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Sample records for residual two-body interaction

  1. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  2. Implicit theories of static interactions between two bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanero, M.; Suero, M. I.; Pérez, A. L.; Pardo, P. J.

    2002-07-01

    There are many spontaneous conceptions related to the principle of action and reaction for two bodies in static contact. A study of a broad sample of students showed Newton's third law to be a great unknown for most of them. The conceptions were found to be consistent, forming authentic minitheories (implicit theories) with general laws governing the interactions. This consistency evolves over the course of the students' education, reflecting changes in their modes of learning.

  3. Two body and multibody interaction in a cold Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianing; Gallagher, Tom

    2009-05-01

    Cold Rydberg atoms trapped in a Magneto Optical Trap (MOT) are not isolated and they tend to bond through dipole-dipole and multiple-multiple interactions between Rydberg atoms. The dipole-dipole interaction and van der Waals interaction between two atoms have been intensively studied. However, the fact that the dipole-dipole interaction and van der Waals interaction show the same size of broadening, studied by Raithel's group, and there is transition between two molecular states, studied by Farooqi and Overstreet, can not be explained by the two atom picture. The purpose of this paper is to show the multibody nature of a dense cold Rydberg gas by studying the molecular state microwave spectrum. Specifically, single body, two body and three body interaction regions are separated. Moreover, the multibody energy levels for selected geometries are calculated. In addition, multibody blockade will be discussed. [3pt] [1] A. Reinhard, K. C. Younge, T. Cubel Liebisch, B. Knuffman, P. R. Berman, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 233201 (2008).[0pt] [2] S.M. Farooqi, D. Tong, S. Krishnan, J. Stanojevic,Y.P. Zhang, J.R. Ensher, A.S. Estrin, C. Boisseau, R. Cote, E.E. Eyler, and P.L. Gould, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 183002 (2003).[0pt] [3] K. Richard Overstreet, Arne Schwettmann, Jonathan Tallant, and James P. Shaffer, Phys. Rev. A 76, 011403 (2007).

  4. Electromagnetic interactions for the two-body spectator equations

    SciTech Connect

    J. Adam; Franz Gross; J.W. Van Orden

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a new non-associative algebra which is used to (1) show how the spectator (or Gross) two-body equations and electromagnetic currents can be formally derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation and currents if both are treated to all orders, (2) obtain explicit expressions for the Gross two-body electromagnetic currents valid to any order, and (3) prove that the currents so derived are exactly gauge invariant when truncated consistently to any finite order. In addition to presenting these new results, this work complements and extends previous treatments based largely on the analysis of sums of Feynman diagrams.

  5. Implicit Theories of Static Interactions between Two Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanero, M.; Suero, M. I.; Perez, A. L.; Pardo, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    There are many spontaneous conceptions related to the principle of action and reaction for two bodies in static contact. A study of a broad sample of students showed Newton's third law to be a great unknown for most of them. The conceptions were found to be consistent, forming authentic minitheories (implicit theories) with general laws governing…

  6. Proton-neutron interacting boson model under random two-body interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, N.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2009-12-15

    The low-lying states of sd-boson systems in the presence of random two-body interactions are studied in the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2). The predominance of spin-zero ground states is confirmed, and a very prominent maximum F-spin dominance in ground states is found. It turns out that the requirement of random interactions with F-spin conservation intensifies the above predominance. Collective motion in the low-lying states is discussed.

  7. Measurement-based quantum computation on two-body interacting qubits with adiabatic evolution.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Thi Ha; Li, Ying; Kwek, Leong-Chuan

    2014-10-31

    A cluster state cannot be a unique ground state of a two-body interacting Hamiltonian. Here, we propose the creation of a cluster state of logical qubits encoded in spin-1/2 particles by adiabatically weakening two-body interactions. The proposal is valid for any spatial dimensional cluster states. Errors induced by thermal fluctuations and adiabatic evolution within finite time can be eliminated ensuring fault-tolerant quantum computing schemes.

  8. Relationships between three-body and two-body interactions in fluids and solids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Sadus, Richard J

    2006-10-14

    Molecular dynamics data are reported for two-body and three-body interactions in noble gases at densities covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases. The data indicate that simple relationships exist between three- and two-body interactions in both fluid and solid phases. The relationship for liquids has a simple density dependence with only one external parameter. In contrast, the solid phase relationship depends both on density and on the square of density and requires the evaluation of two parameters. The relationships are tested for both system-size and temperature dependences. The values of the relationship parameters are only sensitive to system size when a small number of atoms are involved. For 500 or more atoms, they remain nearly constant. The relationships are valid for both subcritical and slightly supercritical temperatures. A practical benefit of the relationships is that they enable the use of two-body intermolecular potentials for the prediction of the properties of real systems without the computational expense of three-body calculations. PMID:17042611

  9. Statistical mechanics of nucleosome ordering by chromatin-structure-induced two-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Răzvan V.; Tolkunov, Denis; Locke, George; Morozov, Alexandre V.

    2011-05-01

    One-dimensional arrays of nucleosomes (DNA-bound histone octamers separated by stretches of linker DNA) fold into higher-order chromatin structures which ultimately make up eukaryotic chromosomes. Chromatin structure formation leads to 10-11 base pair (bp) discretization of linker lengths caused by the smaller free energy cost of packaging nucleosomes into regular chromatin fibers if their rotational setting (defined by the DNA helical twist) is conserved. We describe nucleosome positions along the fiber using a thermodynamic model of finite-size particles with both intrinsic histone-DNA interactions and an effective two-body potential. We infer one- and two-body energies directly from high-throughput maps of nucleosome positions. We show that higher-order chromatin structure helps explains in vitro and in vivo nucleosome ordering in transcribed regions, and plays a leading role in establishing well-known 10-11 bp genome-wide periodicity of nucleosome positions.

  10. Renormalization group analysis of ultracold Fermi gases with two-body attractive interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyong; Chi, Zimeng; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Zaijun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new functional renormalization group (RG) strategy to investigate the many-body physics of interacting ultracold Fermi gases. By mapping the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) action of Fermi gases onto a complex φ4-model, we can obtain the closed flow equation in the one-loop approximation. An analysis of the emerging RG flow gives the ground state behavior. The Hamiltonian of a Fermi gas with a two-body attractive interaction is used as a demonstration to clarify our treatment. The fixed point structure reveals not only the condensation phase transition, but also the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover. The effect of the imaginary time renormalization is also discussed. It is shown that for the dynamical field configuration our RG procedure can reproduce the well known theoretical results of BCS-BEC crossover, while under a static approximation the phase transition takes place at a higher critical temperature.

  11. Analytic, group-theoretic wave functions for confined, correlated N-body systems with general two-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, M.; Watson, D. K.; Loeser, J. G.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we develop an analytic N-body wave function for identical particles under quantum confinement with a general two-body interaction. A systematic approach to correlation is developed by combining three theoretical methods: dimensional perturbation theory, the FG method of Wilson et. al., and the group theory of the symmetric group. Analytic results are achieved for a completely general interaction potential. Unlike conventional perturbation methods which are applicable only for weakly interacting systems, this analytic approach is applicable to both weakly and strongly interacting systems. This method directly accounts for each two-body interaction, rather than an average interaction so even lowest-order results include beyond-mean-field effects. One major advantage is that N appears as a parameter in the analytical expressions for the energy so results for different N are easy to obtain.

  12. Restrictions imposed on relativistic two-body interactions by classical relativistic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, Horace W.; van Alstine, Peter

    1992-07-01

    We show that various relativistic potential models (all sharing exact relativistic two-body kinematics and a common nonrelativistic limit) can be distinguished by agreement or disagreement with relativistic corrections produced by classical field theory. We find that the only one of these models whose relativisic corrections duplicate those of classical field theory is the minimal Todorov equation. Conversely, we derive the Todorov equation from the semirelativistic dynamics of classical field theory, thus exposing the classical field-theoretic origins of its characteristic minimal potential structures and dependences on effective one-body variables.

  13. Periodic orbit quantization of a weakly interacting two-body system using perturbed symmetry-broken trace formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhr, Jamal; Whelan, Niall D.; Dumont, Randall S.

    2006-11-15

    The semiclassical limit of the quantum few-body problem has not been studied in general terms from the point of view of periodic orbit theory. In a previous paper, we studied noninteracting two-body systems [Phys. Rev. A 62, 042109 (2000)] and discussed the fact that the periodic orbits occur in continuous families. Interactions destroy the periodic orbit families leaving a discrete set of isolated periodic orbits. In this paper, we consider the effect of weak two-body interactions, which can be thought of as symmetry-breaking perturbations and can thus be analyzed using a theory developed by Creagh [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 248, 1 (1996)]. The Poeschl-Teller two-body system confined in a square well is analyzed to illustrate the use of the formalism. It is shown that the effect of the interaction can be evaluated for all two-particle periodic orbits, and that the coarse-grained quantum density of states can be fully reproduced from simply summing the perturbed contributions of each periodic orbit family. Good numerical estimates of the quantum singlet energies can actually be obtained, but it is found that that perturbed trace formulas cannot reproduce the multiplet splittings predicted from quantum mechanics. Several interesting properties are observed depending on the range of the interaction and on whether the interaction is attractive or repulsive.

  14. Two-body interactions and decay of three-level Rydberg-dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmrich, S.; Arias, A.; Pehoviak, N.; Whitlock, S.

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically analyze the interactions and decay rates for atoms dressed by multiple laser fields to strongly interacting Rydberg states using a quantum master equation approach. In this framework a comparison of two-level and three-level Rydberg-dressing schemes is presented. We identify a resonant enhancement of the three-level dressed interaction strength which originates from cooperative multiphoton couplings as well as small distance dependent decay rates. In this regime the soft-core shape of the potential is independent of the sign of the bare Rydberg-Rydberg interaction, while its sign can be repulsive or attractive depending on the intermediate state detuning. As a consequence, near-resonant Rydberg dressing in three-level atomic systems may enable the realization of laser driven quantum fluids with long-range and anisotropic interactions and with controllable dissipation.

  15. Many-body systems interacting via a two-body random ensemble. I. Angular momentum distribution in the ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.; Yoshinaga, N.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we discuss in detail the P(I)’s, angular momentum I probabilities in the ground states, of many-body systems interacting via a two-body random ensemble (TBRE). In particular, we extensively apply an approach introduced in an earlier paper and compare the predicted P(I)’s with those obtained by diagonalizing a TBRE Hamiltonian. We begin with a few solvable cases, such as fermions in a small single-j shell and d boson systems, where elegant agreements between the predicted P(I)’s and those obtained by diagonalizing a TBRE Hamiltonian are achieved. We find that d boson systems systematically present counterexamples of angular momentum 0 ground state dominance when the number of d bosons is 6κ±1 with κ a natural number, which suggests that certain fundamental symmetry (say, time reversal invariance) of the Hamiltonian cannot ensure the occurrence of angular momentum 0 ground state dominance. Next, we apply the same approach to more complicated cases, such as even or odd number of fermions in a large single-j shell or a many-j shell, sd-boson or sdg-boson systems, etc. We find that the simple approach proposed in an earlier paper is also well applicable, and thus it is a universal approach. The numerical experiments provide a guideline to tell which interactions are essential to produce a sizable P(I) in a many-body system. This disproves a popular idea that the angular momentum 0 ground state (0 g.s.) dominance may be independent of two-body interactions. Some matrix elements which are useful to understand the observed regularities are given or addressed in detail. In this paper we also report a synchronous staggering between the 0 g.s. probabilities of even numbers of fermions in a single-j shells and j g.s. probabilities of odd numbers of fermions in a single-j shell when j is small. The low seniority chain of 0 g.s. using the same set of two-body interactions is confirmed, but it is noted that contribution to the total 0 g.s. probability

  16. Interacting quantum walkers: two-body bosonic and fermionic bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Luck, J. M.; Mallick, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of bound states of two interacting particles, either bosons or fermions, performing a continuous-time quantum walk on a one-dimensional lattice. We consider the situation where the distance between both particles has a hard bound, and the richer situation where the particles are bound by a smooth confining potential. The main emphasis is on the velocity characterizing the ballistic spreading of these bound states, and on the structure of the asymptotic distribution profile of their center-of-mass coordinate. The latter profile generically exhibits many internal fronts.

  17. Solution of two-body relativistic bound state equations with confining plus Coulomb interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maung, Khin Maung; Kahana, David E.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of meson spectroscopy have often employed a nonrelativistic Coulomb plus Linear Confining potential in position space. However, because the quarks in mesons move at an appreciable fraction of the speed of light, it is necessary to use a relativistic treatment of the bound state problem. Such a treatment is most easily carried out in momentum space. However, the position space Linear and Coulomb potentials lead to singular kernels in momentum space. Using a subtraction procedure we show how to remove these singularities exactly and thereby solve the Schroedinger equation in momentum space for all partial waves. Furthermore, we generalize the Linear and Coulomb potentials to relativistic kernels in four dimensional momentum space. Again we use a subtraction procedure to remove the relativistic singularities exactly for all partial waves. This enables us to solve three dimensional reductions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We solve six such equations for Coulomb plus Confining interactions for all partial waves.

  18. Embedded Gaussian unitary ensembles with U(Ω)⊗SU(r) embedding generated by random two-body interactions with SU(r) symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Manan; Kota, V. K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Following the earlier studies on embedded unitary ensembles generated by random two-body interactions [EGUE(2)] with spin SU(2) and spin-isospin SU(4) symmetries, developed is a general formulation, for deriving lower order moments of the one- and two-point correlation functions in eigenvalues, that is valid for any EGUE(2) and BEGUE(2) ("B" stands for bosons) with U(Ω)⊗SU(r) embedding and with two-body interactions preserving SU(r) symmetry. Using this formulation with r = 1, we recover the results derived by Asaga et al. [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 297, 344 (2002)], 10.1006/aphy.2002.6248 for spinless boson systems. Going further, new results are obtained for r = 2 (this corresponds to two species boson systems) and r = 3 (this corresponds to spin 1 boson systems).

  19. Two trapped particles interacting by a finite-range two-body potential in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Klaiman, Shachar; Alon, Ofir E.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2013-03-01

    We examine the problem of two particles confined in an isotropic harmonic trap, which interact via a finite-range Gaussian-shaped potential in two spatial dimensions. We derive an approximative transcendental equation for the energy and study the resulting spectrum as a function of the interparticle interaction strength. Both the attractive and repulsive systems are analyzed. We study the impact of the potential's range on the ground-state energy. We also explicitly verify by a variational treatment that in the zero-range limit the positive δ potential in two dimensions only reproduces the noninteracting results, if the Hilbert space in not truncated, and demonstrate that an extremely large Hilbert space is required to approach the ground state when one is to tackle the limit of zero-range interaction numerically. Finally, we establish and discuss the connection between our finite-range treatment and regularized zero-range results from the literature. The present results indicate that a finite-range interparticle potential is numerically amenable for treating the statics and the nonequilibrium dynamics of interacting many-particle systems (bosons) in two dimensions.

  20. Effect of the band structure in a rigorous two-body model with long-range interactions in 1D optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Tom; Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We compute scattering and bound state properties for two ultracold molecules in a pure 1D optical lattice. We introduce reference functions with complex quasi-momentum that naturally account for the effect of excited energy bands. Our exact results for a short-range interaction are first compared with the simplest version of the standard Bose-Hubbard (BH) model. Such comparison allows us to highlight the effect of the excited bands, of the non-on-site interaction and of tunneling with distant neighbor, that are not taken into account in the BH model. The effective interaction can depend strongly on the particle quasi-momenta and can present a resonant behavior even in a deep lattice. As a second step, we study scattering of two polar particles in the optical lattice. Peculiar Wigner threshold laws stem from the interplay of the long range dipolar interaction and the presence of the energy bands. We finally assess the validity of an extended Bose-Hubbard model for dipolar gases based on our exact two-body calculations. This work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (Contract No. ANR-12-BS04-0020-01).

  1. Are distance-dependent statistical potentials considering three interacting bodies superior to two-body statistical potentials for protein structure prediction?

    PubMed

    Ghomi, Hamed Tabatabaei; Thompson, Jared J; Lill, Markus A

    2014-10-01

    Distance-based statistical potentials have long been used to model condensed matter systems, e.g. as scoring functions in differentiating native-like protein structures from decoys. These scoring functions are based on the assumption that the total free energy of the protein can be calculated as the sum of pairwise free energy contributions derived from a statistical analysis of pair-distribution functions. However, this fundamental assumption has been challenged theoretically. In fact the free energy of a system with N particles is only exactly related to the N-body distribution function. Based on this argument coarse-grained multi-body statistical potentials have been developed to capture higher-order interactions. Having a coarse representation of the protein and using geometric contacts instead of pairwise interaction distances renders these models insufficient in modeling details of multi-body effects. In this study, we investigated if extending distance-dependent pairwise atomistic statistical potentials to corresponding interaction functions that are conditional on a third interacting body, defined as quasi-three-body statistical potentials, could model details of three-body interactions. We also tested if this approach could improve the predictive capabilities of statistical scoring functions for protein structure prediction. We analyzed the statistical dependency between two simultaneous pairwise interactions and showed that there is surprisingly little if any dependency of a third interacting site on pairwise atomistic statistical potentials. Also the protein structure prediction performance of these quasi-three-body potentials is comparable with their corresponding two-body counterparts. The scoring functions developed in this study showed better or comparable performances compared to some widely used scoring functions for protein structure prediction. PMID:25212727

  2. Interaction of disinfectant residues on cleanroom substrates.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, H; Klein, D; Kopis, E; Leblanc, D; McDonnell, G; Tirey, J F

    1999-01-01

    This study will determine the levels of disinfectant residues on stainless steel surfaces after simulated manual cleaning activities. Additionally, this study will determine if chemical interactions between different chemical agents, representative of commonly used cleanroom disinfectant technologies, subsequently applied to the same surfaces exist, and to what degree these interactions impact sporicidal performance of an oxidizing biocide against Bacillus subtilis.

  3. Applications of two-body Dirac equations to the meson spectrum with three versus two covariant interactions, SU(3) mixing, and comparison to a quasipotential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Crater, Horace W.; Schiermeyer, James

    2010-11-01

    In a previous paper, Crater and Van Alstine applied the two-body Dirac equations of constraint dynamics to quark-antiquark bound states using a relativistic extention of the Adler-Piran potential and compared their spectral results to those from other approaches which also considered meson spectroscopy as a whole and not in parts. In this paper, we explore in more detail the differences and similarities in an important subset of those approaches, the quasipotential approach. In the earlier paper, the transformation properties of the quark-antiquark potentials were limited to a scalar and an electromagnetic-like four-vector, with the former accounting for the confining aspects of the overall potential, and the latter the short range portion. The static Adler-Piran potential was first given an invariant form and then apportioned between those two different types of potentials. Here, we make a change in this apportionment that leads to a substantial improvement in the resultant spectroscopy by including a timelike confining vector potential over and above the scalar confining one and the electromagnetic-like vector potential. Our fit includes 19 more mesons than the earlier results and we modify the scalar portion of the potential in such a way that allows this formalism to account for the isoscalar mesons {eta} and {eta}{sup '} not included in the previous work. Continuing the comparisons of formalisms and spectral results made in the previous paper with other approaches to meson spectroscopy, we examine in this paper the quasipotential approach of Ebert, Faustov, and Galkin.

  4. New Two-Body Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    We present a new scheme to regularize a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations. It is a combination of Sundman's time transformation and Levi-Civita's spatial coordinate transformation applied to the two-dimensional components of the position and velocity vectors in the osculating orbital plane. We adopt a coordinate triad specifying the plane as a function of the orbital angular momentum vector only. Since the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum is explicitly computed from the in-the-plane components of the position and velocity vectors, only two components of the orbital angular momentum vector are to be determined. In addition to these, we select the total energy of the two-body system and the physical time as additional components of the new variables. The equations of motion of the new variables have no singularity even when the mutual distance is extremely small, and therefore, the new variables are suitable to deal with close encounters. As a result, the number of dependent variables in the new scheme becomes eight, which is significantly smaller than the existing schemes to avoid close encounters: two less than the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel and the Bürdet-Ferrandiz regularizations, and five less than the Sperling-Bürdet/Bürdet-Heggie regularization.

  5. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M; Kamarchik, Eugene

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na(+)H2O, F(-)H2O, and Cl(-)H2O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H2O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20,000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na(+) and aVTZ basis for Cl(-) and F(-)), over a large range of distances and H2O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs. PMID:27004880

  6. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M; Kamarchik, Eugene

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na(+)H2O, F(-)H2O, and Cl(-)H2O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H2O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20,000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na(+) and aVTZ basis for Cl(-) and F(-)), over a large range of distances and H2O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  7. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.; Kamarchik, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na+H2O, F-H2O, and Cl-H2O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H2O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20 000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na+ and aVTZ basis for Cl- and F-), over a large range of distances and H2O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  8. Orbits of Two-Body Problem From the Lenz Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Obtains the orbits with reference to the center of mass of two bodies under mutual universe square law interaction by use of the eccentricity vector which is equivalent to the Lenz vector within a numerical factor. (Author/SL)

  9. Computational prediction of heme-binding residues by exploiting residue interaction network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Hu, Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    Computational identification of heme-binding residues is beneficial for predicting and designing novel heme proteins. Here we proposed a novel method for heme-binding residue prediction by exploiting topological properties of these residues in the residue interaction networks derived from three-dimensional structures. Comprehensive analysis showed that key residues located in heme-binding regions are generally associated with the nodes with higher degree, closeness and betweenness, but lower clustering coefficient in the network. HemeNet, a support vector machine (SVM) based predictor, was developed to identify heme-binding residues by combining topological features with existing sequence and structural features. The results showed that incorporation of network-based features significantly improved the prediction performance. We also compared the residue interaction networks of heme proteins before and after heme binding and found that the topological features can well characterize the heme-binding sites of apo structures as well as those of holo structures, which led to reliable performance improvement as we applied HemeNet to predicting the binding residues of proteins in the heme-free state. HemeNet web server is freely accessible at http://mleg.cse.sc.edu/hemeNet/. PMID:21991319

  10. Residue-residue contacts: application to analysis of secondary structure interactions.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Sobolev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Protein structures and their complexes are formed and stabilized by interactions, both inside and outside of the protein. Analysis of such interactions helps in understanding different levels of structures (secondary, super-secondary, and oligomeric states). It can also assist molecular biologists in understanding structural consequences of modifying proteins and/or ligands. In this chapter, our definition of atom-atom and residue-residue contacts is described and applied to analysis of protein-protein interactions in dimeric β-sandwich proteins.

  11. On the relation between residue flexibility and residue interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Li, Yi-Zhou; Li, Meng-Long

    2011-05-01

    B-factor from X-ray crystal structure can well measure protein structural flexibility, which plays an important role in different biological processes, such as catalysis, binding and molecular recognition. Understanding the essence of flexibility can be helpful for the further study of the protein function. In this study, we attempted to correlate the flexibility of a residue to its interactions with other residues by representing the protein structure as a residue contact network. Here, several well established network topological parameters were employed to feature such interactions. A prediction model was constructed for B-factor of a residue by using support vector regression (SVR). Pearson correlation coefficient (CC) was used as the performance measure. CC values were 0.63 and 0.62 for single amino acid and for the whole sequence, respectively. Our results revealed well correlations between B-factors and network topological parameters. This suggests that the protein structural flexibility could be well characterized by the inter-amino acid interactions in a protein.

  12. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families. PMID:26527718

  13. Two-body hadronic charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chiang, Cheng-Wei

    2010-04-01

    In this work we study the two-body hadronic charmed meson decays, including both the PP and VP modes. The latest experimental data are first analyzed in the diagrammatic approach. The magnitudes and strong phases of the flavor amplitudes are extracted from the Cabibbo-favored decay modes using χ2 minimization. The best-fitted values are then used to predict the branching fractions of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes in the flavor SU(3) symmetry limit. We observe significant SU(3) breaking effects in some of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed channels. In the case of VP modes, we point out that the AP and AV amplitudes cannot be completely determined based on currently available data. We conjecture that the quoted experimental results for both Ds+→K¯0K*+ and Ds+→ρ+η' are overestimated. We compare the sizes of color-allowed and color-suppressed tree amplitudes extracted from the diagrammatical approach with the effective parameters a1 and a2 defined in the factorization approach. The ratio |a2/a1| is more or less universal among the D→K¯π, K¯*π, and K¯ρ modes. This feature allows us to discriminate between different solutions of topological amplitudes. For the long-standing puzzle about the ratio Γ(D0→K+K-)/Γ(D0→π+π-), we argue that, in addition to the SU(3) breaking effect in the spectator amplitudes, the long-distance resonant contribution through the nearby resonance f0(1710) can naturally explain why D0 decays more copiously to K+K- than π+π- through the W-exchange topology. This has to do with the dominance of the scalar glueball content of f0(1710) and the chiral-suppression effect in the decay of a scalar glueball into two pseudoscalar mesons. The same final-state interaction also explains the occurrence of D0→K0K¯0 and its vanishing amplitude when SU(3) flavor symmetry is exact. Owing to the G-parity selection rule, Ds+→π+ω does not receive contributions from the short-distance W

  14. Tissue Factor Residues That Putatively Interact with Membrane Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ke; Yuan, Jian; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Blood clotting is initiated by the two-subunit enzyme consisting of the plasma protease, factor VIIa (the catalytic subunit), bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor (the regulatory subunit). Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that certain residues in the tissue factor ectodomain interact with phosphatidylserine headgroups to ensure optimal positioning of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex relative to its membrane-bound protein substrates, factors IX and X. In this study, we individually mutated to alanine all the putative phosphatidylserine-interactive residues in the tissue factor ectodomain and measured their effects on tissue factor cofactor function (activation of factors IX and X by tissue factor/factor VIIa, and clotting of plasma). Some tissue factor mutants exhibited decreased activity in all three assays, with the most profound defects observed from mutations in or near the flexible loop from Lys159 to Gly164. The decreased activity of all of these tissue factor mutants could be partially or completely overcome by increasing the phosphatidylserine content of tissue factor-liposomes. Additionally, yeast surface display was used to screen a random library of tissue factor mutants for enhanced factor VIIa binding. Surprisingly, mutations at a single amino acid (Lys165) predominated, with the Lys165→Glu mutant exhibiting a 3-fold enhancement in factor VIIa binding affinity. Our studies reveal the functional contributions of residues in the C-terminal half of the tissue factor ectodomain that are implicated in interacting with phosphatidylserine headgroups to enhance tissue factor cofactor activity, possibly by allosterically modulating the conformation of the adjacent substrate-binding exosite region of tissue factor. PMID:24516673

  15. Smooth relativistic two-body propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, E. D.; Jennings, B. K.

    1988-06-01

    In this paper we develop two-body propagators for use in relativistic systems. The starting point is the observation of Thies that the success of the Dirac approach may be attributed to the cancellation of short-range structure generated by the iteration of a momentum dependent potential in the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We elevate this observation to a principle and look for two-body propagators that have as little short-range structure as possible. The propagators so found treat the two particles symmetrically, reduce to the correct relativistic equation when either one of the two particles becomes very massive and have the correct contribution from the two-body cut. For the pi-nucleon system we find that both the soft-pion theorems and unitarity can be easily satisfied. For proton-nucleus or electron-nucleus scattering we get a simple method of including nuclear recoil. The present approach generates propagators similar to those of Todorov and of Crater and Van Alstine.

  16. Controller-structure interaction compensation using adaptive residual mode filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    It is not feasible to construct controllers for large space structures or large scale systems (LSS's) which are of the same order as the structures. The complexity of the dynamics of these systems is such that full knowledge of its behavior cannot by processed by today's controller design methods. The controller for system performance of such a system is therefore based on a much smaller reduced-order model (ROM). Unfortunately, the interaction between the LSS and the ROM-based controller can produce instabilities in the closed-loop system due to the unmodeled dynamics of the LSS. Residual mode filters (RMF's) allow the systematic removal of these instabilities in a matter which does not require a redesign of the controller. In addition RMF's have a strong theoretical basis. As simple first- or second-order filters, the RMF CSI compensation technique is at once modular, simple and highly effective. RMF compensation requires knowledge of the dynamics of the system modes which resulted in the previous closed-loop instabilities (the residual modes), but this information is sometimes known imperfectly. An adaptive, self-tuning RMF design, which compensates for uncertainty in the frequency of the residual mode, has been simulated using continuous-time and discrete-time models of a flexible robot manipulator. Work has also been completed on the discrete-time experimental implementation on the Martin Marietta flexible robot manipulator experiment. This paper will present the results of that work on adaptive, self-tuning RMF's, and will clearly show the advantage of this adaptive compensation technique for controller-structure interaction (CSI) instabilities in actively-controlled LSS's.

  17. Birth of a two body photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Randy T.

    2011-09-01

    The two body photon model assumes that an electron and a positron have been accelerated to the speed of light. The tenets of relativity theory would lead one to believe this to be impossible. It has long been thought that a body cannot be accelerated to the speed of light because the relativistic mass or momentum would become infinite. This conceptual problem is addressed with the realization that it is not necessary to resort to the concept of a velocity dependent mass. Instead, the force should be considered to be velocity dependent. The relativistic equations of motion can be rearranged and interpreted such that the force varies with velocity instead of the mass. When the velocity reaches the speed of light, instead of dividing by zero and interpreting the equations as implying a nonphysical infinite mass, the equations show a finite mass with an applied force of zero. The equations can still take on the indeterminate form of 0/0, but standard mathematical analysis of this situation will show that the equations predict that a body can reach the speed of light. Furthermore, under the influence of an inverse square force, a body can be accelerated to the speed of light over very short distances and provide the initial conditions necessary for the birth of a two body photon.

  18. Numerical Comparison of Two-Body Regularizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2007-06-01

    We numerically compare four schemes to regularize a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations: the Sperling-Bürdet (S-B), Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (K-S), and Bürdet-Ferrandiz (B-F) regularizations, and a three-dimensional extension of the Levi-Civita (L-C) regularization we developed recently. As for the integration time of the equation of motion, the least time is needed for the unregularized treatment, followed by the K-S, the extended L-C, the B-F, and the S-B regularizations. However, these differences become significantly smaller when the time to evaluate perturbations becomes dominant. As for the integration error after one close encounter, the K-S and the extended L-C regularizations are tied for the least error, followed by the S-B, the B-F, and finally the unregularized scheme for unperturbed orbits with eccentricity less than 2. This order is not changed significantly by various kinds of perturbations. As for the integration error of elliptical orbits after multiple orbital periods, the situation remains the same except for the rank of the S-B scheme, which varies from the best to the second worst depending on the length of integration and/or on the nature of perturbations. Also, we confirm that Kepler energy scaling enhances the performance of the unregularized, K-S, and extended L-C schemes. As a result, the K-S and the extended L-C regularizations with Kepler energy scaling provide the best cost performance in integrating almost all the perturbed two-body problems.

  19. Two-body bound states & the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pichowsky, M.; Kennedy, M.; Strickland, M.

    1995-01-18

    The Bethe-Salpeter formalism is used to study two-body bound states within a scalar theory: two scalar fields interacting via the exchange of a third massless scalar field. The Schwinger-Dyson equation is derived using functional and diagrammatic techniques, and the Bethe-Salpeter equation is obtained in an analogous way, showing it to be a two-particle generalization of the Schwinger-Dyson equation. The authors also present a numerical method for solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation without three-dimensional reduction. The ground and first excited state masses and wavefunctions are computed within the ladder approximation and space-like form factors are calculated.

  20. Loschmidt echoes in two-body random matrix ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2007-07-01

    Fidelity decay is studied for quantum many-body systems with a dominant independent particle Hamiltonian resulting, e.g., from a mean field theory with a weak two-body interaction. The diagonal terms of the interaction are included in the unperturbed Hamiltonian, while the off-diagonal terms constitute the perturbation that distorts the echo. We give the linear response solution for this problem in a random matrix framework. While the ensemble average shows no surprising behavior, we find that the typical ensemble member as represented by the median displays a very slow fidelity decay known as “freeze.” Numerical calculations confirm this result and show that the ground state even on average displays the freeze. This may contribute to explanation of the “unreasonable” success of mean field theories.

  1. Description and evaluation of nuclear masses based on residual proton-neutron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G. J.; Lei, Y.; Jiang, H.; Zhao, Y. M.; Sun, B.; Arima, A.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we study the residual proton-neutron interactions and make use of the systematics of these interactions to describe experimental data of nuclear masses and to predict some of the unknown masses. The odd-even effect staggering of the residual proton-neutron interaction between the last proton and the last neutron is found and argued in terms of pairing interactions. Two local mass relations, which work very accurately for masses of four neighboring nuclei, are discovered. The accuracy of our predicted masses for medium and heavy nuclei is competitive with that of the AME2003 extrapolations, with the virtue of simplicity.

  2. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jincheng; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Field induced magnetization reversal was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value (on nanometer scale) in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The ultralow field switching phenomenon was missed in the parallel configuration where both the anisotropic axes are aligned along the separation line of the two particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction [J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104303 (2011)] where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles might be implemented as a composite information bit.

  3. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  4. The Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, J.; Pierret, F.; Puig, B.

    2015-03-01

    We study the Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem introduced by Sharma and Parthasarathy in ["Dynamics of a stochastically perturbed two-body problem," Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 979-1003 (2007)]. In particular, we focus on the preservation of some fundamental features of the classical two-body problem like the Hamiltonian structure and first integrals in the stochastic case. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behaviour of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss's equations in the planar case.

  5. The Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Cresson, J.

    2015-03-15

    We study the Sharma-Parthasarathy stochastic two-body problem introduced by Sharma and Parthasarathy in [“Dynamics of a stochastically perturbed two-body problem,” Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 979-1003 (2007)]. In particular, we focus on the preservation of some fundamental features of the classical two-body problem like the Hamiltonian structure and first integrals in the stochastic case. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behaviour of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss’s equations in the planar case.

  6. Collision dynamics in Henon-Heiles' two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, V.; Barbosu, M.

    We tackle the two-body problem associated to Henon-Heiles' potential in the special case of the collision singularity. Using McGehee-type transformations of the second kind, we blow up the singularity and replace it by the collision manifold Mc pasted on the phase spece. We fully describe the flow on Mc. This flow is similar to analogous flows met in post-Newtonian two-body problems.

  7. Exact two-body solutions and quantum defect theory of two-dimensional dipolar quantum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Jianwen; Qi, Ran

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we provide the two-body exact solutions of the two-dimensional (2D) Schrödinger equation with isotropic +/- 1/{r}3 interactions. An analytic quantum defect theory is constructed based on these solutions and it is applied to investigate the scattering properties as well as two-body bound states of an ultracold polar molecules confined in a quasi-2D geometry. Interestingly, we find that for the attractive case, the scattering resonance happens simultaneously in all partial waves, which has not been observed in other systems. The effect of this feature on the scattering phase shift across such resonances is also illustrated.

  8. Two-body relaxation in simulated cosmological haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.

    2006-08-01

    This paper aims to quantify, in a general manner that does not directly resort to large-scale calculations, discreteness effects acting on the dynamics of dark matter haloes forming in the context of cosmological simulations. By generalizing the standard formulation of two-body relaxation to the case when the size and mass distributions are variable, and parametrizing the time evolution using established empirical relations, we find that the dynamics of a million-particle halo is noise-dominated within the inner per cent of the final virial radius. Far larger particle numbers (~108) are required for the rms perturbations to the velocity to drop to the 10per cent level there. The radial scaling of the relaxation time is simple and strong: trelax ~r2, implying that numbers >>108 are required to faithfully model the very inner regions; artificial relaxation may thus constitute an important factor, contributing to the contradictory claims concerning the persistence of a power-law density cusp to the very centre. The cores of substructure haloes can be many relaxation times old. Since relaxation first causes their expansion before recontraction occurs, it may render them either more difficult or easier to disrupt, depending on their orbital parameters. This may modify the characteristics of the subhalo distribution; and if, as suggested by several authors, it is parent-satellite interactions that determine halo profiles, the overall structure of the system may be affected. We derive simple closed form formulae for the characteristic relaxation time of both parents and satellites, and an elementary argument deducing the weak N-scaling reported by Diemand et al. when the main contribution comes from relaxing subhaloes.

  9. Residual charge interactions in unfolded staphylococcal nuclease can be explained by the Gaussian-chain model.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2002-01-01

    The discrepancy of the pH dependence of the unfolding free energy for staphylococcal nuclease from what is expected from an idealized model for the unfolded state is accounted for by the recently developed Gaussian-chain model. Residual electrostatic effects in the unfolded state are attributed to nonspecific interactions dominated by charges close along the sequence. The dominance of nonspecific local interactions appears to be supported by some experimental evidence. PMID:12496071

  10. Determination of the critical residues responsible for cardiac myosin binding protein C's interactions.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Gupta, Manish; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Despite early demonstrations of myosin binding protein C's (MyBP-C) interaction with actin, different investigators have reached different conclusions regarding the relevant and necessary domains mediating this binding. Establishing the detailed structure-function relationships is needed to fully understand cMyBP-C's ability to impact on myofilament contraction as mutations in different domains are causative for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We defined cMyBP-C's N-terminal structural domains that are necessary or sufficient to mediate interactions with actin and/or the head region of the myosin heavy chain (S2-MyHC). Using a combination of genetics and functional assays, we defined the actin binding site(s) present in cMyBP-C. We confirmed that cMyBP-C's C1 and m domains productively interact with actin, while S2-MyHC interactions are restricted to the m domain. Using residue-specific mutagenesis, we identified the critical actin binding residues and distinguished them from the residues that were critical for S2-MyHC binding. To validate the structural and functional significance of these residues, we silenced the endogenous cMyBP-C in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRC) using cMyBP-C siRNA, and replaced the endogenous cMyBP-C with normal or actin binding-ablated cMyBP-C. Replacement with actin binding-ablated cMyBP-C showed that the mutated protein did not incorporate into the sarcomere normally. Residues responsible for actin and S2-MyHC binding are partially present in overlapping domains but are unique. Expression of an actin binding-deficient cMyBP-C resulted in abnormal cytosolic distribution of the protein, indicating that interaction with actin is essential for the formation and/or maintenance of normal cMyBP-C sarcomeric distribution.

  11. Alterations of Nonconserved Residues Affect Protein Stability and Folding Dynamics through Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Garcìa, Angel E; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-10-15

    Charge-charge interactions play an important role in thermal stability of proteins. We employed an all-atom, native-topology-based model with non-native electrostatics to explore the interplay between folding dynamics and stability of TNfn3 (the third fibronectin type III domain from tenascin-C). Our study elucidates the role of charge-charge interactions in modulating the folding energy landscape. In particular, we found that incorporation of explicit charge-charge interactions in the WT TNfn3 induces energetic frustration due to the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state. Moreover, optimization of the surface charge-charge interactions by altering the evolutionarily nonconserved residues not only increases the thermal stability (in agreement with previous experimental study) but also reduces the formation of residual structure and hence minimizes the energetic frustration along the folding route. We concluded that charge-charge interaction in the rationally designed TNfn3 plays an important role not only in enhancing the stability but also in assisting folding. PMID:26413861

  12. Stochastic perturbation of the two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, J.; Pierret, F.; Puig, B.

    2013-11-01

    We study the impact of a stochastic perturbation on the classical two-body problem in particular concerning the preservation of first integrals and the Hamiltonian structure. Numerical simulations are performed which illustrate the dynamical behavior of the osculating elements as the semi-major axis, the eccentricity and the pericenter. We also derive a stochastic version of Gauss's equations in the planar case.

  13. Constraints on two-body lepton flavor violating decay processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nussinov, S.; Peccei, R. D.; Zhang, X. M.

    2001-01-01

    Simple ''unitarity inspired'' relations between two- and three-body lepton flavor violating decays are noted and discussed. In the absence of cancellations, the existing strong bounds on {mu}{yields}3e and {mu}{yields}e{gamma}{gamma} severely constrain two-body lepton flavor violating decays.

  14. Two-Body and Three-Body Atomic Recombination Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarino, Jose M.; Martinez, E.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how, in some circumstances, a two-body reaction (association in absence of a third body) is the only possible association, and how reactions proceed in this case. Taking competition between two/three-body reactions into account, considers relative importance of such combinations and conditions under which the former can be competitive.…

  15. Interaction between dimer interface residues of native and mutated SOD1 protein: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Keerthana, S P; Kolandaivel, P

    2015-04-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is a highly conserved bimetallic protein enzyme, used for the scavenging the superoxide radicals (O2 (-)) produced due to aerobic metabolism in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Over 100 mutations have been identified and found to be in the homodimeric structure of SOD1. The enzyme has to be maintained in its dimeric state for the structural stability and enzymatic activity. From our investigation, we found that the mutations apart from the dimer interface residues are found to affect the dimer stability of protein and hence enhancing the aggregation and misfolding tendency of mutated protein. The homodimeric state of SOD1 is found to be held together by the non-covalent interactions. The molecular dynamics simulation has been used to study the hydrogen bond interactions between the dimer interface residues of the monomers in native and mutated forms of SOD1 in apo- and holo-states. The results obtained by this analysis reveal the fact that the loss of hydrogen bond interactions between the monomers of the dimer is responsible for the reduced stability of the apo- and holo-mutant forms of SOD1. The conformers with dimer interface residues in native and mutated protein obtained by the molecular dynamics simulation is subjected to quantum mechanical study using M052X/6-31G(d) level of theory. The charge transfer between N-H···O interactions in the dimer interface residues were studied. The weak interaction between the monomers of the dimer accounts for the reduced dimerization and enhanced deformation energy in the mutated SOD1 protein. PMID:25578810

  16. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan C; Cantón, Francisco R; Veredas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants. PMID:26597773

  17. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledo, Juan C.; Cantón, Francisco R.; Veredas, Francisco J.

    2015-11-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants.

  18. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Aledo, Juan C.; Cantón, Francisco R.; Veredas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants. PMID:26597773

  19. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan C; Cantón, Francisco R; Veredas, Francisco J

    2015-11-24

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants.

  20. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  1. PAIRpred: partner-specific prediction of interacting residues from sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Geiss, Brian J; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel partner-specific protein-protein interaction site prediction method called PAIRpred. Unlike most existing machine learning binding site prediction methods, PAIRpred uses information from both proteins in a protein complex to predict pairs of interacting residues from the two proteins. PAIRpred captures sequence and structure information about residue pairs through pairwise kernels that are used for training a support vector machine classifier. As a result, PAIRpred presents a more detailed model of protein binding, and offers state of the art accuracy in predicting binding sites at the protein level as well as inter-protein residue contacts at the complex level. We demonstrate PAIRpred's performance on Docking Benchmark 4.0 and recent CAPRI targets. We present a detailed performance analysis outlining the contribution of different sequence and structure features, together with a comparison to a variety of existing interface prediction techniques. We have also studied the impact of binding-associated conformational change on prediction accuracy and found PAIRpred to be more robust to such structural changes than existing schemes. As an illustration of the potential applications of PAIRpred, we provide a case study in which PAIRpred is used to analyze the nature and specificity of the interface in the interaction of human ISG15 protein with NS1 protein from influenza A virus. Python code for PAIRpred is available at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/supplements/pairpred/. PMID:24243399

  2. Atlas2bgeneral: Two-body resonance calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2016-07-01

    For a massless test particle and given a planetary system, Atlas2bgeneral calculates all resonances in a given range of semimajor axes with all the planets taken one by one. Planets are assumed in fixed circular and coplanar orbits and the test particle with arbitrary orbit. A sample input data file to calculate the two-body resonances is available for use with the Fortran77 source code.

  3. Symmetries of Mücket-Treder's two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, V.

    The two-body problem associated to the classical potential field proposed by Mücket and Treder (1977) is considered from the only standpoint of symmetries. The corresponding vector field in Hamiltonian or standard polar coordinates presents nice symmetries that form eight-element symmetric Abelian groups endowed with an idempotent structure. Expressed in Levi-Civita coordinates, the problem exhibits a sixteen-element group of symmetries, also Abelian and presenting an idempotent structure.

  4. Symmetries of Fock's Two-Body Probmlem (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile; Rusu, Mircea; Stavinschi, Magda

    A general view on the symmetries that characterize the two-body problem associated to Fock's field is provided. In both Cartesian or standard polar coordiantes, as well as in collision-blow-up and infinity-blow-up McGehee-type coordinates, these symmetries form isomorphic eight-element Abelian groups endowed with an idempotent structure. For Levi-Civita's regularizing coordinates, we find a sixteen-element group of symmetries with the same characteristics.

  5. The two-body random spin ensemble and a new type of quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Prosen, Tomaž; Mossmann, Stefan; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2008-02-01

    We study in this paper the properties of a two-body random matrix ensemble for distinguishable spins. We require the ensemble to be invariant under the group of local transformations and analyze a parametrization in terms of the group parameters and the remaining parameters associated with the 'entangling' part of the interaction. We then specialize to a spin chain with nearest-neighbour interactions and numerically find a new type of quantum-phase transition related to the strength of a random external field, i.e. the time-reversal-breaking one-body interaction term.

  6. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-07-01

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico-chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain-domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π-π stacking and π-cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring.

  7. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico–chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain–domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π–π stacking and π–cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring. PMID:27198219

  8. Interacting residues in an activated state of a G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hun; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-27

    Ste2p, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the tridecapeptide pheromone alpha-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was used as a model GPCR to investigate the role of specific residues in the resting and activated states of the receptor. Using a series of biological and biochemical analyses of wild-type and site-directed mutant receptors, we identified Asn(205) as a potential interacting partner with the Tyr(266) residue. An N205H/Y266H double mutant showed pH-dependent functional activity, whereas the N205H receptor was non-functional and the Y266H receptor was partially active indicating that the histidine 205 and 266 residues interact in an activated state of the receptor. The introduction of N205K or Y266D mutations into the P258L/S259L constitutively active receptor suppressed the constitutive activity; in contrast, the N205K/Y266D/P258L/S259L quadruple mutant was fully constitutively active, again indicating an interaction between residues at the 205 and 206 positions in the receptor-active state. To further test this interaction, we introduced the N205C/Y266C, F204C/Y266C, and N205C/A265C double mutations into wild-type and P258L/S259L constitutively active receptors. After trypsin digestion, we found that a disulfide-cross-linked product, with the molecular weight expected for a receptor fragment with a cross-link between N205C and Y266C, formed only in the N205C/Y266C constitutively activated receptor. This study represents the first experimental demonstration of an interaction between specific residues in an active state, but not the resting state, of Ste2p. The information gained from this study should contribute to an understanding of the conformational differences between resting and active states in GPCRs. PMID:16314417

  9. Graph states as ground states of two-body frustration-free Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, Andrew S.; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2014-07-01

    The framework of measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) allows us to view the ground states of local Hamiltonians as potential resources for universal quantum computation. A central goal in this field is to find models with ground states that are universal for MBQC and that are also natural in the sense that they involve only two-body interactions and have a small local Hilbert space dimension. Graph states are the original resource states for MBQC, and while it is not possible to obtain graph states as exact ground states of two-body Hamiltonians, here we construct two-body frustration-free Hamiltonians that have arbitrarily good approximations of graph states as unique ground states. The construction involves taking a two-body frustration-free model that has a ground state convertible to a graph state with stochastic local operations, then deforming the model such that its ground state is close to a graph state. Each graph state qubit resides in a subspace of a higher dimensional particle. This deformation can be applied to two-body frustration-free Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) models, yielding Hamiltonians that are exactly solvable with exact tensor network expressions for ground states. For the star-lattice AKLT model, the ground state of which is not expected to be a universal resource for MBQC, applying such a deformation appears to enhance the computational power of the ground state, promoting it to a universal resource for MBQC. Transitions in computational power, similar to percolation phase transitions, can be observed when Hamiltonians are deformed in this way. Improving the fidelity of the ground state comes at the cost of a shrinking gap. While analytically proving gap properties for these types of models is difficult in general, we provide a detailed analysis of the deformation of a spin-1 AKLT state to a linear graph state.

  10. Amino-terminal basic residues of Src mediate membrane binding through electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, C T; Zhou, W; Buser, C A; McLaughlin, S; Resh, M D

    1994-01-01

    Membrane targeting of pp60src (Src) is mediated by its myristoylated amino terminus. We demonstrate that, in addition to myristate, six basic residues in the amino terminus are essential for high-affinity binding to the lipid bilayer via electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids. Specifically, c-Src was shown to bind 2500-fold more strongly to vesicles composed of the physiological ratio of 2:1 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS) than to neutral PC bilayer vesicles. The apparent Kd for binding of c-Src to the PC/PS bilayer was 6 x 10(-7) M. This interaction is sufficiently strong to account for c-Src membrane targeting. Mutants of c-Src in which the amino-terminal basic residues were replaced by neutral asparagine residues exhibited binding isotherms approaching that of wild-type binding to neutral bilayers (apparent Kd of 2 x 10(-3) M). The transforming v-Src and activated c-Src (Y527F) proteins also bound more strongly to PC/PS bilayers (apparent Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-5) M) than to neutral PC bilayers. In vivo experiments with Src mutants confirmed the role of positive charge in mediating membrane binding and cellular transformation. Images PMID:7527558

  11. On the Gravitational Two-Body Problem in Special Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, G. N.; Asanov, R. A.

    The method of POINCARÉ is applied to the consideration of the gravitational two-body problem in the framework of Special Relativity. The formulation of the theory contains two arbitrary functions. A specific choice of these functions leads to the correct description of three crucial experiments, supporting General Relativity, and the time delay of radar signals. However, the gyroscope precession is three times less than that of GR (the realization of this experiment is planned this year). The expansion over the inverse powers of the light velocity being performed approximate Lorentz covariant two-body equations without retardation effects are obtained. These equations are compared with the EIH two-body equations.Translated AbstractÜber das Zweikörperproblem in der speziellen RelativitätstheorieEs wird die POINCARÉ Methode auf das Problem der Gravitationwechselwirkung zweier Körper in der speziellen Relativitätstheorie angewendet. Die Theorie enthält zwei beliebige Funktionen. Im Potentialgrenzfall erhält man bei bestimmter Wahl dieser Funktionen eine richtige Beschreibung der drei bekannten Effekte in der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie und des Zeitverzögerungseffektes von Radarsignalen. Die Größe der Präzession des Gyroskops ergibt sich dreimal kleiner als in der Einsteinschen Theorie (die experimentelle Überprüfung dieses Effektes ist für 1980 geplant). Mit Hilfe einer inversen Potenzreihenentwicklung nach der Lichtgeschwindigkeit wurden genäherte Lorentz-kovariante Gleichungen für das Zweikörperproblem erhalten, in denen Retardierungseffekte fehlen. Es wird der Zusammenhang mit anderen Versuchen, Lorentz-kovariante Gleichungen für das Zweikörperproblem aufzustellen, erörtert.

  12. Two-body quantum propagation in arbitrary potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-08-01

    We have implemented a unitary, numerically exact, Fourier split step method, based on a proper Suzuki-Trotter factorization of the quantum evolution operator, to propagate a two-body complex in arbitrary external potential landscapes taking into account exactly the internal structure. We have simulated spatially indirect Wannier-Mott excitons - optically excited electron-hole pairs with the two charges confined to different layers of a semiconductor heterostructure with prototypical 1D and 2D potentials emphasizing the effects of the internal dynamics and the insufficiency of mean-field methods in this context.

  13. Mücket-Treder's Two-Body Problem: Infinity Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile

    The two-body problem in the Mücket-Treder post-Newtonian classical field is revisited. Starting from the motion equations and first integrals in standard polar coordinates, we apply McGehee-type transformations of the first and second kind to suitably describe the escape/capture dynamics. To this end, the infinity manifold is defined, and the flow on it is depicted. The behaviour of orbits that neighbour infinity is wholly similar to the cases corresponding to some relativistic models.

  14. Structural Evolution in Atomic Nuclei: Residual Interactions, Quantum Phase Transitions and the Emergence of Collectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R. F.

    2007-10-26

    A synoptic view of the evolution of structure with Z and N in nuclei is beginning to emerge from the confiuence of new experimental results on phase transitional behavior, newly proposed many-body symmetries for critical point nuclei, a new generation of solvable collective models, powerful approaches to viewing the systematics of nuclear properties based on simple models of residual interactions, and advances in microscopic calculations of medium mass and heavy nuclei. A recent compilation of nuclear masses has contributed by permitting empirical extractions of new p-n interaction strengths of the last protons with the last neutrons in many nuclei across the nuclear chart. A number of these developments will be discussed with an eye to the opportunities and challenges they provide for the future, especially in the era of next-generation exotic beam facihties throughout the world.

  15. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  16. A detailed study of nonperturbative solutions of two-body Dirac equations

    SciTech Connect

    Crater, H.W.; Becker, R.L.; Wong, C.Y.; Van Alstine, P.

    1992-12-01

    In quark model calculations of the meson spectrums fully covariant two-body Dirac equations dictated by Dirac's relativistic constraint mechanics gave a good fit to the entire meson mass spectrum for light quark mesons as well as heavy quark mesons with constituent world scalar and vector potentials depending on just one or two parameters. In this paper, we investigate the properties of these equations that made them work so well by solving them numerically for quantum electrodynamics (QED) and related field theories. The constraint formalism generates a relativistic quantum mechanics defined by two coupled Dirac equations on a sixteen component wave function which contain Lorentz covariant constituent potentials that are initially undetermined. An exact Pauli reduction leads to a second order relativistic Schroedinger-like equation for a reduced eight component wave function determined by an effective interaction -- the quasipotential. We first determine perturbatively to lowest order the relativistic quasipotential for the Schroedinger-like equation by comparing that form with one derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Insertion of this perturbative information into the minimal interaction structures of the two-body Dirac equations then completely determines their interaction structures. Then we give a procedure for constructing the full sixteen component solution to our coupled first-order Dirac equations from a solution of the second order equation for the reduced wave function. Next, we show that a perturbative treatment of these equations yields the standard spectral results for QED and related interactions.

  17. Non multa, sed multum: Future lessons from two-prong, two-body decays of beauty

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.; Stech, B.

    1987-12-01

    There are four two-body, two-prong decays modes of B mesons and two for beauty baryons and they are quite rare, i.e., their branching ratios are not expected to exceed the script O(10/sup -4/) level. Yet a detailed study of their relative rates with a sensitivity level of 10/sup -5/ can yield unique and important information on strong interactions. If the evolution of these reactions in proper time can be traced then, under favorable conditions, one can analyze B/sup 0/ - anti B/sup 0/ mixing and CP invariance in a detailed way. 4 refs.

  18. Stream-aquifer interactions: evaluation of depletion volume and residual effects from ground water pumping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xunhong; Shu, Longcang

    2002-01-01

    Numerical modeling techniques were used to simulate stream-aquifer interactions from seasonal ground water pumping. We used stream-aquifer models in which a shallow stream penetrates the top of an aquifer that discharges ground water to the stream as base flow. Because of the pumping, the volume of base flow discharged to the stream was reduced, and as the pumping continued, infiltration from the stream to the aquifer was induced. Both base-flow reduction and stream infiltration contributed to total stream depletion. We analyzed the depletion rates and volumes of the reduced base flow and induced stream infiltration during pumping and postpumping periods. Our results suggested that for a shallow penetrating stream with a low streambed conductance, base-flow reduction accounts for a significant percentage of the total stream depletion. Its residual effects in postpumping can last very long and may continue into the next pumping season for areas where recharge is nominal. In contrast, the contribution of the induced stream infiltration to the total stream depletion is much smaller, and its effects often become negligible shortly after pumping was stopped. For areas where surface recharge replenishes the aquifer, the residual effects of base-flow reduction and thus its depletion volume will be significantly reduced. A stream of large conductance has a high hydraulic connection to the aquifer, but the relationship between stream conductance and stream depletion is not linear.

  19. CMWeb: an interactive on-line tool for analysing residue-residue contacts and contact prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Dániel; Simon, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2012-07-01

    A contact map is a 2D derivative of the 3D structure of proteins, containing various residue-residue (RR) contacts within the structure. Contact maps can be used for the reconstruction of structure with high accuracy and can be predicted from the amino acid sequence. Therefore understanding the various properties of contact maps is an important step in protein structure prediction. For investigating basic properties of contact formation and contact clusters we set up an integrated system called Contact Map Web Viewer, or CMWeb for short. The server can be used to visualize contact maps, to link contacts and to show them both in 3D structures and in multiple sequence alignments and to calculate various statistics on contacts. Moreover, we have implemented five contact prediction methods in the CMWeb server to visualize the predicted and real RR contacts in one contact map. The results of other RR contact prediction methods can be uploaded as a benchmark test onto the server as well. All of these functionality is behind a web server, thus for using our application only a Java-capable web browser is needed, no further program installation is required. The CMWeb is freely accessible at http://cmweb.enzim.hu.

  20. On the Mass Difference Between pi and rho Using a Relativistic Two-Body Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Kim, Byeong-Noh; Crater, H. W.; Yoon, Jin-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The big mass difference between the pion(pi) and rho meson(rho) possibly originated from the spin-dependent nature of the interactions in the two states since these two states are similar except for spin. Both pi and rho are quark-antiquark systems which can be treated using the two-body Dirac equations (TBDE) of constraint dynamics. This relativistic approach for the two-body system has the advantage over the non-relativistic treatment in the sense that the spin-dependent nature is automatically coming out from the formalism. We employed Dirac's relativistic constraint dynamics to describe quark-antiquark systems. Within this formalism, the 16-component Dirac equation is reduced to the 4-component 2nd-order differential equation and the radial part of this equation is simply a Schroedinger-type equation with various terms calculated from the basic radial potential. We used a modified Richardson potential for quark-antiquark systems which satisfies the conditions of confinement and asymptotic freedom. We obtained the wave functions for these two mesons which are not singular at short distances. We also found that the cancellation between the Darwin and spin-spin interaction terms occurs in the pi mass but not in the rho mass, and this is the main source of the big difference in the two meson masses.

  1. One plus two-body random matrix ensembles with parity: Density of states and parity ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Manan; Srivastava, P. C.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2011-06-15

    One plus two-body embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices with parity [EGOE(1+2)-{pi}] generated by a random two-body interaction (modeled by GOE in two-particle spaces) in the presence of a mean field for spinless identical fermion systems is defined, generalizing the two-body ensemble with parity analyzed by Papenbrock and Weidenmueller [Phys. Rev. C 78, 054305 (2008)], in terms of two mixing parameters and a gap between the positive ({pi}=+) and negative ({pi}=-) parity single-particle (sp) states. Numerical calculations are used to demonstrate, using realistic values of the mixing parameters appropriate for some nuclei, that the EGOE(1+2)-{pi} ensemble generates Gaussian form (with corrections) for fixed parity eigenvalue densities (i.e., state densities). The random matrix model also generates many features in parity ratios of state densities that are similar to those predicted by a method based on the Fermi-gas model for nuclei. We have also obtained, by applying the formulation due to Chang et al. [Ann. Phys. (NY) 66, 137 (1971)], a simple formula for the spectral variances defined over fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) spaces, where m{sub 1} is the number of fermions in the positive parity sp states and m{sub 2} is the number of fermions in the negative parity sp states. Similarly, using the binary correlation approximation, in the dilute limit, we have derived expressions for the lowest two-shape parameters. The smoothed densities generated by the sum of fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) Gaussians with lowest two-shape corrections describe the numerical results in many situations. The model also generates preponderance of positive parity ground states for small values of the mixing parameters, and this is a feature seen in nuclear shell-model results.

  2. Fibrinogen residue γAla341 is necessary for calcium binding and 'A-a' interactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Rojin; Ping, Lifang; Song, Jaewoo; Hong, Sung-Yu; Choi, Tae-Youn; Choi, Jong-Rak; Gorkun, Oleg V; Lord, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    The fibrinogen γ-module has several important sites relating to fibrinogen function, which include the high affinity calcium binding site, hole 'a' that binds with knob 'A', and the D:D interface. Residue γAla341, which is located in the vicinity of these sites, is altered in three variant fibrinogens: fibrinogen Seoul (γAla341Asp), Tolaga Bay (γAla341Val), and Lyon III (γAla341Thr). In order to investigate the impaired polymerisation of fibrinogens γAla341Asp and γAla341Val to understand the role of γAla341 in fibrin polymerisation and fibrinogen synthesis, we have expressed γAla341Asp and γAla341Val in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, purified these fibrinogens from the culture media and performed biochemical tests to elucidate their function. Expression in CHO cells was similar for these variants. For both variants the kinetics of thrombin-catalysed FpA release was not different from normal fibrinogen, while FpB release was slower than that of normal. Thrombin-catalysed polymerisation of both variants was dependent on the calcium concentration. At physiologic calcium (1 mM) the variants showed impaired polymerisation with a longer lag period and a slower Vmax than normal fibrinogen. Scanning electron micrographs showed the clots were less organised than normal, having thicker and more twisted fibers, and larger pores. Analysis by SDS-PAGE showed that factor XIIIa-catalysed γ and α chain cross-linking was delayed, and plasmin-catalysed lysis was not reduced by the presence of 5 mM calcium or 5 mM GPRP (Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro). Our data indicate that fibrinogen residue γAla341 is important for the proper conformation of the γ-module, maintaining calcium-binding site and 'A-a' interactions.

  3. Charmless hadronic two-body decays of Bs mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yaw-Hwang; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Tseng, B.

    1999-04-01

    Two-body charmless nonleptonic decays of the Bs meson are studied within the framework of generalized factorization in which factorization is applied to the tree level matrix elements while the effective Wilson coefficients are μ and renormalization scheme independent, and nonfactorizable effects are parametrized in terms of Neffc(LL) and Neffc(LR), the effective numbers of colors arising from (V-A)(V-A) and (V-A)(V+A) four-quark operators, respectively. Branching ratios of Bs-->PP,PV,VV decays (P: pseudoscalar meson, V: vector meson) are calculated as a function of Neffc(LR) with two different considerations for Neffc(LL): (a) Neffc(LL) being fixed at the value of 2 and (b) Neffc(LL)=Neffc(LR). Tree and penguin transitions are classified into six different classes. We find the following. (i) The electroweak penguin contributions account for about 85% [for Neffc(LL)=2] of the decay rates of Bs-->ηπ, η'π, ηρ, η'ρ, φπ, φρ, which receive contributions only from tree and electroweak penguin diagrams; a measurement of them will provide a clean determination of the electroweak penguin coefficient a9. (ii) Electroweak penguin corrections to Bs-->ωη('),φη,ωφ,K(*)φ,φφ are in general as significant as QCD penguin effects and even play a dominant role; their decay rates depend strongly on Neffc(LR). (iii) The branching ratio of Bs-->ηη', the analogue of Bd-->η'K, is of order 2×10-5, which is only slightly larger than that of η'η',K*+ρ-,K+K-,K0K¯0 decay modes. (iv) The contribution from the η' charm content is important for Bs-->η'η', but less significant for Bs-->ηη'. (v) The decay rates for the final states K+(*)K-(*) follow the pattern Γ(B¯s-->K+K-)>Γ(B¯s-->K+K*-)>~Γ(B¯s-->K*+K*-)>Γ(B¯s-->K+*K-) and likewise for K0(*)K¯0(*), as a consequence of various interference effects between the penguin amplitudes governed by the effective QCD penguin coefficients a4 and a6.

  4. Exact parapositroniumlike solution to two-body Dirac equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Alstine, Peter; Crater, Horace

    1986-09-01

    Recently we used a supersymmetric version of Dirac's constraint mechanics to derive coupled Dirac equations for a quark and antiquark in mutual chromodynamiclike interaction. Here we investigate the properties of our equations for two spinning particles in mutual electromagneticlike interaction. In the chiral Dirac matrix representation we explicitly obtain a family of exact 16-component solutions with closed-form energy spectrum that agrees with that of parapositronium through order α4. We also find that various rearrangements of our Dirac equations simultaneously yield (for weak potentials) the relativistic wave equations of Todorov and Pilkuhn as well as (for weak potentials and slow motion) the semirelativistic interaction structure of Breit.

  5. Interactions between allelochemicals and the microbial community affect weed suppression following cover crop residue incorporation into soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to understand how soil microorganisms interact with cover crop-derived allelochemicals to suppress weed germination and growth following cover crop residue incorporation. We conducted a time series experiment by crossing sterilized and non-sterilized soil with four dif...

  6. Two-quasiparticle isomer, E1 hindrances and residual interactions in {sup 172}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R. O.; Lane, G. J.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Kibedi, T.; Nieminen, P.; Watanabe, H.

    2008-04-15

    The structure of the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 172}Tm has been studied using incomplete fusion of {sup 7}Li on an {sup 170}Er target at 30 MeV. A 190-{mu}s isomer at an excitation energy of 476 keV was identified using chopped beams and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The isomer decays with very inhibited E1 transitions to the rotational bands based on the parallel and antiparallel couplings of the {nu}5/2{sup -}[512] x {pi}1/2{sup +}[411] configuration, the latter (K{sup {pi}}=2{sup -}) being the ground state. The isomeric state has been assigned J{sup {pi}}=6{sup +}, arising from the energetically favored (parallel) coupling of the {nu}5/2{sup -}[512] x {pi}7/2{sup -}[523] configuration. The proton-neutron residual interaction was deduced for the configuration of the isomeric state and is found to agree with previous empirical studies.

  7. Effect of Tensor Range in Nuclear Two-Body Problems

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Feshbach, H.; Schwinger, J.; Harr, J. A.

    1949-11-01

    The interaction between neutron and proton in the triplet state is investigated, a wide variation in the values of both central and tensor ranges are included; the per cent D state in the deuteron and the effective triplet range have been computed; the results are applied tot he discussion of the magnetic moment of the deuteron, the photoelectric disintegration of the deuteron, and neutron-proton scattering.

  8. Non-Collision Singularities in the Planar Two-Center-Two-Body Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jinxin; Dolgopyat, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a restricted four-body problem called the planar two-center-two-body problem. In the plane, we have two fixed centers Q 1 and Q 2 of masses 1, and two moving bodies Q 3 and Q 4 of masses {μ≪ 1}. They interact via Newtonian potential. Q 3 is captured by Q 2, and Q 4 travels back and forth between two centers. Based on a model of Gerver, we prove that there is a Cantor set of initial conditions that lead to solutions of the Hamiltonian system whose velocities are accelerated to infinity within finite time avoiding all earlier collisions. This problem is a simplified model for the planar four-body problem case of the Painlevé conjecture.

  9. Interaction between soil mineralogy and the application of crop residues on aggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity of the soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, M.; Kiptoon, R.; Bar-Tal, A.; Wakindiki, I. I. C.; Ben-Hur, M.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main goals of modern agriculture is to achieve sustainability by maintaining crop productivity while avoiding soil degradation. Intensive cultivation could lead to a reduction in soil organic matter that could affect the structure stability and hydraulic conductivity of the soil. Moreover, crops extract nutrients from the soil that are taken away from the field when harvested, and as a consequence, the addition of fertilizers to the soil is necessary to maintain crop productivity. One way to deal with these problems is to incorporate crop residues into the soil after harvest. Crop residues are a source of organic matter that could improve soil physical properties, such as aggregate stability and soil hydraulic conductivity. However, this effect could vary according to other soil properties, such as clay content, clay mineralogy, and the presence of other cementing materials in the soil (mainly carbonates and aluminum and iron oxides). In the present work, the interaction between the addition of chickpea crop residues to the soil and clay mineralogy on aggregate stability and saturated hydraulic conductivity were studied. Chickpea plant residues were added at a rate of 0.5% (w/w) to smectitic, kaolinitic, illitic and non-phyllosilicate soils from different regions. The soils without (control) and with chickpea residues were incubated for 0, 3, 7 and 30 days, and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soils was measured in columns after each incubation time. The response of hydraulic conductivity to the addition of residues and incubation time was different in the soils with various mineralogies, although in general, the addition of chickpea residues increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity as compared with the control soils. This positive effect of crop residues on hydraulic conductivity was mainly a result of improved aggregate stability and resistance to slaking during wetting.

  10. The key residue for SSB-RecO interaction is dispensable for Deinococcus radiodurans DNA repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kaiying; Xu, Xin; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Guangzhi; Hua, Yuejin

    2014-05-01

    The RecFOR DNA repair pathway is one of the major RecA-dependent recombinatorial repair pathways in bacteria and plays an important role in double-strand breaks repair. RecO, one of the major recombination mediator proteins in the RecFOR pathway, has been shown to assist RecA loading onto single-stranded binding protein (SSB) coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). However, it has not been characterized whether the protein-protein interaction between RecO and SSB contributes to that process in vivo. Here, we identified the residue arginine-121 of Deinococcus radiodurans RecO (drRecO-R121) as the key residue for RecO-SSB interaction. The substitution of drRecO-R121 with alanine greatly abolished the binding of RecO to SSB but not the binding to RecR. Meanwhile, SSB-coated ssDNA annealing activity was also compromised by the mutation of the residue of drRecO. However, the drRecO-R121A strain showed only modest sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Taking these data together, arginine-121 of drRecO is the key residue for SSB-RecO interaction, which may not play a vital role in the SSB displacement and RecA loading process of RecFOR DNA repair pathway in vivo. PMID:24681881

  11. The key residue for SSB-RecO interaction is dispensable for Deinococcus radiodurans DNA repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kaiying; Xu, Xin; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Guangzhi; Hua, Yuejin

    2014-05-01

    The RecFOR DNA repair pathway is one of the major RecA-dependent recombinatorial repair pathways in bacteria and plays an important role in double-strand breaks repair. RecO, one of the major recombination mediator proteins in the RecFOR pathway, has been shown to assist RecA loading onto single-stranded binding protein (SSB) coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). However, it has not been characterized whether the protein-protein interaction between RecO and SSB contributes to that process in vivo. Here, we identified the residue arginine-121 of Deinococcus radiodurans RecO (drRecO-R121) as the key residue for RecO-SSB interaction. The substitution of drRecO-R121 with alanine greatly abolished the binding of RecO to SSB but not the binding to RecR. Meanwhile, SSB-coated ssDNA annealing activity was also compromised by the mutation of the residue of drRecO. However, the drRecO-R121A strain showed only modest sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Taking these data together, arginine-121 of drRecO is the key residue for SSB-RecO interaction, which may not play a vital role in the SSB displacement and RecA loading process of RecFOR DNA repair pathway in vivo.

  12. Functional interactions between residues in the S1, S4, and S5 domains of Kv2.1.

    PubMed

    Bocksteins, E; Ottschytsch, N; Timmermans, J-P; Labro, A J; Snyders, D J

    2011-06-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv2.1 forms heterotetrameric channels with the silent subunit Kv6.4. Chimeric Kv2.1 channels containing a single transmembrane segment from Kv6.4 have been shown to be functional. However, a Kv2.1 chimera containing both S1 and S5 from Kv6.4 was not functional. Back mutation of individual residues in this chimera (to the Kv2.1 counterpart) identified four positions that were critical for functionality: A200V and A203T in S1, and T343M and P347S in S5. To test for possible interactions in Kv2.1, we used substitutions with charged residues and tryptophan for the outermost pair 203/347. Combinations of substitutions with opposite charges at both T203 and S347 were tolerated but resulted in channels with altered gating kinetics, as did the combination of negatively charged aspartate substitutions. Double mutant cycle analysis with these mutants indicated that both residues are energetically coupled. In contrast, replacing both residues with a positively charged lysine together (T203K + S347K) was not tolerated and resulted in a folding or trafficking deficiency. The nonfunctionality of the T203K + S347K mutation could be restored by introducing the R300E mutation in the S4 segment of the voltage sensor. These results indicate that these specific S1, S4, and S5 residues are in close proximity and interact with each other in the functional channel, but are also important determinants for Kv2.1 channel maturation. These data support the view of an anchoring interaction between S1 and S5, but indicate that this interaction surface is more extensive than previously proposed.

  13. Tryptophan probes reveal residue-specific phospholipid interactions of apolipoprotein C-III.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Walker, Robert L; He, Yi; Gruschus, James M; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-11-01

    Apolipoproteins are essential human proteins for lipid metabolism. Together with phospholipids, they constitute lipoproteins, nm to μm sized particles responsible for transporting cholesterol and triglycerides throughout the body. To investigate specific protein-lipid interactions, we produced and characterized three single-Trp containing apolipoprotein C-III (ApoCIII) variants (W42 (W54F/W65F), W54 (W42F/W65F), W65 (W42F/W54F)). Upon binding to phospholipid vesicles, wild-type ApoCIII adopts an α-helical conformation (50% helicity) as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy with an approximate apparent partition constant of 3×10(4) M(-1). Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements reveal distinct residue-specific behaviors with W54 experiencing the most hydrophobic environment followed by W42 and W65. Interestingly, time-resolved anisotropy measurements show a converse trend for relative Trp mobility with position 54 being the least immobile. To determine the relative insertion depths of W42, W54, and W65 in the bilayer, fluorescence quenching experiments were performed using three different brominated lipids. W65 had a clear preference for residing near the headgroup while W54 and W42 sample the range of depths ~8-11 Å from the bilayer center. On average, W54 is slightly more embedded than W42. Based on Trp spectral differences between ApoCIII binding to phospholipid vesicles and sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, we suggest that ApoCIII adopts an alternate helical conformation on the bilayer which could have functional implications.

  14. Critical regions and residues for self-interaction of grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 protein p24.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Guo, Ran; Li, Mingjun; Feng, Ming; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Yuqin

    2016-07-15

    The 24-kDa protein (p24) encoded by grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 (GLRaV-2) is an RNA-silencing suppressor. In this work, a yeast two-hybrid system (YTHS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses showed that GLRaV-2 p24 can interact with itself, and that this interaction occurs in the cytoplasm of Nicotiana benthamiana cells. To identify the functional region(s) and crucial amino acid residues required for p24 self-interaction, various truncated and substitution mutants were generated. YTHS assay showed that in both homologous pairing and pairing with the wild-type p24, the functional regions mapped to aa 10-180 or 1-170 which contain, respectively, all seven α-helices or the first six α-helices and the N-terminal end (aa 1-9) of the protein. When only the full-length p24 was an interaction partner, the functional region of aa 1-170 could be further mapped to aa 1-140 which contains four α-helices plus most of the fifth α-helix. Further analysis with substitution mutants demonstrated that hydrophobic residues I35/F38/V85/V89/W149 and V162/L169/L170, which may, respectively, mediate the inter-domain interaction of the same p24 monomer and the tail-to-tail association between two p24 counterparts, are crucial for homotypic p24-p24 interaction. In addition, substitution of two basic residues-R2 or R86-of p24, which may play important functional roles in RNA binding, did not seem to affect self-interaction of the mutants in yeast but had obvious effects in plant cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate the functional regions and crucial amino acids for p24 self-interaction.

  15. Experimental Investigations on Fatigue Damage and Residual Properties of Interacting Notched Woven E-Glass/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskara Rao, Pathakokila; Rama Krishna, Avasarala; Ramji, Koona; Satya Devi, Ambadipudi

    2015-10-01

    The interacting notched laminates of plain weave E-glass fiber reinforced with epoxy were fatigued at predetermined frequency in tension-tension to investigate the fatigue damage and residual properties. The results from stress-life curves summarize that damage growing around the notches due to stress concentration is the underlying cause for the variation in fatigue strengths among the geometrically different specimens considered. The residual strength and modulus decay with respect to cycle number at 50 % of the ultimate tensile strength were investigated. It is evident from the experimental data that the residual strength decreases with cycle number and increases due to redistribution of stress around the notches. The detailed study of the damage development under cyclic loads also explains the causes of modulus reduction for all the laminate geometries.

  16. Analysis of conformational motions and related key residue interactions responsible for a specific function of proteins with elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji Guo; Han, Xiao Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yan Xue; Zhu, Jian Zhuo; Wu, Yi Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein collective motions play a critical role in many biochemical processes. How to predict the functional motions and the related key residue interactions in proteins is important for our understanding in the mechanism of the biochemical processes. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of the elastic network model (ENM) is one of the effective approaches to investigate the structure-encoded motions in proteins. However, the motion modes revealed by the conventional NMA approach do not necessarily correspond to a specific function of protein. In the present work, a new analysis method was proposed to identify the motion modes responsible for a specific function of proteins and then predict the key residue interactions involved in the functional motions by using a perturbation approach. In our method, an internal coordinate that accounts for the specific function was introduced, and the Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space by using linear approximation, where the introduced internal coordinate serves as one of the axes of the coordinate space. NMA of ENM in this internal/Cartesian space was performed and the function-relevant motion modes were identified according to their contributions to the specific function of proteins. Then the key residue interactions important for the functional motions of the protein were predicted as the interactions whose perturbation largely influences the fluctuation along the internal coordinate. Using our proposed methods, the maltose transporter (MalFGK2) from E. Coli was studied. The functional motions and the key residue interactions that are related to the channel-gating function of this protein were successfully identified.

  17. On the question of current conservation for the two-body Dirac equations of constraint theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienert, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The two-body Dirac (2BD) equations of constraint theory are of special interest not only in view of applications for phenomenological calculations of mesonic spectra but also because they avoid no-go theorems about relativistic interactions. Furthermore, they provide a quantum mechanical description in a manifestly Lorentz invariant way using the concept of a multi-time wave function. In this paper, we place them into the context of the multi-time formalism of Dirac, Tomonaga and Schwinger for the first time. A general physical and mathematical framework is outlined and the mechanism which permits relativistic interaction is identified. The main requirement derived from the general framework is the existence of conserved tensor currents with a positive component which can play the role of a probability density. We analyze this question for a general class of 2BD equations thoroughly and comprehensively. While the free Dirac current is not conserved, it is possible to find replacements. Improving on previous research, we achieve definite conclusions whether restrictions of the function space or of the interaction terms can guarantee the positive definiteness of the currents—and whether such restrictions are physically adequate. The consequences of the results are drawn, with respect to both applied and foundational perspectives.

  18. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  19. Two-body Dirac equations for meson spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, Horace W.; van Alstine, Peter

    1988-04-01

    Recently we used Dirac's constraint mechanics and supersymmetries to derive two coupled compatible 16-component Dirac equations that govern two relativistic spinning particles interacting through world scalar and vector potentials. They reduce exactly to four decoupled four-component local Schrödinger-like equations with energy-dependent quasipotentials Φw. Their nonperturbative covariant structure [leading to perturbative and O(1/c2) expansions that agree with field-theoretic approaches] suit these equations ideally for phenomenological applications in which the potentials have some links with relativistic field theories. (These equations are exactly solvable for singlet positronium producing a spectrum correct through order α4.) Here we use our equations to extend the validity of various one- or two-parameter models for the heavy-quark static potential to the relativistic light-quark regime. These models include the leading-log model (for all length scales) of Adler and Piran and Richardson's potential modified by flavor-dependent vacuum corrections. They significantly improve the good results that we obtained using Richardson's potential alone. Both nonperturbative and perturbative properties of the constraint approach are responsible for the spin-dependent consequences of the potential that result in a good overall fit to the meson masses. The nonperturbative structure dictated by the compatibility of our two Dirac equations enforces an approximate chiral symmetry that may account for the goodness of our pion fit. Perturbatively, for weak potentials, the upper-upper components of our equations reduce to the appropriate Todorov equation and then for low velocities to the Breit Hamiltonian. Thus, our approach reproduces the semirelativistic spin-dependent consequences of a quantum field theory. We strengthen this connection by deriving the Todorov inhomogeneous quasipotential equation for Φw from the Bethe-Salpeter equation using an operator generalization of

  20. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  1. Gβγ Inhibits Exocytosis via Interaction with Critical Residues on Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Protein-25

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Christopher A.; Zurawski, Zack; Betke, Katherine M.; Yim, Yun Young; Hyde, Karren; Rodriguez, Shelagh; Alford, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of neurotransmitter release is a complex process accomplished by the exocytotic machinery working in tandem with numerous regulatory proteins. G-protein βγ dimers regulate the core process of exocytosis by interacting with the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein-25 (SNAP-25), syntaxin 1A, and synaptobrevin. Gβγ binding to ternary SNAREs overlaps with calcium-dependent binding of synaptotagmin, inhibiting synaptotagmin-1 binding and fusion of the synaptic vesicle. To further explore the binding sites of Gβγ on SNAP-25, peptides based on the sequence of SNAP-25 were screened for Gβγ binding. Peptides that bound Gβγ were subjected to alanine scanning mutagenesis to determine their relevance to the Gβγ-SNAP-25 interaction. Peptides from this screen were tested in protein-protein interaction assays for their ability to modulate the interaction of Gβγ with SNAP-25. A peptide from the C terminus, residues 193 to 206, significantly inhibited the interaction. In addition, Ala mutants of SNAP-25 residues from the C terminus of SNAP-25, as well as from the amino-terminal region decreased binding to Gβ1γ1. When SNAP-25 with eight residues mutated to alanine was assembled with syntaxin 1A, there was significantly reduced affinity of this mutated t-SNARE for Gβγ, but it still interacted with synaptotagmin-1 in a Ca2+-dependent manner and reconstituted evoked exocytosis in botulinum neurotoxin E-treated neurons. However, the mutant SNAP-25 could no longer support 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated inhibition of exocytosis. PMID:22962332

  2. Complete characterization of the ground-space structure of two-body frustration-free Hamiltonians for qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Wei Zhaohui; Zeng Bei

    2011-10-15

    The problem of finding the ground state of a frustration-free Hamiltonian carrying only two-body interactions between qubits is known to be solvable in polynomial time. It is also shown recently that, for any such Hamiltonian, there is always a ground state that is a product of single- or two-qubit states. However, it remains unclear whether the whole ground space is of any succinct structure. Here, we give a complete characterization of the ground space of any two-body frustration-free Hamiltonian of qubits. Namely, it is a span of tree tensor network states of the same tree structure. This characterization allows us to show that the problem of determining the ground-state degeneracy is as hard as, but no harder than, its classical analog.

  3. Identification of an 11-residue portion of CTP-phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase that is required for enzyme-membrane interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Wang, J; Tseu, I; Kuliszewski, M; Lee, W; Post, M

    1997-01-01

    CTP-phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CT) is a key regulatory enzyme in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in many cells. Enzyme-membrane interactions appear to play an important role in CT activation. A putative membrane-binding domain appears to be located between residues 236 and 293 from the N-terminus. To map the membrane-binding domain more precisely, glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins were prepared that contained deletions of various domains in this putative lipid-binding region. The fusion proteins were assessed for their binding of [3H]PC/oleic acid vesicles. Fusion proteins encompassing residues 267-277 bound to PC/oleic acid vesicles, whereas fragments lacking this region exhibited no specific binding to the lipid vesicles. The membrane-binding characteristics of the CT fusion proteins were also examined using intact lung microsomes. Only fragments encompassing residues 267-277 competed with full-length 125I-labelled CT, expressed in recombinant Sf9 insect cells, for microsomal membrane binding. To investigate the role of this region in PC biosynthesis, A549 and L2 cells were transfected with cDNA for CT mutants under the control of a glucocorticoid-inducible long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Induction of CT mutants containing residues 267-277 in transfectants resulted in reduced PC synthesis. The decrease in PC synthesis was accompanied by a shift in endogenous CT activity from the particulate to the soluble fraction. Expression of CT mutants lacking this region in A549 and L2 cells did not affect PC formation and subcellular distribution of CT activity. These results suggest that the CT region located between residues 267 and 277 from the N-terminus is required for the interaction of CT with membranes. PMID:9224626

  4. Residual meson-meson interaction from lattice gauge simulation in a simple QED{sub 2+1} model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Canosa; H. Fiebig

    1995-08-01

    The residual interaction for a meson-meson system is computed utilizing the cumulant, or cluster, expansion of the momentum-space time correlation matrix. The cumulant expansion serves to define asymptotic, or free, meson-meson operators. The definition of an effective interaction is then based on a comparison of the full (interacting) and the free (noninteracting) time correlation matrices. The proposed method, which may straight forwardly be transcribed to other hadron-hadron systems, here is applied to a simple 2+1 dimensional U(1) lattice gauge model tuned such that it is confining. Fermions are treated in the staggered scheme. The effective interaction exhibits a repulsive core and attraction at intermediate relative distances. These findings are consistent with an earlier study of the same model utilizing L{umlt u}scher's method where scattering phase shifts are obtained directly.

  5. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume displacement metrics are systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to statistically denote the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction (ZOI). From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the ploughed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof of concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that now allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. A quantified understanding of fundamental particle-material interaction is critical to anticipating how well components can withstand prolonged use in highly abrasive environments, specifically for our intended applications on the surface of the Moon and other planets or asteroids, as well as in similarly demanding, harsh terrestrial settings

  6. HIGH TEMPERATURE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN RESIDUAL OIL ASH AND DISPERSED KAOLINITE POWDERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential use of sorbents to manage ultrafine ash aerosol emissions from residual oil combustion was investigated using a downfired 82-kW-rated laboratory-scale refractory-lined combustor. The major constituents were vanadium (V), iron (Fe), nickel, (Ni) and zinc (Zn). Of the...

  7. De novo design of protein-protein interactions through modification of inter-molecular helix-helix interface residues.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Sota; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Manami; Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2016-05-01

    For de novo design of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), information on the shape and chemical complementarity of their interfaces is generally required. Recent advances in computational PPI design have allowed for de novo design of protein complexes, and several successful examples have been reported. In addition, a simple and easy-to-use approach has also been reported that arranges leucines on a solvent-accessible region of an α-helix and places charged residues around the leucine patch to induce interactions between the two helical peptides. For this study, we adopted this approach to de novo design a new PPI between the helical bundle proteins sulerythrin and LARFH. A non-polar patch was created on an α-helix of LARFH around which arginine residues were introduced to retain its solubility. The strongest interaction found was for the LARFH variant cysLARFH-IV-3L3R and the sulerythrin mutant 6L6D (KD=0.16 μM). This artificial protein complex is maintained by hydrophobic and ionic interactions formed by the inter-molecular helical bundle structure. Therefore, by the simple and easy-to-use approach to create de novo interfaces on the α-helices, we successfully generated an artificial PPI. We also created a second LARFH variant with the non-polar patch surrounded by positively charged residues at each end. Upon mixing this LARFH variant with 6L6D, mesh-like fibrous nanostructures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our method may, therefore, also be applicable to the de novo design of protein nanostructures.

  8. IRBIT Interacts with the Catalytic Core of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase Type Iα and IIα through Conserved Catalytic Aspartate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hideaki; Hirose, Matsumi; Gainche, Laura; Kawaai, Katsuhiro; Bonneau, Benjamin; Ijuin, Takeshi; Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs) are lipid kinases that generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), a critical lipid signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular functions, including the activities of membrane channels and transporters. IRBIT (IP3R-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) is a multifunctional protein that regulates diverse target proteins. Here, we report that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with members of the PIPK family. IRBIT bound to all PIPK isoforms in heterologous expression systems and specifically interacted with PIPK type Iα (PIPKIα) and type IIα (PIPKIIα) in mouse cerebellum. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that two conserved catalytic aspartate residues of PIPKIα and PIPKIIα are involved in the interaction with IRBIT. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, Mg2+, and/or ATP interfered with the interaction, suggesting that IRBIT interacts with catalytic cores of PIPKs. Mutations of phosphorylation sites in the serine-rich region of IRBIT affected the selectivity of its interaction with PIPKIα and PIPKIIα. The structural flexibility of the serine-rich region, located in the intrinsically disordered protein region, is assumed to underlie the mechanism of this interaction. Furthermore, in vitro binding experiments and immunocytochemistry suggest that IRBIT and PIPKIα interact with the Na+/HCO3− cotransporter NBCe1-B. These results suggest that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with PIPKIα and NBCe1-B, whose activity is regulated by PI(4,5)P2. PMID:26509711

  9. Probing alkali metal-pi interactions with the side chain residue of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J; Gokel, George W

    2002-04-16

    Feeble forces play a significant role in the organization of proteins. These include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, salt bridge formation, and steric interactions. The alkali metal cation-pi interaction is a force of potentially profound importance but its consideration in biology has been limited by the lack of experimental evidence. Our previous studies of cation-pi interactions with Na(+) and K(+) involved the side arms of tryptophan (indole), tyrosine (phenol), and phenylalanine (benzene) as the arene donors. The receptor system possesses limiting steric constraints. In this report, we show that direct interactions between alkali metals and arenes occur at or within the van der Waals contact distance.

  10. Probing alkali metal–π interactions with the side chain residue of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2002-01-01

    Feeble forces play a significant role in the organization of proteins. These include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, salt bridge formation, and steric interactions. The alkali metal cation-π interaction is a force of potentially profound importance but its consideration in biology has been limited by the lack of experimental evidence. Our previous studies of cation–π interactions with Na+ and K+ involved the side arms of tryptophan (indole), tyrosine (phenol), and phenylalanine (benzene) as the arene donors. The receptor system possesses limiting steric constraints. In this report, we show that direct interactions between alkali metals and arenes occur at or within the van der Waals contact distance. PMID:11943874

  11. Residue-level resolution of alphavirus envelope protein interactions in pH-dependent fusion.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-02-17

    Alphavirus envelope proteins, organized as trimers of E2-E1 heterodimers on the surface of the pathogenic alphavirus, mediate the low pH-triggered fusion of viral and endosomal membranes in human cells. The lack of specific treatment for alphaviral infections motivates our exploration of potential antiviral approaches by inhibiting one or more fusion steps in the common endocytic viral entry pathway. In this work, we performed constant pH molecular dynamics based on an atomic model of the alphavirus envelope with icosahedral symmetry. We have identified pH-sensitive residues that cause the largest shifts in thermodynamic driving forces under neutral and acidic pH conditions for various fusion steps. A series of conserved interdomain His residues is identified to be responsible for the pH-dependent conformational changes in the fusion process, and ligand binding sites in their vicinity are anticipated to be potential drug targets aimed at inhibiting viral infections.

  12. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  13. Intra-residue interactions in proteins: interplay between serine or cysteine side chains and backbone conformations, revealed by laser spectroscopy of isolated model peptides.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mohammad; Biswal, Himansu S; Gloaguen, Eric; Mons, Michel

    2015-01-21

    Intra-residue interactions play an important role in proteins by influencing local folding of the backbone. Taking advantage of the capability of gas phase experiments to provide relevant information on the intrinsic H-bonding pattern of isolated peptide chains, the intra-residue interactions of serine and cysteine residues, i.e., OH/SH···OC(i) C6 and NH(i···)O/S C5 interactions in Ser/Cys residues, are probed by laser spectroscopy of isolated peptides. The strength of these local side chain-main chain interactions, elegantly documented from their IR spectral features for well-defined conformations of the main chain, demonstrates that a subtle competition exists between the two types of intra-residue bond: the C6 H-bond is the major interaction with Ser, in contrast to Cys where C5 interaction takes over. The restricted number of conformers observed in the gas phase experiment with Ser compared to Cys (where both extended and folded forms are observed) also suggests a significant mediation role of these intra-residue interactions on the competition between the several main chain folding patterns. PMID:25482851

  14. Molecular dynamics of protein A and a WW domain with a united-residue model including hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipska, Agnieszka G.; Seidman, Steven R.; Sieradzan, Adam K.; Giełdoń, Artur; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2016-05-01

    The folding of the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDB ID: 1BDD, a 46-residue three-α-helix bundle) and the formin-binding protein 28 WW domain (PDB ID: 1E0L, a 37-residue three-stranded anti-parallel β protein) was studied by means of Langevin dynamics with the coarse-grained UNRES force field to assess the influence of hydrodynamic interactions on protein-folding pathways and kinetics. The unfolded, intermediate, and native-like structures were identified by cluster analysis, and multi-exponential functions were fitted to the time dependence of the fractions of native and intermediate structures, respectively, to determine bulk kinetics. It was found that introducing hydrodynamic interactions slows down both the formation of an intermediate state and the transition from the collapsed structures to the final native-like structures by creating multiple kinetic traps. Therefore, introducing hydrodynamic interactions considerably slows the folding, as opposed to the results obtained from earlier studies with the use of Gō-like models.

  15. Molecular dynamics of protein A and a WW domain with a united-residue model including hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Lipska, Agnieszka G; Seidman, Steven R; Sieradzan, Adam K; Giełdoń, Artur; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2016-05-14

    The folding of the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDB ID: 1BDD, a 46-residue three-α-helix bundle) and the formin-binding protein 28 WW domain (PDB ID: 1E0L, a 37-residue three-stranded anti-parallel β protein) was studied by means of Langevin dynamics with the coarse-grained UNRES force field to assess the influence of hydrodynamic interactions on protein-folding pathways and kinetics. The unfolded, intermediate, and native-like structures were identified by cluster analysis, and multi-exponential functions were fitted to the time dependence of the fractions of native and intermediate structures, respectively, to determine bulk kinetics. It was found that introducing hydrodynamic interactions slows down both the formation of an intermediate state and the transition from the collapsed structures to the final native-like structures by creating multiple kinetic traps. Therefore, introducing hydrodynamic interactions considerably slows the folding, as opposed to the results obtained from earlier studies with the use of Gō-like models. PMID:27179474

  16. Drosophila sperm surface alpha-L-fucosidase interacts with the egg coats through its core fucose residues.

    PubMed

    Intra, Jari; Concetta, Veltri; Daniela, De Caro; Perotti, Maria Elisa; Pasini, Maria Enrica

    2015-08-01

    Sperm-oocyte interaction during fertilization is multiphasic, with multicomponent events, taking place between egg's glycoproteins and sperm surface receptors. Protein-carbohydrate complementarities in gamete recognition have observed in cases throughout the whole evolutionary scale. Sperm-associated α-L-fucosidases have been identified in various organisms. Their wide distribution and known properties reflect the hypothesis that fucose and α-L-fucosidases have fundamental function(s) during gamete interactions. An α-L-fucosidase has been detected as transmembrane protein on the surface of spermatozoa of eleven species across the genus Drosophila. Immunofluorescence labeling showed that the protein is localized in the sperm plasma membrane over the acrosome and the tail, in Drosophila melanogaster. In the present study, efforts were made to analyze with solid phase assays the oligosaccharide recognition ability of fruit fly sperm α-L-fucosidase with defined carbohydrate chains that can functionally mimic egg glycoconjugates. Our results showed that α-L-fucosidase bound to fucose residue and in particular it prefers N-glycans carrying core α1,6-linked fucose and core α1,3-linked fucose in N-glycans carrying only a terminal mannose residue. The ability of sperm α-L-fucosidase to bind to the micropylar chorion and to the vitelline envelope was examined in in vitro assays in presence of α-L-fucosidase, either alone or in combination with molecules containing fucose residues. No binding was detected when α-L-fucosidase was pre-incubated with fucoidan, a polymer of α-L-fucose and the monosaccharide fucose. Furthermore, egg labeling with anti-horseradish peroxidase, that recognized only core α1,3-linked fucose, correlates with α-L-fucosidase micropylar binding. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis of the potential role of this glycosidase in sperm-egg interactions in Drosophila.

  17. The Relativistic Two-Body Potentials of Constraint Theory from Summation of Feynman Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallouli, H.; Sazdjian, H.

    1997-01-01

    The relativistic two-body potentials of constraint theory for systems composed of two spin-0 or two spin-{1}/{2} particles are calculated, in perturbation theory, by means of the Lippmann-Schwinger type equation that relates them to the scattering amplitude. The cases of scalar and vector interactions with massless photons are considered. The two-photon exchange contributions, calculated with covariant propagators, are globally free of spurious infra-red singularities and produce at leading orderO(α4) effects that can be represented in three-dimensionalx-space by local potentials proportional to (α/r)2. An approximation scheme, that adapts the eikonal approximation to the bound state problem, is deviced and applied to the evaluation of leading terms of higher order diagrams. Leading contributions ofn-photon exchange diagrams produce terms proportional to (α/r)n. The series of leading contributions are summed. The resulting potentials are functions, in the c.m. frame, ofrand of the total energy. Their forms are compatible with Todorov's minimal substitution rules proposed in the quasipotential approach.

  18. Two-Body Electrodisintegration of $^3$He at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla; O. Benhar; A. Kievsky; L.E. Marcucci; M. Viviani

    2005-08-01

    The {sup 3}He (e,e{prime}p)d reaction is studied using an accurate three-nucleon bound state wave function, a model for the electromagnetic current operator including one- and two-body terms, and the Glauber approximation for the treatment of final state interactions. In contrast to earlier studies, the profile operator in the Glauber expansion is derived from a nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, which retains its full spin and isospin dependence and is consistent with phase-shift analyses of two-nucleon scattering data. The amplitude is boosted from the center-of-mass frame, where parameterizations for it are available, to the frame where rescattering occurs. Exact Monte Carlo methods are used to evaluate the relevant matrix elements of the electromagnetic current operator. The predicted cross section is found to be in quantitative agreement with the experimental data for values of the missing momentum p{sub m} in the range (0--700) MeV/c, but underestimates the data at p{sub m} {approx} 1 GeV/c by about a factor of two. However, the longitudinal-transverse asymmetry, measured up to p{sub m} {approx} 600 MeV/c, is well reproduced by theory. A critical comparison is carried out between the results obtained in the present work and those of earlier studies.

  19. Smallness of tree-dominated charmless two-body baryonic B decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2015-02-01

    The long-awaited baryonic B decay B¯0→p p ¯ was recently observed by LHCb with a branching fraction of order 1 0-8. All the earlier model predictions are too large compared with experiment. In this work, we point out that for a given tree operator Oi, the contribution from its Fiertz transformed operator, an effect often missed in the literature, tends to cancel the internal W -emission amplitude induced from Oi. The wave function of low-lying baryons is symmetric in momenta and the quark flavor with the same chirality but antisymmetric in color indices. Using these symmetry properties and the chiral structure of weak interactions, we find that half of the Feynman diagrams responsible for internal W emission cancel. Since this feature holds in the charmless modes but not in the charmful ones, we advocate that the partial cancellation accounts for the smallness of the tree-dominated charmless two-body baryonic B decays. This also explains why most previous model calculations predicted too large rates as the above consideration was not taken into account. Finally, we emphasize that, contrary to the claim in the literature, the internal W -emission tree amplitude should be proportional to the Wilson coefficient c1+c2 rather than c1-c2.

  20. Pairwise decomposition of residue interaction energies using semiempirical quantum mechanical methods in studies of protein-ligand interaction.

    PubMed

    Raha, Kaushik; van der Vaart, Arjan J; Riley, Kevin E; Peters, Martin B; Westerhoff, Lance M; Kim, Hwanho; Merz, Kenneth M

    2005-05-11

    Pairwise decomposition of the interaction energy between molecules is shown to be a powerful tool that can increase our understanding of macromolecular recognition processes. Herein we calculate the pairwise decomposition of the interaction energy between the protein human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) and the fluorine-substituted ligand N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine (SBB) using semiempirical quantum mechanics based methods. We dissect the interaction between the ligand and the protein by dividing the ligand and the protein into subsystems to understand the structure-activity relationships as a result of fluorine substitution. In particular, the off-diagonal elements of the Fock matrix that is composed of the interaction between the ionic core and the valence electrons and the exchange energy between the subsystems or atoms of interest is examined in detail. Our analysis reveals that the fluorine-substituted benzylamine group of SBB does not directly affect the binding energy. Rather, we find that the strength of the interaction between Thr199 of HCAII and the sulfamylbenzoyl group of SBB affects the binding affinity between the protein and the ligand. These observations underline the importance of the sulfonamide group in binding affinity as shown by previous experiments (Maren, T. H.; Wiley: C. E. J. Med. Chem. 1968, 11, 228-232). Moreover, our calculations qualitatively agree with the structural aspects of these protein-ligand complexes as determined by X-ray crystallography.

  1. Peptide hairpins with strand segments containing alpha- and beta-amino acid residues: cross-strand aromatic interactions of facing Phe residues.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rituparna S; Gopi, Hosahudya N; Raghothama, S; Gilardi, Richard D; Karle, Isabella L; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2005-01-01

    The incporation of beta-amino acid residues into the strand segments of designed beta-hairpin leads to the formation of polar sheets, since in the case of beta-peptide strands, all adjacent carbonyl groups point in one direction and the amide groups orient in the opposite direction. The conformational analysis of two designed peptide hairpins composed of alpha/beta-hybrid segments are described: Boc-Leu-betaPhe-Val-(D)-Pro-Gly-Leu-betaPhe-Val-OMe (1) and Boc-betaLeu-Phe-betaVal-D-Pro-Gly-betaLeu-Phe-betaVal-OMe (2). A 500-MHz 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) analysis in methanol supports a significant population of hairpin conformations in both peptides. Diagnostic nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) are observed in both cases. X-ray diffraction studies on single crystals of peptide 1 reveal a beta-hairpin conformation in both the molecules, which constitute the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Three cross-strand hydrogen bonds and a nucleating type II' beta-turn at the D-Pro-Gly segment are observed in the two independent molecules. In peptide 1, the betaPhe residues at positions 2 and 7 occur at the nonhydrogen-bonding position, with the benzyl side chains pointing on opposite faces of the beta-sheet. The observed aromatic centroid-to-centroid distances are 8.92 A (molecule A) and 8.94 A (molecule B). In peptide 2, the aromatic rings must occupy facing positions in antiparallel strands, in the NMR-derived structure. Peptide 1 yields a normal "hairpin-like" CD spectrum in methanol with a minimum at 224 nm. The CD spectrum of peptide 2 reveals a negative band at 234 nm and a positive band at 221 nm, suggestive of an exciton split doublet. Modeling of the facing Phe side chains at the hydrogen-bonding position of a canonical beta-hairpin suggests that interring separation is approximately 4.78 A for the gauche+ gauche- (g+ g-) rotamer. A previously reported peptide beta-hairpin composed of only alpha-amino acids, Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-D-Pro-Gly-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe also

  2. Two hydrophobic residues can determine the specificity of mitogen-activated protein kinase docking interactions.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A Jane; Bardwell, Lee

    2015-10-30

    MAPKs bind to many of their upstream regulators and downstream substrates via a short docking motif (the D-site) on their binding partner. MAPKs that are in different families (e.g. ERK, JNK, and p38) can bind selectively to D-sites in their authentic substrates and regulators while discriminating against D-sites in other pathways. Here we demonstrate that the short hydrophobic region at the distal end of the D-site plays a critical role in determining the high selectivity of JNK MAPKs for docking sites in their cognate MAPK kinases. Changing just 1 or 2 key hydrophobic residues in this submotif is sufficient to turn a weak JNK-binding D-site into a strong one, or vice versa. These specificity-determining differences are also found in the D-sites of the ETS family transcription factors Elk-1 and Net. Moreover, swapping two hydrophobic residues between these D-sites switches the relative efficiency of Elk-1 and Net as substrates for ERK versus JNK, as predicted. These results provide new insights into docking specificity and suggest that this specificity can evolve rapidly by changes to just 1 or 2 amino acids.

  3. Functions of key residues in the ligand-binding pocket of vitamin D receptor: Fragment molecular orbital interfragment interaction energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamada, Sachiko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki

    2006-03-01

    Fragment molecular orbital-interfragment interaction energy calculations of the vitamin D receptor (VDR)/1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 complex were utilized to assign functions of key residues of the VDR. Only one residue forms a significant interaction with the corresponding hydroxy group of the ligand, although two residues are located around each hydroxy group. The degradation of binding affinity for derivatives upon removal of a hydroxy group is closely related to the trend in the strength of the hydrogen bonds. Type II hereditary rickets due to an Arg274 point mutation is caused by the lack of the strongest hydrogen bond.

  4. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  5. Amino acid residues in the laminin G domains of protein S involved in tissue factor pathway inhibitor interaction.

    PubMed

    Somajo, Sofia; Ahnström, Josefin; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Gierula, Magdalena; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Protein S functions as a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and activated protein C (APC). The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)-like region of protein S, consisting of two laminin G-like domains (LG1 and LG2), contains the binding site for C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and TFPI. Furthermore, the LG-domains are essential for the TFPI-cofactor function and for expression of full APC-cofactor function. The aim of the current study was to localise functionally important interaction sites in the protein S LG-domains using amino acid substitutions. Four protein S variants were created in which clusters of surface-exposed amino acid residues within the LG-domains were substituted. All variants bound normally to C4BP and were fully functional as cofactors for APC in plasma and in pure component assays. Two variants, SHBG2 (E612A, I614A, F265A, V393A, H453A), involving residues from both LG-domains, and SHBG3 (K317A, I330A, V336A, D365A) where residues in LG1 were substituted, showed 50-60 % reduction in enhancement of TFPI in FXa inhibition assays. For SHBG3 the decreased TFPI cofactor function was confirmed in plasma based thrombin generation assays. Both SHBG variants bound to TFPI with decreased affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. The TFPI Kunitz 3 domain is known to contain the interaction site for protein S. Using in silico analysis and protein docking exercises, preliminary models of the protein S SHBG/TFPI Kunitz domain 3 complex were created. Based on a combination of experimental and in silico data we propose a binding site for TFPI on protein S, involving both LG-domains.

  6. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, So-Hee; Moon, Jeonghee; Lee, Myungkyu; Lee, Jae-Ran

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1.

  7. Interactions between 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 and residues in the ligand-binding pocket of the vitamin D receptor: a correlated fragment molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Makishima, Makoto; Yamada, Sachiko

    2010-07-01

    To provide physicochemical insight into the role of each residue in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), we evaluated the energies of the interactions between the LBP residues and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 by using an ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level. This FMO-MP2 method can be used to correctly evaluate both electrostatic and van der Waals dispersion interactions, and it affords these interaction energies separately. We deduced the nature of each interaction and determined the importance of all the LBP residues involved in ligand recognition by the VDR. We previously reported the results of alanine-scanning mutational analysis (ASMA) of all 34 non-alanine residues lining the LBP of the human VDR. The theoretical results in combination with the ASMA results enabled us to assign the role of each LBP residue. We concluded that electrostatic interactions are the major determinant of the ligand-binding activity and ligand recognition specificity and that van der Waals interactions are important for protein folding and, in turn, for cofactor binding.

  8. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width as currently defined by the ASTM G 171 Standard. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement, in some cases considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for detailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness parameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Data are presented to show that different combinations of scratch tips and abraded materials can actually yield the same scratch width, but result in different volume displacement or removal measurements and therefore, the ZOI method is more discriminating than the ASTM method scratch width. Furthermore, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for our specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized manner, and not just by scratch width alone, is reinforced. This benefit is made apparent when a tip creates an intricate contour having multiple peaks and valleys within a single scratch. This work lays the foundation for updating scratch measurement standards to improve modeling and characterization of three-body abrasion test results.

  9. Selective determination of thiram residues in fruit and vegetables by hydrophilic interaction LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ringli, Daniela; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Thiram belongs to the most important class of dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicides including dimethyldithiocarbamates (DMDs), ethylenebis(dithiocarbamtes) (EBDs) and propylenebis(dithiocarbamates) (PBDs). During the surface extraction of fruit and vegetables for the LC-MS determination of residues of DMDs, EBDs and PBDs, thiram is reduced by the penicillamine buffer to the DMD anion, thus resulting in false-positive findings of DMD fungicides like ziram. Therefore, an alkaline sulfite buffer was applied for surface extraction, quantitatively transforming thiram into the DMD anion and a stable DMD-sulfite adduct that was used as a selective marker for thiram. Separation was performed isocratically on a ZIC-pHILIC column with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium hydroxide solution (85/15). Mass selective detection was carried out on a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to an electrospray ionisation interface operating in negative mode. Using d12-thiram as the internal standard, recoveries of 80-108% were obtained from apples, tomatoes, grapes and sweet peppers, spiked in the range of 0.02-1 mg kg(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.6 and 2 µg kg(-1), respectively.

  10. Selective determination of thiram residues in fruit and vegetables by hydrophilic interaction LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ringli, Daniela; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Thiram belongs to the most important class of dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicides including dimethyldithiocarbamates (DMDs), ethylenebis(dithiocarbamtes) (EBDs) and propylenebis(dithiocarbamates) (PBDs). During the surface extraction of fruit and vegetables for the LC-MS determination of residues of DMDs, EBDs and PBDs, thiram is reduced by the penicillamine buffer to the DMD anion, thus resulting in false-positive findings of DMD fungicides like ziram. Therefore, an alkaline sulfite buffer was applied for surface extraction, quantitatively transforming thiram into the DMD anion and a stable DMD-sulfite adduct that was used as a selective marker for thiram. Separation was performed isocratically on a ZIC-pHILIC column with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium hydroxide solution (85/15). Mass selective detection was carried out on a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to an electrospray ionisation interface operating in negative mode. Using d12-thiram as the internal standard, recoveries of 80-108% were obtained from apples, tomatoes, grapes and sweet peppers, spiked in the range of 0.02-1 mg kg(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.6 and 2 µg kg(-1), respectively. PMID:24070320

  11. Fujiwhara interaction of tropical cyclone scale vortices using a weighted residual collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Raymond P.; Alam, Jahrul M.

    2016-09-01

    The fundamental interaction between tropical cyclones was investigated through a series of water tank experiements by Fujiwhara [20, 21, 22]. However, a complete understanding of tropical cyclones remains an open research challenge although there have been numerous investigations through measurments with aircrafts/satellites, as well as with numerical simulations. This article presents a computational model for simulating the interaction between cyclones. The proposed numerical method is presented briefly, where the time integration is performed by projecting the discrete system onto a Krylov subspace. The method filters the large scale fluid dynamics using a multiresolution approximation, and the unresolved dynamics is modeled with a Smagorinsky type subgrid scale parameterization scheme. Numerical experiments with Fujiwhara interactions are considered to verify modeling accuracy. An excellent agreement between the present simulation and a reference simulation at Re = 5000 has been demonstrated. At Re = 37440, the kinetic energy of cyclones is seen consolidated into larger scales with concurrent enstrophy cascade, suggesting a steady increase of energy containing scales, a phenomena that is typical in two-dimensional turbulence theory. The primary results of this article suggest a novel avenue for addressing some of the computational challenges of mesoscale atmospheric circulations.

  12. The First Residue of the PWWP Motif Modulates HATH Domain Binding, Stability, and Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Lee, Hsia-Ju; Jiang, Ingjye; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jan; Sue, Shih-Che

    2015-07-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (hHDGF) and HDGF-related proteins (HRPs) contain conserved N-terminal HATH domains with a characteristic structural motif, namely the PWWP motif. The HATH domain has attracted attention because of its ability to bind with heparin/heparan sulfate, DNA, and methylated histone peptide. Depending on the sequence of the PWWP motif, HRP HATHs are classified into P-type (Pro-His-Trp-Pro) and A-type (Ala-His-Trp-Pro) forms. A-type HATH is highly unstable and tends to precipitate in solution. We replaced the Pro residue in P-type HATHHDGF with Ala and evaluated the influence on structure, dynamics, and ligand binding. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hydrogen/deuterium exchange and circular dichroism (CD) measurements revealed reduced stability. Analysis of NMR backbone (15)N relaxations (R1, R2, and nuclear Overhauser effect) revealed additional backbone dynamics in the interface between the β-barrel and the C-terminal helix bundle. The β1-β2 loop, where the AHWP sequence is located, has great structural flexibility, which aids HATH-HATH interaction through the loop. A-type HATH, therefore, shows a stronger tendency to aggregate when binding with heparin and DNA oligomers. This study defines the role of the first residue of the PWWP motif in modulating HATH domain stability and oligomer formation in binding.

  13. Tyrosine residues 654 and 670 in {beta}-cat enin are crucial in regulation of Met-{beta}-catenin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gang; Apte, Udayan; Micsenyi, Amanda; Bell, Aaron; Monga, Satdarshan P.S. . E-mail: smonga@pitt.edu

    2006-11-01

    {beta}-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is also regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation that regulates its association to E-cadherin. Previously, we reported its association with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met at the membrane. HGF induced Met-{beta}-catenin dissociation and nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, which was tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent. Here, we further investigate the Met-{beta}-catenin interaction by selectively mutating several tyrosine residues, alone or in combination, in {beta}-catenin. The mutants were subcloned into FLAG-CMV vector and stably transfected into rat hepatoma cells, which were treated with HGF. All single or double-mutant-transfected cells continued to show HGF-induced nuclear translocation of FLAG-{beta}-catenin except the mutations affecting 654 and 670 simultaneously (Y654/670F), which coincided with the lack of formation of {beta}-catenin-TCF complex and DNA synthesis, in response to the HGF treatment. In addition, the Y654/670F-transfected cells also showed no phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin or dissociation from Met in response to HGF. Thus, intact 654 and 670 tyrosine residues in {beta}-catenin are crucial in HGF-mediated {beta}-catenin translocation, activation and mitogenesis.

  14. Residues of the UL25 protein of herpes simplex virus that are required for its stable interaction with capsids.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Shelley K; Huffman, Jamie B; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2011-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes.

  15. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  16. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  17. Analytical expressions for partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices at ground-state energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Leaning upon the Fock method of the stereographic projection of the three-dimensional momentum space onto the four-dimensional unit sphere the possibility of the analytical solving of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation for the partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrix at the ground bound state energy has been studied. In this case new expressions for the partial p-, d- and f-wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices have been obtained in the simple analytical form. The developed approach can also be extended to determine analytically the partial wave Coulomb transition matrices at the energies of excited bound states.

  18. Neutral weak-current two-body contributions in inclusive scattering from {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Carlson, Joseph; Pieper, S. C.; Schiavilla, Rocco

    2014-05-01

    An {\\it ab initio} calculation of the sum rules of the neutral weak response functions in $^{12}$C is reported, based on a realistic Hamiltonian, including two- and three-nucleon potentials, and on realistic currents, consisting of one- and two-body terms. We find that the sum rules of the response functions associated with the longitudinal and transverse components of the (space-like) neutral current are largest and that a significant portion ($\\simeq 30$\\%) of the calculated strength is due to two-body terms. This fact may have implications for the MiniBooNE and other neutrino quasi-elastic scattering data on nuclei.

  19. Systematics of the release of residual nuclei from relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Garrard, T. L.; Kertzmann, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic nuclei of krypton, xenon, holmium, and gold, accelerated in a partially stripped state to a maximum rigidity of about 5.6 GeV, interacting with targets of aluminum, carbon, and polyethylene are examined. For each projectile and target combination, determinations are made for the total and partial charge changing cross sections for the production of lighter fragments. From these measurements, a new representation of the dependence of the total charge changing cross sections on beam and target charge is developed. Simple representations of the variation of the partial cross sections were identified with the charge of the produced fragments and shown to be dependent on the charge and energy of the beam. The fission of gold nuclei at high energies in these various targets has also been studied.

  20. Identification of crucial hydrogen-bonding residues for the interaction of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase subunits via peptide display, mutational, and calorimetric approaches.

    PubMed

    Bridges, K G; Chow, C S; Coen, D M

    2001-06-01

    The catalytic subunit, Pol, of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase interacts via its extreme C terminus with the processivity subunit, UL42. This interaction is critical for viral replication and thus a potential target for antiviral drug action. To investigate the Pol-binding region on UL42, we engineered UL42 mutations but also used random peptide display to identify artificial ligands of the Pol C terminus. The latter approach selected ligands with homology to residues 171 to 176 of UL42. Substitution of glutamine 171 with alanine greatly impaired binding to Pol and stimulation of long-chain DNA synthesis by Pol, identifying this residue as crucial for subunit interactions. To study these interactions quantitatively, we used isothermal titration calorimetry and wild-type and mutant forms of Pol-derived peptides and UL42. Each of three peptides corresponding to either the last 36, 27, or 18 residues of Pol bound specifically to UL42 in a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant of 1 to 2 microM. Thus, the last 18 residues suffice for most of the binding energy, which was due mainly to a change in enthalpy. Substitutions at positions corresponding to Pol residue 1228 or 1229 or at UL42 residue 171 abolished or greatly reduced binding. These residues participate in hydrogen bonds observed in the crystal structure of the C terminus of Pol bound to UL42. Thus, interruption of these few bonds is sufficient to disrupt the interaction, suggesting that small molecules targeting the relevant side chains could interfere with Pol-UL42 binding.

  1. Towards numerically robust multireference theories: The driven similarity renormalization group truncated to one- and two-body operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenyang; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2016-04-01

    The first nonperturbative version of the multireference driven similarity renormalization group (MR-DSRG) theory [C. Li and F. A. Evangelista, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 2097 (2015)] is introduced. The renormalization group structure of the MR-DSRG equations ensures numerical robustness and avoidance of the intruder-state problem, while the connected nature of the amplitude and energy equations guarantees size consistency and extensivity. We approximate the MR-DSRG equations by keeping only one- and two-body operators and using a linearized recursive commutator approximation of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff expansion [T. Yanai and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 194106 (2006)]. The resulting linearized MR-DSRG scheme with one- and two-body operators [MR-LDSRG(2)] contains only 39 terms and scales as O ( N 2 NP 2 NH 2 ) where NH, NP, and N correspond to the number of hole, particle, and total orbitals, respectively. Benchmark MR-LDSRG(2) computations on the hydrogen fluoride and molecular nitrogen binding curves and the singlet-triplet splitting of p-benzyne yield results comparable in accuracy to those from multireference configuration interaction, Mukherjee multireference coupled cluster theory, and internally contracted multireference coupled cluster theory.

  2. Towards numerically robust multireference theories: The driven similarity renormalization group truncated to one- and two-body operators.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenyang; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2016-04-28

    The first nonperturbative version of the multireference driven similarity renormalization group (MR-DSRG) theory [C. Li and F. A. Evangelista, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 2097 (2015)] is introduced. The renormalization group structure of the MR-DSRG equations ensures numerical robustness and avoidance of the intruder-state problem, while the connected nature of the amplitude and energy equations guarantees size consistency and extensivity. We approximate the MR-DSRG equations by keeping only one- and two-body operators and using a linearized recursive commutator approximation of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff expansion [T. Yanai and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 194106 (2006)]. The resulting linearized MR-DSRG scheme with one- and two-body operators [MR-LDSRG(2)] contains only 39 terms and scales as O(N(2)NP (2)NH (2)) where NH, NP, and N correspond to the number of hole, particle, and total orbitals, respectively. Benchmark MR-LDSRG(2) computations on the hydrogen fluoride and molecular nitrogen binding curves and the singlet-triplet splitting of p-benzyne yield results comparable in accuracy to those from multireference configuration interaction, Mukherjee multireference coupled cluster theory, and internally contracted multireference coupled cluster theory. PMID:27131538

  3. Number of Sialic Acid Residues in Ganglioside Headgroup Affects Interactions with Neighboring Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Shelli L.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2013-01-01

    Monolayers of binary mixtures of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and asialo-(GA1), disialo-(GD1b) and trisialo-(GT1b) gangliosides were used to determine the effect of ganglioside headgroup charge and geometry on its interactions with the neighboring zwitterionic lipid. Surface pressure versus molecular area isotherm measurements along with concurrent fluorescence microscopy of the monolayers at the air-water interface were complemented with atomic force microscopy imaging of monolayers deposited on solid substrates. Results were used to further develop a proposed geometric packing model that the complementary geometry of DPPC and monosialoganglioside GM1 headgroups affects their close molecular packing, inducing condensation of the layer at small mol % of ganglioside. For GA1, GD1b, and GT1b, a similar condensing effect, followed by a fluidizing effect is seen that varies with glycosphingolipid concentration, but results do not directly follow from geometric arguments because less DPPC is needed to condense ganglioside molecules with larger cross-sectional areas. The variations in critical packing mole ratios can be explained by global effects of headgroup charge and resultant dipole moments within the monolayer. Atomic force microscopy micrographs further support the model of ganglioside-induced DPPC condensation with condensed domains composed of a striped phase of condensed DPPC and DPPC/ganglioside geometrically packed complexes at low concentrations. PMID:24047994

  4. Number of sialic acid residues in ganglioside headgroup affects interactions with neighboring lipids.

    PubMed

    Frey, Shelli L; Lee, Ka Yee C

    2013-09-17

    Monolayers of binary mixtures of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and asialo-(GA1), disialo-(GD1b) and trisialo-(GT1b) gangliosides were used to determine the effect of ganglioside headgroup charge and geometry on its interactions with the neighboring zwitterionic lipid. Surface pressure versus molecular area isotherm measurements along with concurrent fluorescence microscopy of the monolayers at the air-water interface were complemented with atomic force microscopy imaging of monolayers deposited on solid substrates. Results were used to further develop a proposed geometric packing model that the complementary geometry of DPPC and monosialoganglioside GM1 headgroups affects their close molecular packing, inducing condensation of the layer at small mol % of ganglioside. For GA1, GD1b, and GT1b, a similar condensing effect, followed by a fluidizing effect is seen that varies with glycosphingolipid concentration, but results do not directly follow from geometric arguments because less DPPC is needed to condense ganglioside molecules with larger cross-sectional areas. The variations in critical packing mole ratios can be explained by global effects of headgroup charge and resultant dipole moments within the monolayer. Atomic force microscopy micrographs further support the model of ganglioside-induced DPPC condensation with condensed domains composed of a striped phase of condensed DPPC and DPPC/ganglioside geometrically packed complexes at low concentrations. PMID:24047994

  5. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising "Hot-Spot" Lysine Residues.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J; Faber, Johan H; Zuurveld, Marleen G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H; Stennicke, Henning R; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2015-07-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  6. A note on the relations between true and eccentric anomalies in the two-body problem.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.; Cefola, P.

    1973-01-01

    Two remarkably simple formulas are proposed for relating the eccentric and true anomalies in the two-body problem at no numerical trouble, no matter what the values of the angles are. The problem of the maximum difference between the two angles is also considered.

  7. Experiments driving theory: Gravitational wave detection and the two body problem in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Bala R.

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades, the search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries by detectors like LIGO and Virgo has crucially required and consequently spurred tremendous progress in the two body problem in general relativity. A broad brush overview of these major developments and the current status of these significant results is presented.

  8. Universal algorithms and programs for calculating the motion parameters in the two-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhshiyan, B. T.; Sukhanov, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    The algorithms and FORTRAN programs for computing positions and velocities, orbital elements and first and second partial derivatives in the two-body problem are presented. The algorithms are applicable for any value of eccentricity and are convenient for computing various navigation parameters.

  9. Singularity in the Laboratory Frame Angular Distribution Derived in Two-Body Scattering Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory (lab) frame angular distribution derived in two-body scattering theory exhibits a singularity at the maximum lab scattering angle. The singularity appears in the kinematic factor that transforms the centre of momentum (cm) angular distribution to the lab angular distribution. We show that it is caused in the transformation by the…

  10. Two-body correlations and natural-orbital tomography in ultracold bosonic systems of definite parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, Sven; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Deep insights into the structure of a many-body state can often be inferred from its natural orbitals (eigenvectors of the reduced one-body density operator) and their populations. These quantities allow e.g. to distinguish a Bose-Einstein condensate from a correlated many-body state and were utilized to understand many-body processes such as the decay of dark solitons due to dynamical quantum depletion. We explore the relationship between natural orbitals, one-body coherences and two-body correlations for a certain important class of bosonic many-body wave-functions with definite parity. The strength of two-body correlations at the parity-symmetry center is shown (i) to characterize the number state distribution and (ii) to control the structure of non-local two-body correlations. A recipe for the experimental reconstruction of the natural-orbital densities based on two-body correlation measurements is derived. These results are applied to decaying dark solitons.

  11. Two-body Relaxation Driven Evolution of the Young Stellar Disk in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2014-05-01

    The center of our Galaxy hosts almost two hundred very young stars, a subset of which is orbiting the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a relatively thin disk-like structure. First analyses indicated a power-law surface density profile of the disk, ΣvpropR β with β = -2. Recently, however, doubts about this profile arose. In particular, it now seems to be better described by a sort of broken power law. By means of both analytical arguments and numerical N-body modeling, we show that such a broken power-law profile is a natural consequence of the two-body relaxation of the disk. Due to the small relative velocities of the nearby stars in co-planar Keplerian orbits around the SMBH, two-body relaxation is effective enough to affect the evolution of the disk on timescales comparable to its estimated age. In the inner, densest part of the disk, the profile becomes rather flat (β ≈ -1) while the outer parts keep imprints of the initial state. Our numerical models show that the observed projected surface density profile of the young stellar disk can result from two-body relaxation driven evolution of a disk with initial single power-law profile with -2 <~ β <~ -1.5. In addition, we suggest that two-body relaxation may have caused a significant radial migration of the S-stars toward the central SMBH, thus playing an important role in their formation scenario.

  12. Direct interaction of tumor suppressor CEACAM1 with beta catenin: identification of key residues in the long cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lan; Li, Yun; Chen, Charng-Jui; Sherman, Mark A; Le, Keith; Shively, John E

    2008-07-01

    CEACAM1-4L (carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1, with 4 extracellular Ig-like domains and a long, 71 amino acid cytoplasmic domain) is expressed in epithelial cells and activated T-cells, but is down-regulated in most epithelial cell cancers and T-cell leukemias. A highly conserved sequence within the cytoplasmic domain has ca 50% sequence homology with Tcf-3 and -4, transcription factors that bind beta-catenin, and to a lesser extent (32% homology), with E-cadherin that also binds beta-catenin. We show by quantitative yeast two-hybrid, BIAcore, GST-pull down, and confocal analyses that this domain directly interacts with beta-catenin, and that H-469 and K-470 are key residues that interact with the armadillo repeats of beta-catenin. Jurkat cells transfected with CEACAM1-4L have 2-fold less activity in the TOPFLASH reporter assay, and in MCF7 breast cancer cells that fail to express CEACAM1, transfection with CEACAM1 and growth in Ca2+ media causes redistribution of beta-catenin from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane, demonstrating a functional role for the long cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1 in regulation of beta-catenin activity.

  13. Improving homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors through multiple-template derived conserved inter-residue interactions.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Rajan; Heim, Andrew J; Li, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    Evidenced by the three-rounds of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) Dock competitions, improving homology modeling methods of helical transmembrane proteins including the GPCRs, based on templates of low sequence identity, remains an eminent challenge. Current approaches addressing this challenge adopt the philosophy of "modeling first, refinement next". In the present work, we developed an alternative modeling approach through the novel application of available multiple templates. First, conserved inter-residue interactions are derived from each additional template through conservation analysis of each template-target pairwise alignment. Then, these interactions are converted into distance restraints and incorporated in the homology modeling process. This approach was applied to modeling of the human β2 adrenergic receptor using the bovin rhodopsin and the human protease-activated receptor 1 as templates and improved model quality was demonstrated compared to the homology model generated by standard single-template and multiple-template methods. This method of "refined restraints first, modeling next", provides a fast and complementary way to the current modeling approaches. It allows rational identification and implementation of additional conserved distance restraints extracted from multiple templates and/or experimental data, and has the potential to be applicable to modeling of all helical transmembrane proteins.

  14. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    1999-12-01

    Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s {+-} 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s {+-} 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest

  15. Characterization of conserved arginine residues on Cdt1 that affect licensing activity and interaction with Geminin or Mcm complex.

    PubMed

    You, Zhiying; Ode, Koji L; Shindo, Mayumi; Takisawa, Haruhiko; Masai, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    All organisms ensure once and only once replication during S phase through a process called replication licensing. Cdt1 is a key component and crucial loading factor of Mcm complex, which is a central component for the eukaryotic replicative helicase. In higher eukaryotes, timely inhibition of Cdt1 by Geminin is essential to prevent rereplication. Here, we address the mechanism of DNA licensing using purified Cdt1, Mcm and Geminin proteins in combination with replication in Xenopus egg extracts. We mutagenized the 223th arginine of mouse Cdt1 (mCdt1) to cysteine or serine (R-S or R-C, respectively) and 342nd and 346th arginines constituting an arginine finger-like structure to alanine (RR-AA). The RR-AA mutant of Cdt1 could not only rescue the DNA replication activity in Cdt1-depleted extracts but also its specific activity for DNA replication and licensing was significantly increased compared to the wild-type protein. In contrast, the R223 mutants were partially defective in rescue of DNA replication and licensing. Biochemical analyses of these mutant Cdt1 proteins indicated that the RR-AA mutation disabled its functional interaction with Geminin, while R223 mutations resulted in ablation in interaction with the Mcm2∼7 complex. Intriguingly, the R223 mutants are more susceptible to the phosphorylation-induced inactivation or chromatin dissociation. Our results show that conserved arginine residues play critical roles in interaction with Geminin and Mcm that are crucial for proper conformation of the complexes and its licensing activity. PMID:26940553

  16. Initial interaction of rotavirus strains with N-acetylneuraminic (sialic) acid residues on the cell surface correlates with VP4 genotype, not species of origin.

    PubMed

    Ciarlet, Max; Ludert, Juan E; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Gray, James J; Desselberger, Ulrich; Estes, Mary K

    2002-04-01

    We examined 41 human and animal rotavirus strains representative of all known P genotypes for their dependency on cellular N-acetylneuraminic (sialic) acid (SA) residues for infectivity. Our results showed that all rotaviruses studied, whether of animal or human origin, belonging to P genotypes [1], [2], [3], and [7] depended on SA residues on the cell surface for efficient infectivity but that all human and animal rotavirus strains representative of the remaining known P genotypes were SA independent. The SA residue requirement for efficient infectivity did not change for reassortant rotavirus strains with altered VP4-VP7 combinations. The initial interaction of rotavirus strains with SA residues on the cell surface correlated with VP4 genotype specificity, not with species of origin or VP7 G serotype specificity (P = 0.001; r2 = 1.00, Pearson's correlation coefficient). In addition to being a requirement for infectivity, the presence of SA residues on the cell surface is a requirement for efficient growth in cell culture; recognition of the association of specific P genotypes with the binding of rotavirus to SA residues will facilitate our understanding of the molecular basis of the early events of rotavirus-cell interactions in cell culture models and of pathogenicity in vivo. PMID:11907248

  17. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  18. Residues of human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase catalytic subunit UL54 that are necessary and sufficient for interaction with the accessory protein UL44.

    PubMed

    Loregian, Arianna; Appleton, Brent A; Hogle, James M; Coen, Donald M

    2004-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase contains a catalytic subunit, UL54, and an accessory protein, UL44. Recent studies suggested that UL54 might interact via its extreme C terminus with UL44 (A. Loregian, R. Rigatti, M. Murphy, E. Schievano, G. Palu', and H. S. Marsden, J. Virol. 77:8336-8344, 2003). To address this hypothesis, we quantitatively measured the binding of peptides corresponding to the extreme C terminus of UL54 to UL44 by using isothermal titration calorimetry. A peptide corresponding to the last 22 residues of UL54 was sufficient to bind specifically to UL44 in a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant of ca. 0.7 microM. To define individual residues in this segment that are crucial for interacting with UL44, we engineered a series of mutations in the C-terminal region of UL54. The UL54 mutants were tested for their ability to interact with UL44 by glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays, for basal DNA polymerase activity, and for long-chain DNA synthesis in the presence of UL44. We observed that deletion of the C-terminal segment or substitution of alanine for Leu1227 or Phe1231 in UL54 greatly impaired both the UL54-UL44 interaction in pulldown assays and long-chain DNA synthesis without affecting basal polymerase activity, identifying these residues as important for subunit interaction. Thus, like the herpes simplex virus UL30-UL42 interaction, a few specific side chains in the C terminus of UL54 are crucial for UL54-UL44 interaction. However, the UL54 residues important for interaction with UL44 are hydrophobic and not basic. This information might aid in the rational design of new drugs for the treatment of human cytomegalovirus infection.

  19. Specific residues in the connector loop of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase accessory protein UL44 are crucial for interaction with the UL54 catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Loregian, Arianna; Appleton, Brent A; Hogle, James M; Coen, Donald M

    2004-09-01

    The human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase includes an accessory protein, UL44, which has been proposed to act as a processivity factor for the catalytic subunit, UL54. How UL44 interacts with UL54 has not yet been elucidated. The crystal structure of UL44 revealed the presence of a connector loop analogous to that of the processivity subunit of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase, UL42, which is crucial for interaction with its cognate catalytic subunit, UL30. To investigate the role of the UL44 connector loop, we replaced each of its amino acids (amino acids 129 to 140) with alanine. We then tested the effect of each substitution on the UL44-UL54 interaction by glutathione S-transferase pulldown and isothermal titration calorimetry assays, on the stimulation of UL54-mediated long-chain DNA synthesis by UL44, and on the binding of UL44 to DNA-cellulose columns. Substitutions that affected residues 133 to 136 of the connector loop measurably impaired the UL44-UL54 interaction without altering the ability of UL44 to bind DNA. One substitution, I135A, completely disrupted the binding of UL44 to UL54 and inhibited the ability of UL44 to stimulate long-chain DNA synthesis by UL54. Thus, similar to the herpes simplex virus UL30-UL42 interaction, a residue of the connector loop of the accessory subunit is crucial for UL54-UL44 interaction. However, while alteration of a polar residue of the UL42 connector loop only partially reduced binding to UL30, substitution of a hydrophobic residue of UL44 completely disrupted the UL54-UL44 interaction. This information may aid the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of the UL44-UL54 interaction.

  20. Two-body nucleon-nucleon correlations in Glauber models of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Rybczynski, Maciej

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the influence of the central two-body nucleon-nucleon correlations on several quantities observed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. It is demonstrated with explicit Monte Carlo simulations that the basic correlation measures observed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, such as the fluctuations of participant eccentricity, initial size fluctuations, or the fluctuations of the number of sources producing particles, are all sensitive to the inclusion of the two-body correlations. The effect is at the level of about 10-20%. Moreover, the realistic (Gaussian) correlation function gives indistinguishable results from the hard-core repulsion, with the expulsion distance set to 0.9 fm. Thus, we verify that for investigations of the considered correlation measures, it is sufficient to use the Monte Carlo generators accounting for the hard-core repulsion.

  1. Two-quasineutron states in {sub 98}{sup 248}Cf and {sub 98}{sup 250}Cf and the neutron-neutron residual interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, K.; Ahmad, I.; Friedman, A. M.

    2008-07-15

    Two-quasineutron states in {sup 248}Cf and {sup 250}Cf were investigated by single-neutron transfer reactions, {sup 249}Cf(d,t){sup 248}Cf and {sup 249}Cf(d,p){sup 250}Cf. The majority of levels observed were assigned to 12 bands in {sup 248}Cf and six bands in {sup 250}Cf, constructed from the single-particle states in neighboring Cf nuclei. The effective two-body interactions between two odd neutrons coupled outside a deformed core were deduced from the differences in the energies of the bandheads formed by the parallel and antiparallel coupling of the intrinsic spins of the two single-particle states.

  2. Small-world networks of residue interactions in the Abl kinase complexes with cancer drugs: topology of allosteric communication pathways can determine drug resistance effects.

    PubMed

    Tse, A; Verkhivker, G M

    2015-07-01

    The human protein kinases play a fundamental regulatory role in orchestrating functional processes in complex cellular networks. Understanding how conformational equilibrium between functional kinase states can be modulated by ligand binding or mutations is critical for quantifying molecular basis of allosteric regulation and drug resistance. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the Abl kinase complexes with cancer drugs (Imatinib and Dasatinib) were combined with structure-based network modeling to characterize dynamics of the residue interaction networks in these systems. The results have demonstrated that structural architecture of kinase complexes can produce a small-world topology of the interaction networks. Our data have indicated that specific Imatinib binding to a small number of highly connected residues could lead to network-bridging effects and allow for efficient allosteric communication, which is mediated by a dominant pathway sensitive to the unphosphorylated Abl state. In contrast, Dasatinib binding to the active kinase form may activate a broader ensemble of allosteric pathways that are less dependent on the phosphorylation status of Abl and provide a better balance between the efficiency and resilience of signaling routes. Our results have unveiled how differences in the residue interaction networks and allosteric communications of the Abl kinase complexes can be directly related to drug resistance effects. This study offers a plausible perspective on how efficiency and robustness of the residue interaction networks and allosteric pathways in kinase structures may be associated with protein responses to drug binding.

  3. A note of expansions of functions of velocity in the two-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinoshita, H.

    1977-01-01

    Fourier expansions based on both the true anomaly and the mean anomaly are obtained for the functions of velocity in the two-body problem; the series of coefficients is written from classical formulae involving associated Legendre polynomials, Gegenbauer polynomials, or Bessel functions. The Fourier expansions are compared with the expansions in powers of eccentricity developed by Broucke (1974) through use of computerized Poisson series manipulation.

  4. Two-body physics in quasi-low-dimensional atomic gases under spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Kun; Yi, Wei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    One of the most dynamic directions in ultracold atomic gas research is the study of low-dimensional physics in quasi-low-dimensional geometries, where atoms are confined in strongly anisotropic traps. Recently, interest has significantly intensified with the realization of synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). As a first step toward understanding the SOC effect in quasi-low-dimensional systems, the solution of two-body problems in different trapping geometries and different types of SOC has attracted great attention in the past few years. In this review, we discuss both the scattering-state and the bound-state solutions of two-body problems in quasi-one and quasi-two dimensions. We show that the degrees of freedom in tightly confined dimensions, in particular with the presence of SOC, may significantly affect system properties. Specifically, in a quasi-one-dimensional atomic gas, a one-dimensional SOC can shift the positions of confinement-induced resonances whereas, in quasitwo- dimensional gases, a Rashba-type SOC tends to increase the two-body binding energy, such that more excited states in the tightly confined direction are occupied and the system is driven further away from a purely two-dimensional gas. The effects of the excited states can be incorporated by adopting an effective low-dimensional Hamiltonian having the form of a two-channel model. With the bare parameters fixed by two-body solutions, this effective Hamiltonian leads to qualitatively different many-body properties compared to a purely low-dimensional model.

  5. Two-body relaxation driven evolution of the young stellar disk in the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2014-05-10

    The center of our Galaxy hosts almost two hundred very young stars, a subset of which is orbiting the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a relatively thin disk-like structure. First analyses indicated a power-law surface density profile of the disk, Σ∝R {sup β} with β = –2. Recently, however, doubts about this profile arose. In particular, it now seems to be better described by a sort of broken power law. By means of both analytical arguments and numerical N-body modeling, we show that such a broken power-law profile is a natural consequence of the two-body relaxation of the disk. Due to the small relative velocities of the nearby stars in co-planar Keplerian orbits around the SMBH, two-body relaxation is effective enough to affect the evolution of the disk on timescales comparable to its estimated age. In the inner, densest part of the disk, the profile becomes rather flat (β ≈ –1) while the outer parts keep imprints of the initial state. Our numerical models show that the observed projected surface density profile of the young stellar disk can result from two-body relaxation driven evolution of a disk with initial single power-law profile with –2 ≲ β ≲ –1.5. In addition, we suggest that two-body relaxation may have caused a significant radial migration of the S-stars toward the central SMBH, thus playing an important role in their formation scenario.

  6. Symmetries in the two-body problem associated to quasihomogeneous potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile

    2002-09-01

    The dynamics in quasihomogeneous fields (characterized by sums of homogeneous potentials) models a lot of concrete physical and astronomical situations. The two-body problem in Cartesian and standard polar coordinates, as well as in regularizing McGehee-type coordinates of both collision-blow-up kind and infinity-blow-up kind, is being tackled. The corresponding vector fields present symmetries that form isomorphic Abelian groups endowed with an idempotent structure.

  7. Low-energy structure studies of odd-odd deformed nuclei and the coriolis and residual interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    The nuclear level structure of /sup 176/Lu, /sup 170/Tm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 160/Tb have been studied by means of the /sup 177/Hf(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 176/Lu, /sup 171/Yb(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 170/Tm, /sup 167/Er(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 166/Ho, and /sup 161/Dy(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 160/Tb reactions and with the use of previously published (d,p) spectroscopy and gamma transitions from the (n,..gamma..) reactions. The (t,..cap alpha..) reactions have been performed and analyzed with 17 MeV tritons and the Los Alamos Q3D spectrometer. Eighty-one new rotational states in excited proton configurations or vibrational excited states are proposed. An independent parameterization of the Coriolis interaction is presented, which leads to satisfactory results in reproducing experimental single-particle transfer reaction cross-sections by theoretical calculations. The anomalous population of the excited neutron configurations (404 reduces to -624 up arrow) in /sup 176/Lu and (411 reduces to +- 512 up arrow) in /sup 170/Tm, and the anomalously low (t,..cap alpha..) cross-sections of the (411 up arrow +- 633 up arrow) configuration in /sup 166/Ho are observed. Qualitative explanation of the anomalies is presented in terms of the mixing of states which satisfy the requirement delta/sub I'/,/sub I/delta/sub K'/,/sub K/. Off-diagonal H/sub INT/ matrix elements are calculated, which show that the residual interaction cannot be used to account for the magnitude of the cross-sections observed.

  8. Identification of residues crucial for the interaction between human neuroglobin and the α-subunit of heterotrimeric Gi protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian neuroglobin (Ngb) protects neuronal cells under conditions of oxidative stress. We previously showed that human Ngb acts as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for the α-subunits of heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins and inhibits the decrease in cAMP concentration, leading to protection against cell death. In the present study, we used an eukaryotic expression vector driving high-level expression of human wild-type Ngb or Ngb mutants that either exhibit or lack GDI activities in human cells. We demonstrate that the GDI activity of human Ngb is tightly correlated with its neuroprotective activity. We further demonstrate that Glu53, Glu60, and Glu118 of human Ngb are crucial for both the neuroprotective activity and interaction with Gαi1. Moreover, we show that Lys46, Lys70, Arg208, Lys209, and Lys210 residues of Gαi1 are important for binding to human Ngb. We propose a molecular docking model of the complex between human Ngb and Gαi1.

  9. Identification of residues crucial for the interaction between human neuroglobin and the α-subunit of heterotrimeric Gi protein

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian neuroglobin (Ngb) protects neuronal cells under conditions of oxidative stress. We previously showed that human Ngb acts as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for the α-subunits of heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins and inhibits the decrease in cAMP concentration, leading to protection against cell death. In the present study, we used an eukaryotic expression vector driving high-level expression of human wild-type Ngb or Ngb mutants that either exhibit or lack GDI activities in human cells. We demonstrate that the GDI activity of human Ngb is tightly correlated with its neuroprotective activity. We further demonstrate that Glu53, Glu60, and Glu118 of human Ngb are crucial for both the neuroprotective activity and interaction with Gαi1. Moreover, we show that Lys46, Lys70, Arg208, Lys209, and Lys210 residues of Gαi1 are important for binding to human Ngb. We propose a molecular docking model of the complex between human Ngb and Gαi1. PMID:27109834

  10. [Effect of mutations and modifications of amino acid residues on zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of β-amyloid with DNA].

    PubMed

    Khmeleva, S A; Mezentsev, Y V; Kozin, S A; Mitkevich, V A; Medvedev, A E; Ivanov, A S; Bodoev, N V; Makarov, A A; Radko, S P

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of intranuclear β-amyloid with DNA is considered to be a plausible mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The interaction of single- and double-stranded DNA with synthetic peptides was analyzed using surface plasmon resonance. The peptides represent the metal-binding domain of β-amyloid (amino acids 1-16) and its variants with chemical modifications and point substitutions of amino acid residues which are associated with enhanced neurotoxicity of β-amyloid in cell tests. It has been shown that the presence of zinc ions is necessary for the interaction of the peptides with DNA in solution. H6R substitution has remarkably reduced the ability of domain 1-16 to bind DNA. This is in accordance with the supposition that the coordination of a zinc ion by amino acid residues His6, Glu11, His13, and His14 of the β-amyloid metal-binding domain results in the occurrence of an anion-binding site responsible for the interaction of the domain with DNA. Zinc-induced dimerization and oligomerization of domain 1-16 associated with phosphorylation of Ser8 and the presence of unblocked amino- and carboxy-terminal groups have resulted in a decrease of peptide concentrations required for detection of the peptide-DNA interaction. The presence of multiple anion-binding sites on the dimers and oligomers is responsible for the enhancement of the peptide-DNA interaction. A substitution of the negatively charged residue Asp7 for the neutral residue Asn in close proximity to the anion-binding site of the domain 1-16 of Aβ facilitates the electrostatic interaction between this site and phosphates of a polynucleotide chain, which enhances zinc-induced binding to DNA.

  11. The importance of residues 195-206 of human blood clotting factor VII in the interaction of factor VII with tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W.; Kazim, A.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that human and bovine factor VII exhibit 71% amino acid sequence identity. In the present study, competition binding experiments revealed that the interaction of human factor VII with cell-surface human tissue factor was not inhibited by 100-fold molar excess of bovine factor VII. This finding indicated that bovine and human factor VII are not structurally homologous in the region(s) where human factor VII interacts with human tissue factor. On this premise, the authors synthesized three peptides corresponding to regions of human factor VII that exhibited marked structural dissimilarity to bovine factor VII; these regions of dissimilarity included residues 195-206, 263-274, and 314-326. Peptide 195-206 inhibited the interaction of factor VII with cell-surface tissue factor and the activation of factor X by a complex of factor VIIa and tissue factor half-maximally at concentrations of 1-2 mM. A structurally rearranged form of peptide 195-206 containing an aspartimide residue inhibited these reactions half-maximally at concentrations of 250-300 {mu}M. In contrast, neither peptide 263-274 nor peptide 314-326, at 2 mM concentration, significantly affected either factor VIIa interaction with tissue factor or factor VIIa-mediated activation of factor X. The data provide presumptive evidence that residues 195-206 of human factor VII are involved in the interaction of human factor VII with the extracellular domain of human tissue factor apoprotein.

  12. Mutational analysis of the Src SH3 domain: the same residues of the ligand binding surface are important for intra- and intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Erpel, T; Superti-Furga, G; Courtneidge, S A

    1995-01-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase c-Src is negatively regulated by phosphorylation of Tyr527 in its C-terminal tail. The repressed state is achieved through intramolecular interactions involving the phosphorylated tail, the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and the SH3 domain. Both the SH2 and SH3 domains have also been shown to mediate the intermolecular interaction of Src with several proteins. To test which amino acids of the Src SH3 domain are important for these interactions, and whether the intra- and intermolecular associations involve the same residues, we carried out a detailed mutational analysis of the presumptive interaction surface. All mutations of conserved hydrophobic residues had an effect on both inter- and intramolecular interactions of the Src SH3 domain, although not all amino acids were equally important. Chimeric molecules in which the Src SH3 domain was replaced with those of spectrin or Lck showed derepressed kinase activity, whereas a chimera containing the Fyn SH3 domain was fully regulated. Since spectrin and Lck SH3 domains share the conserved hydrophobic residues characteristic of SH3 domains, other amino acids must be important for specificity. Mutational analysis of non- or semi-conserved residues in the RT and n-Src loops showed that some of these were also involved in inter- and intramolecular interactions. Stable transfection of selected SH3 domain mutants into NIH-3T3 cells showed that despite elevated levels of phosphotyrosine, the cells were morphologically normal, indicating that the SH3 domain was required for efficient transformation of NIH-3T3 cells by Src. Images PMID:7534229

  13. Formation of a Three-Electron Sulfur-Sulfur Bond as a Probe for Interaction between Side Chains of Methionine Residues.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Piotr; Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Hug, Gordon L; Pogocki, Dariusz; Schöneich, Christian; Marciniak, Bronislaw

    2016-09-15

    The mechanism of oxidation processes of l-Met-(Pro)n-l-Met peptides that contain two Met residues located on the N- and C-terminal and separated by a defined number (n = 0-4) of proline residues was investigated in aqueous solutions using pulse radiolysis. The use of such peptides allowed for distance control between the sulfur atoms located in the side chains of the Met residues. The formation of a contact between the side chains of the Met residues was probed by the observation of transients with σ*-type 2c-3e S∴S and S∴O bonds as well as of α-(alkylthio)alkyl radicals (αS). This approach enabled the monitoring, in real time, of the efficiency and kinetics of interactions between methionine side chains. Such knowledge is important, inter alia, for long-distance electron transfer processes because methionine side chains can serve as relay stations and also for many aspects of protein folding when the formation of a contact between two amino acid residues in an unfolded polypeptide chain plays a central role in protein-folding mechanisms. The yields of these transients (measured as G-values) were found to be dependent on the number of Pro residues; however, they were not dependent in a simple way on the average distance ⟨rS-S⟩ between the sulfur atoms in Met residues. A decrease in the yield of the (S∴S)(+) species with an increase in the number of Pro residues in the bridge occurred at the expense of an increase in the yields of the intramolecular three-electron-bonded (S∴O)(+) radical cations and αS radicals. A detailed understanding of these trends in the chemical yields was developed by modeling the underlying chemical kinetics with Langevin dynamical simulations of the various oligoproline peptide chains and combining them with a simple statistical mechanical theory on the end-to-end contact rates for polymer chains. This analysis showed that the formation of a contact between terminal Met residues in the peptides with 0-2 Pro residues was

  14. Dipicrylamine Modulates GABAρ1 Receptors through Interactions with Residues in the TM4 and Cys-Loop Domains.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Ruiz, Jorge M Reyes; Miledi, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Dipicrylamine (DPA) is a commonly used acceptor agent in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments that allows the study of high-frequency neuronal activity in the optical monitoring of voltage in living cells. However, DPA potently antagonizes GABAA receptors that contain α1 and β2 subunits by a mechanism which is not clearly understood. In this work, we aimed to determine whether DPA modulation is a general phenomenon of Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), and whether this modulation depends on particular amino acid residues. For this, we studied the effects of DPA on human homomeric GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A serotonin receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results indicate that DPA is an allosteric modulator of GABAρ1 receptors with an IC50 of 1.6 µM, an enhancer of α7 nicotinic receptors at relatively high concentrations of DPA, and has little, if any, effect on 5-HT3A receptors. DPA antagonism of GABAρ1 was strongly enhanced by preincubation, was slightly voltage-dependent, and its washout was accelerated by bovine serum albumin. These results indicate that DPA modulation is not a general phenomenon of LGICs, and structural differences between receptors may account for disparities in DPA effects. In silico modeling of DPA docking to GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A receptors suggests that a hydrophobic pocket within the Cys-loop and the M4 segment in GABAρ1, located at the extracellular/membrane interface, facilitates the interaction with DPA that leads to inhibition of the receptor. Functional examinations of mutant receptors support the involvement of the M4 segment in the allosteric modulation of GABAρ1 by DPA. PMID:26869399

  15. The Two-Body Problem: Balancing a Physics Career With a Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Laurie

    1997-03-01

    In this panel discussion organized by the APS Committee on the Status of Women in Physics, members of the panel will give brief presentations on the challenges they have faced in combining their physics careers with family life. Questions and comments from the audience will then be invited. Topics to be raised include having children while in graduate school, spousal relocation, institutional responses to the "two-body" problem, and industry vs. academia. The panel members will be Susan Coppersmith (U. Chicago), Jia Ling Lin (U. Wisconsin), Madelaine Msall (Bowdoin College), and Janet Tate (Oregon State U.). The discussion will be moderated by Laurie McNeil (U. North Carolina).

  16. The post-Keplerian orbital representations of the relativistic two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klioner, S. A.; Kopeikin, S. M.

    1994-06-01

    Orbital parameterizations of the relativstic two-body problem due to Brumberg, Damour-Deruelle, Epstein-Haugan, and Blandford-Teukolsky as well as osculating elements are compared. Exact relations between constants describing the orbit in the parameterizations are derived. It is shown that all the parameterizations in question are valid not only in general relativity, but in a generic class of relatvistic theories of gravity. The obtained results provide us with an additional check of consistency of different models used in timing of binary pulsars.

  17. Two-body problem with the cosmological constant and observational constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzer, Philippe; Sereno, Mauro

    2006-02-15

    We discuss the influence of the cosmological constant on the gravitational equations of motion of bodies with arbitrary masses and eventually solve the two-body problem. Observational constraints are derived from measurements of the periastron advance in stellar systems, in particular, binary pulsars and the solar system. Up to now, Earth and Mars data give the best constraint, {lambda} < or approx. 10{sup -36} km{sup -2}; bounds from binary pulsars are potentially competitive with limits from interplanetary measurements. If properly accounting for the gravito-magnetic effect, this upper limit on {lambda} could greatly improve in the near future thanks to new data from planned or already operating space missions.

  18. Construction of Effective Electromagnetic Currents for Two-Body Quasipotential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Krioukov

    1998-09-01

    A systematic algebraic approach for the construction of effective electro-magnetic currents consistent with relativistic two-body quasipotential equations is presented. This approach generalizes the Mandelstam formalism and applies it to a generic quasipotential reduction method. The use of Ward-Takahashi identities for the effective currents guarantees conservation of current matrix elements involving any combination of bound and scattering states. This approach is shown to reproduce previous results for current matrix elements for the particular cases of the Gross and Blankenbecler-Sugar equations. A generic method of truncation of the quasipotential effective current with respect to the number of boson exchanges is introduced.

  19. Phase-space structure of the Buckingham's two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricopi, D.; Popescu, E.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the global flow for the two-body problem associated to the Buckingham potential. For this, using McGehee-type transformations, we write the regularized equations of motion. Then, reducing the 4-dimensional phase space to a 2-dimension one, the global flow in the phase plane is described for all possible values of the parameters of the potential and those of the energy and angular momentum constants. Every phase trajectory is interpreted in terms of physical motion, our problem being depicted both geometrically and physically.

  20. Groups of symmetries in the two-body problem associated to Einstein's PN field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, V.

    The two-body problem associated to a spherical post-Newtonian (PN) field with Einsteinian parameterization is revisited from the single standpoint of symmetries. The corresponding vector fields, in Hamiltonian and standard polar coordinates, or in collision-blow-up and infinity-blow-up McGehee-type coordinates, present symmetries that form diffeomorphic commutative groups endowed with a Boolean structure. The existence of such symmetries is of much help in understanding characteristics of the global flow, or in finding symmetric periodic orbits in more complex problems depending on a small parameter.

  1. Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Protein Interacts with Pectin through a Binding Site Formed by Four Clustered Residues of Arginine and Lysine1

    PubMed Central

    Spadoni, Sara; Zabotina, Olga; Di Matteo, Adele; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Mattei, Benedetta; Bellincampi, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) is a cell wall protein that inhibits fungal polygalacturonases (PGs) and retards the invasion of plant tissues by phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we report the interaction of two PGIP isoforms from Phaseolus vulgaris (PvPGIP1 and PvPGIP2) with both polygalacturonic acid and cell wall fractions containing uronic acids. We identify in the three-dimensional structure of PvPGIP2 a motif of four clustered arginine and lysine residues (R183, R206, K230, and R252) responsible for this binding. The four residues were mutated and the protein variants were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The ability of both wild-type and mutated proteins to bind pectins was investigated by affinity chromatography. Single mutations impaired the binding and double mutations abolished the interaction, thus indicating that the four clustered residues form the pectin-binding site. Remarkably, the binding of PGIP to pectin is displaced in vitro by PGs, suggesting that PGIP interacts with pectin and PGs through overlapping although not identical regions. The specific interaction of PGIP with polygalacturonic acid may be strategic to protect pectins from the degrading activity of fungal PGs. PMID:16648220

  2. Elicitin-Induced Distal Systemic Resistance in Plants is Mediated Through the Protein–Protein Interactions Influenced by Selected Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Uhlíková, Hana; Obořil, Michal; Klempová, Jitka; Šedo, Ondrej; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Kašparovský, Tomáš; Skládal, Petr; Lochman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Elicitins are a family of small proteins with sterol-binding activity that are secreted by Phytophthora and Pythium sp. classified as oomycete PAMPs. Although α- and β-elicitins bind with the same affinity to one high affinity binding site on the plasma membrane, β-elicitins (possessing 6–7 lysine residues) are generally 50- to 100-fold more active at inducing distal HR and systemic resistance than the α-isoforms (with only 1–3 lysine residues). To examine the role of lysine residues in elicitin biological activity, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to prepare a series of β-elicitin cryptogein variants with mutations on specific lysine residues. In contrast to direct infiltration of protein into leaves, application to the stem revealed a rough correlation between protein’s charge and biological activity, resulting in protection against Phytophthora parasitica. A detailed analysis of proteins’ movement in plants showed no substantial differences in distribution through phloem indicating differences in consequent apoplastic or symplastic transport. In this process, an important role of homodimer formation together with the ability to form a heterodimer with potential partner represented by endogenous plants LTPs is suggested. Our work demonstrates a key role of selected lysine residues in these interactions and stresses the importance of processes preceding elicitin recognition responsible for induction of distal systemic resistance. PMID:26904041

  3. Role of enthalpy-entropy compensation interactions in determining the conformational propensities of amino acid residues in unfolded peptides.

    PubMed

    Toal, Siobhan E; Verbaro, Daniel J; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    The driving forces governing the unique and restricted conformational preferences of amino acid residues in the unfolded state are still not well understood. In this study, we experimentally determine the individual thermodynamic components underlying intrinsic conformational propensities of these residues. Thermodynamic analysis of ultraviolet-circular dichroism (UV-CD) and (1)H NMR data for a series of glycine capped amino acid residues (i.e., G-x-G peptides) reveals the existence of a nearly exact enthalpy-entropy compensation for the polyproline II-β strand equilibrium for all investigated residues. The respective ΔHβ, ΔSβ values exhibit a nearly perfect linear relationship with an apparent compensation temperature of 295 ± 2 K. Moreover, we identified iso-equilibrium points for two subsets of residues at 297 and 305 K. Thus, our data suggest that within this temperature regime, which is only slightly below physiological temperatures, the conformational ensembles of amino acid residues in the unfolded state differ solely with respect to their capability to adopt turn-like conformations. Such iso-equilibria are rarely observed, and their existence herein indicates a common physical origin behind conformational preferences, which we are able to assign to side-chain dependent backbone solvation. Conformational effects such as differences between the number of sterically allowed side chain rotamers can contribute to enthalpy and entropy but not to the Gibbs energy associated with conformational preferences. Interestingly, we found that alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine are the only residues which do not share these iso-equilbiria. The enthalpy-entropy compensation discovered as well as the iso-equilbrium and thermodynamics obtained for each amino acid residue provide a new and informative way of identifying the determinants of amino acid propensities in unfolded and disordered states.

  4. Two-body potential model based on cosine series expansion for ionic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Oda, Takuji; Weber, William J.; Tanigawa, Hisashi

    2015-09-23

    There is a method to construct a two-body potential model for ionic materials with a Fourier series basis and we examine it. For this method, the coefficients of cosine basis functions are uniquely determined by solving simultaneous linear equations to minimize the sum of weighted mean square errors in energy, force and stress, where first-principles calculation results are used as the reference data. As a validation test of the method, potential models for magnesium oxide are constructed. The mean square errors appropriately converge with respect to the truncation of the cosine series. This result mathematically indicates that the constructed potentialmore » model is sufficiently close to the one that is achieved with the non-truncated Fourier series and demonstrates that this potential virtually provides minimum error from the reference data within the two-body representation. The constructed potential models work appropriately in both molecular statics and dynamics simulations, especially if a two-step correction to revise errors expected in the reference data is performed, and the models clearly outperform two existing Buckingham potential models that were tested. Moreover, the good agreement over a broad range of energies and forces with first-principles calculations should enable the prediction of materials behavior away from equilibrium conditions, such as a system under irradiation.« less

  5. Trinucleon system in a two-body model: Coulomb effect on bound and scattering states

    SciTech Connect

    Tomio, L.; Delfino, A.; Adhikari, S.K.

    1987-02-01

    Recently it has been suggested that as in the neutron deuteron problem the theoretically calculated spin-doublet S wave proton deuteron scattering length /sup 2/a/sub pd/ is correlated with /sup 3/He binding energy. This strongly suggests that /sup 2/a/sub pd/approx. =0. In this paper we study various properties of the low energy trinucleon system including this correlation among scattering length and binding energy for the spin-doublet neutron deuteron and the proton deuteron systems in an ad hoc two-body model. The two-body potential models we employ have a long range tail of r/sup -2/ type and have been parametrized to produce the correct binding energies of /sup 3/H and /sup 3/He and the correct s wave spin-doublet neutron deuteron scattering lengths /sup 2/a/sub nd/. The present study predicts the low energy nucleon deuteron phase shifts and predicts the proton deuteron scattering length to be /sup 2/a/sub pd/approx. =(0.15 +- 0.1) fm.

  6. C P -violating polarization asymmetry in charmless two-body decays of beauty baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Guan-Nan

    2015-08-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark, the b-baryons, have been discovered. The charmless two-body decays of b-baryons can provide a new platform for C P violating studies in a similar way provided by charmless two-body decays of B-meson. There are new C P violating observables related to baryon polarization in b-baryon decays. We show that in the flavor S U (3 ) limit, there exists relations involving different combinations of the decay amplitudes compared with those in C P violating rate asymmetry. These new relations therefore provide interesting tests for the mechanism of C P violations in the standard model (SM) and flavor S U (3 ) symmetry. Such tests could complement the b-meson decay studies which hint at a better flavor S U (3 ) conservation in b-hadron decays than in kaon and hyperon decays. Future data from LHCb can provide new information about C P violation in the SM.

  7. Two-body potential model based on cosine series expansion for ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Takuji; Weber, William J.; Tanigawa, Hisashi

    2015-09-23

    There is a method to construct a two-body potential model for ionic materials with a Fourier series basis and we examine it. For this method, the coefficients of cosine basis functions are uniquely determined by solving simultaneous linear equations to minimize the sum of weighted mean square errors in energy, force and stress, where first-principles calculation results are used as the reference data. As a validation test of the method, potential models for magnesium oxide are constructed. The mean square errors appropriately converge with respect to the truncation of the cosine series. This result mathematically indicates that the constructed potential model is sufficiently close to the one that is achieved with the non-truncated Fourier series and demonstrates that this potential virtually provides minimum error from the reference data within the two-body representation. The constructed potential models work appropriately in both molecular statics and dynamics simulations, especially if a two-step correction to revise errors expected in the reference data is performed, and the models clearly outperform two existing Buckingham potential models that were tested. Moreover, the good agreement over a broad range of energies and forces with first-principles calculations should enable the prediction of materials behavior away from equilibrium conditions, such as a system under irradiation.

  8. Identification of the lambda integrase surface that interacts with Xis reveals a residue that is also critical for Int dimer formation.

    PubMed

    Warren, David; Sam, My D; Manley, Kate; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Lee, Sang Yeol; Abbani, Mohamad; Wojciak, Jonathan M; Clubb, Robert T; Landy, Arthur

    2003-07-01

    Lambda integrase (Int) is a heterobivalent DNA-binding protein that together with the accessory DNA-bending proteins IHF, Fis, and Xis, forms the higher-order protein-DNA complexes that execute integrative and excisive recombination at specific loci on the chromosomes of phage lambda and its Escherichia coli host. The large carboxyl-terminal domain of Int is responsible for binding to core-type DNA sites and catalysis of DNA cleavage and ligation reactions. The small amino-terminal domain (residues 1-70), which specifies binding to arm-type DNA sites distant from the regions of strand exchange, consists of a three-stranded beta-sheet, proposed to recognize the cognate DNA site, and an alpha-helix. We report here that a site on this alpha-helix is critical for both homomeric interactions between Int protomers and heteromeric interactions with Xis. The mutant E47A, which was identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, abolishes interactions between Int and Xis bound at adjacent binding sites and reduces interactions between Int protomers bound at adjacent arm-type sites. Concomitantly, this residue is essential for excisive recombination and contributes to the efficiency of the integrative reaction. NMR titration data with a peptide corresponding to Xis residues 57-69 strongly suggest that the carboxyl-terminal tail of Xis and the alpha-helix of the aminoterminal domain of Int comprise the primary interaction surface for these two proteins. The use of a common site on lambda Int for both homotypic and heterotypic interactions fits well with the complex regulatory patterns associated with this site-specific recombination reaction.

  9. The second-sphere residue T263 is important for the function and catalytic activity of PTP1B via interaction with the WPD-loop.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Hong-Mei; Fu, Xiao-Lei; Cui, Fu-ai; Yu, Xiao; Wen, Shi-shuai; Bi, Wen-Xiang; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases have diverse substrate specificities and intrinsic activities that lay the foundations for the fine-tuning of a phosphorylation network to precisely regulate cellular signal transduction. All classical PTPs share common catalytic mechanisms, and the important catalytic residues in the first sphere of their active sites have been well characterized. However, little attention has been paid to the second-sphere residues that are potentially important in defining the intrinsic activity and substrate specificity of PTPs. Here, we find that a conserved second-sphere residue, Thr263, located in the surface Q-loop is important for both the function and activity of PTPs. Using PTP1B as a study model, we found that mutations of Thr263 impaired the negative regulation role of PTP1B in insulin signaling. A detailed mechanistic study utilizing steady-state kinetics, Brønsted analysis and pH dependence in the presence of pNPP or phosphopeptide substrates revealed that Thr263 is required for the stabilization of the leaving group during catalysis. Further crystallographic studies and structural comparison revealed that Thr263 regulates the general acid function through modulation of the WPD-loop by the T263:F182/Y/H interaction pair, which is conserved in 26 out of 32 classical PTPs. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction between Thr263 and Arg1159 of the insulin receptor contributes to the substrate specificity of PTP1B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the general role of the second-sphere residue Thr263 in PTP catalysis. Our findings suggest that the second sphere residues of PTP active site may play important roles in PTP-mediated function in both normal and diseased states. PMID:25450460

  10. Effect of D to E mutation of the RGD motif in rhodostomin on its activity, structure, and dynamics: importance of the interactions between the D residue and integrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Shiu, Jia-Hau; Hsieh, Yao-Husn; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yen-Chin; Chen, Yi-Chun; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Tang, Ming-Jer; Lo, Szecheng J; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2009-09-01

    Rhodostomin (Rho) is a snake venom protein containing an RGD motif that specifically inhibits the integrin-binding function. Rho produced in Pichia pastoris inhibits platelet aggregation with a K(I) of 78 nM as potent as native Rho. In contrast, its D51E mutant inhibits platelet aggregation with a K(I) of 49 muM. Structural analysis of Rho and its D51E mutant showed that they have the same tertiary fold with three two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets. There are no structural backbone differences between the RG[D/E] loop which extends outward from the protein core and the RG[D/E] sequence at its apex in a four-residue RG[D/E]M type I turn. Two minor differences between Rho and its D51E mutant were only found from their backbone dynamics and 3D structures. The R(2) value of E51 is 13% higher than that of the D51 residue. A difference in the charge separation of 1.76 A was found between the sidechains of positive (R49) and negative residues (D51 or E51).The docking of Rho into integrin alphavbeta3 showed that the backbone amide and carbonyl groups of the D51 residue of Rho were formed hydrogen bonds with the integrin residues R216 and R214, respectively. In contrast, these hydrogen bonds were absent in the D51E mutant-integrin complex. Our findings suggest that the interactions between both the sidechain and backbone of the D residue of RGD-containing ligands and integrin are important for their binding. PMID:19280603

  11. Reactive two-body and three-body collisions of Ba+ in an ultracold Rb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krükow, Artjom; Mohammadi, Amir; Härter, Arne; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    We analyze reactive collisions of a single Ba+ ion in contact with an ultracold gas of Rb atoms at low three-body collision energies of 2.2(9) mK ×kB . Mapping out the Ba+ loss rate dependence on the Rb atom density we can discern two-body reactive collisions from three-body ones and determine both rate coefficients, which are k2=3.1 (6 ) (6 ) ×10-13cm3s-1 and k3=1.04 (4 ) (45 ) ×10-24cm6s-1 , respectively (statistical and systematic errors in parentheses). Thus, the measured ternary recombination dominates over binary reactions even at moderate atom densities of n ≈1012cm-3 . The results for Ba+ and Rb are representative for a wide range of cold ion-atom systems and can serve as guidance for the future development of the field of hybrid atom-ion research.

  12. Geography of the rotational resonances and their stability in the ellipsoidal full two body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Nadoushan, Mahdi; Assadian, Nima

    2016-02-01

    A fourth-order Hamiltonian describing the planar full two body problem is obtained, allowing for a mapping out of the geography of spin-spin-orbit resonances. The expansion of the mutual potential function up to the fourth-order results in the angles to come through one single harmonic and consequently the rotation of both bodies and mutual orbit are coupled. Having derived relative equilibria, stability analysis showed that the stability conditions are independent of physical and orbital characteristics. Simultaneously chaotic motion of bodies is investigated through the Chirikov diffusion utilizing geographic information of the complete resonances. The results show that simultaneous chaos among the binary asteroids is not expected to be prevalent due to the mass distribution of primary in compare with secondary. If mass distribution of bodies is of the same order, simultaneous chaos and global instability are achievable.

  13. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  14. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  15. Effect of the hairpin diagram on two-body nonleptonic B decays and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Dong-sheng; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    1993-08-01

    A careful quark-diagram analysis shows that a number of two-body nonleptonic B decays can occur through the so-called hairpin diagram, a QCD loop-induced graph different from the penguin one in final-state hadronization of valence quarks. Using the two-loop renormalization-group-improved effective Hamiltonian and the naive factorization approximation, we demonstrate the effect of the hairpin diagram on decay rates and CP asymmetries for a few interesting channels such as B d0, overlineBd0→ψ K sandB u±→πK ±. Branching ratios of some pure decay modes, e.g., B u-→ππ -, πϱ -andoverlineBd0→ππ 0, πϱ 0, πω, πη, etc., are estimated to be on the order of 10 -7.

  16. Proton-Nucleus Elastic Cross Sections Using Two-Body In-Medium Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, a method was developed of extracting nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium NN cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. The ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium NN cross sections to calculate elastic proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  17. Parametric study of two-body floating-point wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Atena; Panahi, Roozbeh; Radfar, Soheil

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive numerical simulation of a point wave absorber in deep water. Analyses are performed in both the frequency and time domains. The converter is a two-body floating-point absorber (FPA) with one degree of freedom in the heave direction. Its two parts are connected by a linear mass-spring-damper system. The commercial ANSYS-AQWA software used in this study performs well in considering validations. The velocity potential is obtained by assuming incompressible and irrotational flow. As such, we investigated the effects of wave characteristics on energy conversion and device efficiency, including wave height and wave period, as well as the device diameter, draft, geometry, and damping coefficient. To validate the model, we compared our numerical results with those from similar experiments. Our study results can clearly help to maximize the converter's efficiency when considering specific conditions.

  18. Entropy theorems in classical mechanics, general relativity, and the gravitational two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Bonetti, Luca; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2016-09-01

    In classical Hamiltonian theories, entropy may be understood either as a statistical property of canonical systems or as a mechanical property, that is, as a monotonic function of the phase space along trajectories. In classical mechanics, there are theorems which have been proposed for proving the nonexistence of entropy in the latter sense. We explicate, clarify, and extend the proofs of these theorems to some standard matter (scalar and electromagnetic) field theories in curved spacetime, and then we show why these proofs fail in general relativity; due to properties of the gravitational Hamiltonian and phase space measures, the second law of thermodynamics holds. As a concrete application, we focus on the consequences of these results for the gravitational two-body problem, and in particular, we prove the noncompactness of the phase space of perturbed Schwarzschild-Droste spacetimes. We thus identify the lack of recurring orbits in phase space as a distinct sign of dissipation and hence entropy production.

  19. Treatment of the two-body Coulomb problem as a short-range potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasaneo, G.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2009-12-01

    The scattering wave function and the transition amplitude for the two-body Coulomb problem are written as power series of the Sommerfeld parameter. Making use of a mathematical study of the nth derivatives of Kummer function with respect to its first parameter, the series coefficients are expressed analytically in terms of multivariable hypergeometric functions. We establish the connection with the Born series based on the free particle Green’s function and show its applicability to long-range potentials. We also relate our analysis to recent works on the distorted-wave theory for the Coulomb problem. For the transition amplitude, the Born series is presented and compared to the series obtained from the exact well-known Rutherford result. Since the two series differ, care must be taken when extracting the relevant information about the scattering. Finally, implications for three-body problems are discussed.

  20. The Two-Body Problem in the Point Mass Approximation Field. IV. Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile; Csillik, Iharka

    The only fields for which the correctness of the point-mass representation (Newton's theorem) can be proved are those featured by potentials of the form A/r+Br2. The two-body problem in such a field is tackled from the only standpoint of symmetries. The motion equations, written in Cartesian or polar coordinates, present nice symmetries that form eight-element Abelian groups endowed with an idempotent structure. It is the same for McGehee-type coordinates that extend the phase space to collision or escape. All these groups are proved to be isomorphic. Expressed in Levi-Civita collision-regularizing coordinates, the vector field of the problem exhibits symmetries that form a sixteen-element group with the same characteristics.

  1. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  2. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2016-04-01

    We have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a mass less product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, we utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the standard model particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial because (in general) both the above-mentioned properties are no longer valid. Nonetheless, we propose a suitably modified parametrization of the energy distribution that was used successfully for the massless case, which can deal with the massive case as well. We test this parametrization on concrete examples of energy spectra of Z bosons from the decay of a heavier supersymmetric partner of top quark (stop) into a Z boson and a lighter stop. After establishing the accuracy of this parametrization, we study a realistic application for the same process, but now including dominant backgrounds and using foreseeable statistics at LHC14, in order to determine the performance of this method for an actual mass measurement. The upshot of our present and previous work is that, in spite of energy being a Lorentz-variant quantity, its distribution emerges as a powerful tool for mass measurement at hadron colliders.

  3. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2016-04-26

    Here, we have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, wemore » utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the standard model particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial because (in general) both the above-mentioned properties are no longer valid. Nonetheless, we propose a suitably modified parametrization of the energy distribution that was used successfully for the massless case, which can deal with the massive case as well. We test this parametrization on concrete examples of energy spectra of Z bosons from the decay of a heavier supersymmetric partner of top quark (stop) into a Z boson and a lighter stop. After establishing the accuracy of this parametrization, we study a realistic application for the same process, but now including dominant backgrounds and using foreseeable statistics at LHC14, in order to determine the performance of this method for an actual mass measurement. The upshot of our present and previous work is that, in spite of energy being a Lorentz-variant quantity, its distribution emerges as a powerful tool for mass measurement at hadron colliders.« less

  4. Interactions between residues 2228-2240 within factor VIIIa C2 domain and factor IXa Gla domain contribute to propagation of clot formation.

    PubMed

    Soeda, T; Nogami, K; Ogiwara, K; Shima, M

    2011-11-01

    Factor (F)VIII functions as a cofactor in the tenase complex responsible for phospholipid (PL)-dependent FXa generation by FIXa. We have recently reported that the FVIIIa C2 domain (residues 2228-2240) interacts with the FIXa Gla domain in this complex. We examined the role of this interaction in the generation of tenase activity during the process of clot formation, using a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 2228-2240. The peptide 2228-2240 inhibited FVIIIa/FIXa-mediated FX activation dose-dependently in the presence of PL by >95% (IC50; ~10 μM). This effect was significantly greater than that obtained by peptide 1804-1818 (IC50; ~180 μM) which corresponds to another FIXa-interactive site in the light chain that provides the majority of binding energy for FIXa interaction. Peptide 2228-2240 had little effect on the prothrombin time and did not inhibit FIX activation in the coagulation process mediated by FVIIa/tissue factor or FXIa, suggesting specific inhibition of the intrinsic tenase complex. Clot waveform analysis, a plasma based-assay used to evaluate the process of intrinsic coagulation, demonstrated that peptide 2228-2240 significantly depressed both maximum coagulation velocity (|min1|) and acceleration (|min2|), reflecting the propagation of clot formation, although the clotting time was only marginally prolonged. Thromboelastography, an alternative whole blood based-assay, demonstrated that the peptide inhibited clot formation time, α-angle and maximal clot firmness, but had little effect on the clotting time. Interactions of the FVIIIa C2 domain (residues 2228-2240) with the FIXa Gla domain in the tenase complex appeared to contribute essentially to the propagation of clot formation.

  5. Residues Essential for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin S Component Binding to Its Cell Receptor Suggest Both Plasticity and Adaptability in Its Interaction Surface

    PubMed Central

    Laventie, Benoit-Joseph; Guérin, Frédéric; Mourey, Lionel; Tawk, Mira Y.; Jover, Emmanuel; Maveyraud, Laurent; Prévost, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a bicomponent staphylococcal leukotoxin, is involved in the poor prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia. The present study aimed to elucidate the binding mechanism of PVL and in particular its cell-binding domain. The class S component of PVL, LukS-PV, is known to ensure cell targeting and exhibits the highest affinity for the neutrophil membrane (Kd∼10−10 M) compared to the class F component of PVL, LukF-PV (Kd∼10−9 M). Alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to identify the residues involved in LukS-PV binding to the neutrophil surface. Nineteen single alanine mutations were performed in the rim domain previously described as implicated in cell membrane interactions. Positions were chosen in order to replace polar or exposed charged residues and according to conservation between leukotoxin class S components. Characterization studies enabled to identify a cluster of residues essential for LukS-PV binding, localized on two loops of the rim domain. The mutations R73A, Y184A, T244A, H245A and Y250A led to dramatically reduced binding affinities for both human leukocytes and undifferentiated U937 cells expressing the C5a receptor. The three-dimensional structure of five of the mutants was determined using X-ray crystallography. Structure analysis identified residues Y184 and Y250 as crucial in providing structural flexibility in the receptor-binding domain of LukS-PV. PMID:24643034

  6. On the Accuracy of Sequence-Based Computational Inference of Protein Residues Involved in Interactions with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Zhenkun; Kuznetsov, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for computational inference of DNA-binding residues in DNA-binding proteins are usually developed using classification techniques trained to distinguish between binding and non-binding residues on the basis of known examples observed in experimentally determined high-resolution structures of protein-DNA complexes. What degree of accuracy can be expected when a computational methods is applied to a particular novel protein remains largely unknown. We test the utility of classification methods on the example of Kernel Logistic Regression (KLR) predictors of DNA-binding residues. We show that predictors that utilize sequence properties of proteins can successfully predict DNA-binding residues in proteins from a novel structural class. We use Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) to establish a quantitative relationship between protein properties and the expected accuracy of KLR predictors. Present results indicate that in the case of novel proteins the expected accuracy provided by an MLR model is close to the actual accuracy and can be used to assess the overall confidence of the prediction. PMID:20209034

  7. Addition of a clay subsoil to a sandy top soil alters CO2 release and the interactions in residue mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Andong; Marschner, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Addition of clay-rich subsoils to sandy top soils is an agricultural management option to increase water and nutrient retention and may also increase organic carbon sequestration by decreasing the decomposition rates. An incubation experiment was carried out in a loamy sand top soil mixed with a clay-rich subsoil (84% clay) at 0, 10 and 30% (w/w) amended with finely ground mature shoot residues of two native perennial grasses and annual barley individually or in 1:1 mixtures of two residues. Extractable C, microbial biomass C, available N and soil pH were analysed at days 0, 3, 14 and 28. Cumulative respiration after 28 days was highest with barley residue and lowest with Wallaby grass at all clay soil addition rates; 30% clay soil addition reduced cumulative respiration, especially with barley alone. In the mixture of native grasses and barley, the measured respiration was lower than expected at a clay soil addition rate of 10%. A synergistic effect (higher than expected cumulative respiration) was only found in mixture of Kangaroo grass and barley at a clay soil addition rate of 30%. Clay soil addition also decreased extractable C, available N and soil pH. The temporal change in microbial biomass C and available N in residue mixtures differed among clay addition rates. In the mixture of Wallaby grass and Kangaroo grass, microbial biomass C (MBC) decreased from day 0 to day 28 at clay soil addition rates of 0 and 10%, whereas at 30% clay MBC increased from day 0 to day 3 and then decreased. Our study shows that addition of a clay-rich subsoil to a loamy sand soil can increase C sequestration by reducing CO2 release and extractable C which are further modulated by the type of residues present individually or as mixtures.

  8. Transmembrane Domain Interactions and Residue Proline 378 Are Essential for Proper Structure, Especially Disulfide Bond Formation, in the Human Vitamin K-Dependent γ-Glutamyl Carboxylase†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Hsiao, Kuang-Ling N.; Perera, Lalith; Stafford, Darrel W.; Straight, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We used recombinant techniques to create a two-chain form (residues 1–345 and residues 346–758) of the vitamin K-dependent γ-glutamyl carboxylase, a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum containing five transmembrane domains. The two-chain carboxylase had carboxylase and epoxidase activities similar to those of one-chain carboxylase. In addition, it had normal affinity for the propeptide of factor IX. We employed this molecule to investigate formation of the one disulfide bond in carboxylase, the transmembrane structure of carboxylase, and the potential interactions among the carboxylase’s transmembrane domains. Our results indicate that the two peptides of the two-chain carboxylase are joined by a disulfide bond. Proline 378 is important for the structure necessary for disulfide formation. Results with the P378L carboxylase indicate that noncovalent bonds maintain the two-chain structure even when the disulfide bond is disrupted. As we had previously proposed, the fifth transmembrane domain of carboxylase is the last and only transmembrane domain in the C-terminal peptide of the two-chain carboxylase. We show that the noncovalent association between the two chains of carboxylase involves an interaction between the fifth transmembrane domain and the second transmembrane domain. Results of a homology model of transmembrane domains 2 and 5 suggest that not only do these two domains associate but that transmembrane domain 2 may interact with another transmembrane domain. This latter interaction may be mediated at least in part by a motif of glycine residues in the second transmembrane domain. PMID:18498174

  9. Residual Symmetry and Explicit Soliton-Cnoidal Wave Interaction Solutions of the (2+1)-Dimensional KdV-mKdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wenguang; Li, Biao

    2016-04-01

    The truncated Painlevé method is developed to obtain the nonlocal residual symmetry and the Bäcklund transformation for the (2+1)-dimensional KdV-mKdV equation. The residual symmetry is localised after embedding the (2+1)-dimensional KdV-mKdV equation to an enlarged one. The symmetry group transformation of the enlarged system is computed. Furthermore, the (2+1)-dimensional KdV-mKdV equation is proved to be consistent Riccati expansion (CRE) solvable. The soliton-cnoidal wave interaction solution in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions and the third type of incomplete elliptic integral is obtained by using the consistent tanh expansion (CTE) method, which is a special form of CRE.

  10. The role of N-terminal and C-terminal Arg residues from BK on interaction with kinin B2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Filippelli-Silva, Rafael; Martin, Renan P; Rodrigues, Eliete S; Nakaie, Clovis R; Oliveira, Laerte; Pesquero, João B; Shimuta, Suma I

    2016-04-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a nonapeptide important for several physiological processes such as vasodilatation, increase in vascular permeability and release of inflammatory mediators. BK performs its actions by coupling to and activating the B2 receptor, a family A G-protein coupled receptor. Using a strategy which allows systematical monitoring of BK R1 and R9 residues and B2 receptor acidic residues Glu5.35(226) and Asp6.58(298), our study aims at clarifying the BK interaction profile with the B2 receptor [receptor residue numbers are normalized according to Ballesteros and Weinstein, Methods Neurosci. 25 (1995), pp. 366-428) followed by receptor sequence numbering in brackets]. N- and C-terminal analogs of BK (-A1, -G1, -K1, -E1 and BK-A9) were tested against wild type B2, Glu5.35(226)Ala and Asp6.58(298)Ala B2 mutant receptors for their affinity and capability to elicit responses by mechanical recordings of isolated mice stomach fundus, measuring intracellular calcium mobilization, and competitive fluorimetric binding assays. BK showed 2- and 15-fold decreased potency for Glu5.35(226) and Asp6.58(298) B2 mutant receptors, respectively. In B2-Glu5.35(226)Ala BK analogs showed milder reduction in evaluated parameters. On the other hand, in the B2-Asp6.58(298)Ala mutant, no N-terminal analog was able to elicit any response. However, the BK-A9 analog presented higher affinity parameters than BK in the latter mutant. These findings provide enough support for defining a novel interaction role of BK-R9 and Asp6.58(298) receptor residues.

  11. The C-terminal 50 amino acid residues of dengue NS3 protein are important for NS3-NS5 interaction and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Tay, Moon Y F; Saw, Wuan Geok; Zhao, Yongqian; Chan, Kitti W K; Singh, Daljit; Chong, Yuwen; Forwood, Jade K; Ooi, Eng Eong; Grüber, Gerhard; Lescar, Julien; Luo, Dahai; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2015-01-23

    Dengue virus multifunctional proteins NS3 protease/helicase and NS5 methyltransferase/RNA-dependent RNA polymerase form part of the viral replication complex and are involved in viral RNA genome synthesis, methylation of the 5'-cap of viral genome, and polyprotein processing among other activities. Previous studies have shown that NS5 residue Lys-330 is required for interaction between NS3 and NS5. Here, we show by competitive NS3-NS5 interaction ELISA that the NS3 peptide spanning residues 566-585 disrupts NS3-NS5 interaction but not the null-peptide bearing the N570A mutation. Small angle x-ray scattering study on NS3(172-618) helicase and covalently linked NS3(172-618)-NS5(320-341) reveals a rigid and compact formation of the latter, indicating that peptide NS5(320-341) engages in specific and discrete interaction with NS3. Significantly, NS3:Asn-570 to alanine mutation introduced into an infectious DENV2 cDNA clone did not yield detectable virus by plaque assay even though intracellular double-stranded RNA was detected by immunofluorescence. Detection of increased negative-strand RNA synthesis by real time RT-PCR for the NS3:N570A mutant suggests that NS3-NS5 interaction plays an important role in the balanced synthesis of positive- and negative-strand RNA for robust viral replication. Dengue virus infection has become a global concern, and the lack of safe vaccines or antiviral treatments urgently needs to be addressed. NS3 and NS5 are highly conserved among the four serotypes, and the protein sequence around the pinpointed amino acids from the NS3 and NS5 regions are also conserved. The identification of the functionally essential interaction between the two proteins by biochemical and reverse genetics methods paves the way for rational drug design efforts to inhibit viral RNA synthesis.

  12. Quantum oscillation signatures of spin-orbit interactions controlling the residual nodal bilayer-splitting in underdoped high-Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Neil; Shekhter, Arkady

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the origin of the small residual nodal bilayer-splitting in the underdoped high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x using the results of recently published angle-resolved quantum oscillation data [Sebastian et al., Nature 511, 61 (2014)]. A crucial clue to the origin of the residual bilayer-splitting is found to be provided by the anomalously small Zeeman-splitting of some of the observed cyclotron orbits. We show that such an anomalously Zeeman-splitting (or small effective g-factor) for a subset of orbits can be explained by spin-orbit interactions, which become significant in the nodal regions as a result of the vanishing bilayer coupling. The primary effect of spin-orbit interactions is to cause quasiparticles traversing the nodal region of the Brillouin zone to undergo a spin flip. We suggest that the Rashba-like spin-orbit interactions, naturally present in bilayer systems, have the right symmetry and magnitude to give rise to a network of coupled orbits consistent with experimental observations in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x. This work is supported by the DOEm BES proposal LANLF100, while the magnet lab is supported by the NSF and Florida State.

  13. Two-body and three-body contacts for identical Bosons near unitarity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2014-03-21

    In a recent experiment with ultracold trapped Rb85 atoms, Makotyn et al. studied a quantum-degenerate Bose gas in the unitary limit where its scattering length is infinitely large. We show that the observed momentum distributions are compatible with a universal relation that expresses the high-momentum tail in terms of the two-body contact C2 and the three-body contact C3. We determine the contact densities for the unitary Bose gas with number density n to be C2 ≈ 20 n(4/3) and C3 ≈ 2n(5/3). We also show that the observed atom loss rate is compatible with that from 3-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C3, but the loss rate is not compatible with that from 2-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C2. We point out that the contacts C2 and C3 could be measured independently by using the virial theorem near and at unitarity, respectively.

  14. Two-body and three-body contacts for identical Bosons near unitarity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2014-03-21

    In a recent experiment with ultracold trapped Rb85 atoms, Makotyn et al. studied a quantum-degenerate Bose gas in the unitary limit where its scattering length is infinitely large. We show that the observed momentum distributions are compatible with a universal relation that expresses the high-momentum tail in terms of the two-body contact C2 and the three-body contact C3. We determine the contact densities for the unitary Bose gas with number density n to be C2 ≈ 20 n(4/3) and C3 ≈ 2n(5/3). We also show that the observed atom loss rate is compatible with that from 3-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C3, but the loss rate is not compatible with that from 2-atom inelastic collisions, which gives a contribution proportional to C2. We point out that the contacts C2 and C3 could be measured independently by using the virial theorem near and at unitarity, respectively. PMID:24702333

  15. Direct CP violation in two-body hadronic charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chiang, Cheng-Wei

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of CP violation in the charm sector by LHCb, we study direct CP asymmetries in the standard model (SM) for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons using the topological-diagram approach. In this approach, the magnitude and the phase of topological weak annihilation amplitudes, which arise mainly from final-state rescattering, can be extracted from the data. Consequently, direct CP asymmetry adir(tree) at tree level can be reliably estimated. In general, it lies in the range 10-4

  16. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein–protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MSn. Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  17. Analysis of two-body nonleptonic B decays involving light mesons in the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Greub, C.

    1998-03-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of the exclusive nonleptonic decays of the B+/- and B0 mesons into two light mesons, some of which have been measured recently by the CLEO Collaboration. Our analysis is carried out in the context of an effective Hamiltonian based on the standard model (SM), using next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. We explicitly take into account the O(αs) penguin-loop diagrams of all four-Fermi operators and the O(αs) tree-level diagram of the chromomagnetic dipole operator, and give a prescription for including their effects in nonleptonic two-body decays. Using a factorization ansatz for the hadronic matrix elements, we show that existing data, in particular, the branching ratios B(B+/--->η'K+/-), B(B+/--->π+/-K0), B(B0(B0¯)-->π-/+K+/-), and B(B+/--->ωh+/-)(h+/-=π+/-,K+/-), can be accounted for in this approach. Thus, theoretical scenarios with a substantially enhanced Wilson coefficient of the chromomagnetic dipole operator (as compared to the SM) and/or those with a substantial color-singlet cc¯ component in the wave function of η' are not required by these data. We predict, among other decay rates, the branching ratios for the decays B0(B0¯)-->π+/-π-/+ and B+/--->π0π+/-, which are close to the present experimental limits. Implications of some of these measurements for the parameters of the CKM matrix are presented.

  18. Nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, G.; Munoz, J. H.; Vera, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    We present a systematic study of exclusive charmless nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state. We calculate branching ratios of B{yields}PA, VA, and AA decays, where A, V, and P denote an axial vector, a vector, and a pseudoscalar meson, respectively. We assume a naive factorization hypothesis and use the improved version of the nonrelativistic Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise quark model for form factors in B{yields}A transitions. We include contributions that arise from the effective {delta}B=1 weak Hamiltonian H{sub eff}. The respective factorized amplitudes of these decays are explicitly shown and their penguin contributions are classified. We find that decays B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup +}K{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup 0}, B{sup -}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup -}, B{sup -}{yields}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1400){eta}{sup (')}, B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}(K{sup -}) have branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -5}. We also study the dependence of branching ratios for B{yields}K{sub 1}P(V,A) decays [K{sub 1}=K{sub 1}(1270), K{sub 1}(1400)] with respect to the mixing angle between K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B}.

  19. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  20. Structure determination of human Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule and identification of the critical residues linking the interdomain interaction to the anti-apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoming; Qu, Linglong; Ma, Shuaipeng; Wu, Yujie; Jin, Changwen; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2014-07-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) is a highly conserved anti-apoptotic protein which plays important roles in cells. There are two isoforms of FAIM, of which the short isoform FAIM-S is broadly expressed in all tissues, whereas the long isoform FAIM-L is exclusively expressed in the nervous system. No structure of human FAIM has been reported to date and the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptotic function of FAIM remain unknown. Here, the crystal structure of the human FAIM-S N-terminal domain (NTD) and the NMR solution structure of the human FAIM-S C-terminal domain (CTD) were determined. The structures revealed that the NTD and CTD adopt a similar protein fold containing eight antiparallel β-strands which form two sheets. Both structural and biochemical analyses implied that the NTD exists as a dimer and the CTD as a monomer and that they can interact with each other. Several critical residues were identified to be involved in this interaction. Moreover, mutations of these critical residues also interfered in the anti-apoptotic activity of FAIM-S. Thus, the structural and functional data presented here will provide insight into the anti-apoptotic mechanism of FAIM-S.

  1. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3',5'difluorophenyl)-alanine.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1-5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3',5'-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  2. β- transitions of 16 7N9 → 16 8O8 with optimized SDI residual interaction using pnTDA and TDA approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Firoozi, B.

    2015-11-01

    Within a developed particle-hole approach, a systematic study of the β- transition from the ground state of the 16N nucleus to the ground and some exited states of the 16O nucleus has been carried out. The energy spectrum and the wave functions of pure configuration of the 16N and 16O nuclei are numerically obtained using the mean-field shell model with respect to the Woods-Saxon nuclear potential accompanying spin-orbit and Coulomb interaction. Considering SDI residual interaction, mixed configuration of ground and excited pnTDA and TDA states are extracted for the aforementioned nucleus. These energy spectra and corresponding eigenstates are highly correspondent to the experimental energy spectrum and eigenstates after adjusting the residual potential parameters using the Nelder-Mead (NM) algorithm. In this approach, the endpoint energy, log ft and the partial half-lives of some possible transitions are calculated. The obtained results using the optimized SDI approach are reasonably close to the available experimental data.

  3. Modified Kepler's law, escape speed, and two-body problem in modified Newtonian dynamics-like theories

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Hongsheng; Li Baojiu; Bienayme, Olivier

    2010-11-15

    We derive a simple analytical expression for the two-body force in a subclass of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theories and make testable predictions in the modification to the two-body orbital period, shape, precession rate, escape speed, etc. We demonstrate the applications of the modified Kepler's law in the timing of satellite orbits around the Milky Way, and checking the feasibility of MOND in the orbit of the large Magellanic cloud, the M31 galaxy, and the merging bullet clusters. MOND appears to be consistent with satellite orbits although with a tight margin. Our results on two-bodies are also generalized to restricted three-body, many-body problems, rings, and shells.

  4. Modified Kepler's law, escape speed, and two-body problem in modified Newtonian dynamics-like theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Li, Baojiu; Bienaymé, Olivier

    2010-11-01

    We derive a simple analytical expression for the two-body force in a subclass of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theories and make testable predictions in the modification to the two-body orbital period, shape, precession rate, escape speed, etc. We demonstrate the applications of the modified Kepler’s law in the timing of satellite orbits around the Milky Way, and checking the feasibility of MOND in the orbit of the large Magellanic cloud, the M31 galaxy, and the merging bullet clusters. MOND appears to be consistent with satellite orbits although with a tight margin. Our results on two-bodies are also generalized to restricted three-body, many-body problems, rings, and shells.

  5. Adsorption of charged protein residues on an inorganic nanosheet: Computer simulation of LDH interaction with ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexey A.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional and hybrid nanomaterials based on layered double hydroxides (LDH), cationic clays, layered oxyhydroxides and hydroxides of metals possess large specific surface area and strong electrostatic properties with permanent or pH-dependent electric charge. Such nanomaterials may impact cellular electrostatics, changing the ion balance, pH and membrane potential. Selective ion adsorption/exchange may alter the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, disrupting potential-dependent cellular processes. Cellular proteins as a rule have charged residues which can be effectively adsorbed on the surface of layered hydroxide based nanomaterials. The aim of this study is to attempt to shed some light on the possibility and mechanisms of protein "adhesion" an LDH nanosheet and to propose a new direction in anticancer medicine, based on physical impact and strong electrostatics. An unbiased molecular dynamics simulation was performed and the combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE) approach was used.

  6. Pro178 and Pro183 of Selenoprotein S Are Essential Residues for Interaction with p97(VCP) during Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jea Hwang; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Jeon, Yeong Ha; Ko, Kwan Young; Lee, Seung-Rock; Kim, Ick Young

    2014-01-01

    During endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, p97(VCP) is recruited to the ER membrane through interactions with transmembrane proteins, such as selenoprotein S (SelS), selenoprotein K (SelK), hrd1, and gp78. SelS has a single-spanning transmembrane domain and protects cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis through interaction with p97(VCP). The cytosolic tail of SelS consists of a coiled-coil domain, a putative VCP-interacting motif (VIM), and an unpronounced glycine- and proline-rich secondary structure. To understand the regulatory mechanism of SelS during ER stress, we investigated the interaction of the protein with p97(VCP) using mouse neuroblastoma cells and human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The SelS expression level increased when ER stress was induced. In addition, the effect of ER stress was enhanced, and recruitment of p97(VCP) to the ER membrane was inhibited in SelS knockdown cells. The effect of SelS knockdown was rescued by ectopic expression of SelS U188C. p97(VCP) interacted with SelS U188C and was recruited to the ER membrane. The expression of SelS[ΔVIM], which is a VIM deletion mutant of SelS, also showed both a recovery effect and an interaction with p97(VCP) in cells. However, mutants in which the proline residue positions 178 or 183 of SelS were changed to alanine or were deleted did not interact with p97(VCP). The proline mutants did not rescue ER stress in SelS knockdown cells. These results suggest that both Pro178 and Pro183 of SelS play important roles in the translocation of p97(VCP) to the ER membrane and protect cells from ER stress. PMID:24700463

  7. Chiral two-body currents in nuclei: Gamow-Teller transitions and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, J; Gazit, D; Schwenk, A

    2011-08-01

    We show that chiral effective field theory (EFT) two-body currents provide important contributions to the quenching of low-momentum-transfer Gamow-Teller transitions, and use chiral EFT to predict the momentum-transfer dependence that is probed in neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. We then calculate for the first time the 0νββ decay operator based on chiral EFT currents and study the nuclear matrix elements at successive orders. The contributions from chiral two-body currents are significant and should be included in all calculations. PMID:21902315

  8. Proton-hydrogen reaction in an effectively two-body model

    SciTech Connect

    Pupyshev, V. V.

    2013-02-15

    A model of total interaction between a proton incident to a hydrogen atom and the proton that is the nucleus of this atom is proposed. This interaction is assumed to be the sum of the short-range nuclear Reid potential and the long-range Thomas-Fermi potential induced by the Coulomb interaction of the electron with the nucleus of the hydrogen atom. The explicit low-energy asymptotic behavior of the cross section for the proton-hydrogen reaction leading to deuteron production is found. It is shown that this cross section increases in inverse proportion to the collision energy for the proton and hydrogen atom in its zero limit.

  9. Sperm surface hyaluronan binding protein (HABP1) interacts with zona pellucida of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) through its clustered mannose residues.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ilora; Datta, Kasturi

    2003-02-01

    Sperm-oocyte interaction during fertilization is multiphasic, with multicomponent events, taking place between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and sperm surface receptor. d-mannosylated glycoproteins, the major constituents of ZP are considered to serve as ligands for sperm binding. The presence of hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1) on sperm surface of different mammals including cattle and its possible involvement in sperm function is already reported. Recently, we have demonstrated the specificity of clustered mannose as another ligand for HABP1 (Kumar et al., 2001: J Biosci 26:325-332). Here, we report that only N-linked mannosylated zona-glycoproteins bind to sperm surface HABP1. Labeled HABP1 interacts with ZP of intact oocyte of Bubalus bubalis, which can be competed with unlabeled HABP1 or excess d-mannosylated albumin (DMA). This data suggests the specific interaction of HABP1 with ZP, through clustered mannose residues. In order to examine the physiological significance of such an interaction, the capacity of sperm binding to oocytes under in vitro fertilization plates was examined either in presence of DMA alone or in combination with HABP1. The number of sperms, bound to oocytes was observed to reduce significantly in presence of DMA, which could be reversed by the addition of purified recombinant HABP1 (rHABP1) in the same plate. This suggests that sperm surface HABP1 may act as mannose binding sites for zona recognition.

  10. The tyrosine 343 residue of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is important for its interaction with SHP1, a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase with tumor suppressor functions.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Samar A; Wang, Peng; Anand, Mona; Ingham, Robert J; Gelebart, Pascal; Lai, Raymond

    2010-06-25

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 has been shown to inhibit the oncogenic fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and loss of SHP1 contributes to NPM-ALK-mediated tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to further understand how SHP1 interacts and regulates NPM-ALK. We employed an in vitro model in which GP293 cells were transfected with various combinations of NPM-ALK (or mutants) and SHP1 (or mutants) expression vectors. We found that SHP1 co-immunoprecipitated with NPM-ALK, but not the enzymatically inactive NPM-ALK(K210R) mutant, or the mutant in which all three functionally important tyrosine residues (namely, Tyr(338), Tyr(342), and Tyr(343)) in the kinase activation loop (KAL) of ALK were mutated. Interestingly, whereas mutation of Tyr(338) or Tyr(342) did not result in any substantial change in the NPM-ALK/SHP1 binding (assessed by co-immunoprecipitation), mutation of Tyr(343) abrogated this interaction. Furthermore, the NPM-ALK/SHP1 binding was readily detectable when each of the remaining 8 tyrosine residues known to be phosphorylated were mutated. Although the expression of SHP1 effectively reduced the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, it did not affect that of the NPM-ALK(Y343F) mutant. In soft agar clonogenic assay, SHP1 expression significantly reduced the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK but not that of NPM-ALK(Y343F). In conclusion, we identified Tyr(343) of NPM-ALK as the crucial site for mediating the NPM-ALK/SHP1 interaction. Our results also support the notion that the tumor suppressor effects of SHP1 on NPM-ALK are dependent on its ability to bind to this oncogenic protein.

  11. Maize root lectins mediate the interaction with Herbaspirillum seropedicae via N-acetyl glucosamine residues of lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; Tuleski, Thalita Regina; de Baura, Valter Antonio; Yates, Marshall Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda Satie; Pedrosa, Fabio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele

    2013-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is a plant growth-promoting diazotrophic betaproteobacterium which associates with important crops, such as maize, wheat, rice and sugar-cane. We have previously reported that intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is required for H. seropedicae attachment and endophytic colonization of maize roots. In this study, we present evidence that the LPS biosynthesis gene waaL (codes for the O-antigen ligase) is induced during rhizosphere colonization by H. seropedicae. Furthermore a waaL mutant strain lacking the O-antigen portion of the LPS is severely impaired in colonization. Since N-acetyl glucosamine inhibits H. seropedicae attachment to maize roots, lectin-like proteins from maize roots (MRLs) were isolated and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis showed that MRL-1 and MRL-2 correspond to maize proteins with a jacalin-like lectin domain, while MRL-3 contains a B-chain lectin domain. These proteins showed agglutination activity against wild type H. seropedicae, but failed to agglutinate the waaL mutant strain. The agglutination reaction was severely diminished in the presence of N-acetyl glucosamine. Moreover addition of the MRL proteins as competitors in H. seropedicae attachment assays decreased 80-fold the adhesion of the wild type to maize roots. The results suggest that N-acetyl glucosamine residues of the LPS O-antigen bind to maize root lectins, an essential step for efficient bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:24130823

  12. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L.

    2003-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al

  13. Mutation of a single residue, β-glutamate-20, alters protein–lipid interactions of light harvesting complex II

    PubMed Central

    Kwa, Lee Gyan; Wegmann, Dominik; Brügger, Britta; Wieland, Felix T; Wanner, Gerhard; Braun, Paula

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that assembly of the peripheral antenna complex, LH2, is required for proper photosynthetic membrane biogenesis in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The underlying interactions are, as yet, not understood. Here we examined the relationship between the morphology of the photosynthetic membrane and the lipid–protein interactions at the LH2–lipid interface. The non-bilayer lipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, is shown to be highly enriched in the boundary lipid phase of LH2. Sequence alignments indicate a putative lipid binding site, which includes β-glutamate-20 and the adjacent carotenoid end group. Replacement of β-glutamate-20 with alanine results in significant reduction of phosphatidylethanolamine and concomitant raise in phosphatidylcholine in the boundary lipid phase of LH2 without altering the lipid composition of the bulk phase. The morphology of the LH2 housing membrane is, however, unaffected by the amino acid replacement. In contrast, simultaneous modification of glutamate-20 and exchange of the carotenoid sphaeroidenone with neurosporene results in significant enlargement of the vesicular membrane invaginations. These findings suggest that the LH2 complex, specifically β-glutamate-20 and the carotenoids' polar head group, contribute to the shaping of the photosynthetic membrane by specific interactions with surrounding lipid molecules. PMID:18034796

  14. Activation and repression of transcription at two different phage phi29 promoters are mediated by interaction of the same residues of regulatory protein p4 with RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, M; Mencia, M; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1996-01-01

    Phage phi29 regulatory protein p4 activates transcription from the late A3 promoter and represses the main early promoters, named A2b and A2c. Activation involves stabilization of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at the A3 promoter as a closed complex and is mediated by interaction between RNAP and a small domain of protein p4 in which residue Arg120 plays an essential role. We show that protein p4 represses the A2c promoter by binding to DNA immediately upstream from RNAP in a way that does not hinder RNAP binding; rather, the two proteins bind cooperatively to DNA. In the presence of protein p4, RNAP can form an initiated complex at the A2c promoter that generates short abortive transcripts, but cannot leave the promoter. Mutation of protein p4 residue Arg120, which relieves the contact between the two proteins, leads to a loss of repression. Therefore, the contact between protein p4 and RNAP through the protein p4 domain containing Arg120 can activate or repress transcription, depending on the promoter. The relative position of protein p4 and RNAP, which is different at each promoter, together with the distinct characteristics of the two promoters, may determine whether protein p4 activates or represses transcription. Images PMID:8617213

  15. Quantum few-body problem with internal structure. I. Two-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperin, Yu.A.; Makarov, K.A.; Merkur'ev, S.P.; Motovilov, A.K.; Pavlov, B.S.

    1988-12-01

    The methods of the theory of extensions to an auxiliary Hilbert space are used to construct in the two-particle sector a scattering theory for particles possessing internal structure. The analytic properties of the amplitudes of resonance scattering and Green's functions corresponding to a class of singular energy-dependent interactions are investigated.

  16. Identification of a surface glutamine residue (Q64) of Escherichia coli EntA required for interaction with EntE.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sofia; Jaworski, Ian; Pawelek, Peter D

    2014-10-24

    The enterobactin biosynthetic enzyme EntA forms a complex with EntE, the next enzyme in the pathway, to enhance activation of the enterobactin precursor 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate. Here we used phage display to identify an EntE-interacting region on the surface of EntA. Upon panning immobilized EntE with a random peptide phage library, we recovered 47 unique EntE-binding dodecamer peptide sequences that aligned to a region of the EntA primary sequence corresponding to helix α4. In order to further investigate this region, we mutagenized EntA Q64, a hydrogen-bonding residue found on the surface-exposed face α4. Far-UV circular dichroism, thermal denaturation experiments, and enzymatic assays showed that mutation of EntA residue Gln 64 to alanine (Q64A) had no deleterious effect on EntA structure or function. By following near-UV CD spectral changes, we found that the spectrum of wild-type EntA was altered in the presence of EntE, indicative of conformational changes in EntA aromatic chromophores upon formation of the EntA-EntE complex. However, EntE did not affect the CD spectrum of EntA variant Q64A, demonstrating that this variant did not interact with EntE in a manner similar to wild-type EntA. Analytical ultracentrifugation of wild-type and variant EntA proteins showed that EntA Q64A was predominantly dimeric at 20μM, unlike wild-type EntA which was predominantly tetrameric. Taken together, our findings establish that EntA α4 is required for efficient formation of the EntA-EntE as well as for EntA oligomerization.

  17. INTERACTIONS OF DIFFERENT INHIBITORS WITH ACTIVE-SITE ASPARTYL RESIDUES OF HIV-1 PROTEASE AND POSSIBLE RELEVANCE TO PEPSINS

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the active site region aspartyl residues 25 and 29 of the mature HIV-1 protease (PR) for the binding of five clinical and three experimental protease inhibitors (symmetric cyclic urea inhibitor DMP323, non-hydrolysable substrate analog (RPB) and the generic aspartic protease inhibitor acetyl-pepstatin (Ac-PEP)) was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry. ΔTm values, defined as the difference in Tm for a given protein in the presence and absence of inhibitor, for PR with DRV, ATV, SQV, RTV, APV, DMP323, RPB and Ac-PEP are 22.4, 20.8, 19.3, 15.6, 14.3, 14.7, 8.7, and 6.5 °C, respectively. Binding of APV and Ac-PEP is most sensitive to the D25N mutation, as shown by ΔTm ratios [ΔTm(PR)/ΔTm(PRD25N)] of 35.8 and 16.3, respectively, whereas binding of DMP323 and RPB (ΔTm ratios of 1-2) is least affected. Binding of the substrate-like inhibitors RPB and Ac-PEP is nearly abolished (ΔTm(PR)/ΔTm(PRD29N) ≥ 44) by the D29N mutation, whereas this mutation only moderately affects binding of the smaller inhibitors (ΔTm ratios of 1.4-2.2). Of the 9 FDA approved clinical HIV-1 protease inhibitors screened, APV, RTV and DRV competitively inhibit porcine pepsin with Ki values of 0.3, 0.6 and 2.14 μM, respectively. DSC results were consistent with this relatively weak binding of APV (ΔTm 2.7 °C) compared with the tight binding of AcPEP (ΔTm ≥17 °C). Comparison of superimposed structures of the PR/APV complex with those of PR/Ac-PEP and pepsin/pepstatin A complexes suggests a role for Asp215, Asp32 and Ser219 in pepsin, equivalent to Asp25, Asp25′ and Asp29 in PR, in the binding and stabilization of the pepsin/APV complex. PMID:18951411

  18. Interaction of biochar and organic residues from sugarcane industry in soil chemical attributes and greenhouse gases emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernanda Abbruzzini, Thalita; Feola Conz, Rafaela; Pellegrino Cerri, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Researchers have highlighted the importance of providing soil quality in agricultural systems, besides mitigating greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions to the atmosphere and increasing soil carbon sequestration. Therefore, several studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of biochar as a soil conditioner, both in relation to increased C sequestration and improvements in soil chemical, physical and biological attributes, resulting in better conditions for plant growth. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of applying biochar produced from sugarcane straw to soils in relation to changes in soil chemical attributes and mitigation of greenhouse gases emissions into the atmosphere. To do so, we conducted a laboratory incubation under controlled environmental conditions (ie temperature and humidity) with and without the application of filter cake and vinasse (ie organic residues from sugarcane industry) and rates of biochar application (0, 10, 20 and 50 Mg ha-1). The fluxes of CO2, N2O and CH4 of each incubation unity were measured periodically (in days 1, 2, 5, 9, 13, 16, 20, 24, 28, 30, 47, 60, 91, 105, 123, 130, 138 and 150). Each treatment consisted of eight replicates with destructive samples evaluated at 30, 60, 90 and 150 days after incubation to characterize the chemical attributes of the incubated soil, besides GHG (CO2, N2O and CH4) emissions. In general, there was an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes over time due to the application of filter cake and vinasse and increasing dose of biochar. Regarding nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, there was an increase of 82.35% with the application of vinasse and filter cake compared to the control treatment. However, different doses of biochar (10, 20 and 50 Mg ha-1) reduced N2O emissions by 29, 38.7 and 70.9%, respectively. The methane (CH4) flux was negligible in all treatments. We observed improvements in soil chemical attributes, such as higher pH, a substantial increase in the soil CEC, reduced exchangeable

  19. Induced two-body scattering resonances from a square-well potential with oscillating depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson Smith, D.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of ultracold atoms, pairwise interactions can be resonantly enhanced by a new mechanism which does not rely upon a magnetic Feshbach resonance. In this mechanism, interactions are controlled by tuning the frequency of an oscillating parallel component of the magnetic field close to the Bohr frequency for the transition to a two-atom bound state. The real part of the s-wave scattering length a has a resonance as a function of the oscillation frequency near the Bohr frequency. The resonance parameters can be controlled by varying the amplitude of the oscillating field. The amplitude also controls the imaginary part of a which arises predominantly because the oscillating field converts atom pairs into molecules. For the case of a shallow bound state in the scattering channel, the dimensionless resonance parameters are universal functions of the dimensionless oscillation amplitude.

  20. Pump-Probe Spectroscopy of Two-Body Correlations in Ultracold Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2009-12-31

    We suggest pump-probe spectroscopy to study pair correlations that determine the many-body dynamics in weakly interacting, dilute ultracold gases. A suitably chosen, short laser pulse depletes the pair density locally, creating a 'hole' in the electronic ground state. The dynamics of this nonstationary pair density is monitored by a time-delayed probe pulse. The resulting transient signal allows us to spectrally decompose the hole and to map out the pair correlation function.

  1. Two-body pion absorption on {sup 3}He at threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Kiang, L.L.; Riska, D.O.

    1995-08-01

    We showed that a drastic reduction of the ratio of the rates of the reactions {sup 3}He({pi}{sup -},nn) and {sup 3}He({pi}{sup -},np) for stopped pions is obtained once the effect of the short-range two-nucleon components of the axial charge operator for nuclear systems is taken into account. In a calculation using realistic models of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the construction of these short-range components of the axial charge operator, the predicted ratios can be brought to within 10-20% of the empirical value. A paper describing our results was published.

  2. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in kidney and honey samples by hydrophilic interaction chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Companyó, Ramon; Centrich, Francesc

    2012-10-01

    Two methods based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were developed for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, spectinomycin, apramycin, paromomycin, kanamycin A, gentamycin C1, gentamycin C2/C2a, gentamycin C1a, and neomycin B) in kidney samples from food-producing animals and in honey samples. The methods involved extraction with an aqueous solution (for the kidney samples) or sample dissolution in water (for the honey samples), solid-phase extraction with a weak cation exchange cartridge and injection of the eluate into a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. A zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography column was used for separation of aminoglycosides and a triple quadrupole mass analyzer was used for detection. The methods were validated according to Decision 2002/657/EC. The limits of quantitation ranged from 2 to 125 μg/kg in honey and 25 to 264 μg/kg in the kidney samples. Interday precision (RSD%) ranged from 6 to 26% in honey and 2 to 21% in kidney. Trueness, expressed as the percentage of error, ranged from 7 to 20% in honey and 1 to 11% in kidney.

  3. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in kidney and honey samples by hydrophilic interaction chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Companyó, Ramon; Centrich, Francesc

    2012-10-01

    Two methods based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were developed for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, spectinomycin, apramycin, paromomycin, kanamycin A, gentamycin C1, gentamycin C2/C2a, gentamycin C1a, and neomycin B) in kidney samples from food-producing animals and in honey samples. The methods involved extraction with an aqueous solution (for the kidney samples) or sample dissolution in water (for the honey samples), solid-phase extraction with a weak cation exchange cartridge and injection of the eluate into a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. A zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography column was used for separation of aminoglycosides and a triple quadrupole mass analyzer was used for detection. The methods were validated according to Decision 2002/657/EC. The limits of quantitation ranged from 2 to 125 μg/kg in honey and 25 to 264 μg/kg in the kidney samples. Interday precision (RSD%) ranged from 6 to 26% in honey and 2 to 21% in kidney. Trueness, expressed as the percentage of error, ranged from 7 to 20% in honey and 1 to 11% in kidney. PMID:23065931

  4. The One-Body and Two-Body Density Matrices of Finite Nuclei and Center-of-Mass Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Mavrommatis, E.

    2006-04-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of the one-body (1DM) and two-body (2DM) density matrices and their Fourier transforms in momentum space, that is consistent with the requirement for translational invariance (TI), in the case of a nucleus (a finite self-bound system). We restore TI by using the so-called fixed center-of-mass (CM) approximation for constructing an intrinsic nuclear ground state wavefunction (WF) by starting from a non-translationally invariant (nTI) WF and applying a projection prescription. We discuss results for the one-body (OBMD) and two-body (TBMD) momentum distributions of the 4He nucleus calculated with the Slater determinant of the harmonic oscillator (HO) orbitals, as the initial nTI WF. Effects of such an inclusion of CM correlations are found to be quite important in the momentum distributions.

  5. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA allow identification of residues that mediate the interaction of ZapA with FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Maria Luiza C; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Chin, Yanni K-Y; Mobli, Mehdi; Handler, Aaron; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy Y; Robson, Scott A; King, Glenn F; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial division begins with the formation of a contractile protein ring at midcell, which constricts the bacterial envelope to generate two daughter cells. The central component of the division ring is FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein capable of self-assembling into filaments which further associate into a higher order structure known as the Z ring. Proteins that bind to FtsZ play a crucial role in the formation and regulation of the Z ring. One such protein is ZapA, a widely conserved 21 kDa homodimeric protein that associates with FtsZ filaments and promotes their bundling. Although ZapA was discovered more than a decade ago, the structural details of its interaction with FtsZ remain unknown. In this work, backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA homodimer are described. We titrated FtsZ into (15)N(2)H-ZapA and mapped ZapA residues whose resonances are perturbed upon FtsZ binding. This information provides a structural understanding of the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA.

  6. The Effect of Cholesterol on the Long-Range Network of Interactions Established among Sea Anemone Sticholysin II Residues at the Water-Membrane Interface

    PubMed Central

    García-Linares, Sara; Alm, Ida; Maula, Terhi; Gavilanes, José G.; Slotte, Johan Peter; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Actinoporins are α-pore forming proteins with therapeutic potential, produced by sea anemones. Sticholysin II (StnII) from Stichodactyla helianthus is one of its most extensively characterized members. These proteins remain stably folded in water, but upon interaction with lipid bilayers, they oligomerize to form a pore. This event is triggered by the presence of sphingomyelin (SM), but cholesterol (Chol) facilitates pore formation. Membrane attachment and pore formation require changes involving long-distance rearrangements of residues located at the protein-membrane interface. The influence of Chol on membrane recognition, oligomerization, and/or pore formation is now studied using StnII variants, which are characterized in terms of their ability to interact with model membranes in the presence or absence of Chol. The results obtained frame Chol not only as an important partner for SM for functional membrane recognition but also as a molecule which significantly reduces the structural requirements for the mentioned conformational rearrangements to occur. However, given that the DOPC:SM:Chol vesicles employed display phase coexistence and have domain boundaries, the observed effects could be also due to the presence of these different phases on the membrane. In addition, it is also shown that the Arg51 guanidinium group is strictly required for membrane recognition, independently of the presence of Chol. PMID:25815890

  7. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA allow identification of residues that mediate the interaction of ZapA with FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Maria Luiza C; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Chin, Yanni K-Y; Mobli, Mehdi; Handler, Aaron; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy Y; Robson, Scott A; King, Glenn F; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial division begins with the formation of a contractile protein ring at midcell, which constricts the bacterial envelope to generate two daughter cells. The central component of the division ring is FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein capable of self-assembling into filaments which further associate into a higher order structure known as the Z ring. Proteins that bind to FtsZ play a crucial role in the formation and regulation of the Z ring. One such protein is ZapA, a widely conserved 21 kDa homodimeric protein that associates with FtsZ filaments and promotes their bundling. Although ZapA was discovered more than a decade ago, the structural details of its interaction with FtsZ remain unknown. In this work, backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA homodimer are described. We titrated FtsZ into (15)N(2)H-ZapA and mapped ZapA residues whose resonances are perturbed upon FtsZ binding. This information provides a structural understanding of the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA. PMID:25967379

  8. A note on velocity-related series expansions in the two-body problem. [for Keplerian orbit calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.

    1974-01-01

    The present note describes a few important series expansions in the two-body problem. They are related to the magnitude v of the velocity vector and are important for the treatment of atmospheric drag by the method of general perturbations. These series have been obtained with computerized Poisson series manipulations. The results are given to order seven in the eccentricity, for both the mean anomaly and the true anomaly.

  9. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    Abrasive wear is among the most common and costliest causes for material wastage, and it occurs in many forms. A simple method has been developed to quantify the response of metals and alloys to two-body wet abrasion. A metallographic polishing machine was modified to create a disk-on-flat sliding test rig. Adhesive-backed SiC grinding papers were used under fixed load and speed to rank the abrasive wear of seven alloy steels, some of which are candidates for drill cones for geothermal drilling. Standardized two-body abrasion tests, like those described in ASTM G132, feed unused abrasive into the contact; however, the current work investigated whether useful rankings could still be obtained with a simpler testing configuration in which specimens repeatedly slide on the same wear path under water-lubricated conditions. Tests using abrasive grit sizes of 120 and 180 resulted in the same relative ranking of the alloys although the coarser grit produced more total wear. Wear decreased when the same abrasive disk was re-used for up to five runs, but the relative rankings of the steels remained the same. This procedure was presented to ASTM Committee G2 on Wear and Erosion as a potential standard test for wet two-body abrasive wear.

  10. Electrodynamic two-body problem for prescribed initial data on a straight line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert, D.-A.; Hinrichs, G.

    2016-05-01

    Electrodynamic interaction between point charges can be described by a system of ODEs involving advanced and retarded delays - the so-called Fokker-Schwarzschild-Tetrode (FST) equations. In special situations, approximate equations can be derived which are purely retarded. Upon omission of the terms describing radiation friction, these are called Synge equations. In both cases, few mathematical results are available on existence and uniqueness of solutions. We investigate the situation of two like point-charges in 3 + 1 space-time dimensions restricted to motion on a straight line. We give a priori estimates on the asymptotic motion and, using a Leray-Schauder argument, prove: 1) Existence of solutions to the FST equations on the future or past half-line given finite trajectory segments; 2) Global existence of the Synge equations for Cauchy data; 3) Global existence of a FST toy model. Furthermore, we give a sufficient criterion that uniquely distinguishes solutions by means of finite trajectory segments.

  11. Proton scattering by a hydrogen atom in an effectively two-body model

    SciTech Connect

    Pupyshev, V. V.

    2013-02-15

    It is assumed that the total potential of proton interaction with a hydrogen atom is the sum of the short-range nuclear soft-core Reid potential and the long-range Thomas-Fermi potential. A quantum mechanical analysis of low-energy features of the phase shift and cross section for elastic proton scattering on a hydrogen atom is given for the case of zero total angular momentum. The calculations performed in the present study within a nonlinear version of the variable-phase approach ultimately revealed that, because of a long-range character of the asymptotic behavior of the Thomas-Fermi potential, the respective cross section at low energies oscillates but has a finite number of zeros.

  12. Deformed ODD-ODD nuclei: Matrix elements for the residual n-p interaction and patterns of alternating perturbations in level spacings

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Jain, A.K.; Kvasil, J.; Sood, P.C.; Sheline, R.K.; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL )

    1989-09-01

    The application of a simple semi-empirical model is discussed in terms of interpreting experimental nuclear structure data for twelve of the best characterized odd-odd deformed nuclei. An essential part of this modeling is to calculate values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings and Newby shifts, the observables that arise from the n-p residual interaction in odd-odd nuclei. Assumptions regarding the form for this n-p force are traced historically. The predictive power of a favored form of the n-p force, one that includes a central force with short and long-range components, a tensor force, and some effects of core polarization, is examined in light of experimental data obtained since its formulation. A data set of 42 experimentally determined Newby shifts has been reviewed as to the reliability of each entry. Exceptions to a recently proposed rule for the a priori determination of the sign of Newby shift are discussed. Evidence is presented for the existence of an odd-even staggering or signature effect in the rotational spacings of many K{sup {minus}} bands (with K > 0). By use of Coriolis-coupling calculations, it has been possible to reproduce the staggering observed in some of the K{sup {minus}} rotational bands of {sup 156}Tb, {sup 168}Tm, {sup 176}Lu, {sup 182}Ta, and {sup 182}Re. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca(2+) concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca(2+) sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca(2+), profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active-resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca(2+) binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open-closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open-closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  14. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  15. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca(2+) concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca(2+) sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca(2+), profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active-resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca(2+) binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open-closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open-closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations.

  16. Finite-element analysis to determine effect of monolimb flexibility on structural strength and interaction between residual limb and prosthetic socket.

    PubMed

    Lee, Winson C C; Zhang, Ming; Boone, David A; Contoyannis, Bill

    2004-01-01

    Monolimb refers to a kind of transtibial prostheses having the socket and shank molded into one piece of thermoplastic material. One of its characteristics is that the shank is made of a material that can deform during walking, which can simulate ankle joint motion to some extent. Changes in shank geometry can alter the stress distribution within the monolimb and at the residual limb-socket interface and, respectively, affect the deformability and structural integrity of the prosthesis and comfort perceived by amputees. This paper describes the development of a finite-element model for the study of the structural behavior of monolimbs with different shank designs and the interaction between the limb and socket during walking. The von Mises stress distributions in monolimbs with different shank designs at different walking phases are reported. With the use of distortion energy theory, possible failure was predicted. The effect of the stiffness of the monolimb shanks on the stress distribution at the limb-socket interface was studied. The results show a trend--the peak stress applied to the limb was lowered as the shank stiffness decreased. This information is useful for future monolimb optimization.

  17. Elimination of secular terms from the differential equations for the elements of perturbed two-body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Victor R.; Fraietta, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    In 1961, Sperling linearized and regularized the differential equations of motion of the two-body problem by changing the independent variable from time to fictitious time by Sundman's transformation (r = dt/ds) and by embedding the two-body energy integral and the Laplace vector. In 1968, Burdet developed a perturbation theory which was uniformly valid for all types of orbits using a variation of parameters approach on the elements which appeared in Sperling's equations for the two-body solution. In 1973, Bond and Hanssen improved Burdet's set of differential equations by embedding the total energy (which is a constant when the potential function is explicitly dependent upon time.) The Jacobian constant was used as an element to replace the total energy in a reformulation of the differential equations of motion. In the process, another element which is proportional to a component of the angular momentum was introduced. Recently trajectories computed during numerical studies of atmospheric entry from circular orbits and low thrust beginning in near-circular orbits exhibited numerical instability when solved by the method of Bond and Gottlieb (1989) for long time intervals. It was found that this instability was due to secular terms which appear on the righthand sides of the differential equations of some of the elements. In this paper, this instability is removed by the introduction of another vector integral called the delta integral (which replaces the Laplace Vector) and another scalar integral which removes the secular terms. The introduction of these integrals requires a new derivation of the differential equations for most of the elements. For this rederivation, the Lagrange method of variation of parameters is used, making the development more concise. Numerical examples of this improvement are presented.

  18. Complete angular distribution measurements of two-body deuteron photodisintegration between 0.5 and 3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mirazita; F. Ronchetti; P. Rossi; E. De Sanctis; CLAS Collaboration

    2004-07-12

    Nearly complete angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section have been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer detector and the tagged photon beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data cover photon energies between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV and center-of-mass proton scattering angles 10{sup o}-160{sup o}. The data show a persistent forward-backward angle asymmetry over the explored energy range, and are well described by the nonperturbative quark gluon string model.

  19. Amino acid residues interacting with both the bound quinone and coenzyme, pyrroloquinoline quinone, in Escherichia coli membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Golam; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Migita, Catharina T; Elias, M D; Nakamura, Satsuki; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yamada, Mamoru

    2008-08-01

    The Escherichia coli membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH) as the primary component of the respiratory chain possesses a tightly bound ubiquinone (UQ) flanking pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a coenzyme. Several mutants for Asp-354, Asp-466, and Lys-493, located close to PQQ, that were constructed by site-specific mutagenesis were characterized by enzymatic, pulse radiolysis, and EPR analyses. These mutants retained almost no dehydrogenase activity or ability of PQQ reduction. CD and high pressure liquid chromatography analyses revealed that K493A, D466N, and D466E mutants showed no significant difference in molecular structure from that of the wild-type mGDH but showed remarkably reduced content of bound UQ. A radiolytically generated hydrated electron (e(aq)(-)) reacted with the bound UQ of the wild enzyme and K493R mutant to form a UQ neutral semiquinone with an absorption maximum at 420 nm. Subsequently, intramolecular electron transfer from the bound UQ semiquinone to PQQ occurred. In K493R, the rate of UQ to PQQ electron transfer is about 4-fold slower than that of the wild enzyme. With D354N and D466N mutants, on the other hand, transient species with an absorption maximum at 440 nm, a characteristic of the formation of a UQ anion radical, appeared in the reaction of e(aq)(-), although the subsequent intramolecular electron transfer was hardly affected. This indicates that D354N and D466N are prevented from protonation of the UQ semiquinone radical. Moreover, EPR spectra showed that mutations on Asp-466 or Lys-493 residues changed the semiquinone state of bound UQ. Taken together, we reported here for the first time the existence of a semiquinone radical of bound UQ in purified mGDH and the difference in protonation of ubisemiquinone radical because of mutations in two different amino acid residues, located around PQQ. Furthermore, based on the present results and the spatial arrangement around PQQ, Asp-466 and Lys-493 are suggested to interact both

  20. The gravitational two-body problem in the vicinity of the light ring: Insights from the black-hole-ring toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2013-10-01

    The physical properties of an axisymmetric black-hole-ring system are studied analytically within the framework of general relativity to second order in the dimensionless mass ratio μ≡m/M. In particular, we analyze the asymptotic behaviors of the binding energy and the total angular momentum of the two-body system in the vicinity of the light ring at R=3M, where the circular orbit becomes null. We find that both quantities diverge quadratically in μ(1 at the light ring. The reported divergent behavior of the physical quantities stems from the second-order spin-orbit interaction between the black hole and the orbiting object (the dragging of inertial frames by the orbiting ring). It is shown that this composed black-hole-ring toy model captures some of the essential features of the conservative dynamics of the (astrophysically more interesting) black-hole-particle system. In particular, we show that both systems share the same quadratic divergent behavior of the physical quantities near the light ring. Moreover, we prove that both systems are characterized by the same ratio E(R→3M)J/(R→3M)=13/√{3}, where E and J are the divergent second-order (self-interaction) expansion coefficients of the binding energies and the angular momenta of the systems, respectively.

  1. Some calculator programs for particle physics. [LEGENDRE, ASSOCIATED LEGENDRE, CONFIDENCE, TWO BODY, ELLIPSE, DALITZ RECTANGULAR, and DALITZ TRIANGULAR codes

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Seven calculator programs that do simple chores that arise in elementary particle physics are given. LEGENDRE evaluates the Legendre polynomial series ..sigma..a/sub n/P/sub n/(x) at a series of values of x. ASSOCIATED LEGENDRE evaluates the first-associated Legendre polynomial series ..sigma..b/sub n/P/sub n//sup 1/(x) at a series of values of x. CONFIDENCE calculates confidence levels for chi/sup 2/, Gaussian, or Poisson probability distributions. TWO BODY calculates the c.m. energy, the initial- and final-state c.m. momenta, and the extreme values of t and u for a 2-body reaction. ELLIPSE calculates coordinates of points for drawing an ellipse plot showing the kinematics of a 2-body reaction or decay. DALITZ RECTANGULAR calculates coordinates of points on the boundary of a rectangular Dalitz plot. DALITZ TRIANGULAR calculates coordinates of points on the boundary of a triangular Dalitz plot. There are short versions of CONFIDENCE (EVEN N and POISSON) that calculate confidence levels for the even-degree-of-freedom-chi/sup 2/ and the Poisson cases, and there is a short version of TWO BODY (CM) that calculates just the c.m. energy and initial-state momentum. The programs are written for the HP-97 calculator. (WHK)

  2. Symmetrical dimethylation of arginine residues in spliceosomal Sm protein B/B' and the Sm-like protein LSm4, and their interaction with the SMN protein.

    PubMed Central

    Brahms, H; Meheus, L; de Brabandere, V; Fischer, U; Lührmann, R

    2001-01-01

    Arginine residues in RG-rich proteins are frequently dimethylated posttranslationally by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). The most common methylation pattern is asymmetrical dimethylation, a modification important for protein shuttling and signal transduction. Symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) have until now been confined to the myelin basic protein MBP and the Sm proteins D1 and D3. We show here by mass spectrometry and protein sequencing that also the human Sm protein B/B' and, for the first time, one of the Sm-like proteins, LSm4, contain sDMA in vivo. The symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', LSm4, D1, and D3 decisively influences their binding to the Tudor domain of the "survival of motor neurons" protein (SMN): inhibition of dimethylation by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) abolished the binding of D1, D3, B/B', and LSm4 to this domain. A synthetic peptide containing nine sDMA-glycine dipeptides, but not asymmetrically modified or nonmodified peptides, specifically inhibited the interaction of D1, D3, B/B', LSm4, and UsnRNPs with SMN-Tudor. Recombinant D1 and a synthetic peptide could be methylated in vitro by both HeLa cytosolic S100 extract and nuclear extract; however, only the cytosolic extract produced symmetrical dimethylarginines. Thus, the Sm-modifying PRMT is cytoplasmic, and symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', D1, and D3 is a prerequisite for the SMN-dependent cytoplasmic core-UsnRNP assembly. Our demonstration of sDMAs in LSm4 suggests additional functions of sDMAs in tri-UsnRNP biogenesis and mRNA decay. Our findings also have interesting implications for the understanding of the aetiology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). PMID:11720283

  3. Symmetrical dimethylation of arginine residues in spliceosomal Sm protein B/B' and the Sm-like protein LSm4, and their interaction with the SMN protein.

    PubMed

    Brahms, H; Meheus, L; de Brabandere, V; Fischer, U; Lührmann, R

    2001-11-01

    Arginine residues in RG-rich proteins are frequently dimethylated posttranslationally by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). The most common methylation pattern is asymmetrical dimethylation, a modification important for protein shuttling and signal transduction. Symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) have until now been confined to the myelin basic protein MBP and the Sm proteins D1 and D3. We show here by mass spectrometry and protein sequencing that also the human Sm protein B/B' and, for the first time, one of the Sm-like proteins, LSm4, contain sDMA in vivo. The symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', LSm4, D1, and D3 decisively influences their binding to the Tudor domain of the "survival of motor neurons" protein (SMN): inhibition of dimethylation by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) abolished the binding of D1, D3, B/B', and LSm4 to this domain. A synthetic peptide containing nine sDMA-glycine dipeptides, but not asymmetrically modified or nonmodified peptides, specifically inhibited the interaction of D1, D3, B/B', LSm4, and UsnRNPs with SMN-Tudor. Recombinant D1 and a synthetic peptide could be methylated in vitro by both HeLa cytosolic S100 extract and nuclear extract; however, only the cytosolic extract produced symmetrical dimethylarginines. Thus, the Sm-modifying PRMT is cytoplasmic, and symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', D1, and D3 is a prerequisite for the SMN-dependent cytoplasmic core-UsnRNP assembly. Our demonstration of sDMAs in LSm4 suggests additional functions of sDMAs in tri-UsnRNP biogenesis and mRNA decay. Our findings also have interesting implications for the understanding of the aetiology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  4. Key amino acid residues involved in multi-point binding interactions between brazzein, a sweet protein, and the T1R2-T1R3 human sweet receptor.

    PubMed

    Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Maillet, Emeline L; Radek, James T; Quijada, Jeniffer; Markley, John L; Max, Marianna

    2010-05-14

    The sweet protein brazzein [recombinant protein with sequence identical with the native protein lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate (the numbering system used has Asp2 as the N-terminal residue)] activates the human sweet receptor, a heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptor composed of subunits Taste type 1 Receptor 2 (T1R2) and Taste type 1 Receptor 3 (T1R3). In order to elucidate the key amino acid(s) responsible for this interaction, we mutated residues in brazzein and each of the two subunits of the receptor. The effects of brazzein mutations were assayed by a human taste panel and by an in vitro assay involving receptor subunits expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney cells; the effects of the receptor mutations were assayed by in vitro assay. We mutated surface residues of brazzein at three putative interaction sites: site 1 (Loop43), site 2 (N- and C-termini and adjacent Glu36, Loop33), and site 3 (Loop9-19). Basic residues in site 1 and acidic residues in site 2 were essential for positive responses from each assay. Mutation of Y39A (site 1) greatly reduced positive responses. A bulky side chain at position 54 (site 2), rather than a side chain with hydrogen-bonding potential, was required for positive responses, as was the presence of the native disulfide bond in Loop9-19 (site 3). Results from mutagenesis and chimeras of the receptor indicated that brazzein interacts with both T1R2 and T1R3 and that the Venus flytrap module of T1R2 is important for brazzein agonism. With one exception, all mutations of receptor residues at putative interaction sites predicted by wedge models failed to yield the expected decrease in brazzein response. The exception, hT1R2 (human T1R2 subunit of the sweet receptor):R217A/hT1R3 (human T1R3 subunit of the sweet receptor), which contained a substitution in lobe 2 at the interface between the two subunits, exhibited a small selective decrease in brazzein activity. However, because the mutation was found to increase

  5. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies – Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques

    PubMed Central

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dodds, Trevor J.; Aspell, Jane E.; Herbelin, Bruno; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Mohler, Betty J.; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e., participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2) that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location – measured by anterior posterior drift – was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body. PMID:24385970

  6. HFOLD - A program package for calculating two-body MSSM Higgs decays at full one-loop level.

    PubMed

    Frisch, W; Eberl, H; Hluchá, H

    2011-10-01

    HFOLD (Higgs Full One Loop Decays) is a Fortran program package for calculating all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The package is done in the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention and supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. PROGRAM SUMMARY: Program title: HFOLD Catalogue identifier: AEJG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 340 621 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 760 051 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Workstation, PC Operating system: Linux RAM: 524 288 000 Bytes Classification: 11.1 External routines: LoopTools 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/looptools/), SLHALib 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/slha/). The LoopTools code is included in the distribution package. Nature of problem: A future high-energy e+e- linear collider will be the best environment for the precise measurements of masses, cross sections, branching ratios, etc. Experimental accuracies are expected at the per-cent down to the per-mile level. These must be matched from the theoretical side. Therefore higher order calculations are mandatory. Solution method: This program package calculates all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The renormalization is done in the DR scheme following the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention. The program supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. Running time: The example provided takes only a few seconds to run. PMID:21969735

  7. HFOLD - A program package for calculating two-body MSSM Higgs decays at full one-loop level.

    PubMed

    Frisch, W; Eberl, H; Hluchá, H

    2011-10-01

    HFOLD (Higgs Full One Loop Decays) is a Fortran program package for calculating all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The package is done in the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention and supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. PROGRAM SUMMARY: Program title: HFOLD Catalogue identifier: AEJG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 340 621 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 760 051 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Workstation, PC Operating system: Linux RAM: 524 288 000 Bytes Classification: 11.1 External routines: LoopTools 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/looptools/), SLHALib 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/slha/). The LoopTools code is included in the distribution package. Nature of problem: A future high-energy e+e- linear collider will be the best environment for the precise measurements of masses, cross sections, branching ratios, etc. Experimental accuracies are expected at the per-cent down to the per-mile level. These must be matched from the theoretical side. Therefore higher order calculations are mandatory. Solution method: This program package calculates all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The renormalization is done in the DR scheme following the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention. The program supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. Running time: The example provided takes only a few seconds to run.

  8. Folding of a beta-hairpin peptide derived from the N-terminus of ubiquitin. Conformational preferences of beta-turn residues dictate non-native beta-strand interactions.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, M; Griffiths-Jones, S R; Searle, M S

    2000-06-01

    The role of the non-native beta-turn sequence (NPDG) in nucleating the folding of a beta-hairpin peptide derived from the N-terminus of ubiquitin, has been examined by NMR and CD spectroscopy. The NPDG sequence, while representing a common two-residue type I turn sequence in proteins, folds to give a G1-bulged type I turn in the context of a beta-hairpin peptide, to the exclusion of other possible conformations. The turn conformation results in misalignment of the two beta strands and a beta hairpin with non-native side chain interactions. A truncated 12-residue analogue of the hairpin, in which the majority of residues in the N-terminal beta strand have been deleted, shows some weak propensity to fold into a G-bulged type I turn conformation in the absence of interstrand stabilizing interactions. The NPDG turn sequence pays some of the entropic cost in initiating folding allowing interstrand interactions, which in this case arise from the non-native pairing of residue side chains, to stabilize a significant population of the folded state. Examination of the relative abundance of the Pro-Asp type I turn, with G in the +B1 position, vs. the type I G-bulged turn PXG, in a database of high resolution structures, reveals 48 instances of PXG bulged turns for which X = Asp is by far the most common residue with 20 occurrences. Strikingly, there are no examples of a type I PD turn with G at the +B1 position, in good agreement with our experimental observations that the PDG G-bulged turn is populated preferentially in solution.

  9. Two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian for the time-symmetric two-body problem of the relativistic action-at-a-distance electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Buksman Hollander, Efrain; De Luca, Jayme

    2003-02-01

    We find a two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian for the time-symmetric problem of straight line motion of two electrons in direct relativistic interaction. This time-symmetric dynamical system appeared 100 years ago and it was popularized in the 1940s by the work of Wheeler and Feynman in electrodynamics, which was left incomplete due to the lack of a Hamiltonian description. The form of our Hamiltonian is such that the action of a Lorentz transformation is explicitly described by a canonical transformation (with rescaling of the evolution parameter). The method is closed and defines the Hamitonian in implicit form without power expansions. We outline the method with an emphasis on the physics of this complex conservative dynamical system. The Hamiltonian orbits are calculated numerically at low energies using a self-consistent steepest-descent method (a stable numerical method that chooses only the nonrunaway solution). The two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian suggests a simple prescription for the canonical quantization of the relativistic two-body problem. PMID:12636788

  10. Conformational changes of trialanine induced by direct interactions between alanine residues and alcohols in binary mixtures of water with glycerol and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Toal, Siobhan; Amidi, Omid; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2011-08-17

    linear correlation, which reflects enthalpy-entropy compensation and a common transition temperature. The latter can be considered an indication of a weak binding between cosolvent and peptide. A comparison of infrared and Raman spectra of trialanine in water and in water-alcohol mixtures indeed reveals a close proximity between aliphatic side chains of alanine residues and alcohol molecules even for 5% (v/v) alcohol-water mixtures. Hence, our results provide the first experimental evidence for direct interactions between, e.g., glycerol and peptides in aqueous solutions, in line with the result of recent calculations by Vagenende et al. (Biochemistry 2009, 48, 11084-11096) but at variance with preferential exclusion theories.

  11. Structure-activity relationship of mastoparan analogs: Effects of the number and positioning of Lys residues on secondary structure, interaction with membrane-mimetic systems and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Souza, Bibiana Monson de; Cabrera, Marcia Perez Dos Santos; Gomes, Paulo Cesar; Dias, Nathalia Baptista; Stabeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Leite, Natalia Bueno; Neto, João Ruggiero; Palma, Mario Sergio

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a series of mastoparan analogs were engineered based on the strategies of Ala and Lys scanning in relation to the sequences of classical mastoparans. Ten analog mastoparans, presenting from zero to six Lys residues in their sequences were synthesized and assayed for some typical biological activities for this group of peptide: mast cell degranulation, hemolysis, and antibiosis. In relation to mast cell degranulation, the apparent structural requirement to optimize this activity was the existence of one or two Lys residues at positions 8 and/or 9. In relation to hemolysis, one structural feature that strongly correlated with the potency of this activity was the number of amino acid residues from the C-terminus of each peptide continuously embedded into the zwitterionic membrane of erythrocytes-mimicking liposomes, probably due to the contribution of this structural feature to the membrane perturbation. The antibiotic activity of mastoparan analogs was directly dependent on the apparent extension of their hydrophilic surface, i.e., their molecules must have from four to six Lys residues between positions 4 and 11 of the peptide chain to achieve activities comparable to or higher than the reference antibiotic compounds. The optimization of the antibacterial activity of the mastoparans must consider Lys residues at the positions 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, and 11 of the tetradecapeptide chain, with the other positions occupied by hydrophobic residues, and with the C-terminal residue in the amidated form. These requirements resulted in highly active AMPs with greatly reduced (or no) hemolytic and mast cell degranulating activities.

  12. Key amino acid residues involved in multi-point binding interactions between brazzein, a sweet protein, and the T1R2-T1R3 human sweet receptor

    PubMed Central

    Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Maillet, Emeline L.; Radek, James T.; Quijada, Jeniffer; Markley, John L.; Max, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    The sweet protein brazzein activates the human sweet receptor, a heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) composed of subunits T1R2 and T1R3. In order to elucidate the key amino acid(s) responsible for this interaction, we mutated residues in brazzein and each of the two subunits of the receptor. The effects of brazzein mutations were assayed by a human taste panel and by an in vitro assay involving receptor subunits expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney cells; the effects of the receptor mutations were assayed by the in vitro assay. We mutated surface residues of brazzein at three putative interaction sites: Site 1 (Loop43), Site 2 (N- and C-terminus and adjacent Glu36, Loop33), and Site 3 (Loop9–19). Basic residues in Site 1 and acidic residues in Site 2 were essential for positive responses from each assay. Mutation of Y39A (Site 1) greatly reduced positive responses. A bulky side chain at position 54 (Site 2), rather than a side chain with hydrogen bonding potential, was required for positive responses as was the presence of the native disulfide bond in Loop 9–19 (Site 3). Results from mutagenesis and chimeras of the receptor indicated that brazzein interacts with both T1R2 and T1R3 and that the Venus fly trap module of T1R2 is important for brazzein agonism. With one exception, all mutations of receptor residues at putative interaction sites predicted by wedge models failed to yield the expected decrease in the brazzein response. The exception, hT1R2:R217A-hT1R3, which contained a substitution in lobe 2 at the interface between the two subunits, exhibited a small selective decrease in brazzein activity. However, because the mutation was found to increase the positive cooperativity of binding by multiple ligands proposed to bind both T1R subunits (brazzein, monellin, and sucralose) but not those that bind to a single subunit (neotame and cyclamate), we suggest that this site in involved in subunit-subunit interaction rather than direct

  13. Classical density functional theory and the phase-field crystal method using a rational function to describe the two-body direct correlation function.

    PubMed

    Pisutha-Arnond, N; Chan, V W L; Iyer, M; Gavini, V; Thornton, K

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to represent a two-body direct correlation function (DCF) in order to alleviate the computational demand of classical density functional theory (CDFT) and enhance the predictive capability of the phase-field crystal (PFC) method. The approach utilizes a rational function fit (RFF) to approximate the two-body DCF in Fourier space. We use the RFF to show that short-wavelength contributions of the two-body DCF play an important role in determining the thermodynamic properties of materials. We further show that using the RFF to empirically parametrize the two-body DCF allows us to obtain the thermodynamic properties of solids and liquids that agree with the results of CDFT simulations with the full two-body DCF without incurring significant computational costs. In addition, the RFF can also be used to improve the representation of the two-body DCF in the PFC method. Last, the RFF allows for a real-space reformulation of the CDFT and PFC method, which enables descriptions of nonperiodic systems and the use of nonuniform and adaptive grids. PMID:23410466

  14. Crystal Structure of the Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase PER-2 and Insights into the Role of Specific Residues in the Interaction with β-Lactams and β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Melina; Kerff, Frédéric; Herman, Raphaël; Sapunaric, Frédéric; Galleni, Moreno; Gutkind, Gabriel; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric

    2014-01-01

    PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum β-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most β-lactams. In this study, we determined the X-ray structure of PER-2 at 2.20 Å and evaluated the possible role of several residues in the structure and activity toward β-lactams and mechanism-based inhibitors. PER-2 is defined by the presence of a singular trans bond between residues 166 to 167, which generates an inverted Ω loop, an expanded fold of this domain that results in a wide active site cavity that allows for efficient hydrolysis of antibiotics like the oxyimino-cephalosporins, and a series of exclusive interactions between residues not frequently involved in the stabilization of the active site in other class A β-lactamases. PER β-lactamases might be included within a cluster of evolutionarily related enzymes harboring the conserved residues Asp136 and Asn179. Other signature residues that define these enzymes seem to be Gln69, Arg220, Thr237, and probably Arg/Lys240A (“A” indicates an insertion according to Ambler's scheme for residue numbering in PER β-lactamases), with structurally important roles in the stabilization of the active site and proper orientation of catalytic water molecules, among others. We propose, supported by simulated models of PER-2 in combination with different β-lactams, the presence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the proper activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Therefore, we expect that mutations occurring in these positions will have impacts on the overall hydrolytic behavior. PMID:25070104

  15. Analysis of two-body charmed B meson decays in factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si-Hong; Wei, Yan-Bing; Qin, Qin; Li, Ying; Yu, Fu-Sheng; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2015-11-01

    Within the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach, we study the two-body charmed B meson decays Bu ,d ,s→D(*)M , with M denoting a light pseudoscalar (or vector) meson. The meson decay constants and transition form factors are factorized out from the hadronic matrix element of topological diagrams. Therefore, the effect of SU(3) symmetry breaking is retained, which is different from the conventional topological diagram approach. The number of free nonperturbative parameters to be fitted from experimental data is also much less. Only four universal nonperturbative parameters χC, ϕC, χE and ϕE are introduced to describe the contribution of the color-suppressed tree and W -exchanged diagrams for all the decay channels. With the fitted parameters from 31 decay modes induced by b →c transition, we then predict the branching fractions of 120 decay modes induced by both b →c and b →u transitions. Our results are well consistent with the measured data or to be tested in the LHCb and Belle-II experiments in the future. Besides, the SU(3) symmetry breaking, isospin violation and C P asymmetry are also investigated.

  16. Alternative choice of the Bondi radial coordinate and news function for the axisymmetric two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, S.

    2006-06-01

    In the Bondi formulation of the axisymmetric vacuum Einstein equations, we argue that the “surface area” coordinate condition determining the “radial” coordinate can be considered as part of the initial data and should be chosen in a way that gives information about the physical problem whose solution is sought. For the two-body problem, we choose this coordinate by imposing a condition that allows it to be interpreted, near infinity, as the (inverse of the) Newtonian potential. In this way, two quantities that specify the problem—the separation of the two particles and their mass ratio—enter the equations from the very beginning. The asymptotic solution (near infinity) is obtained and a natural identification of the Bondi “news function” in terms of the source parameters is suggested, leading to an expression for the radiated energy that differs from the standard quadrupole formula but agrees with recent nonlinear calculations. When the free function of time describing the separation of the two particles is chosen so as to make the new expression agree with the classical result, closed-form analytic expressions are obtained, the resulting metric approaching the Schwarzschild solution with time. As all physical quantities are defined with respect to the flat metric at infinity, the physical interpretation of this solution depends strongly on how these definitions are extended to the near-zone and, in particular, how the “time” function in the near-zone is related to Bondi’s null coordinate.

  17. Two-Body Orbit Expansion Due to Time-Dependent Relative Acceleration Rate of the Cosmological Scale Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    By phenomenologically assuming a slow temporal variation of the percent acceleration rate S̈S -1 of the cosmic scale factor S(t), it is shown that the orbit of a local binary undergoes a secular expansion. To first order in the power expansion of S̈S -1 around the present epoch t0, a non-vanishing shift per orbit (Δr) of the two-body relative distance r occurs for eccentric trajectories. A general relativistic expression, which turns out to be cubic in the Hubble parameter H0 at the present epoch, is explicitly calculated for it in the case of matter-dominated epochs with Dark Energy. For a highly eccentric Oort comet orbit with period Pb ≈ 31 Myr, the general relativistic distance shift per orbit turns out to be of the order of (Δr) ≈ 70 km. For the Large Magellanic Cloud, assumed on a bound elliptic orbit around the Milky Way, the shift per orbit is of the order of (Δr) ≈ 2-4 pc. Our result has a general validity since it holds in any cosmological model admitting the Hubble law and a slowly varying S̈S-1(t). More generally, it is valid for an arbitrary Hooke-like extra-acceleration whose "elastic" parameter κ is slowly time-dependent, irrespectively of the physical mechanism which may lead to it. The coefficient κ1 of the first-order term of the power expansion of κ(t) can be preliminarily constrained in a model-independent way down to a κ1 ≤ 2 x 10-13 year-3 level from latest Solar System's planetary observations. The radial velocities of the double lined spectroscopic binary ALPHA Cen AB yield κ1 ≤ 10-8 year-3.

  18. Charmless two-body B{sub (s)}{yields}VP decays in soft collinear effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Wang Yuming; Yang Deshan; Lue Caidian

    2008-08-01

    We provide the analysis of charmless two-body B{yields}VP decays under the framework of the soft collinear effective theory (SCET), where V(P) denotes a light vector (pseudoscalar) meson. Besides the leading power contributions, some power corrections (chiraly enhanced penguins) are also taken into account. Using the current available B{yields}PP and B{yields}VP experimental data on branching fractions and CP asymmetry variables, we find two kinds of solutions in {chi}{sup 2} fit for the 16 nonperturbative inputs which are essential in the 87 B{yields}PP and B{yields}VP decay channels. Chiraly enhanced penguins can change several charming penguins sizably, since they share the same topology. However, most of the other nonperturbative inputs and predictions on branching ratios and CP asymmetries are not changed too much. With the two sets of inputs, we predict the branching fractions and CP asymmetries of other modes especially B{sub s}{yields}VP decays. The agreements and differences with results in QCD factorization and perturbative QCD approach are analyzed. We also study the time-dependent CP asymmetries in channels with CP eigenstates in the final states and some other channels such as B{sup 0}/B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {+-}} and B{sub s}{sup 0}/B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup {+-}}K*{sup {+-}}. In the perturbative QCD approach, the (S-P)(S+P) penguins in annihilation diagrams play an important role. Although they have the same topology with charming penguins in SCET, there are many differences between the two objects in weak phases, magnitudes, strong phases, and factorization properties.

  19. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  20. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    the two-body abrasion.

  1. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    two-body abrasion.

  2. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  3. Specificity of the deoxyhypusine hydroxylase-eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF5A) interaction: identification of amino acid residues of the enzyme required for binding of its substrate, deoxyhypusine-containing eIF5A.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kee Ryeon; Kim, Yeon Sook; Wolff, Edith C; Park, Myung Hee

    2007-03-16

    Deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) is a novel metalloenzyme that catalyzes the final step of the post-translational synthesis of hypusine (Nepsilon-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine) in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). Hypusine synthesis is unique in that it occurs in only one protein, denoting the strict specificity of the modification enzymes toward the substrate protein. The specificity of the interaction between eIF5A and DOHH was investigated using human eIF5A (eIF5A-1 isoform) and human recombinant DOHH. DOHH displayed a strong preference for binding the deoxyhypusine-containing form of eIF5A, over the eIF5A precursor or the hypusine-containing eIF5A, indicating a role for the deoxyhypusine residue in binding. In addition to the deoxyhypusine residue, a large portion of the eIF5A polypeptide (>20-90 amino acids) is required for effective modification by DOHH. We have identified the amino acid residues of DOHH that are critical for substrate binding by alanine substitution of 36 conserved amino acid residues. Of these, alanine substitution at Glu57, Glu90, Glu208, Glu241, Gly63, or Gly214 caused a severe impairment in eIF5A(Dhp) binding, with a complete loss of binding and activity in the E57A and E208A mutant enzymes. Only aspartate substitution mutants, E57D or E208D, retained partial activity and substrate binding, whereas alanine, glutamine, or asparagine mutants did not. These findings support a proposed model of DOHH-eIF5A binding in which the amino group(s) of the deoxyhypusine side chain of the substrate is primarily anchored by gamma-carboxyl groups of Glu57 and Glu208 at the DOHH active site. PMID:17213197

  4. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B.

    2005-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers

  5. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P.; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, CT; Surjit, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66th,67th isoleucine and 101st,102nd leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV. PMID:27113483

  6. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Surjit, Milan

    2016-04-26

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66(th),67(th) isoleucine and 101(st),102(nd) leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV.

  7. Functional Characterization of the re-Face Loop Spanning Residues 536 to 541 and its Interactions with the Cofactor in the Flavin Mononucleotide-Binding Domain of the Flavocytochrome P450 from Bacillus megaterium†

    PubMed Central

    Kasim, Mumtaz; Chen, Huai-Chun; Swenson, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Flavocytochrome P450BM-3, a bacterial monooxygenase, contains a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding domain bearing a strong structural homology to the bacterial flavodoxin. The FMN serves as the one-electron donor to the heme iron but, in contrast to the electron transfer mechanism of mammalian cytochrome P450 reductase, the FMN semiquinone state is not thermodynamically stable and appears transiently as the anionic rather than the neutral form. A unique loop region comprised of residues -536Y-N-G-H-P-P541-, which forms a Type I′ reverse turn, provides several interactions with the FMN isoalloxazine ring, was targeted in this study. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies support the presence of a strong hydrogen bond between the backbone amide of Asn537 and FMN N5, the anionic ionization state of the hydroquinone, and for a change in the hybridization state of the N5 upon reduction. Replacement of Tyr536, which flanks the flavin ring, by the basic residues histidine or arginine did not significantly influence the redox properties of the FMN or the accumulation of the anionic semiquinone. The central residues of the Type I′ turn (-Asn-Gly-) were replaced with various combinations of glycine and alanine as a means to alter the turn and its interactions. Gly538 was found to be crucial in maintaining the type I′ turn conformation of the loop and the strong H-bonding interaction at N5. The functional role of the tandem –Pro-Pro- sequence which anchors and possible “rigidifies” the loop was investigated through alanine replacements. Despite changes in stabilities of the oxidized and hydroquinone redox states of the FMN, none of the replacements studied significantly altered the two-electron midpoint potentials. Pro541 does contribute to some degree to the strength of the N5 interaction, the formation of the anionic semiquinone. Unlike the flavodoxin, it would appear that the conformation of the FMN rather than the loop changes in response to reduction in this

  8. Structural evolution and membrane interaction of the 40-residue β amyloid peptides: differences in the initial proximity between peptides and the membrane bilayer studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Akinlolu, Rumonat D; Nam, Mimi; Shu, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between the β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and cellular membranes have severe consequences such as neuronal cell disruption and therefore may play important roles in Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the structural basis behind such interactions, however, is hindered by the complexity of the Aβ-membrane systems. In particular, because the Aβ peptides are partially incorporated in the membrane bilayer after enzymatic cleavage, there are multiple possibilities in terms of the initial proximity between the peptides and membranes. Structural studies using in vitro model systems with either externally added or preincorporated Aβ in membrane bilayers resulted in distinct evolution pathways. Previous work has shown that the externally added Aβ formed long and mature filaments, while preincorporated Aβ generated short and curvy fibrils. In this study, we perform detailed characterizations on the structural evolution and membrane interaction for these two pathways, using a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and other techniques. For the externally added Aβ, we determined the residue-specific structural evolution during the fibrillation process. While the entire fibrillation process for the externally added Aβ was slow, the preincorporated Aβ generated Aβ-lipid complexes rapidly. Specific interactions between the lipids and peptides were observed, suggesting the colocalization of lipids and peptides within the complex. Formation of such a complex induced molecular-level changes in the lipid bilayer, which may serve as a possible mechanism of membrane disruption. PMID:25397729

  9. Thermodynamics of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model Based on the Exact Two-Body S-Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeClair, André

    2012-04-01

    A new analytic treatment of the 2D Hubbard model at finite temperature and chemical potential is presented. A next-nearest-neighbor hopping term of strength t' is included. This analysis is based upon a formulation of the statistical mechanics of particles in terms of the S-matrix. We show that for U/ t large enough, a region of attractive interactions exists near the Fermi surface due to multi-loop quantum corrections. For t' = - 0.3, these attractive interactions exist for U/ t > 6.4. Our analysis suggests that superconductivity may not exist for t' = 0. Based on the existence of solutions of the integral equation for the pseudo-energy, we provide evidence for a phase transition and estimate T c / t ≈ 0.02 for U/ t = 7.5 and t' / t = - 0.3 at hole doping 0.15.

  10. Modeling Latent Interactions at Level 2 in Multilevel Structural Equation Models: An Evaluation of Mean-Centered and Residual-Centered Unconstrained Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.; Zuo, Youzhen

    2011-01-01

    Among the many methods currently available for estimating latent variable interactions, the unconstrained approach is attractive to applied researchers because of its relatively easy implementation with any structural equation modeling (SEM) software. Using a Monte Carlo simulation study, we extended and evaluated the unconstrained approach to…

  11. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B.

    2004-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation

  12. A search for flavor changing neutral currents and lepton family number violation in neutral two-body charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pripstein, D.A. |

    1997-06-01

    This work presents a search for three rare/forbidden neutral charm decays, D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e, D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu}, and D{sup 0} {yields} ee. This study was based on data collected in Experiment E789 at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using 800 GeV/c proton-gold interactions. Two statistical analyses are presented, one with background subtraction and the other without background subtraction. No evidence is found for any of the decays and the following upper limits are presented at the 90% confidence level.

  13. In vivo analysis in Drosophila reveals differential requirements of contact residues in Axin for interactions with GSK3β or β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Susan A.; Erdeniz, Naz; Peterson-Nedry, Wynne; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Wehrli, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    Proper regulation of the Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway is essential for normal development. The scaffolding protein Axin plays a key role in this process through interactions with Drosophila Shaggy and Armadillo. In the current studies, we used a yeast two-hybrid assay to identify ten amino acids in Axin that are critical for in vitro interaction with Shaggy and two for interaction with Armadillo. We then generated five Axin variants in which individual putative contact amino acids were mutated and compared their activity, as assayed by rescue of axin null mutant flies, to that of Axin lacking the entire Shaggy (AxinΔSgg) or Armadillo (AxinΔArm) binding domain. Although we expected these mutants to function identically to Axin in which the entire binding domain was deleted, we instead observed a spectrum of phenotypic rescue. Specifically, two point mutants within the Shaggy binding domain showed loss of activity similar to that of AxinΔSgg and dominantly interfered with complex function, whereas a third mutant allele, AxinK446E retained most function. Two Axin point mutants within the Armadillo binding domain were weak alleles, and retained most function. These findings demonstrate the importance of in vivo verification of the role of specific amino acids within a protein. PMID:19850033

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations and modelling of the residue interaction networks in the BRAF kinase complexes with small molecule inhibitors: probing the allosteric effects of ligand-induced kinase dimerization and paradoxical activation.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, G M

    2016-10-20

    Protein kinases are central to proper functioning of cellular networks and are an integral part of many signal transduction pathways. The family of protein kinases represents by far the largest and most important class of therapeutic targets in oncology. Dimerization-induced activation has emerged as a common mechanism of allosteric regulation in BRAF kinases, which play an important role in growth factor signalling and human diseases. Recent studies have revealed that most of the BRAF inhibitors can induce dimerization and paradoxically stimulate enzyme transactivation by conferring an active conformation in the second monomer of the kinase dimer. The emerging connections between inhibitor binding and BRAF kinase domain dimerization have suggested a molecular basis of the activation mechanism in which BRAF inhibitors may allosterically modulate the stability of the dimerization interface and affect the organization of residue interaction networks in BRAF kinase dimers. In this work, we integrated structural bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics and binding free energy simulations with the protein structure network analysis of the BRAF crystal structures to determine dynamic signatures of BRAF conformations in complexes with different types of inhibitors and probe the mechanisms of the inhibitor-induced dimerization and paradoxical activation. The results of this study highlight previously unexplored relationships between types of BRAF inhibitors, inhibitor-induced changes in the residue interaction networks and allosteric modulation of the kinase activity. This study suggests a mechanism by which BRAF inhibitors could promote or interfere with the paradoxical activation of BRAF kinases, which may be useful in informing discovery efforts to minimize the unanticipated adverse biological consequences of these therapeutic agents.

  15. (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) from the Clostridium difficile binary toxin catalytic component (CDTa, residues 1-221).

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-10-01

    Once considered a relatively harmless bacterium, Clostridium difficile has become a major concern for healthcare facilities, now the most commonly reported hospital-acquired pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI) is usually contracted when the normal gut microbiome is compromised by antibiotic therapy, allowing the opportunistic pathogen to grow and produce its toxins. The severity of infection ranges from watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis, or death. The past decade has seen a marked increase in the frequency and severity of CDI among industrialized nations owing directly to the emergence of a highly virulent C. difficile strain, NAP1. Along with the large Clostridial toxins expressed by non-epidemic strains, C. difficile NAP1 produces a binary toxin, C. difficile transferase (CDT). As the name suggests, CDT is a two-component toxin comprised of an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) component (CDTa) and a cell-binding/translocation component (CDTb) that function to destabilize the host cytoskeleton by covalent modification of actin monomers. Central to the mechanism of binary toxin-induced pathogenicity is the formation of CDTa/CDTb complexes at the cell surface. From the perspective of CDTa, this interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain (residues 1-215) and is spatially and functionally independent of ART activity, which is located in the C-terminal domain (residues 216-420). Here we report the (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of a 221 amino acid, ~26 kDa N-terminal CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) construct by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These NMR assignments represent the first component coordination domain for a family of Clostridium or Bacillus species harboring ART activity. Our assignments lay the foundation for detailed solution state characterization of structure-function relationships, toxin complex formation, and NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  16. Exploring Beta-Amyloid Protein Transmembrane Insertion Behavior and Residue-Specific Lipid Interactions in Lipid Bilayers Using Multiscale MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) interactions with neurons are linked to Alzheimer's. Using a multiscale MD simulation strategy that combines the high efficiency of phase space sampling of coarse-grained MD (CGD) and the high spatial resolution of Atomistic MD (AMD) simulations, we studied the Abeta insertion dynamics in cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid bilayers that mimic the neuronal membranes domains. Forward (AMD-CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) mappings were used. At the atomistic level, cholesterol promoted insertion of Abeta with high (folded) or low (unfolded) helical contents of the lipid insertion domain (Lys28-Ala42), and the insertions were stabilized by the Lys28 snorkeling and Ala42-anchoring to the polar lipid groups of the bilayer up to 200ns. After the forward mapping, the folded inserted state switched to a new extended inserted state with the Lys28 descended to the middle of the bilayer while the unfolded inserted state migrated to the membrane surface up to 4000ns. The two new states remained stable for 200ns at the atomistic scale after the reverse mapping. Our results suggested that different Abeta membrane-orientation states separated by free energy barriers can be explored by the multiscale MD more effectively than by Atomistic MD simulations alone. NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  17. The Effect of N-acetylation and N-methylation of Lysine Residue of Tat Peptide on its Interaction with HIV-1 TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Maiti, Souvik

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play a very important role in determining their binding to cognate RNAs and therefore regulate the downstream effects. Lysine can undergo various PTMs and thereby contribute to the regulation of different cellular processes. It can be reversibly acetylated and methylated using a pool of respective enzymes, to act as a switch for controlling the binding efficiency of RBPs. Here we have delineated the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of N-acetylation and N-monomethylation of lysine on interaction between HIV-1 TAR RNA and its cognate binder Tat peptide ( a model system). Our results indicate that acetylation of lysine 50 (K50), leads to eight- fold reduction in binding affinity, originating exclusively from entropy changes whereas, lysine 51 (K51) acetylation resulted only in three fold decrease with large enthalpy-entropy compensation. The measurement of kinetic parameters indicated major change (4.5 fold) in dissociation rate in case of K50 acetylation however, K51 acetylation showed similar effect on both association and dissociation rates. In contrast, lysine methylation did not affect the binding affinity of Tat peptide to TAR RNA at K50, nonetheless three fold enhancement in binding affinity was observed at K51 position. In spite of large enthalpy-entropy compensation, lysine methylation seems to have more pronounced position specific effect on the kinetic parameters. In case of K50 methylation, simultaneous increase was observed in the rate of association and dissociation leaving binding affinity unaffected. The increased binding affinity for methylated Tat at K51 stems from faster association rate with slightly slower dissociation rate. PMID:24147034

  18. Two-body Decays of the {ital b} Quark: Applications to Direct {ital CP} Violation, Searches for Electroweak Penguins, and New Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, D.; Soni, A.

    1998-10-01

    A systematic experimental search for two-body hadronic decays of the b quark of the type b{r_arrow}quark+meson is proposed. These reactions have a well-defined experimental signature and they should be theoretically cleaner compared to exclusive decays. Many modes have appreciable branching ratios, and partial rate asymmetries may also be quite large (about 8{percent} {endash}50{percent} ) in several of them. In a few cases electroweak penguins appear to be dominant and may be measurable. CP -violating triple correlation asymmetries provide a clean test of the standard model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Solvable light-front model of the electromagnetic form factor of the relativistic two-body bound state in 1+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mankiewicz, L. ); Sawicki, M. )

    1989-11-15

    Within a relativistically correct yet analytically solvable model of light-front quantum mechanics we construct the electromagnetic form factor of the two-body bound state and we study the validity of the static approximation to the full form factor. Upon comparison of full form factors calculated for different values of binding energy we observe an unexpected effect that for very strongly bound states further increase in binding leads to an increase in the size of the bound system. A similar effect is found for another quantum-mechanical model of relativistic dynamics.

  20. Theoretical analysis of the astrophysical S-factor for the capture reaction α + d → {sup 6}Li + γ in the two-body model

    SciTech Connect

    Tursunov, E. M. Turakulov, S. A.; Descouvemont, P.

    2015-03-15

    Theoretical estimates for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li were obtained on the basis of the two-body model involving an α−d potential that has a simple Gaussian form and which describes correctly S-, P-, and D-wave phase shifts, the binding energy, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the S-wave bound state. The wave functions for the bound and continuum channels were calculated with the aid of the highly precise Numerov algorithm. The results for the contributions of the E1 and E2 transition components reveal a good convergence as the upper limit in the effective integrals increases up to 40 fm. The results obtained for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li in the temperature range of 10{sup 6}K ≤ T ≤ 10{sup 10} K agree well with the results of the calculations performed by A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and his coauthors [Phys. Rev. C 83, 055805 (2011)] by using the known asymptotic form of the wave function at low energies and a complicated two-body potential at higher energies.

  1. A Scheme to Treat Properly Close Encountersin Perturbed Three-Dimensional Two-Body Problemusing Levi-Civita Transformation in Osculating Orbital Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2006-06-01

    We present a scheme to treat properly close encounters in a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations. It is a combination of Sundman's time transformation and Levi-Civita's spatial coordinate transformation applied to the two-dimensional components of the position and velocity vectors in the osculating orbital plane. We adopt a coordinate triad specifying the plane as a function of the orbital angular momentum vector only. Since the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum is explicitly computed from the in-the-plane components of the position and velocity vectors, only two components of the orbital angular momentum vector are to be determined. In addition to these, we select the total energy of the two-body system and the physical time as additional components of the new variables. The equations of motion of the new variables have no singularity even when the mutual distance is extremely small, and therefore, the new variables are suitable to deal with close encounters. As a result, the number of dependent variables in the new scheme becomes eight, which is significantly smaller than the existing schemes to avoid close encounters; by two than the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel and the Burdet-Ferrandiz regularizations, and by five than the Burdet-Heggie regularization.

  2. A Suppressor Screen of the Chimeric AtCNGC11/12 Reveals Residues Important for Intersubunit Interactions of Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Ion Channels1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hamid, Huda; Chin, Kimberley; Moeder, Wolfgang; Shahinas, Dea; Gupta, Deepali; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the structure-function relationship of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs), we identified a total of 29 mutant alleles of the chimeric AtCNGC11/12 gene that induces multiple defense responses in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, constitutive expresser of PR genes22 (cpr22). Based on computational modeling, two new alleles, S100 (AtCNGC11/12:G459R) and S137 (AtCNGC11/12:R381H), were identified as counterparts of human CNGA3 (a human CNGC) mutants. Both mutants lost all cpr22-mediated phenotypes. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana as well as functional complementation in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) showed that both AtCNGC11/12:G459R and AtCNGC11/12:R381H have alterations in their channel function. Site-directed mutagenesis coupled with fast-protein liquid chromatography using recombinantly expressed C-terminal peptides indicated that both mutations significantly influence subunit stoichiometry to form multimeric channels. This observation was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in planta. Taken together, we have identified two residues that are likely important for subunit interaction for plant CNGCs and likely for animal CNGCs as well. PMID:23735507

  3. Evaluation of energies of interaction correlated with observed stabilities and rheological properties of asphalt-aggregate mixtures of western shale-oil residue as a modifier to petroleum asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Tauer, J.E.; Ensley, E.K.; Harnsberger, P.M.; Robertson, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of improving bonding and aging characteristics using a distillation residue from the Green River Formation (western) shale oil as a modifier to a petroleum asphalt for use as a crack and joint filler material in portland cement concrete and asphaltic pavements. This study was to examine the differences in moisture damage resistance and adhesion properties, as measured by bonding energy, of shale-oil modified asphalts compared with non-modified asphalts. The shale-oil modified asphalts mechanical properties were not expected to match those of the rubberized asphalt. A commercially available rubberized asphalt crack and joint filler material was also tested only for comparison of mechanical properties. Portland cement concrete briquets prepared with an asphalt material sandwiched between two concrete wafers were tested in a stress-relaxation type of experiment to evaluate the relaxation and recovery properties of the sealant materials. Energy of interaction (bonding energy) measurements were performed on asphalt materials with portland cement concrete, two silicate aggregates, and a limestone aggregate to evaluate the compatibility of the asphalt materials with various aggregates. The results show that the shale-oil modified petroleum asphalt improved the relaxation time, percent recovery, and bonding energy compared with the petroleum asphalt.

  4. Optimized Bose-Einstein-condensate production in a dipole trap based on a 1070-nm multifrequency laser: Influence of enhanced two-body loss on the evaporation process

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, T.; Kueber, J.; Wille, O.; Birkl, G.

    2011-10-15

    We present an optimized strategy for the production of tightly confined Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) of {sup 87}Rb in a crossed dipole trap with direct loading from a magneto-optical trap. The dipole trap is created with light of a multifrequency fiber laser with a center wavelength of 1070 nm. Evaporative cooling is performed by ramping down the laser power only. A comparison of the resulting atom number in an almost pure BEC to the initial atom number and the value for the gain in phase space density per atom lost confirm that this straightforward strategy is very efficient. We observe that the temporal characteristics of evaporation sequence are strongly influenced by power-dependent two-body losses resulting from enhanced optical pumping to the higher-energy hyperfine state. We characterize these losses and compare them to results obtained with a single-frequency laser at 1030 nm.

  5. Comparison of two-body and three-body decomposition of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2012-01-01

    We investigated two-body (binary) and three-body (triple) dissociations of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene on the ground potential-energy surfaces using quantum-chemical and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations; most attention is paid on the triple dissociation mechanisms. The triple dissociation includes elimination of a hydrogen molecule from a combination of two separate terminal hydrogen atoms; meanwhile, the rest part simultaneously decomposes to two stable fragments, e.g., C2H4, C2H2, or CO. Transition structures corresponding to the concerted triple dissociation were identified using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory and total energies were computed using the method CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df, 2p). The forward barrier height of triple dissociation has a trend of ethanedial < propanal < propenal < n-butane < 1-butene < 1,3-butadiene, pertaining to the reaction enthalpy. Ratios of translational energies of three separate fragments could be estimated from the transition structure of triple dissociation. The synchronous concerted dissociation of propanal, propenal, and 1-butene leading to three different types of molecular fragments by breaking nonequivalent chemical bonds is rare. The triple dissociation of propanal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene were investigated for the first time. To outline a whole picture of dissociation mechanisms, some significant two-body dissociation channels were investigated for the calculations of product branching ratios. The triple dissociation plays an important role in the three carbonyl compounds, but plays a minor or negligible role in the three hydrocarbons.

  6. SFOLD — A program package for calculating two-body sfermion decays at full one-loop level in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hluchá, H.; Eberl, H.; Frisch, W.

    2012-10-01

    SFOLD (Sfermion Full One-Loop Decays) is a Fortran program package for calculating all sfermion two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level within the MSSM. The package adopts the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention and supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. With the SFOLD package we found non-negligible electroweak corrections in bosonic decays of b˜,t˜ and τ˜. Program summaryProgram title: SFOLD Catalogue identifier: AEMZ_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 263346 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1481697 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: Workstation, PC. Operating system: Linux. RAM: approx. 500 Mbytes Classification: 11.1. External routines: LoopTools 2.6 (http://www.feynarts.de/looptools/), SLHALib 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/slha/) Nature of problem: If the MSSM is realized in nature, LHC will produce supersymmetric particles copiously. The best environment for a precise determination of the model parameters would be a high energy e+e- linear collider. Experimental accuracies are expected at the per-cent down to the per-mill level. These must be matched from the theoretical side. Therefore loop calculations are mandatory. Solution method: This program package calculates all sfermion two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level within the MSSM. The renormalization is done in the DR¯ scheme following the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention. The program supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. Running time: The test provided just takes a few seconds to run.

  7. The one-body and two-body density matrices of finite nuclei with an appropriate treatment of the center-of-mass motion⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Mavrommatis, E.

    2006-02-01

    The one-body and two-body density matrices in coordinate space and their Fourier transforms in momentum space are studied for a nucleus (a nonrelativistic, self-bound finite system). Unlike the usual procedure, suitable for infinite or externally bound systems, they are determined as expectation values of appropriate intrinsic operators, dependent on the relative coordinates and momenta (Jacobi variables) and acting on intrinsic wave functions of nuclear states. Thus, translational invariance (TI) is respected. When handling such intrinsic quantities, we use an algebraic technique based upon the Cartesian representation, in which the coordinate and momentum operators are linear combinations of the creation and annihilation operators hat{{a}}^{{{dagger}}}{} and hat{{a}} for oscillator quanta. Each of the relevant multiplicative operators can then be reduced to the form: one exponential of the set { hat{{a}}^{{{dagger}}}{}} times another exponential of the set { hat{{a}}}. In the course of such a normal-ordering procedure we offer a fresh look at the appearance of “Tassie-Barker” factors, and point out other model-independent results. The intrinsic wave function of the nucleus in its ground state is constructed from a nontranslationally-invariant (nTI) one via existing projection techniques. As an illustration, the one-body and two-body momentum distributions (MDs) for the 4He nucleus are calculated with the Slater determinant of the harmonic-oscillator model as the trial, nTI wave function. We find that the TI introduces quite important effects in the MDs.

  8. Pesticide residues in eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Cromartie, E.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.

    1969-01-01

    Bald and golden eagles found sick or dead in 18 States and Canada during 1964-1965 were analyzed for pesticide residues. Residues in bald eagles were considerably higher than in golden eagles. Residues of DDE, DDD, and dieldrin were detected in all samples of bald eagle carcasses; other compounds found, less frequently were heptachlor epoxide, endrin, and DCBP, a metabolite of DDT. DDE was detected in all samples of golden eagle carcasses; DDD, DDT, dieldrin, and heptachlor epoxide were detected less frequently.

  9. Interaction matrix element fluctuations in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, L.; Alhassid, Y.

    2008-04-04

    In the Coulomb blockade regime of a ballistic quantum dot, the distribution of conductance peak spacings is well known to be incorrectly predicted by a single-particle picture; instead, matrix element fluctuations of the residual electronic interaction need to be taken into account. In the normalized random-wave model, valid in the semiclassical limit where the number of electrons in the dot becomes large, we obtain analytic expressions for the fluctuations of two-body and one-body matrix elements. However, these fluctuations may be too small to explain low-temperature experimental data. We have examined matrix element fluctuations in realistic chaotic geometries, and shown that at energies of experimental interest these fluctuations generically exceed by a factor of about 3-4 the predictions of the random wave model. Even larger fluctuations occur in geometries with a mixed chaotic-regular phase space. These results may allow for much better agreement between the Hartree-Fock picture and experiment. Among other findings, we show that the distribution of interaction matrix elements is strongly non-Gaussian in the parameter range of experimental interest, even in the random wave model. We also find that the enhanced fluctuations in realistic geometries cannot be computed using a leading-order semiclassical approach, but may be understood in terms of short-time dynamics.

  10. Mutation of single hydrophobic residue I27, L35, F39, L58, L65, L67, or L71 in the N terminus of VP5 abolishes interaction with the scaffold protein and prevents closure of herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid shells.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jewell N; Sexton, Gerry L; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant

    2003-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive the assembly of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid. A key interaction occurs between the C-terminal tail of the scaffold protein (pre-22a) and the major capsid protein (VP5). Previously (Z. Hong, M. Beaudet-Miller, J. Durkin, R. Zhang, and A. D. Kwong, J. Virol. 70:533-540, 1996) it was shown that the minimal domain in the scaffold protein necessary for this interaction was composed of a hydrophobic amphipathic helix. The goal of this study was to identify the hydrophobic residues in VP5 important for this bimolecular interaction. Results from the genetic analysis of second-site revertant virus mutants identified the importance of the N terminus of VP5 for the interaction with the scaffold protein. This allowed us to focus our efforts on a small region of this large polypeptide. Twenty-four hydrophobic residues, starting at L23 and ending at F84, were mutated to alanine. All the mutants were first screened for interaction with pre-22a in the yeast two-hybrid assay. From this in vitro assay, seven residues, I27, L35, F39, L58, L65, L67, and L71, that eliminated the interaction when mutated were identified. All 24 mutants were introduced into the virus genome with a genetic marker rescue/marker transfer system. For this system, viruses and cell lines that greatly facilitated the introduction of the mutants into the genome were made. The same seven mutants that abolished interaction of VP5 with pre-22a resulted in an absolute requirement for wild-type VP5 for growth of the viruses. The viruses encoding these mutations in VP5 were capable of forming capsid shells comprised of VP5, VP19C, VP23, and VP26, but the closure of these shells into an icosahedral structure was prevented. Mutation at L75 did not affect the ability of this protein to interact with pre-22a, as judged from the in vitro assay, but this mutation specified a lethal effect for virus growth and abolished the formation of any detectable assembled structure

  11. Method and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for modeling interactions that overcomes drawbacks. The method of the present invention comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations by two swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention is more robust and allows faster modeling than previous methods.

  12. Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems - An analysis of solution characteristics using a two-body system

    SciTech Connect

    Trcka, Marija; L.M. Hensena, Jan; Wetter, Michael

    2010-06-21

    Integrated performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and airconditioning (HVAC) systems can help reducing energy consumption and increasing occupant comfort. However, no single building performance simulation (BPS) tool offers suffcient capabilities and flexibilities to analyze integrated building systems and to enable rapid prototyping of innovative building and system technologies. One way to alleviate this problem is to use co-simulation to integrate different BPS tools. Co-simulation approach represents a particular case of simulation scenario where at least two simulators solve coupled differential-algebraic systems of equations and exchange data that couples these equations during the time integration. This article analyzes how co-simulation influences consistency, stability and accuracy of the numerical approximation to the solution. Consistency and zero-stability are studied for a general class of the problem, while a detailed consistency and absolute stability analysis is given for a simple two-body problem. Since the accuracy of the numerical approximation to the solution is reduced in co-simulation, the article concludes by discussing ways for how to improve accuracy.

  13. Predictive CP violating relations for charmless two-body decays of beauty baryons Ξb-,0 and Λb0 with flavor SU (3) symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Guan-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark have been discovered. The decays of these states provide new platform for testing the standard model (SM). We study CP violation in SM for charmless two-body decays of the flavor SU (3) anti-triplet beauty baryon (b-baryon) B = (Ξb-, Ξb0, Λb0) in a model independent way. We found, in the flavor SU (3) symmetry limit, a set of new predictive relations among the branching ratio Br and CP asymmetry ACP for B decays, such as ACP (Ξb- →K0Ξ-) /ACP (Ξb- →Kbar0Σ-) = - Br (Ξb- →Kbar0Σ-) / Br (Ξb- →K0Σ-), ACP (Λb0 →π- p) /ACP (Ξb0 →K-Σ+) = - Br (Ξb0 →K-Σ+)τ Λb0 / Br (Λb0 →π- p)τ Ξb0, and ACP (Λb0 →K- p) /ACP (Ξb0 →π-Σ+) = - Br (Ξb0 →π-Σ+)τ Λb0 / Br (Λb0 →K- p)τ Ξb0. Future data from LHCb can test these relations and also other relations found.

  14. Measurement of branching fractions and search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless two-body B decays into pions and kaons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Fan, Q; Gill, M S; Gowdy, S J; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De La Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel De Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bartelt, J; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Trunov, A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Vallazza, E; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Elmer, P; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobering, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-10-01

    We present measurements, based on a sample of approximately 23x10(6) BB pairs, of the branching fractions and a search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states of kaons and pions. We find the branching fractions B(B0-->pi(+)pi(-)) = (4.1+/-1.0+/-0.7)x10(-6), B(B0-->K+pi(-)) = (16.7+/-1.6+/-1.3)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0)) = (10.8(+2.1)(-1.9)+/-1.0)x10(-6), B(B+-->K0pi(+)) = (18.2(+3.3)(-3.0)+/-2.0)x10(-6), B(B0-->K0pi(0)) = (8.2(+3.1)(-2.7)+/-1.2)x10(-6). We also report 90% confidence level upper limits for B meson decays to the pi(+)pi(0), K+K-, and K0K+ final states. In addition, charge asymmetries have been found to be consistent with zero, where the statistical precision is in the range of +/-0.10 to +/-0.18, depending on the decay mode.

  15. Exact two-body quantum dynamics of an electron-hole pair in semiconductor coupled quantum wells: A time-dependent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We simulate the time-dependent coherent dynamics of a spatially indirect exciton—an electron-hole pair with the two particles confined in different layers—in a GaAs coupled quantum well system. We use a unitary wave-packet propagation method taking into account in full the four degrees of freedom of the two particles in a two-dimensional system, including both the long-range Coulomb attraction and arbitrary two-dimensional electrostatic potentials affecting the electron and/or the hole separately. The method has been implemented for massively parallel architectures to cope with the huge numerical problem, showing good scaling properties and allowing evolution for tens of picoseconds. We have investigated both transient time phenomena and asymptotic time transmission and reflection coefficients for potential profiles consisting of (i) extended barriers and wells and (ii) a single-slit geometry. We found clear signatures of the internal two-body dynamics, with transient phenomena in the picosecond time scale which might be revealed by optical spectroscopy. Exact results have been compared with mean-field approaches which, neglecting dynamical correlations by construction, turn out to be inadequate to describe the electron-hole pair evolution in realistic experimental conditions.

  16. Residue chemistry guidelines.

    PubMed

    Olinger, C L; Schmitt, R D; Zager, E

    1993-01-01

    Residue chemistry guidelines are designed to determine what the potential residues in food are and how much may be present as a result of pesticide application, so that a tolerance level may be established. Some requirements are established to assist in the enforcement of tolerances by the USDA, FDA, and the states. I realize I have given you a quick overview of the residue chemistry requirements. There are many documents which are available if you should require more information, such as the Subdivision O Residue Chemistry Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Procedures (which are used by reviewers when evaluating the studies), the Data Reporting Guidelines (which provide guidance on preparing final reports), and the Technical Guidance from Phase III of Reregistration. We have also released various papers on studies when additional guidance is required. Most of these documents are available from NTIS. I hope you will consider this information when auditing residue chemistry studies. As I see the efforts that you, the QA professionals, have made to educate yourselves on residue chemistry studies through programs such as this meeting, I have a little more confidence in answering the question "Do you trust them?" with a "Yes." Thank you.

  17. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Cold-Sprayed 20 vol.% Cubic BN-NiCrAl Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Tao; Yang, Er-Juan; Shang, Fu-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chen-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    20 vol.% cubic boron nitride (cBN) dispersoid reinforced NiCrAl matrix nanocomposite coating was prepared by cold spray using mechanically alloyed nanostructured composite powders. The as-sprayed nanocomposite coating was annealed at a temperature of 750 °C to enhance the inter-particle bonding. Microstructure of spray powders and coatings was characterized. Vickers microhardness of the coatings was measured. Two-body abrasive wear behavior of the coatings was examined on a pin-on-disk test. It was found that, in mechanically alloyed composite powders, nano-sized and submicro-sized cBN particles are uniformly distributed in nanocrystalline NiCrAl matrix. Dense coating was deposited by cold spray at a gas temperature of 650 °C with the same phases and grain size as those of the starting powder. Vickers hardness test yielded a hardness of 1063 HV for the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl coating. After annealed at 750 °C for 5 h, unbonded inter-particle boundaries were partially healed and evident grain growth of nanocrystalline NiCrAl was avoided. Wear resistance of the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl nanocomposite coating was comparable to the HVOF-sprayed WC-12Co coating. Annealing of the nanocomposite coating resulted in the improvement of wear resistance by a factor of ~33% owing to the enhanced inter-particle bonding. Main material removal mechanisms during the abrasive wear are also discussed.

  18. Residual activation of thin accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, E.I.; Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    A method to calculate residual activation of thin accelerator components is presented. A model for residual dose estimation for thick objects made of arbitrary composite materials for arbitrary irradiation and cooling times is employed in this study. A scaling procedure is described to apply the model to thin objects with linear dimensions less than a fraction of a nuclear interaction length. The scaling has been performed for various materials and corresponding factors have been determined for objects of certain shapes (slab, solid and hollow cylinder) which are important from practical standpoint and can serve as models for beam pipes, magnets and collimators. Both contact residual dose and dose attenuation in air outside the objects were considered. A comparison between calculations and measurements performed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a 120 GeV proton beam is presented.

  19. [Cumulative exposure to pesticide residues in food].

    PubMed

    Kostka, Grazyna; Urbanek-Olejnik, Katarzyna; Liszewska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    The results of food monitoring studies indicate that humans are constantly exposed to residues ofplant protection products (pesticides) in marketed food products. Hence, assessment of the risk to consumers associated with the consumption of products containing residues of the active substances of pesticides is a key stage in both the registration of pesticides and official control of foodstuffs. However there are frequent cases of exposure not only to individual active substances but also to mixtures of pesticide residues. These levels are usually low, below of effective action, and interaction such as synergism orpotentiation is not expected to occur At the same time, literature data indicate that for mixtures sharing a common MOA (Mode of Action/Mechanism of Action), the probability of additive effects is high, even after adjusting for the low levels of the mixed pesticide residues present. Accordingly, health risk assessment for consumers exposed to such mixtures (cumulative/aggregate risk) has become an issue of topical importance. EU-level initiatives regarding the development of appropriate methodology for the estimation of cumulative/aggregate risk have brought about considerable progress in this area. The article discusses various aspects of estimation of cumulative risk for consumers associated with exposure to mixtures of pesticide residues in food.

  20. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  1. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  3. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  4. Water treatment residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    Solutions to an environmental problem often create other environmental problems. That surely is the case in the water supply field. By providing new or expanded water treatment systems to comply with the maximum contaminant levels and treatment mandates of the Safe Drinking Water Act, water purveyors are generating large volumes of residuals that must be managed, ultimately disposed of, or recycled. Numerous federal, state, and local laws govern the management, transport, disposal, and recycling of wastes produced by water treatment systems. Because these laws can result in exorbitant waste disposal costs, restricting some projects entirely, water suppliers need to consider residual disposal early in the siting, selection, and design of treatment projects. To inform water suppliers about residual laws, AWWA commissioned a study published as a Water Industry Technical Action Fund report. In addition to identifying and describing applicable laws at the federal level and in six of the states, the study revealed a series of findings as to the consequences of those laws to water suppliers. This article is a brief overview of the findings of the report.

  5. Experiment E89-044 of quasi-elastic diffusion 3He(e,e'p) at Jefferson Laboratory: Analyze cross sections of the two body breakup in parallel kinematics; Experience E89-044 de diffusion quasi-elastique 3he(e,e'p) au Jefferson Laboratory : analyse des sections efficaces de desintegration a deux corps en cinematique parallele

    SciTech Connect

    Penel-Nottaris, Emilie

    2004-07-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment has measured the 3He(e,e'p) reaction cross sections. The separation of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body breakup reaction in parallel kinematics allows to study the bound proton electromagnetic properties in the 3He nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond impulse approximation. Preliminary cross sections show some disagreement with theoretical predictions for the forward angles kinematics around 0 MeV/c missing momenta, and sensitivity to final state interactions and 3He wave functions for missing momenta of 300 MeV/c.

  6. Ideal architecture of residue packing and its observation in protein structures.

    PubMed Central

    Raghunathan, G.; Jernigan, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    A simple model of sphere packing has been investigated as an ideal model for long-range interactions for the packing of non-bonded residues in protein structures. By superposing all residues, the geometry of packing around a central residue is investigated. It is found that all residues conform almost perfectly to this lattice model for sphere packing when a radius of 6.5 A is used to define non-bonded (virtual) interacting residues. Side-chain positions with respect to sequential backbone segments are relatively regular as well. This lattice can readily be used in conformation simulations to reduce the conformational space. PMID:9336831

  7. The residual caries dilemma.

    PubMed

    Weerheijm, K L; Groen, H J

    1999-12-01

    Restorative dentistry is based on the assumption that bacterial infection of demineralized dentine should prompt operative intervention. One of the concepts of practical dentistry is to create a favourable environment for caries arrest with minimal operative intervention. The progress of remaining primary caries is key to any discussion of this concept. This discussion is important for the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach, since the removal of all carious dentine is sometimes difficult using hand instruments only. In this paper the results of possible measures to guard against the effects of residual carious and its consequences are reviewed, in order to obtain an impression of the justification for (in)complete excavation of occlusal dentinal caries. Three types of measure are considered: isolating the caries process from the oral environment, excavating the carious dentine, and using a cariostatic filling material. Each of these measures contributes to the arrest of the caries process. However, none of these measures can arrest this process by itself. A combination of all three seems necessary. It is concluded that although residual caries does not seem to be the criterion for rerestoration, one has to strive for as complete caries removal as possible. If this cannot be fulfilled the sealing capacities of the filling material seem to be more important than its cariostatic properties. PMID:10600078

  8. Van der Waals interactions: accuracy of pair potential approximations.

    PubMed

    Cole, Milton W; Kim, Hye-Young; Liebrecht, Michael

    2012-11-21

    Van der Waals interactions between single atoms and solids are discussed for the regime of large separation. A commonly employed approximation is to evaluate this interaction as a sum of two-body interactions between the adatom and the constituent atoms of the solid. The resulting potentials are here compared with known results in various geometries. Analogous comparisons are made for diatomic molecules near either single atoms or semi-infinite surfaces and for triatomic molecules' interactions with single atoms. PMID:23181315

  9. Sedentary behavior and residual-specific mortality

    PubMed Central

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Edwards, Meghan K.; Sng, Eveleen; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of accelerometer-assessed sedentary behavior and residual-specific mortality. Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 5536), with follow-up through 2011. Sedentary behavior was objectively measured over 7 days via accelerometry. Results: When expressing sedentary behavior as a 60 min/day increase, the hazard ratio across the models ranged from 1.07-1.40 (P < 0.05). There was evidence of an interaction effect between sedentary behavior and total physical activity on residual-specific mortality (Hazard ratiointeraction [HR] = 0.9989; 95% CI: 0.9982-0.9997; P = 0.008). Conclusion: Sedentary behavior was independently associated with residual-specific mortality. However, there was evidence to suggest that residual-specific mortality risk was a function of sedentary behavior and total physical activity. These findings highlight the need for future work to not only examine the association between sedentary behavior and health independent of total physical activity, but evaluate whether there is a joint effect of these two parameters on health. PMID:27766237

  10. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  11. Experimental determination of residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1991-01-01

    Residual stresses in finished parts have often been regarded as factors contributing to premature part failure and geometric distortions. Currently, residual stresses in welded structures and railroad components are being investigated. High residual stresses formed in welded structures due primarily to the differential contractions of the weld material as it cools and solidifies can have a profound effect on the surface performance of the structure. In railroad wheels, repeated use of the brakes causes high residual stresses in the rims which may lead to wheel failure and possible derailment. The goals of the study were: (1) to develop strategies for using x-ray diffraction to measure residual stress; (2) to subject samples of Inconel 718 to various mechanical and heat treatments and to measure the resulting stress using x-ray diffraction; and (3) to measure residual stresses in ferromagnetic alloys using magnetoacoustics.

  12. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  13. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael Joseph

    2007-12-19

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → H+h'- decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit to

  14. Caspase-3 binds diverse P4 residues in peptides as revealed by crystallography and structural modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Bin; Fu, Guoxing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2009-03-31

    Caspase-3 recognition of various P4 residues in its numerous protein substrates was investigated by crystallography, kinetics, and calculations on model complexes. Asp is the most frequent P4 residue in peptide substrates, although a wide variety of P4 residues are found in the cellular proteins cleaved by caspase-3. The binding of peptidic inhibitors with hydrophobic P4 residues, or no P4 residue, is illustrated by crystal structures of caspase-3 complexes with Ac-IEPD-Cho, Ac-WEHD-Cho, Ac-YVAD-Cho, and Boc-D(OMe)-Fmk at resolutions of 1.9-2.6 {angstrom}. The P4 residues formed favorable hydrophobic interactions in two separate hydrophobic regions of the binding site. The side chains of P4 Ile and Tyr form hydrophobic interactions with caspase-3 residues Trp206 and Trp214 within a non-polar pocket of the S4 subsite, while P4 Trp interacts with Phe250 and Phe252 that can also form the S5 subsite. These interactions of hydrophobic P4 residues are distinct from those for polar P4 Asp, which indicates the adaptability of caspase-3 for binding diverse P4 residues. The predicted trends in peptide binding from molecular models had high correlation with experimental values for peptide inhibitors. Analysis of structural models for the binding of 20 different amino acids at P4 in the aldehyde peptide Ac-XEVD-Cho suggested that the majority of hydrophilic P4 residues interact with Phe250, while hydrophobic residues interact with Trp206, Phe250, and Trp214. Overall, the S4 pocket of caspase-3 exhibits flexible adaptation for different residues and the new structures and models, especially for hydrophobic P4 residues, will be helpful for the design of caspase-3 based drugs.

  15. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-01

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  16. Fungicide residues in strawberry processing.

    PubMed

    Will, F; Krüger, E

    1999-03-01

    The fate of three fungicides (dichlofluanid, procymidone, and iprodione) applied under field conditions was studied during strawberry processing to juice, wine, and jam. An untreated control was compared to raw material treated with fungicides according to recommended doses and to a sample with 6-fold higher application rates. The highest residue values were found in the pomace after pressing. Residue values in readily produced juices and fruit wines were very low and did not exceed legally required maximum residue levels. Generally, processing steps such as pressing and clarification diminished fungicide residues from 50 to 100%. If the whole fruit is processed, as in fruit preparations or jam, the residue levels remain higher due to missing processing steps. PMID:10552381

  17. High Energy Two-Body Deuteron Photodisintegration

    SciTech Connect

    Terburg, Bart

    1999-07-31

    The differential cross section for two­body deuteron photodisintegration was measured at photon energies between 0.8 and 4.0 GeV and center­of­mass angles theta_cm =37deg, 53deg, 70deg, and 90deg as part of CEBAF experiment E89­012. Constituent counting rules predict a scaling of this cross section at asymptotic energies. In previous experiments this scaling has surprisingly been observed at energies between 1.4 and 2.8 GeV at 90deg. The results from this experiment are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements at lower energies. The data at 70deg and 90deg show a constituent counting rule behavior up to 4.0 GeV photon energy. The 37deg and 53deg data do not agree with the constituent counting rule prediction. The new data are compared with a variety of theoretical models inspired by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and traditional hadronic nuclear physics.

  18. Evaluating Higher Education's Two-Body Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolstenhulme, Jared Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Academic couples make up a significant portion of the academic labor market. Unlike other dual-career households, academic couples must not only find employment in the same region, but often in the same institution. Previous work has not considered how outcomes may be different when dual career households work for the same employer. In the first…

  19. Safety assessment of drug residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.A.

    1980-05-15

    The safety assessment of drug residues is part of the process for defining the conditions for the safe use of drugs in food-producing animals. The information needed to assess the safety of drug residues is provided by chemical and toxicity tests. Toxicity tests are conducted to identify the type of effect produced and to determine the exposure concentrations that would be expected not to produce the effect. These tests include acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity tests, as well as reproduction studies and other special tests. The results are used to find an acceptable daily intake for drug residues that can be used to set a tolerance.

  20. Antiproton-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1982-01-01

    The antiproton beams from LEAR are a means for uncovering a hopefully fertile source of physics in the interactions of antiparticles with nuclei. Bound or resonant states have been searched for in the anti N N system and perhaps one candidate found. Resonances in the anti N-A system may have an independent origin, unrelated to isolated states in the two-body system but nevertheless very revealing of the essential nature of the two-body forces. The use of antiproton projectiles to study conventional, and occasionally exotic nuclear structure warrants some attention because of the extreme peripherality of many anti p-induced reactions and the expected strong iso-spin selectivity for inelastic excitation of say giant resonances. The annihilation channels which generate strong absorption in the nuclear interior, localize direct reactions in the nuclear surface. In this fashion anti p's ressemble heavy-ion projectiles but possess the virtue of being a rather more elementary probe and it should be possible to calculate the average anti p-A interaction (optical potential) from something closer to first principles. Perhaps the most fundamental reason for using antinucleons is as carriers, into the target, of antiquarks. It is not at all clear that the sea quarks in a hadron, i.e. in the form of quark-antiquark pairs, exist on an equal footing with valence quarks. The production of cc states (and even of s anti s) appears highly suppressed in nucleon-nucleon collisions. This suppression must be taken into account in establishing the relative merits of pp or p anti p colliders in producing say the W-meson. By introducing antiquarks directly via anti N N and anti N-A one should surely obtain more definite information about q anti q interactions with LEAR, at the low momenta presumably crucial for hadron structure. (WHK)

  1. Towards Accurate Residue-Residue Hydrophobic Contact Prediction for Alpha Helical Proteins Via Integer Linear Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Rajgaria, R.; McAllister, S. R.; Floudas, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    A new optimization-based method is presented to predict the hydrophobic residue contacts in α-helical proteins. The proposed approach uses a high resolution distance dependent force field to calculate the interaction energy between different residues of a protein. The formulation predicts the hydrophobic contacts by minimizing the sum of these contact energies. These residue contacts are highly useful in narrowing down the conformational space searched by protein structure prediction algorithms. The proposed algorithm also offers the algorithmic advantage of producing a rank ordered list of the best contact sets. This model was tested on four independent α-helical protein test sets and was found to perform very well. The average accuracy of the predictions (separated by at least six residues) obtained using the presented method was approximately 66% for single domain proteins. The average true positive and false positive distances were also calculated for each protein test set and they are 8.87 Å and 14.67 Å respectively. PMID:18767158

  2. Higgs particles interacting via a scalar Dark Matter field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Yajnavalkya; Darewych, Jurij

    2016-07-01

    We study a system of two Higgs particles, interacting via a scalar Dark Matter mediating field. The variational method in the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT is used to derive relativistic wave equations for the two-Higgs system, using a truncated Fock-space trial state. Approximate solutions of the two-body equations are used to examine the existence of Higgs bound states.

  3. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  4. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  5. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development) regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters to describe genotoxicity by a general mechanism. Residual-QSAR Method The double or looping multiple linear correlation was examined by comparing the direct and residual structural information against the observed activity. A self-consistent equation of observed-computed activity was assumed to give maximum correlation efficiency for those situations in which the direct correlations gave non-significant statistical information. Alternatively, it was also suited to describe slow and apparently non-noticeable cancer phenomenology, with special application to non-congeneric molecules involved in genotoxic carcinogenesis. Application and Discussions The QSAR principles were systematically applied to a given pool of molecules with genotoxic activity in rats to elucidate their carcinogenic mechanisms. Once defined, the endpoint associated with ligand-DNA interaction was used to select variables that retained the main Hansch physicochemical parameters of hydrophobicity, polarizability and stericity, computed by the custom PM3 semiempirical quantum method. The trial and test sets of working molecules were established by implementing the normal Gaussian principle of activities that applies when the applicability domain is not restrained to the congeneric compounds, as in the present study. The application of the residual, self-consistent QSAR method and the factor (or average) method yielded results characterized by extremely high and low correlations, respectively, with the latter resembling

  6. The role of interaction vertices in bound state calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin Savkli; Franz Gross; John Tjon

    2001-02-01

    In recent studies of the one and two-body problem for scalar interactions it was shown that crossed ladder and ''crossed rainbow'' (for the one-body case) exchanges play a crucial role in nonperturbative dynamics. In this letter we use exact analytical and numerical results to show that the contribution of vertex dressings to the two-body bound state mass for scalar QED are canceled by the wavefunction normalization. This proves, for the first time, that the mass of a two-body bound state given by the full theory can be obtained by summing only ladder and crossed ladder diagrams using a bare vertex and a constant dressed mass. We also discuss the implications of the remarkable cancellation between rainbow and crossed rainbow diagrams that is a feature of one-body calculations.

  7. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  8. Evidence of the Participation of Remote Residues in the Catalytic Activity of Co-Type Nitrile Hydratase from Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Brodkin, Heather R.; Novak, Walter R.P.; Milne, Amy C.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Karabacak, N.M.; Goldberg, Ilana G.; Agar, Jeffrey N.; Payne, Mark S.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Ringe, Dagmar

    2011-09-28

    Active sites may be regarded as layers of residues, whereby the residues that interact directly with substrate also interact with residues in a second shell and these in turn interact with residues in a third shell. These residues in the second and third layers may have distinct roles in maintaining the essential chemical properties of the first-shell catalytic residues, particularly their spatial arrangement relative to the substrate binding pocket, and their electrostatic and dynamic properties. The extent to which these remote residues participate in catalysis and precisely how they affect first-shell residues remains unexplored. To improve our understanding of the roles of second- and third-shell residues in catalysis, we used THEMATICS to identify residues in the second and third shells of the Co-type nitrile hydratase from Pseudomonas putida (ppNHase) that may be important for catalysis. Five of these predicted residues, and three additional, conserved residues that were not predicted, have been conservatively mutated, and their effects have been studied both kinetically and structurally. The eight residues have no direct contact with the active site metal ion or bound substrate. These results demonstrate that three of the predicted second-shell residues ({alpha}-Asp164, {beta}-Glu56, and {beta}-His147) and one predicted third-shell residue ({beta}-His71) have significant effects on the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. One of the predicted residues ({alpha}-Glu168) and the three residues not predicted ({alpha}-Arg170, {alpha}-Tyr171, and {beta}-Tyr215) do not have any significant effects on the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme.

  9. Evidence for Participation of Remote Residues in the Catalytic Activity of Co-type Nitrile Hydratase from Pseudomonas putida†

    PubMed Central

    Brodkin, Heather R.; Novak, Walter R. P.; Milne, Amy C.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Karabacak, N. M.; Agar, Jeffrey N.; Payne, Mark S.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Ringe, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Active sites may be regarded as layers of residues, whereby the residues that interact directly with substrate also interact with residues in a second shell, and these in turn interact with residues in a third shell. These residues in the second and third layers may have distinct roles in maintaining the essential chemical properties of the first-shell catalytic residues, particularly their spatial arrangement relative to the substrate binding pocket, and their electrostatic and dynamic properties. The extent to which these remote residues participate in catalysis and precisely how they affect first-shell residues remains unexplored. In order to better understand the roles of second- and third-shell residues in catalysis, we used THEMATICS to identify residues in the second- and third-shells of the Co-type nitrile hydratase from Pseudomonas putida (ppNHase) that may be important for catalysis. Five of these predicted residues, plus three additional, conserved residues that were not predicted, have been conservatively mutated, and their effects studied both kinetically and structurally. All of these eight residues have no direct contact with the active site metal ion or bound substrate. These results demonstrate that three of the predicted second-shell residues, α-Asp164, β-Glu56, and β-His147, and one predicted third-shell residue β-His71, have significant effects on the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. One of the predicted residues, α-Glu168, and the three residues not predicted, α-Arg170, α-Tyr171, and β-Tyr215, do not show any significant effects on the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. PMID:21473592

  10. Hemoglobin Bohr effects: atomic origin of the histidine residue contributions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guishan; Schaefer, Michael; Karplus, Martin

    2013-11-26

    The Bohr effect in hemoglobin, which refers to the dependence of the oxygen affinity on the pH, plays an important role in its cooperativity and physiological function. The dominant contribution to the Bohr effect arises from the difference in the pKa values of His residues of the unliganded (deoxy) and liganded (carbonmonoxy) structures. Using recent high resolution structures, the residue pKa values corresponding to the two structures are calculated. The method is based on determining the electrostatic interactions between residues in the protein, relative to those of the residue in solution, by use of the linearized finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states. Given that good agreement is obtained with the available experimental values for the contribution of His residues in HbA to the Bohr effect, the calculated results are used to determine the atomic origin of the pKa shift between deoxy and carbonmonoxy HbA. The contributions to the pKa shift calculated by means of the linear response approximation show that the salt bridge involving His146 plays an important role in the alkaline Bohr effect, as suggested by Perutz but that other interactions are significant as well. A corresponding analysis is made for the contribution of His143 to the acid Bohr effect for which there is no proposed explanation. The method used is summarized and the program by which it is implemented is described in the Appendix .

  11. SRide: a server for identifying stabilizing residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M Michael; Pujadas, Gerard; Tusnády, Gábor E; Simon, István

    2005-07-01

    Residues expected to play key roles in the stabilization of proteins [stabilizing residues (SRs)] are selected by combining several methods based mainly on the interactions of a given residue with its spatial, rather than its sequential neighborhood and by considering the evolutionary conservation of the residues. A residue is selected as a stabilizing residue if it has high surrounding hydrophobicity, high long-range order, high conservation score and if it belongs to a stabilization center. The definition of all these parameters and the thresholds used to identify the SRs are discussed in detail. The algorithm for identifying SRs was originally developed for TIM-barrel proteins [M. M. Gromiha, G. Pujadas, C. Magyar, S. Selvaraj, and I. Simon (2004), Proteins, 55, 316-329] and is now generalized for all proteins of known 3D structure. SRs could be applied in protein engineering and homology modeling and could also help to explain certain folds with significant stability. The SRide server is located at http://sride.enzim.hu.

  12. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  13. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  14. Collection of sugarcane crop residue for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Eiland, B.R.; Clayton, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    Crop residue left after sugarcane harvesting was recovered using a forage harvester and a large round baler. The quantity, bulk density and moisture content of the crop residue was determined in four fields. Crop residue from 7 ha was burned in boilers at a sugar mill. Samples of this residue were tested by a laboratory and compared to sugarcane bagasse.

  15. Gramicidin channels that have no tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, V; Daumas, P; Ranjalahy-Rasoloarijao, L; Heitz, F; Lazaro, R; Trudelle, Y; Andersen, O S

    1992-06-16

    In order to understand how aromatic residues modulate the function of membrane-spanning proteins, we examined the role of the four tryptophans in gramicidin A (gA) in determining the average duration and permeability characteristics of membrane-spanning gramicidin channels; the tryptophan residues were replaced by tyrosine (gramicidin T, gT), tyrosine O-benzyl ether [gramicidin T(Bzl), gT(Bzl)], naphthylalanine (gramicidin N, gN), and phenylalanine (gramicidin M enantiomer, gM-). These analogues form channels with durations and conductances that differ some 10- and 16-fold, respectively. The single-channel conductance was invariably decreased by the Trp----Yyy replacement, and the relative conductance alterations were similar in phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) and monoglyceride (GMO) bilayers. The duration variations exhibited a more complex pattern, which was quite different in the two membrane environments: in DPhPC bilayers, gN channels have an average duration that is approximately 2-fold longer than that of gA channels; in GMO bilayers, the average duration of gN channels is about one-tenth that of gA channels. The sequence-dependent alterations in channel function do not result from alterations in the channels' peptide backbone structure, because heterodimers can form between the different analogues and gramicidine A, and there is no energetic cost associated with heterodimer formation [cf. Durkin, J. T., Koeppe, R. E., II, & Andersen, O. S. (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 211, 221]. The alterations in permeability properties are consistent with the notion that Trp residues alter the energy profile for ion permeation through long-range electrostatic interactions.

  16. Potential hazards of fumigant residues.

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, L

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of fumigants (primarily ethylene dibromide, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, ethylene oxide, symdibromotetetrachloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorovos, carbon tetrachloride, methyl bromide) as well as their degradation products in foodstuffs and soil have been examined mainly in regard to the potential mutagenicity of their residues. PMID:789068

  17. Solidification process for sludge residue

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-09-10

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria.

  18. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  19. Bogolubov-Hartree-Fock Theory for Strongly Interacting Fermions in the Low Density Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräunlich, Gerhard; Hainzl, Christian; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Bogolubov-Hartree-Fock functional for a fermionic many-body system with two-body interactions. For suitable interaction potentials that have a strong enough attractive tail in order to allow for two-body bound states, but are otherwise sufficiently repulsive to guarantee stability of the system, we show that in the low-density limit the ground state of this model consists of a Bose-Einstein condensate of fermion pairs. The latter can be described by means of the Gross-Pitaevskii energy functional.

  20. Classification of explosive residues on organic substrates using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Frank C; Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    Standoff laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has previously been used to classify trace residues as either hazardous (explosives, biological, etc.) or benign. Correct classification can become more difficult depending on the surface/substrate underneath the residue due to variations in the laser-material interaction. In addition, classification can become problematic if the substrate material has a similar elemental composition to the residue. We have evaluated coupling multivariate analysis with standoff LIBS to determine the effectiveness of classifying thin explosive residue layers on painted surfaces. Good classification results were obtained despite the fact that the painted surface contributes to the LIBS emission signal. PMID:22410930

  1. Characterization of chicken-liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-1 and A2-2 isoenzymes and their site-directed mutants heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli: identification of Lys-15 and Ser-208 on cGSTA1-1 as residues interacting with ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L F; Liaw, Y C; Tam, M F

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli-expressed chicken-liver glutathione S-transferase, cGSTA1-1, displays high ethacrynic acid (EA)-conjugating activity. Molecular modelling of cGSTA1-1 with EA in the substrate binding site reveals that the side chain of Phe-111 protrudes into the substrate binding site and possibly interacts with EA. Replacement of Phe-111 with alanine resulted in an enzyme (F111A mutant) with a 4.5-fold increase in EA-conjugating activity (9.2 mmol/min per mg), and an incremental Gibbs free energy (DeltaDeltaG) of 4.0 kJ/mol lower than that of the wild-type cGSTA1-1. Two other amino acid residues that possibly interact with EA are Ser-208 and Lys-15. Substitution of Ser-208 with methionine generated a cGSTA1-1(F111AS208M) double mutant that has low EA-conjugating activity (2.0 mmol/min per mg) and an incremental Gibbs free energy of +3.9 kJ/mol greater than the cGSTA1-1(F111A) single mutant. The cGSTA1-1(F111A) mutant, with an additional Lys-15-to-leucine substitution, lost 90% of the EA-conjugating activity (0.55 mmol/min per mg). The Km values of the cGSTA1-1(F111A) and cGSTA1-1(F111AK15L) mutants for EA are nearly identical. The wild-type cGSTA2-2 isoenzyme has a low EA-conjugating activity (0.56 mmol/min per mg). The kcat of this reaction can be increased 2. 5-fold by substituting Arg-15 and Glu-104 with lysine and glycine respectively. The KmEA of the cGSTA2-2(R15KE104G) double mutant is nearly identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. Another double mutant, cGSTA2-2(E104GL208S), has a KmEA that is 3.3-fold lower and a kcat that is 1.8-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results, taken together, illustrate the interactions of Lys-15 and Ser-208 on cGSTA1-1 with EA. PMID:9359434

  2. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  3. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P; Cornell, Eric A; Jin, Deborah S

    2016-07-29

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of ^{87}Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic ^{40}K impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges. PMID:27517776

  4. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J.; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P.; Cornell, Eric A.; Jin, Deborah S.

    2016-07-01

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of 87Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic 40 impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... by reference in § 1065.1010). (2) Phosphorus is at or below 15 mg per kg of fuel based on the... 0.15 ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3) % 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg) % 3.50 4.00...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3)% 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg)% 3.50 4.00 4.50 4.50 4... the elements zinc, phosphorus, or calcium is at or below the specified limits. We consider a fuel...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... ISO 6245. Water, max (m3/m3)% 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 ISO 3733. Sulfur, max (kg/kg)% 3.50 4.00 4.50 4.50 4... the elements zinc, phosphorus, or calcium is at or below the specified limits. We consider a fuel...

  8. Controls on monthly estuarine residuals: Eulerian circulation and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jennifer M.; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Souza, Alejandro J.

    2014-04-01

    The Dee Estuary, at the NW English-Welsh border, is a major asset, supporting: one of the largest wildlife habitats in Europe, industrial importance along the Welsh coastline and residential and recreational usage along the English coast. Understanding of the residual elevation is important to determine the total water levels that inundate intertidal banks, especially during storms. Whereas, improved knowledge of the 3D residual circulation is important in determining particle transport pathways to manage water quality and morphological change. Using mooring data obtained in February-March 2008, a 3D modelling system has been previously validated against in situ salinity, velocity, elevation and wave observations, to investigate the barotropic-baroclinic wave interaction within this estuary under full realistic forcing. The system consists of a coupled circulation-wave-turbulence model (POLCOMS-WAM-GOTM). Using this modelling system the contribution of different processes and their interactions to the monthly residuals in both elevation and circulation is now assessed. By studying a tidally dominated estuary under wave influence, it is found that baroclinicity induced by a weak river flow has greater importance in generating a residual circulation than the waves, even at the estuary mouth. Although the monthly residual circulation is dominated by tidal and baroclinic processes, the residual estuarine surface elevation is primarily influenced by the seasonal external forcing to the region, with secondary influence from the local wind conditions. During storm conditions, 3D radiation stress becomes important for both elevation and circulation at the event scale but is found here to have little impact over monthly time scales.

  9. Creation of residual flows in a partially stratified estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, M.T.; Burau, J.R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    The creation of residual flows in estuaries is examined using acoustic Doppler current profiler data sets from northern San Francisco Bay. The data sets are analyzed using principal component analysis to examine the temporal variability of the flows which create the residual circulation. It is seen that in this periodically and partially stratified estuary the residual flows are created through a series of pulses with strong variability at the 24-hour timescale, through the interaction of shear, stratification and mixing. This interaction is captured through the use of a dimensionless number, the horizontal Richardson number (Rix), which is developed to examine the local balance between the stratifying and destratifying forces at the tidal timescale. It is seen that Rix is a valuable parameter in predicting the onset of the residual-creating events, with a threshold value of ??? 3 on ebb tides. This critical value is argued to be a threshold, above which the stratification and shear flow create a feedback effect, each further intensifying the other. This feedback results in a highly variable exchange flow which creates the estuarine residual in intermittent pulses rather than as a steady flow. Although typically attributed to baroclinic forcing, an argument is made that these pulses of residual-creating exchange flow could be created by barotropic forcing in the presence of variable stratification which is asymmetric between flood and ebb tides. This result poses a great challenge for turbulence modeling, as the timing and magnitude of stratification and shear must be correctly simulated on the tidal timescale in order to reproduce the effects seen in the data sets presented. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Thermogravimetric investigation of the co-combustion between the pyrolysis oil distillation residue and lignite.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2016-10-01

    Co-combustion of lignite with distillation residue derived from rice straw pyrolysis oil was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The addition of distillation residue improved the reactivity and combustion efficiency of lignite, such as increasing the weight loss rate at peak temperature and decreasing the burnout temperature and the total burnout. With increasing distillation residue content in the blended fuels, the synergistic interactions between distillation residue and lignite firstly increased and then decreased during co-combustion stage. Results of XRF, FTIR, (13)C NMR and SEM analysis indicated that chemical structure, mineral components and morphology of samples have great influence on the synergistic interactions. The combustion mechanisms and kinetic parameters were calculated by the Coats Redfern model, suggesting that the lowest apparent activation energy (120.19kJ/mol) for the blended fuels was obtained by blending 60wt.% distillation residue during main co-combustion stage. PMID:27416511

  11. Thermogravimetric investigation of the co-combustion between the pyrolysis oil distillation residue and lignite.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2016-10-01

    Co-combustion of lignite with distillation residue derived from rice straw pyrolysis oil was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The addition of distillation residue improved the reactivity and combustion efficiency of lignite, such as increasing the weight loss rate at peak temperature and decreasing the burnout temperature and the total burnout. With increasing distillation residue content in the blended fuels, the synergistic interactions between distillation residue and lignite firstly increased and then decreased during co-combustion stage. Results of XRF, FTIR, (13)C NMR and SEM analysis indicated that chemical structure, mineral components and morphology of samples have great influence on the synergistic interactions. The combustion mechanisms and kinetic parameters were calculated by the Coats Redfern model, suggesting that the lowest apparent activation energy (120.19kJ/mol) for the blended fuels was obtained by blending 60wt.% distillation residue during main co-combustion stage.

  12. Sequence composition and environment effects on residue fluctuations in protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2010-10-01

    Structure fluctuations in proteins affect a broad range of cell phenomena, including stability of proteins and their fragments, allosteric transitions, and energy transfer. This study presents a statistical-thermodynamic analysis of relationship between the sequence composition and the distribution of residue fluctuations in protein-protein complexes. A one-node-per-residue elastic network model accounting for the nonhomogeneous protein mass distribution and the interatomic interactions through the renormalized inter-residue potential is developed. Two factors, a protein mass distribution and a residue environment, were found to determine the scale of residue fluctuations. Surface residues undergo larger fluctuations than core residues in agreement with experimental observations. Ranking residues over the normalized scale of fluctuations yields a distinct classification of amino acids into three groups: (i) highly fluctuating-Gly, Ala, Ser, Pro, and Asp, (ii) moderately fluctuating-Thr, Asn, Gln, Lys, Glu, Arg, Val, and Cys, and (iii) weakly fluctuating-Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Tyr, Trp, and His. The structural instability in proteins possibly relates to the high content of the highly fluctuating residues and a deficiency of the weakly fluctuating residues in irregular secondary structure elements (loops), chameleon sequences, and disordered proteins. Strong correlation between residue fluctuations and the sequence composition of protein loops supports this hypothesis. Comparing fluctuations of binding site residues (interface residues) with other surface residues shows that, on average, the interface is more rigid than the rest of the protein surface and Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Leu, and Trp have a propensity to form more stable docking patches on the interface. The findings have broad implications for understanding mechanisms of protein association and stability of protein structures.

  13. Three-body interactions between slow light Rydberg polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachymski, Krzysztof; Bienias, Przemyslaw; Büchler, Hans Peter

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg polaritons have recently emerged as a promising platform for nonlinear optics and photonic quantum simulation. They are created in an atomic medium using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme involving a Rydberg excitation. Cavity photons can be used in this context to create long-lived, coherent samples consisting of several polaritons. We show that in addition to effective two-body interaction potential inherited from the Rydberg states, the polaritons also exhibit effective three-body interactions. For attractive two-body forces, the three-body term induces short-range repulsion. We analyze the impact of this interaction on the three-body photonic bound states in one-dimensional geometry and discuss the prospects for engineering novel quantum states.

  14. Generic GPCR residue numbers - aligning topology maps while minding the gaps.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Vignir; de Graaf, Chris; Bortolato, Andrea; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Marshall, Fiona H; Mordalski, Stefan; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Stevens, Raymond C; Vriend, Gerrit; Gloriam, David E

    2015-01-01

    Generic residue numbers facilitate comparisons of, for example, mutational effects, ligand interactions, and structural motifs. The numbering scheme by Ballesteros and Weinstein for residues within the class A GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors) has more than 1100 citations, and the recent crystal structures for classes B, C, and F now call for a community consensus in residue numbering within and across these classes. Furthermore, the structural era has uncovered helix bulges and constrictions that offset the generic residue numbers. The use of generic residue numbers depends on convenient access by pharmacologists, chemists, and structural biologists. We review the generic residue numbering schemes for each GPCR class, as well as a complementary structure-based scheme, and provide illustrative examples and GPCR database (GPCRDB) web tools to number any receptor sequence or structure.

  15. Amino acid network for prediction of catalytic residues in enzymes: a comparison survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhong; Yan, Wenying; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic residues play a significant role in enzyme functions. With the recent accumulation of experimentally determined enzyme 3D structures and network theory on protein structures, the prediction of catalytic residues by amino acid network (AAN, where nodes are residues and links are residue interactions) has gained much interest. Computational methods of identifying catalytic residues are traditionally divided into two groups: sequence-based and structure-based methods. Two new structure- based methods are proposed in current advances: AAN and Elastic Network Model (ENM) of enzyme structures. By concentrating on AAN-based approach, we herein summarized network properties for predictions of catalytic residues. AAN attributes were showed responsible for performance improvement, and therefore the combination of AAN with previous sequence and structural information will be a promising direction for further improvement. Advantages and limitations of AAN-based methods, future perspectives on the application of AAN to the study of protein structure-function relationships are discussed.

  16. Accessibility and mobility of lysine residues in. beta. -lactoglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.M.; Pfeffer, P.E.; Kumosinski, T.F.; Greenberg, R.

    1988-07-26

    N/sup epsilon/-(/sup 2/H/sub 6/)Isopropyllysyl-..beta..-lactoglobulin was prepared by reductive alkylation of ..beta..-lactoglobulin with (/sup 2/H/sub 6/)acetone and NaBH/sub 4/ to provide a /sup 2/H (NMR) probe for the study of lysine involvement in lipid-protein interactions. Amino acid analysis showed 80% of the protein's 15 lysine residues to be labeled. Unmodified lysine residues were located through peptide maps produced from CNBr, tryptic, and chymotryptic digests of the labeled protein. Average correlation times calculated from /sup 2/H NMR spectra were 20 and 320 ps for 8.7 and 3.3 residues, respectively, in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride; in nondenaturing solution, values of 70 and 320 ps were obtained for 6.5 and 3.2 residues, respectively, with the remaining 2.3 modified residues not observed, suggesting that side chains of lysine residues in unordered or flexible regions were more mobile than those in stable periodic structures. /sup 2/H NMR spectra of the protein complexed with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine confirmed the extrinsic membrane protein type behavior of ..beta..-lactoglobulin previously reported from /sup 31/P NMR studies of the phospholipids complexed with ..beta..-lactoglobulin. Although no physiological function has yet been identified, comparison of these results with the X-ray structure supports the hypothesis that residues not accessible for modification may help to stabilize the cone-shaped ..beta..-barrel thought to contain binding sites for small lipid-soluble molecules.

  17. Folding simulations of alanine-based peptides with lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, S S

    1995-01-01

    The folding of short alanine-based peptides with different numbers of lysine residues is simulated at constant temperature (274 K) using the rigid-element Monte Carlo method. The solvent-referenced potential has prevented the multiple-minima problem in helix folding. From various initial structures, the peptides with three lysine residues fold into helix-dominated conformations with the calculated average helicity in the range of 60-80%. The peptide with six lysine residues shows only 8-14% helicity. These results agree well with experimental observations. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the charged lysine side chains and their electrostatic hydration destabilize the helical conformations of the peptide with six lysine residues, whereas these effects on the peptides with three lysine residues are small. The simulations provide insight into the helix-folding mechanism, including the beta-bend intermediate in helix initiation, the (i, i + 3) hydrogen bonds, the asymmetrical helix propagation, and the asymmetrical helicities in the N- and C-terminal regions. These findings are consistent with previous studies. PMID:7756550

  18. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  19. Pesticidal residues in animal tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Menzie, C.M.; Adomaitis, V.A.; Reichel, W.L.

    1960-01-01

    Tests with penned starlings, rats, pheasants, and ducks indicated that each species differs in sensitivity to the various pesticides. Residues in tissues are proportional to the degree of exposure during area treatment and they are also found in animals shot six or more months after treatment. The presence of more than 20-30 ppm of DDT, 20 ppm of chlordan, and 6-20 ppm of heptachlor epoxide in quail tissues indicated that the birds had ingested lethal dosages of the pesticides.

  20. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O`Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination.

  1. Residue management at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Olencz, J.

    1995-12-31

    Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

  2. Residue gasification tests at TVA

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.

    1984-11-01

    The Texaco gasification process was identified as an attractive way to utilise vacuum bottoms from the Exxon Donor Solvent liquefaction process to generate synthesis gas. This gas can then be upgraded to produce the hydrogen required by the EDS plant. Gasification tests were carried out at TVA's 200 t/day Muscle Shoals plant and are reported here. As a result, Texaco expects that a plant could be designed to handle EDS residue from any high-rank coal.

  3. Geotechnical characteristics of residual soils

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Residual soils are products of chemical weathering and thus their characteristics are dependent upon environmental factors of climate, parent material, topography and drainage, and age. These conditions are optimized in the tropics where well-drained regions produce reddish lateritic soils rich in iron and aluminum sesquioxides and kaolinitic clays. Conversely, poorly drained areas tend towards montmorillonitic expansive black clays. Andosols develop over volcanic ash and rock regions and are rich in allophane (amorphous silica) and metastable halloysite. The geological origins greatly affect the resulting engineering characteristics. Both lateritic soils and andosols are susceptible to property changes upon drying, and exhibit compaction and strength properties not indicative of their classification limits. Both soils have been used successfully in earth dam construction, but attention must be given to seepage control through the weathered rock. Conversely, black soils are unpopular for embankments. Lateritic soils respond to cement stabilization and, in some cases, lime stabilization. Andosols should also respond to lime treatment and cement treatments if proper mixing can be achieved. Black expansive residual soils respond to lime treatment by demonstrating strength gains and decreased expansiveness. Rainfall induced landslides are typical of residual soil deposits.

  4. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  5. Method and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.

    2000-08-08

    A method and apparatus for modeling interactions between bodies. The method comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations and rotations by two hierarchical swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention can serve as a practical tool in motion planning, CAD systems, simulation systems, safety analysis, and applications that require modeling time-based interactions. A body can be represented in the present invention by a union of convex polygons and convex polyhedra. As used generally herein, polyhedron includes polygon, and polyhedra includes polygons. The body undergoing translation can be represented by a swept body representation, where the swept body representation comprises a hierarchical bounding volume representation whose leaves each contain a representation of the region swept by a section of the body during the translation, and where the union of the regions is a superset of the region swept by the surface of the body during translation. Interactions between two bodies thus represented can be modeled by modeling interactions between the convex hulls of the finite sets of discrete points in the swept body representations.

  6. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin. PMID:25066915

  7. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin.

  8. Interaction of immunoglobulin glycopeptides with concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, R; Ferris, C

    1975-04-10

    A number of intact and partially degraded immunoglobulin glycopeptides have been tested for their ability to interact with concanavalin A. The degraded glycopeptides were prepared by using purified glycosidases to remove sugar residues from the nonreducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains of intact glycopeptides. A quantitative and sensitive assay was devised to measure the potency of the glycopeptides as haptene inhibitors of 125I-concanavalin A binding to guinea pig erythrocytes. The most potent haptene, derived from an immunoglobulin G glycopeptide, had a branched chain oligosaccharide with two GlcNAc (see article) Man (see article) nonreducing termini linked to a mannose residue in the core. The other very potent glycopeptide was an immunoglobulin E high mannose glycopeptide which contained 3 terminal alpha-mannose residues and 1 internal 2-O-mannose residue. Removal of terminal beta-N-acetylglucosamine residues or alpha-mannose residues reduced the activity of these and other glycopeptides as inhibitors of 125I-concanavalin A binding. It was concluded that the ability of these glycopeptides to interact with concanavalin A is dependent on their content of terminal beta-N-acetylglucosamine residues, terminal alpha-mannose residues, and also internal mannose residues substituted on the C-2 hydroxyl group, and that the saccharide combining site of concanavalin A must be able to bind several sugar residues.

  9. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  10. PESTICIDE RESIDUE RECOVERIES FROM SURFACE WIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors with a primary source resulting from residue deposition on household surfaces. Accurate measurements of surface residues is essential for estimating exposure from different routes. Various procedures have been developed ...

  11. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  12. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  13. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  14. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  15. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  16. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  17. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  18. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  19. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  20. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  1. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  2. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  3. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  4. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  5. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  6. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  7. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  8. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  9. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  10. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  11. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  12. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  13. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  14. Automating a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrie, W. F.; Westfall, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA), a device for measuring the amounts and species of various gases present in a vacuum system is discussed. In a recent update of the RGA, it was shown that the use of microprocessors could revolutionize data acquisition and data reduction. This revolution is exemplified by the Inficon 1Q200 RGA which was selected to meet the needs of this update. The Inficon RGA and the Zilog microcomputer were interfaced in order the receive and format the digital data from the RGA. This automated approach is discussed in detail.

  15. Solitary water wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, W.; Guyenne, P.; Hammack, J.; Henderson, D.; Sulem, C.

    2006-05-01

    This article concerns the pairwise nonlinear interaction of solitary waves in the free surface of a body of water lying over a horizontal bottom. Unlike solitary waves in many completely integrable model systems, solitary waves for the full Euler equations do not collide elastically; after interactions, there is a nonzero residual wave that trails the post-collision solitary waves. In this report on new numerical and experimental studies of such solitary wave interactions, we verify that this is the case, both in head-on collisions (the counterpropagating case) and overtaking collisions (the copropagating case), quantifying the degree to which interactions are inelastic. In the situation in which two identical solitary waves undergo a head-on collision, we compare the asymptotic predictions of Su and Mirie [J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980)] and Byatt-Smith [J. Fluid Mech. 49, 625 (1971)], the wavetank experiments of Maxworthy [J. Fluid Mech. 76, 177 (1976)], and the numerical results of Cooker, Weidman, and Bale [J. Fluid Mech. 342, 141 (1997)] with independent numerical simulations, in which we quantify the phase change, the run-up, and the form of the residual wave and its Fourier signature in both small- and large-amplitude interactions. This updates the prior numerical observations of inelastic interactions in Fenton and Rienecker [J. Fluid Mech. 118, 411 (1982)]. In the case of two nonidentical solitary waves, our precision wavetank experiments are compared with numerical simulations, again observing the run-up, phase lag, and generation of a residual from the interaction. Considering overtaking solitary wave interactions, we compare our experimental observations, numerical simulations, and the asymptotic predictions of Zou and Su [Phys. Fluids 29, 2113 (1986)], and again we quantify the inelastic residual after collisions in the simulations. Geometrically, our numerical simulations of overtaking interactions fit into the three categories of Korteweg-deVries two

  16. Fiber-optic polymer residue monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Jarecki, R.L. Jr.; Dalton, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    Semiconductor processing tools that use a plasma to etch polysilicon or oxides produce residue polymers that build up on the exposed surfaces of the processing chamber. These residues are generally stressed and with time can cause flaking onto wafers resulting in yield loss. Currently, residue buildup is not monitored, and chambers are cleaned at regular intervals resulting in excess downtime for the tool. In addition, knowledge of the residue buildup rate and index of refraction is useful in determining the state of health of the chamber process. The authors have developed a novel optical fiber-based robust sensor that allows measurement of the residue polymer buildup while not affecting the plasma process.

  17. Managing residual limb hyperhidrosis in wounded warriors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Kentosh, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Residual limb dermatologic problems are a common concern among young active traumatic amputee patients who strive to maintain an active lifestyle. Hyperhidrosis of residual limbs is a recognized inciting factor that often contributes to residual limb dermatoses and is driven by the design of the prosthetic liner covering the residual limb. Treatment of hyperhidrosis in this population presents a unique challenge. Several accepted treatments of hyperhidrosis can offer some relief but have been limited by lack of results or side-effect profiles. Microwave thermal ablation has presented an enticing potential for residual limb hyperhidrosis. PMID:27416083

  18. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  19. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  20. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  1. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  2. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  3. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  4. Recent developments in neutrino-nucleus interactions in 1 GeV energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino interactions in 1 GeV energy region are discussed. A role of nucleon-nucleon correlations in understanding recent quasi-elastic cross section measurements on nuclear target is explained. An importance of a correct treatment of two-body current contribution to the neutrino inclusive cross section is addressed.

  5. Notes on oscillator-like interactions of various spin relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvoeglazov, Valeri V.; Delsolmesa, Antonio

    1995-01-01

    The equations for various spin particles with oscillator-like interactions are discussed in this talk. Topics discussed include: (1) comment on 'The Klein-Gordon Oscillator'; (2) the Dirac oscillator in quaternion form; (3) the Dirac-Dowker oscillator; (4) the Weinberg oscillator; and (5) note on the two-body Dirac oscillator.

  6. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation. PMID:27179142

  7. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation.

  8. Roles of NN-interaction components in shell-structure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeya, Atsushi; Muto, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    Since the importance of the monopole interaction was first emphasized in 1960s, roles of monopole strengths of two-body nucleon-nucleon interaction in shell structure have been discussed. Through the monopole strengths, we study the roles in shell-structure evolution, starting from explicit forms of the interaction. For the tensor component of the interaction, we show the derivation of the relation, (2j> + 1)Vjj> + (2j< + 1)Vjj< = 0, with a detailed manipulation. We show that one-body spin-orbit term appears in the multipole expansion of two-body spin-orbit interaction. Only the spin-orbit components can affect the spin-orbit energy splitting between spin-orbit partners, when the spin-orbit partner orbits are fully occupied.

  9. Microscopic approach for the n - d effective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomio, L. ); Frederico, T. ); Delfino, A. )

    1990-03-01

    A three-boson model is applied to the nucleon-deuteron ({ital n}-{ital d}) system to construct an effective energy-dependent two-body potential in configuration space. The three-nucleon observables at low energy are well reproduced with just one free parameter (related with the range of the nucleon-nucleon interaction). We show that the present results give support to a previous phenomenological {ital n}-{ital d} potential.

  10. Effects of retardation in relativistic equations with confining interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maung, Khin Maung; Kahana, David E.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for solving two body relativistic bound state equations in momentum space with a confining interaction. A total of six different three dimensional reductions of the Bethe-Salpeter equations are studied with particular emphasis placed on the competing roles of relativistic kinematics and retardation. The results indicate that these two effects counteract each other and this sheds some light on why nonrelativistic models of meson spectroscopy have been quite successful.

  11. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  12. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  13. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  14. Microscopic theory of the residual surface resistivity of Rashba electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Juba; Lounis, Samir; Blügel, Stefan; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic expression of the residual electrical resistivity tensor is derived in linear response theory for Rashba electrons scattering at a magnetic impurity with cylindrical or noncylindrical potential. The behavior of the longitudinal and transversal residual resistivity is obtained analytically and computed for an Fe impurity at the Au(111) surface. We studied the evolution of the resistivity tensor elements as a function of the Rashba spin-orbit strength and the magnetization direction of the impurity. We found that the absolute values of longitudinal resistivity reduce with increasing spin-orbit strength of the substrate and that the scattering of the conduction electrons at magnetic impurities with magnetic moments pointing in directions not perpendicular to the surface plane produce a planar Hall effect and an anisotropic magnetoresistance even if the impurity carries no spin-orbit interaction. Functional forms are provided describing the anisotropy of the planar Hall effect and the anisotropic magnetoresistance with respect to the direction of the impurity moment. In the limit of no spin-orbit interaction and a nonmagnetic impurity of cylindrical symmetry, the expression of the residual resistivity of a two-dimensional electron gas has the same simplicity and form as for the three-dimensional electron gas [J. Friedel, J. Nuovo. Cim. 7, 287 (1958), 10.1007/BF02751483] and can also be expressed in terms of scattering phase shifts.

  15. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  16. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  17. A circular loop of the 16-residue repeating unit in ice nucleation protein.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kawano, Keiichi; Hikichi, Kunio; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Matsushima, Norio

    2008-06-20

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) from Gram-negative bacteria promotes the freezing of supercooled water. The central domain of INPs with 1034-1567 residues consists of 58-81 tandem repeats with the 16-residue consensus sequence of AxxxSxLTAGYGSTxT. This highly repetitive domain can also be represented by tandem repeats of 8-residues or 48-residues. In order to elucidate the structure of the tandem repeats, NMR measurements were made for three synthetic peptides including QTARKGSDLTTGYGSTS corresponding to a section of the repetitive domains in Xanthomonas campestris INP. One remarkable observation is a long-range NOE between the side chains of Tyr(i) and Ala(i-10) in the 17-residue peptide. Medium-range NOEs between the side chains of Tyr(i) and Leu(i-4), Thr(i-3) or Thr(i-2) were also observed. These side chain-side chain interactions can be ascribed to CH/pi interaction. Structure calculation reveals that the 17-residue peptide forms a circular loop incorporating the 11-residue segment ARKGSDLTTGY.

  18. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  19. Carbohydrate–Aromatic Interactions in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein–carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in health and disease. However, defining and manipulating these interactions has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying fundamental forces. To elucidate common and discriminating features in carbohydrate recognition, we have analyzed quantitatively X-ray crystal structures of proteins with noncovalently bound carbohydrates. Within the carbohydrate-binding pockets, aliphatic hydrophobic residues are disfavored, whereas aromatic side chains are enriched. The greatest preference is for tryptophan with an increased prevalence of 9-fold. Variations in the spatial orientation of amino acids around different monosaccharides indicate specific carbohydrate C–H bonds interact preferentially with aromatic residues. These preferences are consistent with the electronic properties of both the carbohydrate C–H bonds and the aromatic residues. Those carbohydrates that present patches of electropositive saccharide C–H bonds engage more often in CH−π interactions involving electron-rich aromatic partners. These electronic effects are also manifested when carbohydrate–aromatic interactions are monitored in solution: NMR analysis indicates that indole favorably binds to electron-poor C–H bonds of model carbohydrates, and a clear linear free energy relationships with substituted indoles supports the importance of complementary electronic effects in driving protein–carbohydrate interactions. Together, our data indicate that electrostatic and electronic complementarity between carbohydrates and aromatic residues play key roles in driving protein–carbohydrate complexation. Moreover, these weak noncovalent interactions influence which saccharide residues bind to proteins, and how they are positioned within carbohydrate-binding sites. PMID:26561965

  20. Studies Of Residual Flexibility And Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1995-01-01

    Collection of reports presents theoretical and experimental studies in which concept of residual flexibility applied to modal vibration testing and verification of mathematical models of vibrations of flexible structure constrained by another structure. "Residual flexibility" denotes that part of interface flexibility due to mode shapes out of frequency range of test. Studies directed toward assessing residual-flexibility approach as substitute for fixed-base vibrational testing of payloads installed in spacecraft.

  1. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  2. Optical systolic array processor using residue arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Casasent, D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of residue arithmetic to increase the accuracy and reduce the dynamic range requirements of optical matrix-vector processors is evaluated. It is determined that matrix-vector operations and iterative algorithms can be performed totally in residue notation. A new parallel residue quantizer circuit is developed which significantly improves the performance of the systolic array feedback processor. Results are presented of a computer simulation of this system used to solve a set of three simultaneous equations.

  3. Analytical Methods for Detonation Residues of Insensitive Munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Marianne E.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical methods are described for the analysis of post-detonation residues from insensitive munitions. Standard methods were verified or modified to obtain the mass of residues deposited per round. In addition, a rapid chromatographic separation was developed and used to measure the mass of NTO (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one), NQ (nitroguanidine) and DNAN (2,4-dinitroanisole). The HILIC (hydrophilic-interaction chromatography) separation described here uses a trifunctionally-bonded amide phase to retain the polar analytes. The eluent is 75/25 v/v acetonitrile/water acidified with acetic acid, which is also suitable for LC/MS applications. Analytical runtime was three minutes. Solid phase extraction and LC/MS conditions are also described.

  4. Residues of profenofos in spring onion.

    PubMed

    Talebi, K; Ghassami, M R

    2004-01-01

    Profenofos is one of the commonly used insecticides in the control of Trips tabaci on spring onion in Iran. Residues of profenofos in spring onion were determined in two different fields under the same conditions. In the first field, onion plants were sprayed with profenofos (40EC) at the rate of 1000 g/ha. Spraying was repeated 2 weeks later. In the second field one spraying was preformed at the same rate. Spring onionwere sampled at different time intervals and analyzed for profenofos residues using a GC equipped with NPD detector. In the first field's samples, the residues were 0.097 and 0.025 mg/kg at 2 and 6 days after spraying, respectively. The residues declined to 0.002 mg/kg on the day twelve. Two days after the second spraying the residues was 0.27 mg/kg, which reduced to 0.032 on the day sixth. However the residues were not detectable 32 days after the second spraying. In the second field, residue levels were 0.193 and 0.043 mg/kg at 2 and 6 days after spraying. Residues, which found after 32 days, were less than 0.001 mg/kg. The rate of residue decay in the first field was higher than the second field. PMID:15756871

  5. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, J. Richard

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  6. H-2Dd exploits a four residue peptide binding motif

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized the amino acid sequences of over 20 endogenous peptides bound by a soluble analog of H-2Dd, H-2Dds. Synthetic analogs corresponding to self, viral, tumor, or motif peptides were then tested for their ability to bind to H-2Dd by serologic epitope induction assays using both purified soluble protein and cell surface H-2Dd. The dominant primary sequence motif included glycine at position 2, proline at position 3, and a hydrophobic COOH terminus: leucine, isoleucine, or phenylalanine at position 9 or 10. Ancillary support for high affinity binding was contributed by a positively charged residue at position 5. Three-dimensional computer models of H-2Dds/peptide complexes, based on the crystallographic structure of the human HLA-B27/peptide complex, showed that the basic residue at position 5 was in position to form a salt bridge with aspartic acid at position 156, a polymorphic residue of the H-2Dd heavy (H) chain. Analysis of 28 such models, including 17 based on nonamer self-peptides, revealed considerable variation in the structure of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) surrounding peptide residue 1, depending on the size and charge of the side chain. Interactions between the side chains of peptide residues 5 and 7, and 6 and 8 commonly occurred. Those peptide positions with limited sequence variability and least solvent accessibility may satisfy structural requirements for high affinity binding of the peptide to the MHC class I H chain, whereas the highly variable positions of the peptide (such as positions 4, 6, and 8) may contribute more to the T cell epitopes. PMID:8245770

  7. Mapping wave breaking and residual foam using infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, R. J.; Jessup, A. T.; Chickadel, C.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying wave breaking in the surfzone is important for the advancement of models that seek to accurately predict energy dissipation, near-shore circulation, wave-current interactions, and air-sea gas transfer. Electro-optical remote sensing has been used to try to identify breaking waves. However, the residual foam, left over after the wave has broken, is indistinguishable from active foam in the visible band, which makes identification of active breaking difficult. Here, we explore infrared remote sensing of breaking waves at near-grazing incidence angles to differentiate between active and residual foam in the surfzone. Measurements were made at two field sites: Duck, NC, in September 2010 (Surf Zone Optics) and New River Inlet, NC, in May 2012 (RIVET). At both sites, multiple IR cameras were mounted to a tower onshore, viewing the surfzone at near-grazing incidence angles. For near-grazing incidence angles, small changes in viewing angle, such as those produced by the slope of a wave face, cause large modulations of the infrared signal. Therefore, the passage of waves can be seen in IR imagery. Wave breaking, however, is identified by the resulting foam. Foam has a higher emissivity than undisturbed water and thus appears warmer in an IR image. Residual foam cools quickly [Marmorino and Smith, 2005], thereby making its signal distinct from that of foam produced during active wave breaking. We will use these properties to develop a technique to produce spatial and temporal maps of active breaking and residual foam. These products can then be used to validate current models of surfzone bubbles and foam coverage. From the maps, we can also estimate energy dissipation due to wave breaking in the surfzone and compare this to estimates made with in situ data.; Infrared image of the surfzone at Duck, NC. Examples of actively breaking foam and cool residual foam are labeled.

  8. Induction of Soil Suppressiveness Against Rhizoctonia solani by Incorporation of Dried Plant Residues into Soil.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Masahiro; Olivier, Andriantsoa R; Ota, Yoko; Tojo, Motoaki; Honjo, Hitoshi; Fukui, Ryo

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT Suppressive effects of soil amendment with residues of 12 cultivars of Brassica rapa on damping-off of sugar beet were evaluated in soils infested with Rhizoctonia solani. Residues of clover and peanut were tested as noncruciferous controls. The incidence of damping-off was significantly and consistently suppressed in the soils amended with residues of clover, peanut, and B. rapa subsp. rapifera 'Saori', but only the volatile substance produced from water-imbibed residue of cv. Saori exhibited a distinct inhibitory effect on mycelial growth of R. solani. Nonetheless, disease suppression in such residue-amended soils was diminished or nullified when antibacterial antibiotics were applied to the soils, suggesting that proliferation of antagonistic bacteria resident to the soils were responsible for disease suppression. When the seed (pericarps) colonized by R. solani in the infested soil without residues were replanted into the soils amended with such residues, damping-off was suppressed in all cases. In contrast, when seed that had been colonized by microorganisms in the soils containing the residues were replanted into the infested soil, damping-off was not suppressed. The evidence indicates that the laimosphere, but not the spermosphere, is the site for the antagonistic microbial interaction, which is the chief principle of soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia damping-off.

  9. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  10. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  11. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric M.; Watkins, Thomas R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Dutler, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  12. A color-determining amino acid residue of proteorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yuya; Kawashima, Takayoshi; Abe-Yoshizumi, Rei; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-09-30

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) is a light-driven proton pump found in marine bacteria. More than 1000 PRs are classified as blue-absorbing (λmax ∼ 490 nm) and green-absorbing (λmax ∼ 525 nm) PRs. The color determinant is known to be at position 105, where blue-absorbing and green-absorbing PRs possess Gln and Leu, respectively. This suggests hydrophobicity at position 105 plays a key role in color tuning. Here we successfully introduced 19 amino acid residues into position 105 of green-absorbing PR in the membrane environment and investigated the absorption properties. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis shows that the isomeric composition of the all-trans form is >70% for all mutants, indicating little influence of different isomers on color tuning. Absorption spectra of the wild-type and 19 mutant proteins were well-characterized by the pH-dependent equilibria of the protonated and deprotonated counterion (Asp97) of the Schiff base, whereas the λmax values of these two states and the pKa value differed significantly among mutants. Although Gln and Leu are hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues, respectively, the λmax values of the two states and the pKa value did not correlate with the hydropathy index of residues. In contrast, the λmax and pKa were correlated with the volume of residues, though Gln and Leu possess similar volumes. This observation concludes that the λmax and pKa of Asp97 are determined by local and specific interactions in the Schiff base moiety, in which the volume of the residue at position 105 is more influential than its hydrophobicity. We suggest that the hydrogen-bonding network in the Schiff base moiety plays a key role in the λmax and pKa of Asp97, and the hydrogen-bonding network is significantly perturbed by large amino acid residues but may be preserved by additional water molecule(s) for small amino acid residues at position 105. PMID:25180875

  13. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats.

  14. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  15. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  16. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  17. Use of Combined Uncertainty of Pesticide Residue Results for Testing Compliance with Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs).

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Slate, Andrew; Whitaker, Thomas B; Suszter, Gabriella; Ambrus, Árpád

    2015-05-13

    The uncertainty of pesticide residue levels in crops due to sampling, estimated for 106 individual crops and 24 crop groups from residue data obtained from supervised trials, was adjusted with a factor of 1.3 to accommodate the larger variability of residues under normal field conditions. Further adjustment may be necessary in the case of mixed lots. The combined uncertainty of residue data including the contribution of sampling is used for calculation of an action limit, which should not be exceeded when compliance with maximum residue limits is certified as part of premarketing self-control programs. On the contrary, for testing compliance of marketed commodities the residues measured in composite samples should be greater than or equal to the decision limit calculated only from the combined uncertainty of the laboratory phase of the residue determination. The options of minimizing the combined uncertainty of measured residues are discussed. The principles described are also applicable to other chemical contaminants. PMID:25658668

  18. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40

  19. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for

  20. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  1. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  2. Crop Residues: The Rest of the Story

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent scientific publication stated that to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, the most permanent and rapid solution would be to sink crop residues to the ocean floor where they would be buried in deep ocean sediments. However, mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations by removing crop residu...

  3. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  4. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  5. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  6. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue....

  7. Residuals Management and Water Pollution Control Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    This pamphlet addresses the problems associated with residuals and water quality especially as it relates to the National Water Pollution Control Program. The types of residuals and appropriate management systems are discussed. Additionally, one section is devoted to the role of citizen participation in developing management programs. (CS)

  8. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  9. Measurment Of Residual Stress In Ferromagnetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Grainger, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic (MAC) and magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) techniques combined to provide complete characterization of residual stresses in ferromagnetic structural materials. Combination of MAC and MAE techniques makes it possible to characterize residual tension and compression without being limited by surface conditions and unavailability of calibration standards. Significant in field of characterization of materials as well as detection of fatigue failure.

  10. THE IMMIGRANT POOR AND THE RESIDUAL POOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SEGALMAN, RALPH

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE LIVES OF THE POOR IN AMERICA WILL SHOW DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE IMMIGRANT (AND REFUGEE) POOR AND THE RESIDUAL POOR (NEGROES, PUERTO RICANS, LATIN AMERICANS, INDIANS, AND OTHERS). THE IMMIGRANT POOR WERE ACCULTURATED AND ABSORBED INTO THE MAINSTREAM OF AMERICAN LIFE WITHIN THREE GENERATIONS, WHEREAS THE RESIDUAL POOR HAVE BEEN…

  11. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section 311.39 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it...

  12. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  13. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  14. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  15. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  16. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  17. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  18. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM RESIDUES

    DOEpatents

    Schaap, W.B.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for the recovery of uranium from insoluble oxide residues resistant to repeated leaching with mineral acids. The residue is treated with gaseous hydrogen fluoride, then with hydrogen and again with hydrogen fluoride, preferably at 500 to 700 deg C, prior to the mineral acid leaching.

  19. Importance of surrounding residues for protein stability of partially buried mutations.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M M; Oobatake, M; Kono, H; Uedaira, H; Sarai, A

    2000-10-01

    For understanding the factors influencing protein stability, we have analyzed the relationship between changes in protein stability caused by partially buried mutations and changes in 48 physico-chemical, energetic and conformational properties of amino acid residues. Multiple regression equations were derived to predict the stability of protein mutants and the efficiency of the method has been verified with both back-check and jack-knife tests. We observed a good agreement between experimental and computed stabilities. Further, we have analyzed the effect of sequence window length from 1 to 12 residues on each side of the mutated residue to include the sequence information for predicting protein stability and we found that the preferred window length for obtaining the highest correlation is different for each secondary structure; the preferred window length for helical, strand and coil mutations are, respectively, 0, 9 and 4 residues on both sides of the mutant residues. However, all the secondary structures have significant correlation for a window length of one residue on each side of the mutant position, implying the role of short-range interactions. Extraction of surrounding residue information for various distances (3 to 20A) around the mutant position showed the highest correlation at 8A, 6A and 7A, respectively, for mutations in helical, strand and coil segments. Overall, the information about the surrounding residues within the sphere of 7 to 8A, may explain better the stability in all subsets of partially buried mutations implying that this distance is sufficient to accommodate the residues influenced by major intramolecular interactions for the stability of protein structures. PMID:11089649

  20. Correlations of excited states for sd bosons in the presence of random interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Yoshida, N.; Arima, A.

    2011-04-15

    In this work we study the yrast states of sd-boson systems in the presence of random interactions. It is found that the yrast states with spin-zero ground states among the random ensemble exhibit strong correlations, characterized by anharmonic vibration, s-boson or d-boson condensation, as well as vibrational and rotational motions. We study these correlations explicitly based on their wave functions and the features of two-body interactions in the random ensemble.

  1. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck G; Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wang, Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6 a.u. and a barrier rising at r 5 a.u.

  2. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  3. Residual charge of niobium spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In 1964, Gell-Mann and Zweig hypothesized that the particles inside nuclei are composed of quarks with electric charges of {plus minus} 1/3 e and {plus minus} 1/2 e. Since then, many searches have been made for stable fractional charges. The experiment described in a Millikan-type electrometer with a sample 10{sup 7} times heavier. A 0.28 mm diameter superconducting niobium ball is levitated magnetically between capacitor plates. The ball oscillates vertically on this magnetic spring and an electric field is applied at the oscillation frequency. The rate of change of the ball's oscillation amplitude is proportional to the force exerted on the ball by the electric field. The force on the ball is measured as a function of its position between the capacitor plates to discriminate against the background force due to the patch effect field gradient of the plates. There is one other background effect, due to the tilting of the ball's magnetic moment, which has sometimes manifested itself as a drift or occasionally as an offset in the measured force. An analysis presented in this thesis explains a mechanism for this effect and shows that we can eliminate it in our next run by spinning the ball about the vertical axis. The results are strong evidence for the existence of stable fractional charges of {plus minus} 1/3 e in matter. Out of 58 measurements on 20 balls, 9 have yielded results near - 1/3 e, 34 near 0, 13 near + 1/3e, one of the 0.19 e, and one of 0.44 e. Out of 38 repeat measurements, there have been 12 residual charge changes, 5 near - 1/3e and 7 near + 1/3 e.

  4. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats. PMID:26115226

  5. Recycling of auto shredder residue.

    PubMed

    Nourreddine, Menad

    2007-01-31

    Currently, about 75% of end-of-life vehicle's (ELV) total weight is recycled in EU countries. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residues (ASR) or auto fluff, is disposed of as landfill because of its complexity. It is a major challenge to reduce this percentage of obsolete cars. The European draft directive states that by the year 2006, only 15% of the vehicle's weight can be disposed of at landfill sites and by 2015, this will be reduced to 5%. The draft directive states that a further 10% can be incinerated. The quantities of shredder fluff are likely to increase in the coming years. This is because of the growing number of cars being scrapped, coupled with the increase in the amount of plastics used in cars. In Sweden, some current projects are focusing on recycling of ASR material. In this paper some different alternatives for using this material are reported. The hypothetical injection of ASR into a blast furnace concentrating on ASR's effect to some blast furnace (BF) parameters has been completed using a blast furnace mass balance model. As a result, in principle, ASR can be used as reducing agent in the BF process if certain conditions are met. The particle size of ASR material must be controlled to ensure optimal gasification of the material in the raceway. Regarding the chemical composition of ASR, the non-ferrous content can affect the pig iron quality, which is difficult to rectify at a later point. The most attractive recycling alternative is to use the products obtained from pyrolysis of ASR in appropriate metallurgical processes. PMID:16600493

  6. Impurity Effects on Momentum Transport and Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sehoon; Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-11-01

    Impurities are inevitable during tokamak plasma operation because of strong interaction of plasma and plasma facing component and helium ash as a byproduct of fusion process. They cause problems such as radiation power loss and fusion fuel dilution. On the other hands, they are used to diagnosis plasma parameters (CES, XICS etc) and to suppress edge-localized mode by wall-coating. In this research, we study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  7. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  8. Agricultural residue availability in the United States.

    PubMed

    Haq, Zia; Easterly, James L

    2006-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to forecast US energy production, consumption, and price trends for a 25-yr-time horizon. Biomass is one of the technologies within NEMS, which plays a key role in several scenarios. An endogenously determined biomass supply schedule is used to derive the price-quantity relationship of biomass. There are four components to the NEMS biomass supply schedule including: agricultural residues, energy crops, forestry residues, and urban wood waste/mill residues. The EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 includes updated estimates of the agricultural residue portion of the biomass supply schedule. The changes from previous agricultural residue supply estimates include: revised assumptions concerning corn stover and wheat straw residue availabilities, inclusion of non-corn and non-wheat agricultural residues (such as barley, rice straw, and sugarcane bagasse), and the implementation of assumptions concerning increases in no-till farming. This article will discuss the impact of these changes on the supply schedule. PMID:16915628

  9. Monitoring tricyclazole residues in rice paddy watersheds.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Laura; Capri, Ettore; Padovani, Caterina; Puglisi, Edoardo; Trevisan, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Pesticide application to rice paddies may affect the quality of environmental resources such as groundwater and surface water. The distribution of residues of tricyclazole, an environmentally persistent fungicide used widely in Italy, was monitored in the network of surface water bodies surrounding the main rice production area in Italy. The location of monitoring sites was based on the potential risk for contamination with tricyclazole. This was determined as a function of the area of rice grown, the geographical distribution of rice crops susceptible to the pest, and sales of tricyclazole. Monitoring sites were also located to represent different spatial scales (farm, catchment and basin). For water samples taken shortly after application in July and August, the highest concentrations of tricyclazole were measured at the farm sites. However, residues were also detected at the catchment and basin scale. The 95% of the measured residue levels was below 9.80, 1.20 and 1.15 microg l(-1), at the farm, catchment and basin scales, respectively. In sediment, tricyclazole residues were detected in 12 out 176 samples collected with the 95% of the measured residue levels below the concentration of 0.03 mg kg(-1). Residues were sporadically detected in samples taken after the crop was harvested in November and December. Variables such as the scale of sampling, the season and the year, were significant in determining pesticide residue distribution. The type of water body was less significant.

  10. Antioxidant properties of roasted coffee residues.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wen-Jye; Wang, Bor-Sen; Chang, Lee-Wen; Duh, Pin-Der

    2005-04-01

    The antioxidant activity of roasted coffee residues was evaluated. Extraction with four solvents (water, methanol, ethanol, and n-hexane) showed that water extracts of roasted coffee residues (WERCR) produced higher yields and gave better protection for lipid peroxidation. WERCR showed a remarkable protective effect on oxidative damage of protein. In addition, WERCR showed scavenging of free radicals as well as the reducing ability and to bind ferrous ions, indicating that WERCR acts as both primary and secondary antioxidants. The HPLC analyses showed that phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and nonphenolic compounds [caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfuraldehyde] remained in roasted coffee residues. These compounds showed a protective effect on a liposome model system. The concentrations of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds in roasted coffee residues were 8,400 and 20,400 ppm, respectively. In addition, the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) remaining in roasted coffee residues were believed to show antioxidant activity. These data indicate that roasted coffee residues have excellent potential for use as a natural antioxidant source because the antioxidant compounds remained in roasted coffee residues. PMID:15796608

  11. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction.

  12. Making Sense of Residues on Flaked Stone Artefacts: Learning from Blind Tests

    PubMed Central

    Rots, Veerle; Hayes, Elspeth; Cnuts, Dries; Lepers, Christian; Fullagar, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Residue analysis has become a frequently applied method for identifying prehistoric stone tool use. Residues adhering to the stone tool with varying frequencies are interpreted as being the result of an intentional contact with the worked material during use. Yet, other processes during the life cycle of a stone tool or after deposition may leave residues and these residues may potentially lead to misinterpretations. We present a blind test that was designed to examine this issue. Results confirm that production, retouch, prehension, hafting, various incidental contacts during use and deposition may lead to residue depositions that significantly affect the accurateness of identifications of tool-use. All currently applied residue approaches are concerned. We therefore argue for a closer interaction with independent wear studies and a step-wise procedure in which a low magnification of wear traces is used as a first step for selecting potentially used flakes in archaeological contexts. In addition, residue concentrations on a tool’s edge should be sufficiently dense before linking them with use. PMID:26930210

  13. Making Sense of Residues on Flaked Stone Artefacts: Learning from Blind Tests.

    PubMed

    Rots, Veerle; Hayes, Elspeth; Cnuts, Dries; Lepers, Christian; Fullagar, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Residue analysis has become a frequently applied method for identifying prehistoric stone tool use. Residues adhering to the stone tool with varying frequencies are interpreted as being the result of an intentional contact with the worked material during use. Yet, other processes during the life cycle of a stone tool or after deposition may leave residues and these residues may potentially lead to misinterpretations. We present a blind test that was designed to examine this issue. Results confirm that production, retouch, prehension, hafting, various incidental contacts during use and deposition may lead to residue depositions that significantly affect the accurateness of identifications of tool-use. All currently applied residue approaches are concerned. We therefore argue for a closer interaction with independent wear studies and a step-wise procedure in which a low magnification of wear traces is used as a first step for selecting potentially used flakes in archaeological contexts. In addition, residue concentrations on a tool's edge should be sufficiently dense before linking them with use.

  14. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues.

    PubMed

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology.

  15. Identification of residues by infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.E.; Ayala, N.L.; Jin, Hong; Drumheller, C.T.

    1997-12-31

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy of surfaces can be a very powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface residues. The goal of this work was to study the application of diffuse reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy to the identification of pesticide, herbicide, and explosive residues on surfaces. A field portable diffuse reflectance spectrometer was used to collect the mid-infrared spectra of clean surfaces and contaminated surfaces. These spectra were used as calibration sets to develop automated data analysis to classify or to identify residues on samples. In this presentation, the instrumentation and data process algorithms will be discussed.

  16. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology. PMID:27366642

  17. Diazinon residues in insects from sprayed tobacco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Beyer, W.N.; Kolbe, E.

    1982-01-01

    Pooled samples of tobacco hornworms collected from a field sprayed with 0.84 kg/ha of diazinon were analyzed for residues at various intervals after application. No residues of the toxic metabolite diazoxon were detected (sensitivity 0.5 ppm) in any sample. Only one sample exceeded 1.0 ppm of the parent compound and was collected 4 hours after spraying. Residues declined over time (P<0.01) and none were detected (sensitivity 0.1 ppm) 18 days after spraying. the potential hazard to birds eating these insects appeared to be minimal.

  18. Residual stresses in injection molded products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K. M. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the molding process residual stresses are formed due to thermal contraction during cooling as well as the local pressure history during solidification. In this paper a simple analytical model is reviewed which relates residual stresses, product shrinkage as well as warpage to the temperature and pressure histories during molding. Precise excimer laser layer removal measurements were performed to verify the predicted residual stress distributions. In addition, detailed shrinkage and warpage measurements on a large series of polymers and for different molding conditions were performed and are shown to compare well with the model predictions.

  19. Role of interfacial amino acid residues in assembly, stability, and conformation of a spherical virus capsid

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Carreira, Aura; Riolobos, Laura; Almendral, José María; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-eight amino acid residues involved in most noncovalent interactions between trimeric protein subunits in the capsid of the parvovirus minute virus of mice were truncated individually to alanine, and the effects on capsid assembly, thermostability, and conformation were analyzed. Only seven side chains were essential for protein subunit recognition. These side chains virtually corresponded with those that either buried a large hydrophobic surface on trimer association or formed buried intertrimer hydrogen bonds or salt bridges. The seven residues are evolutionarily conserved, and they define regularly spaced spots on a thin equatorial belt surrounding each trimer. Truncation of the many side chains that were dispensable for assembly, including those participating in solvent-accessible polar interactions, did not substantially affect capsid thermostability either. However, the interfacial residues located at the base of the pores delineating the capsid five-fold axes participated in a heat-induced conformational rearrangement associated with externalization of the capsid protein N terminus, and they were needed for infectivity. Thus, at the subunit interfaces of this model virus capsid, only key residues involved in the strongest interactions are critical for assembly and stability, but additional residues fulfill other important biological roles. PMID:14981262

  20. Recovery of transuranics from process residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Process residues are generated at both the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during aqueous chemical and pyrochemical operations. Frequently, process operations will result in either impure products or produce residues sufficiently contaminated with transuranics to be nondiscardable as waste. Purification and recovery flowsheets for process residues have been developed to generate solutions compatible with subsequent Purex operations and either solid or liquid waste suitable for disposal. The ''scrub alloy'' and the ''anode heel alloy'' are examples of materials generated at RFP which have been processed at SRP using the developed recovery flowsheets. Examples of process residues being generated at SRP for which flowsheets are under development include LECO crucibles and alpha-contaminated hydraulic oil.