technology has the potential to substantially decrease structural weight through enhanced damage containment capabilities. The most recent generation of stitched composite technology, the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, has been shown to successfully arrest damage at the sub-component level through tension testing of a three stringer panel with damage in the form of a two-bay notch. In a joint effort undertaken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Boeing Company, further studies are being conducted to characterize the damage containment features of the PRSEUS concept. A full-scale residual strength test will be performed on a fuselage panel to determine if the load capacity will meet strength, deformation, and damage tolerance requirements. A curved panel was designed, fabricated, and prepared for residual strength testing. A pre-test Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed using design allowables from previous test programs to predict test panel deformation characteristics and margins of safety. Three phases of testing with increasing damage severity include: (1) as manufactured; (2) barely visible impact damage (BVID) and visible impact damage (VID); and (3) discrete source damage (DSD) where the panel will be loaded to catastrophic failure. This paper presents the background information, test plan, and experimental procedure. This paper is the first of several future articles reporting the test preparations, results, and analysis conducted in the test program.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  19. Neural networks for damage identification

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Klenke, S.E.

    1997-11-01

    Efforts to optimize the design of mechanical systems for preestablished use environments and to extend the durations of use cycles establish a need for in-service health monitoring. Numerous studies have proposed measures of structural response for the identification of structural damage, but few have suggested systematic techniques to guide the decision as to whether or not damage has occurred based on real data. Such techniques are necessary because in field applications the environments in which systems operate and the measurements that characterize system behavior are random. This paper investigates the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to identify damage in mechanical systems. Two probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) are developed and used to judge whether or not damage has occurred in a specific mechanical system, based on experimental measurements. The first PNN is a classical type that casts Bayesian decision analysis into an ANN framework; it uses exemplars measured from the undamaged and damaged system to establish whether system response measurements of unknown origin come from the former class (undamaged) or the latter class (damaged). The second PNN establishes the character of the undamaged system in terms of a kernel density estimator of measures of system response; when presented with system response measures of unknown origin, it makes a probabilistic judgment whether or not the data come from the undamaged population. The physical system used to carry out the experiments is an aerospace system component, and the environment used to excite the system is a stationary random vibration. The results of damage identification experiments are presented along with conclusions rating the effectiveness of the approaches.

  20. Sperm DNA damage and its relation with leukocyte DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Babazadeh, Zahra; Razavi, Shahnaz; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Shahidi, Maryam; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-01-01

    DNA fragmentation in human sperm has been related to endogenous and exogenous factors. Exogenous factors can also affect leukocyte DNA integrity. This study evaluated the relation between sperm DNA damage and leukocyte DNA integrity, as a predictor of exogenous factors. DNA damage in the sperm and leukocytes of 41 individuals undergoing ICSI were measured by Comet assay. In addition, sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) was carried out on semen samples. A positive correlation was observed between the DNA integrity of sperm with leukocytes. When patients were divided into low and high DNA exposure groups, sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly different between the two groups. Cleavage rate and embryo quality showed significant correlation with leukocyte DNA integrity. The results showed that leukocyte DNA integrity could be used to identify individuals at high risk in order to reduce the extent of DNA damage in patients before ICSI in order to improve the subsequent outcome of this procedure.

  1. Time-dependent lethal body residues for the toxicity of pentachlorobenzene to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landrum, Peter F.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; Gossiaux, Duane C.; McElroy, Michael; Robinson, Sander; Begnoche, Linda; Chernyak, Sergei; Hickey, James

    2004-01-01

    The study examined the temporal response of Hyalella azteca to pentachlorobenzene (PCBZ) in water-only exposures. Toxicity was evaluated by calculating the body residue of PCBZ associated with survival. The concentration of PCBZ in the tissues of H. azteca associated with 50% mortality decreased from 3 to 0.5 μmol/g over the temporal range of 1 to 28 d, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the body residue calculated for 50% mortality when the value was determined using live or dead organisms. Metabolism of PCBZ was not responsible for the temporal response because no detectable PCBZ biotransformation occurred over an exposure period of 10 d. A damage assessment model was used to evaluate the impact and repair of damage by PCBZ on H. azteca. The toxicokinetics were determined so that the temporal toxicity data could be fit to a damage assessment model. The half-life calculated for the elimination of PCBZ averaged approximately 49 h, while the value determined for the half-life of damage repair from the damage assessment model was 33 h.

  2. STS-118 Radiator Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, Dana M.; Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Herrin, J.; Lyons, F.

    2008-01-01

    During the August 2007 STS-118 mission to the International Space Station, a micro-meteoroid or orbital debris (MMOD) particle impacted and completely penetrated one of shuttle Endeavour s radiator panels and the underlying thermal control system (TCS) blanket, leaving deposits on (but no damage to) the payload bay door. While it is not unusual for shuttle orbiters to be impacted by small MMOD particles, the damage from this impact is larger than any previously seen on the shuttle radiator panels. A close-up photograph of the radiator impact entry hole is shown in Figure 1, and the location of the impact on Endeavour s left-side aft-most radiator panel is shown in Figure 2. The aft radiator panel is 0.5-inches thick and consists of 0.011 inch thick aluminum facesheets on the front and back of an aluminum honeycomb core. The front facesheet is additionally covered by a 0.005 inch thick layer of silver-Teflon thermal tape. The entry hole in the silver-Teflon tape measured 8.1 mm by 6.4 mm (0.32 inches by 0.25 inches). The entry hole in the outer facesheet measured 7.4 mm by 5.3 mm (0.29 inches by 0.21 inches) (0.23 inches). The impactor also perforated an existing 0.012 inch doubler that had been bonded over the facesheet to repair previous impact damage (an example that lightning can strike the same place twice, even for MMOD impact). The peeled-back edge around the entry hole, or lip , is a characteristic of many hypervelocity impacts. High velocity impact with the front facesheet fragmented the impacting particle and caused it to spread out into a debris cloud. The debris cloud caused considerable damage to the internal honeycomb core with 23 honeycomb cells over a region of 28 mm by 26 mm (1.1 inches by 1.0 inches) having either been completely destroyed or partially damaged. Figure 3 is a view of the exit hole in the rear facesheet, and partially shows the extent of the honeycomb core damage and clearly shows the jagged petaled exit hole through the backside

  3. Increased cytogenetic damage in outdoor painters.

    PubMed

    Pinto, D; Ceballos, J M; García, G; Guzmán, P; Del Razo, L M; Vera, E; Gómez, H; García, A; Gonsebatt, M E

    2000-05-01

    Painters are exposed to an extensive variety of hazardous substances such as organic solvents, lead-containing pigments and residual plastic monomers. In this particular case, workers used commercially available exterior paints and occasionally gasoline or thinner as solvents. The application or removal of paints was performed without protection (masks or gloves). To determine occupational exposure risk, a monitoring study was designed. Group selection was made after a questionnaire administration, which included questions about lifestyle and medical history to exclude exposure to other potential sources of genotoxics. Smoking and drinking habits were also considered. Blood and buccal cell samples were obtained from 25 public building male painters and from a similar number of age- and gender-matched controls. Lead levels were measured in paint samples and in individuals' blood. Organic solvents and/or its metabolites were also determined in blood. Chromosomal aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were determined in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. Also, the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in buccal cells was investigated. Painters had higher lead levels in blood (p<0.05); CA and SCE in lymphocytes and MN in epithelial cells were also elevated (p<0.05). Cytogenetic damage was significantly associated with occupational exposure time but not with the levels of lead found in blood. PMID:10838197

  4. Radiation damage in nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1992-03-01

    Any nuclear material experiences radiation damage in the course of its technological application. The damage sources cover a wide range: fission, fast neutrons, α-particles and recoil atoms of the α-decay, β- and γ-radiation. In addition, extensive parametric studies using controlled ion implantation have been performed covering wide ranges of doses, ion energies, implantation and recovery-temperatures and using different ion beams. The present paper concentrates on ceramic nuclear materials for fission reactors (i.e. the nuclear fuels UO 2 and UN), but damage effects in materials for solidification of nuclear waste (ceramics and glasses) arc also discussed. Since the author has contributed extensive reviews to this field at previous REI conferences, emphasis is placed on new insights gained in recent work. A good knowledge on the various aspects (type, extent, recovery temperatures, etc.) of radiation damage has been elaborated. Many physical properties are affected. The importance of radiation effects and of radiation damage for the technological application of nuclear materials is discussed.

  5. Assessment of impact damage of composite rocket motor cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    cylinders since there are significant differences in out time of the resins relative to full scale cylinder fabrication, differences in hoop fiber tensioning and unsatisfactory coupon configurations. It appears that development of a new test method for subscale cylinders is merited. Damage tolerance may be improved by material optimization that uses fiber treatments and matrix modifications to control the fiber matrix interface bonding. It is difficult to develop process optimization in subscale cylinders without also modeling the longer out times resins experience in full scale testing. A major breakthrough in characterizing the effect of impact damage on residual strength, and understanding how to scale results of subscale evaluations, will be a sound micromechanical model that described progressive failure of the composite. Such models will utilize a three dimensional stress analysis due to the complex nature of low velocity impact stresses in thick composites. When these models are coupled with non-contact NDE methods that geometrically characterize the damage and acoustic methods that characterize the effective local elastic properties, accurate assessment of residual strength from impact damage may be possible. Directions for further development are suggested.

  6. Assessment of impact damage of composite rocket motor cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1994-02-01

    cylinders since there are significant differences in out time of the resins relative to full scale cylinder fabrication, differences in hoop fiber tensioning and unsatisfactory coupon configurations. It appears that development of a new test method for subscale cylinders is merited. Damage tolerance may be improved by material optimization that uses fiber treatments and matrix modifications to control the fiber matrix interface bonding. It is difficult to develop process optimization in subscale cylinders without also modeling the longer out times resins experience in full scale testing. A major breakthrough in characterizing the effect of impact damage on residual strength, and understanding how to scale results of subscale evaluations, will be a sound micromechanical model that described progressive failure of the composite. damage and acoustic methods that characterize the effective local elastic properties, accurate assessment of residual strength from impact damage may be possible. Directions for further development are suggested.

  7. Measurement of small intestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Many animal models have been devised for investigating the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions and for screening drugs for the treatment of intestinal ulcers in humans. Recently, particular attention has been focused on NSAID-induced intestinal lesions as a result of the development of the capsule endoscope and double-balloon endoscope. Ischemic enteritis, one of the most dramatic abdominal emergencies, is known to cause severe damage to the small intestine by a significant decrease of arterial blood flow in the small intestine. In this unit, two animal models for small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs or intestinal ischemia are described. Also included are methods for lesion induction and evaluation of the damage as well as the measurement of pathogenic functional and biochemical changes.

  8. Studies Of Residual Flexibility And Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1995-01-01

    Collection of reports presents theoretical and experimental studies in which concept of residual flexibility applied to modal vibration testing and verification of mathematical models of vibrations of flexible structure constrained by another structure. "Residual flexibility" denotes that part of interface flexibility due to mode shapes out of frequency range of test. Studies directed toward assessing residual-flexibility approach as substitute for fixed-base vibrational testing of payloads installed in spacecraft.

  9. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  10. Optical systolic array processor using residue arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Casasent, D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of residue arithmetic to increase the accuracy and reduce the dynamic range requirements of optical matrix-vector processors is evaluated. It is determined that matrix-vector operations and iterative algorithms can be performed totally in residue notation. A new parallel residue quantizer circuit is developed which significantly improves the performance of the systolic array feedback processor. Results are presented of a computer simulation of this system used to solve a set of three simultaneous equations.

  11. The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vervaeck, A.

    2011-08-01

    The global CATDAT damaging earthquakes and secondary effects (tsunami, fire, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture) database was developed to validate, remove discrepancies, and expand greatly upon existing global databases; and to better understand the trends in vulnerability, exposure, and possible future impacts of such historic earthquakes. Lack of consistency and errors in other earthquake loss databases frequently cited and used in analyses was a major shortcoming in the view of the authors which needed to be improved upon. Over 17 000 sources of information have been utilised, primarily in the last few years, to present data from over 12 200 damaging earthquakes historically, with over 7000 earthquakes since 1900 examined and validated before insertion into the database. Each validated earthquake includes seismological information, building damage, ranges of social losses to account for varying sources (deaths, injuries, homeless, and affected), and economic losses (direct, indirect, aid, and insured). Globally, a slightly increasing trend in economic damage due to earthquakes is not consistent with the greatly increasing exposure. The 1923 Great Kanto (214 billion USD damage; 2011 HNDECI-adjusted dollars) compared to the 2011 Tohoku (>300 billion USD at time of writing), 2008 Sichuan and 1995 Kobe earthquakes show the increasing concern for economic loss in urban areas as the trend should be expected to increase. Many economic and social loss values not reported in existing databases have been collected. Historical GDP (Gross Domestic Product), exchange rate, wage information, population, HDI (Human Development Index), and insurance information have been collected globally to form comparisons. This catalogue is the largest known cross-checked global historic damaging earthquake database and should have far-reaching consequences for earthquake loss estimation, socio-economic analysis, and the global reinsurance field.

  12. Surface contamination initiated laser damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Faux, D.R.

    1997-01-24

    We are engaged in a comprehensive effort to understand and model the initiation and growth of laser damage initiated by surface contaminants. This includes, for example, the initial absorption by the contaminant, heating and plasma generation, pressure and thermal loading of the transparent substrate, and subsequent shockwave propagation, ``splashing`` of molten material and possible spallation, optical propagation and scattering, and treatment of material fracture. The integration use of large radiation hydrodynamics codes, optical propagation codes and material strength codes enables a comprehensive view of the damage process The following picture of surface contaminant initiated laser damage is emerging from our simulations. On the entrance optical surface, small particles can ablate nearly completely. In this case, only relatively weak shockwaves are launched into the substrate, but some particulate material may be left on the surface to act as a diffraction mask and cause further absorption. Diffraction by wavelength scale scattering centers can lead to significant intensity modulation. Larger particles will not be completely vaporized. The shockwave generated in this case 1642is larger and can lead to spallation of contaminant material which then may be deposited in the substrate. A gaseous atmosphere can lead to radiation trapping with concomitant increases in temperature and pressure near the surface. In addition, supersonic ionization waves in air may be generated which greatly extend the plasma plume spatially and temporally. Contaminants on the exit optical surface behave differently. They tend to heat and pop off completely in which case significant damage may not occur. Since plasma formed at the interface of the optic and absorbing particle is confined, much stronger pressures are generated in this case. Imaging of contaminants resulting in ``writing`` a diffraction pattern on the exit surface due to contamination on the entrance surface has been

  13. Residues of profenofos in spring onion.

    PubMed

    Talebi, K; Ghassami, M R

    2004-01-01

    Profenofos is one of the commonly used insecticides in the control of Trips tabaci on spring onion in Iran. Residues of profenofos in spring onion were determined in two different fields under the same conditions. In the first field, onion plants were sprayed with profenofos (40EC) at the rate of 1000 g/ha. Spraying was repeated 2 weeks later. In the second field one spraying was preformed at the same rate. Spring onionwere sampled at different time intervals and analyzed for profenofos residues using a GC equipped with NPD detector. In the first field's samples, the residues were 0.097 and 0.025 mg/kg at 2 and 6 days after spraying, respectively. The residues declined to 0.002 mg/kg on the day twelve. Two days after the second spraying the residues was 0.27 mg/kg, which reduced to 0.032 on the day sixth. However the residues were not detectable 32 days after the second spraying. In the second field, residue levels were 0.193 and 0.043 mg/kg at 2 and 6 days after spraying. Residues, which found after 32 days, were less than 0.001 mg/kg. The rate of residue decay in the first field was higher than the second field. PMID:15756871

  14. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, J. Richard

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  15. 7 CFR 51.613 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.613 Section 51.613 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.613 Serious damage. Serious damage means any injury... any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Crater rot, when moist, or when...

  16. 7 CFR 51.613 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.613 Section 51.613 Agriculture... damage. Serious damage means any injury or defect which seriously affects the appearance, or edible or... exceeds the maximum allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Crater...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1583 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage. 51.1583 Section 51.1583 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1583 Damage. Damage... defective area. Loss of outer skin (epidermis) shall not be considered as damage when the potatoes...

  18. 7 CFR 51.3067 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.3067 Section 51.3067 Agriculture... Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3067 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect which... serious damage: (a) Anthracnose when any spot exceeds the area of a circle one-fourth inch in diameter,...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2960 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage. 51.2960 Section 51.2960 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2960 Damage. Damage means any specific defect... considered as damage: (a) Broken shells when the area from which a portion of the shell is missing is...

  20. Use of a New Portable Instrumented Impactor on the NASA Composite Crew Module Damage Tolerance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Polis, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Damage tolerance performance is critical to composite structures because surface impacts at relatively low energies may result in a significant strength loss. For certification, damage tolerance criteria require aerospace vehicles to meet design loads while containing damage at critical locations. Data from standard small coupon testing are difficult to apply to larger more complex structures. Due to the complexity of predicting both the impact damage and the residual properties, damage tolerance is demonstrated primarily by testing. A portable, spring-propelled, impact device was developed which allows the impact damage response to be investigated on large specimens, full-scale components, or entire vehicles. During impact, both the force history and projectile velocity are captured. The device was successfully used to demonstrate the damage tolerance performance of the NASA Composite Crew Module. The impactor was used to impact 18 different design features at impact energies up to 35 J. Detailed examples of these results are presented, showing impact force histories, damage inspection results, and response to loading.

  1. Effect of focus position of ns pulse laser on damage characteristics of K9 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Li, Mengmeng; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced damage of optical glasses has been investigated for more than fifty years. Due to the residual scratches, inclusions and other forms of defects at surfaces of optical glasses after the processes of grinding and polishing, it is well known that the sample surface can be damaged more easily than bulk. In order to get the relationship between the damage threshold and the location of the laser spot, we carried out damage experiments on K9 glasses with a 7ns pulse laser. Since ns pulse laser-induced damage of optical glasses always accompanies with the generation of the plasma, a optical microscope connected with a CCD camera was used to observe the plasma flash, which can provide a real time detection of damage sites. The laser pulse was first focused into the bulk, then the spot was moved toward the direction of incident laser beam step by step until the beam was completely focused in ambient air. Damage threshold curves were measured for each focus position, and low thresholds and high thresholds were extracted from those curves. Finally, the relationship between damage thresholds and focus position was analyzed.

  2. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  3. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  4. Strength and failure of a damaged material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cerreta, Ellen K.; Gray III, George T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Potocki, Mark L.; Vachhani, Shraddha; Martinez, Daniel T.; Lovato, Manual L.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-07

    Under complex, dynamic loading conditions, damage can occur within a material. Should this damage not lead to catastrophic failure, the material can continue to sustain further loading. But, little is understood about how to represent the mechanical response of a material that has experienced dynamic loading leading to incipient damage. We examine this effect in copper. Copper is shock loaded to impart an incipient state of damage to the material. Thereafter compression and tensile specimens were sectioned from the dynamically damaged specimen to quantify the subsequent properties of the material in the region of intense incipient damage and in regionsmore » far from the damage. Finally, we observed that enhanced yield stresses result from the damaged material even over material, which has simply been shock loaded and not damaged. These results are rationalized in terms of stored plastic work due to the damage process.« less

  5. Strength and failure of a damaged material

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K.; Gray III, George T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Potocki, Mark L.; Vachhani, Shraddha; Martinez, Daniel T.; Lovato, Manual L.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-07

    Under complex, dynamic loading conditions, damage can occur within a material. Should this damage not lead to catastrophic failure, the material can continue to sustain further loading. But, little is understood about how to represent the mechanical response of a material that has experienced dynamic loading leading to incipient damage. We examine this effect in copper. Copper is shock loaded to impart an incipient state of damage to the material. Thereafter compression and tensile specimens were sectioned from the dynamically damaged specimen to quantify the subsequent properties of the material in the region of intense incipient damage and in regions far from the damage. Finally, we observed that enhanced yield stresses result from the damaged material even over material, which has simply been shock loaded and not damaged. These results are rationalized in terms of stored plastic work due to the damage process.

  6. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric M.; Watkins, Thomas R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Dutler, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  7. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  8. Compensation for oil pollution damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matugina, E. G.; Glyzina, T. S.; Kolbysheva, Yu V.; Klyuchnikov, A. S.; Vusovich, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The commitment of national industries to traditional energy sources, as well as constantly growing energy demand combined with adverse environmental impact of petroleum production and transportation urge to establish and maintain an appropriate legal and administrative framework for oil pollution damage compensation. The article considers management strategies for petroleum companies that embrace not only production benefits but also environmental issues.

  9. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats.

  10. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  11. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  12. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  13. Use of Combined Uncertainty of Pesticide Residue Results for Testing Compliance with Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs).

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Slate, Andrew; Whitaker, Thomas B; Suszter, Gabriella; Ambrus, Árpád

    2015-05-13

    The uncertainty of pesticide residue levels in crops due to sampling, estimated for 106 individual crops and 24 crop groups from residue data obtained from supervised trials, was adjusted with a factor of 1.3 to accommodate the larger variability of residues under normal field conditions. Further adjustment may be necessary in the case of mixed lots. The combined uncertainty of residue data including the contribution of sampling is used for calculation of an action limit, which should not be exceeded when compliance with maximum residue limits is certified as part of premarketing self-control programs. On the contrary, for testing compliance of marketed commodities the residues measured in composite samples should be greater than or equal to the decision limit calculated only from the combined uncertainty of the laboratory phase of the residue determination. The options of minimizing the combined uncertainty of measured residues are discussed. The principles described are also applicable to other chemical contaminants. PMID:25658668

  14. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  15. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D. A.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto subduction about 4Ga, evident in geochemical analysis from ancient cratons, to global tectonics by 3-2.7Ga, suggests that plates and plate boundaries spread globally over a 1Gyr period. We hypothesize that when sufficient lithospheric damage, which promotes shear-localization and long-lived weak zones, combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of plate boundaries and eventually fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We demonstrate this process with an idealized model of pressure-driven flow (wherein a low pressure zone is equivalent to downwelling suction or slab pull) in a lithosphere that self-weakens according to a mylonitic-type polycrystalline grain-damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. v.202-203, pp27-55, 2012). In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, four successive orthogonal rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damage zones that are inherited to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even as flow is only driven by subduction. For Venus' hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which is compatible with observations. After plates are developed, continued changes in driving forces combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor and micro plates.

  16. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  17. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  18. Finite element model update via Bayesian estimation and minimization of dynamic residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, K.F.

    1996-12-31

    An algorithm is presented for updating finite element models based upon a minimization of dynamic residuals. The dynamic residual of interest is the force unbalance in the homogeneous form of the equations of motion arising from errors in the model`s mass and stiffness when evaluated with the identified modal parameters. The present algorithm is a modification and extension of a previously-developed Sensitivity-Based Element-By-Element (SB-EBE) method for damage detection and finite element model up- dating. In the present algorithm, SB-EBE has been generalized to minimize a dynamic displacement residual quantity, which is shown to improve test- analysis mode correspondence. Furthermore, the algorithm has been modified to include Bayesian estimation concepts, and the underlying nonlinear optimization problem has been consistently linearized to improve the convergence properties. The resulting algorithm is demonstrated via numerical and experimental examples to be an efficient and robust method for both localizing model errors and estimating physical parameters.

  19. Bi-Metallic Composite Structures With Designed Internal Residual Stress Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) have a unique ability to recover small amounts of plastic strain through a temperature induced phase change. For these materials, mechanical displacement can be accomplished by heating the structure to induce a phase change, through which some of the plastic strain previously introduced to the structure can be reversed. This paper introduces a concept whereby an SMA phase is incorporated into a conventional alloy matrix in a co-continuous reticulated arrangement forming a bi-metallic composite structure. Through memory activation of the mechanically constrained SMA phase, a controlled residual stress field is developed in the interior of the structure. The presented experimental data show that the memory activation of the SMA composite component significantly changes the residual stress distribution in the overall structure. Designing the structural arrangement of the two phases to produce a controlled residual stress field could be used to create structures that have much improved durability and damage tolerance properties.

  20. Fatigue damage in cross-ply titanium metal matrix composites containing center holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of fatigue damage in (0/90) sub SCS-6/TI-15-3 laminates containing center holes was studied. Stress levels required for crack initiation in the matrix were predicted using an effective strain parameter and compared to experimental results. Damage progression was monitored at various stages of fatigue loading. In general, a saturated state of damage consisting of matrix cracks and fiber matrix debonding was obtained which reduced the composite modulus. Matrix cracks were bridged by the 0 deg fibers. The fatigue limit (stress causing catastrophic fracture of the laminates) was also determined. The static and post fatigue residual strengths were accurately predicted using a three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The matrix damage that occurred during fatigue loading significantly reduced the notched strength.

  1. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  2. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  3. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  4. Crop Residues: The Rest of the Story

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent scientific publication stated that to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, the most permanent and rapid solution would be to sink crop residues to the ocean floor where they would be buried in deep ocean sediments. However, mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations by removing crop residu...

  5. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  6. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  7. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  8. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  9. Residuals Management and Water Pollution Control Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    This pamphlet addresses the problems associated with residuals and water quality especially as it relates to the National Water Pollution Control Program. The types of residuals and appropriate management systems are discussed. Additionally, one section is devoted to the role of citizen participation in developing management programs. (CS)

  10. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  11. Measurment Of Residual Stress In Ferromagnetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Grainger, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic (MAC) and magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) techniques combined to provide complete characterization of residual stresses in ferromagnetic structural materials. Combination of MAC and MAE techniques makes it possible to characterize residual tension and compression without being limited by surface conditions and unavailability of calibration standards. Significant in field of characterization of materials as well as detection of fatigue failure.

  12. THE IMMIGRANT POOR AND THE RESIDUAL POOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SEGALMAN, RALPH

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE LIVES OF THE POOR IN AMERICA WILL SHOW DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE IMMIGRANT (AND REFUGEE) POOR AND THE RESIDUAL POOR (NEGROES, PUERTO RICANS, LATIN AMERICANS, INDIANS, AND OTHERS). THE IMMIGRANT POOR WERE ACCULTURATED AND ABSORBED INTO THE MAINSTREAM OF AMERICAN LIFE WITHIN THREE GENERATIONS, WHEREAS THE RESIDUAL POOR HAVE BEEN…

  13. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section 311.39 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it...

  14. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  15. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  16. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  17. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  18. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  19. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  20. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM RESIDUES

    DOEpatents

    Schaap, W.B.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for the recovery of uranium from insoluble oxide residues resistant to repeated leaching with mineral acids. The residue is treated with gaseous hydrogen fluoride, then with hydrogen and again with hydrogen fluoride, preferably at 500 to 700 deg C, prior to the mineral acid leaching.

  1. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  2. 20-Residue and 11-residue peptaibols from the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum are synergistic in forming Na+/K+ -permeable channels and adverse action towards mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Raimo; Andersson, Maria A; Kredics, László; Grigoriev, Pavel A; Sundell, Nina; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2012-11-01

    Certain species of the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma (e.g. Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Trichoderma citrinoviride) are among the emerging clinical pathogens and also the most common species in the indoor space of mould-damaged buildings. The molecules involved in its pathology are not known. In the present study, we report that 0.5-2.6 wt% of the T. longibrachiatum mycelial biomass consisted of thermostable secondary metabolites mitochondriotoxic to mammalian cells. These were identified by LC/MS as one 11-residue and eight 20-residue peptaibols, AcAib-Asn-Leu/Ile-Leu/Ile-Aib-Pro-Leu/Ile-Leu/Ile-Aib-Pro-Leuol/Ileol (1175 Da) and AcAib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala/Aib-Gln-Aib-Val/Iva-Aib-Gly-Leu/Ile-Aib-Pro-Val/Iva-Aib-Val/Iva/Aib-Gln/Glu-Gln-Pheol(1936-1965 Da) (Aib, α-aminoisobutyric acid; Ac, acetyl; Ileol, isoleucinol; Iva, isovaline; Leuol, leucinol; Pheol, phenylalaninol). The toxic effects on boar sperm cells depended on these peptaibols, named trilongins. The trilongins formed voltage dependent, Na(+)/K(+) permeable channels in biomembranes. The permeability ratios for Na(+) ions, relative to K(+), of the 11-residue trilongin channel (0.95 : 1) and the 20-residue trilongin channel (0.8 : 1) were higher than those of alamethicin. The combined 11-residue and 20-residue trilongins generated channels that remained in an open state for a longer time than those formed by either one of the peptaibols alone. Corresponding synergy was observed in toxicokinetics. With 11-residue and 20-residue trilongins combined 1 : 2 w/w, an effective median concentration (EC(50) ) of 0.6 μg·mL(-1) was reached within 30 min, and the EC(50) shifted down to 0.2 μg·mL(-1) upon extended exposure. By contrast, with 11-residue or 20-residue trilonging separately in 30 min of exposure, the EC(50) values were 15 and 3 μg·mL(-1) , respectively, and shifted down to 1.5 and 0.4 μg·mL(-1) upon extended exposure. This is the first report on ion-channel forming peptaibols with

  3. Laser Damage Inspection Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J T; Brase, J M; Bliss, E S; Carrano, C J; Kegelmeyer, L M; Miller, M G; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A

    2001-02-26

    Large, high-power laser systems are often designed as reimaging multipass cavities to maximize the extraction of energy from the amplifiers. These multipass cavities often have vacuum spatial filters that suppress the growth of beam instability via B-integral effects. These spatial filters also relay images of laser damage, often nearly superimposing these images in common planes. Also, the fluence damage threshold limits the minimum size of the optics. When used as vacuum barriers in the spatial filters, these large optics present a safety hazard from the risk of implosion if the laser damage were sufficiently large. The objective of the project was to develop algorithms and methods for optical detection and characterization of laser-induced damage of optics. The system should detect small defects (about 5% of the critical size), track their growth over multiple laser shots, and characterize the defects accurately so that the optic can be replaced (at 25% of the critical size) and, hence, minimize the risk of implosion. The depth of field must be short enough to isolate the damaged vacuum barrier from other damaged optics in the beamline, and the system should also be capable of inspecting other optics in the beamline, since damage on one optic can subsequently damage subsequent optics. Laser induced damage starts as a small (<<1mm) crater and grows as material is removed on subsequent laser shots. The highly fractured rough surface of the crater scatters light from the illuminating inspection beam. This scattered light is imaged by the inspection system. Other types of defects may occur as well including inclusions in the bulk glass, tooling marks, and surface contamination. This report will discuss the detection and characterization of crater-like surface defects although the general techniques may prove useful for other types of defects. The work described here covers the development of an image processing approach and specific algorithms for defect detection

  4. Accumulation of altered aspartyl residues in erythrocyte membrane proteins from patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Stefania; Trojsi, Francesca; Salvatore, Anna; Daniele, Luca; Raimo, Marianna; Galletti, Patrizia; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous protein deamidation of labile asparagines (Asn), generating abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues (IsoAsp), is associated with cell aging and enhanced by an oxidative microenvironment. The presence of isopeptide bonds impairs protein structure/function. To minimize the damage, IsoAsp can be "repaired" by the protein l-isoaspartyl/d-aspartyl O-methyltransferase (PIMT) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is the methyl donor of this reaction. PIMT is a repair enzyme that initiates the conversion of l-isoAsp (or d-Asp) residues to l-Asp residues. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease principally affecting motor neurons. The condition of oxidative stress reported in familial and sporadic forms of ALS prompted us to investigate Asn deamidation in ALS tissue. Erythrocytes (RBCs) were selected as a model system since they are unable to replace damaged proteins and protein methylesterification is virtually the only AdoMet-consuming reaction operating in these cells. Our data show that, in vitro assay, abnormal IsoAsp residues were significantly higher in ALS patients erythrocyte membrane proteins with an increased methyl accepting capability relative to controls (p<0.05). Moreover, we observed a reduction in AdoMet levels, while AdoHcy concentration was comparable to that detected in the control, resulting in a lower [AdoMet]/[AdoHcy] ratio. Then, the accumulation of altered aspartyl residues in ALS patients is probably related to a reduced efficiency of the S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent repair system causing increased protein instability at Asn sites. The increase of abnormal residues represents a new protein alteration that may be present not only in red blood cells but also in other cell types of patients suffering from ALS.

  5. In utero exposure of neonatal buffalo calves to pesticide residues and the alterations within their reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Karanpreet; Ghuman, Sarvpreet Singh; Singh, Opinder; Bedi, Jasbir Singh; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh

    2015-11-01

    In utero exposure of neonates to pesticide residues could be damaging to the reproductive tract. Hence, the present study assessed the circulating concentrations of pesticide residues in buffalo and their neonatal calves as well as in the reproductive tract tissue samples of same calves. Also, histopathological alterations were revealed in the reproductive tract of calves. Pesticide residues were high (P<0.05) in the reproductive tract of calves (119.5 ± 20.2 ng/g, 35% positive) in comparison to their blood (32.1 ± 8.4 ng/ml, 15% positive) or blood of their dams (41.5 ± 8.3 ng/ml, 25% positive). The number of histopathological alterations were high (P<0.05) in the reproductive tract of a calf contaminated with high concentrations of pesticide residues (3.43 ± 1.29) in comparison to a tract positive for low residue concentrations (1.57 ± 0.60) or pesticide negative tract (0.28 ± 0.10). In conclusion, in utero exposure of neonatal buffalo calves to pesticide residues may be associated with damaging alterations in their reproductive tract.

  6. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. PMID:9744574

  7. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation.

  8. Residual charge of niobium spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In 1964, Gell-Mann and Zweig hypothesized that the particles inside nuclei are composed of quarks with electric charges of {plus minus} 1/3 e and {plus minus} 1/2 e. Since then, many searches have been made for stable fractional charges. The experiment described in a Millikan-type electrometer with a sample 10{sup 7} times heavier. A 0.28 mm diameter superconducting niobium ball is levitated magnetically between capacitor plates. The ball oscillates vertically on this magnetic spring and an electric field is applied at the oscillation frequency. The rate of change of the ball's oscillation amplitude is proportional to the force exerted on the ball by the electric field. The force on the ball is measured as a function of its position between the capacitor plates to discriminate against the background force due to the patch effect field gradient of the plates. There is one other background effect, due to the tilting of the ball's magnetic moment, which has sometimes manifested itself as a drift or occasionally as an offset in the measured force. An analysis presented in this thesis explains a mechanism for this effect and shows that we can eliminate it in our next run by spinning the ball about the vertical axis. The results are strong evidence for the existence of stable fractional charges of {plus minus} 1/3 e in matter. Out of 58 measurements on 20 balls, 9 have yielded results near - 1/3 e, 34 near 0, 13 near + 1/3e, one of the 0.19 e, and one of 0.44 e. Out of 38 repeat measurements, there have been 12 residual charge changes, 5 near - 1/3e and 7 near + 1/3 e.

  9. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats. PMID:26115226

  10. Recycling of auto shredder residue.

    PubMed

    Nourreddine, Menad

    2007-01-31

    Currently, about 75% of end-of-life vehicle's (ELV) total weight is recycled in EU countries. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residues (ASR) or auto fluff, is disposed of as landfill because of its complexity. It is a major challenge to reduce this percentage of obsolete cars. The European draft directive states that by the year 2006, only 15% of the vehicle's weight can be disposed of at landfill sites and by 2015, this will be reduced to 5%. The draft directive states that a further 10% can be incinerated. The quantities of shredder fluff are likely to increase in the coming years. This is because of the growing number of cars being scrapped, coupled with the increase in the amount of plastics used in cars. In Sweden, some current projects are focusing on recycling of ASR material. In this paper some different alternatives for using this material are reported. The hypothetical injection of ASR into a blast furnace concentrating on ASR's effect to some blast furnace (BF) parameters has been completed using a blast furnace mass balance model. As a result, in principle, ASR can be used as reducing agent in the BF process if certain conditions are met. The particle size of ASR material must be controlled to ensure optimal gasification of the material in the raceway. Regarding the chemical composition of ASR, the non-ferrous content can affect the pig iron quality, which is difficult to rectify at a later point. The most attractive recycling alternative is to use the products obtained from pyrolysis of ASR in appropriate metallurgical processes. PMID:16600493

  11. Jim Starnes' Contributions to Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Harris, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    A summary of advances in residual strength analyses methods for metallic structures that were realized under the leadership of Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr., is presented. The majority of research led by Dr. Starnes in this area was conducted in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Dr. Starnes, respectfully referred to herein as Jim, had a passion for studying complex response phenomena and dedicated a significant amount of research effort toward advancing damage tolerance and residual strength analysis methods for metallic structures. Jim's efforts were focused on understanding damage propagation in built-up fuselage structure with widespread fatigue damage, with the goal of ensuring safety in the aging international commercial transport fleet. Jim's major contributions in this research area were in identifying the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads, and geometric nonlinearity, on the response of built-up structures with damage. Analytical and experimental technical results are presented to demonstrate the breadth and rigor of the research conducted in this technical area. Technical results presented herein are drawn exclusively from papers where Jim was a co-author.

  12. Permeability damage to natural fractures caused by fracturing fluid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.; Sattler, A.R.; Maloney, D.R.; Raible, C.J.

    1988-04-01

    Formation damage studies using artificially fractured, low-permeability sandstone cores indicate that viscosified fracturing fluids can severely restrict gas flow through these types of narrow fractures. These studies were performed in support of the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Extensive geological and production evaluations at the MWX site indicate that the presence of a natural fracture system is largely responsible for unstimulated gas production. The laboratory formation damage studies were designed to examine changes in cracked core permeability to gas caused by fracturing fluid residues introduced into such narrow fractures during fluid leakoff. Polysaccharide polymers caused significant reduction (up to 95%) to gas flow through cracked cores. Polymer fracturing fluid gels used in this study included hydroxypropyl guar, hydroxyethyl cellulose, and xanthan gum. In contrast, polyacrylamide gels caused little or no reduction in gas flow through cracked cores after liquid cleanup. Other components of fracturing fluids (surfactants, breakers, etc.) caused less damage to gas flows. Other factors affecting gas flow through cracked cores were investigated, including the effects of net confining stress and non-Darcy flow parameters. Results are related to some of the problems observed during the stimulation program conducted for the MWX. 24 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  14. β2-spectrin depletion impairs DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Hambarde, Shashank; Sharma, Dharmendra; Mattoo, Abid R.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Charaka, Vijaya; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    β2-Spectrin (β2SP/SPTBN1, gene SPTBN1) is a key TGF-β/SMAD3/4 adaptor and transcriptional cofactor that regulates TGF-β signaling and can contribute to liver cancer development. Here we report that cells deficient in β2-Spectrin (β2SP) are moderately sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and extremely sensitive to agents that cause interstrand cross-links (ICLs) or replication stress. In response to treatment with IR or ICL agents (formaldehyde, cisplatin, camptothecin, mitomycin), β2SP deficient cells displayed a higher frequency of cells with delayed γ-H2AX removal and a higher frequency of residual chromosome aberrations. Following hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress, β2SP-deficient cells displayed delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci along with defective repair factor recruitment (MRE11, CtIP, RAD51, RPA, and FANCD2) as well as defective restart of stalled replication forks. Repair factor recruitment is a prerequisite for initiation of DNA damage repair by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, which was also defective in β2SP deficient cells. We propose that β2SP is required for maintaining genomic stability following replication fork stalling, whether induced by either ICL damage or replicative stress, by facilitating fork regression as well as DNA damage repair by homologous recombination. PMID:27248179

  15. Inhibition of proteolysis in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins.

    PubMed

    Zamora, R; Hidalgo, F J

    2001-12-01

    The proteolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified by reaction with the lipid peroxidation product 4,5(E)-epoxy-2(E)-heptenal was studied to better understand the loss of digestibility observed in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins. BSA was incubated for different periods of time with eight concentrations of the epoxyalkenal and, then, treated for 24 h with chymotrypsin, pancreatin, Pronase, or trypsin. The treatment of BSA with the aldehyde always decreased its proteolysis in relation to that of native BSA, and this inhibition of the proteolysis was related to the concentration of the epoxyalkenal and the reaction time. In fact, this inhibition was correlated with the damage suffered by the protein as a consequence of its reaction with the aldehyde: mainly the development of browning, the denaturation of the protein, and the formation of the oxidized lipid/amino acid reaction product epsilon-N-pyrrolylnorleucine (p < or = 0.0011, 0.0045, and 0.0031, respectively). In addition, epsilon-N-pyrrolylnorleucine added at 0.1 or 1 mM inhibited the proteases assayed and suggested that the inhibition of the proteolysis observed in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins may be related to the formation and accumulation of pyrrolized amino acid residues. PMID:11743800

  16. Detection of localized fatigue damage in steel by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgenberg, Justus; Ummenhofer, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Fatigue damage of unalloyed steels in the high cycle regime is governed by localized cyclic plastic deformations and subsequent crack initiation. The extent of early microplastic deformations depends on the applied stress level, stress concentration at macroscopic notches, surface treatment, residual stresses etc. The onset of a nonlinear material response can be regarded as an early indicator of fatigue damage. During fatigue loading thermoelastic coupling and thermoplastic dissipation cause characteristic temperature variations in tested specimens which have been assessed by a highly sensitive infrared camera. A specialized data processing method in the time domain has been developed which allows to separate the different contributions to the measured temperature signal. In contrast to other methods - as e.g. measuring the rise of mean temperature during fatigue loading - the proposed methodology is based on measurements during the stabilized temperature regimen and offers very high spatial resolution of localized phenomena. Investigations have been made on mildly notched cylindrical and also on welded specimens. The results confirm the close relation between the local temperature signal and typical fatigue phenomena. The new methodology allows for a much better localization and quantification of effects as cyclic plasticity, crack initiation, crack growth etc. The following paper presents considerations and experimental results of an application of thermography to the local assessment of fatigue damage.

  17. Cumulative life damage in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Ibler, Kristina; Jemec, Gregor B.E.

    2011-01-01

    Cumulative life damage is an old concept of considerable face validity, which has attracted more scientific interest in the fields of sociology and psychology than in medicine over the years. The research examines the interconnectivity of the many factors which shape the development of individuals or institutions over time. By focussing on time, context and process, life course research highlights the different effects seemingly similar events may have at different points in time and in different contexts. PMID:25386260

  18. Plasma model for charging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.; Lukaszek, W.; Current, M.I.; Tripsas, N.H.

    1994-07-01

    The mechanism responsible for charging damage is treated as beam/plasma driven differences in local floating potentials on the process surface. A cold plasma flood is shown to limit these potential differences. Beam/plasma J-V characteristics obtained with CHARM2 in a high current implanter are fit with the theory. With flood OFF, the fit corresponds to plasma buildup over the target surface.

  19. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  20. Method for producing damage resistant optics

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Burnham, Alan K.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Wegner, Paul J.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Feit, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a system that mitigates the growth of surface damage in an optic. Damage to the optic is minimally initiated. In an embodiment of the invention, damage sites in the optic are initiated, located, and then treated to stop the growth of the damage sites. The step of initiating damage sites in the optic includes a scan of the optic using a laser to initiate defects. The exact positions of the initiated sites are identified. A mitigation process is performed that locally or globally removes the cause of subsequent growth of the damaged sites.

  1. Moisture damage in asphalt concrete. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Information is provided on physical and chemical explanations for moisture damage in asphalt concrete, along with a discussion of current practices and test methods for determining or reducing the susceptibility of various asphalt concrete components and mixtures to such damage. Moisture damage in asphalt concrete is a nationwide problem which often necessitates premature replacement of highway pavement surfaces. The report of the Transportation Research Board describes the underlying physical and chemical phenomena responsible for such damage. Current test methods used to determine the susceptibility of asphalt concretes, or their constituents, to moisture damage are described and evaluated. Additionally, current practices for minimizing the potential for moisture damage are examined.

  2. Use of Damage Data for Calibration of GMPE's in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Y.; Molina, S.; Navarro, M.; Benito, B.

    2013-05-01

    , we used data on the damage caused by the earthquake provided by the Haitian Ministry of Public Works. To achieve that, we simulated the earthquake in SELENA and compared our results with the observed damage. Through an iterative process based on minimizing the residuals, we calibrated both, the GMPE and the damage functions associated with the building typologies. We found that Boore & Atkinson and Campbell & Bozorgnia are the models that yield the lowest root mean square (RMS) error; hence, these GMPS's could be considered as the models that better predict the damage, together with the calibrated set of damage functions. Accordingly, we propose them to be used in future seismic risk assessments in the city.

  3. Electron Irradiation Damage in Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayensu, Akwasi; Ocran, John

    2002-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy for observing highly beam sensitive materials had been used to study the microstructure of deformed quartz crystals. At 100 kV accelerating voltage and electron flux of 3 x 10^8 e/cm2/s, beam spots damage appeared within five minutes of exposure to the electron beam. The rate of damage was found to depend on the crystal type; in particular, on the OH content and initial defect density, since these factors controlled the plasticity of quartz. The electron irradiation damage was manifested as black spots, prismatic dislocation loops, defect clusters, hairpin shaped images of dislocations and long segements of dislocation loops. The observed microstructure indicate that during electron beam irradiation, the primary defects in quartz attained sufficiently high mobilities permitting large-scale recombination and clustering leading to rapid creation of secondary defects from the clustering processes. The number of electrons that are lost by the recombination process is determined by the density of the recombination centres and the probability that an electron will interact with the centre.

  4. Composite blade damaging under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menouillard, T.; Réthoré, J.; Bung, H.; Suffis, A.

    2006-08-01

    Composites materials are now being used in primary aircraft structures, and other domains because of numerous advantages. A part of a continuous in-flight operating costs, gas turbine engine manufacturers are always looking for ways to decrease engine weight. This is the case of compressor blades which have to satisfy, for example, the standard bird strike or debris in order to measure the crashworthiness. Bird strike impacts are actually among the most challenging loads that composite blades must accommodate. Thus for the further development of composite structures, it becomes important to have available predictive tools for simulating the response of composite structures under crash or impact loads, which will allow to evaluate damage state in the structure in function of time. A composites damage model, without mesh dependency, is presented, and allows to obtain agreement with impact experiment. Examples of finite element simulations for the impact response of blade based on this materials model are developped. These numerical results correspond to a bird strike on an equivalent composites blade, and insists on damage evolution in structure.

  5. Economic measurement of environment damages

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.

    1980-05-01

    The densities, energy consumption, and economic development of the increasing population exacerbate environmental degradation. Air and water pollution is a major environmental problem affecting life and health, outdoor recreation, household soiling, vegetation, materials, and production. The literature review indicated that numerous studies have assessed the physical and monetary damage to populations at risk from excessive concentrations of major air and water pollutants-sulfur dioxide, total suspended particulate matter, oxidants, and carbon monoxide in air; and nutrients, oil, pesticides, and toxic metals and others in water. The measurement of the damages was one of the most controversial issues in pollution abatement. The methods that have been used to estimate the societal value of pollution abatement are: (1) chain of effects, (2) market approaches, and (3) surveys. National gross damages of air pollution of $20.2 billion and of water pollution of $11.1 billion for 1973 are substantial. These best estimates, updated for the economic and demographic conditions, could provide acceptable control totals for estimating and predicting benefits and costs of abating air and water pollution emissions. The major issues to be resolved are: (1) lack of available noneconomic data, (2) theoretical and empirical difficulties of placing a value on human life and health and on benefits such as aesthetics, and (3) lack of available demographic and economic data.

  6. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  7. Agricultural residue availability in the United States.

    PubMed

    Haq, Zia; Easterly, James L

    2006-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to forecast US energy production, consumption, and price trends for a 25-yr-time horizon. Biomass is one of the technologies within NEMS, which plays a key role in several scenarios. An endogenously determined biomass supply schedule is used to derive the price-quantity relationship of biomass. There are four components to the NEMS biomass supply schedule including: agricultural residues, energy crops, forestry residues, and urban wood waste/mill residues. The EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 includes updated estimates of the agricultural residue portion of the biomass supply schedule. The changes from previous agricultural residue supply estimates include: revised assumptions concerning corn stover and wheat straw residue availabilities, inclusion of non-corn and non-wheat agricultural residues (such as barley, rice straw, and sugarcane bagasse), and the implementation of assumptions concerning increases in no-till farming. This article will discuss the impact of these changes on the supply schedule. PMID:16915628

  8. Monitoring tricyclazole residues in rice paddy watersheds.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Laura; Capri, Ettore; Padovani, Caterina; Puglisi, Edoardo; Trevisan, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Pesticide application to rice paddies may affect the quality of environmental resources such as groundwater and surface water. The distribution of residues of tricyclazole, an environmentally persistent fungicide used widely in Italy, was monitored in the network of surface water bodies surrounding the main rice production area in Italy. The location of monitoring sites was based on the potential risk for contamination with tricyclazole. This was determined as a function of the area of rice grown, the geographical distribution of rice crops susceptible to the pest, and sales of tricyclazole. Monitoring sites were also located to represent different spatial scales (farm, catchment and basin). For water samples taken shortly after application in July and August, the highest concentrations of tricyclazole were measured at the farm sites. However, residues were also detected at the catchment and basin scale. The 95% of the measured residue levels was below 9.80, 1.20 and 1.15 microg l(-1), at the farm, catchment and basin scales, respectively. In sediment, tricyclazole residues were detected in 12 out 176 samples collected with the 95% of the measured residue levels below the concentration of 0.03 mg kg(-1). Residues were sporadically detected in samples taken after the crop was harvested in November and December. Variables such as the scale of sampling, the season and the year, were significant in determining pesticide residue distribution. The type of water body was less significant.

  9. Quantitative Examination of Corrosion Damage by Means of Thermal Response Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajic, Nik

    1998-01-01

    Two computational methods are presented that enable a characterization of corrosion damage to be performed from thermal response measurements derived from a standard flash thermographic inspection. The first is based upon a one dimensional analytical solution to the heat diffusion equation and presumes the lateral extent of damage is large compared to the residual structural thickness, such that lateral heat diffusion effects can be considered insignificant. The second proposed method, based on a finite element optimization scheme, addresses the more general case where these conditions are not met. Results from an experimental application are given to illustrate the precision, robustness and practical efficacy of both methods.

  10. Residual Nuclei Production in the reaction {sup 136}Xe+ deuterium at 500 A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara-Nunez, J. A.; Benlliure, J.; Perez-Loureiro, D.; Casarejos, E.; Fernandez Ordonez, M.; Pereira, J.; Armbruster, P.; Enqvist, T.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kelic, A.; Pleskac, R.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schmitt, C.; Yordanov, O.; Audouin, L.; Bernas, M.; Lafriaskh, A.; Stephan, C.

    2010-04-26

    More than six hundred nuclei produced in the fragmentation of {sup 136}Xe projectiles at 500 A MeV on a liquid deuterium target were identified using inverse kinematics at the GSI Fragment Separator (FRS). These data are relevant for understanding of spallation reactions.

  11. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction.

  12. Colorimetric detection of DNA damage by using hemin-graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, D. M.; Yin, L. H.; Pu, Y. P.; Liu, S. Q.

    2013-04-01

    A colorimetric method for detection of DNA damage was developed by using hemin-graphene nanosheets (H-GNs). H-GNs were skillfully synthesized by adsorping of hemin on graphene through π-π interactions. The as-prepared H-GNs possessed both the ability of graphene to differentiate the damage DNA from intact DNA and the catalytic action of hemin. The damaged DNA made H-GNs coagulated to different degrees from the intact DNA because there were different amount of negative charge exposed on their surface, which made a great impact on the solubility of H-GNs. As a result, the corresponding centrifugal supernatant of H-GNs solution showed different color in the presence of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2, which could be discriminated by naked eyes or by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometer. Based on this, the damaged effects of styrene oxide (SO), NaAsO2 and UV radiation on DNA were studied. Results showed that SO exerted most serious damage effect on DNA although all of them damaged DNA seriously. The new method for detection of DNA damage showed good prospect in the evaluation of genotoxicity of new compounds, the maximum limit of pesticide residue, food additives, and so on, which is important in the fields of food science, pharmaceutical science and pesticide science.

  13. Evaluation of Formation Damage Caused by Drilling Fluids Specifically in Pressure-Reduced Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, C.; Rahman, S.S.

    1984-02-01

    The paper describes a method for evaluating formation damage caused by drilling fluid in reservoirs which may have pressure considerably less than hydrostatic pressure. The problem is of specific interest for enhanced oil recovery and/or underground gas storage projects. The method is flexible and practically oriented. It allows formation damage evaluation under the conditions of differential pressure of up to 100 bar (1400 psi) temperature of 140/sup 0/C (300 /sup 0/F), annular velocity of 2 m/s (.6 ft/s), 1 - 2,5 cm (0,4 - 1'') core diameter and length of 25 cm (10 ''). Formation damage is evaluated by 2 factors: damage ratio (DR) and sectional damage ratio (SDR). The residual permeability is expressed in terms of relative values using the initial permeability as reference. The depth of permeability impairment is determined by measuring the permeability of segmented cores of 5 cm (2 '') length (fig. 1). For this criterion the term sectional damage ratio is introduced. The method as described in this paper was applied to evaluate formation damage caused by a KC1-Chalk-Mud in two sandstones of 10 mD and 1000 mD range with pressure difference, temperature, annular velocity and time of contamination as the influencing variables.

  14. Damage Tolerance of Pre-Stressed Composite Panels Under Impact Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Schueler, Dominik

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign studied the structural integrity of carbon fibre/epoxy panels preloaded in tension or compression then subjected to gas gun impact tests causing significant damage. The test programme used representative composite aircraft fuselage panels composed of aerospace carbon fibre toughened epoxy prepreg laminates. Preload levels in tension were representative of design limit loads for fuselage panels of this size, and maximum compression preloads were in the post-buckle region. Two main impact scenarios were considered: notch damage from a 12 mm steel cube projectile, at velocities in the range 93-136 m/s; blunt impact damage from 25 mm diameter glass balls, at velocities 64-86 m/s. The combined influence of preload and impact damage on panel residual strengths was measured and results analysed in the context of damage tolerance requirements for composite aircraft panels. The tests showed structural integrity well above design limit loads for composite panels preloaded in tension and compression with visible notch impact damage from hard body impact tests. However, blunt impact tests on buckled compression loaded panels caused large delamination damage regions which lowered plate bending stiffness and reduced significantly compression strengths in buckling.

  15. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  16. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues.

    PubMed

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology.

  17. Identification of residues by infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.E.; Ayala, N.L.; Jin, Hong; Drumheller, C.T.

    1997-12-31

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy of surfaces can be a very powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface residues. The goal of this work was to study the application of diffuse reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy to the identification of pesticide, herbicide, and explosive residues on surfaces. A field portable diffuse reflectance spectrometer was used to collect the mid-infrared spectra of clean surfaces and contaminated surfaces. These spectra were used as calibration sets to develop automated data analysis to classify or to identify residues on samples. In this presentation, the instrumentation and data process algorithms will be discussed.

  18. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology. PMID:27366642

  19. Diazinon residues in insects from sprayed tobacco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Beyer, W.N.; Kolbe, E.

    1982-01-01

    Pooled samples of tobacco hornworms collected from a field sprayed with 0.84 kg/ha of diazinon were analyzed for residues at various intervals after application. No residues of the toxic metabolite diazoxon were detected (sensitivity 0.5 ppm) in any sample. Only one sample exceeded 1.0 ppm of the parent compound and was collected 4 hours after spraying. Residues declined over time (P<0.01) and none were detected (sensitivity 0.1 ppm) 18 days after spraying. the potential hazard to birds eating these insects appeared to be minimal.

  20. Residual stresses in injection molded products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K. M. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the molding process residual stresses are formed due to thermal contraction during cooling as well as the local pressure history during solidification. In this paper a simple analytical model is reviewed which relates residual stresses, product shrinkage as well as warpage to the temperature and pressure histories during molding. Precise excimer laser layer removal measurements were performed to verify the predicted residual stress distributions. In addition, detailed shrinkage and warpage measurements on a large series of polymers and for different molding conditions were performed and are shown to compare well with the model predictions.

  1. Evaluation of barely visible indentation damage (BVID) in CF/EP sandwich composites using guided wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Samir; Ye, Lin; Dong, Xingjian; Alamdari, Mehrisadat Makki

    2016-08-01

    Barely visible indentation damage after quasi-static indentation in sandwich CF/EP composites was assessed using ultrasonic guided wave signals. Finite element analyses were conducted to investigate the interaction between guided waves and damage, further to assist in the selection process of the Lamb wave sensitive modes for debonding identification. Composite sandwich beams and panels structures were investigated. Using the beam structure, a damage index was defined based on the change in the peak magnitude of the captured wave signals before and after the indentation, and the damage index was correlated with the residual deformation (defined as the depth of the dent), that was further correlated with the amount of crushing within the core. Both A0 and S0 Lamb wave modes showed high sensitivity to the presence of barely visible indentation damage with residual deformation of 0.2 mm. Furthermore, barely visible indentation damage was assessed in composite sandwich panels after indenting to 3 and 5 mm, and the damage index was defined, based on (a) the peak magnitude of the wave signals before and after indentation or (b) the mismatch between the original and reconstructed wave signals based on a time-reversal algorithm, and was subsequently applied to locate the position of indentation.

  2. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  3. Electrodeposition Repair of Damaged Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, M.; Rietdyk, J.

    1983-01-01

    Damaged material replace by electrodeposited copper. Channel restoration consists of alternately machinging damaged material and reconstructing material by electrodeposition. Solid wax processed into coolant channels to provide plating surfaces that match original channel surfaces.

  4. 7 CFR 51.2763 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Shelled Virginia Type Peanuts Definitions § 51.2763 Damage. Damage means that the peanut... cuts, web or frass; (d) Freezing injury causing hard, translucent or discolored flesh; and, (e)...

  5. 7 CFR 51.908 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.908 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect or any combination of defects which... berries which are split, crushed, wet, affected by decay or waterberry, or affected by heat or...

  6. Recent Advances in Composite Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifsnider, Ken; Case, Scott; Iyengar, Nirmal

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art and recent developments in the field of composite material damage mechanics are reviewed, with emphasis on damage accumulation. The kinetics of damage accumulation are considered with emphasis on the general accumulation of discrete local damage events such as single or multiple fiber fractures or microcrack formation. The issues addressed include: how to define strength in the presence of widely distributed damage, and how to combine mechanical representations in order to predict the damage tolerance and life of engineering components. It is shown that a damage mechanics approach can be related to the thermodynamics of the damage accumulation processes in composite laminates subjected to mechanical loading and environmental conditions over long periods of time.

  7. 7 CFR 51.2293 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2293 Serious damage. Serious damage... severely shriveled, or a greater area is affected by lesser degrees of shriveling producing an...

  8. 7 CFR 51.777 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Florida Grapefruit Definitions § 51.777 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... the edible or marketing quality of the fruit....

  9. 7 CFR 51.1826 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Florida Tangerines Definitions § 51.1826 Damage. Damage means any specific defect... edible or marketing quality of the fruit....

  10. 7 CFR 51.773 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Florida Grapefruit Definitions § 51.773 Damage. Damage means any specific defect... marketing quality of the fruit....

  11. 7 CFR 51.1871 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1871 Damage. Damage means any specific defect described in... marketing quality of the tomato....

  12. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.573 Damage. Damage, unless otherwise specifically defined in this... the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in the container. Any one of the...

  13. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.573 Damage. Damage, unless... the edible or shipping quality of the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in...

  14. 7 CFR 51.586 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.586 Serious damage. Serious damage, unless otherwise specifically... shipping quality of the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in the container. Any one...

  15. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.573 Damage. Damage, unless... the edible or shipping quality of the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  20. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  1. Sphingolipids in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Jane Catalina; Obeid, Lina

    2015-05-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. PMID:25434743

  2. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  3. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  4. Recovery of transuranics from process residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Process residues are generated at both the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during aqueous chemical and pyrochemical operations. Frequently, process operations will result in either impure products or produce residues sufficiently contaminated with transuranics to be nondiscardable as waste. Purification and recovery flowsheets for process residues have been developed to generate solutions compatible with subsequent Purex operations and either solid or liquid waste suitable for disposal. The ''scrub alloy'' and the ''anode heel alloy'' are examples of materials generated at RFP which have been processed at SRP using the developed recovery flowsheets. Examples of process residues being generated at SRP for which flowsheets are under development include LECO crucibles and alpha-contaminated hydraulic oil.

  5. Differential Spectroscopic Imaging of Particulate Explosives Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    We present experimental results showing transmission and reflection imaging of approximately 100 microgram quantities of particulate explosives residue using a commercial uncooled microbolometer infrared camera and CO2 laser differential wavelength illumination.

  6. Ceramic colorant from untreated iron ore residue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Oscar Costa; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-09-30

    This work deals with the development of a ceramic colorant for glazes from an untreated iron ore residue. 6 mass% of the residue was added in suspensions (1.80 g/cm(3) density and 30s viscosity) of white, transparent and matte glazes, which were applied as thin layers (0.5mm) on engobeb and not fired ceramic tiles. The tiles were fired in laboratory roller kiln in a cycle of 35 min and maximum temperatures between 1050 and 1180°C. The residue and glazes were characterized by chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA and optical dilatometry) analyses, and the glazed tiles by colorimetric and XRD analyses. The results showed that the colorant embedded in the transparent glaze results in a reddish glaze (like pine nut) suitable for the ceramic roof tile industry. For the matte and white glazes, the residue has changed the color of the tiles with temperature. PMID:22795839

  7. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  8. Arabian crude-oil residues evaluated

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.F.; Bukhari, A.; Hasan, M.; Saleem, M.

    1985-08-12

    This article evaluates detailed physical and chemical characteristics for four important Saudi Arabian resids. Petroleum residues are composed of a mixture of large and complex hydrocarbon molecules along with one or more heteroatoms such as sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, vanadium, and nickel. The amount of residue and its physical and chemical composition depend on the source of the crude oil and methods of processing. Residues from four Saudi Arabian crude oils produced by the Arabian American Oil Co. (Aramco) were evaluated. The crude oils are 38.5 degrees API Arabian Extra Light, 33.8 degrees API Arabian Light, 30.4 degrees Api Arabian Medium, and 28.03 degrees API Arabian Heavy. Results are presented and residue preparation, and physical and chemical characteristics are analyzed.

  9. Properties of Rasch residual fit statistics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Margaret; Adams, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the residual-based fit statistics commonly used in Rasch measurement. In particular, the paper analytically examines some of the theoretical properties of the residual-based fit statistics with a view to establishing the inferences that can be made using these fit statistics. More specifically, the relationships between the distributional properties of the fit statistics and sample size are discussed; some research that erroneously concludes that residual-based fit statistics are unstable is reviewed; and finally, it is analytically illustrated that, for dichotomous items, residual-based fit statistics provide a measure of the relative slope of empirical item characteristic curves. With a clear understanding of the theoretical properties of the fit statistics, the use and limitations of these statistics can be placed in the right light.

  10. Ceramic colorant from untreated iron ore residue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Oscar Costa; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-09-30

    This work deals with the development of a ceramic colorant for glazes from an untreated iron ore residue. 6 mass% of the residue was added in suspensions (1.80 g/cm(3) density and 30s viscosity) of white, transparent and matte glazes, which were applied as thin layers (0.5mm) on engobeb and not fired ceramic tiles. The tiles were fired in laboratory roller kiln in a cycle of 35 min and maximum temperatures between 1050 and 1180°C. The residue and glazes were characterized by chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA and optical dilatometry) analyses, and the glazed tiles by colorimetric and XRD analyses. The results showed that the colorant embedded in the transparent glaze results in a reddish glaze (like pine nut) suitable for the ceramic roof tile industry. For the matte and white glazes, the residue has changed the color of the tiles with temperature.

  11. A Damage Tolerance Comparison of Composite Hat-Stiffened and Honeycomb Sandwich Structure for Launch Vehicle Interstage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a direct comparison of the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of impact-damaged, hat-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich structure for launch vehicle use was made. The specimens used consisted of small substructure designed to carry a line load of approx..3,000 lb/in. Damage was inflicted upon the specimens via drop weight impact. Infrared thermography was used to examine the extent of planar damage in the specimens. The specimens were prepared for compression testing to obtain residual compression strength versus damage severity curves. Results show that when weight of the structure is factored in, both types of structure had about the same CAI strength for a given damage level. The main difference was that the hat-stiffened specimens exhibited a multiphase failure whereas the honeycomb sandwich structure failed catastrophically.

  12. Progressive Damage Analysis of Laminated Composite (PDALC)-A Computational Model Implemented in the NASA COMET Finite Element Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of progressive failure in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed is presented in this report. The relationship employed in this analysis describes the matrix crack damage and fiber fracture via kinematics-based volume-averaged variables. Damage accumulation during monotonic and cyclic loads is predicted by damage evolution laws for tensile load conditions. The implementation of this damage model required the development of two testbed processors. While this report concentrates on the theory and usage of these processors, a complete list of all testbed processors and inputs that are required for this analysis are included. Sample calculations for laminates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loads were performed to illustrate the damage accumulation, stress redistribution, and changes to the global response that occur during the load history. Residual strength predictions made with this information compared favorably with experimental measurements.

  13. GLC determination of quinaldine residue in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Sills, J.B.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of quinaldine residue in various fish tissues is described. Homogenized tissues are extracted wi th hexane-ethyl ether, the extracts are concentrated by partitioning through O.IN sulfuric acid, and the residues are measured by alkali Harne ionization gas chromatography. Muscle tissues containing from 0.01 to 10.0 ppm quinaldine were successfully analyzed with recoveries from 75 to 100%.

  14. Employment Discrimination Litigation: The Availability of Damages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plax, Karen A.

    1976-01-01

    The focus of this comment is on the availability of damages under both Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and section 1981 with an analysis of the decisional law and theoretical rationales used by federal courts in allowing or disallowing damage awards. Consideration is given to compensatory versus punitive damages as well as those for…

  15. 7 CFR 51.609 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage. 51.609 Section 51.609 Agriculture Regulations..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.609 Damage. Damage means any injury or defect which materially affects the appearance, or edible or shipping...

  16. 7 CFR 51.2933 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2933 Serious damage. Serious Damage means any specific... or shipping quality of the apricot. The dimensions given for these defects are based on an apricot... larger or smaller apricots. The following specific defects shall be considered as serious damage:...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2933 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2933 Serious damage. Serious Damage means any specific... or shipping quality of the apricot. The dimensions given for these defects are based on an apricot... larger or smaller apricots. The following specific defects shall be considered as serious damage:...

  18. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  19. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  20. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  1. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1911 - Damaged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1911 Damaged. Damaged means any defect which... the fruit. Such scars damage the tomato when they are rough or deep, or when channels extend into...

  3. Damage Caused by the Rogue Trustee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-nine community college presidents and chancellors in 16 states report on the damage caused by rogue trustees. While the damage to presidents, other trustees, and faculty and staff is alarming, the damage these trustees cause the college suggests that the rogue trustee may be the single most destructive force ever to plague an educational…

  4. 7 CFR 51.2966 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.2966 Section 51.2966 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2966 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... discoloration covering a smaller area if the appearance is equally objectionable; (b) Perforated shells when...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1583 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage. 51.1583 Section 51.1583 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1583 Damage. Damage means any injury or defect which... of the total weight of the potato including peel covering defective area. Loss of outer...

  6. 7 CFR 51.2966 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.2966 Section 51.2966 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2966 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... discoloration covering a smaller area if the appearance is equally objectionable; (b) Perforated shells when...

  7. 7 CFR 51.2293 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.2293 Section 51.2293 Agriculture... § 51.2293 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect, other than color, which seriously affects... more than one-fourth of the kernel is severely shriveled, or a greater area is affected by...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1913 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.1913 Section 51.1913 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1913 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect... diameter on a tomato 21/2 inches in diameter, or lighter colored, shallow scars covering a greater...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1913 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.1913 Section 51.1913 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1913 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect... diameter on a tomato 21/2 inches in diameter, or lighter colored, shallow scars covering a greater...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1413 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... defects shall be considered as damage: (a) Adhering hull material or dark stains affecting an aggregate of... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1413 Damage. Damage means any specific defect described in this section; or an equally objectionable variation of any one of these defects, or any...

  11. Damaging effects of visible light. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress in studies of photodynamic damage of visual photoreceptors is presented. It was found the retina is not homogeneous in its susceptibility to light damage. Steady state rhodopsin levels have been evaluated in albino rats and in pigmented rats at several light intensities. Studies have continued of the effects of peroxidative photodynamic damage on the properties of rod outer segments. (ACR)

  12. Codex committee on veterinary drug residues.

    PubMed

    Crawford, L; Kugler, E G

    1986-12-01

    There has been widespread international concern over residues of veterinary drugs in food. However, until recently, there was little international cooperation in trying to find solutions to the problem. Many nations have taken steps to control the increased use of veterinary drugs, but the rules governing their use vary widely from country to country. Sharing of scientific expertise and other resources between countries would markedly improve this situation. With the need for international cooperation mounting, concerned drug regulators from 20 countries met in 1982 and again in 1984 to discuss international use of veterinary drugs. The group repeatedly called for a Codex committee on veterinary drug residues. At its 1983 meeting in Rome the Codex Alimentarius Commission convened an Expert Consultation to consider the need for a new committee. That international group of experts strongly agreed that a standing committee under the sponsorship of the commission should be established. In July of 1985, the commission unanimously voted to establish a new Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food. The United States was chosen as host country. The committee will work closely with several existing Codex committees, but it has a clear mandate of its own. Its responsibilities will include establishing a list of priority drugs for review, recommending maximum residue levels, developing codes of practice, and reviewing analytical methods used to control veterinary drug residues. This fall, a new Codex committee has met for the first time--the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  14. Residual caries detection using visible fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lennon, A M; Buchalla, W; Switalski, L; Stookey, G K

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of a new fluorescence method to detect residual caries in vitro. Gross caries was removed from 40 teeth with D2 caries. Samples were excited with violet-blue light and viewed through a 530-nm high-pass filter. Residual caries (orange-red fluorescing dentin) was detected in all samples. Further tooth substance was removed from half of the samples until no residual caries was detectable using the new method. Half of the samples remained untreated. A blinded examiner checked all samples for residual caries using DIAGNOdent, a visual tactile examination, and Caries Detector dye. Presence or absence of residual caries in each sample was determined using a fluorescent nucleic acid stain in conjunction with confocal microscopy. The new method, Visible Fluorescence, had the greatest sensitivity, specificity, percent correct score and predictive values of any of the methods tested. The new method had significantly higher percent correct score than any of the other methods and significantly higher specificity than visual tactile and Caries Detector. It was concluded that Visible Fluorescence is an improvement on the currently available aids for residual caries detection.

  15. Method for residual household waste composition studies.

    PubMed

    Sahimaa, Olli; Hupponen, Mari; Horttanainen, Mika; Sorvari, Jaana

    2015-12-01

    The rising awareness of decreasing natural resources has brought forward the idea of a circular economy and resource efficiency in Europe. As a part of this movement, European countries have identified the need to monitor residual waste flows in order to make recycling more efficient. In Finland, studies on the composition of residual household waste have mostly been conducted using different methods, which makes the comparison of the results difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method for residual household waste composition studies. First, a literature review on European study methods was performed. Also, 19 Finnish waste composition studies were compared in order to identify the shortcomings of the current Finnish residual household waste composition data. Moreover, the information needs of different waste management authorities concerning residual household waste were studied through a survey and personal interviews. Stratification, sampling, the classification of fractions and statistical analysis were identified as the key factors in a residual household waste composition study. The area studied should be divided into non-overlapping strata in order to decrease the heterogeneity of waste and enable comparisons between different waste producers. A minimum of six subsamples, each 100 kg, from each stratum should be sorted. Confidence intervals for each waste category should be determined in order to evaluate the applicability of the results. A new three-level classification system was created based on Finnish stakeholders' information needs and compared to four other European waste composition study classifications.

  16. Detecting organic gunpowder residues from handgun use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCrehan, William A.; Ricketts, K. Michelle; Baltzersen, Richard A.; Rowe, Walter F.

    1999-02-01

    The gunpowder residues that remain after the use of handguns or improvised explosive devices pose a challenge for the forensic investigator. Can these residues be reliably linked to a specific gunpowder or ammunition? We investigated the possibility by recovering and measuring the composition of organic additives in smokeless powder and its post-firing residues. By determining gunpowder additives such as nitroglycerin, dinitrotoluene, ethyl- and methylcentralite, and diphenylamine, we hope to identify the type of gunpowder in the residues and perhaps to provide evidence of a match to a sample of unfired powder. The gunpowder additives were extracted using an automated technique, pressurized fluid extraction (PFE). The conditions for the quantitative extraction of the additives using neat and solvent-modified supercritical carbon dioxide were investigated. All of the major gunpowder additives can be determined with baseline resolution using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with a micellar agent and UV absorbance detection. A study of candidate internal standards for use in the CE method is also presented. The PFE/CE technique is used to evaluate a new residue sampling protocol--asking shooters to blow their noses. In addition, an initial investigation of the compositional differences among unfired and post-fired .22 handgun residues is presented.

  17. Method for residual household waste composition studies.

    PubMed

    Sahimaa, Olli; Hupponen, Mari; Horttanainen, Mika; Sorvari, Jaana

    2015-12-01

    The rising awareness of decreasing natural resources has brought forward the idea of a circular economy and resource efficiency in Europe. As a part of this movement, European countries have identified the need to monitor residual waste flows in order to make recycling more efficient. In Finland, studies on the composition of residual household waste have mostly been conducted using different methods, which makes the comparison of the results difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method for residual household waste composition studies. First, a literature review on European study methods was performed. Also, 19 Finnish waste composition studies were compared in order to identify the shortcomings of the current Finnish residual household waste composition data. Moreover, the information needs of different waste management authorities concerning residual household waste were studied through a survey and personal interviews. Stratification, sampling, the classification of fractions and statistical analysis were identified as the key factors in a residual household waste composition study. The area studied should be divided into non-overlapping strata in order to decrease the heterogeneity of waste and enable comparisons between different waste producers. A minimum of six subsamples, each 100 kg, from each stratum should be sorted. Confidence intervals for each waste category should be determined in order to evaluate the applicability of the results. A new three-level classification system was created based on Finnish stakeholders' information needs and compared to four other European waste composition study classifications. PMID:26337965

  18. Comparative ecotoxicology of halogenated hydrocarbon residues.

    PubMed

    Winteringham, F P

    1977-12-01

    The term ecotoxicology is adopted in the sense of a comparative and integrated study of the undesirable effects of trace contaminants on the range of fauna and flora of an "ecosystem" or of a defined part or unit thereof. The importance of population changes over long periods of time is stressed. Sources, usage, and global trends of representative halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) residues which appear as trace contaminants of environment, food, and living organisms are briefly compared: industrial solvents and intermediates, chlorofluoromethanes as an atmospheric pollutant, methyl bromide as a food and soil residue, HCH (hexachlorobenzene) as a fungicide residue, DDT, lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane), and dieldrin as insecticide residues, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as industrial contaminants. A simple mathematical approach to the problem of relating inputs, persistence, and steady-state residue levels is explained. Persistence and biodegradation of representative compounds are compared. Attention is drawn to the persistence of hexachlorobenzene, the p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl- and hexachlorocyclopentadiene-derived moities of HHC residues. Ecotoxicological effects and their implications are discussed comparatively under the indirect effects of atmospheric pollutants and direct and indirect effects of trace contaminants of soil and aquatic ecosystems. Some conclusions related to research and "impact monitoring" are drawn.

  19. 40 CFR 180.432 - Lactofen; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Lactofen; tolerances for residues. (a) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide lactofen, 1... residues of the herbicide, lactofen, 1-(carboethoxy)ethyl 5- -2- nitrobenzoate, in or on the following...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA damage and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Emma P K; Bennett, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondria are often regarded as the cellular powerhouses through their ability to generate ATP, the universal fuel for metabolic processes. However, in recent years mitochondria have been recognised as critical regulators of cell death, inflammation, metabolism, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction directly promotes cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress and alters metabolism. These are key processes in atherosclerosis and there is now evidence that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and promotes atherosclerosis directly. In this review we discuss the recent evidence for and mechanisms linking mtDNA defects and atherosclerosis and suggest areas of mitochondrial biology that are potential therapeutic targets.