Science.gov

Sample records for residual stress effects

  1. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  2. Impurity Effects on Momentum Transport and Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sehoon; Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-11-01

    Impurities are inevitable during tokamak plasma operation because of strong interaction of plasma and plasma facing component and helium ash as a byproduct of fusion process. They cause problems such as radiation power loss and fusion fuel dilution. On the other hands, they are used to diagnosis plasma parameters (CES, XICS etc) and to suppress edge-localized mode by wall-coating. In this research, we study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  3. Bioinjection Treatment: Effects of Post-Injection Residual Stress on Left Ventricular Wall Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Wall, Samuel T.; Genet, Martin; Hinson, Andy; Guccione, Julius M.

    2014-01-01

    Injection of biomaterials into diseased myocardium has been associated with decreased myofiber stress, restored left ventricular (LV) geometry and improved LV function. However, its exact mechanism(s) of action remained unclear. In this work, we present the first patient-specific computational model of biomaterial injection that accounts for the possibility of residual strain and stress introduced by this treatment. We show that the presence of residual stress can create more heterogeneous regional myofiber stress and strain fields. Our simulation results show that the treatment generates low stress and stretch areas between injection sites, and high stress and stretch areas between the injections and both the endocardium and epicardium. Globally, these local changes are translated into an increase in average myofiber stress and its standard deviation (from 6.9 ± 4.6 to 11.2 ± 48.8 kPa and 30 ± 15 to 35.1 ± 50.9 kPa at end-diastole and end-systole, respectively). We also show that the myofiber stress field is sensitive to the void-to-injection size ratio – for a constant void size, the myofiber stress field became less heterogeneous with decreasing injection volume. These results suggest that the residual stress and strain possibly generated by biomaterial injection treatment can have large effects on the regional myocardial stress and strain fields, which may be important in the remodeling process. PMID:25065728

  4. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  5. Experimental determination of residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1991-01-01

    Residual stresses in finished parts have often been regarded as factors contributing to premature part failure and geometric distortions. Currently, residual stresses in welded structures and railroad components are being investigated. High residual stresses formed in welded structures due primarily to the differential contractions of the weld material as it cools and solidifies can have a profound effect on the surface performance of the structure. In railroad wheels, repeated use of the brakes causes high residual stresses in the rims which may lead to wheel failure and possible derailment. The goals of the study were: (1) to develop strategies for using x-ray diffraction to measure residual stress; (2) to subject samples of Inconel 718 to various mechanical and heat treatments and to measure the resulting stress using x-ray diffraction; and (3) to measure residual stresses in ferromagnetic alloys using magnetoacoustics.

  6. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  7. Effect of Residual Stresses on the Hardness of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bei, Hongbin; Gao, Y. F.; Lu, Zhao Ping; Nieh, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation experiments were conducted on Zr-based metallic glass samples, which were elastically and plastically bent in order to investigate the effect of residual stresses on hardness. It was found that tensile residual stress reduced the hardness significantly, while compressive residual stress produced only a small effect on the hardness. These observations are consistent with three-dimensional continuum-plasticity-based finite-element simulations. The hardness was also found to vary more significantly with residual stresses, in particular in tension, than that caused by shear-banding-induced softening, suggesting hardness measurement is a practical method for the evaluation of tensile residual stresses in a metallic glass. Hardness variation in the bent sample was correlated with the residual-stress induced volume dilatation through a free-volume-based model. In this paper, we also present a detailed stress analysis based on yield asymmetry under tension and compression to describe the distribution of residual stresses in bent metallic glass specimens. The calculations agree well with the hardness variations measured experimentally.

  8. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po; Malone, Tina; Bod, Robert; Torres, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  9. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P.; Malone, T.; Bond, R.; Torres, P.

    2001-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  10. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  11. A quasi-linear analysis of the impurity effect on turbulent momentum transport and residual stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, S. H.; Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-08-01

    We study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  12. A quasi-linear analysis of the impurity effect on turbulent momentum transport and residual stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, S. H. Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-08-15

    We study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  13. The Effect of Residual Stress on the Distortion of Gray Iron Brake Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, M. W.; Jang, G. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Jang, Ho

    2013-04-01

    Thermal distortion of gray iron brake disks due to residual stress and its effect on brake vibrations were studied. The residual stress of heat- and non-heat-treated gray iron disks was measured using neutron scattering. Dynamometer tests were performed to measure the friction force oscillation caused by the disk runout during brake applications. High-temperature tensile tests were carried out to find out possible plastic deformation due to residual stress during brake applications. The results showed that the average residual stress of the heat-treated disk (47.6 MPa) was lower than that of the non-heat-treated disk (99.6 MPa). Dynamometer tests at high temperatures (up to 600 °C) indicated that the residual stress pronounced the runout: the increase in disk runout after the tests for the non-heat-treated sample was more than twice that for the heat-treated sample. This difference correlated well with the neutron scattering results and the dimensional changes after a separate vacuum heat treatment. The high-temperature tensile tests showed severe reductions in yield strength at 600 °C, suggesting that disks produced with no stress relaxation could be deformed during severe braking.

  14. Analytical modeling of oxide thickness effects on residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, C.H.; Fuller, E.R. Jr.

    2000-04-14

    During high temperature operation, an oxide scale forms along the irregular top coat/bond coat interface in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) system. The residual stresses in the system are affected by the presence of the thermally grown oxide (TGO). Along the irregular interface, the asperity can be convex or concave. Semicircular convex and concave asperities have been adopted for numerical simulations to examine the effects of the TGO thickness on residual thermal stresses. It was found that in the tip region of a convex asperity, the residual stress normal to the interface, {sigma}{sub y}, in the ceramic top coat is tensile for a thin oxide but becomes compressive for a thick oxide. In the tip region of a concave asperity, {sigma}{sub y} in the ceramic topcoat is compressive for a thin oxide and becomes less compressive for a thick oxide. The purpose of the present study was to explore the physical meaning of the trend of the stress state of {sigma}{sub y} in the ceramic topcoat with the variation of the TGO thickness. To achieve this, a simple analytical model of three concentric circles was adopted. First, the residual thermal stresses in the three-concentric-circles model were derived. Then, the results for residual radial stresses at the top coat/TGO and the TGO/bond coat interfaces as functions of the TGO thickness were presented. Also, the physical meaning of the above results was discussed.

  15. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  16. The Effect of Weld Residual Stress on Life of Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald G. Ballinger; Sara E. Ferry; Bradley P. Black; Sebastien P. Teysseyre

    2013-08-01

    With the elimination of Yucca Mountain as the long-term storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in the United States, a number of other storage options are being explored. Currently, used fuel is stored in dry-storage cask systems constructed of steel and concrete. It is likely that used fuel will continue to be stored at existing open-air storage sites for up to 100 years. This raises the possibility that the storage casks will be exposed to a salt-containing environment for the duration of their time in interim storage. Austenitic stainless steels, which are used to construct the canisters, are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride-containing environments if a continuous aqueous film can be maintained on the surface and the material is under stress. Because steel sensitization in the canister welds is typically avoided by avoiding post-weld heat treatments, high residual stresses are present in the welds. While the environment history will play a key role in establishing the chemical conditions for cracking, weld residual stresses will have a strong influence on both crack initiation and propagation. It is often assumed for modeling purposes that weld residual stresses are tensile, high and constant through the weld. However, due to the strong dependence of crack growth rate on stress, this assumption may be overly conservative. In particular, the residual stresses become negative (compressive) at certain points in the weld. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a probabilistic model with quantified uncertainties for SCC failure in the dry storage casks. In this paper, the results of a study of the residual stresses, and their postulated effects on SCC behavior, in actual canister welds are presented. Progress on the development of the model is reported.

  17. Arc-discharge effects on residual stress and refractive index in single-mode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Jenkins, Micah H; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2016-03-20

    Arc-discharge effects on the residual stress and refractive index in single-mode optical fibers are investigated using a previously developed three-dimensional concurrent stress-index measurement method. Using commercial optical fibers and a commercial fusion splicer, the residual stress and refractive index perturbations caused by weak electrical arc discharges in single-mode fibers were measured. Refractive index changes greater than 10-4 and longitudinal perturbation lengths of less than 500 μm were shown to be possible. The subsequent prospects for arc-induced long-period fiber gratings are analyzed, and a typical transmission resonance is predicted to have a depth of 56 dB and a bandwidth of 0.08 nm at a wavelength of 1585 nm. The results of this investigation will be useful in modeling device performance and optimization of arc-induced long-period fiber grating fabrication.

  18. The Effect of Stochastically Varying Creep Parameters on Residual Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Constituent properties, along with volume fraction, have a first order effect on the microscale fields within a composite material and influence the macroscopic response. Therefore, there is a need to assess the significance of stochastic variation in the constituent properties of composites at the higher scales. The effect of variability in the parameters controlling the time-dependent behavior, in a unidirectional SCS-6 SiC fiber-reinforced RBSN matrix composite lamina, on the residual stresses induced during processing is investigated numerically. The generalized method of cells micromechanics theory is utilized to model the ceramic matrix composite lamina using a repeating unit cell. The primary creep phases of the constituents are approximated using a Norton-Bailey, steady state, power law creep model. The effect of residual stresses on the proportional limit stress and strain to failure of the composite is demonstrated. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using a normal distribution for the power law parameters and the resulting residual stress distributions were predicted.

  19. Effect of substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on residual stress in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dapei

    2015-07-01

    A thermal-mechanical coupling model was developed based on thermal-elastic- plastic theory according the special process of plasma spraying Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating upon Ti-6Al-4V substrate. On the one hand, the classical Fourier transient heat conduction equation was modified by introducing the effect item of deformation on temperature, on the other hand, the Johnson-Cook model, suitable for high temperature and high strain rate conditions, was used as constitutive equation after considering temperature softening effect, strain hardening effect and strain rate reinforcement effect. Based on the above coupling model, the residual stress field within the HA coating was simulated by using finite element method (FEM). Meanwhile, the substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on the influence of residual stress components were calculated, respectively. The failure modes of coating were also preliminary analyzed. In addition, in order to verify the reliability of calculation, the material removal measurement technique was applied to determine the residual stress of HA coating near the interface. Some important conclusions are obtained.

  20. Effects of WC size and amount on the thermal residual stress in WC–Ni composites

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, K.; Krawitz, A. D.; Richardson, J. W.; Weisbrook, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    We studied the effects of WC particle size and volume fraction on the magnitude and distribution of thermal residual stresses (TRS) in WC–Ni cemented carbide composites by neutron powder diffraction. Samples of high (0.3) and low (0.1) Ni volume fraction and coarse (1.7 m) and fine (0.5 m) WC particle size were employed. Thermal residual strain and stress values were obtained at temperatures between 100 and 900 K. Moreover, the magnitude of the mean (compressive) WC stress increased as WC fraction decreased, while the mean (tensile) Ni stress did the opposite. For both phases, stresses were highest for fine WC particles, reaching over 3 GPa in Ni. Elastic strain distributions, due to the sharp edges and corners of WC particles, were characterized by analyzing diffraction peak widths. The range of stress increased with the magnitude of the TRS. Even though the mean TRS is compressive in WC, regions of tension exist, and, for Ni, regions of compression are present.

  1. The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

  2. Effects of laser peening on residual stresses and fatigue crack growth properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. Z.; Huang, S.; Zuo, L. D.; Meng, X. K.; Sheng, J.; Tian, Q.; Han, Y. H.; Zhu, W. L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of laser peening (LP) with different laser peening coverage rates on residual stresses and fatigue crack growth (FCG) properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy were investigated. Residual stresses after LP and micro-structure with different fatigue striation patterns on fracture cross-sections were analyzed. Compressive residual stresses and dense dislocation arrangements can be obtained in the superficial layer after LP. The influence of compressive residual stresses induced under different LP coverage rates on FCG properties was revealed. LP coverage rate had an apparent influence on FCG properties as confirmed by the fatigue striation spacing on fracture cross-sections. Moreover, FCG rate decreased with the increase of compressive residual stresses perpendicular to the crack growth direction, which indicated that LP had an obvious inhibitory effects on FCG.

  3. The effect of cutting speed on residual stresses when orthogonal cutting TC4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaofeng; Wang, Zengqiang; Zhang, Guang; Liu, Lei

    2015-09-01

    As one of the most important parameters in mental cutting, cutting speed has a significant influence on residual stress. Finite element method and experiment method are used to study the relationship between cutting speed and residual stress when orthogonal cutting TC4 titanium alloy. The result of simulation and experiment shows that: when the cutting speed is low, the residual stress in axial direction is compressive stress and gradually converts to tensile stress with the increase of cutting speed, but it will convert to compressive stress again if the cutting speed continues to increase; the residual stress in tangential direction is constant to compressive stress and it will decrease with the increase of cutting speed.

  4. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  5. Effect of residual stress on modal patterns of MEMS vibratory gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Shankar; Panchal, Abha; Kumar, Manoj; Pal, Ramjay; Bhan, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    Deep boron diffusion often induces residual stress in bulk micromachined MEMS structures, which may affect the MEMS devices operation. In this study, we studied the modal patterns of MEMS vibratory gyroscope under the residual stress (100 - 1000 MPa). Modal patterns and modal frequencies of the gyro are found to be dependent on the residual stress values. Without any residual stress, the modal frequencies drive and sense modeswere found to be 20.06 kHz and 20.36 kHz respectively. In presence of 450 MPa residual stress, the modal frequencies of the drive and sense modes were changed to 42.75 kHz and 43.07 kHz respectively.

  6. Residual stresses in angleplied laminates and their effects on laminate behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of lamination residual stresses in angleplied laminates were transply cracks and warpage of unsymmetric laminates which occur prior to application of any mechanical load. Lamination residual strains were measured using the embedded strain gage technique. These strains result from the temperature differences between cure and room temperature and vary linearly within this temperature range. Lamination residual stresses were usually present in angleplied fiber composites laminates; they were also present in unidirectional hybrids and superhybrids. For specific applications, the magnitudes of lamination residual stresses were determined and evaluated relative to the anticipated applied stresses. Particular attention was given to cyclic thermal loadings in applications where the thermal cycling takes place over a wide temperature range.

  7. Modeling the Effect of Carburization and Quenching on the Development of Residual Stresses and Bending Fatigue Resistance of Steel Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Freborg, Andrew M.; Hansen, Bruce D.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2013-03-01

    Most steel gears are carburized and quenched prior to service to obtain the desired specific strength (σ/ρ) and hardness requirements. Use of carburization and quenching of steel gears creates a compressive residual stress on the carburized surface, which is beneficial for improving both bending and contact fatigue performance. Also, higher carbon content in the carburized surface decreases the starting temperature for formation of the martensitic phase and delaying the martensitic transformation at the part surface during the quenching hardening process. During the martensite phase formation, the material volume expands. The delayed martensitic transformation, coupled with the associated delayed volume expansion, induces residual compressive stress on the surface of the quenched part. The carburized case depth and distribution of carbon affect both the magnitude and the depth of the resulting residual compressive stress. In this article, the effect of carbon distribution on the residual stress in a spur gear is presented and discussed using finite element modeling to understand the intrinsic material mechanics contributing to the presence of internal stress. Influence of the joint on thermal gradient and the influence of phase transformation on the development of internal stresses are discussed using results obtained from modeling. The residual stress arising due to heat treatment is imported into single-tooth bending and dynamic contact stress analysis models to investigate the intrinsic interplay among carbon case depth, residual stress, bending load, and torsional load on potential fatigue life. Three carburization processes, followed by oil quenching, are examined. A method for designing minimum case depth so as to achieve beneficial residual stresses in gears subjected to bending and contact stresses is suggested.

  8. Effect of Laser Shock Peening on surface properties and residual stress of Al6061-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimianrizi, A.; Foroozmehr, E.; Badrossamay, M.; Farrokhpour, H.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Laser Shock Peening (LSP) on Al 6061-T6. The confined LSP regime using Nd: YAG laser with 1200 mJ of energy per pulse and 8 ns of pulse width were applied. The treated specimens were evaluated by means of surface integrity with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, microhardness, surface roughness and induced residual stress using an X-ray diffraction method. Results showed that by the use of LSP, compressive residual stress could effectively be induced on the surface of treated material. It was also revealed that the hardened depth of the material, up to a maximum depth of 1875 μm, could be achieved due to work hardening and grain refinement. In addition, surface roughness measurements showed that the LSP could deteriorate surface quality depending on the LSP parameters. The influences of beam overlap rates, number of laser shots and scanning pattern on microhardness as well as surface roughness are discussed.

  9. Effects of Processing Residual Stresses on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Structural Materials: Experimental Approaches and Microstructural Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Lados, Diana A.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth mechanisms of long cracks through fields with low and high residual stresses were investigated for a common structural aluminum alloy, 6061-T61. Bulk processing residual stresses were introduced in the material by quenching during heat treatment. Compact tension (CT) specimens were fatigue crack growth (FCG) tested at varying stress ratios to capture the closure and K max effects. The changes in fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale are correlated to closure, stress ratio, and plasticity, which are all dependent on residual stress. A dual-parameter Δ K- K max approach, which includes corrections for crack closure and residual stresses, is used uniquely to connect fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale with changes in crack growth rates at various stress ratios for low- and high-residual-stress conditions. The methods and tools proposed in this study can be used to optimize existing materials and processes as well as to develop new materials and processes for FCG limited structural applications.

  10. Effect of thermal exposure on the residual stress relaxation in a hardened cylindrical sample under creep conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, V. P.; Saushkin, M. N.; Tsvetkov, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the effect of thermal exposure (high-temperature exposure) ( T = 675°C) on the residual creep stress relaxation in a surface hardened solid cylindrical sample made of ZhS6UVI alloy. The analysis is carried out with the use of experimental data for residual stresses after micro-shot peening and exposures to temperatures equal to T = 675°C during 50, 150, and 300 h. The paper presents the technique for solving the boundary-value creep problem for the hardened cylindrical sample with the initial stress-strain state under the condition of thermal exposure. The uniaxial experimental creep curves obtained under constant stresses of 500, 530, 570, and 600 MPa are used to construct the models describing the primary and secondary stages of creep. The calculated and experimental data for the longitudinal (axial) tensor components of residual stresses are compared, and their satisfactory agreement is determined.

  11. Characterization of Residual Stresses in Ferrous Components by Magnetic Anisotropy Measurements Using a Hall Effect Sensor Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.

    2011-06-01

    A new surface sensor probe comprising an angular array of Hall effect sensors has been developed for characterization of residual stresses in ferrous materials by means of stress-induced magnetic anisotropy measurements. The sensor probe applies a radially spreading ac magnetic field to a test sample, and detects stray fields in different directions simultaneously to determine the principal stress axes. In situ measurements were conducted on a annealed steel plate under four-point bending stresses to evaluate the probe performance. The ratio of stray field signals measured along and perpendicular to the stress axis varies linearly with the surface stress, indicating the possibility of characterizing residual stresses in ferrous components using the sensor array probe.

  12. Longitudinal residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of measuring the longitudinal residual stress distribution in boron fibers is presented. The residual stresses in commercial CVD boron on tungsten fibers of 102, 142, and 203 microns (4, 5.6, and 8 mil) diameters were determined. Results for the three sizes show a compressive stress at the surface 800 to -1400 MN/sq m 120 to -200 ksi), changing monotonically to a region of tensile stress within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile 600 to 1000 MN/sq m(90 to 150 ksi) and then decreases to compressive near the tungsten boride core. The core itself is under a compressive stress of approximately -1300 MN/sq m (-190 ksi). The effects of surface removal on core residual stress and core-initiated fracture are discussed.

  13. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  14. The effects of uneven fiber spacing on thermal residual stresses in a unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.

    1992-01-01

    High residual stresses develop in SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites during cooldown from the fabrication temperature; these residual stresses can effect the mechanical and physical properties of the composite. Discrete fiber-matrix finite element models were used to study the residual stresses due to the temperature change during the fabrication process, including the effects of uneven fiber spacing, the free surface, and increased fiber volume fractions. To accurately model the effects of the free surface, it is only necessary to model one fiber through the thickness. Below the first ply, the analysis predicts stress distributions that are identical to the infinite array predictions. For uneven fiber space less than 0.042 mm in an interior ply, the maximum hoop stress was predicted to occur between fibers within a ply and to increase as the fiber spacing decreased. The maximum hoop stress correlated well with the observed radial cracking between fibers. For the case of touching fibers, the analysis predicted tensile radial stresses at the fiber-matrix debonding during the fabrication cooldown. Identical trends were predicted for uneven fiber spacing in surface plies with slightly greater values of maximum stresses. The analysis predicted matrix yielding to occur upon cooldown when the edge-to-edge fiber spacing was less than or equal to 0.022 mm. The stress distributions preidcted for increasing fiber volume fractions were similar to those predicted for decreasing the fiber spacing for two adjacent fibers within a ply.

  15. The effects of uneven fiber spacing on thermal residual stresses in a unidirectional SCS-6Ti-15-3 laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    High residual stresses develop in SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites during cooldown from the fabrication temperature; these residual stresses can effect the mechanical and physical properties of the composite. Discrete fiber-matrix finite element models were used to study the residual stresses due to the temperature change during the fabrication process, including the effects of uneven fiber spacing, the free surface, and increased fiber volume fractions. To accurately model the effects of the free surface, it is only necessary to model one fiber through the thickness. Below the first ply, the analysis predicts stress distributions that are identical to the infinite array predictions. For uneven fiber space less then 0.042 mm in an interior ply, the maximum hoop stress was predicted to occur between fibers within a ply and to increase as the fiber spacing decreased. The maximum hoop stress correlated well with the observed radial cracking between fibers. For the case of touching fibers, the analysis predicted tensile radial stresses at the fiber-matrix debonding during the fabrication cooldown. Identical trends were predicted for uneven fiber spacing in surface plies with slightly greater values of maximum stresses. The analysis predicted matrix yielding to occur upon cooldown when the edge-to-edge fiber spacing was less than or equal to 0.022 mm. The stress distributions predicted for increasing fiber volume fractions were similar to those predicted for decreasing the fiber spacing for two adjacent fibers within a ply.

  16. Effect of Residual Stresses and Prediction of Possible Failure Mechanisms on Thermal Barrier Coating System by Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar-Far, M.; Absi, J.; Mariaux, G.; Shahidi, S.

    2010-09-01

    This work is focused on the effect of the residual stresses resulting from the coating process and thermal cycling on the failure mechanisms within the thermal barrier coating (TBC) system. To reach this objective, we studied the effect of the substrate preheating and cooling rate on the coating process conditions. A new thermomechanical finite element model (FEM) considering a nonhomogeneous temperature distribution has been developed. In the results, we observed a critical stress corresponding to a low substrate temperature and high cooling rate during spraying of the top-coat material. Moreover, the analysis of the stress distribution after service shows that more critical stresses are obtained in the case where residual stresses are taken into account.

  17. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  18. Effect of Quenching Rate on Distortion and Residual Stresses During Induction Hardening of a Full-Float Truck Axle Shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Ferguson, B. Lynn; Nemkov, Valentin; Goldstein, Robert; Jackowski, John; Fett, Greg

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulation is used to predict the residual stresses and distortion of a full-float truck axle shaft that has been induction scan hardened. Flux2D® is used to model the electromagnetic behavior and the power distributions inside the axle shaft in terms of time. The power distributions are imported and mapped into DANTE® model for thermal, phase transformation, and stress analysis. The truck axle shaft has three main geometrical regions: the flange/filet, the shaft, and the spline. Both induction heating and spray quenching processes have significant effect on the quenching results: distortion and residual stress distributions. In this study, the effects of spray quenching severity on residual stresses and distortion are investigated using modeling. The spray quenching rate can be adjusted by spray nozzle design, ratio of polymer solution, and quenchant flow rate. Different quenching rates are modeled by assigning different heat transfer coefficients as thermal boundary conditions during spray quenching. In this paper, three heat transfer coefficients, 5, 12, and 25 kW/(m2 °C), are applied while keeping all other conditions constant. With the understanding of effects of heating and quenching on residual stresses and distortion of induction hardened parts, the induction hardening process can be optimized for improved part performance.

  19. Numerical Parametric Analysis of Bond Coat Thickness Effect on Residual Stresses in Zirconia-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Musharaf; Hasham, Hasan Junaid; Baig, Yasir

    2016-02-01

    Numerical-based finite element investigation has been conducted to explain the effect of bond coat thickness on stress distribution in traditional and nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Stress components have been determined to quantitatively analyze the mechanical response of both kinds of coatings under the thermal shock effect. It has been found that maximum radial tensile and compressive stresses that exist at thermally grown oxide (TGO)/bond coat interface and within TGO respectively decrease with an increase in bond coat thickness. Effect of bond coat thickness on axial tensile stresses is not significant. However, axial compressive stresses that exist at the edge of the specimen near bond coat/substrate interface decrease appreciably with the increase in bond coat thickness. Residual stress profile as a function of bond coat thickness is further explained for comparative analysis of both coatings to draw some useful conclusions helpful in failure studies of TBCs.

  20. Effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field induced by laser shock processing on aluminum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-González, C.; Gomez-Rosas, G.; Ocaña, J. L.; Molpeceres, C.; Banderas, A.; Porro, J.; Morales, M.

    2006-07-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) or laser shock peening is a new technique for strengthening metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field, which increases fatigue crack initiation life and reduces fatigue crack growth rate. Specimens of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy are used in this investigation. A convergent lens is used to deliver 2.5 J, 8 ns laser pulses by a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser, operating at 10 Hz. The pulses are focused to a diameter of 1.5 mm onto aluminum samples. Density of 2500 pulses/cm 2 with infrared (1064 nm) radiation was used. The effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field using this LSP setup and this energy level is evaluated. Residual stress distribution as a function of depth is assessed by the hole drilling method. It is observed that the overlay makes the compressive residual stress profile move to the surface. This effect is explained on the basis of the vaporization of the coat layer suppressing thermal effects on the metallic substrate. The effect of coating the specimen surface before LSP treatment may have advantages on improving wear and contact fatigue properties of this aluminum alloy.

  1. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on Residual Stress State and Fatigue Strength of AISI 304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, A.; Pyoun, Y.; Scholtes, B.

    2010-03-01

    The effects of a new mechanical surface treatment method, called ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM), on near-surface microstructures and residual stress states as well as on the fatigue behavior of an austenitic steel AISI 304 are investigated and discussed. The results are compared with consequences of other mechanical surface treatment methods such as deep rolling or shot peening.

  2. Residual stress measurements in carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Min, N.

    1986-01-01

    External dc magnetic field-induced changes in natural velocity of Rayleigh surface waves were measured in steel specimens under various stress conditions. The low field slopes of curves representing the fractional changes of natural velocity were proved to provide correct stress information in steels with different metallurgical properties. The slopes of curves under uniaxial compression, exceeding about one third of the yield stress, fell below zero in all the specimens when magnetized along the stress axis. The slopes under tension varied among different steels but remained positive in any circumstances. The stress effect was observed for both applied and residual stress. A physical interpretation of these results is given based on the stress-induced domain structure changes and the delta epsilon effect. Most importantly, it is found that the influence of detailed metallurgical properties cause only secondary effects on the obtained stress information.

  3. Effect of laser spot size on the residual stress field of pure Al treated by laser shock processing: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Zhang, Y. K.; Wen, D. P.; Ren, X. D.; Zhou, J. Z.

    2014-10-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) is a unique surface treatment technique. It induces high-depth compressive residual stresses for improved fatigue or stress corrosion cracking resistance. FEM simulation is an effective method to predict material behavior by LSP. A 2D quarter-infinite model was used to simulate the material behaviors of commercially pure Al by LSP. Different peak pressure with different laser spot diameter was applied to surface of pure Al. Each simulation included two steps: (i) explicit dynamics analysis for the analysis of the LSP; (ii) static equilibrium analysis for springback deformation analysis. The following conclusions could be made: (1) Plastically affected depth increased with the increase of laser spot diameter. There was an ultimate value about plastically affected depth when the laser spot diameter increased to some value, and the ultimate value was consistent with Ballard' model. When the laser spot diameter was small, there still existed tensile residual stresses on the surface layer of material although the peak pressure was below 2.5 HEL. When the diameter laser spot diameter was big enough, the tensile residual stresses on the surface layer of material were converted into compressive residual stresses although the peak pressure was higher than 2.5 HEL.

  4. The Effect of Laser Scan Strategy on Distortion and Residual Stresses of Arches Made With Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey D.; Sochalski-Kolbus, Lindsay M.; Bunn, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing Additive Manufacturing (AM) - both in-space AM for on-demand parts, tools, or structures, and on-earth AM for rapid, reduced-cost, small volume production of complex space-flight hardware. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an on-earth AM technology that MSFC is using to build Alloy 718 rocket engine components. An understanding of the SLM-718 material properties is required to design, build, and qualify these components for space flight. Residual stresses and are of particular interest for this AM process, since SLM is a series of approximately 100 micron-wide welds, where highly non-linear heating and cooling, severe thermal gradients and repeated thermal cycling can result in high residual stresses within the component. These stresses may cause degraded material properties, and warp or distort the geometry of the SLM component. The distortions can render the component out-of-tolerance when inspected, and even interrupt or halt the build process if the warped material prevents the SLM machine from operating properly. The component must be scrapped and re-designed, which is time consuming and costly. If residual stresses are better understood, and can be predicted, these effects can be mitigated early in the component's design. the compressive residual stresses in the z-direction were highest in the chess sample, followed by island then continuous. This may be due to the binding nature of the segments

  5. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  6. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  7. Effect of argon gas pressure on residual stress, microstructure evolution and electrical resistivity of beryllium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bing-Chi; Li, Kai; Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Wu, Wei-Dong; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-02-01

    The residual stress in beryllium films fabricated on K9 substrates by using magnetron sputtering deposition is measured by using a curvature method and is theoretically estimated by using the Nix and Clemens (NC) model. The experimental results indicate that the 1.3-μm-thick film is always in a tensile state for pressure variations in the range from 0.4 to 1.2 Pa. When the sputtering gas pressure is increased, the average stress increases at first, after which it decreases by a remarkable amount. The observed descending trend of the tensile stress when the sputtering gas pressure is beyond 0.6 Pa is mainly attributed to the grain size in the film being larger than that in the film when the pressure is below 0.6 Pa. The maximal residual stress of 552 MPa at a sputtering gas pressure of 0.6 Pa is close to the tensile strength (550 MPa) of the corresponding beryllium bulk material and is about 8 times smaller than that calculated by using the N-C model. In addition, the surface morphologies of the as-fabricated films reveal fibrous grains while the cross-sectional morphologies are characterized by a coarsening of columnar grains. The measured electric resistivity of each film strongly depends on its porosity and the sizes of its grains.

  8. Residual stress depth profiles of ausrolled 9310 gear steel

    SciTech Connect

    Paliani, C.M.; Queeney, R.A.; Kozaczek, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    Residual Stress analysis utilizing x-ray diffraction in conjunction with material removal by chemical polishing provides a very effective method of analyzing the near surface residual stress profile of steels. In this experiment, residual stress profiling has been used to analyze the effects of surface ausrolling during the marquenching of a 9310 gear steel which has been carburized to 1% carbon. The ausrolling process is an advanced thermomechanical processing technique used to ausform only the critical surface layer of gears and produce a hard, tough, fine-grained martensitic product. This study compares the residual stress profile of a marquenched specimen with a moderately deformed ausrolled specimen and with a heavily deformed ausrolled specimen, in order to correlate the effects of residual stress with the improved fatigue properties of the gear steel. While no significant variation was observed between the residual stress profile of the marquenched specimens (no deformation) and the line contact ausrolled specimens (moderate deformation), significant increases in the amount of compressive residual stress was noted in the residual stress profile of the point contact ausrolled (heavily deformed) samples. The maximum increase in compressive residual stress due to point contact ausrolling was approximately 500 MPa, when compared to the marquenched sample. This increased residual compressive stress will lower the effective shear stresses during rolling contact fatigue and would therefore explain some of the increase the rolling contact fatigue endurance of the point contact ausrolled specimens.

  9. Simulation of residual stresses and their effects on thermal barrier coating systems using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, JianGuo; Chen, Wei; Xie, HuiMin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are widely used in industrial gas-turbine engines. However, premature failures have impaired the use of TBCs and cut down their lifetime, which requires a better understanding of their failure mechanisms. In the present study, experimental studies of isothermal cycling are firstly carried out with the observation and estimation of microstructures. According to the experimental results, a finite element model is established for the analysis of stress perpendicular to the TBC/BC interface. Detailed residual stress distributions in TBC are obtained to reflect the influence of mechanical properties, oxidation, and interfacial roughness. The calculated results show that the maximum tensile stress concentration appears at the peak of TBC and continues to increase with thermal cycles. Because of the microstructural characteristics of plasma-sprayed TBCs, cracks initialize in tensile stress concentration (TSC) regions at the peaks of TBC and propagate along the TBC/BC interface resulting in the spallation of TBC. Also, the inclusion of creep is crucial to failure prediction and is more important than the inclusion of sintering in the simulation.

  10. Longitudinal residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A technique is proposed for measuring the longitudinal residual stress distribution in commercial CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) boron on tungsten fibers of 102, 142, and 203 microns in diameter. The experimental apparatus is so designed that continuous measurements are made of the length changes of a boron fiber specimen as the surface of the fiber is removed by electropolishing. The effects of surface removal on core residual stress and core-initiated fracture are discussed. The three sizes of boron fibers investigated show similar residual stress distributions, i.e., compressive at the surface, tensile near the core, and for the 102-micron fiber compressive again in the core. It is shown that an increase in UTS is due to the increase in the compressive stress at the core produced by fiber contraction during surface removal. An expression is derived for calculating the longitudinal residual stress at a given radius for an as-received fiber of a certain radius from measurements of the axial strain produced by removal of the surface by electropolishing.

  11. Effect of laser surface hardening on the microstructure, hardness and residual stresses of austempered ductile iron grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, C.; Leunda, J.; Lambarri, J.; García Navas, V.; Sanz, C.

    2011-06-01

    A study of the laser surface hardening process of two austempered ductile iron grades, with different austempering treatments has been carried out. Hardening was performed with an infrared continuous wave Nd:YAG laser in cylindrical specimens. The microstructure of the laser hardened samples was investigated using an optical microscope, microhardness profiles were measured and surface and radial residual stresses were studied by an X-ray diffractometer. Similar results were achieved for both materials. A coarse martensite with retained austenite structure was found in the treated area, resulting in a wear resistant effective layer of 0.6 mm to 1 mm with a microhardness between 650 HV and 800 HV. Compressive residual stresses have been found at the hardened area being in agreement with the microhardness and microstructural variations observed. The achieved results point out that the laser surface hardening is a suitable method for improving the mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons.

  12. Immediate and residual effects of heat stress and restricted intake on milk protein and casein composition and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cowley, F C; Barber, D G; Houlihan, A V; Poppi, D P

    2015-04-01

    The effects of heat stress on dairy production can be separated into 2 distinct causes: those effects that are mediated by the reduced voluntary feed intake associated with heat stress, and the direct physiological and metabolic effects of heat stress. To distinguish between these, and identify their effect on milk protein and casein concentration, mid-lactation Holstein-Friesian cows (n = 24) were housed in temperature-controlled chambers and either subjected to heat stress [HS; temperature-humidity index (THI) ~78] or kept in a THI<70 environment and pair-fed with heat-stressed cows (TN-R) for 7 d. A control group of cows was kept in a THI<70 environment with ad libitum feeding (TN-AL). A subsequent recovery period (7 d), with THI<70 and ad libitum feeding followed. Intake accounted for only part of the effects of heat stress. Heat stress reduced the milk protein concentration, casein number, and casein concentration and increased the urea concentration in milk beyond the effects of restriction of intake. Under HS, the proportion in total casein of αS1-casein increased and the proportion of αS2-casein decreased. Because no effect of HS on milk fat or lactose concentration was found, these effects appeared to be the result of specific downregulation of mammary protein synthesis, and not a general reduction in mammary activity. No residual effects were found of HS or TN-R on milk production or composition after THI<70 and ad libitum intake were restored. Heat-stressed cows had elevated blood concentrations of urea and Ca, compared with TN-R and TN-AL. Cows in TN-R had higher serum nonesterified fatty acid concentrations than cows in HS. It was proposed that HS and TN-R cows may mobilize different tissues as endogenous sources of energy.

  13. Neutron diffraction measurements for the determination of heat treatment effectiveness in generating compressive residual stress in an automotive crown gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertini, G.; Bruno, G.; Fiori, F.; Girardin, E.; Giuliani, A.; Quadrini, E.; Romani, F.

    2000-03-01

    Thermal austenitizing and tempering treatments are being developed in automotive industry to prevent crack initiation and propagation, especially in components where stress intensity factors influence the stress field and ultimately the fatigue life of the component. This is the case of crown gears, where the tooth root typically undergoes impulsive and very high loads which frequently cause cracking if tensile residual stresses are present at the surface. The sign reversal of these stresses is the aim of austenitizing and tempering treatments. In this work neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress (RS) on a UNI55Cr3 steel crown gear, carried out at HMI-BENSC , are presented. The sample was submitted to a new multi-frequency induction technique whose effectiveness was checked. Comparisons with X-ray measurements are shown, and RS measured by X-rays on a similar shot-peened sample are also mentioned. Experiments at HMI-BENSC have received financial support by the European Commission under the TMR/LSF Access Programme (contract no. ERBFMGE CT950060).

  14. Effects of post-weld heat treatments on the residual stress and mechanical properties of electron beam welded SAE 4130 steel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chuang, T.H.; Pan, Y.C.

    1997-02-01

    The distribution of the residual stresses of electron beam welded SAE 4130 and the effect of stress relief after various post-weld heat treatments (PWHT) were measured using X-ray diffraction. The mechanical properties and microstructure were also examined. Experimental results show that the tensile residual stress increased with the heat input of the electron beam. Most of the residual stresses were relieved by the PWHT at 530 C for 2 h followed by furnace cooling to 50 C. The strength of the welds decreased slightly, and the elongation of the welds increased after PWHT.

  15. Effects of post-weld heat treatments on the residual stress and mechanical properties of electron beam welded sae 4130 steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. C.; Pan, Y. C.; Chuang, T. H.

    1997-02-01

    The distribution of the residual stresses of electron beam welded SAE 4130 and the effect of stress relief after various post- weld heat treatments (PWHT) were measured using X- ray diffraction. The mechanical properties and microstructure were also examined. Experimental results show that the tensile residual stress increased with the heat input of the electron beam. Most of the residual stresses were relieved by the PWHT at 530 °C for 2 h followed by furnace cooling to 50 °C. The strength of the welds decreased slightly, and the elongation of the welds increased after PWHT.

  16. Modeling of the cooling rate effect on the residual stress formation in the cantala fiber/recycled HDPE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probotinanto, Yosafat C.; Raharjo, Wijang W.; Budiana, Eko P.

    2016-03-01

    Residual stress has great influence on the mechanical properties of polymer composites. Therefore, its formation during the manufacturing process needs to be investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the influences of cooling rate on the residual stress distribution of the cantala/rHDPE composite by simulation. The simulation was done by using a SOLID227 element type of ANSYS. The cooling rates that used in this study are 0.5°C/minute, 1°C/minute, and 60°C/minute. The values of the residual stress correspond to the increasing of the cooling rate are 1171.31 kPa, 1171.42 kPa, 1172.36 kPa. In the radial direction, the residual stress was tensile inside the fibers, while in the longitudinal direction, the tensile residual stress occurred in the matrix zones and compressive in the fiber zones.

  17. The effect of residual decontamination reagent on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic materials under high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, M.; Sasaki, S.; Takashima, N.; Takimoto, S.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic materials has been investigated under high temperature water into which a trace level of chemical reagent for reactor process decontamination was injected to simulate residual chemical reagent in normal reactor cooling water. Creviced bend beam and 4-in. pipe tests have been performed with two kinds of concentrated-type reagents and two kinds of dilute-type reagents. It was found that concentrated-type reagents, when injected into high temperature water by 1/1000 of a specified concentration, work as an oxygen scavenger and significantly inhibit intergranular stress corrosion cracking in both sensitized Type 304 stainless steel and Inconel alloys 600 and X-750. Dilute-type reagents did not reduce dissolved oxygen (DO) at all and one of the reagents tested accelerated SCC in Type 304 stainless steel when injected into high temperature water by 1/1000 of a specified concentration. Another dilute-type reagent partially suppressed cracking of Type 304 stainless steel at the same residual reagent concentration. It is suggested that residual level decontamination reagent will work in two ways, depending on residual concentration. When residual concentration is rather high, it will work as an oxygen scavenger and will not have detrimental effects in terms of SCC; when reagent concentration is very diluted, it will accelerate cracking in heavily sensitized Type 304 stainless steel, regardless of the type or kind of decontamination reagent. This effect will be reduced in actual operation since the DO level is about0.2 ppm maximum in the normal reactor water.

  18. Numerical Simulation to Study the Effect of Arc Travelling Speed and Welding Sequences on Residual Stresses in Welded Sections of New Ferritic P92 Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei; Ge, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    New ferritic P92 steel is widely used in modern power plants due to its good combination of mechanical and physical properties. However, cracks are often formed in the welded sections during the fabrication or service. In order to ensure the structure integrity, the effects of residual stresses need to be considered. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of arc travelling speed and welding sequences on the residual stresses distribution in the welded sections of P92 pipes by finite element method (FEM). Results show that arc travelling speed and welding sequences have great effects on residual stresses distribution. With the arc travelling speed increasing, the residual stresses increase. Meanwhile, welding sequences of case B present smaller residual stresses and more symmetrical distribution of residual stresses at the weld centre line. Therefore, using slower arc travelling speed and case B welding sequences can be useful to decrease the residual stresses, which provides a reference for optimizing the welding technology and improving the fabrication process of new ferritic P92 welded pipes with small diameter and thick wall.

  19. Effect of Decarburization on the Residual Stresses Produced by Shot Peening in Automotive Leaf Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Rosa, Claudia E. Flores; Trejo, Martin Herrera; Román, Manuel Castro; López, Eddy Alfaro

    2016-07-01

    The shot peening is used in the leaf springs manufacturing process for producing a compressive residual stress field (CRSF) at and near the surface that improves the fatigue resistance. The resulting CRSF is influenced by the surface ferrite thickness associated with the decarburization. Hence, this work aims to extend the knowledge on the influence of the decarburization on the CRSF for the given shot peening conditions. A study on the laboratory scale was conducted for an SAE 5160 steel grade used in the automotive industry. Next, specimens with different decarburization depths were treated using industrial shot peening, and the resulting CRSF was characterized. The CRSF was found to be influenced by the decarburization depth. It is assumed that the elastic deformation mechanism is predominant at low decarburization depths, followed by a zone in which both the elastic and plastic deformation have competing mechanisms that contribute to the CRSF, and at higher decarburization depths, the dominant mechanism is plastic deformation. The values for σsrs and σmcrs decrease as the decarburized depth increases, and suitable CRSFs were obtained below a decarburization depth of 120 µm in industrial leaves. Furthermore, the prediction based on expressions correlating the measured variables was good in these leaves.

  20. Quantifying Residual Stresses by Means of Thermoelastic Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study focused on the application of the Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) technique as a tool for assessing the residual stress state of structures. TSA is based on the fact that materials experience small temperature changes when compressed or expanded. When a structure is cyclically loaded, a surface temperature profile results which correlates to the surface stresses. The cyclic surface temperature is measured with an infrared camera. Traditionally, the amplitude of a TSA signal was theoretically defined to be linearly dependent on the cyclic stress amplitude. Recent studies have established that the temperature response is also dependent on the cyclic mean stress (i.e., the static stress state of the structure). In a previous study by the authors, it was shown that mean stresses significantly influenced the TSA results for titanium- and nickel-based alloys. This study continued the effort of accurate direct measurements of the mean stress effect by implementing various experimental modifications. In addition, a more in-depth analysis was conducted which involved analyzing the second harmonic of the temperature response. By obtaining the amplitudes of the first and second harmonics, the stress amplitude and the mean stress at a given point on a structure subjected to a cyclic load can be simultaneously obtained. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical predictions for both the first and second harmonics of the temperature response. As a result, confidence was achieved concerning the ability to simultaneously obtain values for the static stress state as well as the cyclic stress amplitude of structures subjected to cyclic loads using the TSA technique. With continued research, it is now feasible to establish a protocol that would enable the monitoring of residual stresses in structures utilizing TSA.

  1. Residual stress determination from a laser-based curvature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Swank; R. A. Gavalya; J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2000-05-08

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  2. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  3. The effects of residual stress, viscoelastic and thermodynamic parameters on apparent fracture toughness of dental bilayer ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskonak, Burak

    Bilayer dental ceramic composites used for fixed partial dentures are becoming more widely used in dental practices because of their biocompatibility, aesthetic properties, and chemical durability. However, large statistical variations in the strength of ceramics are associated with the structural flaws as a result of processing and complex stress states within the surfaces of the materials because of thermal properties of each layer. In addition, partial delaminations of the veneer layer and connector fractures of bilayer ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have been observed in a clinical study which is a part of this dissertation. Analysis of fracture surfaces of failed FPDs reveals that such fractures of the veneering ceramic are most likely caused by lateral crack growth. Global residual stresses associated with the coefficient of thermal expansion differences between core and veneering ceramics can cause lateral crack initiation. Also, rapid cooling of bilayer ceramics from the sintering temperature of the glass veneer may not allow the interfacial stresses in the viscoelastic glass to relax to equilibrium values. This can further contribute to the propagation of lateral cracks. Furthermore, local residual stresses that develop in the plastic deformation zone below sharp contact areas on the occlusal surface are another contributor to lateral crack growth. Superposition of global residual stresses and a Boussinesq stress field can incrementally increase the possibility of lateral crack growth. The long-range goals of this study are to critically analyze the lateral crack growth mechanisms associated with residual stresses, to modify residual tensile stress distributions by controlled heat treatment, and to minimize the probability of veneering ceramic fractures. Four approaches were used to accomplish these goals: (1) clinical evaluation of a bilayer ceramic fixed partial denture system; (2) fracture surface analysis of clinically failed FPDs; (3

  4. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric M.; Watkins, Thomas R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Dutler, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  5. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  6. Effect of graded interlayer on the mode I edge delamination by residual stresses in multilayer coating-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. C.; Xu, B. S.; Wang, H. D.; Wu, Y. X.

    2008-01-01

    The mode I edge delamination could be initiated due to the presence of the interfacial peeling stresses near the edges of the multilayered systems due to the material mismatches between the adjacent layers. However, the exact peeling stress distributions could not be obtained by using the existing analytical and numerical models. It was proposed recently that the peeling moment resulting from the localized peeling stresses could be used to characterize mode I edge delamination. In this paper, the effect of the graded interlayer on the mode I edge delamination by thermal residual stresses in multilayer coating-based systems was investigated. Following the previous analysis approaches, the exact closed-form solutions for the peeling moments at individual interfaces and the curvatures for bilayer system, typical thermal barrier coating (TBC) system and TBC-based system with a graded interlayer inserted between the metallic layer and the ceramic layer were, respectively, derived. Case studies showed that the edge delamination by thermal stress could be impeded by properly selecting the coating materials and individual layer thicknesses. These studies may provide some important insights for developing fail-safe designing methodologies for multilayered systems.

  7. Residual stress development and effect on the piezoelectric performance of sol-gel derived lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berfield, Thomas A.

    Ferroelectric thin films have higher energy densities, larger strain capabilities and more rapid response times than their bulk counterparts. Typical applications include micro-actuators, micro-sensors and ultrasonic motors for MEMs applications, as well as, nonvolatile computer memories and switching capacitors for integrated circuitry. The electro-mechanical performance of ceramic thin films is greatly influenced by many factors, including grain size, orientation, film thickness, and residual stress level. Residual stresses which arise during the various processing phases of thin film manufacturing can be quite high due to substantial mismatches in substrate-film thermal properties, intrinsic sources (such as grain boundary interactions, etc.), and other external factors. This dissertation examines the relationship between field-induced displacement response and residual stress level for lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) thin films. The film piezoelectric properties are characterized via interferometric measurements for two different loading cases, while the residual stress is determined experimentally from wafer curvature measurements. Additionally two patterning methods, traditional chemical wet-etching and a novel soft lithographic technique, are explored as a means to reduce residual stress within film features. For the soft lithographic technique, film features are created by selective film cracking, a result of poor substrate adhesion promoted by a mediated, self-assembled monolayer. Wafer curvature stress measurements and DIC-based strain measurements of mediated monolayer patterned features reveal that the in-plane stress/strain development is reduced compared to the blanket film case. Critical in-plane strains at crack initiation are also measured using a new digital image correlation technique, in which fluorescent nanoparticles (c.a. 140 nm) provide the speckle pattern. A corresponding increase in the field induced displacements is observed for the film

  8. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Idury, K.S.N. Satish; Ismail, T.P.; Bhadauria, Alok; Shekhawat, S.K.; Khatirkar, Rajesh K.; Sapate, Sanjay G.

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  9. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  10. Effect of Plastic Pre-straining on Residual Stress and Composition Profiles in Low-Temperature Surface-Hardened Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoli, Federico; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Winther, Grethe; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual stress profiles in expanded austenite by applying grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) combined with successive sublayer removal. Annealed and deformed ( ɛ eq=0.5) samples of stable stainless steel EN 1.4369 were nitrided or nitrocarburized. The residual stress profiles resulting from the thermochemical low-temperature surface treatment were measured. The results indicate high-residual compressive stresses of several GPa's in the nitrided region, while lower-compressive stresses are produced in the carburized case. Plastic deformation in the steel prior to thermochemical treatment has a hardly measurable influence on the nitrogen-rich zone, while it has a measurable effect on the stresses and depth of the carbon-rich zone.

  11. Investigation on the Effect of Mold Constraints and Cooling Rate on Residual Stress During the Sand-Casting Process of 1086 Steel by Employing a Thermomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghani, Amir; Davami, Parviz; Varahram, Naser; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the effects of mold constraints and cooling rate on residual stress were analyzed during the shaped casting process. For this purpose, an H-shaped sample was designed in which the contraction of its middle portion is highly restricted by the mold during the cooling process. The effects of an increasing cooling rate combined with mold constraints were analyzed by reducing the thickness of the middle portion in the second sample. A three-dimensional coupled temperature-displacement analysis was performed in finite-element code ABAQUS to simulate residual stress distribution, and then numerical results were verified by the hole-drilling strain-gauge method. It was concluded that the mold constraints have a greater effect on the values of residual stress than the cooling rate (thin section) in steel sand casting. Increasing the cooling rate would increase the amount of residual stress, only in the presence of mold constraints. It is also suggested that employing the elastic-plastic stress model for the sand mold will satisfy the experimental results and avoid exaggerated values of residual stress in simulation.

  12. Residual stress in spin-cast polyurethane thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-19

    Residual stress is inevitable during spin-casting. Herein, we report a straightforward method to evaluate the residual stress in as-cast polyurethane thin films using area shrinkage measurement of films in floating state, which shows that the residual stress is independent of radial location on the substrate and decreased with decreasing film thickness below a critical value. We demonstrate that the residual stress is developed due to the solvent evaporation after vitrification during spin-casting and the polymer chains in thin films may undergo vitrification at an increased concentration. The buildup of residual stress in spin-cast polymer films provides an insight into the size effects on the nature of polymer thin films.

  13. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volumeconstancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  14. Effect of dissolution/precipitation on the residual stress redistribution of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on titanium substrate in simulated body fluid (SBF).

    PubMed

    Rakngarm Nimkerdphol, Achariya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2014-08-01

    The residual stress distributions in hydroxyapatite (HAp) coating with and without mixed hydroxyapatite/titanium (HAp/Ti) bond coating on commercially pure Titanium substrate (cp-Ti) were evaluated by Raman piezo-spectroscopy analysis. The Raman shifted position 962cm(-1), which is the symmetrical stretching of surrounded oxygen atoms with phosphorous atom ( [Formula: see text] ), was referred to analyses of stress dependency. The piezo-spectroscopic coefficient, which is a Raman shift value per stress (cm(-1)/GPa), was fitted from the result of four-points bending test of rectangular HAp bar and as-sprayed HAp on Zn plate. The calculated values were 3.89cm(-1)/GPa for the former and 7.11cm(-1)/GPa for the latter. By using these calibrations, the compressive residual stress in HAp coating with HAp/Ti bond coating (HA-B) has been found to be distributed in the range of -137MPa to -75MPa. For the heat-treated HAp coating (HA-B-HT) specimen, the compressive residual stresses placed in the range of -40--22MPa. The changes in the values of residual stress of the HAp coating after immersion in SBF were also evaluated. The residual stress in HA-WB specimens tend to change from compressive to tensile after 30 days immersion. The HA-B-HT specimens exhibited similar behavior and reached to zero stress after the immersion. The mechanism of the changes in residual stress would be the effect of stress redistribution around melted calcium phosphate particles to remained HAp splats.

  15. Residual stresses in injection molded products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K. M. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the molding process residual stresses are formed due to thermal contraction during cooling as well as the local pressure history during solidification. In this paper a simple analytical model is reviewed which relates residual stresses, product shrinkage as well as warpage to the temperature and pressure histories during molding. Precise excimer laser layer removal measurements were performed to verify the predicted residual stress distributions. In addition, detailed shrinkage and warpage measurements on a large series of polymers and for different molding conditions were performed and are shown to compare well with the model predictions.

  16. Study on residual stress in carbon fibres by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanchen; Wang, Qiuping; Wu, Junfang; Zhang, Chonghui; Wang, Jing; Tang, Yuanhe

    2008-12-01

    Based on the principle that residual stress in crystal lattice leads to change of distance among atoms, an approximate linear relationship between Raman shift and suffered strain of fibers is deduced. According to the stress-strain curve, a linear relationship between the stress and Raman shift is also deduced, and the ratio coefficient of the stress and Raman frequency shift is given. In high intensity carbon fibers, different spectra of the carbon fibers are obtained by Raman spectroscopy. The approximate linear relationship between the carbon fiber tensile strain and Raman shift is validated and the stress factor is given as well. Both the theoretic and experimental results show that the stress factor is -486.7GPa.mm. The experiment results also show that the Raman spectroscopy is a very effective method for the microstructure residual stress measurement. This method for residual stress measurement by Raman shift is able to be used in textile, biology, materials etc..

  17. Residual Stress Analysis in Thick Uranium Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Foreman, R J; Gallegos, G F

    2004-12-06

    Residual stress analysis was performed on thick, 1.0 to 25 {micro}m, depleted Uranium (DU) films deposited on an Al substrate by magnetron sputtering. Two distinct characterization techniques were used to measure substrate curvature before and after deposition. Stress evaluation was performed using the Benabdi/Roche equation, which is based on beam theory of a bi-layer material. The residual stress evolution was studied as a function of coating thickness and applied negative bias voltage (0-300V). The stresses developed were always compressive; however, increasing the coating thickness and applying a bias voltage presented a trend towards more tensile stresses and thus an overall reduction of residual stresses.

  18. 3D FEM Simulations of Drop Test Reliability on 3D-WLP: Effects of Solder Reflow Residual Stress and Molding Resin Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhenini, Soufyane; Tougui, Abdellah; Bouchou, Abdelhake; Mohan, Ranganathan; Dosseul, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Numerous three-dimensional (3D) packaging technologies are currently used for 3D integration. 3D-wafer level package (3D-WLP) appears to be a way to keep increasing the density of the microelectronic components. The reliability of 3D components has to be evaluated on mechanical demonstrators with daisy chains before real production. Numerical modeling is acknowledged as a very efficient tool for design optimization. In this paper, 3D finite-elements calculations are carried out to analyze the effects of molding resin's mechanical properties and thickness on the 3D component's dynamic response under drop loading conditions. Residual stress generated by solder reflow is also discussed. The influences of residual stresses on the numerical estimation of the component behavior during drop loading are studied. Solder reflow residual stresses have an impact on solder plastic strain and die equivalent stress calculations. We have compared the result of two numerical drop test models. Stress-free initial conduction is introduced for the first model. Solder reflow residual stresses are considered as the initial condition for the second drop test model. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons are carried out to show the effect of residual stress in drop test calculations. For the effect of molding resin thickness on the component behavior under drop loading, the stress-free initial condition is considered. The effect of the molding resin's thickness on critical area location is discussed. The solder bump maximum plastic shear strain and the silicon die maximum equivalent stress are used as reliability criteria. Numerical submodeling techniques are used to increase calculation accuracy. Numerical results have contributed to the design optimization of the 3D-WLP component.

  19. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  20. Measurment Of Residual Stress In Ferromagnetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Grainger, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic (MAC) and magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) techniques combined to provide complete characterization of residual stresses in ferromagnetic structural materials. Combination of MAC and MAE techniques makes it possible to characterize residual tension and compression without being limited by surface conditions and unavailability of calibration standards. Significant in field of characterization of materials as well as detection of fatigue failure.

  1. Residual Stress Predictions in Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; SAYLOR,DAVID M.; ROHRER,GREGORY S.; CARTER,W. CRAIG; LANGER,STEPHEN A.

    1999-12-13

    Microstructure-level residual stresses arise in polycrystalline ceramics during processing as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy and crystallographic disorientation across the grain boundaries. Depending upon the grain size, the magnitude of these stresses can be sufficiently high to cause spontaneous microcracking during the processing of these materials. They are also likely to affect where cracks initiate and propagate under macroscopic loading. The magnitudes of residual stresses in untextured and textured alumina samples were predicted using object oriented finite (OOF) element analysis and experimentally determined grain orientations. The crystallographic orientations were obtained by electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The residual stresses were lower and the stress distributions were narrower in the textured samples compared to those in the untextured samples. Crack initiation and propagation were also simulated using the Griffith fracture criterion. The grain boundary to surface energy ratios required for computations were estimated using AFM groove measurements.

  2. Lamination residual stresses in hybrid composites, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study lamination residual stresses for various material and loading parameters. The effects of hybridization on residual stresses and residual properties after thermal cycling under load were determined in angle-ply graphite/Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates. Residual strains in the graphite plies are not appreciably affected by the type and number of hybridizing plies. Computed residual stresses at room temperature in the S-glass plies reach values up to seventy-five percent of the transverse strength of the material. Computed residual stresses in the graphite plies exceed the static strength by approximately ten percent. In the case of Kevlar plies, computed residual stresses far exceed the static strength indicating possible early failure of these plies. Static testing of the hybrids above indicates that failure is governed by the ultimate strain of the graphite plies. In thermally cycled hybrids, in general, residual moduli were somewhat lower and residual strengths were higher than initial values.

  3. Residual stresses in cross-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Hyer, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The residual thermal stresses in 4-layer cross-ply tubes are studied. The tubes considered has a small radius to wall-thickness ratios and so elasticity solutions were used. The residual thermal stress problem was considered to be axisymmetric and three elasticity solutions were derived and the results compared with the results using classical lamination theory. The comparison illustrates the limitations of classical lamination theory. The three elasticity solutions derived were: plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain, the latter being the most realistic. Residual stresses in both the hoop and axial direction is significant. Stacking arrangement effects the residual stress to some extent, as do the material properties of the individual lamina. The benefits of hybrid construction are briefly discussed.

  4. Residual stress measurements of tension leg platform tendon welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Results of fatigue test of prototype welded tendons showed that fatigue life was greatly reduced for the weld repaired joint. Since tensile residual stresses near the fusion boundary were suspected to cause the fatigue life reduction, these residual stresses were measured. Residual stresses of girth welded tendon pipes for a tension leg platform (TLP) were obtained for various fabrication conditions. The stresses were measured experimentally using the blind hole drilling (BHD) technique, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Barkhausen Noise (BHN) method. The results of these measurements illustrate the reliability of each measurement technique. Effects of joint configuration, weld repair, weld cap grinding, and pre-fatigue test on residual stresses were discussed.

  5. Effect of process variables on the Drucker-Prager cap model and residual stress distribution of tablets estimated by the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Otoguro, Saori; Miura, Takahiro; Onuki, Yoshinori; Obata, Yasuko; Takayama, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    A multivariate statistical technique was applied to clarify the causal correlation between variables in the manufacturing process and the residual stress distribution of tablets. Theophylline tablets were prepared according to a Box-Behnken design using the wet granulation method. Water amounts (X1), kneading time (X2), lubricant-mixing time (X3), and compression force (X4) were selected as design variables. The Drucker-Prager cap (DPC) model was selected as the method for modeling the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders. Simulation parameters, such as Young's modulus, Poisson rate, internal friction angle, plastic deformation parameters, and initial density of the powder, were measured. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the simulation parameters were significantly affected by process variables. The constructed DPC models were fed into the analysis using the finite element method (FEM), and the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders during the tableting process was analyzed using the FEM. The results of this analysis revealed that the residual stress distribution of tablets increased with increasing X4. Moreover, an interaction between X2 and X3 also had an effect on shear and the x-axial residual stress of tablets. Bayesian network analysis revealed causal relationships between the process variables, simulation parameters, residual stress distribution, and pharmaceutical responses of tablets. These results demonstrated the potential of the FEM as a tool to help improve our understanding of the residual stress of tablets and to optimize process variables, which not only affect tablet characteristics, but also are risks of causing tableting problems. PMID:25109913

  6. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.

    2004-02-12

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container.

  7. Water aging reverses residual stresses in hydrophilic dental composites.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Ferracane, J L

    2014-02-01

    Dental composites develop residual stresses during polymerization due to shrinkage. These stresses may change with time because of relaxation and water sorption in the oral environment. This phenomenon is likely dependent on the composition of the materials, specifically their hydrophilic characteristics, and could result in deleterious stresses on restorative materials and tooth structure. The purpose of this experiment was to use the thin ring-slitting method to compare the residual stress generated within composite materials of varying hydrophilicity when aged in wet and dry conditions after polymerization. Water sorption, solubility, elastic modulus, and residual stresses were measured in 6 commercial composites/cements aged in water and dry conditions. The self-adhesive resin cement showed the highest water sorption and solubility. All composites showed initial residual contraction stresses, which were maintained when aged dry. Residual stresses in 2 of the self-adhesive cements and the polyacid-modified composite aged in wet conditions resulted in a net expansion. This experiment verified that residual shrinkage stresses in dental composites can be reversed during aging in water, resulting in a net expansion, with the effect directly related to their hydrophilic properties.

  8. Water aging reverses residual stresses in hydrophilic dental composites.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Ferracane, J L

    2014-02-01

    Dental composites develop residual stresses during polymerization due to shrinkage. These stresses may change with time because of relaxation and water sorption in the oral environment. This phenomenon is likely dependent on the composition of the materials, specifically their hydrophilic characteristics, and could result in deleterious stresses on restorative materials and tooth structure. The purpose of this experiment was to use the thin ring-slitting method to compare the residual stress generated within composite materials of varying hydrophilicity when aged in wet and dry conditions after polymerization. Water sorption, solubility, elastic modulus, and residual stresses were measured in 6 commercial composites/cements aged in water and dry conditions. The self-adhesive resin cement showed the highest water sorption and solubility. All composites showed initial residual contraction stresses, which were maintained when aged dry. Residual stresses in 2 of the self-adhesive cements and the polyacid-modified composite aged in wet conditions resulted in a net expansion. This experiment verified that residual shrinkage stresses in dental composites can be reversed during aging in water, resulting in a net expansion, with the effect directly related to their hydrophilic properties. PMID:24272790

  9. Surface Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds: Pre- and Post-Thermal Stress Relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the residual stresses present in titanium friction stir welds and if a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle would be effective in minimizing those weld-induced residual stresses. Surface residual stresses in titanium 6Al-4V alloy friction stir welds were measured in butt joint thicknesses ranging from 3 to 12 mm. The residual stress states were also evaluated after the welds were subjected to a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle of 760 °C for 45 min. High (300-400 MPa) tensile residual stresses were observed in the longitudinal direction prior to stress relief and compressive residual stresses were measured in the transverse direction. After stress relief, the residual stresses were decreased by an order of magnitude to negligible levels.

  10. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    SciTech Connect

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

  11. Evaluation of Surface Residual Stresses in Friction Stir Welds Due to Laser and Shot Peening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Rivero, Iris V.; Lyons, Jed

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser, and shot peening on the residual stresses in Friction Stir Welds (FSW) has been investigated. The surface residual stresses were measured at five different locations across the weld in order to produce an adequate residual stress profile. The residual stresses before and after sectioning the coupon from the welded plate were also measured, and the effect of coupon size on the residual stress relaxation was determined and characterized. Measurements indicate that residual stresses were not uniform along the welded plate, and large variation in stress magnitude could be exhibited at various locations along the FSW plate. Sectioning resulted in significant residual stress relaxation in the longitudinal direction attributed to the large change in dimensions in this direction. Overall, Laser and shot peening resulted in a significant reduction in tensile residual stresses at the surface of the specimens.

  12. Effects of cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen jet on forces, temperature and surface residual stresses in grinding steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    Grinding is a widely employed finishing process for different materials such as metals, ceramics, glass, carbides, rocks, etc. to achieve good geometrical (form) and dimensional accuracy with acceptable surface finish and surface integrity. However, it is inherently characterized by high specific energy requirements, unlike other conventional machining processes such as turning, milling, etc., which lead to a high grinding zone temperature and poor surface integrity. Many methods have been investigated to control this high grinding zone temperature, but all have their shortfalls, both technological and environmental, in exchange for controlling the grinding zone temperature. This paper briefly discusses the results obtained with regard to grinding forces, specific energy, grinding zone temperature and surface residual stress when using cryogenic cooling and compares them to the results from dry grinding and grinding with soluble oil. Cryogenic cooling seems to have the edge over other coolants in terms of controlling the temperature, residual stresses and grinding forces, and it is also environment friendly.

  13. System and method for measuring residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Prime, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

  14. Nondestructive method for measuring residual stresses in metals, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwebel, C. D.

    1968-01-01

    Nondestructive direct measurement of residual surface stresses in metals can be made because metal under stress has a different electrochemical solution potential than in the unstressed condition. The method uses two matched electrolytic cells to cancel extraneous effects on the actual solution potential of the metal specimen.

  15. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: Ta). Above Ta these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  16. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-15

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: T{sub a}). Above T{sub a} these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  17. Residual contact stresses in cryotechnical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    Two examples were chosen to show the use of residual stress measurements in the evaluation and comprehension of possible ruptures of parts subjected to the working conditions of cryogenic turbomachines which induce wear of the surfaces in dry contact. The examples concern the ball bearings and spline of the liquid hydrogen pump of the Vulcain engine to be used on Ariane 5. The Ariane program is introduced and tribological problems of the cryogenic technique are discussed. The utility of the residual stress measurements is assessed.

  18. The effect of a homogenizing optic on residual stresses and shear strength of laser brazed ceramic/steel-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Südmeyer, I.; Rohde, M.; Besser, H.; Grein, M.; Liesching, B.; Schneider, J.

    2011-03-01

    Oxide and non oxide ceramics (Al2O3, SiC) were brazed to commercial steel with active filler alloys using a CO2-laser (l = 10.64 μm). Two different laser intensity profiles were used for heating up the compound: A laser output beam presenting a Gaussian profile and a homogenized, nearly top head profile were applied for joining the compounds in an Argon stream. The temperature distribution with and without the homogenizing optic was measured during the process and compared to the results of a finite element model simulating the brazing process with the different laser intensity profiles. Polished microsections were prepared for characterization of the different joints by scanning electron micrographs and EDXanalysis. In order to evaluate the effects of the different laser intensity profiles on the compound, the shear strengths of the braze-joints were determined. Additionally residual stresses which were caused by the gradient of thermal expansion between ceramic and metal were determined by finite element modeling. The microsections did not exhibit differences between the joints, which were brazed with different laser profiles. However the shear tests proved, that an explicit increase of compound strength up to 34 MPa of the ceramic/metal joints can be achieved with the top head profile, whereas the joints brazed with the Gaussian profile achieved only shear strength values of 24 MPa. Finally tribological pin-on-disc tests proved the capability of the laser brazed joints with regard to the application conditions.

  19. Residual stresses in a cast iron automotive brake disc rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, Maurice I.; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Runout, and consequent juddering and pulsation through the brake pedal, is a multi-million dollar per year warranty problem for car manufacturers. There is some suspicion that the runout can be caused by relaxation of residual casting stresses when the disc is overheated during severe-braking episodes. We report here neutron-diffraction measurements of the levels and distribution of residual strains in a used cast iron brake disc rotor. The difficulties of measuring stresses in grey cast iron are outlined and three-dimensional residual-strain distributions are presented and their possible effects discussed.

  20. On the effect of prestrain and residual stress in thin biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the difference between ex vivo and in vivo measurements is critical to interpret the load carrying mechanisms of living biological systems. For the past four decades, the ex vivo stiffness of thin biological membranes has been characterized using uniaxial and biaxial tests with remarkably consistent stiffness parameters, even across different species. Recently, the in vivo stiffness was characterized using combined imaging techniques and inverse finite element analyses. Surprisingly, ex vivo and in vivo stiffness values differed by up to three orders of magnitude. Here, for the first time, we explain this tremendous discrepancy using the concept of prestrain. We illustrate the mathematical modeling of prestrain in nonlinear continuum mechanics through the multiplicative decomposition of the total elastic deformation into prestrain-induced and load-induced parts. Using in vivo measured membrane kinematics and associated pressure recordings, we perform an inverse finite element analysis for different prestrain levels and show that the resulting membrane stiffness may indeed differ by four orders of magnitude depending on the prestrain level. Our study motivates the hypothesis that prestrain is important to position thin biological membranes in vivo into their optimal operating range, right at the transition point of the stiffening regime. Understanding the effect of prestrain has direct clinical implications in regenerative medicine, medical device design, and and tissue engineering of replacement constructs for thin biological membranes. PMID:23976792

  1. Measurement of residual stress in bent pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alers, G. A.; McColskey, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Buried gas and oil pipelines can be subjected to unexpected bending loads caused by such earth movements as earthquakes, wash-outs, road building, or mining subsidence as well as by denting from unintentional digging. In order to make a fitness-for-service assessment, it is necessary to measure any residual stresses that are left in the pipe wall as well as the degree of plastic flow within regions of severe damage. A portable instrument that uses EMATs to rapidly measure ultrasonic shear wave birefringence in the wall of a pipe has been developed and applied to a 5 m (15 ft) long section of 0.56 m (22 in) diameter linepipe loaded in three point bending by a 22 MN (five million pound) load frame. The results showed that: (1) a large correction for shear wave anisotropy caused by texture in the steel had to be introduced and (2) the degree of plastic flow could be deduced from changes in the texture contribution alone. An attempt to separate the stress and texture effects by using SH wave modes in the pipe wall proved unreliable because of magnetostrictive effects in the periodic permanent magnet EMATs used for these experiments.

  2. Effect of thermal and weld-induced residual stresses on the J-integral and CTOD in elastic-plastic fracture analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Delfin, P.; Sattari-Far, I.; Brickstad, B.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of how the residual stress of a welded pipe contributes to the CTOD and the J-integral has been performed. Many experiments show that for ductile materials and high L(sub r) values the contribution from the residual stress to the risk of fracture is negligible. The objective of the present numerical analyses is to investigate how the weld residual stresses interact with other types of stresses and if possible give some recommendations on how to treat weld residual stresses in fracture assessments. The welding process has been simulated according to generally accepted methods in order to obtain a proper plastic strain field. The results imply that although the relative contribution of the residual stress to fracture decreases rapidly for high L(sub r), the residual stress still makes a contribution even for quite high loads.

  3. Effect of thermal and weld-induced residual stresses on the J-integral and CTOD in elastic-plastic fracture analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Delfin, P.; Sattari-Far, I.; Brickstad, B.

    1999-11-01

    An investigation of how the residual stress of a welded pipe contributes to the CTOD and the J-integral has been performed. Many experiments show that for ductile materials and high L(sub r) values the contribution from the residual stress to the risk of fracture is negligible. The objective of the present numerical analyses is to investigate how the weld residual stresses interact with other types of stresses and if possible give some recommendations on how to treat weld residual stresses in fracture assessments. The welding process has been simulated according to generally accepted methods in order to obtain a proper plastic strain field. The results imply that although the relative contribution of the residual stress to fracture decreases rapidly for high L(sub r), the residual stress still makes a contribution even for quite high loads.

  4. Residual stress measurement and microstructural characterization of thick beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Detor, A; Wang, M; Hodge, A M; Chason, E; Walton, C; Hamza, A V; Xu, H; Nikroo, A

    2008-02-11

    Beryllium films are synthesized by a magnetron sputtering technique incorporating in-situ residual stress measurement. Monitoring the stress evolution in real time provides quantitative through-thickness information on the effects of various processing parameters, including sputtering gas pressure and substrate biasing. Specimens produced over a wide range of stress states are characterized via transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, in order to correlate the stress data with microstructure. A columnar grain structure is observed for all specimens, and surface morphology is found to be strongly dependent on processing conditions. Analytical models of stress generation are reviewed and discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

  5. Effect of laser-remelting of surface cracks on microstructure and residual stresses in 12Ni maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum, J.; Slabe, J. M.

    2006-04-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on possible application of laser-remelting to repair of narrow and comparatively deep cracks at the surface of highly thermo-mechanically loaded parts made of 12% Ni hot-working maraging tool steel. Laser-remelting of maraging steel is, due to very good weldability and flexibility of the process, very prospective for repair of fatigued surfaces of parts made of this steel at which the presence of surface microcracks may be observed. In addition to the efficiency of crack remelting, the influence of laser-remelting on the heat-affected zone in terms of its microstructure and residual stresses was also studied. The microstructure in the laser-remelted track is cellular/dendritic. In the heat-affected zone surrounding the laser-remelted track, the microstructure varies considerably. A microstructure analysis revealed, in the heat-affected zone, five microstructural zones and sub-zones. Residual stresses measured after laser-remelting are with reference to gradual through-depth changing of the stresses favourable.

  6. Effects of thermal cycling parameters on residual stresses in alumina scales of CoNiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY bond coats

    SciTech Connect

    Nordhorn, Christian; Mücke, Robert; Unocic, Kinga A.; Lance, Michael J.; Pint, Bruce A.; Vaßen, Robert

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, furnace cycling experiments were performed on free-standing high-velocity oxygen-fuel bond coat samples to investigate the effect of material composition, surface texture, and cycling conditions on the average stresses in the formed oxide scales after cooling. The oxide scale thicknesses were determined by SEM image analyses and information about the stresses were acquired by photo-stimulated luminescence-spectroscopy. Additionally, the scale thickness dependent stress fields were calculated in finite-element analyses including approximation functions for the surface roughness derived on the basis of profilometry data. The evolution of the average residual stress as a function of oxide scale thickness was subject to stochastic fluctuations predominantly caused by local scale spallations. In comparison to the supplemental modeling results, thermal stresses due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients are identified as the main contribution to the residual stresses. Finally, the theoretical results emphasize that analyses of spectroscopic data acquired for average stress investigations of alumina scales rely on detailed information about microstructural features.

  7. Effects of thermal cycling parameters on residual stresses in alumina scales of CoNiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY bond coats

    DOE PAGES

    Nordhorn, Christian; Mücke, Robert; Unocic, Kinga A.; Lance, Michael J.; Pint, Bruce A.; Vaßen, Robert

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, furnace cycling experiments were performed on free-standing high-velocity oxygen-fuel bond coat samples to investigate the effect of material composition, surface texture, and cycling conditions on the average stresses in the formed oxide scales after cooling. The oxide scale thicknesses were determined by SEM image analyses and information about the stresses were acquired by photo-stimulated luminescence-spectroscopy. Additionally, the scale thickness dependent stress fields were calculated in finite-element analyses including approximation functions for the surface roughness derived on the basis of profilometry data. The evolution of the average residual stress as a function of oxide scale thickness was subjectmore » to stochastic fluctuations predominantly caused by local scale spallations. In comparison to the supplemental modeling results, thermal stresses due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients are identified as the main contribution to the residual stresses. Finally, the theoretical results emphasize that analyses of spectroscopic data acquired for average stress investigations of alumina scales rely on detailed information about microstructural features.« less

  8. Residual Stresses and Critical Initial Flaw Size Analyses of Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Raju, Ivatury, S.; Dawocke, David S.; Cheston, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). A series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on the fatigue life. The purpose of the weld analyses was to model the weld process using a variety of sequences to determine the 'best' sequence in terms of weld residual stresses and distortions. The many factors examined in this study include weld design (single-V, double-V groove), weld sequence, boundary conditions, and material properties, among others. The results of this weld analysis are included with service loads to perform a fatigue and critical initial flaw size evaluation.

  9. The effect of electrodeposition process parameters on residual stress-induced self-assembly under external load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hyun; Woo, Yoonhwan; Boyd, James G.

    2014-11-01

    The authors (Boyd et al 2007 J. Micromech. Microeng. 17 452-61http://iopscience.iop.org/0960-1317/17/3/006/) presented a methodology for using residual stresses due to mismatch strains as a means of self-assembling microstructures under external loading during material deposition. Assembly of two components was considered: one component was subjected to deposition and was modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the other component was not deposited and was modeled as a linear spring. This work experimentally extends Boyd et al (2007 J. Micromech. Microeng. 17 452-61http://iopscience.iop.org/0960-1317/17/3/006/) to account for the effects of process conditions, specifically the electrodeposition current density and temperature, which affect both the Young’s modulus and the mismatch strain. First, nickel was electrodeposited onto an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, and the cantilever deflections at various current densities and temperatures were measured by using the resonance method of AFM and the measured deformation of the cantilever was converted into the quantitative mismatch strain by appropriate mechanics. For a given deposition thickness, the magnitude of the mismatch strain increased with increasing current density or plating temperature. The Young’s modulus decreased with increasing current density and increased slightly with increasing temperature. Next, the self-assembly model was experimentally verified by electrodepositing nickel onto an AFM cantilever beam in contact with a second AFM beam, serving as the spring, that does not undergo deposition. For a given deposition thickness, the spring deflection increased with increasing current density and increasing deposition temperature.

  10. Modelling of residually stressed materials with application to AAA.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, T; Dorfmann, L; Ogden, R W

    2016-08-01

    Residual stresses are generated in living tissues by processes of growth and adaptation and they significantly influence the mechanical behaviour of the tissues. Thus, to effectively model the elastic response of the tissues relative to a residually stressed configuration the residual stresses need to be incorporated into the constitutive equations. The purposes of this paper are (a) to summarise a general elastic constitutive formulation that includes residual stress, (b) to specify the tensors needed for the three-dimensional implementation of the theory in a nonlinear finite element code, and (c) to use the theory and its implementation to evaluate the wall stress distribution in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using patient specific geometry and material model parameters. The considered material is anisotropic with two preferred directions indicating the orientation of the collagen fibres in the aortic tissue. The method described in this paper is general and can be used, by specifying appropriate energy functions, to investigate other residually stressed biological systems. PMID:26874252

  11. Determination of Residual Stress in Composite Materials Using Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokhlin, S. I.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of high temperature composites can be significantly affected by the presence of residual stresses. These stresses arise during cooling processes from fabrication to room temperature due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between matrix and fiber materials. This effect is especially pronounced in metal matrix and intermetallic composites. It can lead to plastic deformations, matrix cracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding. In this work the feasibility of ultrasonic techniques for residual stress assessment in composites is addressed. A novel technique for absolute stress determination in orthotropic materials from angular dependencies of ultrasonic velocities is described. The technique is applicable for determination of both applied and residual stresses and does not require calibration measurements on a reference sample. The important advantage of this method is that stress is determined simultaneously with stress-dependent elastic constants and is thus decoupled from the material texture. It is demonstrated that when the principal plane stress directions coincide with acoustical axes, the angular velocity data in the plane perpendicular to the stress plane may be used to determine both stress components. When the stress is off the acoustical axes, the shear and the difference of the normal stress components may be determined from the angular dependence of group velocities in the plane of stresses. Synthetic sets of experimental data corresponding to materials with different anisotropy and stress levels are used to check the applicability of the technique. The method is also verified experimentally. A high precision ultrasonic wave transmission technique is developed to measure angular dependence of ultrasonic velocities. Examples of stress determination from experimental velocity data are given. A method is presented for determination of velocities of ultrasonic waves propagating through the composite material with residual

  12. Residual stresses in injection molded shape memory polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmer, Sukran; Esen, Huseyin; Karatas, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are materials which have shape memory effect (SME). SME is a property which has the ability to change shape when induced by a stimulator such as temperature, moisture, pH, electric current, magnetic field, light, etc. A process, known as programming, is applied to SMP parts in order to alter them from their permanent shape to their temporary shape. In this study we investigated effects of injection molding and programming processes on residual stresses in molded thermoplastic polyurethane shape memory polymer, experimentally. The residual stresses were measured by layer removal method. The study shows that injection molding and programming process conditions have significantly influence on residual stresses in molded shape memory polyurethane parts.

  13. Characterization of welding residual stresses with neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Taljat, B.; Feng, Z.

    1998-03-01

    Welding residual stresses are a key concern in the fabrication and use of structural components containing welds. Residual stresses in welds are caused by non-uniform expansion and shrinkage of differently heated zones during the thermal transient of a weld pass. In some alloys, solid state phase transformations occurring during the welding transient contribute additional residual stresses. Manufacturing problems arising from welding residual stresses include cracking and dimensional distortion. During use, tensile stresses in the welded zone limit the fatigue resistance of the component under cyclic loading. In an aggressive environment, tensile welding residual stresses also create a necessary condition for stress-corrosion cracking to take place.

  14. Patterns of residual stresses due to welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botros, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    Residual stresses caused by welding result from the nonuniform rate of cooling and the restrained thermal contraction or non-uniform plastic deformation. From the zone of extremely high temperature at the weld, heat flows into both the adjoining cool body and the surrounding atmosphere. The weld metal solidifies under very rapid cooling. The plasticity of the hot metal allows adjustment initially, but as the structure cools the rigidity of the surrounding cold metal inhibits further contraction. The zone is compressed and the weld is put under tensile stresses of high magnitude. The danger of cracking in these structural elements is great. Change in specific volume is caused by the change in temperature.

  15. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; Muransky, Ondrej; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250more » MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.« less

  16. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; Muransky, Ondrej; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250 MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.

  17. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  18. Effect of process temperature on structure, microstructure, residual stresses and soft magnetic properties of sputtered Fe70Co30 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, Swaleha; Ramudu, M.; Raja, M. Manivel; Kamat, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of substrate and post-annealing temperatures on the structure, microstructure, residual stresses and soft magnetic properties of Fe70Co30 thin films was systematically investigated. Microstructural studies reveal that the films are continuous and undergo changes in shape of grain from plate like to spherical resulting in an increase in grain size with the increase in substrate temperature, whereas the post-annealed films show small pores and no significant grain growth till 500 °C. Coercivity (Hc) was found decreasing with both the substrate and post-annealing temperatures; however, the best Hc value of 26 Oe was obtained for the films deposited at substrate temperature of 500 °C. The post-annealed films exhibited relatively higher Hc values. A good combination of high saturation magnetization 4πMs of ~23.2 kG and low coercivity Hc of 26-65 Oe was obtained for the films deposited at substrate temperature of 450-500 °C. Residual stress analysis on films with different substrate temperatures shows the presence of tensile stress. The decrease in tensile stress is attributed to the relaxation of thermal stresses in the films.

  19. Effect of oxygen and associated residual stresses on the mechanical properties of high growth rate Czochralski silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Khaled; Shi, Meirong; Radue, Chantelle; Good, Ethan; Rozgonyi, George

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical properties of Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) crystals grown in vacancy rich regimes with elevated axial oxygen concentrations ranging from ˜6 × 1017 to ˜12 × 1017 atoms/cm3 have been investigated using nano- and micro-indentation techniques. Both hardness and fracture toughness were found to decrease with increasing oxygen concentration, while major differences in mechanical properties were found between the central core and the edge of the high oxygen concentration wafers. Photoluminescence imaging and Nomarski optical microscopy of high-oxygen wafers revealed the presence of a ring and swirl-like distributions of micro defects, including oxidation induced stacking faults. Micro-Raman analysis was used to measure local residual stress profiles associated with these characteristic defects. These results provide a quantitative understanding of the influence of the oxygen content and the associated defects resulting from the sub-optimal growth regimes within the Cz-Si process.

  20. Effect of residual stress on the microstructure of GaN epitaxial films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhu, Yunnong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-04-01

    The stress-free GaN epitaxial films have been directly grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 850 °C, and the effect of different stress on the microstructure of as-grown GaN epitaxial films has been explored in detail. The as-grown stress-free GaN epitaxial films exhibit very smooth surface without any particles and grains, which is confirmed by the smallest surface root-mean-square roughness of 2.3 nm measured by atomic force microscopy. In addition, they also have relatively high crystalline quality, which is proved by the small full-width at half maximum values of GaN(0002) and GaN (10 1 bar 2) X-ray rocking curves as 0.27° and 0.68°, respectively. However, when the growth temperature is lower or higher than 850 °C, internal or thermal stress would be increased in as-grown GaN epitaxial films. To release the larger stress, a great number of dislocations are generated. Many irregular particulates, hexagonal GaN gains and pits are therefore produced on the films surface, and the crystalline quality is greatly reduced consequently. This work has demonstrated the direct growth of stress-free GaN epitaxial films with excellent surface morphology and high crystalline quality by PLD, and presented a comprehensive study on the origins and the effect of stress in GaN layer. It is instructional to achieve high-quality nitride films by PLD, and shows great potential and broad prospect for the further development of high-performance GaN-based devices.

  1. Measurements of residual stress in fracture mechanics coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Hill, Michael R; Nav Dalen, John E

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of residual stress in coupons used for fracture mechanics testing. The primary objective of the measurements is to quantify the distribution of residual stress acting to open (and/or close) the crack across the crack plane. The slitting method and the contour method are two destructive residual stress measurement methods particularly capable of addressing that objective, and these were applied to measure residual stress in a set of identically prepared compact tension (C(T)) coupons. Comparison of the results of the two measurement methods provides some useful observations. Results from fracture mechanics tests of residual stress bearing coupons and fracture analysis, based on linear superposition of applied and residual stresses, show consistent behavior of coupons having various levels of residual stress.

  2. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Loren A.; Michel, David J.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  3. Residual Stress Measurements of Explosively Clad Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Douglas J; Watkins, Thomas R; Hubbard, Camden R; Hill, M. R.; Meith, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum refractory liners were explosively clad into cylindrical pressure vessels, some of which had been previously autofrettaged. Using explosive cladding, the refractory liner formed a metallurgical bond with the steel of the pressure vessel at a cost of induced strain. Two techniques were employed to determine the residual stress state of the clad steel cylinders: neutron diffraction and mechanical slitting. Neutron diffraction is typically nondestructive; however, due to attenuation along the beam path, the cylinders had to be sectioned into rings that were nominally 25 mm thick. Slitting is a destructive method, requiring the sectioning of the cylindrical samples. Both techniques provided triaxial stress data and useful information on the effects of explosive cladding. The stress profiles in the hoop and radial directions were similar for an autofrettaged, nonclad vessel and a clad, nonautofrettaged vessel. The stress profiles in the axial direction appeared to be different. Further, the data suggested that residual stresses from the autofrettage and explosive cladding processes were not additive, in part due to evidence of reverse yielding. The residual stress data are presented, compared and discussed.

  4. Thermal residual stresses in amorphous thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to calculate the internal stresses in a cylindrically shaped polycarbonate (LEXAN-GE) component, subjected to an arbitrary cooling rate, will be described. The differential volume relaxation arising as a result of the different thermal history suffered by each body point was considered as the primary source of stresses build up [1-3]. A numerical routine was developed accounting for the simultaneous stress and structural relaxation processes and implemented within an Ansys® environment. The volume relaxation kinetics was modeled by coupling the KAHR (Kovacs, Aklonis, Hutchinson, Ramos) phenomenological theory [4] with the linear viscoelastic theory [5-7]. The numerical algorithm translates the specific volume theoretical predictions at each body point as applied non-mechanical loads acting on the component. The viscoelastic functions were obtained from two simple experimental data, namely the linear viscoelastic response in shear and the PVT (pressure volume temperature) behavior. The dimensionless bulk compliance was extracted from PVT data since it coincides with the memory function appearing in the KAHR phenomenological theory [7]. It is showed that the residual stress scales linearly with the logarithm of the Biot's number.

  5. FEM simulation of residual stresses induced by laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyre, P.; Sollier, A.; Chaieb, I.; Berthe, L.; Bartnicki, E.; Braham, C.; Fabbro, R.

    2003-08-01

    Benefits from laser Peening have been demonstrated several times in fields like fatigue, wear or stress corrosion cracking. However, in spite of recent work on the calculation of residual stresses, very few authors have considered a finite element method (FEM) approach to predict laser-induced mechanical effect. This comes mainly from the high strain rates involved during LP (10^6 s^{-1}), that necessitate the precise determination of dynamic properties, and also from the possible combination of thermal and mechanical loadings in the case of LP without protective coatings. In this paper, we aim at presenting a global approach of the problem, starting from the determination of loading conditions and dynamic yield strengths, to finish with FEM calculation of residual stress fields induced on a 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel and a 7075 aluminium alloy.

  6. Finite element formulation and analysis for an arterial wall with residual and active stresses.

    PubMed

    Kida, Naoki; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-08-01

    In this study, for predicting arterial function and pathogenesis from a mechanical viewpoint, we develop a continuum mechanical model of an arterial wall that embodies residual and active stresses following a traditional anisotropic passive constitutive law. The residual and active stresses are incorporated into finite element methods based on a two-field variational principle described in the Lagrangian form. The linearisation of nonlinear weak-form equations derived from this variational principle is then described for developing an original finite element algorithm. Numerical simulations reveal the following: (i) residual stresses lead to a reduction in stress gradient regardless of the magnitude of external load; (ii) active stresses help homogenise stress distribution under physiological external load, but this homogeneity collapses under pathological external load; (iii) when residual and active stresses act together, the effect of the residual stresses is relatively obscured by that of the active stresses. We conclude that residual stresses have minor but persistent mechanical effects on the arterial wall under both physiological and pathological external loads; active stresses play an important role in the physiological functions and pathogenesis of arteries, and the mechanical effect of residual stresses is dependent on the presence/absence of active stresses.

  7. Thermal oxidation of medical Ti6Al4V blasted with ceramic particles: Effects on the microstructure, residual stresses and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, M; Barriuso, S; Multigner, M; González-Doncel, G; González-Carrasco, J L

    2016-02-01

    Roughening of Ti6Al4V by blasting with alumina or zirconia particles improves the mechanical fixation of implants by increasing the surface area available for bone/implant apposition. Additional thermal oxidation treatments of the blasted alloy have already shown to be a complementary low-cost solution to enhancing the in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of the alloy. In this work, the effects of oxidation treatment on a grit blasted Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy have been analysed in order to understand the net effect of the combined treatments on the alloy fatigue properties. Synchrotron radiation diffraction experiments have been performed to measure residual stresses before and after the treatments and microstructural and hardness changes have been determined. Although blasting of Ti6Al4V with small spherical zirconia particles increases the alloy fatigue resistance with respect to unblasted specimens, fatigue strength after oxidation decreases below the unblasted value, irrespective of the type of particle used for blasting. Moreover, at 700°C the as-blasted compressive residual stresses (700MPa) are not only fully relaxed but even moderate tensile residual stresses, of about 120MPa, are found beneath the blasted surfaces. Contrary to expectations, a moderate increase in hardness occurs towards the blasted surface after oxidation treatments. This can be attributed to the fact that grit blasting modifies the crystallographic texture of the Ti6Al4V shifting it to a random texture, which affects the hardness values as shown by additional experiments on cold rolled samples. The results indicate that the oxidation treatment performed to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of grit blasted Ti6Al4V should be carried out with caution since the alloy fatigue strength can be critically diminished below the value required for high load-bearing components. PMID:26458115

  8. Thermal oxidation of medical Ti6Al4V blasted with ceramic particles: Effects on the microstructure, residual stresses and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, M; Barriuso, S; Multigner, M; González-Doncel, G; González-Carrasco, J L

    2016-02-01

    Roughening of Ti6Al4V by blasting with alumina or zirconia particles improves the mechanical fixation of implants by increasing the surface area available for bone/implant apposition. Additional thermal oxidation treatments of the blasted alloy have already shown to be a complementary low-cost solution to enhancing the in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of the alloy. In this work, the effects of oxidation treatment on a grit blasted Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy have been analysed in order to understand the net effect of the combined treatments on the alloy fatigue properties. Synchrotron radiation diffraction experiments have been performed to measure residual stresses before and after the treatments and microstructural and hardness changes have been determined. Although blasting of Ti6Al4V with small spherical zirconia particles increases the alloy fatigue resistance with respect to unblasted specimens, fatigue strength after oxidation decreases below the unblasted value, irrespective of the type of particle used for blasting. Moreover, at 700°C the as-blasted compressive residual stresses (700MPa) are not only fully relaxed but even moderate tensile residual stresses, of about 120MPa, are found beneath the blasted surfaces. Contrary to expectations, a moderate increase in hardness occurs towards the blasted surface after oxidation treatments. This can be attributed to the fact that grit blasting modifies the crystallographic texture of the Ti6Al4V shifting it to a random texture, which affects the hardness values as shown by additional experiments on cold rolled samples. The results indicate that the oxidation treatment performed to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of grit blasted Ti6Al4V should be carried out with caution since the alloy fatigue strength can be critically diminished below the value required for high load-bearing components.

  9. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  10. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  11. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  12. THE CONTOUR METHOD: SIMPLE 2-D MAPPING OF RESIDUAL STRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    M. PRIME; A. GONZALES

    2000-06-01

    We present an entirely new method for measuring residual stress that is extremely simple to apply yet more powerful than existing techniques. In this method, a part is carefully cut in two. The contour of the resulting new surface is measured to determine the displacements normal to the surface caused by the release of the residual stresses. Analytically, the opposite of these measured displacements are applied as boundary conditions to the surface in a finite element model. By Bueckner's superposition principle, this gives the original residual stresses normal to the plane of the cut. Unlike other relaxation methods for measuring residual stress, the measured data can be used to solve directly for the stresses without a tedious inversion technique. At the same time, an arbitrary two-dimensional variation in stresses can be determined. We demonstrate the method on a steel specimen with a known residual stress profile.

  13. Residual stress and crack propagation in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yttergren, R.M.F.; Zeng, K.; Rowcliffe, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Residual stress distributions in several laminated ceramic composites were measured by an indentation technique. The material included alumina-zirconia laminated composites, containing strong interfaces, and alumina-porcelain laminated composites with both weak and strong interfaces. The residual stress in these material originates from the mismatch of the thermal properties, differences in elastic properties, and different shrinkage of the laminates during sintering. An experimental technique is presented which gives a direct view of the residual stress state in the materials. Values of residual tensile stress are presented as a function of position relative to the interface in each material.

  14. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  15. Residual Stress Measurements After Proof and Flight: ETP-0403

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Ronald L..

    1997-01-01

    The intent of this testing was to evaluate the residual stresses that occur in and around the attachment details of a case stiffener segment that has been subjected to flight/recovery followed by proof loading. Not measured in this test were stresses relieved at joint disassembly due to out-of-round and interference effects, and those released by cutting the specimens out of the case segment. The test article was lightweight case stiffener segment 1U50715, S/N L023 which was flown in the forward stiffener position on flight SRM 14A and in the aft position on flight SRM24A. Both of these flights were flown with the 3 stiffener ring configuration. Stiffener L023 had a stiffener ring installed only on the aft stub in its first flight, and it had both rings installed on its second flight. No significant post flight damage was found on either flight. Finally, the segment was used on the DM-8 static test motor in the forward position. No stiffener rings were installed. It had only one proof pressurization prior to assignment to its first use, and it was cleaned and proof tested after each flight. Thus, the segment had seen 3 proof tests, two flight pressurizations, and two low intensity water impacts prior to manufacturing for use on DM-8. On DM-8 it received one static firing pressurization in the horizontal configuration. Residual stresses at the surface and in depth were evaluated by both the x-ray diffraction and neutron beam diffraction methods. The x-ray diffraction evaluations were conducted by Technology for Energy Corporation (TEC) at their facilities in Knoxville, TN. The neutron beam evaluations were done by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario. The results showed general agreement with relatively high compressive residual stresses on the surface and moderate to low subsurface tensile residual stresses.

  16. Effect of sputtering pressure on crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided sapphire substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hiroto; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for use in applications such as deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. In the present study, the effect of sputtering pressure on the surface morphology, crystalline quality, and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided a-plane sapphire substrates, which have high-crystalline-quality c-plane AlN thin layers, by pulsed DC reactive sputtering was investigated. The c-axis-oriented AlN films were homoepitaxially grown on nitrided sapphire substrates at sputtering pressures of 0.4–1.5 Pa. Surface damage of the AlN sputtered films increased with increasing sputtering pressure because of arcing (abnormal electrical discharge) during sputtering. The sputtering pressure affected the crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN sputtered films because of a change in the number and energy of Ar+ ions and Al sputtered atoms. The crystalline quality of AlN films was improved by deposition with lower sputtering pressure.

  17. Investigation of residual stresses in shape memory alloy (SMA) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Justin Bradley

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) composites are a class of smart materials in which SMA actuators are embedded in a host matrix. The shape memory effect allows for stress induced phase transformations and large recoverable strains that make SMA composites promising candidates for structural shape/vibration control, impact absorption, aircraft deicing or in-flight airfoil shape control systems. However, the difference in thermal expansion between the SMA and the host material leads to residual stresses during processing. In addition, the SMA transformation from martensite to austenite, or the reverse, also generate stresses. These stresses acting in combination can lead to SMA/polymer interfacial debonding or microcracking of the host matrix. The present work was undertaken to study the behavior of nitinol shape memory alloys embedded in epoxy and glass/epoxy matrices and to investigate the development of residual stresses during their manufacture and actuation. A three-phase concentric cylinder micromechanics model and an SMA composite thermoelastic beam theory were developed to analyze the micromechanical and structural-level thermal and transformational stresses for nitinol composites induced by nitinol wires embedded in a host matrix. A series of warpage experiments were conducted on nitinol composite beams during heating cycles to provide experimental validation of model predictions and to assess their thermoelastic structural behavior under non-mechanical loading. Micromechanical model results indicate that excessive residual hoop stresses in nitino/graphite/epoxy composites leads to radial cracking around the embedded nitinol wires. Based on modeling results, the most important factor in reducing residual stresses (and thereby preventing radial cracking) is increasing the level of recovery strain for the nitinol wire. The SMA composite beam model agrees well with experimental data captured for the nitinol/epoxy beam series. Warpage experiments on nitinol

  18. Grinding Induced Changes in Residual Stresses of Carburized Gears

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaster, Robert A; Boggs, Bryan L; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study performed to measure the change in residual stress that results from the finish grinding of carburized gears. Residual stresses were measured in five gears using the x-ray diffraction equipment in the Large Specimen Residual Stress Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two of the gears were hobbed, carburized, quenched and tempered, but not finished. The remaining three gears were processed similarly, but were finish ground. The residual stresses were measured at 64 different locations on a tooth from each gear. Residual stresses were also measured at fewer points on other teeth to determine the tooth-to-tooth variation. Tooth profile measurements were made of the finished and unfinished gear samples. The results show a fairly uniform and constant compressive residual field in the nonfinished gears. There was a significant reduction in the average residual stress measured in the finished gears. Additionally, there was a significant increase in the variability of the residual stress that was introduced by the grinding process. Analysis of the data suggests a linear relationship between the change in average residual stress and the amount of material removed by the grinding process.

  19. A residual stress study in similar and dissimilar welds

    DOE PAGES

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Goldak, John A.; Aidun, Daryush K.; Coules, Harry E.; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Achuthan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Residual strain distributions in similar and dissimilar welds were measured using neutron diffraction (ND) method. Then, using three strain components, three-dimensional stress states were calculated. The results were used to determine the effect of the martensitic phase transformation and material properties on residual stress (RS) distribution. It was observed that smaller longitudinal RS was induced in the low carbon steel side of dissimilar weld when compared to its similar weld. Also, it was found that the transverse RS near and within the weld zone (WZ) in dissimilar weld exhibited a distinctive trend, with tensile mode reaching the yield strength ofmore » the base metal (BM). In order to characterize the WZ in dissimilar weld, we deployed optical microscopy, hardness, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). This study not only provides further insight into the RS state in similar and dissimilar welds; it also delivers important consequences of phase transformation in the latter case.« less

  20. Overcoming residual stresses and machining distortion in the production of aluminum alloy satellite boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    Distortion frequently occurs during machining of age hardening aluminum alloys due to residual stresses introduced during the quenching step in the heat treatment process. This report quantifies, compares, and discusses the effectiveness of several methods for minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion in aluminum alloys 7075 and 6061.

  1. The relationships between residual stress relaxation and texture development in AZ31 Mg alloys via the vibratory stress relief technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-Siang; Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lai, Hsuan-Han; Kuo, Che-Wei; Wu, Paxon Ti-Yuan; Wu, Weite

    2015-01-15

    A systematic study of residual stress relaxation and the texture evolution of cold-rolled AZ31 Mg alloys using the vibratory stress relief technique with a simple cantilever beam vibration system was performed using a high-resolution X-ray diffractometer and a portable X-ray residual stress analyzer. The effects of vibrational stress excitation on the surface residual stress distribution and on the texture of pole figures (0002) occurring during the vibratory stress relief were examined. Compared with the effects corresponding to the same alloy under non-vibration condition, it can be observed that the uniform surface residual stress distribution and relaxation of the compressive residual stress in the stress concentration zone were observed rather than all of the residual stresses being eliminated. Furthermore, with an increase in the vibrational aging time, the compressive residual stress, texture density, and (0002) preferred orientation increased first and then decreased. It should be underlined that the vibratory stress relief process for the vibrational aging time of more than 10 min is able to weaken the strong basal textures of AZ31 Mg alloys, which is valuable for enhancement of their formability and is responsible for an almost perfect 3D-Debye–Scherrer ring. - Highlights: • 3D-Debye ring about VSR technique is not discussed in the existing literature. • A newly developed VSR method is suitable for small or thin workpieces. • The cosα method accurately and effectively determines the residual stresses. • The VSR technique is valuable for enhancement of their formability. • The texture and preferred orientation change with the vibrational aging time.

  2. Thermoacoustic method for relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Koshovyi, V.V.; Pakhn`o, M.I.; Tsykhan, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a thermoacoustic method for the relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints, present a block diagram of a generator of local thermoacoustic pulses designed for implementation of this method, and describe our experiment aimed at relaxation of residual tensile stresses.

  3. The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.S.; Tanner, D.A.; Truman, C.E.; Paradowska, A.M.; Wimpory, R.C.

    2012-03-15

    The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity

  4. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  5. Nondestructive Testing Residual Stress Using Ultrasonic Critical Refracted Longitudinal Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunguang; Song, Wentao; Pan, Qinxue; Li, Huanxin; Liu, Shuai

    Residual stress has significant impacts on the performance of the mechanical components, especially on its strength, fatigue life and corrosion resistance and dimensional stability. Based on theory of acoustoelasticity, the testing principle of ultrasonic LCR wave method is analyzed. The testing system of residual stress is build. The method of calibration of stress coefficient is proposed in order to improve the detection precision. At last, through experiments and applications on residual stress testing of oil pipeline weld joint, vehicle's torsion shaft, glass and ceramics, gear tooth root, and so on, the result show that it deserved to be studied deeply on application and popularization of ultrasonic LCR wave method.

  6. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  7. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  8. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation. PMID:27179142

  9. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation.

  10. Measurement and theory of the dependence of hardness on residual stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbate, A.; Frankel, J.; Scholz, W.

    1993-05-01

    The Rockwell C hardness (Rc) was measured as a function of position on the three steel rings cut from tubes with different amounts of autofrettage. These rings had different residual stress profiles through the wall that were measured using an ultrasonic technique. An experimental correlation between residual stress and Rc was obtained. In order to model the effects of residual stress on the measured hardness, the Tresca (linear) and the von Mises-Hencky (power) yield criteria were utilized within a model given by Shaw, Hoshi, and Henry that depicts the stress state within a spherical indenter. The von Mises-Hencky method was more successful in matching the data.

  11. Effect of thermal heat stress on energy utilization in two lines of pigs divergently selected for residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Renaudeau, D; Frances, G; Dubois, S; Gilbert, H; Noblet, J

    2013-03-01

    Castrated males from 2 lines of purebred French Large White obtained from a divergent selection experiment for their residual feed intake (RFI) over 7 generations were measured for their energy utilization during thermal acclimation to increased ambient temperature. The RFI(+) line consumed more feed than predicted from its performance, whereas the RFI- line consumed less feed. Each pig was exposed to 24°C for 7 d (P0) and thereafter to a constant temperature of 32°C for 3 consecutive periods of 7 d (P1, P2, P3). Feed intake, feeding behavior parameters, digestibility, components of heat production (HP; measured by indirect calorimetry in respiration chambers), and energy, nitrogen, fat, and water balance were measured in pigs offered feed and water ad libitum and individually housed in respiratory chambers. Two identical respiratory chambers were simultaneously used, and 5 pigs of each line were measured successively. Whatever the trait, the interaction between line and period was not significant (P > 0.10). On average, ADFI was greater in the RFI+ than in the RFI- line (1,945 vs. 1,639 g/d; P = 0.051) in relation to an increase of the mean size of each feeding bout (128 vs. 82 g/visit; P < 0.001). There was no line effect on nutrient and energy digestibility. Total HP tended to be greater in RFI+ than in RFI- lines (1,279 vs. 1,137 kJ·kg BW-0.60·d-1; P = 0.065), which tended to retain more energy (968 vs. 798 kJ·kg BW-0.60·d-1; P = 0.050). The sensible heat loss was greater in RFI+ compared with the RFI- line (644 vs. 560 kJ·kg BW-0.60·d-1; P = 0.020). The RFI+ pigs consumed more water (+981 vs. 657 g·kg BW-0.60·d-1; P = 0.085) and produced more urine (589 vs. 292 g·kg BW-0.60·d-1; P < 0.001) than RFI- pigs, whereas water evaporation was similar for both lines. On average, ME intake and HP declined by about 38% and 20%, respectively, from P0 to P1 (P < 0.001). In contrast to ME intake, HP gradually decreased (P < 0.05) from P1 to P3 in connection with

  12. A stress-free model for residual stress assessment using thermoelastic stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Geoffrey; Dulieu-Barton, Janice M.; Achintha, Mithila; Robinson, Andrew F.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been proposed as a method of obtaining residual stresses. The results of a preliminary study demonstrated that when Al-2024 plate containing holes that were plastically deformed by cold expansion process to 2% and 4% strain the thermoelastic response in the material around the hole was different to that obtained from a plate that had not experienced any plastic cold expansion (i.e. a reference specimen). This observation provides an opportunity for obtaining residual stresses based on TSA data. In many applications a reference specimen (i.e. residual stress free specimen) may not be available for comparison, so a synthetic, digital bitmap has been proposed as an alternative. An elastic finite element model is created using commercially available software Abaqus/Standard and the resultant stress field is extracted. The simulated stress field from the model is mapped onto a grid that matches the TSA pixel data from a physical reference specimen. This stress field is then converted to a ΔT/T field that can be compared to the full-field TSA data. When the reference experimental data is subtracted from the, bitmap dataset the resultant ΔT/T field is approximately zero. Further work proposes replacing the experimental reference data with that from specimens that have undergone cold expansion with the aim of revealing the regions affected by residual stress through a departure from zero in the resultant stress field. The paper demonstrates the first steps necessary for deriving the residual stresses from a general specimen using TSA.

  13. Prediction and Optimization of Residual Stresses on Machined Surface and Sub-Surface in MQL Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xia; Zou, Pan; Li, Beizhi; Rajora, Manik; Shao, Yamin; Liang, Steven Y.

    Residual stress in the machined surface and subsurface is affected by materials, machining conditions, and tool geometry and can affect the component life and service quality significantly. Empirical or numerical experiments are commonly used for determining residual stresses but these are very expensive. There has been an increase in the utilization of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) in recent years in order to reduce the cost and tool/part handling efforts, while its effect on machined part residual stress, although important, has not been explored. This paper presents a hybrid neural network that is trained using Simulated Annealing (SA) and Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LM) in order to predict the values of residual stresses in cutting and radial direction on the surface and within the work piece after the MQL face turning process. Once the ANN has successfully been trained, an optimization procedure, using Genetic Algorithm (GA), is applied in order to find the best cutting conditions in order to minimize the surface tensile residual stresses and maximize the compressive residual stresses within the work piece. The optimization results show that the usage of MQL decreases the surface tensile residual stresses and increases the compressive residual stresses within the work piece.

  14. Influence of ion-plasma treatment on residual stress in the microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushkin, A. S.; Uvarov, I. V.; Amirov, I. I.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of ion-plasma treatment on residual stress in the microcantilever is investigated. The ability of treatment with energy below the sputtering threshold to affect the mechanical stress is shown. It is also demonstrated that a preliminary vacuum thermal annealing of samples reduces the influence of ion bombardment on the residual stress. With the increase of the annealing temperature the effect of ion bombardment disappears.

  15. Issues related to prediction of residual stresses in titanium alloy matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaswamy, P.; Jayaraman, N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a detailed study of residual stresses on the as-processed SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb [0]{sub 8} composite, and SCS-6/Beta-21S composites in unidirectional [0]{sub 4}, cross-ply [0/90]s, and quasi-isotropic [0/{+-}45/90]s lay-ups has been completed. In this study, residual stresses have been measured using x-ray diffraction (Sin{sup 2}{Psi}) technique. We have shown that the use of conventional unit cell models consisting of a quarter fiber surrounded by the matrix material to predict residual stresses for verification of experimental results is inadequate. Such models have successfully predicted the stresses at the fiber-matrix interface. However, experimental work to measure residual stresses have always been on surfaces far away from the interface region. In this paper, the approach taken in extending the conventional unit cell model to the concept of multi-fiber models to predict average stresses are presented. In this process, several modeling issues have been identified. These issues are (i) use of conventional unit models for prediction of average surface residual stresses, (ii) effect of orientation of the sub-surface plies on the residual stresses in the surface ply, (iii) residual stresses in the interior plies, and (iv) constituent material properties.

  16. Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A. ); Holden, T.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  18. Power-law creep and residual stresses in carbopol microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidon, Pierre; Manneville, Sebastien

    We report on the interplay between creep and residual stresses in carbopol microgels. When a constant shear stress σ is applied below the yield stress σc, the strain is shown to increase as a power law of time, γ (t) =γ0 +(t / τ) α , with and exponent α ~= 0 . 38 that is strongly reminiscent of Andrade creep in hard solids. For applied shear stresses lower than some characteristic value of about σc / 10 , the microgels experience a more complex creep behavior that we link to the existence of residual stresses and to weak aging of the system after preshear. The influence of the preshear protocol, of boundary conditions and of microgel concentration on residual stresses is investigated. We discuss our results in light of previous works on colloidal glasses and other soft glassy systems.

  19. Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator Residual Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Brust, Frederick W.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Cheston, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    The structural analyses described in the present report were performed in support of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Critical Initial Flaw Size (CIFS) assessment for the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) common shell segment. An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The Ares system of space launch vehicles is the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration s plan for replacement of the aging space shuttle. The new Ares space launch system is somewhat of a combination of the space shuttle system and the Saturn launch vehicles used prior to the shuttle. Here, a series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on fatigue and fracture life. The results of this effort served as one of the critical load inputs required to perform a CIFS assessment of the same segment.

  20. Relation Between Residual and Hoop Stresses and Rolling Bearing Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-element bearings operated at high speed or high vibration may require a tight interference fit between the bore of the bearing and shaft to prevent rotation of the bearing bore around the shaft and fretting damage at the interfaces. Previous work showed that the hoop stresses resulting from tight interference fits can reduce bearing lives by as much as 65 percent. Where tight interference fits are required, case-carburized steel such as AISI 9310 or M50 NiL is often used because the compressive residual stresses inhibit subsurface crack formation and the ductile core inhibits inner-ring fracture. The presence of compressive residual stress and its combination with hoop stress also modifies the Hertz stress-life relation. This paper analyzes the beneficial effect of residual stresses on rolling-element bearing fatigue life in the presence of high hoop stresses for three bearing steels. These additional stresses were superimposed on Hertzian principal stresses to calculate the inner-race maximum shearing stress and the resulting fatigue life of the bearing. The load-life exponent p and Hertz stress-life exponent n increase in the presence of compressive residual stress, which yields increased life, particularly at lower stress levels. The Zaretsky life equation is described and is shown to predict longer bearing lives and greater load- and stress-life exponents, which better predicts observed life of bearings made from vacuum-processed steel.

  1. Polder Effects on Sediment-to-Soil Conversion: Water Table, Residual Available Water Capacity, and Salt Stress Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Radimy, Raymond Tojo; Dudoignon, Patrick; Hillaireau, Jean Michel; Deboute, Elise

    2013-01-01

    The French Atlantic marshlands, reclaimed since the Middle Age, have been successively used for extensive grazing and more recently for cereal cultivation from 1970. The soils have acquired specific properties which have been induced by the successive reclaiming and drainage works and by the response of the clay dominant primary sediments, that is, structure, moisture, and salinity profiles. Based on the whole survey of the Marais Poitevin and Marais de Rochefort and in order to explain the mechanisms of marsh soil behavior, the work focuses on two typical spots: an undrained grassland since at least 1964 and a drained cereal cultivated field. The structure-hydromechanical profiles relationships have been established thanks to the clay matrix shrinkage curve. They are confronted to the hydraulic functioning including the fresh-to-salt water transfers and to the recording of tensiometer profiles. The CE1/5 profiles supply the water geochemical and geophysical data by their better accuracy. Associated to the available water capacity calculation they allow the representation of the parallel evolution of the residual available water capacity profiles and salinity profiles according to the plant growing and rooting from the mesophile systems of grassland to the hygrophile systems of drained fields. PMID:23990758

  2. Mode-coupling analysis of residual stresses in colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, S; Fuchs, M; Voigtmann, Th

    2014-07-21

    We present results from computer simulation and mode-coupling theory of the glass transition for the nonequilibrium relaxation of stresses in a colloidal glass former after the cessation of shear flow. In the ideal glass, persistent residual stresses are found that depend on the flow history. The partial decay of stresses from the steady state to this residual stress is governed by the previous shear rate. We rationalize this observation in a schematic model of mode-coupling theory. The results from Brownian-dynamics simulations of a glassy two-dimensional hard-disk system are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the theory. PMID:24841537

  3. Neutron diffractometer RSND for residual stress analysis at CAEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Hong; Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Chen, Yanzhou; Pang, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Changsheng; Gong, Jian; Liu, Yaoguang

    2015-05-01

    Residual Stress Neutron Diffractometer (RSND) has been built at China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP) in Mianyang. Due to its excellent flexibility, the residual stress measurement on different samples, as well as in-situ study for materials science, can be carried out through RSND. The basic tests on its intensity and resolution and some preliminary experimental results under mechanical load, demonstrate the high quality of RSND.

  4. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  5. Effects of vacuum annealing treatment on microstructures and residual stress of AlSi10Mg parts produced by selective laser melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tian; Wang, Linzhi; Tan, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM)-fabricated AlSi10Mg parts were heat-treated under vacuum to eliminate the residual stress. Microstructure evolutions and tensile properties of the SLM-fabricated parts before and after vacuum annealing treatment were studied. The results show that the crystalline structure of SLM-fabricated AlSi10Mg part was not modified after the vacuum annealing treatment. Additionally, the grain refinement had occurred after the vacuum annealing treatment. Moreover, with increasing of the vacuum annealing time, the second phase increased and transformed to spheroidization and coarsening. The SLM-produced parts after vacuum annealing at 300∘C for 2 h had the maximum ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS) and elongation, while the elastic modulus decreased significantly. In addition, the tensile residual stress was found in the as-fabricated AlSi10Mg samples by the microindentation method.

  6. Modeling of the effects of different substrate materials on the residual thermal stresses in the aluminum nitride crystal grown by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2009-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical finite element modeling method is applied to compare interfacial residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystals grown by using different substrates such as silicon carbide, boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum carbide, and niobium carbide. A dimensionless coordinate system is used which reduces the numbers of computations and hence simplifies the stress analysis. All components of the stress distribution, both in the film and in the substrate, including the normal stress along the growth direction as well as in-plane normal stresses and shear stresses are fully investigated. This information about the stress distribution provides insight into understanding and controlling the AlN single crystal growth by the sublimation technique. The normal stress in the film at the interface along the growth direction and the shear stresses are zero except at the edges, whereas in-plane stresses are nonzero. The in-plane stresses are compressive when TaC and NbC substrates are used. A small compressive stress might be beneficial in prohibiting crack growth in the film. The compressive stress in the AlN is lower for the TaC substrate than that for the NbC. Tensile in-plane stresses are formed in the AlN for 6H-SiC, BN, and W substrates. This tensile stress in the film is detrimental as it will assist in the crack growth. The stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film at the interface is compressive in nature when TaC and NbC are used as a substrate. This causes the film to bend downward (i.e., convex shape) and assist it to adhere to the substrate. The AlN film curves upward or in a concave shape when SiC, BN, and W substrates are used since the stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film is tensile at the interface and this may cause detachment of the film from the substrate.

  7. Residual stress and plastic anisotropy in indented 2024-T351 aluminum disks

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Prime, Michael B; Saurabh, Kabra; Brown, Donald W; Pagliaro, Pierluigi; Backlund, Peter; Shaw, Sanjiv; Criss, Everett

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proven that generating a well defined residual stress state using the indented disk approach is an excellent way to validate experimental and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting residual stresses. The previous studies dealt with indented stainless steel disks, and included experimental determination of residual stresses using the Contour Method and neutron diffraction measurements. The measured residual stress states showed good agreement between the techniques, and a Finite Element Model predicted residual stress state based upon material properties determined form standard tension and compression/tension tests was also in good agreement with the measurements. In the present work, disks of 2024-T351 Aluminum were investigated. As before, the residual stress profile was measured using neutron diffraction and the Contour Method and Finite Element Modeling was employed to predict the residual stress profile. Analysis and comparison of the three techniques were complicated by the fact that the experimental data shows evidence of plastic anisotropy and strong Bauschinger effect within the indented disks.

  8. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  9. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-09-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  10. Residual-stress characterization by use of elastic-wave-scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Domany, E.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of a state of residual stress in a material can impair its structural quality by adversely affecting its elastic limit, yield point, etc. In this paper we derive the appropriate equations for the use of elastic waves to probe an inhomogeneous state of residual stress. As in other treatments of ultrasonic residual stress measurement, we start with nonlinear effects and require knowledge of third order elastic constants. Unlike other treatments, which relate these nonlinear effects to small relative changes in propagation speed of an incident wave, we identify these effects as a source of scattering of the incident wave. Like other treatments, one difficulty with ultrasonic residual stress measurements is separating small residual stress effects from other effects. However, we will give an example of at least one class of problems where this separation appears possible using our approach. It is demonstrated that elastic wave propagation in the presence of non-uniform residual stress can be viewed as a scattering problem. One should note that in various limits, such as that of short wavelength, this scattering problem (as well as any other) can be treated by optical methods (ray bendings, diffraction, etc.). The special features of a scattering situation are expected to be important for smaller wavelengths, and therefore their experimental observability is questionable, and can be resolved only by careful and thorough measurements.

  11. Effect of residual stress on nematic domains in BaFe2-x Ni x As2 studied by angular magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hu; Wenliang, Zhang; Yuan, Wei; Xiaotian, Zhang; Cong, Ren; Lei, Shan; Yi-feng, Ya; Huiqian, Luo; Shiliang, Li

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the angular magnetoresistance of iron pnictides BaFe2-x Ni x As2, which shows clear 180 degree periodicity as fitted by a cosine function. In the x = 0.065 sample, the phase of the two-fold symmetry changes 90 degrees above the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition temperature T s. Since the phase at low temperature is associated with the rotation of orthorhombic domains by magnetic field, we show that even vacuum grease can push the presence of orthorhombic domains at temperatures much higher than T s. Our results suggest that residual stress may have significant effects in studying the nematic orders and its fluctuations in iron pnictides. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07020300), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB821400 and 2011CBA00110), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374011, 11374346, and 11305257).

  12. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Residual Stress from Diamagnetic Velocity Shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2010-11-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the parallel velocity (and parallel velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [1] we demonstrated with gyrokinetic (GYRO) simulations that TAM pinching from the diamagnetic level shear in the ExB velocity could provide the residual stress needed for spontaneous toroidal rotation. Here we show that the shear in the diamagnetic velocities themselves provide comparable residual stress (and level of stabilization). The sign of the residual stress, quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion power flow (M/P), depends on the signs of the various velocity shears as well as ion (ITG) versus electron (TEM) mode directed turbulence. The residual stress from these temperature and density gradient diamagnetic velocity shears is demonstrated in global gyrokinetic simulation of ``null'' rotation DIIID discharges by matching M/P profiles within experimental error. 8pt [1] R.E. Waltz, G.M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F.L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009).

  13. Influence of Reel Lay on Residual Stress and Ultimate Bearing Capacity of Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hongqian; Wang, Liquan

    Reel lay is a fast and cost-effective way to install subsea pipelines. During reel lay, pipe's repeated plastic bending produces residual stress, which has influence on pipe's ultimate bearing capacity. First, the deformation of pipe in reel lay is analyzed, and the cyclic bending stages are simplified for convenience of theoretical research. Based on the finite element method (FEM), the Ramberg-Osgood model is adopted to describe material's mechanical property with kinematic hardening rule, and five bending stages are simulated. Further, the influence of material parameters and geometry parameters on pipe's residual stress is studied. Finally, the effect of residual stress on pipe's external pressure bearing capacity and tensile capacity is analyzed. Some important conclusions can be drawn: (1) the influence of diameter-thick ratio on residual stress is small, and material parameters' effect on the residual stress is large; (2) the influence of residual stress on pipe's external pressure bearing capacity is small, but its influence on tensile capacity is large.

  14. Residual Stresses in LENS-Deposited AISI 410 Stainless Steel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Felicellli, S D; Pratt, Phillip R

    2008-01-01

    The residual stress in thin plate components deposited by the laser engineered net shaping (LENS{reg_sign}) process was investigated experimentally and numerically. Neutron diffraction mapping was used to characterize the residual stress in LENS-deposited AISI 410 stainless steel thin wall plates. Using the commercial welding software SYSWELD, a thermo-mechanical three-dimensional finite element model was developed, which considers also the effect of metallurgical phase transformations. The model was employed to predict the temperature history and the residual stress field during the LENS process. Several simulations were performed with the geometry and process parameters that were used to build the experimental samples. The origin of the residual stress distribution is discussed based on the thermal histories of the samples, and the modeling results are compared with measurements obtained by neutron diffraction mapping.

  15. Residual stresses in weld overlay tubes: A finite element study

    SciTech Connect

    Taljat, B.; Zacharia, T.; Wang, X.L.; Keiser, J.R.; Feng, Z.; Jirinec, M.J.

    1997-01-03

    Residual stresses and strains in a tube with circumferential weld overlay were analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The objective of this work was to develop and verify a FE model, to determine the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in the weld overlay tube, and to evaluate the significance of two contributing factors to residual stress: (1) difference in material properties between tube and weld material, and (2) thermal gradients in the weld. An axisymmetric FE model was developed to simulate the circumferential two-layer welding process of alloy 625 overlay on SA210 tube. The first layer was modeled as a gas metal arc welding process with filler metal, whereas the autogenous gas tungsten arc welding process was modeled for the second layer. Neutron diffraction technique was used to experimentally determine residual elastic strains in the weld overlay tube. Comparison with the FE results shows overall good agreement. Both the experimental and FE results show high compressive stresses at the inside tube surface and high tensile stresses in the weld overlay. This suggests that weld overlay may be used to relieve tensile or produce compressive stresses at the inside tube surface, which is significant for applications where crack initiation is found at the root pass of the joining weld.

  16. Correlation between residual stresses and the strength differential effect in PM 6061Al-15 vol% SiC{sub w} composites: experiments, models and predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, R.; Bruno, G. . E-mail: bruno@ill.fr; Gonzalez-Doncel, G.

    2004-11-08

    An experimental and theoretical study of the strength differential effect (SDE) observed in uniaxial tensile/compressive testing in discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites has been carried out. The predictions have been compared with experimental data obtained in three 6061Al-15 vol% SiC{sub w} composites. The study has been carried out using two subsequent steps. In the first one, the analysis of the residual stress, RS, state (assumed to be the ultimate responsible of the SDE) has been conducted using an extended Eshelby equivalent inclusion methodology. A good agreement between the experimental values as obtained by neutron diffraction and the values predicted by the Eshelby model is obtained when the real composites microstructure (orientation and distribution of the reinforcement) is taken into consideration. The effective temperature drop responsible of the RS state in each composite has been calculated from this model. In the second step, the SDE values obtained in each of the composites is predicted in two ways. The Eshelby-Withers (EW) model, based on Eshelby's theory, has been used. In parallel, a new method, which combines the mechanisms of load transfer, as described by a Shear-Lag type model, with the RS has been developed. The characteristics of these two models are discussed. It is shown that the results derived from them fit very well with the experimental data presented. All these findings together allow showing that the load transfer mechanism introduces a correction factor, which compares the RS directly with the SDE. It is concluded that RS and the mechanism of load transfer are eventually the origin of the SDE in discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites.

  17. Residual thermal strains and stresses in nickel aluminide matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saigal, A.; Kupperman, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Thermally induced residual strains and stresses developed during postfabrication cooling in Saphikon/NiAl and tungsten/NiAl high-temperature composites are investigated through three-dimensional elastoplastic finite-element analyses. Average axial and transverse strains in the matrix are found to be tensile and compressive, respectively, and similar for both Saphikon and W-fiber-reinforced NiAl composites. It is suggested that the residual matrix stresses and strains are controlled more by the low-matrix yield stress than by the fiber/matrix expansion mismatch. Residual thermal strains in the matrix of these composites are measured by using a neutron-diffraction technique; the measured axial and transverse strains in the matrix are found to be in agreement with the computed values.

  18. On Taylor-Series Approximations of Residual Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Although subgrid-scale models of similarity type are insufficiently dissipative for practical applications to large-eddy simulation, in recently published a priori analyses, they perform remarkably well in the sense of correlating highly against exact residual stresses. Here, Taylor-series expansions of residual stress are exploited to explain the observed behavior and "success" of similarity models. Until very recently, little attention has been given to issues related to the convergence of such expansions. Here, we re-express the convergence criterion of Vasilyev [J. Comput. Phys., 146 (1998)] in terms of the transfer function and the wavenumber cutoff of the grid filter.

  19. Modeling of residual stresses by HY-100 weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Taljat, B.; Radhakrishnan, B.

    1997-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in a HY-100 steel disk, induced by GTA spot welding, was analyzed by finite element (FE) formulations and measured by neutron diffraction (ND). Computations used temperature- dependent thermophysical and mechanical properties. FE model predictions are in good agreement with ND data in far heat affected zone (HAZ) and in base metal. Predicted residual stresses in fusion zone and near HAZ were higher than those measured by ND. This discrepancy was attributed to microstructural changes and associated material properties in the HAZ and fusion zone due to phase transformations during the weld thermal cycle.

  20. Residual Stress Assessment in Thin Angle Ply Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddour, A. S.; Al-Hassani, S. T. S.; Hinton, M. J.

    2003-05-01

    This preliminary study aims to investigate the residual stresses developed in hot cured thin-walled angle-ply filament wound tubes made of E-glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy materials. The residual stresses were estimated from change in geometry of these tubes when axially slitted at ambient temperature. Three basic deformation modes; namely opening up, closing-in and twisting, were observed and these depended on the winding angle, material and wall thickness. The residual stresses were also determined from hoop and axial strain gauges mounted on both the inner and outer surfaces at various locations around the tube. The stresses were compared with theoretical prediction based upon a linear thermo-elastic analysis. Both the predicted and measured values were found to increase with increasing hoop stiffness but there was a large discrepancy between the predicted and measured data, reaching a factor of 5 for the thinnest case. When compared with predicted failure stresses, the experimentally determined stresses were some 15% of the computed compressive strength.

  1. Residual stress induced stabilization of martensite phase and its effect on the magnetostructural transition in Mn-rich Ni-Mn-In/Ga magnetic shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Kushwaha, Pallavi; Scheibel, F.; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Barman, S. R.; Acet, M.; Felser, C.; Pandey, Dhananjai

    2015-07-01

    The irreversibility of the martensite transition in magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) with respect to the external magnetic field is one of the biggest challenges that limits their application as giant caloric materials. This transition is a magnetostructural transition that is accompanied with a steep drop in magnetization (i.e.,Δ M ) around the martensite start temperature (Ms) due to the lower magnetization of the martensite phase. In this Rapid Communication, we show that Δ M around Ms in Mn-rich Ni-Mn-based MSMAs gets suppressed by two orders of magnitude in crushed powders due to the stabilization of the martensite phase at temperatures well above Ms and the austenite finish (Af) temperatures due to residual stresses. Analysis of the intensities and the FWHM of the x-ray powder-diffraction patterns reveals stabilized martensite phase fractions as 97 % , 75 % , and 90 % with corresponding residual microstrains as 5.4 % , 5.6 % , and 3 % in crushed powders of the three different Mn-rich Ni-Mn alloys, namely, M n1.8N i1.8I n0.4 , M n1.75N i1.25Ga , and M n1.9N i1.1Ga , respectively. Even after annealing at 773 K, the residual stress stabilized martensite phase does not fully revert to the equilibrium cubic austenite phase as the magnetostructural transition is only partially restored with a reduced value of Δ M . Our results have a very significant bearing on the application of such alloys as inverse magnetocaloric and barocaloric materials.

  2. Residual stress distribution in oxide films formed on Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawabe, T.; Sonoda, T.; Furuya, M.; Kitajima, S.; Takano, H.

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate residual the stress distribution in oxides formed on zirconium alloys, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed on the oxides formed on Zircaloy-2 after autoclave treatment at a temperature of 360° C in pure water. The use of a micro-beam XRD and a micro-sized cross-sectional sample achieved the detailed local characterization of the oxides. The oxide microstructure was observed by TEM following the micro-beam XRD measurements. The residual compressive stress increased in the vicinity of the oxide/metal interface of the pre-transition oxide. Highly oriented columnar grains of a monoclinic phase were observed in that region. Furthermore, at the interface of the post-first transition oxide, there was only a small increase in the residual compressive stress and the columnar grains had a more random orientation. The volume fraction of the tetragonal phase increased with the residual compressive stress. The results are discussed in terms of the formation and transition of the protective oxide.

  3. ETP-0492, Measured Residual Stresses in CYL S/N 53 Fretted Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    This test report presents the results of a residual stress survey of the inner clevis leg of lightweight cylinder SIN 053 as described by ETP-0492. The intent of this testing was to evaluate the residual stresses that occur in and around the inner clevis leg at the capture feature contact zone during a normal flight cycle. Lightweight case cylinder segment IU50717, S/N L053 from Flight STS-27 exhibited fretting around the contact zone of the inner clevis leg and the capture feature of the field joint. Post flight inspection revealed several large fitting pits on the inside of the inner clevis leg. This cylinder was assigned for both residual stress and metallurgical evaluation. This report is concerned only with the residual so= evaluations. The effects of glass bead cleaning and fi=ing were evaluated using the x-ray diffraction method.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of the residual bone angulation on implant-supported fixed prosthesis in mandibular posterior edentulism. Part II: 3-D finite element stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Akça, K; Iplikçioğlu, H

    2001-01-01

    Buccolingual angulation of the mandibular posterior edentulous region may affect the prosthetic load conditions, so as to cause high stress concentrated areas that may easily lead to failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various predetermined buccolingual angulation values on stress distribution in the mandibular posterior edentulous region restored with implant-supported fixed partial dentures, using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Stress analyses were performed applying 400N oblique force to implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Stress analyses indicated tensile stress values on the buccal surface and compressive stress values on the lingual surface of cortical bone were increased as the angulation of the edentulous bone increased (especially corresponding to the cervical region of the implants). Compressive stress values, observed where two implants were placed at the second premolar and second molar regions (5-7 design) and first and second molar regions (6-7 design), respectively, were very close to or even exceeded the ultimate compressive strength of bone. It is concluded that when a definite buccolingual angulation is added to other existing risk factors such as bruxism, placing an implant for every missing tooth might reduce the high stress concentration areas. PMID:11813664

  5. Non-destructive measurement and role of surface residual stress monitoring in residual life assessment of a steam turbine blading material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu-Gaunkar, Gajanana; Rawat, M. S.; Prasad, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Steam turbine blades in power generation equipment are made from martensitic stainless steels having high strength, good toughness and corrosion resistance. However, these steels are susceptible to pitting which can promote early failures of blades in the turbines, particularly in the low pressure dry/wet areas by stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue. Presence of tensile residual stresses is known to accelerate failures whereas compressive stresses can help in delaying failures. Shot peening has been employed as an effective tool to induce compressive residual stresses which offset a part of local surface tensile stresses in the surface layers of components. Maintaining local stresses at stress raisers, such as pits formed during service, below a threshold level can help in preventing the initiation microcracks and failures. The thickness of the layer in compression will, however, depend of the shot peening parameters and should extend below the bottom of corrosion pits. The magnitude of surface compressive drops progressively during service exposure and over time the effectiveness of shot peening is lost making the material susceptible to micro-crack initiation once again. Measurement and monitoring of surface residual stress therefore becomes important for assessing residual life of components in service. This paper shows the applicability of surface stress monitoring to life assessment of steam turbine blade material based on data generated in laboratory on residual surface stress measurements in relation to fatigue exposure. An empirical model is proposed to calculate the remaining life of shot peened steam turbine blades in service.

  6. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  7. Thermoelastoplastic and residual stress analysis during induction hardening of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanian, S.

    1995-12-01

    A theoretical model was developed to predict the thermoelastoplastic and residual stresses developed in a round steel bar during induction hardening. For numerical analysis, a quasi-static, uncoupled thermoelastoplastic solution based on the hyperbolic sine law of Tien and Richmond was formulated. The properties of the material were assumed to be temperature dependent. The phase transformation was considered in the numerical calculation, and the results were compared with the case where phase transformation is avoided. The cylinder was heated rapidly; once the temperature of the outer surface exceeded the transformation temperature, the cylinder was rapidly cooled. Accordingly, in the numerical calculation, only the area at the vicinity of the outer surface was assumed to transform to martensite. The results showed that the compressive residual stresses at the vicinity of the outer surface were considerably higher than the tensile stresses at the center.

  8. Distortion and Residual Stress Control in Integrally Stiffened Structure Produced by Direct Metal Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shih-Yung; Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2007-01-01

    2-D thermo-mechanical model developed to characterize distortion and residual stresses in integral structure produced by DMD. Demonstrated as a tool to guide experimental development of DMD fabrication process for aero structures. Distortion and residual stresses are local to deposit. Most distortion develops during deposition of the first few layers; Little change in distortion or residual stresses after fifth deposit layer Most of distortion is localized just beneath the build. Thicker build plates and the use of build lands results in greatest decrease in levels of distortion. Pre-straining shown to reduce distortion. Difficult to implement, particularly for complex stiffener arrays. Clamp position has complex effect on distortion and stresses. Overall distortion reduced with decreasing clamp clearance. Larger clamp clearances induce bending. Use of pre-heat and active cooling show minor influence on panel distortion. Generate changes in thermal gradients in the build plate.

  9. Residual Stresses in Porcelain-veneered Zirconia Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarri, Marta; Stappert, Christian F. J.; Wolff, Mark S.; Thompson, Van P.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Compressive stress has been intentionally introduced into the overlay porcelain of zirconia-ceramic prostheses to prevent veneer fracture. However, recent theoretical analysis has predicted that the residual stresses in the porcelain may be also tensile in nature. This study aims to determine the type and magnitude of the residual stresses in the porcelain veneers of full-contour fixed-dental prostheses (FDPs) with an anatomic zirconia coping design and in control porcelain with the zirconia removed using a well-established Vickers indentation method. Methods Six 3-unit zirconia FDPs were manufactured (NobelBiocare, Gothenburg, Sweden). Porcelain was hand-veneered using a slow cooling rate. Each FDP was sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane for Vickers indentations (n = 143; load = 9.8 N; dwell time = 5 s). Tests were performed in the veneer of porcelain-zirconia specimens (bilayers, n = 4) and porcelain specimens without zirconia cores (monolayers, n = 2). Results The average crack lengths and standard deviation, in the transverse and radial directions (i.e. parallel and perpendicular to the veneer/core interface, respectively), were 67 ± 12 μm and 52 ± 8 μm for the bilayers and 64 ± 8 μm and 64 ± 7 μm for the monolayers. These results indicated a major hoop compressive stress (~40 to 50 MPa) and a moderate radial tensile stress (~10 MPa) in the bulk of the porcelain veneer. Significance Vickers indentation is a powerful method to determine the residual stresses in veneered zirconia systems. Our findings revealed the presence of a radial tensile stress in the overlay porcelain, which may contributed to the large clinical chip fractures observed in these prostheses. PMID:22578663

  10. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and

  11. A micromechanical study of residual stresses in functionally graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, M.; Gu, P.; Maewal, A.; Asaro, R.J.

    1997-08-01

    A physically based computational micromechanics model is developed to study random and discrete microstructures in functionally graded materials (FGMs). The influences of discrete microstructure on residual stress distributions at grain size level are examined with respect to material gradient and FGM volume percentage (within a ceramic-FGM-metal three-layer structure). Both thermoelastic and thermoplastic deformation are considered, and the plastic behavior of metal grains is modeled at the single crystal level using crystal plasticity theory. The results are compared with those obtained using a continuous model which does not consider the microstructural randomness and discreteness. In an averaged sense both the micromechanics model and the continuous model give practically the same macroscopic stresses; whereas the discrete micromechanics model predicts fairly high residual stress concentrations at the grain size level (i.e., higher than 700 MPa in 5--6 vol% FGM grains) with only a 300 C temperature drop in a Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} FGM system. Statistical analysis shows that the residual stress concentrations are insensitive to material gradient and FGM volume percentage. The need to consider microstructural details in FGM microstructures is evident. The results obtained provide some insights for improving the reliability of FGMs against fracture and delamination.

  12. Iron GH2036 alloy residual stress thermal relaxation behavior in laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Zhou, W. F.; Xu, S. D.; Yuan, S. Q.; Ren, N. F.; Wang, Y.; Zhan, Q. B.

    2015-11-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) has a significant effect on the fatigue performance of Iron GH2036 alloy by inducing a deep compressive residual stress field. The effects of isothermal annealing treatments on Iron GH2036 alloy compressive residual stress after laser shock processing at various temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 650 °C were studied comprehensively using experimental and simulation methods. The thermal stability of compressive residual stress induced by LSP was investigated. The residual stress distributions of original and processed specimens were measured by the X-ray diffraction method. The results showed that the experimental measurements were well consistent with the simulation data. Residual stress of laser shock processing Iron GH2036 alloy had released but not completely released at the selected temperatures and during the initial exposure period (less than 30 min); the thermal relaxation magnitude was large and increased with the rise of applied temperature. We infer that the main mechanism of thermal relaxation is the mechanism involving rearrangement and annihilation of dislocation.

  13. Long-Term Stability of Residual Stress Improvement by Water Jet Peening Considering Working Processes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Osawa, Yusuke; Itoh, Shinsuke; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2013-06-01

    To prevent primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), water jet peening (WJP) has been used on the welds of Ni-based alloys in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Before WJP, the welds are machined and buffed in order to conduct a penetrant test (PT) to verify the weld qualities to access, and microstructure evolution takes place in the target area due to the severe plastic deformation. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP might be unstable under elevated temperatures because of the high dislocation density in the compressive stress layer. Therefore, the stability of the compressive residual stresses caused by WJP was investigated during long-term operation by considering the microstructure evolution due to the working processes. The following conclusions were made: The compressive residual stresses were slightly relaxed in the surface layers of the thermally aged specimens. There were no differences in the magnitude of the relaxation based on temperature or time. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP were confirmed to remain stable under elevated temperatures. The stress relaxation at the surface followed the Johnson-Mehl equation, which states that stress relaxation can occur due to the recovery of severe plastic strain, since the estimated activation energy agrees very well with the self-diffusion energy for Ni. By utilizing the additivity rule, it was indicated that stress relaxation due to recovery is completed during the startup process. It was proposed that the long-term stability of WJP under elevated temperatures must be assessed based on compressive stresses with respect to the yield stress. Thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis was performed to predict the effect of creep strain. After 100 yr of simulated continuous operation at 80% capacity, there was little change in the WJP compressive stresses under an actual operating temperature of 623 K. Therefore, the long-term stability of WJP during actual operation was

  14. An approximate method for residual stress calculation infunctionally graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, T.L.

    1999-06-02

    Thermal residual stresses in functionally graded materials(FGMs) arise primarily from nonlinear spatial variations in the thermalexpansion coefficient, but can be significantly adjusted by variations inmodulus. Thermoelastic analysis of FGMs is complicated by such modulusgradients. A class of problems for which thermal stress solutions formaterials with constant modulus can be used as a basis for approximationsfor FGMs is discussed. The size of the error in this approximation due togradients in elastic modulus is investigated. Analytical and finiteelement solutions for the thermal stresses in various FGM geometries arecompared to results from this approximate method. In a geometry ofpractical interest, a right cylinder graded along the z-axis, the errorfor a Ni-Al2O3 FGM was found to be within 15 percent for all gradientsconsidered. The form of the approximation makes it easier to identifydesirable types of spatial nonlinearity in expansion coefficient andvariations in modulus: this would allow the manipulation of the locationof compressive stresses.

  15. Dual-axis hole-drilling ESPI residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Steinzig, Michael; Schajer, Gary

    2008-01-01

    A novel dual-axis ESPI hole-drilling residual stress measurement method is presented. The method enables the evaluation of all the in-plane normal stress components with similar response to measurement errors, significantly lower than with single-axis measurements. A numerical method is described that takes advantage of, and compactly handles, the additional optical data that are available from the second measurement axis. Experimental tests were conducted on a calibrated specimen to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results supported theoretical expectations.

  16. Residual stresses calculation in autofrettage using variable material properties method

    SciTech Connect

    Jahed, H.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Autofrettaged cylinders are used for variety of applications in chemical and nuclear industries where large internal pressures have to be withstood. Autofrettage is in the process by which beneficial residual stresses are introduced into thick-walled tubes by initially subjected the tube to high internal pressure which causes inelastic deformation. Here, the variable material properties method is employed to obtain elastic-plastic analysis of an autofrettaged tube. This method develops inelastic solution from the elastic solution by treating the material properties as field variables. The distribution of these parameters are obtained in an iterative manner as a part of the solution. An energy based scheme is used to update these variables. The residual stress field of autofrettaged tubes based on the actual material curve and isotropic and kinematic hardening models are obtained. The results are shown to be in good agreement with the published experimental and finite element results.

  17. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: An NDE Tool for the Residual Stress Assessment of Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2000-01-01

    During manufacturing, certain propulsion components that will be used in a cyclic fatigue environment are fabricated to contain compressive residual stresses on their surfaces because these stresses inhibit the nucleation of cracks. Overloads and elevated temperature excursions cause the induced residual stresses to dissipate while the component is still in service, lowering its resistance to crack initiation. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has focused on employing the Thermoelastic Stress Analysis technique (TSA, also recognized as SPATE: Stress Pattern Analysis by Thermal Emission) as a tool for monitoring the residual stress state of propulsion components. TSA is based on the fact that materials experience small temperature changes when they are compressed or expanded. When a structure is cyclically loaded (i.e., cyclically compressed and expanded), the resulting surface-temperature profile correlates to the stress state of the structure s surface. The surface-temperature variations resulting from a cyclic load are measured with an infrared camera. Traditionally, the temperature amplitude of a TSA signal has been theoretically defined to be linearly dependent on the cyclic stress amplitude. As a result, the temperature amplitude resulting from an applied cyclic stress was assumed to be independent of the cyclic mean stress.

  18. Mechanical relaxation of localized residual stresses associatedwith foreign object damage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B.L.; Chen, X.; Peters, J.O.; Hutchinson, J.H.; Ritchie,R.O.

    2002-05-01

    Foreign-object damage associated with the ingestion ofdebris into aircraft turbine engines can lead to a marked degradation inthe high-cycle fatigue life of turbine components. This degradation isgenerally considered to be associated with the premature initiation offatigue cracks at or near the damage sites; this is suspected to be dueto, at least in part, the impact-induced residual stress state, which canbe strongly tensile in these locations.

  19. Present status of residual stress instrument at the HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Myung-Kook; Em, Vyacheslav; Lee, Chang-Hee; Cheon, Jong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Hyun; Nam, Uk-Won; Kong, Kyung-Nam

    2006-11-01

    The new residual stress instrument was installed recently at beam port ST-1 at the HANARO reactor in KAERI. The instrument is equipped with 200 mm high position-sensitive detector. The shielding drum for monochromator allows take-off angle in the range of 2 θM=0-60°. A horizontally focusing bent perfect crystal Si monochromator with (2 2 0) reflecting plane was found to be the most appropriate for the instrument.

  20. Residual stresses determination in textured substrates for plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capek, J.; Pala, Z.; Kovarik, O.

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution, we have striven to respond to the desire of obtaining the residual stress tensor in the both cold-rolled and hot-rolled substrates designated for deposition of thermal coatings by plasma spraying. Residual stresses play an important role in the coating adhesion to the substrate and, as such, it is a good practice to analyse them. Prior to spraying, the substrate is often being grit blasted. Residual stresses and texture were quantitatively assessed in both virgin and grit blasted sample employing three attitudes. Firstly without taking preferred orientation into account, secondly from measurements of interplanar lattice spacings of planes with high Miller indices using MoKα radiation. And eventually, by calculating anisotropic elastic constants as a weighted average between single-crystal and X-ray elastic constants with weighting being done according to the amount of textured and isotropic material in the irradiated volume. In the ensuing verification analyses, it was established that the latter approach is suitable for materials with either very strong or very weak presence of texture.

  1. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-04

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction.Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge registered software, is based on data taken from Outeiro and al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature.Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R and D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  2. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction. Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge® software, is based on data taken from Outeiro & al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature. Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R&D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  3. Residual stress, mechanical behavior and electrical properties of Cu/Nb thin-film multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, A.J. Jr.; Hundley, M.F.; Jervis, T.R.; Kung, H.H.; Scarborough, W.K.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Embury, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    Effect of compositional wavelength (modulation) on residual stress, electrical resistivities and mechanical properties of Cu/Nb thin-film multilayers sputtered onto single-crystal Si substrates, was evaluated. Electrical resistivities were measured down to 4 K using a standard 4-point probe. Differential specimen curvature was used to determine residual stress, and a microprobe was used to obtain hardness and elastic modulus. Profilometry, ion-beam analysis and TEM were used. Hardness of the Cu-Nb multilayers increased with decreasing compositional wavelength so that the layered structures had hardness values in excess of either constituent and the hardness predicted by the rule of mixtures. A peak in net residual compressive stress of the multilayers was observed at a compositional wavelength of 100 nm. No resistivity plateau was observed within the composition wavelength range studied.

  4. Neutron diffraction measurements of time-dependent residual stresses generated by severe thermomechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; Hubbard, Camden R

    2009-01-01

    Residual stresses were generated by severe thermomechanical deformation in an aluminum alloy plate. The evolution of the residual stresses during natural aging was investigated by neutron diffraction up to 10,000h. A data reduction method was developed to eliminate microstructure influences (solute variations) on the lattice spacing changes, thereby allowing the determination of the long-range macroscopic residual stresses. The residual stress decreased ({approx}25MPa) with time due to the microstructural modification within the deformed region during natural aging.

  5. Residual stress alleviation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods to eliminate or reduce residual stresses in aircraft metal structures reinforced by filamentary composites are discussed. Residual stress level reductions were achieved by modifying the manufacturing procedures used during adhesive bonding. The residual stress alleviation techniques involved various forms of mechanical constraint which were applied to the components during bonding. Nine methods were evaluated, covering a wide range in complexity. All methods investigated during the program affected the residual stress level. In general, residual stresses were reduced by 70 percent or more from the stress level produced by conventional adhesive bonding procedures.

  6. Determination and modeling of residual stress in functionally graded WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahvilian, Leila

    Gradual variations in composition and/or structure through the volume of functionally graded materials (FGMs) generally result in corresponding continuous spatial variations in mechanical/physical properties, and often in significant residual stresses that develop during processing. Due to inhomogeneous properties in these materials, residual stress measurement in FGMs can be a very challenging problem. In this study, residual stresses in functionally graded cemented tungsten carbide (FG-WC-Co) were investigated by numerical, analytical and experimental approaches by means of a layer removal technique. The numerical method consisted of finite element analysis (FEA) modeling for the FGM plate, in order to calculate residual stress distribution over the volume and to develop a method for predicting residual stress levels in closely related materials. The analytical procedure embodied a mathematical approach to determine residual stress distributions, and analytically determined values are compared with those obtained from FEA modeling and experimental results. The experimental approach consisted of fabricating and heat treating FG-WC-Co flat samples, then measuring strain changes by strain gauge after each sequential layer removal from the opposite side of the specimen from the graded region. Good agreement was found between analytical, numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, thermal residual stress distribution in FG-WC-Co hollow cylinder was examined with an emphasis on the effects of key variables, the gradient profile and the gradient thickness, on the magnitude and distribution of the stress field. An analytical direct solution based on solving the governing equations of a cylinder composed of a uniform inner core and a functionally graded outer shell was developed. The cylindrical compound was considered as two separate elements: homogeneous cylinder and functionally graded shell. Material properties, such as the elastic modulus and the coefficient of

  7. Quantification of Residual Stress from Photonic Signatures of Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 +/- 0.54 x 10(exp -12)/Pa. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented. Keywords: Glass, fused silica, photoelasticity, residual stress

  8. On the use of the hole-drilling technique for residual stress measurements in thin plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. W.; Nelson, D. V.

    1992-01-01

    The strain gage blind hole-drilling technique may be used to determine residual stresses at and below the surface of components. In this paper, the hole-drilling analysis methodology for thick plates is reviewed, and experimental data are used to evaluate the methodology and to assess its applicability to thin plates. Data on the effects of gage pattern, surface preparation, hole spacing, hole eccentricity, and stress level are also presented.

  9. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William T.

    2014-02-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10-12 Pa-1. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  10. Phase composition and residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Ashmarin, A. A.; Ryabenko, B. V.; Ivanova, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray study of the phase composition and residual stresses distribution in two-layer APS coatings showed that the ceramic layer consists of t-ZrO2 phase with tetragonal lattice and the metal underlayer γ-solid solution based on nickel. In the transition zone thickness of ∼ 100 pm as the distance from the surface was revealed a gradual transition from t-ZrO2 to γ-solid solution. Increase in the specific volume of the metal underlayer resulting TGO growing leads to the formation of this layer high compressive stresses up to 600 MPa. In this case, the ceramic layer contains tensile stress up to 200 MPa.

  11. Modeling of residual thermal stresses for aluminum nitride crystal growth by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2007-09-01

    Residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystal, grown on tungsten as a crucible material, was investigated using a numerical study. It has been demonstrated that a three-dimensional, instead of a two-dimensional, formulation predicts significantly greater values of stress. Dimensionless coordinates were used to essentially simplify the stress analysis and reduce the number of calculations. In addition, thermoelasticity approach simplifies the study of stresses for a nonstationary temperature field. The stress in the AlN film along the thickness or [0001] growth direction is essentially zero but the in-plane stress is large. The stress at the corner of the film is much higher due to stress concentration and could cause formation of microcracks. The stress in the film is tensile while that in the substrate is compressive, which causes a reversal of the stress across the interface. Separation or delamination of the film from the substrate could occur due to this reversal of the stress at the interface. The stress decreases as the thickness of the film increases or the thickness of the substrate decreases. Thus, formation of microscopic cracks in the film could be avoided by using a thinner substrate. The analysis on interaction of neighboring islands in order to simulate coalescence of island growth indicates stress concentration at the boundaries of the islands, which could produce threading dislocations and hence polycrystalline growth. The analysis of the effect of misorientation of the neighboring grains on the residual thermal stress in the film has shown that a large stress can develop at the grain boundary and can lead to grain boundary cracking.

  12. Residual strain change resulting from stress corrosion in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and strains have been shown to play a fundamental role in determining the elastic behavior of engineering materials, yet the effect of these strains on brittle and elastic behavior of rocks remains unclear. In order to evaluate the impact of stored elastic strains on fracture propagation in rock, we undertook a four-month-long three-point bending test on three large 1100 x 100 x 100 mm Carrara Marble samples. This test induced stable low stress conditions in which strains were concentrated at the tip of a saw cut and pre-cracked notch. A corrosive environment was created at the tip of the notch on two samples (M2 and M4) by dripping calcite saturated water (pH ~ 7.5-8). Sample M5 was loaded in the same way, but kept dry. Samples were unloaded prior to failure, and along with an additional non-loaded reference sample (M0), cored into cylindrical subsamples (ø = 50 mm, h = 100 mm) before being tested for changes in residual elastic strains at the SALSA neutron diffractometer at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France. Three diffraction peaks corresponding to crystallographic planes hkl (110), (104) and (006) were measured in all three spatial directions relative to the notch. Shifts in the diffraction peak position (d) with respect to a strain free state are indicative of intergranular strain, while changes in the width of the peak (FWHM) reflect changes in intragranular strain. We observe distinctly different patterns in residual and volumetric strains in hkℓ (104) and (006) for the dry M5 and wet tested samples (M2 and M4) indicating the presence of water changes the deformation mechanism, while (110) is strained in compression around 200 μstrain in all samples. A broadening of the diffraction peaks (006) and (110) in front of the crack tip is observed in M2 and M4, while M5 shows no changes in the peak width throughout the depth of the sample. We suggest water present at the crack tip increased the rate of corrosion, allowing a

  13. Microstructural residual stress in particle-filled dental composite.

    PubMed

    Prejzek, Ondřej; Spaniel, Miroslav; Mareš, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to develop a micromechanical model of a particle-filled dental composite focused on the residual stress (RS) field developed during the curing process in its microstructure. A finite element model of a representative volume element of filler and resin was developed, and volumetric shrinkage was simulated during the curing process. Four material models (von Mises plasticity model, Drucker-Prager plasticity model, von Mises plasticity model with stress relaxation and Drucker-Prager plasticity with stress relaxation) of the polymer resin were built to assess the influence of the material model on the resulting internal stress. The relationship between the curing process and the magnitude of the stress components will be described, and an analysis of the post-curing state of the material in particular microstructure locations will be conducted in this study. Obtained RS is comparable to the stresses developed in the material under the external load. The substantial dependence on the choice of material model for resin is to be observed, and the suitability of particular models is discussed.

  14. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual stresses near unannealed welds in anhydrous ammonia nurse tanks.

    PubMed

    Becker, A T; Chumbley, L S; Goettee, D; Russell, A M

    2014-01-01

    Neutron diffraction analysis was employed to measure residual stresses near welds in used anhydrous ammonia nurse tanks. Tensile residual stresses contribute to stress corrosion cracking of nurse tanks, which can cause tanks to release toxic ammonia vapor. The analysis showed that tensile residual stresses were present in the tanks measured, and the magnitudes of these stresses approached the yield strength of the steel. Implications for agricultural safety and health are discussed.

  15. Measurement of residual stresses on ceramic materials with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Ruud, C.O.; Fitting, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    A fast x-ray diffraction technique has been developed for measuring the residual stresses with high spatial resolution in ceramic materials. This resolution is limited by the mean size of grains and the radiation type. The effective diffraction elastic constants were experimentally determined for alumina as (E/l+{nu})){sub (1016)} = 200 GPa. The accuracy of XRD measurement of residual stresses with the spatial resolution of 170 {mu}m and precision {plus_minus} 15 MPa was verified experimentally by strain gauge measurements. The stress field around a singular Kovar pin brazed to alumina was asymmetric with high tangential stresses in the vicinity of the pin decreasing with the distance from the pin.

  16. Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour of Turbine Disc Assembly in the Presence of Residual Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricic, Luke Anthony

    A comprehensive three dimensional coupled thermo-mechanical finite element study is performed on turbine blade attachments in gas turbine engines. The effects of the self-generated centrifugal forces of the disc and the associated blades, thermal loads, and shot peening residual are all considered in this thesis. Three aspects of the work were accordingly examined. The first was concerned with the coupled thermo-mechanical stress analysis and load sharing between the teeth of the fir-tree root. The second was devoted to the development of a complete model incorporating the effect of shot peening residual stresses upon the developed stress state. The effectiveness of shot peening treatment in response to cyclic thermo-mechanical loadings at the contact interface has also been studied. The third was concerned with the validation of some aspects of the developed models analytically using closed form solutions and experimentally using photoelasticity.

  17. Interplay Between Residual Stresses, Microstructure, Process Variables and Engine Block Casting Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Anthony; D'Elia, Francesco; Ravindran, Comondore; Sediako, Dimitry; Murty, B. S.; MacKay, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The replacement of nodular cast iron with 319 type aluminum (Al) alloys in gasoline engine blocks is an example of the shift towards the use of lighter alloys in the automotive industry. However, excessive residual stress along the cylinder bore may lead to bore distortion, significantly reducing engine operating efficiency. In the current study, microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stress were characterized along the cylinder bridge of engine blocks following thermal sand reclamation (TSR), T7 heat treatment, and service testing of the casting. Neutron diffraction was effectively used to quantify the residual stress along both the Al cylinder bridge and the adjacent gray cast iron cylinder liners in the hoop, radial, and axial orientations with respect to the cylinder axis. The results suggest that an increase in cooling rate along the cylinder caused a significant refinement in microstructure at the bottom of the cylinder. In turn, this suggested an increase in alloy strength at the bottom of the cylinder relative to the top. This increased strength at the bottom of the cylinder likely reduced the susceptibility of the cylinder to rapid relief of residual stress at elevated temperature. In contrast, the coarse microstructure at the top of the cylinder likely triggered stress relief at an elevated temperature.

  18. Eddy Current Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment in Shot-Peened Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, M. P.; Yu, F.; Nagy, P. B.

    2005-04-01

    Shot peening and other mechanical surface enhancement methods improve the fatigue resistance and foreign-object damage tolerance of metallic components by introducing beneficial near-surface compressive residual stresses and hardening the surface. However, the fatigue life improvement gained via surface enhancement is not explicitly accounted for in current engine component life prediction models because of the lack of accurate and reliable nondestructive methods that could verify the presence of compressive near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened hardware. In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated components. This technique is based on the so-called piezoresistivity effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of electrical resistivity. We found that, in contrast with most other materials, surface-treated nickel-base superalloys exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, i.e., at decreasing penetration depths. Experimental results are presented to illustrate that the excess frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity of shot-peened nickel-base superalloys can be used to estimate the absolute level and penetration depth of the compressive residual stress layer both before and after partial thermal relaxation.

  19. Method and apparatus for determination of material residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J. (Inventor); Flom, Yury (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for the determination of residual stress in a material sample consisting of a sensor coil, adjacent to the material sample, whose resistance varies according to the amount of stress within the material sample, a mechanical push-pull machine for imparting a gradually increasing compressional and tensional force on the material sample, and an impedance gain/phase analyzer and personal computer (PC) for sending an input signal to and receiving an input signal from the sensor coil is presented. The PC will measure and record the change in resistance of the sensor coil and the corresponding amount of strain of the sample. The PC will then determine, from the measurements of change of resistance and corresponding strain of the sample, the point at which the resistance of the sensor coil is at a minimum and the corresponding value and type of strain of the sample at that minimum resistance point, thereby, enabling a calculation of the residual stress in the sample.

  20. Neutron diffraction residual stress studies for aero-engine component applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, K.; Small, C.

    1991-12-01

    Computer graphics for a presentation describing how Rolls-Royce is refining the method of residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction to suit the characteristic stress fields of components are presented. Results to date are given. An outline of how this residual stress data is to be used in developing stress models for critical rotating components is given.

  1. The formation mechanism and the influence factor of residual stress in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    Residual stresses generated in cutting process have important influences on workpiece performance. The paper presents a method of theoretical analysis in order to explicate the formation mechanism of residual stresses in cutting. An important conclusion is drawn that the accumulated plastic strain is the main factor which determines the nature and the magnitude of surface residual stresses in the workpiece. On the basis of the analytical model for residual stress, a series of simulations for residual stress prediction during cutting AISI 1045 steel are implemented in order to obtain the influences of cutting speed, depth of cut and tool edge radius on surface residual stress in the workpiece. And these influences are explained from the perspective of formation mechanism of residual stress in cutting. The conclusions have good applicability and can be used to guide the parameters selection in actual production.

  2. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulnessmore » of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (σ/E = 7 · 10⁻⁵) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (σ/E = 14 · 10⁻⁵).« less

  3. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (σ/E = 7 · 10⁻⁵) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (σ/E = 14 · 10⁻⁵).

  4. A method for incorporating three-dimensional residual stretches/stresses into patient-specific finite element simulations of arteries.

    PubMed

    Pierce, David M; Fastl, Thomas E; Rodriguez-Vila, Borja; Verbrugghe, Peter; Fourneau, Inge; Maleux, Geert; Herijgers, Paul; Gomez, Enrique J; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2015-07-01

    The existence of residual stresses in human arteries has long been shown experimentally. Researchers have also demonstrated that residual stresses have a significant effect on the distribution of physiological stresses within arterial tissues, and hence on their development, e.g., stress-modulated remodeling. Through progress in medical imaging, image analysis and finite element (FE) meshing tools it is now possible to construct in vivo patient-specific geometries and thus to study specific, clinically relevant problems in arterial mechanics via FE simulations. Classical continuum mechanics and FE methods assume that constitutive models and the corresponding simulations start from unloaded, stress-free reference configurations while the boundary-value problem of interest represents a loaded geometry and includes residual stresses. We present a pragmatic methodology to simultaneously account for both (i) the three-dimensional (3-D) residual stress distributions in the arterial tissue layers, and (ii) the equilibrium of the in vivo patient-specific geometry with the known boundary conditions. We base our methodology on analytically determined residual stress distributions (Holzapfel and Ogden, 2010, J. R. Soc. Interface 7, 787-799) and calibrate it using data on residual deformations (Holzapfel et al., 2007, Ann. Biomed. Eng. 35, 530-545). We demonstrate our methodology on three patient-specific FE simulations calibrated using experimental data. All data employed here are generated from human tissues - both the aorta and thrombus, and their respective layers - including the geometries determined from magnetic resonance images, and material properties and 3-D residual stretches determined from mechanical experiments. We study the effect of 3-D residual stresses on the distribution of physiological stresses in the aortic layers (intima, media, adventitia) and the layers of the intraluminal thrombus (luminal, medial, abluminal) by comparing three types of FE simulations

  5. Auto-calibration principles for two-dimensional residual stress measurements by Barkhausen noise technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikalova, Ulana; Schreiber, Jürgen; Hillmann, Susanne; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2014-02-01

    The magnetic Barkhausen Noise (BN) is well suited to evaluate the effects of mechanical stresses of ferromagnetic materials, e.g. the indirect detection of residual stress states. The most common causes for the occurrence of residual stresses are manufacturing processes, such as casting, welding, machining, forming, heat treatment, etc., consecutive repairs and design changes, and installation or assembly and overloads during the operating life of a construction. A significant calibration effort based on a set of reference values and/or test samples is needed for these measurements, which require a great deal of time and material resources. Additionally, it is impossible to determine the stress states of different components (σxx and σyy) at the surface. Therefore, a new auto-calibration method was developed to analyze two-dimensional stresses. A fixed calibration function based on defined parameters (determined experimentally) was applied. To adjust the auto-calibration function to the experimental reference values by varying functional parameters, a large number of measurement points were used. We present a method that can calculate, based on the multi-dimensional stress state at the measuring point, the stress components σxx and σyy for two perpendicular magnetization directions using the Barkhausen Noise effect.

  6. Residual stresses in design, fabrication, assessment and repair. PVP-Volume 327

    SciTech Connect

    Warke, R.W.; Dong, P.; Dermenjian, A.

    1996-12-01

    Residual stresses introduced during fabrication, particularly those induced by welding processes, are often a significant concern in the structural integrity of pressure vessels and piping. They are rarely treated explicitly in design, and unrealistically conservative assumptions regarding their distribution are commonly adopted in flaw assessment practice. In recent years there has been renewed interest in understanding their development and true influence on structural integrity. This has been enabled by increases in computational power and innovations in modeling and measurement. Improvements in the sophistication and accuracy of traditional methods (e.g., sectioning and hole-drilling) have also been observed. Recent progress in the application of these techniques and new insights into the mechanisms of residual stress development are reflected by the various papers in this volume. The subject matter has been categorized as follows: (1) modeling techniques; (2) measurement techniques; (3) structural integrity effects; (4) residual stresses in repair welds; and (5) residual stresses in pressure vessels. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  7. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  8. Influence of thick-walled cylinders length on the residual stresses generated during the single-cycle mandrelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, V. F.; Boznak, A. O.; Kim, A. B.; Arlyapov, A. Yu

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents methodology and results of experimental study by Sachs method the effect of length of mandrelled thick-walled cylinders made of steel grade 50 (0.5% C) with 5 mm diameter hole, outer diameter of 15 and 25 mm on residual stresses. Based on the review of studies, it was noted that this effect may be both due to uneven process of mandrelling along the cylinder length and due to zero axial residual stresses on its faces. It was found that the length of cylinders has the strongest influence on axial residual stresses. With allowances between 0.9 and 7.1% and length reduction from 40 to 10 mm, the largest absolute value of axial residual stresses decreases from 210 to 50 MPa. It was noted that when the outer diameter of cylinders is 15 mm their length significantly influence on both hoop and radial residual stresses. With the above-mentioned decrease in cylinders length, absolute values of hoop and radial residual stresses in the region adjacent to the hole, depending on the mandrelling allowance, increase (from -135 to -205 MPa and from -45 to 55 MPa respectively, when allowance is 7.1%), decrease (from -315 to -235 MPa and from -135 to -95 MPa respectively, when allowance is 0.9%) and remain almost unchanged (when allowance is 3.4%). Impact of length on these stresses is weak when the outer diameter of cylinders is 25 mm.

  9. Weld Residual Stress and Distortion Analysis of the ARES I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury; Dawicke, David; Cheston, Derrick; Phillips, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The Ares system of space launch vehicles is the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration s plan for replacement of the aging space shuttle. The new Ares space launch system is somewhat of a combination of the space shuttle system and the Saturn launch vehicles used prior to the shuttle. Here, a series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on fatigue and fracture life. While the main focus of this paper is a discussion of the weld modeling procedures and results for the USS, a short summary of the CIFS assessment is provided.

  10. Residual Stress Measurement and Calibration for A7N01 Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints by Using Longitudinal Critically Refracted (LCR) Wave Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qimeng; Chen, Jia; Gou, Guoqing; Chen, Hui; Li, Peng; Gao, W.

    2016-08-01

    Residual stress measurement and control are highly important for the safety of structures of high-speed trains, which is critical for the structure design. The longitudinal critically refracted wave technology is the most widely used method in measuring residual stress with ultrasonic method, but its accuracy is strongly related to the test parameters, namely the flight time at the free-stress condition (t 0), stress coefficient (K), and initial stress (σ0) of the measured materials. The difference of microstructure in the weld zone, heat affected zone, and base metal (BM) results in the divergence of experimental parameters. However, the majority of researchers use the BM parameters to determine the residual stress in other zones and ignore the initial stress (σ0) in calibration samples. Therefore, the measured residual stress in different zones is often high in errors and may result in the miscalculation of the safe design of important structures. A serious problem in the ultrasonic estimation of residual stresses requires separation between the microstructure and the acoustoelastic effects. In this paper, the effects of initial stress and microstructure on stress coefficient K and flight time t 0 at free-stress conditions have been studied. The residual stress with or without different corrections was investigated. The results indicated that the residual stresses obtained with correction are more accurate for structure design.

  11. Residual Stress Measurement and Calibration for A7N01 Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints by Using Longitudinal Critically Refracted ( LCR) Wave Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qimeng; Chen, Jia; Gou, Guoqing; Chen, Hui; Li, Peng; Gao, W.

    2016-10-01

    Residual stress measurement and control are highly important for the safety of structures of high-speed trains, which is critical for the structure design. The longitudinal critically refracted wave technology is the most widely used method in measuring residual stress with ultrasonic method, but its accuracy is strongly related to the test parameters, namely the flight time at the free-stress condition ( t 0), stress coefficient ( K), and initial stress (σ0) of the measured materials. The difference of microstructure in the weld zone, heat affected zone, and base metal (BM) results in the divergence of experimental parameters. However, the majority of researchers use the BM parameters to determine the residual stress in other zones and ignore the initial stress (σ0) in calibration samples. Therefore, the measured residual stress in different zones is often high in errors and may result in the miscalculation of the safe design of important structures. A serious problem in the ultrasonic estimation of residual stresses requires separation between the microstructure and the acoustoelastic effects. In this paper, the effects of initial stress and microstructure on stress coefficient K and flight time t 0 at free-stress conditions have been studied. The residual stress with or without different corrections was investigated. The results indicated that the residual stresses obtained with correction are more accurate for structure design.

  12. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  13. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium E ×B velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or "profile shear" in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) E ×B and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a "null" toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the E ×B shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger "diffusive" parallel velocity shear driven component and

  14. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.; Hayward, Maurice

    2014-02-18

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup −12} Pa{sup −1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  15. Effects of oxygen partial pressure and annealing temperature on the residual stress of hafnium oxide thin-films on silicon using synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debaleen; Sinha, Anil Kumar; Chakraborty, Supratic

    2016-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) technique is employed here to estimate the residual stress of < 10 nm thin hafnium oxide film deposited on Si (100) substrate at different argon/oxygen ratios using reactive rf sputtering. A decrease in residual stress, tensile in nature, is observed at higher annealing temperature for the samples deposited with increasing argon ratio in the Ar/O2 plasma. The residual stress of the films deposited at higher pAr (Ar:O2 = 4:1) is also found to be decreased with increasing annealing temperature. But the stress is more or less constant with annealing temperature for the films deposited at lower Ar/O2 (1:4) ratio. All the above phenomena can be explained on the basis of swelling of the interfacial layer and enhanced structural relaxation in the presence of excess Hf in hafnium oxide film during deposition.

  16. Residual Stress Analysis in Deep Drawn Twinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steels Using Neutron Diffraction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Lee, Junghoon; Lee, Sunghak; Woo, Wanchuck; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2014-04-01

    In Twinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, delayed fracture occurs due to residual stresses induced during deep drawing. In order to investigate the relation between residual stresses and delayed fracture, in the present study, residual stresses of deep drawn TWIP steels (22Mn-0.6C and 18Mn-2Al-0.6C steels) were investigated using the finite element method (FEM) and neutron diffraction measurements. In addition, the delayed fracture properties were examined by dipping tests of cup specimens in the boiled water. In the FEM analysis, the hoop direction residual stress was highly tensile at cup edge, and the delayed fracture was initiated by the separation of hoop direction and propagated in an axial direction. According to the neutron diffraction analysis, residual stresses in 18Mn-2Al-0.6C steel were about half the residual stresses in 22Mn-0.6C steel. From the residual strain measurement using electron back-scatter diffraction, formation of deformation twins caused a lot of grain rotation and local strain at the grain boundaries and twin boundaries. These local residual strains induce residual stress at boundaries. Al addition in TWIP steels restrained the formation of deformation twins and dynamic strain aging, resulting in more homogeneous stress and strain distributions in cup specimens. Thus, in Al-added TWIP steels, residual stress of cup specimen considerably decreased, and delayed fracture resistance was remarkably improved by the addition of Al in TWIP steels.

  17. On the thermally-induced residual stresses in thick fiber-thermoplastic matrix (PEEK) cross-ply laminated plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shoufeng; Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method for calculating thermally-induced residual stresses in laminated plates is applied to cross-ply PEEK laminates. We considered three cooling procedures: slow cooling (uniform temperature distribution); convective and radiative cooling; and rapid cooling by quenching (constant surface temperature). Some of the calculated stresses are of sufficient magnitude to effect failure properties such as matrix microcracking.

  18. On the thermally-induced residual stresses in thick fiber-thermoplastic matrix (PEEK) cross-ply laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.; Nairn, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    An analytical method for calculating thermally-induced residual stresses in laminated plates is applied to cross-ply PEEK laminates. The authors considered three cooling procedures: slow cooling (uniform temperature distribution); convective and radiative cooling; and rapid cooling by quenching (constant surface temperature). Some of the calculated stresses are of sufficient magnitude to effect failure properties such as matrix microcracking.

  19. Residual Stress Analysis of Cold-Sprayed Copper Coatings by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenya; Yang, Kang; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhou, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis on the residual stress evolution of cold-sprayed copper coatings on Cu and Al substrates was performed. To investigate the influences of particle velocity, temperature and material combination on the final residual stresses, an integrated frame of calculation was proposed based on the simulation results obtained from the developed thermo-mechanically coupled Eulerian model. In a single Cu splat, generally speaking, the maximum residual stress and plastic deformation are concentrated at the outside contact zone rather than at the center point of initial impact. The action of friction shear between the particle and substrate during impacting should be considered as one of the essential factors on the final residual stress. And the states of residual stresses can vary significantly depending on the material combination, particle velocity, and temperature. In a single pass Cu coating, the residual stress fluctuates across the coating and there exists both compressive stress and tensile stress within the coating. At a certain range of impacting velocities, the resultant residual stresses increase with the increase of particle velocity. The present simulated results are related to the reported experiments by others, showing that the residual stress states and stress change trend are different from some of the reported results.

  20. Through-thickness determination of phase composition and residual stresses in thermall barrier coatings using high- energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Weyant, , C. M.; Almer, J. D.; Faber, K. T.; Stony Brook Univ.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy X-rays were used to determine the local phase composition and residual stresses through the thickness of as-sprayed and heat-treated plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat produced with through-thickness segmentation cracks. The as-sprayed residual stresses reflected the combined influence of quenching stresses from the plasma spray process, thermal expansion mismatch between the topcoat, bond coat and substrate, and stress relief from the segmentation cracks. Heat treatments led to the formation of a thermally grown oxide (TGO) which was in compression in the plane, as well as relief of quenching stresses and development of a stress gradient in the YSZ topcoat. The high-energy X-ray technique used in this study revealed the effects that TGO and segmentation cracks have on the in-plane stress state of the entire coating.

  1. Analytical solutions for determining residual stresses in two-dimensional domains using the contour method

    PubMed Central

    Kartal, Mehmet E.

    2013-01-01

    The contour method is one of the most prevalent destructive techniques for residual stress measurement. Up to now, the method has involved the use of the finite-element (FE) method to determine the residual stresses from the experimental measurements. This paper presents analytical solutions, obtained for a semi-infinite strip and a finite rectangle, which can be used to calculate the residual stresses directly from the measured data; thereby, eliminating the need for an FE approach. The technique is then used to determine the residual stresses in a variable-polarity plasma-arc welded plate and the results show good agreement with independent neutron diffraction measurements. PMID:24204187

  2. Residual stress delaying phase transformation in Y-TZP bio-restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud; Hanan, Jay C.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering favorable residual stress for the complex geometry of bi-layer porcelain-zirconia crowns potentially prevents crack initiation and improves the mechanical performance and lifetime of the dental restoration. In addition to external load, the stress field depends on initial residual stress before loading. Residual stress is the result of factors such as the thermal expansion mismatch of layers and compliance anisotropy of zirconia grains in the process of sintering and cooling. Stress induced phase transformation in zirconia extensively relaxes the residual stress and changes the stress state. The objective of this study is to investigate the coupling between tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformations and residual stress. Residual stress, on the surface of the sectioned single load to failure crown, at 23 points starting from the pure tetragonal and ending at a fully monoclinic region were measured using the micro X-ray diffraction sin2 ψ method. An important observation is the significant range in measured residual stress from a compressive stress of -400 MPa up to tensile stress of 400 MPa and up to 100% tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation.

  3. Residual parallel Reynolds stress due to turbulence intensity gradient in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Hennequin, P.; Diamond, P. H.; McDevitt, C. J.; Garbet, X.; Bourdelle, C.

    2010-11-15

    A novel mechanism for driving residual stress in tokamak plasmas based on k{sub ||} symmetry breaking by the turbulence intensity gradient is proposed. The physics of this mechanism is explained and its connection to the wave kinetic equation and the wave-momentum flux is described. Applications to the H-mode pedestal in particular to internal transport barriers, are discussed. Also, the effect of heat transport on the momentum flux is discussed.

  4. Stress Free Temperature Testing and Residual Stress Calculations on Out-of-Autoclave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Tate, LaNetra C.; Danley, Susan; Sampson, Jeff; Taylor, Brian; Miller, Sandi

    2012-01-01

    Future launch vehicles will require the incorporation large composite parts that will make up primary and secondary components of the vehicle. NASA has explored the feasibility of manufacturing these large components using Out-of-Autoclave impregnated carbon fiber composite systems through many composites development projects. Most recently, the Composites for Exploration Project has been looking at the development of a 10 meter diameter fairing structure, similar in size to what will be required for a heavy launch vehicle. The development of new material systems requires the investigation of the material properties and the stress in the parts. Residual stress is an important factor to incorporate when modeling the stresses that a part is undergoing. Testing was performed to verify the stress free temperature with two-ply asymmetric panels. A comparison was done between three newly developed out of autoclave IM7 /Bismalieimide (BMI) systems. This paper presents the testing results and the analysis performed to determine the residual stress of the materials.

  5. Modeling and validation of residual stress distribution in an HSLA-100 disk

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Zhu, Y.Y.; Zacharia, T.; Fields, R.J.; Prask, H.J.; Brand, P.C.; Blackburn, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The residual stress distribution in a GTA spot we 100 steel disk was analyzed using thermomechanically uncoupled and semi-coupled finite element (FE) formulations and measured with the neutron diffraction technique. The computations used temperature-dependent the and mechanical properties of the base metal. The thermal analysis was based on the heat conduction formulation with the Gaussian heat input from the arc. The semi-coupled approach is an effective alternative to the fully coupled approach in which the incompatibility in the thermal and mechanical time increments often leads to numerical convergence difficulties. Convergence was achieved in the semi-coupled approach where a larger time increment for temperature calculation was automatically divided into some sub-intervals for the thermal stress calculation. The temperature, deformation configurations, and state variables were updated at the end of the temperature increment. The predictions from the FE models are in very good agreement with the neutron measurement results in the far heat-affected zone (HAZ) and in the base metal. Both models over-predicted the residual stress field in the fusion zone and near HAZ as measured by the neutron diffraction method. The discrepancy could be attributed to the changes in microstructures and material properties in the HAZ and fusion zone due to phase transformations during the welding thermal cycle. The formation of cracks in the fusion zone is another factor that possibly contributes to the lower measured residual stress values.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Thermomechanical Matrix Residual Stresses Incurred During MMC Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, much effort has been spent examining the residual stress-strain states of advanced composites. Such examinations are motivated by a number of significant concerns that affect composite development, processing, and analysis. The room-temperature residual stress states incurred in many advanced composite systems are often quite large and can introduce damage even prior to the first external mechanical loading of the material. These stresses, which are induced during the cooldown following high-temperature consolidation, result from the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the fiber and matrix. Experimental techniques commonly used to evaluate composite internal residual stress states are non-mechanical in nature and generally include forms of x-ray and neutron diffraction. Such approaches are usually complex, involving a number of assumptions and limitations associated with a wide range of issues, including the depth of penetration, the volume of material being assessed, and erroneous effects associated with oriented grains. Furthermore, and more important to the present research, these techniques can assess only "single time" stress in the composite. That is, little, if any, information is obtained that addresses the time-dependent point at which internal stresses begin to accumulate, the manner in which the accumulation occurs, and the presiding relationships between thermoelastic, thermoplastic, and thermoviscous behaviors. To address these critical issues, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed and implemented an innovative mechanical test technique to examine in real time, the time-dependent thermomechanical stress behavior of a matrix alloy as it went through a consolidation cycle.

  7. Thermal Stability of Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, A.; Angerer, P.; Oberwinkler, B.

    2016-03-01

    The need for light weight design while maintaining a high safety is essential for many components, especially in the aircraft industry. Therefore, it's important to consider every aspect to reduce weight, improve fatigue life and maintain safety of crucial components. Residual stresses are a major factor which can positively influence components and fulfil all three requirements. However, due to the inconstancy of the behaviour of residual stresses during the life time of a component, residual stresses are often neglected. If the behaviour of residual stresses could be described reliably over the entire life time of a component, residual stresses could be taken into account and components could be optimized even further. Mechanical and thermal loads are the main reason for relaxation of residual stresses. This work covers the thermal stability of residual stresses in Ti-6Al-4V components. Therefore, exposure tests at raised temperatures were performed on specimens with different surface conditions. Residual stresses were measured by x-ray diffraction before and after testing. Creep tests were also carried out to describe the creep behaviour and thereby the ability for residual stress relaxation. A correlation between the creep rate and amount of relaxed stress was found. The creep behaviour of the material was described by using a combination of the Norton Power law and the Arrhenius equation. The Zener-Wert-Avrami model was used to describe the residual stress relaxation. With these models a satisfying correlation between measured and calculated data was found. Hence, the relaxation of residual stresses due to thermal load was described reliably.

  8. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  9. Ultrasonic evaluation of residual stresses in aero engine materials using bulk and Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Sebastian; Dillhöfer, Alexander; Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Götz, Joshua; Hessert, Roland; Preikszas, Christina

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of residual stresses using ultrasound can be a very complex issue, because different material properties may effect the propagation of ultrasonic waves. Nevertheless, in the manufacturing of modern aero engines it is essential to benefit from the full potential of the employed materials. In this context, it is indispensable to test whether ultrasonic stress measurement is applicable for the highly developed nickel- and titanium-based alloys. This contribution contains basic investigations on the achievable measurement effect in samples made of Inconel IN718 and the Titanium alloy Ti 6-2-4-6. Furthermore, we give an overview over the principles of ultrasonic stress measurement using bulk and Rayleigh waves and present first results which are discussed with respect to texture effects and future work.

  10. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    Several reviews have highlighted a number of applications of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to metals and semiconductors which show that SEAM can provide new information on surface and near-surface features of such materials, but there have been few studies attempting to determine the capabilities of SEAM for characterizing ceramic materials. We have recently observed image contrast in SEAM from residual stress fields induced in brittle materials by Vickers indentations that is strongly dependent on the electron beam chopping frequency. We have also recently developed a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in SEAM, appropriate to the brittle materials studied, that we use as a starting point in this paper for modeling the effect of residual stress fields on the generated electron acoustic signal. The influence of the electron beam chopping frequency is also considered under restrictive assumptions.

  11. Influence of deposition parameters on residual stress of YbF3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao-ping; Fan, Jun-qi; Long, Guo-yun

    2016-01-01

    YbF3 was proposed as a substitute for ThF4 in anti-reflection or reflection coatings for the infrared range, and the residual stress of YbF3 thin film using APS plasma ion assisted deposition(PIAD) was studied. From the results, we found the anode voltage of PIAD has a large effect on the residual stress of YbF3 thin film, and the refractive index of YbF3 produced with PIAD was higher than without it, with a possible reason close to packing density. Finally, we produced multi-layer reflection coating on a 260mm diameter mono-crystalline silicon substrate. Its surface contour was approximately 0.240λ (λ=632.8nm), and the absorption was lower than 200ppm, which can satisfy the practical requirement.

  12. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  13. Morphology of residually stressed tubular tissues: Beyond the elastic multiplicative decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.; Taffetani, M.

    2016-05-01

    Many interesting shapes appearing in the biological world are formed by the onset of mechanical instability. In this work we consider how the build-up of residual stress can cause a solid to buckle. In all past studies a fictitious (virtual) stress-free state was required to calculate the residual stress. In contrast, we use a model which is simple and allows the prescription of any residual stress field. We specialize the analysis to an elastic tube subject to a two-dimensional residual stress, and find that incremental wrinkles can appear on its inner or its outer face, depending on the location of the highest value of the residual hoop stress. We further validate the predictions of the incremental theory with finite element simulations, which allow us to go beyond this threshold and predict the shape, number and amplitude of the resulting creases.

  14. 3D Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of the Nonuniform Residual Stress in Ultrasonic Impact Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengsun; Guo, Chaobo; Wang, Dongpo; Wang, Zhijiang

    2016-09-01

    The nonuniform distributions of the residual stress were simulated by a 3D finite element model to analyze the elastic-plastic dynamic ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) process of multiple impacts on the 2024 aluminum alloy. The evolution of the stress during the impact process was discussed. The successive impacts during the UIT process improve the uniformity of the plastic deformation and decrease the maximum compressive residual stress beneath the former impact indentations. The influences of different controlled parameters, including the initial impact velocity, pin diameter, pin tip, device moving, and offset distances, on the residual stress distributions were analyzed. The influences of the controlled parameters on the residual stress distributions are apparent in the offset direction due to the different surface coverage in different directions. The influences can be used to understand the UIT process and to obtain the desired residual stress by optimizing the controlled parameters.

  15. Determination of the residual stress tensor in textured zirconium alloy by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, V. V.; Papushkin, I. V.; Vasin, R. N.; Venter, А. M.; Balagurov, А. М.

    2012-02-01

    Results of neutron diffraction studies of crystallographic texture and residual stress tensor components in cold-worked and annealed cylindrical components made from E-110 zirconium alloy are presented. Those components are used as plugs in the fuel elements of the VVER-type reactors; the resident residual stresses influence the durability and safety of the fuel elements. The experiments were carried out on the neutron diffractometers at Dubna (the IBR-2 pulsed reactor) and Berlin Helmholtz-Zentrum (the BER II research reactor). It is shown that the samples have fiber texture that is changed considerably with annealing. The type I residual stress tensors for both samples were calculated by the BulkPathGEO model. The cold worked component has 136-166 MPa tensile residual stress in the radial direction and zero stress along the axial direction. Residual stress values in the annealed component are close to zero.

  16. Measuring residual stress in ceramic zirconia-porcelain dental crowns by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Allahkarami, M; Hanan, J C

    2012-02-01

    Residual stress plays a critical role in failure of ceramic dental crowns. The magnitude and distribution of residual stress in the crown system are largely unknown. Determining the residual stress quantitatively is challenging since the crown has such complex contours and shapes. This work explored the feasibility and validity of measuring residual stress of zirconia and porcelain in ceramic crowns by nanoindentation. Nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a crown for both porcelain and zirconia along four critical locations: the thickest, thinnest and medium porcelain thicknesses. Zirconia and porcelain pieces, chipped off from the crown and annealed at 400 °C, were used as reference samples. The residual stress was determined by comparing the measured hardness of the stressed sample with that of the reference sample. Nanoindentation impression images were acquired through a scanning probe microscope (SPM) equipped with a Hysitron Triboindenter. Zirconia showed large pile-up. Residual stress is determined along the thickness of crowns at the chosen locations for both porcelain and zirconia. The measured results were compared with the results from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and finite element modeling (FEM). Results show there are large amounts of residual stresses in the dental crown and their magnitude differs between locations due to the complex shape of the crown. The average residual stress readings were as high as -637 MPa and 323 MPa for zirconia and porcelain respectively.

  17. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  18. Nondestructive Induced Residual Stress Assessment in Superalloy Turbine Engine Components Using Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rideout, C. A.; Ritchie, S. J.; Denison, A.

    2007-03-21

    Induced Positron Analysis (IPA) has demonstrated the ability to nondestructively quantify shot peening/surface treatments and relaxation effects in single crystal superalloys, steels, titanium and aluminum with a single measurement as part of a National Science Foundation SBIR program and in projects with commercial companies. IPA measurement of surface treatment effects provides a demonstrated ability to quantitatively measure initial treatment effectiveness along with the effect of operationally induced changes over the life of the treated component. Use of IPA to nondestructively quantify surface and subsurface residual stresses in turbine engine materials and components will lead to improvements in current engineering designs and maintenance procedures.

  19. FEM calculation of residual stresses induced by laser shock processing in stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyre, P.; Chaieb, I.; Braham, C.

    2007-04-01

    Laser shock processing, also known as laser shock peening, generates through a laser-induced plasma, plastic deformation and compressive residual stresses in materials for improved fatigue or stress corrosion cracking resistances. The calculation of mechanical effects is rather complex, due to the severity of the pressure loading imparted in a very short time period (in the ns regime). This produces very high strain rates (106 s-1), which necessitate a precise determination of dynamic properties. Finite element techniques have been applied to predict the residual stress fields induced in two different stainless steels, combining shock wave hydrodynamics and strain rate dependent mechanical behaviour. The predicted residual stress fields for single or multiple laser processes were correlated with those from experimental data, with a specific focus on the influence of process parameters such as pressure pulse amplitude and duration, laser spot size or sacrificial overlay. Among other results, simulations confirmed that the affected depths increased with pulse duration, peak pressure and cyclic deformations, thus reaching much deeper layers (> 0.5 mm) than with any other conventional surface processing. To improve simulations, the use of experimental VISAR determinations to determine pressure loadings and elastic limits under shock conditions (revealing different strain-rate dependences for the two stainless steels considered) was shown to be a key point. Finally, the influence of protective coatings and, more precisely, the simulation of a thermo-mechanical uncoated laser shock processing were addressed and successfully compared with experiments, exhibiting a large tensile surface stress peak affecting a few tenths of micrometres and a compressive sub-surface stress field.

  20. A Finite Element Evaluation of Residual Stress in a Thread Form Generated by a Cold-Rolling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.A.

    1999-02-26

    This paper presents a finite element evaluation of residual stress in a thread form generated by a cold rolling process. Included in this evaluation area mesh development study, methodology sensitivity studies, and the effects of applied loads on the stress in a rolled thread root. A finite element analysis of the thread forming process using implicit modeling methodology, incremental large deformation, elastic-plastic material properties, and adaptive meshing techniques was performed. Results of the study indicate the axial component of the residual stress in the thread root of the fastener is highly compressive. Results also indicate that a rolled threaded fastener loaded to an average tensile stress equal to yield through the cross-section will retain compressive stresses in the thread root. This compressive stress state will be advantageous when evaluating fasteners for fatigue and environmental concerns.

  1. Evolution of microstructure and residual stress under various vibration modes in 304 stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang; Wu, Weite

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ -ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator.

  2. Method of characterizing residual stress in ferromagnetic materials using a pulse histogram of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Grainger, John L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for characterizing residual uniaxial stress in a ferromagnetic test member by distinguishing between residual stresses resulting from positive (tension) forces and negative (compression) forces by using the distinct and known magnetoacoustic (MAC) and a magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) measurement circuit means. A switch permits the selective operation of the respective circuit means.

  3. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

    2009-11-02

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  4. Distortion and residual stresses in laser beam weld shaft-hub joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschenhenke, F.; Hofmann, M.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In laser beam welding, a serious challenge is to control the distortion during the process. Understanding the whole process chain in view of different distortion potentials applied in each processing step provides the ability to control the distortion of the welded components. Every manufacturing step induces residual stresses in the component which can be released by the heat of the welding process, while further residual stresses are introduced into the welded parts upon cooling. The laser beam sources of the new generation permit a high power welding process and high beam quality at the same time. These laser beams are capable of producing deep and narrow seams. Thus the thermal strains of the joined parts are expected to be minimized. Especially axial welded shaft-hub joints show an irregular distribution of bending deformation, which is caused by the self-influencing welding gap. This work deals with the investigation of different laser beam sources and their effect on the welding distortion in axial welded shafthub joints made of steel (20MnCr5). The aim of the work done was to achieve minimal distortion after the welding process. To characterize the influences on the distortion behaviour of the welded parts, residual stresses have been determined by neutron diffraction.

  5. Bandgap tuning with thermal residual stresses induced in a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Kong, Eui-Hyun; Joo, Soo-Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jin; Song, Seungwoo; Chang, Yong-June; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2014-09-24

    Lattice distortion induced by residual stresses can alter electronic and mechanical properties of materials significantly. Herein, a novel way of the bandgap tuning in a quantum dot (QD) by lattice distortion is presented using 4-nm-sized CdS QDs grown on a TiO2 particle as an application example. The bandgap tuning (from 2.74 eV to 2.49 eV) of a CdS QD is achieved by suitably adjusting the degree of lattice distortion in a QD via the tensile residual stresses which arise from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between CdS and TiO2. The idea of bandgap tuning is then applied to QD-sensitized solar cells, achieving ≈60% increase in the power conversion efficiency by controlling the degree of thermal residual stress. Since the present methodology is not limited to a specific QD system, it will potentially pave a way to unexplored quantum effects in various QD-based applications. PMID:24832671

  6. Residual stress measurement in thin films using a slitting method with geometric phase analysis under a dual beam (FIB/SEM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ronghua; Xie, Huimin; Dai, Xianglu; Zhu, Jianguo; Jin, Aizi

    2014-09-01

    Stress generated during thin film deposition is a critical issue for many applications. In general, the possible origins of the residual stress include intrinsic and extrinsic stresses. Since high residual stresses can cause detrimental effects on the film, such as delamination and wrinkle, it is of great importance to quantify the residual stress for the optimal design and the evaluation of its mechanical behavior. In this study, a method combining focused ion beam (FIB) milling and geometric phase analysis (GPA) is developed to assess the residual stress of thin films. The procedures of the residual stress measurement using this method include grating fabrication and slot milling by FIB, high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of the grating before and after stress relaxation, and deformation analysis by GPA. The residual stress can be inferred from the released deformation using the reference displacements of the finite element model. As an application, this method was utilized to measure the residual stress in a TiAlSiN film, and the measured result is in good agreement with that obtained by the curvature method. In order to analyze the measurement error, the influence factors of Ga+ bombardment and the deposited platinum layer on the stress calculation are also discussed in detail.

  7. Predicting residual and flow stresses from surface topography created by laser cutting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harničárová, Marta; Valíček, Jan; Öchsner, Andreas; Grznárik, Radovan; Kušnerová, Milena; Neugebauer, Josef; Kozak, Dražan

    2013-11-01

    The paper deals with the engineering method for laser cutting technology that utilizes stress equations derived from surface topography for determining residual stresses. It presents an original method for residual stress assessment in a non-contact and non-destructive manner. The high temperature around cut edges results in the development of residual stresses during the cutting process, which decreases the quality of the end product. Surface topographical parameters themselves carry information on a concrete state of technological process in the concrete moment of its usage. This method for the assessment of residual stress in materials being cut by a laser beam provides sufficient information on the residual stress state evaluation with sufficient accuracy by applying an analytical and experimental approach. Experiments were conducted on three different materials, namely steel, aluminium alloy and titanium. It was necessary to check calculation by measuring the residual stress distribution in the vicinity of cut edge using the ultrasonic method. The novelty of the method for the determination of residual stresses in a workpiece lies in the physics-based approach focusing on the mechanical and stress-deformation parameters of the material being cut and on the mechanical equilibrium of the system: material properties-tool properties-deformation properties.

  8. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; David, Stan A

    2011-01-01

    Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

  9. Analytical Method for Reduction of Residual Stress Using Low Frequency and Ultrasonic Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Kurita, Katsumi; Koshimizu, Shigeomi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Hiroi, Tetsumaro; Hirai, Seiji

    Welding is widely used for construction of many structures. It is well known that residual stress is generated near the bead because of locally given heat. Tensile residual stress on the surface degrades fatigue strength. On the other hand, welding is used for repair of mold and die. In this case, reduction of residual stress is required because of protection from crack of welded part in mold and die. In this paper, a new method for reduction of residual stress of welded joint is proposed for repair welding of mold and die. In this method, low frequency and ultrasonic vibrations are used during welding. Thick plates are used as specimens of mold and die. Residual stresses are reduced when low frequency and ultrasonic vibrations are used during welding. Experimental results are examined by simulation method using an analytical model. One mass model considering plastic deformation is used as an analytical model. Experimental results are demonstrated by simulation method.

  10. Fluorine Implantation and Residual Stresses in Polysilicon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Lynn; Zschack, Paul; Angelis, Robert De

    1994-01-01

    As microelectronic device dimensions are reduced below one micron, the hot carrier effect is a major barrier to continued scaling and VLSI reliability. Several reports have shown that fluorine diffusion into the device gate greatly enhances the resistance to hot carriers. There has been some disagreement as to the mechanism of influence; however, several reports have suggested that the polysilicon is physically modified by the fluorine implant and that the beneficial effects are at least in part due to stress relaxation in the polysilicon.

  11. Transient and residual stresses in dental porcelains as affected by cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, K; Tesk, J A

    1989-06-01

    The development of either transient or residual stress in a slab of dental porcelain during cooling was simulated by use of a super-computer. The temperature dependences of the elastic modulus, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the shear viscosity, and the cooling rate dependence of the glass transition temperature, Tg, were considered in this calculation. Internal stress and viscoelastic creep were computed for several cooling rates. Calculated results display stress profiles which agree reasonably well with reported measured profiles in quenched, tempered glasses. The calculated residual surface stress, sigma, could be fit by the following empirical formula, sigma = kl2(q/q0)n, q is the cooling rate, q0 is a reference cooling rate and l is the half-thickness of the porcelain. The method by which residual stress develops is also discussed. This discussion suggests a method for strengthening of the porcelain by the development of high-compressive residual stress on the surface. PMID:2638963

  12. Residual stresses in boron/tungsten and boron/carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Longitudinal residual stress distribution is determined for 102-micron diam B/W and B/C fibers. The 102-micron diam B/W fibers are deposited on a 12.7-micron diam tungsten wire resistively heated in a BCl3-H2 reactor. The 102-micron diam B/C fibers are made by deposition of boron on a pyrolytic graphite-coated carbon fiber. The longitudinal residual stress distribution is calculated from measurements of the change in length of the fiber produced by removal of the surface through electropolishing. It is found that for both types of fibers, the residual stress vary from a compressive stress at the surface to a tensile stress in the boron near the core. Closer to the core and in the core, significant differences in the residual stresses are observed for the B/W and B/C fibers.

  13. Assessment of Bending Fatigue Strength of Crankshaft Sections with Consideration of Quenching Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W. J.; Dong, C.; Li, X.

    2016-03-01

    High-cycle bending fatigue is the primary failure mode of crankshafts in engines. Compressive residual stresses are often introduced by induction quenching to improve the fatigue strength of crankshafts. The residual stresses, which are commonly obtained by numerical methods, such as the finite element method (FEM), should be included in fatigue failure analysis to predict the fatigue strength of crankshafts accurately. In this study, the simulation method and theory of quenching process are presented and applied to investigate the residual stresses of a diesel engine crankshaft. The coupling calculation of temperature, microstructure, and stress fields of the crankshaft section is conducted by FEM. Then, the fatigue strength of the crankshaft section is analytically assessed by Susmel and Lazzarin's criterion based on the critical plane approach that superimposes the residual stresses onto the bending stresses. The resonant bending fatigue tests of the crankshaft sections are conducted, and the tests and analytical assessments yield consistent results.

  14. Microstructure and residual stress of magnetron sputtered nanocrystalline palladium and palladium gold films on polymer substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Castrup, Anna; Kuebel, Christian; Scherer, Torsten; Hahn, Horst

    2011-03-15

    The authors report the structural properties and residual stresses of 500-nm-thick nanocrystalline Pd and PdAu films on compliant substrates prepared by magnetron sputtering as a function of the pressure of the Ar-sputtering gas. Films were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At low pressures the metal films exhibit strong compressive stresses, which rapidly change to highly tensile with increasing pressure, and then gradually decrease. Along with this effect a change in microstructure is observed from a dense equiaxed structure at low pressures to distinctive columns with reduced atomic density at the column walls at higher pressures. The preparation of nearly stress-free dense nanocrystalline films is demonstrated.

  15. Residual stress in nano-structured stainless steel (AISI 316L) prompted by Xe+ ion bombardment at different impinging angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucatti, S.; Droppa, R.; Figueroa, C. A.; Klaus, M.; Genzel, Ch.; Alvarez, F.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of low energy (<1 keV) xenon (Xe+) ion bombardment on the residual stress of polycrystalline iron alloy (AISI 316L steel) is reported. The results take into account the influence of the ion incident angle maintaining constant all other bombarding parameters (i.e., ion energy and current density, temperature, and doses). The bombarded surface topography shows that ions prompt the formation of nanometric regular patterns on the surface crystalline grains and stressing the structure. The paper focalizes on the study of the surface residual stress state stemming from the ion bombardment studied by means of the "sin2 ψ" and "Universal Plot" methods. The analysis shows the absence of shear stress in the affected material region and the presence of compressive in-plane residual biaxial stress (˜200 MPa) expanding up to ˜1 μm depth for all the studied samples. Samples under oblique bombardment present higher compressive stress values in the direction of the projected ion beam on the bombarded surface. The absolute value of the biaxial surface stress difference (σ11-σ22) increases on ion impinging angles, a phenomenon associated with the momentum transfer by the ions. The highest stress level was measured for ion impinging angles of 45° ( σ 11 = -380 ± 10 MPa and σ 22 = -320 ± 10 MPa). The different stresses obtained in the studied samples do not affect significantly the formation of characteristic surface patterns.

  16. Measuring residual stresses in metallic components manufactured with fibre Bragg gratings embedded by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havermann, Dirk; Mathew, Jinesh; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal clad single mode optical fibres containing Fibre Bragg Gratings are embedded in stainless steel components using bespoke laser based Selective Laser Melting technology (SLM). Significant residual stresses can be created in SLM manufactured components through the strong thermal gradients during the build process. We demonstrate the ability to monitor these internal stresses through embedded optical fibres with FBGs on a layer to layer basis, confirming estimates from models for residual stresses in additive manufactured components.

  17. Residual stress and fracture characteristics of zirconia/metal(Ni, SUS304) functionally gradient materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yeon-Gil; Choi, Sung-Churl; Paik, Un-Gyu

    1995-09-01

    To analyze the residual stress and the fracture behavior of FGMs. disc-type TZP/Ni- and TZP/SUS304-FGM were hot passed, and compared with MM& The continuous interface and the microstructure of FGMs were characterized with EPMA, optical microscopy and SEM. The defect-like cracks in the FGMs induced by the preferential shear stress have been shown to cause fracture. This fact has well corresponded to the analysis of the residual stress distribution by FEM.

  18. Residual stresses in a ferritic steel welded pipe: an experimental comparison between reactor and pulsed neuron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertini, Gianni; Brugnami, D.; Bruno, Giovanni; Ceretti, M.; Cernuschi, F. M.; Edwards, Lyndon

    1997-02-01

    Residual stresses induced by welding processes can affect the integrity of structural components like tubes and pipes of thermoelectric power plants. In order to reduce or cancel these stresses, welded components are often heat treated. The residual stress field in an arc-welded 2.25Cr1Mo ferritic steel pipe was measured using neutron diffraction both before and after stress relieving heat treatment. In the first stage stresses were measured using two different kinds of neutron sources: a reactor and a pulsed one. A comparison between results obtained using G5.2 diffractometer at LLB and ENGIN equipment at ISIS will be outlined and the effectiveness of heat treatment will be shown.

  19. Residual stress and debonding analysis using a fiber Bragg grating in a model composite specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpo, F.; Dunkel, G.; Humbert, L.; Botsis, J.

    2005-05-01

    Optical Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors are excellent non-destructive tools for internal strain characterization of composite materials and structures. They can be embedded at selected locations during material preparation to provide accurate in-situ measurements. In this study, long-gauge-FBGs are introduced in cylindrical specimens of epoxy. This configuration is particularly attractive because it simplifies the study of some relevant phenomena in micromechanics of composites, for instance residual stresses and fracture of the fibre-matrix interface. Because the matrix epoxy shrinks during the polymerisation process, the optical sensor undergoes substantial non-uniform strain along the fibre. The response of a FBG to a non-uniform strain distribution is investigated using a new Optical Low-Coherence Reflectometry (OLCR) technique developed at EPFL. This method provides a direct reconstruction of the optical period and the corresponding strain distribution along the grating without any a priori assumption about the strain field. Considering the non-uniform residual strain as a reference state, new Bragg wavelength distributions are obtained for two configurations. First, a new Bragg wavelength distribution is measured as a function of the depth of circular cracks machined in the radial direction. These measurements lead to the knowledge of (a) the zone of perturbation of the reinforcing fibre on the residual stresses and (b) the effect of the presence of the mechanically induced crack on the residual stress state in the specimen. A finite element modelling of the residual stress field based on an equivalent thermo-elastic approach is also proposed, showing a very good agreement with experimental data. Second, an interface crack (debonding) between the epoxy and the fibre is introduced by fatigue and monitored using a specifically designed video acquisition system. The induced variations in the FBG response are measured when the fibre is unloaded and then

  20. Numerical Simulation of Residual Stress in an Al-Cu Alloy Block During Quenching and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ya-Bo; Shao, Wen-Zhu; Lu, Liang-Xing; Jiang, Jian-Tang; Zhen, Liang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, residual stresses after different quenching and aging processes of Al-Cu forged blocks were investigated by numerical simulation method and experimental measurements. An iterative zone-based heat transfer calculation was coupled with the hyperbolic sine-type constitutive model to simulate the residual stress during quenching process. The simulation results were compared with experiment data using both x-ray diffraction and crack compliance methods. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental measurements with around 9-13% deviation at the largest. Residual stress reduction can be achieved by decreasing the cooling rate during quenching. Quenching in water with different temperatures of 60, 80, and 100 °C resulted in the maximum compressive residual stress reduction of approximately 28.2, 75.7, and 88.9%, respectively, in Al-Cu alloy samples. When quenched in 10, 20, and 30% PAG solution, the reduction of maximum compressive residual stress in Al-Cu alloy samples was approximately 35.1, 47.8, and 53.2%, respectively. In addition, in order to study the amount of residual stress relief after aging treatments, aging treatments at 140 and 170 °C for different times were also studied. Aging treatment used to obtain the peak-aged (T6) and overaged (T7) condition produces only about 22.5 to 34.7% reduction in residual stresses.

  1. Residual stresses in a multi-pass weld in an austenitic stainless steel plate before and after thermal stress relief

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Wang, X.L.; Hubbard, C.R.; David, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Changes in residual stresses due to thermal stress relief were determined in a welded 1/2 in. thick 304 stainless steel plate from two residual stress maps determined with the neutron diffraction technique. The 304 stainless plate was made from two 6 {times} 12 {times} 1/2 in. pieces joined along the length by a gas tungsten arc welding process. Multi-pass welds were made with a semiautomatic welding machine employing cold-wire feed of type 308 stainless steel filler alloy. The thermal stress relief treatment consisted of heating to 1150 F, holding for one hour at temperature and then air cooling. Strain components were measured along the weld direction (longitudinal), perpendicular to the weld line in the plate (transverse), and normal to the plate. Measurements were confined to the plane bisecting the weld at the center of the plate. The strain components were converted to stresses assuming that the measured strains were along the principal axes of the strain tensor. Parameters used in the calculation were E=224 GPa and v=0.25. As-welded longitudinal stresses are compressive in the base metal and become strongly tensile through the heat affected zone and into the fusion zone. The transverse stresses follow the longitudinal trend but with a lower magnitude while the normal stresses are small throughout. The stress relief treatment reduced the magnitudes of all the stresses. In the weld zone the longitudinal stress was lowered by 30% and the spatial range of residual stresses was reduced as well.

  2. Three-dimensional welding residual stresses evaluation based on the eigenstrain methodology via X-ray measurements at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Masaru

    2014-12-01

    In order to assure structural integrity for operating welded structures, it is necessary to evaluate crack growth rate and crack propagation direction for each observed crack non-destructively. Here, three dimensional (3D) welding residual stresses must be evaluated to predict crack propagation. Today, X-ray diffraction is used and the ultrasonic method has been proposed as non-destructive method to measure residual stresses. However, it is impossible to determine residual stress distributions in the thickness direction. Although residual stresses through a depth of several tens of millimeters can be evaluated non-destructively by neutron diffraction, it cannot be used as an on-site measurement technique. This is because neutron diffraction is only available in special irradiation facilities. Author pays attention to the bead flush method based on the eigenstrain methodology. In this method, 3D welding residual stresses are calculated by an elastic Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis from eigenstrains which are evaluated by an inverse analysis from released strains by strain gauges in the removal of the reinforcement of the weld. Here, the removal of the excess metal can be regarded as non-destructive treatment because toe of weld which may become crack starters can be eliminated. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for welded plates and pipes even with relatively lower bead height. In actual measurements, stress evaluation accuracy becomes poorer because measured values of strain gauges are affected by processing strains on the machined surface. In the previous studies, the author has developed the bead flush method that is free from the influence of the affecting strains by using residual strains on surface by X-ray diffraction. However, stress evaluation accuracy is not good enough because of relatively poor measurement accuracy of X-ray diffraction. In this study, a method to improve the estimation accuracy of residual stresses in this method is

  3. Cryogenic Treatment of Al-Li Alloys for Improved Weldability, Repairability, and Reduction of Residual Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Tina W.; Graham, Benny F.; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Service performance has shown that cryogenic treatment of some metals provides improved strength, fatigue life, and wear resistance to the processed material. Effects such as these were initially discovered by NASA engineers while evaluating spacecraft that had returned from the cold vacuum of space. Factors such as high cost, poor repairability, and poor machinability are currently prohibitive for wide range use of some aerospace aluminum alloys. Application of a cryogenic treatment process to these alloys is expected provide improvements in weldability and weld properties coupled with a reduction in repairs resulting in a significant reduction in the cost to manufacture and life cycle cost of aerospace hardware. The primary purpose of this effort was to evaluate the effects of deep cryogenic treatment of some aluminum alloy plate products, welds, and weld repairs, and optimize a process for the treatment of these materials. The optimized process is being evaluated for improvements in properties of plate and welds, improvements in weldability and repairability of treated materials, and as an alternative technique for the reduction of residual stresses in repaired welds. This paper will present the results of testing and evaluation conducted in this effort. These results will include assessments of changes in strength, toughness, stress corrosion susceptability, weldability, repairability, and reduction in residual stresses of repaired welds.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN SRS AND HANFORD 3013 INNER AND CONVENIENCE CANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2009-03-01

    Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a plausible corrosion mechanism for the stainless steel 3013 containers during their lifetime for plutonium material storage if sufficient electrolyte is present within the container. Contributing factors for SCC, such as fabrication and welding residual stresses, are present in the 3013 cans. Convenience and inner cans from both Hanford and SRS are made by a flow form process, which cold works the stainless steel during fabrication. Additionally, the inner cans also are sealed at the can top with a closure weld to the sealing plug. Only SRS and Hanford were tested since moisture levels were significant for SCC. As part of the 3013 corrosion plan for FY09, testing in a boiling magnesium chloride solution was performed on actual 3013 convenience and inner cans to determine if the residual stresses were sufficient for the initiation and propagation of SCC. Additional testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution was also performed on 304L stainless steel SCC coupons, i.e. stressed teardrop-shaped samples (teardrops), and an inner can welded top to provide comparative results and to assess the effect of residual stresses in a less aggressive environment. The testing performed under this task consisted of 3013 inner and convenience cans and 304L teardrops exposed to a boiling magnesium chloride solutions per ASTM G36 and a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C following the guidance of ASTM G123. Cracking occurred in all can types including the inner can bottom and welded top and the bottoms of the SRS and Hanford convenience cans when exposed to the boiling magnesium chloride solution at 155 C. Cracking occurred at different times indicative of the residual stress levels in the cans. 304L teardrops cracked in the shortest time interval and therefore provide a conservative estimate for can performance. Testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C demonstrated that cracking occurs in a less aggressive environment but at

  5. Measurement of residual stress in a multi-layer semiconductor heterostructure by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wei; Cheng, Cui-Li; Liang, Ren-Rong; Zhao, Chun-Wang; Lei, Zhen-Kun; Zhao, Yu-Cheng; Ma, Lu-Lu; Xu, Jun; Fang, Hua-Jun; Kang, Yi-Lan

    2016-07-01

    Si-based multilayer structures are widely used in current microelectronics. During their preparation, some inhomogeneous residual stress is induced, resulting in competition between interface mismatching and surface energy and even leading to structure failure. This work presents a methodological study on the measurement of residual stress in a multi-layer semiconductor heterostructure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to measure the geometric parameters of the multilayer structure. The relationship between the Raman spectrum and the stress/strain on the [100] and [110] crystal orientations was determined to enable surface and cross-section residual stress analyses, respectively. Based on the Raman mapping results, the distribution of residual stress along the depth of the multi-layer heterostructure was successfully obtained.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Study on the Residual Stresses in the Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian; Narayanaswamy, S.; Huang, Y. Z.; Zarinejad, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, residual stresses distribution in the gas nitrided AISI 4140 sample has been studied using finite element (FE) simulation. The nitrogen concentration profile is obtained from the diffusion-controlled compound layer growth model, and nitrogen concentration controls the material volume change through phase transformation and lattice interstitials which results in residual stresses. Such model is validated through residual stress measurement technique—micro-ring-core method, which is applied to the nitriding process to obtain the residual stresses profiles in both the compound and diffusion layer. The numerical and experimental results are in good agreement with each other; they both indicate significant stress variation in the compound layer, which was not captured in previous research works due to the resolution limit of the traditional methods.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Study on the Residual Stresses in the Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian; Narayanaswamy, S.; Huang, Y. Z.; Zarinejad, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, residual stresses distribution in the gas nitrided AISI 4140 sample has been studied using finite element (FE) simulation. The nitrogen concentration profile is obtained from the diffusion-controlled compound layer growth model, and nitrogen concentration controls the material volume change through phase transformation and lattice interstitials which results in residual stresses. Such model is validated through residual stress measurement technique—micro-ring-core method, which is applied to the nitriding process to obtain the residual stresses profiles in both the compound and diffusion layer. The numerical and experimental results are in good agreement with each other; they both indicate significant stress variation in the compound layer, which was not captured in previous research works due to the resolution limit of the traditional methods.

  8. Crack prediction in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings based on the simulation of residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. W.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Ma, J.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings systems (TBCs) are widely used in the field of aerospace. The durability and insulating ability of TBCs are highly dependent on the residual stresses of top coatings, thus the investigation of the residual stresses is helpful to understand the failure mechanisms of TBCs. The simulation of residual stresses evolution in electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs is described in this work. The interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling is observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). An interface model of TBCs is established based on thermal elastic-plastic finite method. Residual stress distributions in TBCs are obtained to reflect the influence of interfacial roughness. Both experimental and simulation results show that it is feasible to predict the crack location by stress analysis, which is crucial to failure prediction.

  9. The influence of alloy composition on residual stresses in heat treated aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.S.; Redington, W.

    2015-07-15

    The as quenched properties of eight different heat treatable aluminium alloys are related to residual stress magnitudes with the objective being to establish if there is a relationship between the residual stress and the as quenched alloy hardness and strength. Near surface residual stresses were assessed with X-ray diffraction using both the established sin{sup 2}ψ method and the more recent cos α technique. Through thickness residual stresses were also characterised using neutron diffraction. The alloys were chosen to encompass a wide range of strengths. The low to medium strength alloys were 6060 and 6082, medium to high strength 2618A, 2014A, 7075, 7010 and two variants of 7449, while the very high strength alloy was the powder metallurgy alloy N707. To assess the as quenched strength, dynamic hardness and tensile properties were determined from samples tested immediately after quenching to minimise the influence of precipitation hardening by natural aging. In addition, hot hardness measurements were made in situ on samples cooled to simulate quench paths. Within the experimental constraints of the investigation, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness was found to follow the same pattern for all the alloys investigated, varying from tensile in the interior to surface compression. The influence of alloy strength was manifested as a change in the observed residual stress magnitudes, and surface residual stresses were found to vary linearly with as quenched hardness and strength. - Highlights: • As quenched aluminium alloys contain high magnitude residual stresses. • Surface is compressive balance by a tensile core. • As quenched surface residual stress is linear function of alloy strength. • In situ hot hardness demonstrates rapid change in intrinsic hardness during rapid cooling.

  10. Enhancement of residual stress by electromagnetic fluctuations: A quasi-linear study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaang, Helen H.; Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    A study is conducted on the impact of electromagnetic (EM) fluctuations on residual Reynolds stress in the context of the quasi-linear theory. We employ a fluid formulation describing EM ion temperature gradient turbulence. Analyses show that finite plasma β (=plasma thermal energy/magnetic energy) significantly increases the residual stress, potentially leading to the strong enhancement of flow generation in high β plasmas. We identify that this strong increase of residual stress originates from the reinforcement of radial ⟨ k ∥ ⟩ (=spectrally averaged parallel wavenumber) asymmetry due to the deformation of eigenfunctions near a rational surface.

  11. Effects of vacuum annealing treatment on microstructures and residual stress of AlSi10Mg parts produced by selective laser melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tian; Wang, Linzhi; Tan, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM)-fabricated AlSi10Mg parts were heat-treated under vacuum to eliminate the residual stress. Microstructure evolutions and tensile properties of the SLM-fabricated parts before and after vacuum annealing treatment were studied. The results show that the crystalline structure of SLM-fabricated AlSi10Mg part was not modified after the vacuum annealing treatment. Additionally, the grain refinement had occurred after the vacuum annealing treatment. Moreover, with increasing of the vacuum annealing time, the second phase increased and transformed to spheroidization and coarsening. The SLM-produced parts after vacuum annealing at 300∘C for 2 h had the maximum ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS) and elongation, while the elastic modulus decreased significantly. In addition, the tensile residual stress was found in the as-fabricated AlSi10Mg samples by the microindentation method.

  12. Induction of engineered residual stresses fields and enhancement of fatigue life of high reliability metallic components by laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Porro, J. A.; Díaz, M.; Ruiz de Lara, L.; Correa, C.; Gil-Santos, A.; Peral, D.

    2013-02-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) is being increasingly applied as an effective technology for the improvement of metallic materials mechanical and surface properties in different types of components as a means of enhancement of their corrosion and fatigue life behavior. As reported in previous contributions by the authors, a main effect resulting from the application of the LSP technique consists on the generation of relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Additional results accomplished by the authors in the line of practical development of the LSP technique at an experimental level (aiming its integral assessment from an interrelated theoretical and experimental point of view) are presented in this paper. Concretely, follow-on experimental results on the residual stress profiles and associated surface properties modification successfully reached in typical materials (especially Al and Ti alloys characteristic of high reliability components in the aerospace, nuclear and biomedical sectors) under different LSP irradiation conditions are presented along with a practical correlated analysis on the protective character of the residual stress profiles obtained under different irradiation strategies. Additional remarks on the improved character of the LSP technique over the traditional "shot peening" technique in what concerns depth of induced compressive residual stresses fields are also made through the paper.

  13. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in brittle materials and uses the model to simulate the effect of residual stress fields on the scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM)-generated electron acoustic signal. According to the model, a positive (tensile) strain produces an increase in the output signal, whereas a negative (compressive) strain produces a decrease in the ouput signal. Dark field contrast conditions occur at a chopping frequency at which V2 - V1 is greater than 0 (where V2 = V is the SEAM output in a region of residual stresses, and V1 is the output in a stress-free region of the sample). Under ideal conditions (maximum contrast) V1 approaches zero. It was found that tensile strains of the order 0.2-0.3 percent, possible in brittle materials, would produce a variation of the acoustic output signal of the order 10 nV (about 1 percent), well within the image contrast and signal processing capability of the SEAM electronics.

  14. Residual stress in laser welded dissimilar steel tube-to-tube joints

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zheng . Lab. of Production Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Austenitic-ferritic dissimilar steel joints are widely used in power generation systems. Their utilization has proved to be efficient in terms of satisfactory properties and the economics. These types of joints have usually been produced using conventional welding processes, such as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. With the rapid development of high power lasers, laser welding has received considerable attention. Laser welding offers many advantages over conventional welding processes, e.g. low heat input, small heat-affected zone (HAZ), small distortion, and welding in an exact and reproducible manner. Residual stress distribution in laser welds may also differ from those made by conventional welding processes due to its special features. Residual stress, particularly tensile residual stress in the weld, can be very important factor in controlling the quality and service life of the welded structure. The formation of tensile residual stress in the weld may result in the initiation of fatigue cracking, stress corrosion cracking or other types of fractures. It is useful, therefore, to understand the distribution of residual stress in austenitic-ferritic laser welds, and thus evaluate the quality of the joints. Although residual stress distribution in the welded joints has been extensively investigated, little data are available for the residual stress distribution in laser welds. The aim of the work was to examine residual stress distribution along laser welds of dissimilar steel tube-to-tube joints, which were made by both autogeneous welding and welding with filler wire. The results were also compared with the joints made by plasma arc and TIG welding.

  15. Optimizing amorphous indium zinc oxide film growth for low residual stress and high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Sigdel, A. K.; Gennett, T.; Berry, J. J.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.; Packard, C. E.

    2013-10-01

    With recent advances in flexible electronics, there is a growing need for transparent conductors with optimum conductivity tailored to the application and nearly zero residual stress to ensure mechanical reliability. Within amorphous transparent conducting oxide (TCO) systems, a variety of sputter growth parameters have been shown to separately impact film stress and optoelectronic properties due to the complex nature of the deposition process. We apply a statistical design of experiments (DOE) approach to identify growth parameter-material property relationships in amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin films and observed large, compressive residual stresses in films grown under conditions typically used for the deposition of highly conductive samples. Power, growth pressure, oxygen partial pressure, and RF power ratio (RF/(RF + DC)) were varied according to a full-factorial test matrix and each film was characterized. The resulting regression model and analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant contributions to the residual stress from individual growth parameters as well as interactions of different growth parameters, but no conditions were found within the initial growth space that simultaneously produced low residual stress and high electrical conductivity. Extrapolation of the model results to lower oxygen partial pressures, combined with prior knowledge of conductivity-growth parameter relationships in the IZO system, allowed the selection of two promising growth conditions that were both empirically verified to achieve nearly zero residual stress and electrical conductivities >1480 S/cm. This work shows that a-IZO can be simultaneously optimized for high conductivity and low residual stress.

  16. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outeiro, José C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Pina, José C.; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  17. Microbial response to salinity stress in a tropical sandy soil amended with native shrub residues or inorganic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Sall, Saïdou Nourou; Ndour, Ndèye Yacine Badiane; Diédhiou-Sall, Siré; Dick, Richard; Chotte, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-15

    Soil degradation and salinization caused by inappropriate cultivation practices and high levels of saltwater intrusion are having an adverse effect on agriculture in Central Senegal. The residues of Piliostigma reticulatum, a local shrub that coexists with crops, were recently shown to increase particulate organic matter and improve soil quality and may be a promising means of alleviating the effects of salinization. This study compared the effects of inorganic fertilizer and P. reticulatum residues on microbial properties and the ability of soil to withstand salinity stress. We hypothesized that soils amended with P. reticulatum would be less affected by salinity stress than soils amended with inorganic fertilizer and control soil. Salinity stress was applied to soil from a field site that had been cultivated for 5 years under a millet/peanut crop rotation when microbial biomass, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) community profile, catabolic diversity, microbial activities were determined. Microbial biomass, nitrification potential and dehydrogenase activity were higher by 20%, 56% and 69% respectively in soil with the organic amendment. With salinity stress, the structure and activities of the microbial community were significantly affected. Although the biomass of actinobacteria community increased with salinity stress, there was a substantial reduction in microbial activity in all soils. The soil organically amended was, however, less affected by salinity stress than the control or inorganic fertilizer treatment. This suggests that amendment using P. reticulatum residues may improve the ability of soils to respond to saline conditions.

  18. Prediction of Residual Stress Distributions in Welded Sections of P92 Pipes with Small Diameter and Thick Wall based on 3D Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei

    2015-05-01

    This study used ABAQUS finite element (FE) software to investigate the residual stress distributions of P92 welded pipes in both the as-weld and post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Sequential coupling quasi-static thermo-mechanical in conjunction with moving double ellipsoidal heat source and an element add/remove technique to simulate deposition of new weld material, are combined in the 3D FE analysis. To validate the simulation results, the residual stresses in axial direction at the surface of pipe were measured by X-ray diffraction technique and compared with the results of FE analysis. Detailed characteristic distributions of the residual stresses are discussed. Results show that the FE model can predict the residual stress distributions satisfactorily. Highest residual stresses on the outer surface are found in the last weld bead to be deposited. And the highest tensile residual stress for the full welded section take place in heat affected zone (HAZ) near the middle thickness. Larger residual sstress can be found around the welding start point along the pipe circumference. Comparison of heat treated specimen and untreated specimen illustrates that PWHT has a strong effect on the residual stress field.

  19. Residual stress impairs pump function after surgical ventricular remodeling: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja, Joe Luis; Zhang, Zhihong; Tartibi, Mehrzad; Sun, Kay; Macmillan, Warrick; Guccione, Julius M.; Ge, Liang; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Surgical ventricular restoration (Dor procedure) is generally thought to reduce left ventricular (LV) myofiber stress (FS) but to adversely affect pump function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of residual stress (RS) on LV FS and pump function after the Dor procedure. Methods Previously described finite element models of the LV based on MRI data obtained in five sheep 16 weeks after antero-apical myocardial infarction were used. Simulated Dacron patches that were elliptical and 25% of the infarct opening area were implanted using a virtual suture technique (VIRTUAL-DOR). In each case, diastole and systole were simulated and RS, FS, LV volumes, systolic and diastolic function, and pump (Starling) function were calculated. Results VIRTUAL-DOR was associated with significant RS that was tensile (2.89±1.31 kPa) in the remote myocardium and compressive (234.15±65.53 kPa) in the borderzone (BZ). VIRTUAL-DOR+RS (compared to VIRTUAL-DOR-NO-RS) was associated with further reduction in regional diastolic and systolic FS with the greatest change in the BZ (43.5-fold and 7.1-fold respectively, p<0.0001). VIRTUAL-DOR+RS was also associated with further reduction in systolic and diastolic volumes (7.9%, p=0.0606 and 10.6%, p=0.0630, respectively). The resultant effect was a further reduction in pump function after VIRTUAL-DOR+RS. Conclusion Residual stress that occurs after the Dor procedure is positive (tensile) in the remote myocardium and negative (compressive) in the BZ and associated with reductions in fiber stress and LV volumes. The resultant effect is a further reduction in LV pump (Starling) function. PMID:26341601

  20. As-Cast Residual Stresses in an Aluminum Alloy AA6063 Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of thermally induced residual stresses, created during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns and the formation of defects during downstream processing. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. Recently, the variation in residual elastic strains in the steady-state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction (ND) in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. In the present study, these measurements are used to show that a well-designed thermomechanical finite element (FE) process model can reproduce relatively well the experimental results. A sensitivity analysis is then carried out to determine the relative effect of the various mechanical parameters when computing the as-cast residual stresses in a cylindrical billet. Two model parameters have been investigated: the temperature when the alloy starts to thermally contract and the plasticity behavior. It is shown that the mechanical properties at low temperatures have a much larger influence on the residual stresses than those at high temperatures.

  1. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  2. An inverse finite element method for determining residual and current stress fields in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartibi, M.; Steigmann, D. J.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2016-11-01

    The life expectancy of a solid component is traditionally predicted by assessing its expected stress cycle and comparing it to experimentally determined stress states at failure. The accuracy of this procedure is often compromised by unforeseen extremes in the loading cycle or material degradation. Residually stressed parts may either have longer or shorter lifespans than predicted. Thus, determination of the current state of stress (i.e., the residual stress in the absence of external loading) and material properties is particularly important. Typically, the material properties of a solid are determined by fitting experimental data obtained from the measured deformation response in the stress-free configuration. However, the characterization of the mechanical behavior of a residually stressed body requires, in principle, a method that is not restricted to specific constitutive models. Complementing a recently developed technique, known as the reversed updated Lagrangian finite element method (RULFEM), a new method called estimating the current state of stress (ECSS) is presented herein. ECSS is based on three-dimensional full-field displacement and force data of a body perturbed by small displacements and complements the first step of the incremental RULFEM method. The present method generates the current state of stress (or residual stress in the absence of external tractions) and the incremental elasticity tensor of each finite element used to discretize the deformable body. The validity of the ECSS method is demonstrated by two noise-free simulation cases.

  3. An inverse finite element method for determining residual and current stress fields in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartibi, M.; Steigmann, D. J.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2016-08-01

    The life expectancy of a solid component is traditionally predicted by assessing its expected stress cycle and comparing it to experimentally determined stress states at failure. The accuracy of this procedure is often compromised by unforeseen extremes in the loading cycle or material degradation. Residually stressed parts may either have longer or shorter lifespans than predicted. Thus, determination of the current state of stress (i.e., the residual stress in the absence of external loading) and material properties is particularly important. Typically, the material properties of a solid are determined by fitting experimental data obtained from the measured deformation response in the stress-free configuration. However, the characterization of the mechanical behavior of a residually stressed body requires, in principle, a method that is not restricted to specific constitutive models. Complementing a recently developed technique, known as the reversed updated Lagrangian finite element method (RULFEM), a new method called estimating the current state of stress (ECSS) is presented herein. ECSS is based on three-dimensional full-field displacement and force data of a body perturbed by small displacements and complements the first step of the incremental RULFEM method. The present method generates the current state of stress (or residual stress in the absence of external tractions) and the incremental elasticity tensor of each finite element used to discretize the deformable body. The validity of the ECSS method is demonstrated by two noise-free simulation cases.

  4. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials.

  5. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter

    PubMed Central

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials. PMID:27113413

  6. Residual stress characteristics of butt-welded flange by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Lun; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Ran, Guo-Wei; Xiao, Tian-Jiao; Yan, Si-Bo

    2011-06-01

    Finite element simulation is utilized in an aluminum alloy 2014 butt-welded flange under AC Tungsten Inert Gas (AC-TIG) welding condition. The simulated results are in good agreement with the residual stress for the plate test using the actual welding parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of residual stress could be investigated in detail in several aspects, such as the welding structures, the welding sequences, the time intervals, preheating, and repair weld. The intermittent welding may be more convenient and advantageous for the practical applications to reduce the stress, and the local repair welding may cause more stress within the repairing region obviously.

  7. Validation of Predicted Residual Stresses within Direct Chill Cast Magnesium Alloy Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turski, Mark; Paradowska, Anna; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Mortensen, Dag; Fjaer, Hallvard; Grandfield, John; Davis, Bruce; DeLorme, Rick

    2012-05-01

    A significant level of cold cracking has been observed within direct chill (DC) cast, high-strength magnesium alloy Elektron WE43. These cracks have been attributed to the formation of significant residual stresses during casting. A finite-element modeling (FEM) code, which is called ALSIM, has been used to predict the residual stress within the DC-cast slab. Verification of the predicted residual stress field within an 870 × 315-mm sized slab has been carried out using neutron diffraction measurements. Given that measurements in such large-scale components using diffraction measurements are particularly challenging and expensive, the efficient use of neutron diffraction measurements is emphasized. This has included the use of sectioning, allowing the residual stress within the slab to be mapped in detail.

  8. Free vibrations of sensor diaphragm with residual stress coupled with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayong; Zhou, Shenjie

    2014-02-01

    The free vibrations of a micro-biochemical sensor diaphragm with residual stress in contact with a liquid are analyzed using the Rayleigh-Ritz method in the paper. A mechanics model based on a plate with residual stress is presented and analyzed when the plate vibrates in contact on one side with a liquid. The liquid is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid and the velocity potential is used to describe its irrotational motion. The Ritz solution is performed to find out the dependency of the natural frequency and the mode shape on the residual stress when the diaphragm vibrating in contact with a liquid. The results show that the residual stress significantly affects the natural frequency and the mode shape, and this is important to consider in the research and development of circular biochemical sensor diaphragms.

  9. Factors Influencing Residual Stresses in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrann, Roy T. R.; Rybicki, Edmund F.; Shadley, John R.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    To improve gas turbine and diesel engine performance using thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) requires an understanding of the factors that influence the in-service behavior of thermal barrier coatings. One of the many factors related to coating performance is the state of stress in the coating. The total stress state is composed of the stresses due to the in-service loading history and the residual stresses. Residual stresses have been shown to affect TBC life, the bond strength of thermal spray coatings, and the fatigue life of tungsten carbide coatings. Residual stresses are first introduced in TBC's by the spraying process due to elevated temperatures during processing and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of the top coat, bond coat, and substrate. Later, the residual stresses can be changed by the in-service temperature history due to a number of time and temperature dependent mechanisms, such as oxidation, creep, and sintering. Silica content has also been shown to affect sintering and the cyclic life of thermal barrier coatings. Thus, it is important to understand how the spraying process, the in-service thermal cycles, and the silica content can create and alter residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings.

  10. Residual stresses in oxide scale formed on Fe-17Cr stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Xiao, Ji; Prud'homme, Nathalie; Chen, Zhe; Ji, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate residual stresses in the oxide scale formed on ferritic stainless steel, which is proposed to be used as interconnector in the planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The oxidation of the alloy has been conducted at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 12-96 h by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) system. The oxide surface morphology, cross-section microstructure and the chemical composition of the oxide scale were studied after oxidation, and the residual stresses distribution of the oxide scale were determined at room temperature. It has been found that the oxide scale composed of an inner Cr2O3 layer and an outer Mn1.5Cr1.5O4 spinel layer, the residual stresses in both oxide layers are compressive and the growth stresses plays an important role. The competition of the stresses generation and relaxation during oxidation and cooling affects the residual stresses level. The evolution of residual stresses in the two layers is different according to the oxidation temperature, and the stresses in the two layers are interactional.

  11. The application of neutron diffraction to stress mapping in pipeline steels: Measurement of residual, applied, and defect-induced stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Clapham, L.; Krause, T.W.; Olsen, H.; Atherton, D.L.; Holden, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Gas pipelines are inspected for defects including generalized corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally-induced cracking. The most common in-line corrosion inspection tools utilize the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technique, which is also sensitive to the pipeline stress state. Accurate determination of the residual, applied (bulk) and local defect-induced stresses is therefore essential to understand how stress affects MFL signals. This paper summarizes the results of the following work: (1) Measurement of residual stresses in a section of X70 pipe, using neutron diffraction. (2) Examination with neutron diffraction of the local stresses surrounding a blind (i.e., 50% through-wall) hole defect in the X70 pipe wall section, when the section is subjected to a bending stress in the hoop direction.

  12. Assessment of Residual Stresses in 3013 Inner and Outer Containers and Teardrop Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, Mary Ann; Prime, Michael Bruce; Veirs, Douglas Kirk; Berg, John M.; Clausen, Bjorn; Worl, Laura Ann; DeWald, Adrian T.

    2015-12-08

    This report is an assessment performed by LANL that examines packaging for plutonium-bearing materials and the resilience of its design. This report discusses residual stresses in the 3013 outer, the SRS/Hanford and RFETS/LLNL inner containers, and teardrop samples used in studies to assess the potential for SCC in 3013 containers. Residual tensile stresses in the heat affected zones of the closure welds are of particular concern.

  13. Residual stress measurements in polycrystalline graphite with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ram; Jones, Abbie N.; Edge, Ruth; Marsden, Barry J.

    2015-06-01

    Micro-Raman microscopy technique is applied to evaluate unevenly distributed residual stresses in the various constituents of polygranular reactor grades graphite. The wavenumber based Raman shift (cm-1) corresponds to the local residual stress and measurements of stress dependent first order Raman spectra in graphite have enabled localized residual stress values to be determined. The bulk polygranular graphite of reactor grades - Gilsocarbon, NBG-18 and PGA - are examined to illustrate the residual stress variations in their constituents. Binder phase and filler particles have shown to be under compressive and tensile stresses, respectively. Among the studied graphite grades, the binder phase in Gilsocarbon has the highest residual stress and NBG-18 has the lowest value. Filler particles in Gilsocarbon have the highest residual stress and PGA showed the lowest, this is most likely due to the morphology of the coke particles used in the manufacturing and applied processing techniques for fabrications. Stresses have also been evaluated along the peripheral of pores and at the tips of the cracks. Cracks in filler and binder phases have shown mixed behaviour, compressive as well as tensile, whereas pores in binder and filler particles have shown compressive behaviour. The stresses in these graphitic constituents are of the order of MPa. Non-destructive analyses presented in this study make the current state-of-the-art technique a powerful method for the study of stress variations near the graphite surface and are expected to increase its use further in property determination analysis of low to highly fluence irradiated graphite samples from the material test reactors.

  14. Verification of residual stresses in flash-butt-weld rails using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, David; Kirstein, Oliver; Mutton, Peter John; Chiu, Wing Kong

    2006-11-01

    Residual stresses developed during flash-butt welding may play a crucial role in prolonging the fatigue life of the welded tracks under service loading conditions. The finished welds typically exhibit high levels of tensile residual stresses in the web region of the weld. Moreover, the surface condition of the web may contain shear drag or other defects resulting from the shearing process which may lead to the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks in a horizontal split web failure mode under high axle loads. However, a comprehensive understanding into the residual stress behaviour throughout the complex weld geometry remains unclear and is considered necessary to establish the correct localised post-weld heat treatment modifications intended to lower tensile residual stresses. This investigation used the neutron diffraction technique to analyse residual stresses in an AS60 flash-butt-welded rail cooled under normal operating conditions. The findings will ultimately contribute to developing modifications to the flash-butt-welding procedure to lower tensile residual stresses which may then improve rail performance under high axle load.

  15. INTERFACE RESIDUAL STRESSES IN DENTAL ZIRCONIA USING LAUE MICRO-DIFFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, H. A.; Tamura, N.; Coelho, P.G.; Hanan, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Due to their aesthetic value and high compressive strength, dentists have recently employed ceramics for restoration materials. Among the ceramic materials, zirconia provides high toughness and crack resistant characteristics. Residual stresses develop in processing due to factors including grain anisotropy and thermal coefficient mismatch. In the present study, polychromatic X-ray (Laue) micro-diffraction provided grain orientation and residual stresses on a clinically relevant zirconia model ceramic disk. A 0.5 mm x 0.024 mm region on zirconia was examined on a 500 nm scale for residual stresses using a focused poly-chromatic synchrotron X-ray beam. Large stresses ranging from - to + 1GPa were observed at some grains. On average, the method suggests a relatively small compressive stress at the surface between 47 and 75 MPa depending on direction.

  16. Neutron diffraction determination of the residual stress redistribution in cracked autofrettaged tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A. ); McGillivray, H.J.; Webster, G.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Webster, P.J. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the residual stress distributions in uncracked and fatigue cracked rings taken from a high strength, low alloy steel autofrettage tube with a bore diameter of 60mm and a wall thickness of 32mm. Stresses were determined to a precision of {plus minus} 10MPa. Three crack sixes were examines. No appreciable stress redistribution was observed until the crack was grown into a region which originally contained tensile residual hoop stress. When this occurred an increase in residual hoop tension was observed ahead of the crick tip. Qualitative agreement was achieved between the measured hoop stress distribution and values predicted using a boundary element method. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Experimental Study of Residual Stresses in Metal Parts Obtained by Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protasov, C. E.; Safronov, V. A.; Kotoban, D. V.; Gusarov, A. V.

    High local temperature gradients occur at additive manufacturing by selective laser melting of powder. This gives rise to undesirable residual stresses, deformations, and cracks. To understand how to control the formation of the residual stresses, a reliable method is necessary for measuring their distribution in the fabricated part. It is proposed to cut the part into thin plates and to reconstruct the residual stresses from the measured deformation of the plates. This method is tested on beams with square cross-section built from stainless steel. The beams were cut by electrical discharge machining and chemically etched. The obtained stress profile in vertical transversal direction slightly increases from the top to the bottom of the beam. This dependency is confirmed by numerical modeling. The measured stress profile agrees with the known results by other authors.

  18. Surface-Roughness Induced Residual Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings: Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Carter, C.; Fuller, E.R., Jr.; Hsueh, C.H.; Langer, S.A.

    1998-10-26

    Adherence of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC'S} is strongly dependent on mechanical interlocking at the interface between the ceramic coating and the underlying metallic bond coat. Typically, a rough bond-coat surface topology is required to achieve adequate mechanical bonding. However, the resultant interfacial asperities modify the residual stresses that develop in the coating system due to thermal expansion differences, and other misfit strains, and generate stresses that can induce progressive fracture and eventual spallation of the ceramic coating. For a flat interface the principal residual stress is parallel to the interface as the stress normal to the interface is zero. However, the residual stress normal to the interface becomes non-zero, when the interface has the required interlocking morphology. In the present study, an actual microstructure of a plasma-sprayed TBC system was numerically simulated and analyzed with a recently developed, object-oriented finite element analysis program, OOF, to give an estimate of the localized residual stresses in a TBC system. Additionally, model TBC rnicrostructures were examined to evaluate the manner in which the topology of interfacial asperities influences residual stresses. Results are present for several scenarios of modifying interfacial roughness.

  19. The relation of material properties, residual stresses, and thermal and mechanical loadings to coating degradation in thermal barrier coatings and tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrann, Roy Thomas Rumsey

    Thermal spray coatings (TSCs) are increasing in industrial applications. Further growth in the industry requires a better understanding of the relation between coating production procedures and in-service failure. This work investigates two types of TSCs: plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and high velocity oxy-fuel sprayed tungsten carbide (WC) coatings. Residual stresses are inherent in thermal spray coatings and can influence in-service performance and life of the coatings. Therefore, the effective design and processing of thermal spray coatings requires knowledge about residual stress generation and the effect of residual stresses on life. The effect of spraying processes and in-service conditions on Young's modulus is investigated. Residual stresses were evaluated by the Modified Layer Removal Method. The Cantilever Beam Bending Method was used to determine Young's modulus. TBCs were studied to evaluate the effects of (1) substrate temperature during processing, (2) coating powder silica content, and (3) air plasma spraying (APS) versus vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) in conjunction with post-processing thermal cycles (one hour at 1000sp°C) on coating residual stresses and Young's modulus of the top coat. Results show that a higher substrate processing temperature increases top coat compressive residual stress. The initial thermal cycles further increase the compressive residual stresses for both higher and lower substrate processing temperatures, but continued thermal cycling does not further change the residual stresses. A silica content of 1.0% increases the Young's modulus of the coating after ten thermal cycles. As-sprayed, there is no difference in residual stresses in the top coat due to 0.1% and a 1.0% silica content. After ten thermal cycles, the residual stresses increase the same amount for both silica contents. There is no difference in the residual stress in the top coat between APS and VPS methods after ten

  20. Onsager's symmetry relation and the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a magnetized plasma with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yang Wang, Shaojie

    2014-09-15

    The physics of the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a rotating plasma with electrostatic turbulence is explicitly identified by using the transport formulation of the gyrokinetic turbulence. It is clarified that the residual stress consists of four terms, among which are the cross terms due to the pressure gradient and the temperature gradient and the terms related to the turbulent acceleration impulse and the turbulent heating rate. The last two terms are identified for the first time, and are shown to cause analogous residual term in the heat flux. Meanwhile, the transport matrix reveals diffusion in the phase space. The transport matrix is demonstrated to satisfy the Onsager's symmetry relation.

  1. Finite-element analysis of a magnetic sensor to detect permeability changes due to residual stresses in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, Madhav R.; Katragadda, Gopichand; Wallace, John L.

    1998-03-01

    High strength steel alloys (such as 300 M) used in naval aircraft engine and landing gear components are subjected to cyclic loading in service and found to be highly susceptible to fatigue cracking. There is a critical need for nondestructive evaluation techniques which can detect both cracking and potential crack nucleation sites within these components. An innovative electromagnetic technology called the stress induced-magnetic-anisotropy (SMA) technique has been proposed to be used to detect and evaluate residual stresses. SMA measures residual stresses by sensing the changes in magnetic flux induced in directions parallel and perpendicular to the stress. A novel probe and instrumentation is being developed to simultaneously detect both subsurface residual stresses and stress-induced cracking in coated and uncoated ferromagnetic structures. Finite element analysis has been used to determine the distribution of magnetic flux density and inductance of the probe under varying AC fields. Using ANSYSTM EMAG, the effect of varying frequency of the excitation field, permeability and dimensions of the core have been analyzed. The paper describes how finite element analysis can be used in design and development of the probe and in understanding its behavior.

  2. Comparison of computational analysis with clinical measurement of stresses on below-knee residual limb in a prosthetic socket.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Roberts, C

    2000-11-01

    Interface pressures and shear stresses between a below-knee residual limb and prosthetic socket predicted using finite element analyses were compared with experimental measurements. A three-dimensional nonlinear finite element model, based on actual residual geometry and incorporating PTB socket rectification and interfacial friction/slip conditions, was developed to predict the stress distribution. A system for measuring pressures and bi-axial shear stresses was used to measure the stresses in the PTB socket of a trans-tibial amputee. The FE-predicted results indicated that the peak pressure of 226 kPa occurred at the patellar tendon area and the peak shear stress of 50 kPa at the anterolateral tibia area. Quantitatively, FE-predicted pressures were 11%, on average, lower than those measured by triaxial transducers placed at all the measurement sites. Because friction/slip conditions between the residual limb and socket liner were taken into consideration by using interface elements in the FE model, the directions and magnitudes of shear stresses match well between the FE prediction and clinical measurements. The results suggest that the nonlinear mechanical properties of soft tissues and dynamic effects during gait should be addressed in future work.

  3. Residual stresses in silicon carbide-zircon composites from thermal expansion measurements and fiber pushout tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.K.; Kumar, S.; Singh, R.N. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in the axial direction of two types of SiC fibers, monolithic zircon, monolithic SiC, and several SiC[sub f]-zircon composites were measured in the temperature range of 50 to 1,380 C. The measured CTE values of composites were compared with values predicted by the rule-of-mixtures approach, and a small difference in measured and calculated values was ascribed to the nature of interfacial bonding and assumptions implicit in the rule-of-mixture approach. Fiber pushout tests were performed on these composites and the residual stresses were extracted from the analysis of the load-displacement plots in terms of the shear-lag and progressive debonding models. The radial and axial residual stresses arising from the mismatch in CTE were calculated and compared with values obtained from the fiber pushout tests. The fiber pushout tests in general produced lower values of the residual stresses, but the residual stresses obtained using shear-lag analysis were in good agreement with the calculated values based on the CTE mismatch in composites with lower values of the interfacial shear stress. The influence of anisotropic fiber expansion in the radial and axial directions on the radial and axial residual stresses in composites were also examined.

  4. Properties of the Residual Stress of the Temporally Filtered Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. E.; Thacker, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    The development of a unifying framework among direct numerical simulations, large-eddy simulations, and statistically averaged formulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is of current interest. Toward that goal, the properties of the residual (subgrid-scale) stress of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations are carefully examined. Causal time-domain filters, parameterized by a temporal filter width 0 less than Delta less than infinity, are considered. For several reasons, the differential forms of such filters are preferred to their corresponding integral forms; among these, storage requirements for differential forms are typically much less than for integral forms and, for some filters, are independent of Delta. The behavior of the residual stress in the limits of both vanishing and in infinite filter widths is examined. It is shown analytically that, in the limit Delta to 0, the residual stress vanishes, in which case the Navier-Stokes equations are recovered from the temporally filtered equations. Alternately, in the limit Delta to infinity, the residual stress is equivalent to the long-time averaged stress, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are recovered from the temporally filtered equations. The predicted behavior at the asymptotic limits of filter width is further validated by numerical simulations of the temporally filtered forced, viscous Burger's equation. Finally, finite filter widths are also considered, and a priori analyses of temporal similarity and temporal approximate deconvolution models of the residual stress are conducted.

  5. JOINING OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE TO STAINLESS STEEL USING AMORPHOUS METAL BRAZES-RESIDUAL STRESS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    VAIDYA, RAJENDRA U; KAUTZ, DOUGLAS D.; GALLEGOS, DAVID E.

    2007-01-30

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2})/stainless steel 316 L jOints were produced by high temperature brazing using a cobalt-based metallic-glass (METGLAS{trademark} 2714A). Successful joining was completed in two different ways; either by feeding excess braze into the braze gap upon heating or by constraining the MoSi{sub 2}/stainiess steel assembly with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) fixture during the heating cycle. These steps were necessary to ensure the production of a high quality void free joint. Residual stress measurements were completed on these joints. Indentation results show higher tensile residual stresses in the stainless steel for the joint with the external constraint, in comparison to the unconstrained state. In contrast, the compressive residual stresses In the MoSi{sub 2} (as measured by X-ray diffraction) were lower in the constrained state relative to the unconstrained state. These results and a lack of residual stress balance indicate that the stress state in the braze is significantly different under the two joining conditions and the volume of the braze plays an important role in the development of the residual stresses. Push-out tests carried out on these joints gave higher joint strengths in the unconstrained as compared to the constrained condition. The results of this study have important implications on the selection of the appropriate joining process (use of constraint versus extra braze).

  6. Nondestructive testing and characterization of residual stress field using an ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wentao; Xu, Chunguang; Pan, Qinxue; Song, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    To address the difficulty in testing and calibrating the stress gradient in the depth direction of mechanical components, a new technology of nondestructive testing and characterization of the residual stress gradient field by ultrasonic method is proposed based on acoustoelasticity theory. By carrying out theoretical analysis, the sensitivity coefficients of different types of ultrasonic are obtained by taking the low carbon steel(12%C) as a research object. By fixing the interval distance between sending and receiving transducers, the mathematical expressions of the change of stress and the variation of time are established. To design one sending-one receiving and oblique incidence ultrasonic detection probes, according to Snell law, the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) is excited at a certain depth of the fixed distance of the tested components. Then, the relationship between the depth of LCR wave detection and the center frequency of the probe in Q235 steel is obtained through experimental study. To detect the stress gradient in the depth direction, a stress gradient LCR wave detection model is established, through which the stress gradient formula is derived by the relationship between center frequency and detecting depth. A C-shaped stress specimen of Q235 steel is designed to conduct stress loading tests, and the stress is measured with the five group probes at different center frequencies. The accuracy of ultrasonic testing is verified by X-ray stress analyzer. The stress value of each specific depth is calculated using the stress gradient formula. Accordingly, the ultrasonic characterization of residual stress field is realized. Characterization results show that the stress gradient distribution is consistent with the simulation in ANSYS. The new technology can be widely applied in the detection of the residual stress gradient field caused by mechanical processing, such as welding and shot peening.

  7. Random-type scanning patterns in laser shock peening without absorbing coating in 2024-T351 Al alloy: A solution to reduce residual stress anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, C.; Peral, D.; Porro, J. A.; Díaz, M.; Ruiz de Lara, L.; García-Beltrán, A.; Ocaña, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Laser Shock Peening (LSP) is considered as an alternative technology to shot peening (SP) for the induction of compressive residual stresses in metallic alloys in order to improve their fatigue, corrosion and wear resistance. Since laser pulses generated by high-intensity laser systems cover only a small area, laser pulses are generally overlapped and scanned in a zigzag-type pattern to cover completely the surface to be treated. However, zigzag-type scanning patterns induce residual stress anisotropy as collateral effect. The purpose of this paper is to describe and explain, for the first time and with the aid of the numerical model developed by the authors, the influence of the scanning pattern directionality on the residual stress tensor. As an effective solution, the authors propose the application of random-type scanning patterns instead of zigzag-type in order to reduce the mentioned residual stress anisotropy.

  8. Study on residual stresses in ultrasonic torsional vibration assisted micro-milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zesheng; Hu, Haijun; Sun, Yazhou; Sun, Qing

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that machining induced residual stresses can seriously affect the dimensional accuracy, corrosion and wear resistance, etc., and further influence the longevity and reliability of Micro-Optical Components (MOC). In Ultrasonic Torsional Vibration Assisted Micro-milling (UTVAM), cutting parameters, vibration parameters, mill cutter parameters, the status of wear length of tool flank are the main factors which affect residual stresses. A 2D model of UTVAM was established with FE analysis software ABAQUS. Johnson-Cook's flow stress model and shear failure principle are used as the workpiece material model and failure principle, while friction between tool and workpiece uses modified Coulomb's law whose sliding friction area is combined with sticking friction. By means of FEA, the influence rules of cutting parameters, vibration parameters, mill cutter parameters, the status of wear length of tool flank on residual stresses are obtained, which provides a basis for choosing optimal process parameters and improving the longevity and reliability of MOC.

  9. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Fernandez Baca, J.A.; David, S.A.; Hubbard, C.R.; Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances stain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition dudng welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 {plus_minus} 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa {plus_minus} 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 {times} l0{minus}4 compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  10. Oxidative stress induced in sunflower seedling roots by aqueous dry olive-mill residues.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Inmaculada; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; Casero, Pedro Joaquin; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR) with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O(2)·(-) generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs) activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O(2)·(-) generation and EC-POX's activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O(2)·(-) and H(2)O(2) accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX's activities might be involved in the enhancement of H(2)O(2) content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress.

  11. Oxidative Stress Induced in Sunflower Seedling Roots by Aqueous Dry Olive-Mill Residues

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Inmaculada; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; Casero, Pedro Joaquin; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR) with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O2·- generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs) activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O2·- generation and EC-POX′s activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O2·- and H2O2 accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX′s activities might be involved in the enhancement of H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress. PMID:23049960

  12. On the Feasibility of Eddy Current Characterization of the Near-Surface Residual Stress Distribution in Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blodgett, Mark P.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2004-02-26

    In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in shot-peened specimens. This technique is based on the so-called electroelastic effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of the electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, the relatively small ({approx}1%) change in electrical conductivity caused by the presence of compressive residual stresses is often distorted, or even completely overshadowed, by the accompanying conductivity loss caused by cold work and surface roughness effects. Recently, it was observed that, in contrast with most other materials, shot-peened Waspaloy and IN100 specimens exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies. This observation by itself indicates that in these materials the measured conductivity change is probably dominated by residual stress effects, since both surface roughness and increased dislocation density are known to decrease rather than increase the conductivity and the presence of crystallographic texture does not affect the electrical conductivity of these materials, which crystallize in cubic symmetry. Our preliminary experiments indicate that probably there exists a unique 'window of opportunity' for eddy current NDE in nickel-base superalloys. We identified five major effects that contribute to this fortunate constellation of material properties, which will be reviewed in this presentation.

  13. Residual Stress in Brazing of Submicron Al2O3 to WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, T.; Piquerez, A.; Bach, M.; Mille, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the residual stresses induced by brazing and grinding submicron Al2O3, using different methods. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry analysis (EDX) of 72Ag-Cu filler and filler/WC-Co interface showed evidence of atomic diffusion and possible formation of titanium oxide layers between the joint and the bonding materials. An analytical model supported by the finite element method (FEM) based on strain determination due to the difference in variation of thermal expansion was used to assess the stress distribution at the coupling interface and in bulk materials. The model took into account the evolution of the Young's modulus and of the thermal expansion with temperature. The model could be used to follow strain and stress evolutions of the bonded materials during the cooling cycle. The maximum stress rose above -300 MPa at the center of the 100 × 100 × 3 mm ceramic plates. The residual stresses on the external surface of ceramic were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and indentation fracture method (IFM). After brazing and grinding the plate, the principal stresses were 128.1 and 94.9 MPa, and the shear stress was -20.1 MPa. Microscopic examination revealed grain pull-out promoted by the global residual stresses induced by the brazing and grinding processes. The surface stresses evaluated by the different methods were reasonably correlated.

  14. Forging And Milling Contribution On Residual Stresses For A Textured Biphasic Titanium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Deleuze, C.; Fabre, A.; Barrallier, L.; Molinas, O.

    2011-01-17

    Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al is a biphasic titanium alloy ({alpha}+{beta}) used in aeronautical applications for its mechanical properties, such as its yield strength of 1200 MPa and it weighs 40% less than steel. This alloy is particularly useful for vital parts with complex geometry, because of its high forging capability. In order to predict the capability for fatigue lifetime, the designers need to know the residual stresses. X-Ray diffraction is the main experimental technique used to determine residual stresses on the surface. In this case, stress levels are primarily influenced by the complex forging and milling process. On this alloy in particular, it may be difficult to characterize stress due to modification of the microstructure close to the surface. Results obtained by x-ray analysis depend on the correct definition of the shape of the diffraction peaks. The more precisely defined the position of the peak, the more accurately the stresses are evaluated. This paper presents a method to detect if residual stresses can be characterized by x-ray diffraction. The characterization of hardness seems to be a relevant technique to quickly analyze the capability of x-ray diffraction to determine residual stresses.

  15. Development of ultrasonic tomography for residual stress mapping. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boland, A.J.; Davis, T.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Harrington, T.P.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Lemon, D.K.; Posakony, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The volumetric stress distribution in nuclear reactor piping and pressure vessels is becoming an increasingly important parameter in nondestructive evaluation. This report describes research and development of instrumentation leading toward a means of measuring subsurface stress distributions in metals. Based on the principles of Computerized Tomography (CT), an ultrasonic tomographic instrument system has been developed. The microprocessor-based system uses an ultrasonic linear array to acquire time-of-flight data to an accuracy of 0.5 to 1.0 ns. The data is processed using a modified ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) program. A two-dimensional map of the velocity distribution is displayed on a monitor. The velocity distribution is interpreted or calibrated in terms of stress through the acousto-elastic coefficients.

  16. Evolution of Microstructure and Residual Stress under Various Vibration Modes in 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ-ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator. PMID:24605068

  17. Computer simulation of residual stresses/distortion and structural change in the course of scanning induction hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, F.; Arimoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    1996-12-31

    Simulated results of structural change, residual stresses and distortion are presented for carbon steel cylinder in the scanning-type induction hardening process by a CAE system {open_quotes}HEARTS (HEAt tReaTment Simulation system){close_quotes}. The system HEARTS has been developed to simulate heat treatment processes based on {open_quotes}metallo-thermo-mechanics{close_quotes} available for describing the coupling effect between metallurgical change due to phase transformation, temperature and inelastic stress/strain. A steel cylinder is treated as an axisymmetric model with scanning internal heat generation and convection boundary. The results under different scanning velocity and magnitude of the heat source from induction coil are compared with experimental data of distortions, volume fraction of metallic phases as well as residual stresses.

  18. Residual stress measurements in forced convective quenched steel bars by means of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Morales, B.; Hawbolt, B.E.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The residual stress distributions in 38.1 mm-dia., forced convective quenched bars of interstitial-free (IF), 1045 carbon, and alloyed steels were determined by neutron diffraction. The IF and 1045 carbon steel quenched bars exhibited compressive axial and circumferential (hoop) residual stresses near the surface and tensile values at the center. The radial residual stresses were tensile at all radial positions, decreasing towards zero near the surface. In contrast, the measured axial and circumferential components of the residual stress tensor in the alloyed eutectoid steel quenched bar were tensile near the surface and decreased to compressive values at the center. The radial component showed a maximum compressive value at the center and approached zero close to the surface. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing of the three steel specimens, revealed that the IF steel had transformed completely to ferrite, while the 1045 carbon steel bar transformed to martensite near the surface and a mixture of pearlite, ferrite and martensite at the center. On the other hand, the alloyed eutectoid steel specimen transformed entirely to martensite with small amounts of bainite near the center of the rod. The observed differences in the residual stress distributions in the three steels were explained based on the sequence of phase transformations that took place during quenching.

  19. Measurement of residual stress in quenched 1045 steel by the nanoindentation method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lina; Xu Binshi; Wang Haidou; Wang Chengbiao

    2010-12-15

    In this paper, the residual stress in quenched AISI 1045 steel was measured by a recently developed nanoindentation technique. Depth control mode was adopted to measure the residual stress. It was found that residual compressive stress was generated in the quenched steel. The material around nanoindents exhibits significant pile-up deformation. A new method was proposed to determine the real contact area for pile-up material on the basis of invariant pile-up morphology of the loaded or unloaded states. The results obtained by the new method were in good agreement with the residual stresses measured by the classical X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. - Research Highlights: {yields} A new method was proposed to measure the real contact area for pile-up materials. {yields} The real contact depth is defined as the sum of h{sub max} and the pile-up height h{sub p}. {yields} The value of residual stress measured by the nanoindentation method was in good agreement with that by the XRD method.

  20. X-ray diffraction analysis of residual stress in zirconia dental composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud

    Dental restoration ceramic is a complex system to be characterized. Beside its essential biocompatibility, and pleasant appearance, it requires being mechanically strong in a catastrophic loading environment. Any design is restricted with geometry boundary and material property limits. Inspired by natural teeth, a multilayer ceramic is a smart way of achieving an enhanced restoration. Bi-layers of zirconia core covered by porcelain are known as one of the best multilayer restorations. Residual stresses may be introduced into a bi-layer dental ceramic restoration during its entire manufacturing process due to thermal expansion and elastic property mismatch. It is impossible to achieve a free of residual stresses bi-layer zirconia-porcelain restoration. The idea is to take the advantage of residual stress in design in such a way to prevent the crack initiation and progression. The hypothesis is a compressive residual stress at external contact surface would be enabling the restoration to endure a greater tensile stress. Optimizing the layers thickness, manufacturing process, and validating 3D simulations require development of new techniques of thickness, residual stresses and phase transformation measurement. In the present work, a combined mirco-tomography and finite element based method were adapted for thickness measurement. Two new 2D X-ray diffraction based techniques were adapted for phase transformation area mapping and combined phase transformation and residual stress measurement. Concerning the complex geometry of crown, an efficient method for X-ray diffraction data collection mapping on a given curved surface was developed. Finally a novel method for 3D dimensional x-ray diffraction data collection and visualization were introduced.

  1. Finite Element Modeling and Validation of Residual Stresses in 304 L Girth Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Ortega, A.R.; Cadden, C.H.; Rangaswamy, P. Brown, D.

    1998-06-01

    Three dimensional finite element simulations of thermal and mechanical response of a 304 L stainless steel pipe subjected to a circumferential autogenous gas tungsten arc weld were used to predict residual stresses in the pipe. Energy is input into the thermal model using a volumetric heat source. Temperature histories from the thermal analysis are used as loads in the mechanical analyses. In the mechanical analyses, a state variable constitutive model was used to describe the material behavior. The model accounts for strain rate, temperature, and load path histories. The predicted stresses are compared with x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in the hoop and circumferential directions on the outside surface of the pipe. Calculated stress profiles fell within the measured data. Reasons for observed scatter in measured stresses are discussed.

  2. Remarks on Residual Stress Measurement by Hole-Drilling and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hole drilling is the most widespread method for measuring residual stress. It is based on the principle that drilling a hole in the material causes a local stress relaxation; the initial residual stress can be calculated by measuring strain in correspondence with each drill depth. Recently optical techniques were introduced to measure strain; in this case, the accuracy of the final results depends, among other factors, on the proper choice of the area of analysis. Deformations are in fact analyzed within an annulus determined by two parameters: the internal and the external radius. In this paper, the influence of the choice of the area of analysis was analysed. A known stress field was introduced on a Ti grade 5 sample and then the stress was measured in correspondence with different values of the internal and the external radius of analysis; results were finally compared with the expected theoretical value. PMID:25276850

  3. Phase transformations and residual stresses in environmental barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Bryan J.

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are promising materials for high-temperature structural applications in turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) were developed to protect the underlying substrate. In the case of silicon carbide (SiC), multilayer coating systems consist of a Ba1-xSrxAl2Si 2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite or mullite + SrAl2Si 2O8 (SAS) interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. In this work, biaxial strains were measured on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples to analyze the stress and phase evolution in the coating system as a function of depth and temperature. Models were used to compare the results with an ideal coating system. In the assprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 175 MPa were measured, and cracking was observed. After thermally cycling the samples, stresses were significantly reduced and cracks in the topcoat had closed. The addition of SAS to the interlayer increased the compressive stress in the BSAS topcoat in thermally-cycled samples, which was desirable for EBC applications. The BSAS topcoat transformed from the as-deposited hexacelsian state to the stable celsian above 1200°C. This phase transformation is accompanied by a CTE reduction. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation were quantified for freestanding plasma-sprayed BSAS. Activation energies for bulk bars and crushed powder were determined to be ˜340 kJ/mol and ˜500 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction were used to establish how microstructural constraints reduce the transformation energy. Barrier coating lifetime and stability are also influenced by exposure to reactive, low-melting point calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) deposits formed from dust and sand. Multilayer doped aluminosilicate coatings and bulk BSAS material were

  4. Mapping residual stresses after foreign object damage using the contour method

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, M. B.; Martineau, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    A 51-mm thick plate of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA-100) steel was impacted by a 6.4 mm diameter tungsten carbide sphere traveling at 2.2 km/sec. The projectile penetration left a 10 mm diameter and 12 mm deep crater. A residual stress map over a cross-section through the crater was measured by the contour method. The predominant feature of the stress map was a peak compressive stress of 900 MPa, or 1.3 times the yield strength, centered about 1.5 crater radii below the crater floor. The results were compared with an explicit finite element simulation of the impact event. The model has good agreement with the measured residual stresses. As part of the study, residual stresses in the as-received HSLA-100 plate were also measured and found to be a typical quenching stress distribution with peak compressive stress of about 165 MPa a few mm below the surface and tensile stress of 200 MPa in the center of the plate thickness.

  5. Elastoplastic analysis of process induced residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongxiong; Liang Xiubing; Liu Yan; Xu Binshi

    2010-07-15

    The residual stresses induced from thermal spraying process have been extensively investigated in previous studies. However, most of such works were focused on the elastic deformation range. In this paper, an elastoplastic model for predicting the residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings was developed, in which two main contributions were considered, namely the deposition induced stress and that due to differential thermal contraction between the substrate and coating during cooling. The deposition induced stress was analyzed based on the assumption that the coating is formed layer-by-layer, and then a misfit strain is accommodated within the multilayer structure after the addition of each layer (plastic deformation is induced consequently). From a knowledge of specimen dimensions, processing temperatures, and material properties, residual stress distributions within the structure can be determined by implementing the model with a simple computer program. A case study for the plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY on Inconel 718 system was performed finally. Besides some similar phenomena observed from the present study as compared with previous elastic model reported in literature, the elastoplastic model also provides some interesting features for prediction of the residual stresses.

  6. Burst Ductility of Zirconium Clads: The Defining Role of Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Kanjarla, A. K.; Lodh, Arijit; Singh, Jaiveer; Singh, Ramesh; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, Indradev

    2016-08-01

    Closed end burst tests, using room temperature water as pressurizing medium, were performed on a number of industrially produced zirconium (Zr) clads. A total of 31 samples were selected based on observed differences in burst ductility. The latter was represented as total circumferential elongation or TCE. The selected samples, with a range of TCE values (5 to 35 pct), did not show any correlation with mechanical properties along axial direction, microstructural parameters, crystallographic textures, and outer tube-surface normal ( σ 11) and shear ( τ 13) components of the residual stress matrix. TCEs, however, had a clear correlation with hydrostatic residual stress ( P h), as estimated from tri-axial stress analysis on the outer tube surface. Estimated P h also scaled with measured normal stress ( σ 33) at the tube cross section. An elastic-plastic finite element model with ductile damage failure criterion was developed to understand the burst mechanism of zirconium clads. Experimentally measured P h gradients were imposed on a solid element continuum finite element (FE) simulation to mimic the residual stresses present prior to pressurization. Trends in experimental TCEs were also brought out with computationally efficient shell element-based FE simulations imposing the outer tube-surface P h values. Suitable components of the residual stress matrix thus determined the burst performance of the Zr clads.

  7. Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

  8. Residual Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings for a Cu-8Cr-4Nb Substrate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Raj, Sai V.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical calculations were conducted to determine the thermal stresses developed in a coated copper-based alloy, Cu-8%(at.%)Cr-4%Nb (designated as GRCop-84), after plasma spraying and during heat-up in a simulated rocket engine environment. Finite element analyses were conducted for two coating systems consisting of a metallic top coat, a pure copper bond coat and the GRCop-84. The through thickness temperature variations were determined as a function of coating thickness for two metallic coatings, a Ni-17%(wt%)Cr-6%Al-0.5%Y alloy and a Ni-50%(at.%)Al alloy. The residual stresses after low-pressure plasma spraying of the NiCrAlY and NiAl coatings on GRCop-84 substrate were also evaluated. These analyses took into consideration a 50.8 mm copper bond coat and the effects of an interface coating roughness. The through the thickness thermal stresses developed in coated liners were also calculated after 15 minutes of exposure in a rocket environment with and without an interfacial roughness.

  9. Evaluation on double-wall-tube residual stress distribution of sodium-heated steam generator by neutron diffraction and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kisohara, N.; Suzuki, H.; Akita, K.; Kasahara, N.

    2012-07-01

    A double-wall-tube is nominated for the steam generator heat transfer tube of future sodium fast reactors (SFRs) in Japan, to decrease the possibility of sodium/water reaction. The double-wall-tube consists of an inner tube and an outer tube, and they are mechanically contacted to keep the heat transfer of the interface between the inner and outer tubes by their residual stress. During long term SG operation, the contact stress at the interface gradually falls down due to stress relaxation. This phenomenon might increase the thermal resistance of the interface and degrade the tube heat transfer performance. The contact stress relaxation can be predicted by numerical analysis, and the analysis requires the data of the initial residual stress distributions in the tubes. However, unclear initial residual stress distributions prevent precious relaxation evaluation. In order to resolve this issue, a neutron diffraction method was employed to reveal the tri-axial (radius, hoop and longitudinal) initial residual stress distributions in the double-wall-tube. Strain gauges also were used to evaluate the contact stress. The measurement results were analyzed using a JAEA's structural computer code to determine the initial residual stress distributions. Based on the stress distributions, the structural computer code has predicted the transition of the relaxation and the decrease of the contact stress. The radial and longitudinal temperature distributions in the tubes were input to the structural analysis model. Since the radial thermal expansion difference between the inner (colder) and outer (hotter) tube reduces the contact stress and the tube inside steam pressure contributes to increasing it, the analytical model also took these effects into consideration. It has been conduced that the inner and outer tubes are contacted with sufficient stresses during the plant life time, and that effective heat transfer degradation dose not occur in the double-wall-tube SG. (authors)

  10. Calculation of residual principal stresses in CVD boron on carbon filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the chemical vapor deposition of boron on a carbon substrate (B/C) is developed. The model includes an expansion of the boron after deposition due to atomic rearrangement and includes creep of the boron and carbon. Curves are presented showing the variation of the principal residual stresses and the filament elongation with the parameters defining deposition strain and creep. The calculated results are compared with experimental axial residual stress and elongation measurements made on B/C filaments. For good agreement between calculated and experimental results, the deposited boron must continue to expand after deposition, and the build up of residual stresses must be limited by significant boron and carbon creep rates.

  11. Bi-Metallic Composite Structures With Designed Internal Residual Stress Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) have a unique ability to recover small amounts of plastic strain through a temperature induced phase change. For these materials, mechanical displacement can be accomplished by heating the structure to induce a phase change, through which some of the plastic strain previously introduced to the structure can be reversed. This paper introduces a concept whereby an SMA phase is incorporated into a conventional alloy matrix in a co-continuous reticulated arrangement forming a bi-metallic composite structure. Through memory activation of the mechanically constrained SMA phase, a controlled residual stress field is developed in the interior of the structure. The presented experimental data show that the memory activation of the SMA composite component significantly changes the residual stress distribution in the overall structure. Designing the structural arrangement of the two phases to produce a controlled residual stress field could be used to create structures that have much improved durability and damage tolerance properties.

  12. Simulation of balloon angioplasty in residually stressed blood vessels-Application of a gradient-enhanced fibre damage model.

    PubMed

    Polindara, César; Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    In this contribution we study the balloon angioplasty in a residually stressed artery by means of a non-local gradient-enhanced fibre damage model. The balloon angioplasty is a common surgical intervention used to extend or reopen narrowed blood vessels in order to restore the continuous blood flow in, for instance, atherosclerotic arteries. Inelastic, i.e. predominantly damage-related and elastoplastic processes are induced in the artery during its inflation resulting in an irreversible deformation. As a beneficial consequence, provided that the inelastic deformations do not exceed a specific limit, higher deformations can be obtained within the same pressure level and a continuous blood flow can be guaranteed. In order to study the mechanical response of the artery in this scenario, we make use of the non-local gradient-enhanced model proposed in Waffenschmidt et al. (2014). In this contribution, we extend this model to make use of an incompressible format in connection with a Q1Q1P0 finite element implementation. The residual stresses in the artery are also taken into account following the framework presented in Waffenschmidt (2015). From the results it becomes apparent that, when the artery is subjected to radial stresses beyond the physiological range, damage evolution is triggered in the collagen fibres. The impact of the residual stresses on the structural response and on the circumferential stress distribution along the thickness of the arterial wall is also studied. It is observed that the residual stresses have a beneficial effect on the mechanical response of the arterial wall.

  13. Simulation of balloon angioplasty in residually stressed blood vessels-Application of a gradient-enhanced fibre damage model.

    PubMed

    Polindara, César; Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    In this contribution we study the balloon angioplasty in a residually stressed artery by means of a non-local gradient-enhanced fibre damage model. The balloon angioplasty is a common surgical intervention used to extend or reopen narrowed blood vessels in order to restore the continuous blood flow in, for instance, atherosclerotic arteries. Inelastic, i.e. predominantly damage-related and elastoplastic processes are induced in the artery during its inflation resulting in an irreversible deformation. As a beneficial consequence, provided that the inelastic deformations do not exceed a specific limit, higher deformations can be obtained within the same pressure level and a continuous blood flow can be guaranteed. In order to study the mechanical response of the artery in this scenario, we make use of the non-local gradient-enhanced model proposed in Waffenschmidt et al. (2014). In this contribution, we extend this model to make use of an incompressible format in connection with a Q1Q1P0 finite element implementation. The residual stresses in the artery are also taken into account following the framework presented in Waffenschmidt (2015). From the results it becomes apparent that, when the artery is subjected to radial stresses beyond the physiological range, damage evolution is triggered in the collagen fibres. The impact of the residual stresses on the structural response and on the circumferential stress distribution along the thickness of the arterial wall is also studied. It is observed that the residual stresses have a beneficial effect on the mechanical response of the arterial wall. PMID:26924658

  14. Structural transformations in Mn{sub 2}NiGa due to residual stress

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sanjay; Maniraj, M.; D'Souza, S. W.; Barman, S. R.; Ranjan, R.

    2010-02-22

    Powder x-ray diffraction study of Mn{sub 2}NiGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy shows the existence of a 7M monoclinic modulated structure at room temperature (RT). The structure of Mn{sub 2}NiGa is found to be highly dependent on residual stress. For higher stress, the structure is tetragonal at RT, and for intermediate stress it is 7M monoclinic. However, only when the stress is considerably relaxed, the structure is cubic, as is expected at RT since the martensitic transition temperature is 230 K.

  15. Weighted mechanical models for residual stress determination using x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Conal E.; Bedell, Stephen W.; Ryan, E. Todd

    2013-07-01

    Determining the mechanical response of thin films by diffraction-based methods requires appropriate elastic models. Weighting factors associated with the linear combination of Reuss and Voigt x-ray elastic constants are compared to the experimental values determined through linear, least-squares regression of diffraction data collected from multiple reflections of several materials. It is found that the optimal weighting factors, x*, determined by the experimental data of Cu, Ni, and Ti thin films vary significantly from those calculated under the Kröner and Neerfeld limits. The discrepancies may be due to plastic effects on the mechanical models that assume linear elastic behavior. The corresponding residual stress values under these limits exhibit a closer correspondence, where the relative variation among the mechanical models scales with the elastic anisotropy of the material.

  16. Residual stress, strain, and faults in nanocrystalline palladium and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Witney, A.B.; Weertman, J.R.; Valiev, R.Z.; Siegel, R.W.

    1995-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Pd and Cu, prepared by inert gas condensation and warm compaction, were studied using x-ray diffraction techniques. A sample of Cu with sub-micrometer grain size produced by severe plastic deformation was also examined. The Warren-Averbach technique was used to separate the line broadening due to grain size, root-mean-squared strain, and faults. Peak shifts and asymmetry were used to determine the long range surface stresses, stacking fault probability, and twin probability. The Young`s modulus of a Pd sample was determined by an ultrasonic technique, and compared with the coarse-grained, fully-dense value.

  17. On the reliability of neutron diffraction for residual stress measurement in cold-drawn steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Mompean, F.; Hofmann, M.; Atienza, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    Residual strains were measured in the ferrite phase of pearlitic steel rods along the radial, axial and hoop directions. Two samples with different initial diameters were subjected to one drawing pass (using same drawing parameters) with 20% section reduction and measured in two different neutron diffraction instruments. The results show that the residual strain state is very similar in both cases, regardless of the diameter of the initial rod. This means that the final residual strain-stress state is unique and it is related to the cold-drawing process parameters. In addition, the results show the reliability of strain scanning with different neutron instruments and experimental conditions.

  18. Concurrent tailoring of fabrication process and interphase layer to reduce residual stresses in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented to reduce the residual matrix stresses in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) by optimizing the fabrication process and interphase layer characteristics. The response of the fabricated MMC was simulated based on nonlinear micromechanics. Application cases include fabrication tailoring, interphase tailoring, and concurrent fabrication-interphase optimization. Two composite systems, silicon carbide/titanium and graphite/copper, are considered. Results illustrate the merits of each approach, indicate that concurrent fabrication/interphase optimization produces significant reductions in the matrix residual stresses and demonstrate the strong coupling between fabrication and interphase tailoring.

  19. Measuring stiffness and residual stress of thin films by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang; Chen, Jianfeng; Chu, Jiaru

    2016-11-01

    A method based on contact resonance atomic force microscopy (AFM) was proposed to determine the mechanical properties of thin films. By analyzing the contact resonance frequencies of an AFM probe while the tip was in contact with the sample, the stiffness and residual stress of a freestanding circular SiN x membrane were evaluated quantitatively. The obtained magnitude of residual stress was in reasonable agreement with that determined by wafer curvature measurement. The method was verified to have much better mechanical sensitivity than the popular AFM bending test method. Its promising application to fast, nondestructive mechanical mapping of thin-film-type structures at the nanoscale was also demonstrated.

  20. Residual thermal stresses in filamentary polymer-matrix composites containing an elastomeric interphase

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S.D.; Pittman, C.U. Jr.; Hackett, R.M. Mississippi Univ., University )

    1993-01-01

    A three-phase micromechanical model based on the method of cells is formulated to characterize residual thermal stresses in filamentary composites containing an interphase between the fiber and the matrix. This is the first such study to incorporate a true three-phase version of the method of cells. The model's performance is critically evaluated using data generated from other micromechanical models. Subsequently, a parametric study is performed to quantify the residual stresses in two hypothetical graphite fiber/epoxy matrix composites: one containing an elastomeric interphase whose Young's modulus is less than that of the fiber and the matrix and one incorporating an interphase whose Young's modulus is intermediate with respect to the fiber and the matrix. The data correlate the residual thermal stresses in the fiber, interphase and matrix as a function of the interphase thickness and fiber volume fraction within each model eomposite. The study makes a broad assessment of the stress-attenuating characteristics that each interphase imparts to the graphite/epoxy composites. Over the range of variables considered, properly dimensioning the elastomer interphase leads to a more favorable reduction of residual thermal stress. 38 refs.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Residual Stress in Thick Titanium Alloy Plate Joined with Electron Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Jian Xun

    2010-10-01

    A finite-element (FE) simulation process integrating three dimensional (3D) with two-dimensional (2D) models is introduced to investigate the residual stress of a thick plate with 50-mm thickness welded by an electron beam. A combined heat source is developed by superimposing a conical volume heat source and a uniform surface heat source to simulate the temperature field of the 2D model with a fine mesh, and then the optimal heat source parameters are employed by the elongated heat source for the 3D simulation without trial simulations. The welding residual stress also is investigated with emphasis on the through-thickness stress for the thick plate. Results show that the agreement between simulation and experiment is good with a reasonable degree of accuracy in respect to the residual stress on the top surface and the weld profile. The through-thickness residual stress of the thick plate induced by electron beam welding is distinctly different from that of the arc welding presented in the references.

  2. Residual stress evaluation in martensitic stainless steel as a function of gas quenching pressure using thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Edward D.; Wong, Yat Choy; Ripley, Maurice I.

    2006-11-01

    The distribution of bulk residual stress was evaluated for two modified grades of martensitic stainless steels. Residual stress levels generated in the two steels were evaluated as a function of quenching gas pressure in vacuum heat treatment using neutron diffraction. It was observed that the levels of residual stress increased with increasing gas pressure, with the high hardenability grade showing the greater increase. However, quenching at 6 bar gas pressure resulted in a significant drop in the levels of residual stress, an observation that is interpreted in terms of the accommodation of high levels of strain by the presence of high levels of interlath retained austenite.

  3. Influence of Processing Parameters on Residual Stress of High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermally Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, M.; Eybel, R.; Asselin, B.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Cerps, J.

    2012-10-01

    Residual stress in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating was studied based on design of experiment (DOE) with five factors of oxygen flow, fuel gas hydrogen flow, powder feed rate, stand-off distance, and surface speed of substrate. In each DOE run, the velocity and temperature of in-flight particle in flame, and substrate temperature were measured. Almen-type N strips were coated, and their deflections after coating were used for evaluation of residual stress level in the coating. The residual stress in the coating obtained in all DOE runs is compressive. In the present case of HVOF thermally sprayed coating, the residual stress is determined by three types of stress: peening, quenching, and cooling stress generated during spraying or post spraying. The contribution of each type stress to the final compressive residual stress in the coating depends on material properties of coating and substrate, velocity and temperature of in-flight particle, and substrate temperature. It is found that stand-off distance is the most important factor to affect the final residual stress in the coating, following by two-factor interaction of oxygen flow and hydrogen flow. At low level of stand-off distance, higher velocity of in-flight particle in flame and higher substrate temperature post spraying generate more peening stress and cooling stress, resulting in higher compressive residual stress in the coating.

  4. Residual internal stress optimization for EPON 828/DEA thermoset resin using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Garth D.; Rasberry, Roger D.; Kaczmarowski, Amy K.; Stavig, Mark E.; Gibson, Cory S.; Udd, Eric; Roach, Allen R.; Nation, Brendan

    2015-05-01

    Internal residual stresses and overall mechanical properties of thermoset resins are largely dictated by the curing process. It is well understood that fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can be used to evaluate temperature and cure induced strain while embedded during curing. Herein, is an extension of this work whereby we use FBGs as a probe for minimizing the internal residual stress of an unfilled and filled Epon 828/DEA resin. Variables affecting stress including cure cycle, mold (release), and adhesion promoting additives will be discussed and stress measurements from a strain gauge pop-off test will be used as comparison. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. The variability residual stresses of thick superconductor films during orthorhombic to tetragonal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Danyluk, S.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1992-04-01

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} thick films have been deposited by spray pyrolysis of a sol-gel on 10 cm diameter polycrystalline MgO wafers. The film thickness was built up in layers of approximately 1 {mu}m thick. The in-plane residual stresses were measured by an optical interferometry (shadow moire) method as a function of film structure. In-plane residual stress maps over the area of the wafer have been obtained. The average stress of the 5 {mu}m orthorhombic phase was 0.84 GPa. As the film transforms from the orthorhombic to the tetragonal structure, the tensile stresses decreased by 0.5 GPa.

  6. The variability residual stresses of thick superconductor films during orthorhombic to tetragonal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Danyluk, S. . Dept. of Civil Engineering, Mechanics, and Metallurgy); Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} thick films have been deposited by spray pyrolysis of a sol-gel on 10 cm diameter polycrystalline MgO wafers. The film thickness was built up in layers of approximately 1 {mu}m thick. The in-plane residual stresses were measured by an optical interferometry (shadow moire) method as a function of film structure. In-plane residual stress maps over the area of the wafer have been obtained. The average stress of the 5 {mu}m orthorhombic phase was 0.84 GPa. As the film transforms from the orthorhombic to the tetragonal structure, the tensile stresses decreased by 0.5 GPa.

  7. Extremal states of energy of a double-layered thick-walled tube - application to residually stressed arteries.

    PubMed

    Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Various biological tissues are designed to optimally support external loads for complex geometries and mechanobiological structures. This results in complex microstructures of such materials. The design of, for instance, (healthy) arteries, which are in the focus of this work, is characterised by a residually stressed fibre-reinforced multi-layered composite with highly non-linear elastic response. The complex interaction of material properties with the geometry and residual stress effects enables the optimal support under different blood pressures, respectively blood flow, within the vessel. The fibres reinforcing the arterial wall, as well as residual stresses present in the vessel, strongly influence its overall behaviour and performance. Turn-over and remodelling processes of the collagenous fibres occurring in the respective layers - either resulting from natural growth phenomena or from artificially induced changes in loading condition such as stent deployment - support the optimisation of the multi-layered composite structure of arteries for the particular loading conditions present in the artery. Within this contribution, the overall energetic properties of an artery are discussed by means of the inflation, bending and extension of a double-layered cylindrical tube. Different states of residual stresses and different fibre orientations are considered so that, for instance, representative fibre angles that result in extremal states of the total potential energy can be identified. In view of turn-over and remodelling processes, these orientations are considered to constitute preferred directions of fibre alignment. In summary, the main goal of this work is to calculate optimal material, structural and loading parameters by concepts of energy-minimisation. Several numerical studies show that the obtained values - such as the fibre orientations, the residual axial stretch and the opening angle - are in good agreement with respective physiological parameters

  8. Residual stress induced crystalline to amorphous phase transformation in Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhawan, Sahil; Vedeshwar, Agnikumar G.; Dhawan, Tanuj

    2014-07-28

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} quantum dots (QDs) were grown using a simple technique of vacuum thermal evaporation. QDs were found to be crystalline in nature by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) in TEM. Samples with thickness up to 20 nm did not show any significant residual strain. Residual stress effect on band gap of crystalline Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was studied for films thicker than 20 nm. Residual strain was determined using SAED of the films with reference to powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Films thicker than 45 nm become amorphous as analyzed by both SAED and XRD. The optical absorption of films in the range 25–60 nm indicates significantly varying optical band gap of films. The varying band gap with film thickness scales linearly very well with the variation of residual stress with film thickness. The residual stress dependence of band gap of crystalline films yields stress free band gap as 3.37 eV with pressure coefficient of band gap (∂E{sub g}/∂P){sub T} = −29.3 meV/GPa. From this study, the crystalline to amorphous transformation in tetragonal form of M-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been determined to be at about 14 GPa. Both pressure coefficient of band gap and crystalline to amorphous transition for tetragonal M-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been determined for the first time in the literature.

  9. Extremal states of energy of a double-layered thick-walled tube - application to residually stressed arteries.

    PubMed

    Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Various biological tissues are designed to optimally support external loads for complex geometries and mechanobiological structures. This results in complex microstructures of such materials. The design of, for instance, (healthy) arteries, which are in the focus of this work, is characterised by a residually stressed fibre-reinforced multi-layered composite with highly non-linear elastic response. The complex interaction of material properties with the geometry and residual stress effects enables the optimal support under different blood pressures, respectively blood flow, within the vessel. The fibres reinforcing the arterial wall, as well as residual stresses present in the vessel, strongly influence its overall behaviour and performance. Turn-over and remodelling processes of the collagenous fibres occurring in the respective layers - either resulting from natural growth phenomena or from artificially induced changes in loading condition such as stent deployment - support the optimisation of the multi-layered composite structure of arteries for the particular loading conditions present in the artery. Within this contribution, the overall energetic properties of an artery are discussed by means of the inflation, bending and extension of a double-layered cylindrical tube. Different states of residual stresses and different fibre orientations are considered so that, for instance, representative fibre angles that result in extremal states of the total potential energy can be identified. In view of turn-over and remodelling processes, these orientations are considered to constitute preferred directions of fibre alignment. In summary, the main goal of this work is to calculate optimal material, structural and loading parameters by concepts of energy-minimisation. Several numerical studies show that the obtained values - such as the fibre orientations, the residual axial stretch and the opening angle - are in good agreement with respective physiological parameters

  10. Intrinsic Rotation from a Residual Stress at the Boundary of a Cylindrical Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.; Diamond, P. H.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2010-02-12

    An azimuthally symmetric radially sheared azimuthal flow is driven by a nondiffusive, or residual, turbulent stress localized to a narrow annular region at the boundary of a cylindrical magnetized helicon plasma device. A no-slip condition, imposed by ion-neutral flow damping outside the annular region, combined with a diffusive stress arising from turbulent and collisional viscous damping in the central plasma region, leads to net plasma rotation in the absence of momentum input.

  11. Residual stresses in biaxially fatigued austenitic stainless steel sample of cruciform geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu V.; Balagurov, A. M.; Schreiber, J.; Evans, A.; Venter, A. M.

    2012-02-01

    A specifically designed cruciform-shaped austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 sample was subjected to ex-situ biaxial tension-compression cycling to establish ferromagnetic martensitic phase conversion under the action of plastic deformation. The time-of-flight neutron diffraction technique was employed for in-plane residual stress determination in this sample for both the austenitic and martensitic phases. The 2D data enabled determination of macro-, micro-, hydro- and deviatoric contributions to the total phase stresses.

  12. Residual stresses in biaxially fatigued austenitic stainless steel sample of cruciform geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu. V.; Balagurov, A. M.; Schreiber, J.; Evans, A.; Venter, A. M.

    2011-03-01

    A specifically designed cruciform-shaped austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 sample was subjected to ex-situ biaxial tension-compression cycling to establish ferromagnetic martensitic phase conversion under the action of plastic deformation. The time-of-flight neutron diffraction technique was employed for in-plane residual stress determination in this sample for both the austenitic and martensitic phases. The 2D data enabled determination of the macro-, micro-, hydro- and deviatoric contributions to the total phase stresses.

  13. Residual stresses in a stainless steel - titanium alloy joint made with the explosive technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu V.; Balagurov, A. M.; Sabirov, B. M.; Evans, A.; Davydov, V.; Venter, A. M.

    2012-02-01

    Joining of pipes from stainless steel (SS) and titanium (Ti) alloy still experience serious technical problems. Recently, reliable and hermetic joining of SS and Ti pipes has been achieved with the explosive bonding technique in the Russian Federal Nuclear Center. Such adapters are earmarked for use at the future International Linear Collider. The manufactured SS-Ti adapters have excellent mechanical behavior at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, during high-pressure tests and thermal cycling. We here report the first neutron diffraction investigation of the residual stresses in a SS-Ti adapter on the POLDI instrument at the SINQ spallation source. The strain scanning across the adapter walls into the SS-SS and SS-Ti pipes sections encompassed measurement of the axial, radial and hoop strain components, which were transformed into residual stresses. The full stress information was successfully determined for the three steel pipes involved in the joint. The residual stresses do not exceed 300 MPa in magnitude. All stress components have tensile values close to the adapter internal surface, whilst they are compressive close to the outer surface. The strong incoherent and weak coherent neutron scattering cross-sections of Ti did not allow for the reliable determination of stresses inside the titanic pipe.

  14. Infrared birefringence imaging of residual stress and bulk defects in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati, Vidya; Schoenfelder, Stephan; Castellanos, Sergio; Oener, Sebastian; Koepge, Ringo; Sampson, Aaron; Marcus, Matthew A.; Lai, Barry; Morhenn, Humphrey; Hahn, Giso; Bagdahn, Joerg; Buonassisi1, Tonio

    2010-05-05

    This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to date, and advance four closely related topics. (1) We present a method to decouple macroscopic thermally-induced residual stresses and microscopic bulk defect related stresses. In contrast to previous reports, thermally-induced residual stresses in wafer-sized samples are generally found to be less than 5 MPa, while defect-related stresses can be several times larger. (2) We describe the unique IR birefringence signatures, including stress magnitudes and directions, of common microdefects in mc-Si solar cell materials including: {beta}-SiC and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} microdefects, twin bands, nontwin grain boundaries, and dislocation bands. In certain defects, local stresses up to 40 MPa can be present. (3) We relate observed stresses to other topics of interest in solar cell manufacturing, including transition metal precipitation, wafer mechanical strength, and minority carrier lifetime. (4) We discuss the potential of IBI as a quality-control technique in industrial solar cell manufacturing.

  15. Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.

    DOEpatents

    Green, David J.; Sglavo, Vincenzo M.; Tandon, Rajan

    2003-02-11

    Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

  16. Structural transformation and residual stresses in surface layers of α + β titanium alloys nanotextured by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Yu. R.; Golosov, E. V.; Vershinina, T. N.; Zhidkov, M. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Ligachev, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    Surface topography, phase composition and compressive residual stresses were characterized in surface layers of α + β titanium alloys VT6 (Ti-6Al-4V) and VT16 (Ti-3Al-4.5V-5Mo) nanotextured by 744-nm, 120-fs-laser pulses. The relative content of β-phase, along with the residual compressive stresses, increases significantly in both these materials over the depth ~0.2 μ in the nanotextured surface layer comprised by nanograins and remains almost unchanged at higher depths of 1-2 μ in bulk. The laser-driven α → β phase transformation is related to the combined effect of ultrafast heating/cooling, strong (multi-GPa) shock waves, chemical segregation and nanograin formation induced during the ablative surface nanotexturing.

  17. Study of Welding Distortion and Residual Stress Considering Nonlinear Yield Stress Curves and Multi-constraint Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Youmin; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Inherent strain analysis has been successfully applied to predict welding deformations of large-scale structural components, while thermal-elastic-plastic finite element method is rarely used for its disadvantages of long calculation period and large storage space. In this paper, a hybrid model considering nonlinear yield stress curves and multi-constraint equations to thermal-elastic-plastic analysis is further proposed to predict welding distortions and residual stresses of large-scale structures. For welding T-joint structural steel S355JR by metal active gas welding, the published experiment results of temperature and displacement fields are applied to illustrate the credibility of the proposed integration model. By comparing numerical results of four different cases with the experiment results, it is verified that prediction precision of welding deformations and residual stresses is apparently improved considering the power-law hardening model, and computational time is also obviously shortened about 30.14% using multi-constraint equations. On the whole, the proposed hybrid method can be further used to precisely and efficiently predict welding deformations and residual stresses of large-scale structures.

  18. Study of Welding Distortion and Residual Stress Considering Nonlinear Yield Stress Curves and Multi-constraint Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Youmin; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Inherent strain analysis has been successfully applied to predict welding deformations of large-scale structural components, while thermal-elastic-plastic finite element method is rarely used for its disadvantages of long calculation period and large storage space. In this paper, a hybrid model considering nonlinear yield stress curves and multi-constraint equations to thermal-elastic-plastic analysis is further proposed to predict welding distortions and residual stresses of large-scale structures. For welding T-joint structural steel S355JR by metal active gas welding, the published experiment results of temperature and displacement fields are applied to illustrate the credibility of the proposed integration model. By comparing numerical results of four different cases with the experiment results, it is verified that prediction precision of welding deformations and residual stresses is apparently improved considering the power-law hardening model, and computational time is also obviously shortened about 30.14% using multi-constraint equations. On the whole, the proposed hybrid method can be further used to precisely and efficiently predict welding deformations and residual stresses of large-scale structures.

  19. Growth behavior of voids randomly distributed at grain boundary on thin metal film with bamboo microstructures under thermal residual stress field and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Mabao; Lu, Yi; Ren, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    Based on the rigid grain hypothesis, an analytic expression is developed to investigate the grain boundary void growth on a thin metal film with bamboo microstructures under thermal residual stress field and electric field. The effect of the microstructure of the thin metal film, thermal residual stress, applied electric field, and diffusivity ratio between the grain boundary and the interface on the growth behavior of the voids and the stress evolution is evaluated. The result shows that the thin metal film with fine grains near the anode end may inhibit void nucleation and growth, which is beneficial for the optimization design of the thin metal film with bamboo microstructures.

  20. Effects of processing on carbendazim residue in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Erdong; Tao, Wuqun; Yao, Xi; Wang, Jin; Tang, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Samples of Pleurotus ostreatus were exposed to fungicide carbendazim to study the effect of processing on the residues. In most cases, processing operations led to a significant decrease in residue levels in the finished products, particularly through washing, drying, and cooking processes. The results indicated that rinsing under running tap water led to more than 70.30% loss in carbendazim residues. When dried under sunlight could remove more than 70.30% residues. There was a 63.90-97.14% reduction after steaming, with processing time extending, the removal rates increased especially for lower initial residue level samples. The residue was almost completely removed by frying combined with microwave heating. Furthermore, boiling the mushrooms reduced the residue in the mushroom and no carbendazim residues were determined in the broth. PMID:27386113

  1. The effect of academic stress and attachment stress on stress-eaters and stress-undereaters.

    PubMed

    Emond, Michael; Ten Eycke, Kayla; Kosmerly, Stacey; Robinson, Adele Lafrance; Stillar, Amanda; Van Blyderveen, Sherry

    2016-05-01

    It is well established that stress is related to changes in eating patterns. Some individuals are more likely to increase their overall food intake under conditions of stress, whereas others are more likely to consume less food when stressed. Attachment style has been linked to disordered eating and eating disorders; however, comparisons of eating behaviors under attachment versus other types of stress have yet to be explored. The present laboratory study examined the eating patterns in self-identified stress-undereaters and stress-eaters under various types of stress. More specifically, the study examined the effects of academic and attachment stress on calorie, carbohydrate and sugar consumption within these two groups. Under the guise of critiquing student films, university students viewed either one of two stress-inducing videos (academic stress or attachment stress, both designed to be emotionally arousing) or a control video (designed to be emotionally neutral), and their food intake was recorded. Results demonstrated that the video manipulations were effective in inducing stress. Differential patterns of eating were noted based on group and stress condition. Specifically, stress-undereaters ate fewer calories, carbohydrates and sugars than stress-eaters in the academic stress condition, but not in the attachment stress or control condition. Findings suggest that specific types of stressors may influence eating behaviors differently.

  2. Morphology, Microstructure and Residual Stress in EB-PVD Erbia Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Alan; Saw, C K; Ferreira, J L; Harper, J S; Hayes, J.; Pint, Bruce A

    2007-01-01

    The electron-beam physical vapor deposition of erbium-oxide coatings onto sapphire wafers is investigated to evaluate processing effects on the residual stress state and microstructure. The erbium-oxide coatings are found to be in a compressive stress state. The crystallographic texture of the erbium-oxide coating is evaluated using X-ray diffraction along with an assessment of forming the cubic erbia phase as a function of substrate temperature. In addition to the cubic erbia phase, an orthorhombic phase is found at the lower deposition temperatures. A transition is found from a two-phase erbium-oxide coating to a single phase at deposition temperatures above 948 K. The variation in morphology with deposition temperature observed in fracture cross-sections is consistent with features of the classic zone growth models for vapor-deposited oxide coatings. For high-temperature applications, a deposition process temperature above 948 K is seen to produce a stoichiometric, fully dense, and equiaxed-polycrystalline coating of cubic erbia.

  3. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress.

  4. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1999-07-06

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material is disclosed comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress. 3 figs.

  5. Method for measuring residual stresses in materials by plastically deforming the material and interference pattern comparison

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of establishing a speckle pattern on the surface with a first laser then heating a portion of that pattern with an infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress dung heating and enables calculation of the stress.

  6. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, Martin J.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress.

  7. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: The Mean Stress Effect in Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study involved the utilization of the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) method to demonstrate the mean stress dependence of the thermoelastic constant. Titanium and nickel base alloys, commonly employed in aerospace gas turbines, were the materials of interest. The repeatability of the results was studied through a statistical analysis of the data. Although the mean stress dependence was well established, the ability to confidently quantify it was diminished by the experimental variations. If calibration of the thermoelastic response to mean stress can be successfully implemented, it is feasible to use the relationship to determine a structure's residual stress state.

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in low-carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the preferred orientation on the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity in low carbon steels are investigated. The sensitivity of the acousto-elastic constant to changes in microstructure is assessed as well as the possibility of determining some mechanical properties of a material by measuring the acousto-elastic constant.

  9. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-04

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  10. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  11. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-01

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  12. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  13. Measuring multiple residual-stress components using the contour method and multiple cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Swenson, Hunter; Pagliaro, Pierluigi; Zuccarello, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    The conventional contour method determines one component of stress over the cross section of a part. The part is cut into two, the contour of the exposed surface is measured, and Bueckner's superposition principle is analytically applied to calculate stresses. In this paper, the contour method is extended to the measurement of multiple stress components by making multiple cuts with subsequent applications of superposition. The theory and limitations are described. The theory is experimentally tested on a 316L stainless steel disk with residual stresses induced by plastically indenting the central portion of the disk. The stress results are validated against independent measurements using neutron diffraction. The theory has implications beyond just multiple cuts. The contour method measurements and calculations for the first cut reveal how the residual stresses have changed throughout the part. Subsequent measurements of partially relaxed stresses by other techniques, such as laboratory x-rays, hole drilling, or neutron or synchrotron diffraction, can be superimposed back to the original state of the body.

  14. Residual stress profiling in the ferrite and cementite phases of cold-drawn steel rods by synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Perez, M.L.; Mompean, F.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Atienza, J.M.; Elices, M.; Peng Rulin; Buslaps, T.

    2004-10-18

    Residual stress profiles have been measured in the ferrite and cementite phases of a cold-drawn eutectoid steel rod by neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction in three orientations (axial, radial and hoop). Neutron diffraction was employed to measure the ferrite stresses, whereas synchrotron radiation was used for ferrite and cementite stresses. Experimental results in the ferrite phase showed excellent agreement between both experimental techniques when gauge volume effects were accounted for. Axial cementite stresses were always tensile, with a maximum value close to 1700 MPa at the rod surface. Radial and hoop cementite stresses were compressive along the diameter of the rod, with a minimum of -1900 MPa at the rod center. A 3D-finite element simulation of the macro residual stresses resulting from cold-drawing showed remarkable agreement with those determined from the experimental measurements in the ferrite and cementite phases.

  15. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stir zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.

  16. Residual stress measurement by successive extension of a slot: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, M.B.

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the technical literature on techniques that employ successive extension of a slot and the resulting deformations to measure residual stress. Such techniques are known variously in the literature as the compliance or crack compliance method, the successive cracking method, the slotting method, and a fracture mechanics based approach. The report introduces the field and describes the basic aspects of these methods. The report then reviews all literature on the theoretical developments of the method. The theory portion first considers forward method solutions including fracture mechanics, finite element, analytical, and body force methods. Then it examines inverse solutions, including incremental inverses and series expansions. Next, the report reviews all experimental applications of slotting methods. Aspects reviewed include the specimen geometry and material, the details of making the slot, the method used to measure deformation, and the theoretical solutions used to solve for stress. Finally, the report makes a brief qualitative comparison between slotting methods and other residual stress measurement methods.

  17. Residual Stress Measurements with Laser Speckle Correlation Interferometry and Local Heat Treating

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.; Miller, R.F.; Vikram, C.S.

    1994-01-06

    A new experimental technique has been devised to measure residual stresses in ductile materials with a combination of laser speckle pattern interferometry and spot heating. The speckle pattern interferometer measures in-plane deformations while the heating provides for very localized stress relief. The residual stresses are determined by the amount of strain that is measured subsequent to the heating and cool-down of the region being interrogated. A simple lumped parameter model is presented to provide a description of the method. This description is followed by presentations of the results of finite element analyses and experimental results with uniaxial test specimens. Excellent agreement between the experiments and the computer analyses were obtained.

  18. Residual stress determination in an overlay dissimilar welded pipe by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Em, Vyacheslav; Hubbard, Camden R; Lee, Ho-Jin; Park, Kwang Soo

    2011-01-01

    Residual stresses were determined through the thickness of a dissimilar weld overlay pipe using neutron diffraction. The specimen has a complex joining structure consisting of a ferritic steel (SA508), austenitic steel (F316L), Ni-based consumable (Alloy 182), and overlay of Ni-base superalloy (Alloy 52M). It simulates pressurized nozzle components, which have been a critical issue under the severe crack condition of nuclear power reactors. Two neutron diffractometers with different spatial resolutions have been utilized on the identical specimen for comparison. The macroscopic 'stress-free' lattice spacing (d{sub o}) was also obtained from both using a 2-mm width comb-like coupon. The results show significant changes in residual stresses from tension (300-400 MPa) to compression (-600 MPa) through the thickness of the dissimilar weld overlay pipe specimen.

  19. Microstructure and residual stress in γ-LiAlO 2 layer fabricated by vapor transport equilibration on (1 1 2¯ 0) sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinzhen; Yang, Weiqiao; Li, Shuzhi; Peng, Guangliang; Liu, Shiliang; Zou, Jun; Zhou, Shengming; Xu, Jun; zhang, Rong

    2004-09-01

    γ-LiAlO2 layers have been fabricated by vapor transport equilibration (VTE) technique on (1 1 2bar 0) sapphire substrate. Microstructure of γ-LiAlO2 layers is characterized by X-ray diffraction as functions of VTE treatment temperature and sapphire surface roughness, it has been found that the LiAlO2 layers show a (2 0 0) preferred orientation. The effects of the VTE treatment temperature and sapphire surface roughness on the residual stress have been studied. The results show that residual stress in γ-LiAlO2 layers varies from tension to compression with increasing VTE treatment temperature , but the thermal stress is compressive; the values of residual stress in γ-LiAlO2 layers increase with the sapphire surface roughness.

  20. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  1. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-02

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  2. Measurement of residual stresses in deposited films of SOFC component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.; Momma, A.; Nagata, S.; Kasuga, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The stress induced in Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)s has important influence on the lifetime of SOFC. But the data on stress in SOFC and mechanical properties of SOW component materials have not been accumulated enough to manufacture SOFC. Especially, the data of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} cathode and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} interconnection have been extremely limited. We have estimated numerically the dependences of residual stress in SOFC on the material properties, the cell structure and the fabrication temperatures of the components, but these unknown factors have caused obstruction to simulate the accurate behavior of residual stress. Therefore, the residual stresses in deposited La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} films are researched by the observation of the bending behavior of the substrate strips. The films of SOFC component materials were prepared by the RF sputtering method, because: (1) It can fabricate dense films of poor sinterable material such as La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} compared with sintering or plasma spray method. (2) For the complicated material such as perovskite materials, the difference between the composition of a film and that of a target material is generally small. (3) It can fabricate a thick ceramics film by improving of the deposition rate. For example, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thick films of 50{mu}m can be fabricated with the deposition rate of approximately 5{mu}m/h industrially. In this paper, the dependence of residual stress on the deposition conditions is defined and mechanical properties of these materials are estimated from the results of the experiments.

  3. Local residual stress monitoring of aluminum nitride MEMS using UV micro-Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Sukwon; Griffin, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-06

    Localized stress variation in aluminum nitride (AlN) sputtered on patterned metallization has been monitored through the use of UV micro-Raman spectroscopy. This technique utilizing 325 nm laser excitation allows detection of the AlN E2(high) phonon mode in the presence of metal electrodes beneath the AlN layer with a high spatial resolution of less than 400 nm. The AlN film stress shifted 400 MPa from regions where AlN was deposited over a bottom metal electrode versus silicon dioxide. Thus, across wafer stress variations were also investigated showing that wafer level stress metrology, for example using wafer curvature measurements, introduces large uncertaintiesmore » for predicting the impact of AlN residual stress on the device performance.« less

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  5. Research opportunities and facilities at ORNL`s residual stress user center

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.R.; Watkins, T.R.; Kozaczek, K.; Wang, X.-L.; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program at ORNL was established to help solve high-temperature materials problems that limit the efficiency and reliability of advanced energy-conversion systems. Both proprietary and nonproprietary research can be conducted within the user program. The facilities are open to researchers in US industry, universities, and federal laboratories. The Residual Stress User Center (RSUC), one of the six HTML user centers, was recently established and consists of two high precision x-ray diffraction systems for measurement of residual strain and texture. Both biaxial and triaxial residual strain data can be collected. Attachments to the diffraction system include a position sensitive detector and a laser specimen positioning system. The RSUC has capabilities for electropolishing and strain measurement with strain gauges. A complementary neutron diffraction facility has recently been developed and demonstrated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL. The neutron diffraction facility enables mapping of macro residual stresses throughout the volume of a component, complementing the near surface stress measurements available by x-ray diffraction. The neutron facility has been proposed as an addition to the RSUC.

  6. Aluminum alloys for satellite boxes : engineering guidelines for obtaining adequate strength while minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    This report provides strategies for minimizing machining distortion in future designs of aluminum alloy satellite boxes, based in part on key findings from this investigation. The report outlines types of aluminum alloys and how they are heat treated, how residual stresses develop during heat treatment of age hardening alloys, ways residual stresses can be minimized, and the design of machining approaches to minimize distortion in parts that contain residual stresses. Specific recommendations are made regarding alloy selection, heat treatment, stress relieving, and machining procedures for boxes requiring various strength levels with emphasis on 6061 and 7075 aluminum alloys.

  7. Tutorial: Understanding residual stress in polycrystalline thin films through real-time measurements and physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chason, Eric; Guduru, Pradeep R.

    2016-05-01

    Residual stress is a long-standing issue in thin film growth. Better understanding and control of film stress would lead to enhanced performance and reduced failures. In this work, we review how thin film stress is measured and interpreted. The results are used to describe a comprehensive picture that is emerging of what controls stress evolution. Examples from multiple studies are discussed to illustrate how the stress depends on key parameters (e.g., growth rate, material type, temperature, grain size, morphology, etc.). The corresponding stress-generating mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the data are also described. To develop a fuller understanding, we consider the kinetic factors that determine how much each of these processes contributes to the overall stress under different conditions. This leads to a kinetic model that can predict the dependence of the stress on multiple parameters. The model results are compared with the experiments to show how this approach can explain many features of stress evolution.

  8. The Sensitivity of Abradable Coating Residual Stresses to Varying Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports recent research on abradable materials employed for aero-engine applications. Such thermal spray coatings are used extensively within the gas turbine, applied to the inner surface of compressor and turbine shroud sections, coating the periphery of the blade rotation path. The function of an abradable seal is to wear preferentially when rotating blades come into contact with it, while minimizing over-tip clearance and improving the efficiency of the engine. Thermal spraying of an abradable coating onto a substrate imparts two components of residual stress; rapid quenching stresses as the spray material cools on impact and stresses arising from differential thermal contraction. In-service thermal stresses are superimposed by the differential expansion of these bonded layers. The combination of the production and operation history will lead to thermal-mechanical fatigue damage within the abradable coating. The present paper will describe the numerical modeling and sensitivity analysis of the thermal spray process. The sensitivity of residual stresses (with varying material properties, coating/substrate thickness, Poisson’s ratio, and substrate temperature) predicted by the Tsui and Clyne progressive deposition model enabled identification of performance drivers to coating integrity. Selecting material properties that minimize in-service stresses is a crucial stage in advancing future abradable performance.

  9. Using Designed Residual Stress Profiles to Produce Flaw-Tolerant Glass

    SciTech Connect

    BEAUCHAMP, E.K.; GLASS, S. JILL; GREEN, D.J.; SGLAVO, M.

    1999-09-02

    A processing approach has been identified and reduced to practice in which a residual stress profile can be designed such that cracks in a brittle material are arrested or grow in a stable fashion. In the procedure, cracks in the body encounter an increase in the magnitude of residual compression as the crack propagates. If correctly designed, the process increases strength, significantly decreases strength variability and gives rise to multiple cracking. This approach is demonstrated for an ion-exchanged silicate glass using four-point and biaxial flexure strength testing. Optical microscopy was used to study the morphology and development of the multiple cracking that precedes the final failure.

  10. Young's Modulus, Residual Stress, and Crystal Orientation of Doubly Clamped Silicon Nanowire Beams.

    PubMed

    Calahorra, Y; Shtempluck, O; Kotchetkov, V; Yaish, Y E

    2015-05-13

    Initial or residual stress plays an important role in nanoelectronics. Valley degeneracy in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is partially lifted due to built-in stresses, and consequently, electron-phonon scattering rate is reduced and device mobility and performance are improved. In this study we use a nonlinear model describing the force-deflection relationship to extract the Young's modulus, the residual stress, and the crystallographic growth orientation of SiNW beams. Measurements were performed on suspended doubly clamped SiNWs subjected to atomic force microscopy (AFM) three-point bending constraints. The nanowires comprised different growth directions and two SiO2 sheath thicknesses, and underwent different rapid thermal annealing processes. Analysis showed that rapid thermal annealing introduces compressive strains into the SiNWs and may result in buckling of the SiNWs. Furthermore, the core-shell model together with the residual stress analysis accurately describe the Young's modulus of oxide covered SiNWs and the crystal orientation of the measured nanowires. PMID:25826449

  11. Influence of engineered interfaces on residual stresses and mechanical response in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the inherent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between fiber and matrix within metal and intermetallic matrix composite systems, high residual stresses can develop under various thermal loading conditions. These conditions include cooling from processing temperature to room temperature as well as subsequent thermal cycling. As a result of these stresses, within certain composite systems, radial, circumferential, and/or longitudinal cracks have been observed to form at the fiber matrix interface region. A number of potential solutions for reducing this thermally induced residual stress field have been proposed recently. Examples of some potential solutions are high CTE fibers, fiber preheating, thermal anneal treatments, and an engineered interface. Here the focus is on designing an interface (by using a compensating/compliant layer concept) to reduce or eliminate the thermal residual stress field and, therefore, the initiation and propagation of cracks developed during thermal loading. Furthermore, the impact of the engineered interface on the composite's mechanical response when subjected to isothermal mechanical load histories is examined.

  12. Young's Modulus, Residual Stress, and Crystal Orientation of Doubly Clamped Silicon Nanowire Beams.

    PubMed

    Calahorra, Y; Shtempluck, O; Kotchetkov, V; Yaish, Y E

    2015-05-13

    Initial or residual stress plays an important role in nanoelectronics. Valley degeneracy in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is partially lifted due to built-in stresses, and consequently, electron-phonon scattering rate is reduced and device mobility and performance are improved. In this study we use a nonlinear model describing the force-deflection relationship to extract the Young's modulus, the residual stress, and the crystallographic growth orientation of SiNW beams. Measurements were performed on suspended doubly clamped SiNWs subjected to atomic force microscopy (AFM) three-point bending constraints. The nanowires comprised different growth directions and two SiO2 sheath thicknesses, and underwent different rapid thermal annealing processes. Analysis showed that rapid thermal annealing introduces compressive strains into the SiNWs and may result in buckling of the SiNWs. Furthermore, the core-shell model together with the residual stress analysis accurately describe the Young's modulus of oxide covered SiNWs and the crystal orientation of the measured nanowires.

  13. Method to control residual stress in a film structure and a system thereof

    DOEpatents

    Parthum, Sr., Michael J.

    2008-12-30

    A method for controlling residual stress in a structure in a MEMS device and a structure thereof includes selecting a total thickness and an overall equivalent stress for the structure. A thickness for each of at least one set of alternating first and second layers is determined to control an internal stress with respect to a neutral axis for each of the at least alternating first and second layers and to form the structure based on the selected total thickness and the selected overall equivalent stress. Each of the at least alternating first and second layers is deposited to the determined thickness for each of the at least alternating first and second layers to form the structure.

  14. X-ray and neutron diffraction determination of residual stresses in a pressed and welded component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertini, G.; Bruno, G.; Fiori, F.; Girardin, E.; Giuliani, A.; Quadrini, E.

    2000-03-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments have been carried out, in order to determine the residual stress (RS) field in a pressed and welded mock-up of an engine support for motor-bike technology. Such investigation is suggested by the need to know the stress state of the component after forming and welding. This allows to assess the quality of the first machining and further to theoretically simulate its performances under operation. Results are presented below, showing a good agreement between X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments.

  15. Blocks and residual stresses in sapphire rods of different crystallographic orientations grown by the Stepanov method

    SciTech Connect

    Krymov, V. M. Nosov, Yu. G.; Bakholdin, S. I.; Maslov, V. N.; Shul’pina, I. L.

    2015-05-15

    The formation of blocks in shaped sapphire rods of two crystallographic orientations has been investigated. It is shown that, when growth occurs in the direction of the optical c axis, blocks are formed with a higher probability than in the case of growth in the a direction. A model of formation of blocks in rods of different orientations is proposed. The distribution of residual stresses over sapphire rod cross sections is measured by conoscopy. It is found that stresses increase from the middle of a rod to its periphery and reach 20 MPa.

  16. Residual stress and microstructural characterization using Rietveld refinement of a carburized layer in a 5120 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C.; O`Rourke, J.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns has been used to provide microstructural information complementary to conventional X-ray residual stress measurements through a carburized layer containing a maximum vol. 25 % of retained austenite. Layers in a simple specimen were removed incrementally by electropolishing and, at each depth in addition to conventional residual stress measurements in both the martensite and retained austenite, data were collected at {Psi} = 0 for Rietveld refinement. The refinements provide accurate values for the lattice parameters in the respective phases that can be related to carbon content and microstructure. Besides to providing qualitative information concerning the microstructure and possible surface decarburization, the c/a ratio of the martensite potentially offers an independent technique for determining carbon content profiles.

  17. Residual stress analysis in forming process of filament wound thick-walled CFRP pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Toshimi; Sekine, Hideki; Nakano, Kunio

    1995-11-01

    Residual stress analysis for the cracking phenomenon of filament would thick-walled CFRP pipes, which frequently occurs in the forming process of curing and thermal cycling through the course of the wet filament winding, was made from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. A simple analytical model to study the cracking in the CFRP pipes was proposed. The pipes are multilayered and reinforced in the axial and circumferential directions alternatively by carbon fibers. Taking account of the anisotropy of mechanical and thermal properties including the shrinkage strain, which depend considerably on the temperature, the residual stresses in the CFRP pipes were elucidated in the forming process, particularly, in cooling of the cure process.

  18. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  19. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  20. Residual stress relief due to fatigue in tetragonal lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D. A.; Mori, T.; Comyn, T. P.; Ringgaard, E.; Wright, J. P.

    2013-07-14

    High energy synchrotron XRD was employed to determine the lattice strain {epsilon}{l_brace}111{r_brace}and diffraction peak intensity ratio R{l_brace}200{r_brace}in tetragonal PZT ceramics, both in the virgin poled state and after a bipolar fatigue experiment. It was shown that the occurrence of microstructural damage during fatigue was accompanied by a reduction in the gradient of the {epsilon}{l_brace}111{r_brace}-cos{sup 2} {psi} plot, indicating a reduction in the level of residual stress due to poling. In contrast, the fraction of oriented 90 Degree-Sign ferroelectric domains, quantified in terms of R{l_brace}200{r_brace}, was not affected significantly by fatigue. The change in residual stress due to fatigue is interpreted in terms of a change in the average elastic stiffness of the polycrystalline matrix due to the presence of inter-granular microcracks.

  1. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of out-of-plane residual shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, R.; Kohli, D.; Sinha, V. P.; Prasad, G. J.; Samajdar, I.

    2014-02-01

    Bond strength and microstructural developments were investigated during fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. The study involved roll bonding of aluminum-aluminum (case A) and aluminum-aluminum + yttria (Y2O3) dispersion (case B). Case B approximated aluminum-uranium silicide (U3Si2) 'fuel-meat' in an actual plate fuel. Samples after different stages of fabrication, hot and cold rolling, were investigated through peel and pull tests, micro-hardness, residual stresses, electron and micro-focus X-ray diffraction. Measurements revealed a clear drop in bond strength during cold rolling: an observation unique to case B. This was related to significant increase in 'out-of-plane' residual shear stresses near the clad/dispersion interface, and not from visible signatures of microstructural heterogeneities.

  2. Relief of Residual Stress in Streamline Tie Rods by Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, R E; Reinhart, Fred M

    1941-01-01

    About two-thirds of the residual stress in cold-worked SAE 1050 steel tie rods was relieved by heating 30 minutes at 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Cold-worked austenitic stainless-steel tie rods could be heated at temperatures up to 1000 degrees Fahrenheit without lowering the important physical properties. The corrosion resistance, in laboratory corrosion test, of straight 18:8 and titanium-treated 18:8 materials appeared to be impaired after heating at temperatures above 800 degrees or 900 degrees fahrenheit. Columbium-treated and molybdenum-treated 18:8 steel exhibited improved stability over a wide range of temperatures. Tie rods of either material could be heated 30 minutes with safety at any temperature up to 1000 degrees Fahrenheit. At this temperature most of the residual stress would be relieved.

  3. Non-destructive measurements of slip and residual stress in metals at KUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Masayoshi

    1995-02-01

    Three kinds of Bragg scattering set-ups have been installed in the supermirror neutron guide hall at KUR with the aim of performing residual stress measurements in pure metals, multi-phase steels and metal-matrix composites. Two of the set-ups are time-of-flight diffractometers with point detectors and the third is a crystal diffractometer with two one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors. The materials are satisfactorily tested.

  4. Residual stress in the cylindrical drawing cup of SUS304 stainless steel evaluated by split-ring test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang-Hong; Yuan, Dao-He; Xiang, Jun-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Gang; Zhou, Yi-Chun

    2016-02-01

    The residual stresses in the wall of a SUS304 stainless steel cylindrical drawing cup were evaluated by split-ring tests, and the influences of stamping die parameters on the residual stress were investigated. A new theoretical model of a split-ring test was developed to evaluate the residual stress in a ring, which was verified to be reasonable and reliable by numerical simulations with ABAQUS code and by nanoindentation tests. Seven groups of split-ring tests were completed, and the residual stresses were calculated according to the theoretical model. The split-ring test results showed that the circumferential residual stress in the wall of the SUS304 stainless steel cylindrical drawing cup was very large and did not change with the different die corner radius. The circumferential residual stress first increased with the increase of drawing punch-die clearance, then was almost unchanged when the clearance increased greater than blank thickness 1 mm. Thus, a smaller clearance was suggested to be chosen to reduce the residual stress in the wall of the SUS304 stainless steel drawing cup.

  5. Thermal-induced residual stresses affect the fractographic patterns of zirconia-veneer dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Veneer fractures in dental zirconia-veneer prostheses are more frequent clinically than in conventional metal-ceramic systems. This is thought to be due to the increased residual stresses generated within the veneer during fabrication when zirconia is the infrastructure material. This investigation aimed to analyze the fractographic features of fractured zirconia-veneer dental crowns submitted to a load-to-failure test and to a more clinically relevant in vitro chewing simulation fatigue test. As-sintered and sandblasted zirconia copings were veneered with glass-ceramic with different coefficients of thermal expansion and cooled following two cooling rates, creating, this way, different levels of stresses within the veneer. Crowns with different thermal mismatch combinations and different cooling rates were hypothesized to present particular fracture patterns. A careful examination of >1000 scanning electron microscopy images of the fracture surfaces was conducted in search of characteristic fractographic markings of fracture mechanisms connected to the stress state of the veneer. Distinctive structural features could be observed between groups veneered with the two different glass-ceramics and between fractured crowns under static and cyclic loading. The presence/absence of residual stresses zones within the veneer have shown to play the major role in the fracture pattern of zirconia-veneer dental prostheses. For the fatigue crowns, the zirconia core was never exposed, either for sandblasted and as-sintered groups.

  6. Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

    DOE PAGES

    Lam, Poh-Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2016-04-28

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram. It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress has amore » strong influence on the results.« less

  7. Experimental measurement and numerical simulation of residual stresses in a carburized layer of a 5120 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Shipley, J.C.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study of residual stress and microstructure has been performed for a carburized steel 5120 specimen. Specimens were cut from 5120 steel bar stock, in the shape of hockey pucks and were subsequently carburized and quenched. X-ray diffraction was used to record stress profiles through the case for the martensite and retained austenite on the two flat surfaces oriented up and down during the quench. Layer removal was performed by electropolishing. Rietveld analysis was used to determine the lattice parameters of the phases at each depth varying with both carbon content and stress. The experimental measurements are compared with a numerical simulation of the phase transformation and the metallurgical changes following the carburization and quench. Results am discussed in the context of the microstructure and the role played by the retained austenite in interpretation. In addition the carbon profile obtained from the lattice parameters is compared with profiles measured using burnout.

  8. Effect of Multi-Axial Loading on Residual Strain Tensor for 12L14 Steel Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, J. R.; Penumadu, Dayakar; Lou, Xin; Hubbard, Camden R

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating the state of residual strain or stress is critically important for structural materials and for reliable design of complex shape components that need to function in extreme environment subjected to large thermo-mechanical loading. When residual stress state is superposed to external loads, it can lead to reduction or increase in failure strength. Past diffraction studies for evaluating the residual strain state involved measuring lattice spacings in three orthogonal directions and do not often correspond to principal directions. To completely resolve the state of strain at a given location, a full strain tensor must be determined. This is especially important when characterizing materials or metallic components exposed to biaxial or complex loading. Neutron diffraction at the second Generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used in this study to measure strain tensors associated with different modes of stress path. Hollow cylinder steel samples with 2 mm wall thickness are subjected to either pure axial extension or pure torsion to simulate multi-axial loading conditions. A virgin sample that is not subjected to any deformation, but subjected to identical manufacturing conditions and machining steps involved to obtain hollow cylinder geometry is used for obtaining reference d-spacing for given hkl planes at target spatial location(s). The two samples which are subjected to either pure tension or torsion are loaded to a deformation state that corresponded to equal amount of octahedral shear strain which is an invariant. This procedure is used so that a basis for comparison between the two samples can be made to isolate the stress path effects. A 2-circle Huber orienter is used to obtain strain measurements on identical gauge volume at a series of chi and psi values. The residual state of stress tensor corresponding to ex situ (upon unloading) conditions is presented for three lattice planes (211, 110, 200) for

  9. Thermal residual stresses in silicon-carbide/titanium (0/90) laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The current work formulated a micromechanical analysis of a cross-ply laminate and calculated the thermal residual stress in a very thick (0/90)(sub 2n) silicon-carbide/titanium laminate. Results were also shown for a unidirectional laminate of the same material. Discrete fiber-matrix models assuming a rectangular array of fibers with a fiber volume fraction of 32.5 percent and a three-dimensional, finite-element analysis were used. Significant differences in the trends and magnitudes for the fiber, matrix, and interface stresses were calculated for unidirectional and (0/90) models. Larger hoop stresses calculated for the (0/90) model indicate that it may be more susceptible to radial cracking when subjected to mechanical loading than the unidirectional model. The axial stresses in the matrix were calculated to be slightly larger for the (0/90) model. The compressive axial stresses in the fiber were significantly larger in the (0/90) model. The presence of the cross-ply in the (0/90) model reduced the constraint on the fiber, producing radial interface stresses that were less compressive, which could lead to earlier failure of the fiber-matrix interface.

  10. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Beckermann, Christoph; Carlson, Kent

    2011-07-22

    Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting's overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of

  11. Optical properties and residual stress in aluminum nitride films prepared by alternating-current dual reactive magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chien-Jen; Jaing, Cheng-Chung; Lee, Kun-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2011-05-01

    Aluminum nitride films were deposited by alternating-current dual reactive magnetron sputtering. The influence of different nitrogen flow and working pressures at a sputtering power of 5 kW on the refractive index, extinction coefficient, crystalline structure, residual stress, and surface roughness of aluminum nitride films was discussed. The aluminum nitride film would have high refractive index, low extinction coefficient and small residual stress at suitable nitrogen flow rate and low working pressure.

  12. Calculation of the shrinkage-induced residual stress in a viscoelastic dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    A procedure able to describe the curing process of a particulate composite material used in a dental restoration is developed in the ANSYS environment. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restoration, activated by visible light. The model accounts for the dependence of the viscoelastic functions on temperature and degree of cure. Three geometries have been considered in the analysis that are representative of three different classes of dental restoration and mainly differ by the C (constrained)-factor, (i.e. the bounded to unbounded surface ratio). It was found that the temperature could give a necrosis in the vicinity of the tooth nerve and that the average stress at the interface between the composite and the tooth scales exponentially with the C-factor. The residual stress at the dental restoration interface is also compared with the uniaxial tensile strength of twelve commercially available composite materials: it clearly appears that the level of residual stress may overcome the strength of the composite, especially at high C-factors.

  13. The influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure of non-oriented silicon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hao, Linpo; Yi, Jingwen; Zhang, Xianglin; Luo, Zhonghan; Chen, Shenglin; Li, Rongfeng

    2016-05-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure. The residual stress in non-oriented silicon steel after punching process was measured by nanoindentation. The maximum depth was kept constant as 300 nm during nanoindentation. The material around indentation region exhibited no significant pile-up deformation. The calculation of residual stress was based on the Suresh theoretical model. Our experimental results show that residual compressive stress was generated around the sheared edge after punching. The width of residual stress affected zone by punching was around 0.4-0.5 mm. After annealing treatment, the residual stress was significantly decreased. Magnetic domain structure was observed according to the Bitter method. The un-annealed sample exhibited complicated domain patterns, and the widths of the magnetic domains varied between 3 μm and 8 μm. Most of the domain patterns of the annealed sample were 180°-domains and 90°-domains, and the widths of the domains decreased to 1-3 μm.

  14. Reactivation of posttraumatic stress in male disaster survivors: the role of residual symptoms.

    PubMed

    Boe, Hans Jakob; Holgersen, Katrine H; Holen, Are

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the relative distribution of resilient, remitted, chronic and reactivated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a population of survivors from a major civilian disaster. Residual PTSD symptoms were explored to identify predictors of future reactivation. Symptoms were measured by the Impact of Event Scale (IES) 5.5 months, 14 months and 5 years after the disaster. Forty-eight survivors (79%) were interviewed after 27 years. PTSD status was determined by using the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis I Disorders (SCID-I). The distributions were: 58.3% resilient, 14.6% remitted, 8.3% chronic, and 18.8% reactivated PTSD. Number of residual symptoms from intrusion and avoidance 14 months and 5 years past trauma predicted later reactivation. Intrusion symptoms in general, and sleep related intrusions in particular, were the most consistent predictors deserving special attention. PMID:20207518

  15. Compressional residual stress in Bastogne boudins revealed by synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin; Li, Yao; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Sintubin, Manuel; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Lattice distortions in crystals can be mapped at the micron scale using synchrotron X-ray Laue microdiffraction (μXRD). From lattice distortions the shape and orientation of the elastic strain tensor can be derived and interpreted in terms of residual stress. Here we apply the new method to vein quartz from the original boudinage locality at Bastogne, Belgium. A long-standing debate surrounds the kinematics of the Bastogne boudins. The μXRD measurements reveal a shortening residual elastic strain, perpendicular to the vein wall, corroborating the model that the Bastogne boudins formed by layer-parallel shortening and not by layer-parallel extension, as is in the geological community generally inferred by the process of boudinage.

  16. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment. PMID:24240901

  17. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment.

  18. Effect of household processing on fenazaquin residues in okra fruits.

    PubMed

    Duhan, Anil; Kumari, Beena; Gulati, Rachna

    2010-02-01

    Fenazaquin (4-[[4 (1,1-dimethylethyl) phenyl] ethoxy]quinazoline) is a new acaricide of the quinazoline class. Residue levels of fenazaquin were determined in unprocessed and processed okra fruits to evaluate the effect of different processes (washing, boiling and washing followed by boiling) in reduction of residues of this pesticide in okra. The study was carried out on okra crop (Variety, Varsha Uphar) in research farm of Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar with application of fenazaquin (Magister 10 EC) @ 125 ga.i./ha (Single Dose, T(1)) and 250 g a.i./ha (Double Dose, T(2)). Samples of okra fruits were collected on 0, 3, 7, 15 days after treatment and at harvest (30 days). Residues were estimated by gas chromatograph equipped with capillary column and nitrogen phosphorus detector. Residues reached below maximum residue limit of 0.01 mg/kg at harvest. The residues dissipated with half-life period of 3.13 days at lower dose and 4.43 days at higher dose. Processing is shown to be very effective in reducing the levels of fenazaquin residues in okra fruits. Maximum reduction (60-61%) was observed by washing + boiling followed by boiling/cooking (38-40%) and then by washing (31-32%).

  19. Residual stress analysis on tensile MMC specimens after loading/unloading tests in several conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandra; Albertini, Gianni; Manescu, Adrian

    2004-07-01

    Residual stresses have been investigated in samples made of AA6061+22% Al2O3 in order to correlate microstructural characteristics with mechanical performances. In particular, the possible occurrence of a brittle fracture induced by an excessive load transfer from the matrix to the reinforcement was investigated. To this end, macrostresses and microstresses were analysed. A neutron diffraction test on 12 specimens submitted to several loading/unloading conditions at different temperatures was performed. These measurements aimed to establish the optimal temperature for the initial extruded billet in pre-heating stage, before forging the final wheel hub.

  20. Residual Stress Reversal in Highly Strained Shot Peened Structural Elements. Degree awarded by Florida Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, William S.; Throckmorton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to further the understanding of a crack initiation problem in a highly strained pressure containment housing. Finite Element Analysis methods were used to model the behavior of shot peened materials undergoing plastic deformation. Analytical results are in agreement with laboratory tensile tests that simulated the actual housing load conditions. These results further validate the original investigation finding that the shot peened residual stress had reversed, changing from compressive to tensile, and demonstrate that analytical finite element methods can be used to predict this behavior.

  1. Effective function annotation through catalytic residue conservation.

    PubMed

    George, Richard A; Spriggs, Ruth V; Bartlett, Gail J; Gutteridge, Alex; MacArthur, Malcolm W; Porter, Craig T; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Thornton, Janet M; Swindells, Mark B

    2005-08-30

    Because of the extreme impact of genome sequencing projects, protein sequences without accompanying experimental data now dominate public databases. Homology searches, by providing an opportunity to transfer functional information between related proteins, have become the de facto way to address this. Although a single, well annotated, close relationship will often facilitate sufficient annotation, this situation is not always the case, particularly if mutations are present in important functional residues. When only distant relationships are available, the transfer of function information is more tenuous, and the likelihood of encountering several well annotated proteins with different functions is increased. The consequence for a researcher is a range of candidate functions with little way of knowing which, if any, are correct. Here, we address the problem directly by introducing a computational approach to accurately identify and segregate related proteins into those with a functional similarity and those where function differs. This approach should find a wide range of applications, including the interpretation of genomics/proteomics data and the prioritization of targets for high-throughput structure determination. The method is generic, but here we concentrate on enzymes and apply high-quality catalytic site data. In addition to providing a series of comprehensive benchmarks to show the overall performance of our approach, we illustrate its utility with specific examples that include the correct identification of haptoglobin as a nonenzymatic relative of trypsin, discrimination of acid-d-amino acid ligases from a much larger ligase pool, and the successful annotation of BioH, a structural genomics target.

  2. The 14 month wind stressed residual circulation (pole tide) in the North Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnor, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    From published research it is known that a quasi-periodic 14 month atmospheric pressure oscillation of a few tenths of a millibar exists in the region of the North and Baltic Seas. At some time in the cycle the associated wind stress has a westerly component that drives a circulation in the North Sea. The results of a dynamical model and comparisons with several North Sea residual circulation studies show that a large sea level gradient results along the Dutch coast. It is this feature that has been referred to as the enhanced pole tide. The dynamical similarity of this pole tide in the North and Baltic Seas to the annual and seasonal wind forced circulations is considered. It is inferred that the large deviations of the pole tide from equilibrium at coastal stations are the result of this sea level set up forces by the 14 month wind stress cycle.

  3. Finite element analysis of residual stress field induced by laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Taeksun

    The finite element method is applied to analyze the laser shock peening process (LSP) for thick parts (considered as a semi-infinite half space) and thin parts (finite thickness domain). The technology of LSP is used to enhance mechanical properties such as fatigue life, fretting fatigue life, resistance to stress corrosion cracking and surface hardness. These enhanced material properties are directly related to the magnitude and distribution of the plastic strain and associated residual stresses due to shockwaves induced by LSP. To reduce the process development cost and time, the prediction of residual stress field is very useful to provide a base design guideline for selecting appropriate LSP conditions for evaluation. An axisymmetric Finite Element Analysis (FEA) code, named SHOCKWAVE, is developed in order to complement shortcomings of applying commercial FEA codes at extremely high strain rates (as high as 104 -106/sec). The rate dependent plasticity theory is applied along with the small strain assumption. The solution process consists of an explicit dynamic loading analysis for shock loading stage and a static unloading analysis (implicit) to determine the equilibrium state for the residual stress and plastic strain fields. Some of the highlights explored in this investigation entail: (i) overstress power law models for the rate dependence, (ii) various hardening models, (iii) a second-order accurate implicit algorithm for the plastic consistency condition, (iv) an adaptively expanding domain scheme to trace the stress-free boundary condition in a simple way, (v) a special uniform meshing scheme to avoid the usual assembly process and repeated calculations for the stiffness matrix, (vi) mesh sensitivity study, (vii) comparisons with measured data provided and supported by the LSP Technologies, Inc. The dynamic behavior of Ti-6Al-4V at high strain rates can be investigated by using the split torsional Hopkinson bar experiment and by a longitudinal shock

  4. Residual stresses in boron/tungsten and boron/carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the change in fracture stress of 203 micrometer diameter fibers of boron on tungsten (B/W) as a function of fiber diameter as reduced by chemical etching, it is shown that the flaws which limit B/W fiber strength are located at the surface and in the tungsten boride core. After etching to a diameter of 188 micrometers m virtually all fiber fractures were caused by core flaws, the average strength being 4.50 GN/sq m. If both the surface and core flaws are removed, the fracture strength, limited by flaws in the boron itself, is approximately 6.89 GN/sq m. This was measured on B/W fibers which were split longitudinally and had their cores removed by chemical etching. The longitudinal residual stress distribution was determined for 102 micrometer diameter B/W and B/C fibers.

  5. Thermomechanical modeling of residual strains and stresses in a GTAW process

    SciTech Connect

    Tekriwal, P.; Mazumder, J.

    1995-12-31

    A three-dimensional thermomechanical model was developed and the transient analysis was carried out for the autogenous Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process using the finite element method. Because the heat generated due to the plastic deformation in the welding process is negligible in comparison with the heat from the arc, the thermomechanical analysis is carried out in two parts. The first part performs a three-dimensional uncoupled transient heat transfer analysis and computes the thermal history of the entire weldment. The second part then uses the results of the first part and performs a three-dimensional transient thermoelasto-plastic analysis in order to compute the distortions, strains and stresses in the weld. Mild steel looses its strength almost completely in the molten state and therefore, a cut-off temperature of melting point (1,755 K) is used for the computation of transient and residual strains and stresses.

  6. Improved measurement of low residual stresses by speckle correlation interferometry and local heat treating

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.

    2000-02-23

    The results presented in this paper clearly demonstrate that the dynamic range of this measurement technique can be improved substantially over the earlier experiments. It is just as clear that a more systematic study must be performed to quantify these improvements and to generate usable calibrations. These results are also encouraging in the sense that this technique may now be appropriate for other materials with high thermal diffusivities. Previous attempts to measure residual stresses by laser annealing and electronic speckle pattern interferometry have been successful for moderate to high stress levels. The method uses an infrared laser for relieving stress in a small spot. A dab on temperature indicating paint is applied to the spot and a specklegram of the spot and the surrounding area is captured. The paint is then heated with a laser until it melts. The heat is transferred from the paint into the metal resulting in a small amount of localized stress relief as the yield stress of the material drops below the stress levels surrounding the spot. Once the spot and area around it have cooled a second speckle-gram is captured and the images are processed to determine the in-plane strain. The amount of stress relief depends on the melting temperature of the paint since yield stress is a function of temperature. The measurement of local stress relief by heating is subject to limitations that result from thermal expansion competing with the reduction in yield stress of the spot at the elevated temperature. That is, as the spot is heated it tends to temporarily reduce the stress in the region surrounding the spot as it expands into this surrounding region. This limits the amount of stress relief that can occur. This can be overcome to some extent by using higher temperature paints, which in turn lowers the yield stress in the heated spot. At some point, however, the thermal expansion overtakes the surrounding stress field and can even drive it into compression

  7. Organochlorine pesticide residue levels and oxidative stress in preterm delivery cases.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rahul; Suke, Sanvidhan G; Ahmed, Tanzeel; Ahmed, Rafat S; Tripathi, A K; Guleria, Kiran; Sharma, C S; Makhijani, S D; Banerjee, B D

    2010-05-01

    A number of studies have focused attention on various biochemical abnormalities evoked due to exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The aim of the present study was to analyze the OCP residues in maternal and cord blood of women and assess the levels of different non-enzymatic oxidative stress markers as well as to establish correlation with OCP levels, if any. Thirty women in each group of full-term delivery (FTD; > or =37 weeks of gestation) and preterm delivery (PTD; <37 weeks of gestation) were enrolled in this study. Levels of OCPs like Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), endosulfan, p,p(') Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and p,p' Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed by gas chromatography. Non-enzymatic oxidative stress was measured by the quantification of malondialhyde (MDA), protein carbonyl, reduced glutathione (GSH) and ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP). MDA and protein carbonyl levels were increased significantly, while the levels of GSH and FRAP were decreased in PTD in comparison to FTD cases. We have observed higher levels of beta-HCH and alpha-endosulfan and increased oxidative stress in PTD than FTD cases. In PTD cases, a significant positive correlation was observed between maternal blood levels of beta-HCH and MDA (r = .78), beta-HCH and GSH (r = -.65), gamma-HCH and MDA (r = .89), gamma-HCH and GSH (r = -.74) and alpha-endosulfan and MDA (r = .54) in PTD cases. We also found significant correlations between cord blood levels of beta-HCH and MDA (r = .59), beta-HCH and GSH (r = -.69), gamma-HCH and MDA (r = .62) and alpha-endosulfan and MDA (r = .54) in PTD cases. In conclusion, our results suggest that higher levels of some of the OCP residues may be associated with PTD and increased oxidative stress.

  8. Residual stress mapping by micro X-ray diffraction: Application to the study of thin film buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, P.; Villain, P.; Tamura, N.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.

    2002-11-06

    Thin films deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition techniques on substrates generally exhibit large residual stresses which may be responsible of spontaneous detachment of the film from its substrate and in the case of compressive stresses, thin film buckling. Although these effects are undesirable for future applications, one may take benefit of it for thin film mechanical properties investigation. Since the 80's, a lot of theoretical works have been done to develop mechanical models with the aim to get a better understanding of driven mechanisms giving rise to this phenomenon and thus to propose solutions to avoid such problems. Nevertheless, only a few experimental works have been done on this subject to support these theoretical results and nothing concerning local stress/strain measurement mainly because of the small dimension of the buckling (few tenth mm). This paper deals with the application of micro beam x-ray diffraction available on synchrotron radiation sources for stress/ strain mapping analysis of gold thin film buckling.

  9. Compact sensor combining digital speckle pattern interferometry and the hole-drilling technique to measure nonuniform residual stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matías R.; Albertazzi, Armando

    2013-10-01

    A portable device to essentially measure residual stress fields outside an optical bench is presented. This system combines the hole-drilling technique with digital speckle pattern interferometry. A novel feature of this device is its high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. A new version of the American society for testing and materials standard E837 for the measurement of residual stresses has been improved including a computation method for nonuniform residual stresses. According to this standard, a hole with a maximum depth of 1.0 mm should be introduced into the material to assess the stress distribution along the hole's depth. The discretization of the stress distribution is performed in 20 equal steps of 0.05 mm, getting the deformations generated for stress relief in every drilling step. A description of the compact device showing the solution for a fast and easy interchanging process between modules is also presented. The proposed system was compared with a traditional method using strain gages, and a good agreement was shown between stress distributions measured with both methods. Finally, the portable device was used to evaluate the residual stress distribution in a sample with a rod welded by friction hydro pillar processing.

  10. Effects of Crop Residue on the Persistence of Steinernema carpocapsae

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, David I.; Obrycki, John J.; Lewis, Leslie C.; Jackson, Jan J.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the effects of crop residue on the persistence of an entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae. During 2 consecutive years, nematodes were applied at rates of 2.5 × 10₄ and 1.0 × 10⁵ infective juveniles/m² to small field plots planted with corn. Nematode persistence was monitored by exposing Galleria mellonella larvae to soil samples from plots with and without crop residue (approximately 75% coverage of soybean stubble). Persistence of S. carpocapsae was significantly greater in crop residue plots than in plots without residue. In crop residue plots that received the higher rate of nematode application, larval mortality did not significantly decrease during the study period (3 to 5 days) and remained above 85%. In nematode-treated plots without crop residue, however, larval mortality fell from over 96% to below 11% and 35% in the first and second trials, respectively. The increased crop residue may have benefited nematode persistence through protection from desiccation or ultraviolet light. We conclude that increased ground cover in cropping systems (e.g., due to reduced tillage) may lead to increased insect pest suppression with entomopathogenic nematodes. PMID:19270924

  11. A kinetic approach to evaluate salinity effects on carbon mineralization in a plant residue-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Farshid; Sheikh-Hosseini, Ahmad R

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of salinity stress and plant residue quality on C mineralization kinetics in soil is not well understood. A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the effects of salinity stress on C mineralization kinetics in a soil amended with alfalfa, wheat and corn residues. A factorial combination of two salinity levels (0.97 and 18.2 dS/m) and four levels of plant residues (control, alfalfa, wheat and corn) with three replications was performed. A first order kinetic model was used to describe the C mineralization and to calculate the potentially mineralizable C. The CO(2)-C evolved under non-saline condition, ranged from 814.6 to 4842.4 mg CO(2)-C/kg in control and alfalfa residue-amended soils, respectively. Salinization reduced the rates of CO(2) evolution by 18.7%, 6.2% and 5.2% in alfalfa, wheat and corn residue-amended soils, respectively. Potentially mineralizable C (C(0)) was reduced significantly in salinized alfalfa residue-treated soils whereas, no significant difference was observed for control treatments as well as wheat and corn residue-treated soils. We concluded that the response pattern of C mineralization to salinity stress depended on the plant residue quality and duration of incubation.

  12. Residual Stresses and Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded AZ31B-H24 Magnesium Alloy in Lap Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Bhukya Srinivasa; Cao, Xinjin; Wanjara, Priti; Friedman, Jacob; Chen, Daolun

    2015-08-01

    AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy sheets with a thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded in lap configuration using two tool rotational rates of 1000 and 1500 rpm and two welding speeds of 10 and 20 mm/s. The residual stresses in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the weldments were determined using X-ray diffraction. The shear tensile behavior of the lap joints was evaluated at low [233 K (-40 °C)], room [298 K (25 °C)], and elevated [453 K (180 °C)] temperatures. The failure load was highest for the lower heat input condition that was obtained at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s for all the test temperatures, due to the smaller hooking height, larger effective sheet thickness, and lower tensile residual stresses, as compared to the other two welding conditions that were conducted at a higher tool rotational rate or lower welding speed. The lap joints usually fractured on the advancing side of the top sheet near the interface between the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the stir zone. Elevated temperature testing of the weld assembled at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s led to the failure along the sheet interface in shear fracture mode due to the high integrity of the joint that exhibited large plastic deformation and higher total energy absorption.

  13. Minimization and Mitigation of Wire EDM Cutting Errors in the Application of the Contour Method of Residual Stress Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    The contour method of residual stress measurement relies on the careful application of wire electro-discharge machining (WEDM) for the cutting stage. Changes in material removal rates during the cut lead to errors in the final calculated values of residual stress. In this study, WEDM cutting parameters have been explored to identify the optimum conditions for contour method residual stress measurements. The influence of machine parameters on the surface roughness and cutting artifacts in the contour cut is discussed. It has been identified that the critical parameter in improving the surface finish is the spark pulse duration. A typical cutting artifact and its impact on measured stress values have been identified and demonstrated for a contour cut in a welded marine steel. A procedure is presented to correct contour displacement data from the influence of WEDM cutting artifacts, and is demonstrated on the correction of a measured weld residual stress. The corrected contour method improved the residual stress magnitude up to 150 MPa. The corrected contour method results were validated by X-ray diffraction, incremental center hole drilling, and neutron diffraction.

  14. Research on residual stress inside Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy coating by laser cladding processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Heng; Lin, Cheng-xin; Zhang, Jia-qi; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2016-09-01

    The stainless Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy (SMA) coating was prepared on the surface of AISI 304 stainless steel. The principal residual stress measured by the mechanical hole-drilling method indicates that the Fe-Mn-Si SMA cladding specimen possesses a lower residual stress compared with the 304 stainless steel cladding specimen. The mean stress values of the former and the latter on 10-mm-thick substrate are 4.751 MPa and 7.399 MPa, respectively. What's more, their deformation values on 2-mm-thick substrate are about 0° and 15°, respectively. Meanwhile, the variation trend and the value of the residual stress simulated by the ANSYS finite element software consist with experimental results. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows ɛ-martensite exists in Fe-Mn-Si SMA coating, which verifies the mechanism of low residual stress. That's the γ→ɛ martensite phase transformation, which relaxes the residual stress of the specimen and reduces its deformation in the laser cladding processing.

  15. [Effects of traumatic stress].

    PubMed

    Herbst, Gesa; Jaeger, Ulrich; Leichsenring, Falk; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis PTSD does not adequately describe the impact of exposure to childhood trauma of the developing child. The objective of the study was to examine the prevalence of different interpersonal trauma types and to describe the long-term effects of maltreatment and neglect in a clinical sample of 34 adolescents. The majority (62%) of the sample was exposed to two different types of trauma during childhood. Emotional abuse and emotional neglect have been the most common trauma types (59%; 53%). 71% of the traumatized adolescents did not meet the criteria for PTSD. The most common diagnosis in the sample was Borderline Personality Disorder. All average scores at SCL-90-Symptom-Scale were clinical significant. Half of the sample reported suicide attempts and self destructive behavior. One third reported substance abuse and aggressive behavior against others respectively. None of the traumatized adolescents had a positive Self-concept. Altogether the results show that abused children and adolescents have a range of psychological sequelae that are not captured in the PTSD diagnostic criteria. Therefore the results support the necessity for a new and more precise diagnosis for chronically traumatized children and adolescents. PMID:19961125

  16. On Eulerian constitutive equations for modeling growth and residual stresses in arteries.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2005-06-01

    Recently Volokh and Lev (2005) argued that residual stresses could appear in growing arteries because of the arterial anisotropy. This conclusion emerged from a continuum mechanics theory of growth of soft biological tissues proposed by the authors. This theory included Lagrangian constitutive equations, which were formulated directly with respect to the reference configuration. Alternatively, it is possible to formulate Eulerian constitutive equations with respect to the current configuration and to 'pull them back' to the reference configuration. Such possibility is examined in the present work. The Eulerian formulation of the constitutive equations is used for a study of arterial growth. It is shown, particularly, that bending resultants are developed in the ring cross-section of the artery. These resultants may cause the ring opening or closing after cutting the artery in vitro as it is observed in experiments. It is remarkable that the results of the present study, based on the Eulerian constitutive equations, are very similar to the results of Volokh and Lev (2005), based on the Lagrangian constitutive equations. This strengthens the authors' argument that anisotropy is a possible reason for accumulation of residual stresses in arteries. This argument appears to be invariant with respect to the mathematical description.

  17. Non-destructive Measurement of Residual Stress Depth Profile in Laser-peened Steel at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Masugu; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Sano, Yuji; Tanaka, Hirotomo; Akita, Koichi

    2007-01-19

    We investigated the residual stress depth profile near the surface of steel treated by laser peening without coating using X-ray diffraction at SPring-8. This investigation was carried out using a constant penetration depth sin2{psi} method. In this method, the sin2{psi} diagram is measured controlling both the {psi} angle and the X-ray penetration depth simultaneously with a combination of the {omega} and {chi} axes of the 4-circle goniometer. This method makes it possible to evaluate the residual stress and its depth profile in material with a stress gradient precisely and non-destructively. As a result, we confirmed that a compressive residual stress was successfully formed all over the range of the depth profile in the steel treated properly by laser peening without coating.

  18. Non-destructive Measurement of Residual Stress Depth Profile in Laser-peened Steel at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masugu; Sano, Yuji; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Tanaka, Hirotomo; Akita, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the residual stress depth profile near the surface of steel treated by laser peening without coating using X-ray diffraction at SPring-8. This investigation was carried out using a constant penetration depth sin2ψ method. In this method, the sin2ψ diagram is measured controlling both the ψ angle and the X-ray penetration depth simultaneously with a combination of the ω and χ axes of the 4-circle goniometer. This method makes it possible to evaluate the residual stress and its depth profile in material with a stress gradient precisely and non-destructively. As a result, we confirmed that a compressive residual stress was successfully formed all over the range of the depth profile in the steel treated properly by laser peening without coating.

  19. Hemoglobin Bohr effects: atomic origin of the histidine residue contributions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guishan; Schaefer, Michael; Karplus, Martin

    2013-11-26

    The Bohr effect in hemoglobin, which refers to the dependence of the oxygen affinity on the pH, plays an important role in its cooperativity and physiological function. The dominant contribution to the Bohr effect arises from the difference in the pKa values of His residues of the unliganded (deoxy) and liganded (carbonmonoxy) structures. Using recent high resolution structures, the residue pKa values corresponding to the two structures are calculated. The method is based on determining the electrostatic interactions between residues in the protein, relative to those of the residue in solution, by use of the linearized finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states. Given that good agreement is obtained with the available experimental values for the contribution of His residues in HbA to the Bohr effect, the calculated results are used to determine the atomic origin of the pKa shift between deoxy and carbonmonoxy HbA. The contributions to the pKa shift calculated by means of the linear response approximation show that the salt bridge involving His146 plays an important role in the alkaline Bohr effect, as suggested by Perutz but that other interactions are significant as well. A corresponding analysis is made for the contribution of His143 to the acid Bohr effect for which there is no proposed explanation. The method used is summarized and the program by which it is implemented is described in the Appendix .

  20. EXPERIMENTAL-BASED DISCUSSION FOR THE SEPARATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES AND COLD WORK IN SHOT PEENED IN718 USING HIGH FREQUENCY EDDY CURRENT SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Robbert, A.; Meyendorf, N.; Baron, H.-U.; Bamberg, J.

    2010-02-22

    Typical aero engine alloys, such as IN718, can be surface-treated by shot peening to induce near-surface compressive strains. To calculate the remaining operation time for those critical aero engine components, a quantitative nondestructive determination of near-surface strain gradients has to be developed. We have demonstrated in the past, that it is possible to obtain a characteristic depth profile (surface and sub-surface) of the electrical conductivity of shot peened specimen by using high-frequency eddy current techniques. The measured conductivity profile is resulting from residual stresses, cold work, surface roughness, and the microstructure of the material. The objective is to measure residual stresses (separately from other material properties) in such components after a defined life time. It can be assumed, that surface roughness and microstructure remain unchanged in IN718 materials over their lifetime, but cold work and residual stresses can change independently. Consequently, there is a need to clearly separate the information from both material properties of received eddy current conductivity signals in order to obtain specific information related to residual stresses. This paper presents results acquired from different experiments, conducted to separate both effects by using the eddy current technique on shot peened IN718 materials. We present different physical approaches and illustrate the experiments to solve them. In addition, we will demonstrate that there is a need to use additional techniques, for example ultrasonic time-of-flight measurements, to separate the effects of residual stresses from compound (mixed) signals obtained on cold work samples.

  1. Stress amplification effect of lung.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyuan; Ma, Guowei

    2010-01-01

    Under a blast or impact load, rapid movement of the thoracic wall generates stress in lung, a foam-like structure of high compressibility, which is different from general solids. Due to this unique characteristic, it is hypothesized that when lung is subjected to a blast or impact load, there will be an initial low stress progressively developed into a high stress in a short duration in a thin layer of parenchyma at the lung surface. Compared to the incident stress, the actual stress value experienced by lung is amplified, which may cause alveolar-capillary walls to burst, subsequently results in injuries such as edema or hemorrhage. This hypothesis can explain one significant phenomenon observed in animal tests that the gross thoracic compression do not cause major lung injury and there is a close relationship between thoracic wall velocity and the lung injury degree. According to the hypothesis, under a blast or impact load, there should be a significant injury degree discrepancy between a thin layer of parenchyma at the lung surface and the rest of the lung. Serious injuries should be mainly found in this thin layer, which can be employed to test whether this amplified effect exists or not. The hypothesis may shed some light on the mechanism of blast lung injury.

  2. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    DOE PAGES

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stirmore » zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.« less

  3. Technical note: Equivalent genomic models with a residual polygenic effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Goddard, M E; Hayes, B J; Reinhardt, F; Reents, R

    2016-03-01

    Routine genomic evaluations in animal breeding are usually based on either a BLUP with genomic relationship matrix (GBLUP) or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) BLUP model. For a multi-step genomic evaluation, these 2 alternative genomic models were proven to give equivalent predictions for genomic reference animals. The model equivalence was verified also for young genotyped animals without phenotypes. Due to incomplete linkage disequilibrium of SNP markers to genes or causal mutations responsible for genetic inheritance of quantitative traits, SNP markers cannot explain all the genetic variance. A residual polygenic effect is normally fitted in the genomic model to account for the incomplete linkage disequilibrium. In this study, we start by showing the proof that the multi-step GBLUP and SNP BLUP models are equivalent for the reference animals, when they have a residual polygenic effect included. Second, the equivalence of both multi-step genomic models with a residual polygenic effect was also verified for young genotyped animals without phenotypes. Additionally, we derived formulas to convert genomic estimated breeding values of the GBLUP model to its components, direct genomic values and residual polygenic effect. Third, we made a proof that the equivalence of these 2 genomic models with a residual polygenic effect holds also for single-step genomic evaluation. Both the single-step GBLUP and SNP BLUP models lead to equal prediction for genotyped animals with phenotypes (e.g., reference animals), as well as for (young) genotyped animals without phenotypes. Finally, these 2 single-step genomic models with a residual polygenic effect were proven to be equivalent for estimation of SNP effects, too. PMID:26723117

  4. Technical note: Equivalent genomic models with a residual polygenic effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Goddard, M E; Hayes, B J; Reinhardt, F; Reents, R

    2016-03-01

    Routine genomic evaluations in animal breeding are usually based on either a BLUP with genomic relationship matrix (GBLUP) or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) BLUP model. For a multi-step genomic evaluation, these 2 alternative genomic models were proven to give equivalent predictions for genomic reference animals. The model equivalence was verified also for young genotyped animals without phenotypes. Due to incomplete linkage disequilibrium of SNP markers to genes or causal mutations responsible for genetic inheritance of quantitative traits, SNP markers cannot explain all the genetic variance. A residual polygenic effect is normally fitted in the genomic model to account for the incomplete linkage disequilibrium. In this study, we start by showing the proof that the multi-step GBLUP and SNP BLUP models are equivalent for the reference animals, when they have a residual polygenic effect included. Second, the equivalence of both multi-step genomic models with a residual polygenic effect was also verified for young genotyped animals without phenotypes. Additionally, we derived formulas to convert genomic estimated breeding values of the GBLUP model to its components, direct genomic values and residual polygenic effect. Third, we made a proof that the equivalence of these 2 genomic models with a residual polygenic effect holds also for single-step genomic evaluation. Both the single-step GBLUP and SNP BLUP models lead to equal prediction for genotyped animals with phenotypes (e.g., reference animals), as well as for (young) genotyped animals without phenotypes. Finally, these 2 single-step genomic models with a residual polygenic effect were proven to be equivalent for estimation of SNP effects, too.

  5. Alcohol Effects on Stress Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Sara K.; Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen

    2016-01-01

    A significant amount of neurobiological research regarding the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) has focused on alcohol-related activation and long-term alterations in the mesocortical dopaminergic reward pathways. However, alcohol does not only interact with brain reward systems. Many of its acute and chronic effects may be related to allostatic adaptations in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways. For example, acute binge intoxication is associated with hypothalamically driven increases in blood cortisol, norepinephrine, and sex steroid metabolite levels. This may contribute to the development of mesocortical sensitization to alcohol. Furthermore, chronic alcohol exposure is associated with systemic dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal medullary system, and sex steroid systems. This dysregulation appears to manifest as neuroendocrine tolerance. In this review, we first summarize the literature suggesting that alcohol-induced alterations in these hypothalamic systems influence craving and contribute to the development of AUDs. We note that for women, the effects of alcohol on these neuroendocrine stress regulation systems may be influenced by the rhythmic variations of hormones and steroids across the menstrual cycle. Second, we discuss how changes in these systems may indicate progression of AUDs and increased risk of relapse in both sexes. Specifically, neuroendocrine tolerance may contribute to mesocortical sensitization, which in turn may lead to decreased prefrontal inhibitory control of the dopaminergic reward and hypothalamic stress systems. Thus, pharmacological strategies that counteract alcohol-associated changes in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways may slow the development and progression of AUDs. PMID:27254089

  6. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on cotton plant residue decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Torbert, H.A.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.

    1995-09-01

    Assessing the impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on the global environment is hampered due to a lack of understanding of global C cycling. Carbon fixed within plant biomass ultimately enters the soil via plant residues, but the effects of elevated-CO{sub 2}-grown plant material on decomposition rates and long-term soil C storage are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the decomposition rate of plant residues grown under an elevated CO{sub 2} environment as affected by soil type. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. `Delta Pine 77`) samples were collected from a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (550 {mu}L L{sup -1}) experiment. The plant residues were incubated under ambient CO{sub 2} conditions to determine decomposition rates of leaves, stems, and roots and potential N and P mineralization-immobilization in three soil series. No significant difference was observed between plant residue grown under CO{sub 2} enrichment vs. ambient CO{sub 2} conditions for soil respiration or P mineralization-immobilization. Significantly greater net N immobilization was observed during the incubation in all soil types for plant residue grown at elevated CO{sub 2}. These results indicate that while decomposition of plant residue may not be reduced by CO{sub 2} enrichment, N dynamics may be markedly changed. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Quenching and Cold-Work Residual Stresses in Aluminum Hand Forgings : Contour Method Measurement and FEM Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, M. B.; Newborn, M. A.; Balog, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The cold-compression stress relief process used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings does not fully relieve the stresses. This study measured and predicted the residual stress in 7050-T74 (solution heat treated, quenched, and artificially overaged) and 7050-T7452 (cold compressed prior to aging) hand forgings. The manufacturing process was simulated by finite element analysis. First, a thermal analysis simulated the quench using appropriate thermal boundary conditions and temperature dependent material properties. Second, a structural analysis used the thermal history and a temperature and strain-rate dependent constitutive model to predict the stresses after quenching. Third, the structural analysis was continued to simulate the multiple cold compressions of the stress relief process. Experimentally, the residual stresses in the forgings were mapped using the contour method, which involved cutting the forgings using wire EDM and then measuring the contour of the cut surface using a CMM. Multiple cuts were used to map different stress components. The results show a spatially periodic variation of stresses that results from the periodic nature of the cold work stress relief process. The results compare favorably with the finite element prediction of the stresses.

  8. Measurement of Young's modulus and residual stress of thin SiC layers for MEMS high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Oliver; Schiffer, Michael; Obermeier, Ernst; Tekin, Tolga; Lang, Klaus Dieter; Ngo, Ha-Duong

    2011-06-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for applications in harsh environments. Standard silicon (Si) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are limited in operating temperature to temperatures below 130 °C for electronic devices and below 600 °C for mechanical devices. Due to its large bandgap SiC enables MEMS with significantly higher operating temperatures. Furthermore, SiC exhibits high chemical stability and thermal conductivity. Young's modulus and residual stress are important mechanical properties for the design of sophisticated SiC-based MEMS devices. In particular, residual stresses are strongly dependent on the deposition conditions. Literature values for Young's modulus range from 100 to 400 GPa, and residual stresses range from 98 to 486 MPa. In this paper we present our work on investigating Young's modulus and residual stress of SiC films deposited on single crystal bulk silicon using bulge testing. This method is based on measurement of pressure-dependent membrane deflection. Polycrystalline as well as single crystal cubic silicon carbide samples are studied. For the samples tested, average Young's modulus and residual stress measured are 417 GPa and 89 MPa for polycrystalline samples. For single crystal samples, the according values are 388 GPa and 217 MPa. These results compare well with literature values.

  9. In Situ Tensile Deformation and Residual Stress Measurement by Neutron Diffraction in Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit; Potirniche, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    The deformation behavior of monolithic modified 9Cr-1Mo (Grade 91) steel during uniaxial tensile loading was studied using the in situ neutron diffraction technique. The residual stress distribution across gas tungsten arc welds in the Grade 91 steel was measured by the time-of-flight neutron diffraction method using the SMARTS diffractometer at Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Grade 91 plates were welded using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) technique. The load sharing by different grain orientations was observed during the tensile loading. The residual stresses along three orthogonal directions were determined at the mid-thickness, 4.35 and 2.35 mm below the surface of both the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated plates. The residual stresses of the as-welded plates were compared with those of the post-weld heat-treated plates. The post-weld heat treatment significantly reduced the residual stress level in the base metal, the heat-affected zone, and the weld zone. Vickers microhardness across the weld zone of the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated specimens was evaluated and correlated with the observed residual stress profile and microstructure.

  10. Through-thickness residual stress evaluations for several industrial thermal spray coatings using a modified layer-removal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greving, D. J.; Rybicki, E. F.; Shadley, J. R.

    1994-12-01

    Residual stresses are inherent in thermal spray coatings because the application process involves large temperature gradients in materials with different mechanical properties. In many cases, failure analysis of thermal spray coatings has indicated that residual stresses contribute to reduced service life. An estab-lished method for experimentally evaluating residual stresses involves monitoring deformations in a part as layers of material are removed. Although the method offers several advantages, applications are lim-ited to a single isotropic material and do not include coated materials. This paper describes a modified layer-removal method for evaluating through-thickness residual stress distributions in coated materials. The modification is validated by comparisons with three-dimensional finite-element analysis results. The modified layer-removal method was applied to determine through-thickness residual stress distributions for six industrial thermal spray coatings: stainless steel, aluminum, Ni-5A1, two tungsten carbides, and a ceramic thermal barrier coating. The modified method requires only ordinary resistance strain-gage measuring equipment and can be relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the mechanical properties of the coating material.

  11. On Residual Stresses in Resistance Spot-Welded Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, D.; Sedighi, M.; Karimi, M. R.; Barsoum, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an electro-thermal-structural-coupled finite element (FE) model and x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements have been utilized to analyze distribution of residual stresses in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 resistance spot-welded joint with 2-mm-thickness sheet. Increasing the aluminum sheet thickness to more than 1 mm leads to creating difficulty in spot-welding process and increases the complexity of the FE model. The electrical and thermal contact conductances, as mandatory factors are applied in contact areas of electrode-workpiece and workpiece-workpiece to resolve the complexity of the FE model. The physical and mechanical properties of the material are defined as thermal dependent to improve the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, the electrodes are removed after the holding cycle using the birth-and-death elements method. The results have a good agreement with experimental data obtained from x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements. However, the highest internal tensile residual stress occurs in the center of the nugget zone and decreases toward nugget edge; surface residual stress increases toward the edge of the welding zone and afterward, the area decreases slightly.

  12. Modeling of process-induced residual stresses and resin flow behavior in resin transfer molded composites with woven fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, Hossein

    This research focuses on modeling Resin Transfer Molding process for manufacture of composite parts with woven fiber mats. Models are developed to determine cure dependent stiffness matrices for composites manufactured with two types of woven fiber mats. Five-harness carbon and eight-harness fiberglass mats with EPON 826 resin composites are considered. The models presented here take into account important material/process parameters with emphasis on; (1) The effects of cure-dependent resin mechanical properties, (2) Fiber undulation due to the weave of the fiber fill and warp bundles, and (3) Resin interaction with the fiber bundles at a microscopic scale. Cure-dependent mechanical properties were then used in numerical models to determine residual stresses and deformation in the composite parts. The complete cure cycle was modeled in these analyses. Also the cool down stage after the composite cure was analyzed. The effect of 5% resin shrinkage on residual stresses and deformations was also investigated. In the second part of the study, Finite Element models were developed to simulate mold filling in RTM processes. Resin flow in the fiber mats was modeled as flow through porous media. Physical models were also developed to investigate resin flow behavior into molds of rectangular and irregular shapes. Silicone fluids of 50 and 100 centistoke viscosities as well as EPON 826 epoxy resin were used in the mold filling experiments. The reinforcements consisted of several layers of woven fiberglass and carbon fiber mats. The effects of injection pressure, fluid viscosity, type of reinforcement, and mold geometry on mold filling times were investigated. Fiber mat permeabilities were determined experimentally for both types of reinforcements. Comparison of experimental and numerical resin front positions indicated the importance of edge effects in resin flow behavior in small cavities. The resin front positions agreed well for the rectangular mold geometry.

  13. Accelerated crack growth, residual stress, and a cracked zinc coated pressure shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittman, Daniel L.; Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1987-01-01

    During a partial inspection of a 42 year old, operating, pressurized wind tunnel at NASA-Ames Research Center, a surface connected defect 114 in. long having an indicated depth of a 0.7 in. was detected. The pressure shell, constructed of a medium carbon steel, contains approximately 10 miles of welds and is cooled by flowing water over its zinc coated external surface. Metallurgical and fractographic analysis showed that the actual detect was 1.7 in. deep, and originated from an area of lack of weld penetration. Crack growth studies were performed on the shell material in the laboratory under various loading rates, hold times, and R-ratios with a simulated shell environment. The combination of zinc, water with electrolyte, and steel formed an electrolytic cell which resulted in an increase in cyclic crack growth rate by as much as 500 times over that observed in air. It was concluded that slow crack growth occurred in the pressure shell by a combination of stress corrosion cracking due to the welding residual stress and corrosion fatigue due to the cyclic operating stress.

  14. Investigations of Residual Stresses and Mechanical Properties of Single Crystal Niobium for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Gnäupel-Herold; Ganapati Rao Myneni; Richard E. Ricker

    2007-06-01

    This work investigates properties of large grained, high purity niobium with respect to the forming of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from such large grained sheets. The yield stresses were examined using tensile specimens that were essentially single crystals in orientations evenly distributed in the standard projection triangle. No distinct yield anisotropy was found, however, vacuum annealing increased the yield strength by a factor 2..3. The deep drawing forming operation of the half cells raises the issues of elastic shape changes after the release of the forming tool (springback) and residual stresses, both of which are indicated to be negligible. This is a consequence of the low yield stress (< 100 MPa) and the large thickness (compared to typical thicknesses in sheet metal forming). However, the significant anisotropy of the transversal plastic strains after uniaxial deformation points to potentially critical thickness variations for large grained / single crystal half cells, thus raising the issue of controlling grain orientation or using single crystal sheet material.

  15. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering

    DOE PAGES

    Kolbus, Lindsay M.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Cornwell, Paris A.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Duty, Chad E.; Lorenz, M.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.

    2015-01-10

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting and the other with direct laser sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by EDM sectioning equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacing examined for the EDM sectioned sample was compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill force and moment balance. We have shown that Applying force and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. Furthermore, our work hasmore » shown that residual stresses in electron beam melting parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintering parts.« less

  16. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbus, Lindsay M.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Cornwell, Paris A.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Duty, Chad E.; Lorenz, M.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.

    2015-01-10

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting and the other with direct laser sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by EDM sectioning equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacing examined for the EDM sectioned sample was compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill force and moment balance. We have shown that Applying force and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. Furthermore, our work has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melting parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintering parts.

  17. Comparison of measured temperatures, thermal stresses and creep residues with predictions on a built-up titanium structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Temperature, thermal stresses, and residual creep stresses were studied by comparing laboratory values measured on a built-up titanium structure with values calculated from finite-element models. Several such models were used to examine the relationship between computational thermal stresses and thermal stresses measured on a built-up structure. Element suitability, element density, and computational temperature discrepancies were studied to determine their impact on measured and calculated thermal stress. The optimum number of elements is established from a balance between element density and suitable safety margins, such that the answer is acceptably safe yet is economical from a computational viewpoint. It is noted that situations exist where relatively small excursions of calculated temperatures from measured values result in far more than proportional increases in thermal stress values. Measured residual stresses due to creep significantly exceeded the values computed by the piecewise linear elastic strain analogy approach. The most important element in the computation is the correct definition of the creep law. Computational methodology advances in predicting residual stresses due to creep require significantly more viscoelastic material characterization.

  18. Modelling the layer-specific three-dimensional residual stresses in arteries, with an application to the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Ogden, Ray W

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides the first analysis of the three-dimensional state of residual stress and stretch in an artery wall consisting of three layers (intima, media and adventitia), modelled as a circular cylindrical tube. The analysis is based on experimental results on human aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening documented in a recent paper by Holzapfel et al. (Holzapfel et al. 2007 Ann. Biomed. Eng. 35, 530-545 (doi:10.1007/s10439-006-9252-z)). The intima is included in the analysis because it has significant thickness and load-bearing capacity, unlike in a young, healthy human aorta. The mathematical model takes account of bending and stretching in both the circumferential and axial directions in each layer of the wall. Previous analysis of residual stress was essentially based on a simple application of the opening-angle method, which cannot accommodate the three-dimensional residual stretch and stress states observed in experiments. The geometry and nonlinear kinematics of the intima, media and adventitia are derived and the associated stress components determined explicitly using the nonlinear theory of elasticity. The theoretical results are then combined with the mean numerical values of the geometrical parameters and material constants from the experiments to illustrate the three-dimensional distributions of the stretches and stresses throughout the wall. The results highlight the compressive nature of the circumferential stress in the intima, which may be associated with buckling of the intima and its delamination from the media, and show that the qualitative features of the stretch and stress distributions in the media and adventitia are unaffected by the presence or absence of the intima. The circumferential residual stress in the intima increases significantly as the associated residual deformation in the intima increases while the corresponding stress in the media (which is compressive at its inner boundary and tensile at its outer boundary

  19. Load transfer mechanics between trans-tibial prosthetic socket and residual limb--dynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ming; Lee, Winson C C

    2004-09-01

    The effects of inertial loads on the interface stresses between trans-tibial residual limb and prosthetic socket were investigated. The motion of the limb and prosthesis was monitored using a Vicon motion analysis system and the ground reaction force was measured by a force platform. Equivalent loads at the knee joint during walking were calculated in two cases with and without consideration of the material inertia. A 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) model based on the actual geometry of residual limb, internal bones and socket liner was developed to study the mechanical interaction between socket and residual limb during walking. To simulate the friction/slip boundary conditions between the skin and liner, automated surface-to-surface contact was used. The prediction results indicated that interface pressure and shear stress had the similar double-peaked waveform shape in stance phase. The average difference in interface stresses between the two cases with and without consideration of inertial forces was 8.4% in stance phase and 20.1% in swing phase. The maximum difference during stance phase is up to 19%. This suggests that it is preferable to consider the material inertia effect in a fully dynamic FE model.

  20. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  1. Residual compressive stress and intensity of infrared absorption of cubic BN films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hang-Sheng; Jin, Pan-Pan; Xu, Ya-Bo; Li, Hai-Yang

    2014-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on the dependence of the intensity of infrared (IR) absorption of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride thin films under the residual compressive stress conditions have been performed. Our results indicate that the intensity of the IR absorption is proportional to the total degree of freedom of all the ions in the ordered regions. The reduction of interstitial Ar atom concentration, which causes the increase in the ordered regions of cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystallites, could be one cause for the increase in the intensity of IR absorption after residual compressive stress relaxation. Theoretical derivation is in good agreement with the experimental results concerning the IR absorption intensity and the Ar interstitial atom concentration in cubic boron nitride films measured by energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Our results also suggest that the interstitial Ar is the origin of residual compressive stress accumulation in plasma enhanced cBN film deposition.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of tool-chip contact parameters when predicting residual stresses in turning of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrano, I.; Barbero, O.; Kortabarria, A.; Arrazola, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    Heat-resistant alloys like Inconel 718 are used in critical components such as aircraft engine turbine discs. Due to the extreme thermo-mechanical solicitations that must suffer during their lifetime, reliability is essential, even more if its failure could lead to loss of human lives. Surface integrity is a critical issue in this kind of components and specially residual stresses are a key aspect. Currently, the development and optimization of the machining process with regards to the residual stresses is done through expensive experimental trial and error methods. This article shows the research work made on the simulation of a machining model in three dimensions with the Deform TM commercial program. The results obtained show the influence of contact parameters (friction coefficient, heat transfer coefficient) not only on the cutting forces and temperatures, but also in the generation of residual stresses.

  3. Residual stresses and phase transformations in Ytterbium silicate environmental barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Fabian

    Due to their high melting temperature, low density, and good thermomechanical stability, silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are some of the most promising materials systems for high temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, their silica surface layer reacts with water vapor contained in combustion environments. The resulting hydroxide layer volatilizes, leading to component recession. Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the substrate from degradation. Next generation coatings for silicon-based ceramics based on ytterbium silicates have shown a promising combination of very low and good thermomechanical properties. The focus of this thesis is threefold: In the first part, phase transformations in plasma sprayed ytterbium silicates were investigated. Plasma sprayed materials are known to contain large amounts of amorphous material. Phase changes during the conversion from amorphous to crystalline materials were investigated as they have been known to lead to failure in many coatings. The second part of this work focused on measuring residual stresses in multilayer EBCs using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). Strains were resolved spatially, with probe sizes as small as 20 um. Stresses were calculated using mechanical properties of ytterbium silicates, determined with in-situ loading and heating experiments. In-situ and ex-situ heating experiments allowed for the study of changes in stress states that occur in these EBC materials during heating and cooling cycles. Lastly, the interaction of ytterbium silicates with low-melting environmental calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glasses was studied. Synchrotron XRD was used to study the influence of CMAS on the stress state in the coating, X-ray computed tomography was used to provide 3D images of coatings, and EDS and TEM analysis were used to study the interactions at the CMAS/ytterbium silicate interface in detail.

  4. Development of Laser Ultrasonic Device for Residual Stress Measurement in Welded Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Subudhi, Manomohan

    2009-03-31

    A CRADA project was performed between BNL and SpectraQuest, Inc. of Richmond, Virginia under the auspices of IPP with the DOE support. The purpose was to jointly support Prokhorov General Physics Institute (GPI), Russian Academy of Sciences of Russia to develop a prototype Laser Ultrasonic Impact Testing (LUIT) device which could be commercialized and marketed. The device is based on laser-generated ultrasonic waves and can be used for measuring residual stresses in welded structures using a nondestructive technique. The work was performed from October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2009. The project resulted in development and validation of a prototype LUIT device. GPI - BNL – SpectraQuest partnership developed the LUIT device to the point where it could be commercialized and marketed for the special applications in the manufacturing field.

  5. Analysis of Residual Stress for Narrow Gap Welding Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choon Yeol; Hwang, Jae Keun; Bae, Joon Woo

    Reactor coolant loop (RCL) pipes circulating the heat generated in a nuclear power plant consist of so large diameter pipes that the installation of these pipes is one of the major construction processes. Conventionally, a shield metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been mainly used in RCL piping installations, which sometimes caused severe deformations, dislocation of main equipments and various other complications due to excessive heat input in welding processes. Hence, automation of the work of welding is required and narrow-gap welding (NGW) process is being reviewed for new nuclear power plants as an alternative method of welding. In this study, transient heat transfer and thermo-elastic-plastic analyses have been performed for the residual stress distribution on the narrow gap weldment of RCL by finite element method under various conditions including surface heat flux and temperature dependent thermo-physical properties.

  6. Assessment of residual stresses on U10Mo alloy based monolithic mini-plates during Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaltun, Hakan; Herman Shen, M.-H.; Medvedev, Pavel

    2011-12-01

    This article presents an assessment of the residual stresses in U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates and the elasto-plastic response to thermo-mechanical processing. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Understanding of the three-dimensional residual stress field is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. To define fuel-cladding stress-strain characteristics, a thermo-mechanical finite element model was developed. During fuel plate fabrication, the hot pressing temperature approaches the melting temperature of the cladding, so that temperature dependent material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy of the model. By using elasto-thermo-plastic material models, it was determined that the cladding material (Al6061-O) is subjected to tensile stresses that exceed its proportional limits. The fuel foil is subject to compressive stresses and remains below yield. The residual stresses in the plates are significant, and therefore, should not be neglected. In particular, the simulations indicate the presence of high stress gradients at the fuel/cladding interface, thus emphasizing the need for a high quality bond.

  7. Numerical simulation of MIG type arc welding induced residual stresses and distortions in thin sheets of S235 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakri, A.; Guidara, M.; Elhalouani, F.

    2010-11-01

    This paper investigates distortions and residual stresses which are induced in butt joint of thin plates using Metal Inert Gas welding. In fact, a distribution of heat flux is implemented in finite element simulation of the welding process. Thermo-elastic-plastic finite element methods are applied to modelling the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the welded plate during the welding process. Prediction of temperature variations and heat affected zone as well as longitudinal and transverse shrinkage, angular distortion, and residual stress are obtained. Comparisons are made between numerical and experimental results on out-of-plane displacements of steel assembly.

  8. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2016-09-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  9. Irregularities of crystallographic orientation and residual stresses in the crossed-lamellar shell as a natural functionally graded material.

    PubMed

    Bonarski, Jan T; Checa, Antonio G; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Tarkowski, Leszek; Wajda, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    The microstructures of different groups of molluscs are characterized by preferential orientations of crystallites (texture), leading to a significant anisotropy of the physical properties of the shells. A complementary characteristic, usually neglected, is the distribution of the residual stresses existing within the shell wall. By means of X-ray diffraction, we study the distribution of stresses with thickness in the shell wall of the gastropod Conus marmoreus, which has a microstructure of the crossed-lamellar type. The results revealed an extraordinary texture inhomogeneity and the existence of tensional residual stresses along the shell thickness, the origins of which are unknown. Some of the observed changes in textural parameters and stresses coincide with the transitions between shell layers, although other features are of unknown origin. Our results provide insight into the microstructural regularities that govern the mesoscale construction of shells, such as that of C. marmoreus.

  10. Irregularities of crystallographic orientation and residual stresses in the crossed-lamellar shell as a natural functionally graded material.

    PubMed

    Bonarski, Jan T; Checa, Antonio G; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Tarkowski, Leszek; Wajda, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    The microstructures of different groups of molluscs are characterized by preferential orientations of crystallites (texture), leading to a significant anisotropy of the physical properties of the shells. A complementary characteristic, usually neglected, is the distribution of the residual stresses existing within the shell wall. By means of X-ray diffraction, we study the distribution of stresses with thickness in the shell wall of the gastropod Conus marmoreus, which has a microstructure of the crossed-lamellar type. The results revealed an extraordinary texture inhomogeneity and the existence of tensional residual stresses along the shell thickness, the origins of which are unknown. Some of the observed changes in textural parameters and stresses coincide with the transitions between shell layers, although other features are of unknown origin. Our results provide insight into the microstructural regularities that govern the mesoscale construction of shells, such as that of C. marmoreus. PMID:26631336

  11. Residual compressive stress induced infrared-absorption frequency shift of hexagonal boron nitride in cubic boron nitride films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Jin, Panpan; Chen, Aili; Yang, Hangsheng; Xu, Yabo

    2012-09-01

    The effects of compressive stress on the TO phonon frequencies of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in cubic BN (cBN) films were investigated using infrared absorption spectroscopy, showing that the B-N stretching vibration of hBN at 1380 cm-1 shifted to high wavenumbers under biaxial compressive stress with the rate 2.65 cm-1 per GPa, while the B-N-B bending vibration near 780 cm-1 shifted to low wavenumbers with the rate -3.45 cm-1/GPa. The density functional perturbation theoretical calculation was carried out to check the above phonon frequencies under stress for two typical orientations of hBN crystallite. The results are shown to be in fair agreement with the experimental data. Our results suggest that the residual compressive stress accumulated in cBN films can be evaluated from the IR peak position near 780 cm-1.

  12. Residual effects of flurazepam and brotizolam on psychomotor performance

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, H.; Müller-Limmroth, W.

    1983-01-01

    1 Residual effects of brotizolam (0.25 mg) and flurazepam (30 mg) were studied in healthy young adults. Performance and subjective assessments were observed from 7 to 8 h after overnight ingestion, and effects were compared with that of placebo. 2 Visuo-motor coordination, visuo-mental processing time, visuo-motor reaction time and reading errors were not impaired with brotizolam. 3 There were residual effects with 30 mg flurazepam. Visuo-motor coordination, visuo-mental processing time, visuo-motor reaction time, and reading errors were impaired compared with placebo and 0.25 mg brotizolam. 4 Subjective assessments of performance correlated with measured performance. There was a decrease with flurazepam (visuo-motor coordination and visuo-mental processing time) compared with placebo. PMID:6661380

  13. Effects of oil and oil burn residues on seabird feathers.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Linnebjerg, Jannie Fries; Sørensen, Martin X; Brogaard, Nicholas L; Rigét, Frank F; Kristensen, Paneeraq; Jomaas, Grunde; Boertmann, David M; Wegeberg, Susse; Gustavson, Kim

    2016-08-15

    It is well known, that in case of oil spill, seabirds are among the groups of animals most vulnerable. Even small amounts of oil can have lethal effects by destroying the waterproofing of their plumage, leading to loss of insulation and buoyancy. In the Arctic these impacts are intensified. To protect seabirds, a rapid removal of oil is crucial and in situ burning could be an efficient method. In the present work exposure effects of oil and burn residue in different doses was studied on seabird feathers from legally hunted Common eider (Somateria mollissima) by examining changes in total weight of the feather and damages on the microstructure (Amalgamation Index) of the feathers before and after exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that burn residues from in situ burning of an oil spill have similar or larger fouling and damaging effects on seabird feathers, as compared to fresh oil.

  14. Effects of oil and oil burn residues on seabird feathers.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Linnebjerg, Jannie Fries; Sørensen, Martin X; Brogaard, Nicholas L; Rigét, Frank F; Kristensen, Paneeraq; Jomaas, Grunde; Boertmann, David M; Wegeberg, Susse; Gustavson, Kim

    2016-08-15

    It is well known, that in case of oil spill, seabirds are among the groups of animals most vulnerable. Even small amounts of oil can have lethal effects by destroying the waterproofing of their plumage, leading to loss of insulation and buoyancy. In the Arctic these impacts are intensified. To protect seabirds, a rapid removal of oil is crucial and in situ burning could be an efficient method. In the present work exposure effects of oil and burn residue in different doses was studied on seabird feathers from legally hunted Common eider (Somateria mollissima) by examining changes in total weight of the feather and damages on the microstructure (Amalgamation Index) of the feathers before and after exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that burn residues from in situ burning of an oil spill have similar or larger fouling and damaging effects on seabird feathers, as compared to fresh oil. PMID:27234369

  15. Prediction of residual stress and distortion of ferrous and non-ferrous metals: Current status and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Sabine; Archambault, Pierre; Gautier, Elisabeth; Simon, André; Beck, Gérard

    2002-02-01

    The quantitative prediction of the consequences of a heat treatment, in terms of microstructure and hardness, residual stresses and distortions, implies a thorough knowledge of the coupled thermal, metallurgical, and mechanical phenomena that occur during the treatment and their modeling. Recent progress made in that field for metallic alloys (steels, aluminum alloys, and titanium alloys) is reviewed through different examples.

  16. Status report. Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on a Full-Diameter SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup.

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-08-01

    This report documents the mockup specifications and manufacturing processes; the initial cutting of the mockup into three cylindrical pieces for testing and the measured strain changes that occurred during the cutting process; and the planned weld residual stress characterization activities and the status of those activities.

  17. Correlation between full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD peak with residual stress on ground surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, M.; Paul, S.

    2012-11-01

    The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD profiles is used to characterize different material properties and surface integrity features. However, there is no literature available that discusses the nature of the correlation between the FWHM of XRD peaks with induced surface residual stress upon grinding with simultaneous occurrence of plastic deformation, formation of white layer, grain elongation, change in microhardness, etc. AISI 1060 steel samples were ground under different grinding domains, i.e. conventional abusive grinding, conventional grinding, cBN grinding and high speed grinding with moderately deep cut. Induction of tensile and compressive residual stress, microstructural changes, white layer formation, grain refinement, plastic deformation, grain elongation and change in microhardness were observed upon grinding AISI 1060 steel. A correlation was established between the FWHM of XRD peaks and surface residual stress when simultaneous changes in microhardness and microstructure, grain elongation, plastic deformation and formation of white layer take place due to grinding. The correlation between FWHM of XRD peak and residual stress appears to be nonlinear due to simultaneous change in other aspects of surface integrity.

  18. Study on the microstructure, mechanical property and residual stress of SLM Inconel-718 alloy manufactured by differing island scanning strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanjin; Wu, Songquan; Gan, Yiliang; Huang, Tingting; Yang, Chuanguang; Junjie, Lin; Lin, Jinxin

    2015-12-01

    Inconel-718 has received an extensive using in mold industry. The selective laser melting (SLM) is providing an ideal means for manufacturing mold insert with complex geometrical features and internal architecture. During the manufacturing of high quality mold inserts with conformal cooling channel, the parameters play a vital role in the SLM process. In the study, the Inconel-718 alloys were manufactured by SLM with 2×2 mm2, 3×3 mm2, 5×5 mm2, and 7×7 mm2 island scanning strategies. The microstructure, mechanical property, and residual stress were investigated by optical microscope, tensile test and Vickers micro-indentation, respectively. It can be found that the relative density increased with enlarging the island size; the results on the microstructure indicated that the cracks and more pores were detected in the 22-specimen; whilst the microstructures of all specimens were composed of fine dendritic grains, cellular, and columnar structures; the tensile testing suggested that the ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of all samples was similar; while the outcome of the residual stress showed that the value of residual stress was ranked in the following sequence: 22-specimen<55-specimen<77-specimen<33-specimen. Although the 22-specimen had lower residual stress compared with the other groups, the occurrence of cracks limited its processing application in SLM. Through integrated into account, the 55-scanning strategy is a promising candidate for manufacturing of mold inserts.

  19. Feeding a diet contaminated with ochratoxin A for broiler chickens at the maximum level recommended by the EU for poultry feeds (0.1 mg/kg). 2. Effects on meat quality, oxidative stress, residues and histological traits.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, L; Cavallarin, L; Antoniazzi, S; Guerre, P; Biasibetti, E; Capucchio, M T; Schiavone, A

    2013-05-01

    The European Commission Recommendation 2006/576/EC indicates that the maximum tolerable level of ochratoxin A (OTA) in poultry feeds is 0.1 mg OTA/kg. Thirty-six 1-day-old male broiler chicks were divided into two groups, a control (basal diet) and an OTA (basal diet + 0.1 mg OTA/kg) group. The OTA concentration was quantified in serum, liver, kidney, breast and thigh samples. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content were evaluated in the liver, kidney, breast and thigh samples. The glutathione (GSH) content, and catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured in the liver and kidney samples. Histopathological traits were evaluated for the spleen, bursa of Fabricius and liver samples. Moreover, the chemical composition of the meat was analysed in breast and thigh samples. In the OTA diet-fed animals, a serum OTA concentration of 1.15 ± 0.35 ng/ml was found, and OTA was also detected in kidney and liver at 3.58 ± 0.85 ng OTA/g f.w. and 1.92 ± 0.21 ng OTA/g f.w., respectively. The TBARS content was higher in the kidney of the ochratoxin A group (1.53 ± 0.18 nmol/mg protein vs. 0.91 ± 0.25 nmol/mg protein). Feeding OTA at 0.1 mg OTA/kg also resulted in degenerative lesions in the spleen, bursa of Fabricius and liver. The maximum tolerable level of 0.1 mg OTA/kg, established for poultry feeds by the EU, represents a safe limit for the final consumer, because no OTA residues were found in breast and thigh meat. Even though no clinical signs were noticed in the birds fed the OTA-contaminated diet, moderate histological lesions were observed in the liver, spleen and bursa of Fabricius.

  20. Effect of high-energy X-ray doses on bone elastic properties and residual strains.

    PubMed

    Singhal, A; Deymier-Black, Alix C; Almer, J D; Dunand, D C

    2011-11-01

    Bone X-ray irradiation occurs during medical treatments, sterilization of allografts, space travel and in vitro studies. High doses are known to affect the post-yield properties of bone, but their effect on the bone elastic properties is unclear. The effect of such doses on the mineral-organic interface has also not been adequately addressed. Here, the evolution of elastic properties and residual strains with increasing synchrotron X-ray dose (5-3880 kGy) is examined on bovine cortical bone. It is found that these doses affect neither the degree of nanometer-level load transfer between the hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and the collagen up to stresses of -60 MPa nor the microscopic modulus of collagen fibrils (both measured by synchrotron X-ray scattering during repeated in situ loading and unloading). However, the residual elastic strains in the HAP phase decrease markedly with increased irradiation, indicating damage at the HAP-collagen interface. The HAP residual strain also decreases after repeated loading/unloading cycles. These observations can be explained by temporary de-bonding at the HAP/collagen interface (thus reducing the residual strain), followed by rapid re-bonding (so that load transfer capability is not affected).