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Sample records for residue-residue contact-type potentials

  1. Residue-residue contacts: application to analysis of secondary structure interactions.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Sobolev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Protein structures and their complexes are formed and stabilized by interactions, both inside and outside of the protein. Analysis of such interactions helps in understanding different levels of structures (secondary, super-secondary, and oligomeric states). It can also assist molecular biologists in understanding structural consequences of modifying proteins and/or ligands. In this chapter, our definition of atom-atom and residue-residue contacts is described and applied to analysis of protein-protein interactions in dimeric β-sandwich proteins.

  2. A contact-type tensionmeter for hot rolling mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhaohui; Sun, Yikang; Wang, Jun; Que, Cheng

    2008-12-01

    To improve the hot rolled strip quality and operational stability, a novel tensionmeter based on lever principle is developed which inspects latent waves and provides real references for flatness control in hot rolling process. The contact-type tensionmeter including two segmented rolls can get the transverse tension distribution along the strip width. Tension profile is deduced by different ratio of four force values from the embedded force sensors in tensionmeter system. The compact mechanical structure ensures the tensionmeter's robust stability in hot rolling process, standard hardware and software for data acquisition make the system easy to operate and maintain. The trails have proven tensionmeter successful in improving both strip flatness and mill performance.

  3. Non-contact type seal device for turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, K.; Shibata, M.; Ugajin, M.

    1987-02-24

    A non-contact type seal device is described for a turbocharger, comprising: a retainer mounted in a compressor chamber of a housing of the turbocharger; a collar attached to a compressor wheel mounting portion of a rotor shaft of the turbocharger; and a ring provided on an inner peripheral surface of the retainer, an annular groove receiving the ring being formed in an outer peripheral surface of the collar; a first gap being formed between the outer peripheral surface of the collar and the inner peripheral surface of the retainer; a second gap being formed between the inner surface of the annular groove and each of inner and opposite end surfaces of the ring; and a threaded groove being formed in the inner peripheral surface of the retainer in opposition to the outer peripheral surface of the collar.

  4. Residue-residue contact substitution probabilities derived from aligned three-dimensional structures and the identification of common folds.

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, M. A.; Johnson, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    We report the derivation of scores that are based on the analysis of residue-residue contact matrices from 443 3-dimensional structures aligned structurally as 96 families, which can be used to evaluate sequence-structure matches. Residue-residue contacts and the more than 3 x 10(6) amino acid substitutions that take place between pairs of these contacts at aligned positions within each family of structures have been tabulated and segregated according to the solvent accessibility of the residues involved. Contact maps within a family of structures are shown to be highly conserved (approximately 75%) even when the sequence identity is approaching 10%. In a comparison involving a globin structure and the search of a sequence databank (> 21,000 sequences), the contact probability scores are shown to provide a very powerful secondary screen for the top scoring sequence-structure matches, where between 69% and 84% of the unrelated matches are eliminated. The search of an aligned set of 2 globins against a sequence databank and the subsequent residue contact-based evaluation of matches locates all 618 globin sequences before the first non-globin match. From a single bacterial serine proteinase structure, the structural template approach coupled with residue-residue contact substitution data lead to the detection of the mammalian serine proteinase family among the top matches in the search of a sequence databank. PMID:7756991

  5. CMWeb: an interactive on-line tool for analysing residue-residue contacts and contact prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Dániel; Simon, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2012-07-01

    A contact map is a 2D derivative of the 3D structure of proteins, containing various residue-residue (RR) contacts within the structure. Contact maps can be used for the reconstruction of structure with high accuracy and can be predicted from the amino acid sequence. Therefore understanding the various properties of contact maps is an important step in protein structure prediction. For investigating basic properties of contact formation and contact clusters we set up an integrated system called Contact Map Web Viewer, or CMWeb for short. The server can be used to visualize contact maps, to link contacts and to show them both in 3D structures and in multiple sequence alignments and to calculate various statistics on contacts. Moreover, we have implemented five contact prediction methods in the CMWeb server to visualize the predicted and real RR contacts in one contact map. The results of other RR contact prediction methods can be uploaded as a benchmark test onto the server as well. All of these functionality is behind a web server, thus for using our application only a Java-capable web browser is needed, no further program installation is required. The CMWeb is freely accessible at http://cmweb.enzim.hu.

  6. Changes in the remuneration system for general practitioners: effects on contact type and consultation length.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Christel E; Verheij, Robert A; te Brake, Hans; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2014-01-01

    In The Netherlands, the remuneration system for GPs changed in 2006. Before the change, GPs received a capitation fee for publicly insured patients and fee for service (FFS) for privately insured patients. In 2006, a combined system was introduced for all patients, with elements of capitation as well as FFS. This created a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of the change in the remuneration system on contact type and consultation length. Our hypothesis was that for former publicly insured patients the change would lead to an increase in the proportion of home visits, a decrease in the proportion of telephone consultations and an increase in consultation length relative to formerly privately insured patients. Data were used from electronic medical records from 36 to 58 Dutch GP practices and from 532,800 to 743,961 patient contacts between 2002 and 2008 for contact type data. For consultation length, 1,994 videotaped consultations were used from 85 GP practices in 2002 and 499 consultations from 16 GP practices in 2008. Multilevel multinomial regression analysis was used to analyse consultation type. Multilevel logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine consultation length. Our study shows that contact type and consultation length were hardly affected by the change in remuneration system, though the proportion of home visits slightly decreased for privately insured patients compared with publicly insured patients. Declaration behaviour regarding telephone consultations did change; GP practices more consistently declared telephone consultations after 2006.

  7. Process window variation comparison between NTD and PTD for various contact type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doyoun; Yune, Hyoungsoon; Park, Daejin; Jeong, Joohong; Moon, Woosung; Kim, Mingu; Oh, Seyoung; Park, Chanha; Yang, Hyunjo

    2016-03-01

    As technology node has been shrinking for bit growth, various technologies have been developed for high productivity. Nevertheless, lithography technology is close to its limit. In order to overcome these limits, EUV(Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography) and DSA(Directed Self-Assembly) are being developed, but there still exists problems for mass production. Currently, all lithography technology developments focus on solving the problems related to fine patterning and widening process window. One of the technologies is NTD(Negative Tone Development) which uses inverse development compared to PTD(Positive Tone Development). The exposed area is eliminated by positive developer in PTD, whereas the exposed area is remained in NTD. It is well known that NTD has better characteristics compared to PTD in terms of DOF(Depth of Focus) margin, MEEF(Mask Error Enhancement Factor), and LER(Line End Roughness) for both small contact holes and isolated spaces [1]. Contact hole patterning is especially more difficult than space patterning because of the lower image contrast and smaller process window [2]. Thus, we have focused on the trend of both NTD and PTD contact hole patterns in various environments. We have analyzed optical performance of both NTD and PTD according to size and pitch by SMO(Source Mask Optimization) software. Moreover, the simulation result of NTD process was compared with the NTD wafer level performance and the process window variation of NTD was characterized through both results. This result will be a good guideline to avoid DoF loss when using NTD process for contact layers with various contact types. In this paper, we studied the impact of different sources on various combinations of pattern sizes and pitches while estimating DOF trends aside from source and pattern types.

  8. Development of Soft X-ray Contact-type Microscope and Application to Micro-spectroscopy in Water-window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejima, T.; Neichi, Y.; Ishida, F.; Yanagihara, M.

    2013-10-01

    A contact-type microscope for the observation of organelles in a culture solution is fabricated with the use of a scintillator plate which shows high quantum efficiency and linearity in Water-window wavelength region. The fabricated microscope was applied to micro -spectroscopy, and an absorption spectrum of polystyrene beads was obtained from SX images taken by the microscope.

  9. Determination of transfer rate and nature of the residue(s) in milk from {sup 14}C-atrazine cows

    SciTech Connect

    Thalacker, F.W.; Ash, S.G.; Simoneaux, B.J.

    1996-10-01

    In order to determine the rate of transfer and the nature of the atrazine residues present in milk, lactating dairy cattle were treated with atrazine at three concentrations, 0.764 ppm, 0.0747 ppm and 0.0085 ppm (dry weight of food consumed). The concentrations were selected to bridge the gap between the concentration used for EPA metabolism studies (10 ppm) and the potential exposure level of dairy cattle to atrazine and its chlorotriazine metabolites through feed. The cattle were dosed following the morning milking for nine consecutive days with a single capsule bolus of {sup 14}C-atrazine. Milk was collected twice daily and aliquots of each milking and the individual cow`s daily pool of milk were analyzed by liquid scinitllation counting (LSC). The concentrations of {sup 14}C-residues in the milk plateaued on approximately day 3 and the mean {sup 14}C-atrazine levels in milk were 11.2 ppb, 1.13 ppb and 0.152 ppb for the high, middle and low dosed animals, respectively. The transfer of radioactive level of exposure to {sup 14}C-atrazine. The nature of the residues in milk were determined by extracting milk samples and analysis by HPLC, TLC or Aminex chromatography. Diaminchlorotriazine was the only chlorinated metabolite in the milk, constituting approximately 65% to 75% of the total radioactive residues (TRR).

  10. N-SCAN: new vibromodulation system for detection and monitoring of cracks and other contact-type defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donskoy, Dmitri; Ekimov, Alexander; Luzzato, Emile; Lottiaux, Jean-Louis; Stoupin, Stanislav; Zagrai, Andrei

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, innovative vibro-modulation technique has been introduced for detection of contact-type interfaces such as cracks, debondings, and delaminations. The technique utilizes the effect of nonlinear interaction of ultrasound and vibrations at the interface of the defect. Vibration varies on the contact area of the interface modulating passing through ultrasonic wave. The modulation manifests itself as additional side-band spectral components with the combination frequencies in the spectrum of the received signal. The presence of these components allows for detection and differentiation of the contact-type defects from other structural and material inhomogeneities. Vibro-modulation technique has been implemented in N-SCAN damage detection system. The system consists of a digital synthesizer, high and low frequency amplifiers, a magnetostrictive shaker, ultrasonic transducers and a PC-based data acquisition/processing station with N-SCAN software. The ability of the system to detect contact-type defects was experimentally verified using specimens of simple and complex geometries made of steel, aluminum, composites and other structural materials. N-SCAN proved to be very effective for nondestructive testing of full-scale structures ranging from 24 foot-long gun barrels to stainless steel pipes used in nuclear power plants. Among advantages of the system are applicability for the wide range of structural materials and for structures with complex geometries, real time data processing, convenient interface for system operation, simplicity of interpretation of results, no need for sensor scanning along structure, onsite inspection of large structures at a fraction of time as compared with conventional techniques. This paper describes the basic principles of nonlinear vibro-modulation NDE technique, some theoretical background for nonlinear interaction and justification of signal processing algorithm. It is also presents examples of practical implementation and

  11. Magmatic ore deposits in layered intrusions - Descriptive model for reef-type PGE and contact-type Cu-Ni-PGE deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Layered, ultramafic to mafic intrusions are uncommon in the geologic record, but host magmatic ore deposits containing most of the world's economic concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) (figs. 1 and 2). These deposits are mined primarily for their platinum, palladium, and rhodium contents (table 1). Magmatic ore deposits are derived from accumulations of crystals of metallic oxides, or immiscible sulfide, or oxide liquids that formed during the cooling and crystallization of magma, typically with mafic to ultramafic compositions. "PGE reefs" are stratabound PGE-enriched lode mineralization in mafic to ultramafic layered intrusions. The term "reef" is derived from Australian and South African literature for this style of mineralization and used to refer to (1) the rock layer that is mineralized and has distinctive texture or mineralogy (Naldrett, 2004), or (2) the PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization that occurs within the rock layer. For example, Viljoen (1999) broadly defined the Merensky Reef as "a mineralized zone within or closely associated with an unconformity surface in the ultramafic cumulate at the base of the Merensky Cyclic Unit." In this report, we will use the term PGE reef to refer to the PGE-enriched mineralization, not the host rock layer. Within a layered igneous intrusion, reef-type mineralization is laterally persistent along strike, extending for the length of the intrusion, typically tens to hundreds of kilometers. However, the mineralized interval is thin, generally centimeters to meters thick, relative to the stratigraphic thickness of layers in an intrusion that vary from hundreds to thousands of meters. PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization is also found near the contacts or margins of layered mafic to ultramafic intrusions (Iljina and Lee, 2005). This contact-type mineralization consists of disseminated to massive concentrations of iron-copper-nickel-PGE-enriched sulfide mineral concentrations in zones that can be tens to hundreds

  12. Secondary "smile"-gap in the density of states of a diffusive Josephson junction for a wide range of contact types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutlinger, J.; Glazman, L.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Belzig, W.

    2014-07-01

    The superconducting proximity effect leads to strong modifications of the local density of states in diffusive or chaotic cavity Josephson junctions, which displays a phase-dependent energy gap around the Fermi energy. The so-called minigap of the order of the Thouless energy ETh is related to the inverse dwell time in the diffusive region in the limit ETh≪Δ, where Δ is the superconducting energy gap. In the opposite limit of a large Thouless energy ETh≫Δ, a small new feature has recently attracted attention, namely, the appearance of a further secondary gap, which is around two orders of magnitude smaller compared to the usual superconducting gap. It appears in a chaotic cavity just below the superconducting gap edge Δ and vanishes for some value of the phase difference between the superconductors. We extend previous theory restricted to a normal cavity connected to two superconductors through ballistic contacts to a wider range of contact types. We show that the existence of the secondary gap is not limited to ballistic contacts, but is a more general property of such systems. Furthermore, we derive a criterion which directly relates the existence of a secondary gap to the presence of small transmission eigenvalues of the contacts. For generic continuous distributions of transmission eigenvalues of the contacts, no secondary gap exists, although we observe a singular behavior of the density of states at Δ. Finally, we provide a simple one-dimensional scattering model which is able to explain the characteristic "smile" shape of the secondary gap.

  13. Towards Accurate Residue-Residue Hydrophobic Contact Prediction for Alpha Helical Proteins Via Integer Linear Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Rajgaria, R.; McAllister, S. R.; Floudas, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    A new optimization-based method is presented to predict the hydrophobic residue contacts in α-helical proteins. The proposed approach uses a high resolution distance dependent force field to calculate the interaction energy between different residues of a protein. The formulation predicts the hydrophobic contacts by minimizing the sum of these contact energies. These residue contacts are highly useful in narrowing down the conformational space searched by protein structure prediction algorithms. The proposed algorithm also offers the algorithmic advantage of producing a rank ordered list of the best contact sets. This model was tested on four independent α-helical protein test sets and was found to perform very well. The average accuracy of the predictions (separated by at least six residues) obtained using the presented method was approximately 66% for single domain proteins. The average true positive and false positive distances were also calculated for each protein test set and they are 8.87 Å and 14.67 Å respectively. PMID:18767158

  14. A single-layer CCD image sensor with wide gap electrode and gradual potential channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monoi, Makoto; Sasaki, Syu; Dobashi, Kumiko; Iwai, Junya; Sekine, Hirokazu; Tomita, Ken; Ooki, Masayuki; Mashiko, Seiichi; Saito, Hiroyuki; Itabashi, Yasushi

    2009-02-01

    CCD is a continuum of MOS capacitors, so its big capacitance becomes one of the major disadvantages compared with CMOS image sensor, that cause not only large power dissipation but also other problems, such as generating an electro magnetic interference(EMI). Single-layer electrode CCD is one of the ways to reduce CCD capacitance compared with conventional two layer CCD electrode structure. On the other hand, image scanning system using linear image sensor is moving from lens reduction optics system to contact type optics system, because contact type system has smaller size than lens reduction system. Image sensor for contact optics requires much longer CCD pitch. It means that charge transfer in CCD becomes more difficult than short pitch CCD. We have developed a CCD linear image sensor, called "Gratron", with gradual potential channel CCD for the purpose of accelerating charge transfer in long channel single-layer CCD. A CCD that is driven by two phase clock is fabricated with single layer poly Si electrodes that have wider electrode gaps and longer electrode channel length. At the sensor that has 21um pitch pixel linear array with a single sided CCD register, high charge transfer efficiency (>99%) is obtained at 25MHz and small capacitance of CCD is realized.

  15. Improving residue-residue contact prediction via low-rank and sparse decomposition of residue correlation matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haicang; Gao, Yujuan; Deng, Minghua; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Jianwei; Li, Shuai Cheng; Zheng, Wei-Mou; Bu, Dongbo

    2016-03-25

    Strategies for correlation analysis in protein contact prediction often encounter two challenges, namely, the indirect coupling among residues, and the background correlations mainly caused by phylogenetic biases. While various studies have been conducted on how to disentangle indirect coupling, the removal of background correlations still remains unresolved. Here, we present an approach for removing background correlations via low-rank and sparse decomposition (LRS) of a residue correlation matrix. The correlation matrix can be constructed using either local inference strategies (e.g., mutual information, or MI) or global inference strategies (e.g., direct coupling analysis, or DCA). In our approach, a correlation matrix was decomposed into two components, i.e., a low-rank component representing background correlations, and a sparse component representing true correlations. Finally the residue contacts were inferred from the sparse component of correlation matrix. We trained our LRS-based method on the PSICOV dataset, and tested it on both GREMLIN and CASP11 datasets. Our experimental results suggested that LRS significantly improves the contact prediction precision. For example, when equipped with the LRS technique, the prediction precision of MI and mfDCA increased from 0.25 to 0.67 and from 0.58 to 0.70, respectively (Top L/10 predicted contacts, sequence separation: 5 AA, dataset: GREMLIN). In addition, our LRS technique also consistently outperforms the popular denoising technique APC (average product correction), on both local (MI_LRS: 0.67 vs MI_APC: 0.34) and global measures (mfDCA_LRS: 0.70 vs mfDCA_APC: 0.67). Interestingly, we found out that when equipped with our LRS technique, local inference strategies performed in a comparable manner to that of global inference strategies, implying that the application of LRS technique narrowed down the performance gap between local and global inference strategies. Overall, our LRS technique greatly facilitates protein contact prediction by removing background correlations. An implementation of the approach called COLORS (improving COntact prediction using LOw-Rank and Sparse matrix decomposition) is available from http://protein.ict.ac.cn/COLORS/. PMID:26920058

  16. Geometry and kinematics of the plate on disk contact type influencing friction measurements on UMT tribometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicu, R.; Bobancu, S.; Popa, S.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents theoretical bases and experimental test on the pin on disk module of the UMT tribometer. In order to determine the friction coefficient between a chain and a guide, the rotational pin on disk module of the UMT tribometer has been adapted using a plate of the chain (instead of the pin) pushed against a rotating disk made from the guide material. In this case the contact surface between plate and disk is a rectangle. In comparison with the pin on disk case, the differences between sliding velocities on the rectangular contact surface of the plate on disk case may be considerable bigger. Study of kinematics shows the maximum and minimum sliding velocities and friction forces. The relative extreme sliding velocities and friction forces are expressed depending on geometrical inputs. The study continues with the measurements of friction coefficients maintaining the same couple of materials, surface dimension, normal force and sliding velocity at the centre of the rectangle with variation of the radius. Conclusion is drawn on the influence of the geometry and kinematics of the plate on disk measured friction.

  17. Thermal response of proteins (histone H2AX, H3.1) by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation with a knowledge-based phenomenological potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Miriam; Heermann, Dieter; Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2012-02-01

    Using a coarse-grained bond fluctuating model, we investigate structure and dynamics of two histones, H2AX (143 residues) and H3.1 (136 residues) as a function of temperature (T). A knowledged based contact matrix is used as an input for a phenomenological residue-residue interaction in a generalized Lennard-Jones potential. Metropolis algorithm is used to execute stochastic movement of each residue. A number of local and global physical quantities are analyzed. Despite unique energy and mobility profiles of its residues in a specific sequence, the histone H3.1 appears to undergo a structural transformation from a random coil to a globular conformation on reducing the temperature. The radius of gyration of the histone H2AX, in contrast, exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on temperature with a maximum at a characteristic temperature (Tc) where crossover occurs from a positive (stretching below Tc) to negative (contraction above Tc) thermal response on increasing T. Multi-scale structures of the proteins are examined by a detailed analysis of their structure functions.

  18. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  19. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  20. Vector potential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.

    1989-01-01

    Vector potential and related methods, for the simulation of both inviscid and viscous flows over aerodynamic configurations, are briefly reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of several formulations are discussed and alternate strategies are recommended. Scalar potential, modified potential, alternate formulations of Euler equations, least-squares formulation, variational principles, iterative techniques and related methods, and viscous flow simulation are discussed.

  1. The effects of physical contact type on the internal and external demands during a rugby league match simulation protocol.

    PubMed

    Norris, Jonathan P; Highton, Jamie; Hughes, Stephen F; Twist, Craig

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the type of contact influences physiological, perceptual and locomotive load during a simulated rugby league match. Eleven male university rugby league players performed two trials of the rugby league movement simulation protocol for interchange forwards with a traditional soft tackle bag and a weighted tackle sled to replicate contact demands. The interchange forward-specific simulation was chosen given the contact frequency is higher for this group of players compared to whole match players. Locomotive rate, sprint speed, tackle intensity, heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion were analysed during the first and second bouts that replicated two ~23 min on-field passages. Countermovement jump (CMJ) was measured before and immediately after each trial. More time was spent in heart rate zone between 91 and 100% HRpeak during the first (effect size ± 90% confidence interval: 0.44 ± 0.49) and second bouts (0.44 ± 0.43), and larger (0.6 ± 0.69) decrements in CMJ performance were observed during the sled trial (5.9, s = 4.9%) compared to the bag trial (2.6, s = 5.4%). Changing the type of contact during the match simulation subtly altered both the internal and external loads on participants. Using a standard tackle bag results in faster sprint speed to contact, but lower overall high-intensity running. Conversely, a heavier tackle object increases the internal load and results in greater lower limb neuromuscular fatigue as reflected by the decrease in CMJ performance.

  2. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  3. Studies on the Evaluation Methods for the Food Quality with a Non-contact type Capacitance Sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narumiya, Tadaoki; Hagura, Yoshio

    Changes of capacitance and temperature of ethyl alcohol, hamburger and dough with cheese filling were measured with specially-made measuring devices during the freezing and thawing. The results of measurement of capacitance and temperature suggest a linear correlation for ethyl alcohol as a single constituent substance. The adequate correlation is too estimated from the results of food samples, though the capacitance of food sample varies greatly at the start and end of freezing and thawing process. It has been demonstrated that the quality or physical condition of food sample can be determined easily by the measurement of capacitance using the specially-made devices. Also the quality or physical condition of food can be determined easily by the non-contact and non-destructive measurements of capacitance. A variety application of the present technique is conceivable for the process control of the freezing and thawing foods.

  4. Potentials and bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Buell, W.F. ); Shadwick, B.A. )

    1995-03-01

    We discuss several quantum mechanical potential problems, focusing on those which highlight commonly held misconceptions about the existence of bound states. We present a proof, based on the variational principle, that certain one dimensional potentials always support at least one bound state, regardless of the potential's strength. We examine arguments concerning the existence of bound states based on the uncertainty principle and demonstrate, by explicit calculations, that such arguments must be viewed with skepticism.

  5. Pumping potential wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E. Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, all such structures must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well. Nevertheless, steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which pump ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electron collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density, multidipole plasma are considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two-dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important.

  6. Revisiting Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the notion of curriculum potential by revisiting the ideas of Miriam Ben-Peretz and Joseph Schwab. Invoking the German "Didaktik" tradition and by way of a curriculum-making framework, the paper argues that interpreting curriculum materials for curriculum potential requires a careful analysis and unpacking of the meanings and…

  7. Potential conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzinger, Michael; Popovych, Roman O.

    2008-10-15

    We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman et al. [J. Math. Phys. 47, 113505 (2006)]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings, and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of these results is given. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

  8. Potential theory of radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical method is being developed by which the structure of a radiation field can be predicted by a radiation potential theory, similar to a classical potential theory. The introduction of a scalar potential is justified on the grounds that the spectral intensity vector is irrotational. The vector is also solenoidal in the limits of a radiation field in complete radiative equilibrium or in a vacuum. This method provides an exact, elliptic type equation that will upgrade the accuracy and the efficiency of the current CFD programs required for the prediction of radiation and flow fields. A number of interesting results emerge from the present study. First, a steady state radiation field exhibits an optically modulated inverse square law distribution character. Secondly, the unsteady radiation field is structured with two conjugate scalar potentials. Each is governed by a Klein-Gordon equation with a frictional force and a restoring force. This steady potential field structure and the propagation of radiation potentials are consistent with the well known results of classical electromagnetic theory. The extension of the radiation potential theory for spray combustion and hypersonic flow is also recommended.

  9. Two Phase Streaming Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S S; Wheatall, M W

    1987-01-20

    The streaming potentials generated by the flow of both liquid and gas through either a Pyrex capillary tube or else an unconsolidated Pyrex porous medium were investigated. This mixture of distilled water plus nitrogen gas simulated wet stream but allowed experiments to be run at room temperature. Single-phase flow of distilled water alone resulted in a constant voltage-to-pressure drop ratio, E/Δp, of +0.15 v/psi for the capillary tube and -0.52 v/psi for the porous medium. For both single- and two-phase flow through the capillary tube, the upstream potential was always positive relative to the downstream electrode while the opposite was true for the porous medium. The maximum two-phase potentials generated in the porous medium were about four times as great as those generated in the capillary tube for similar gas fractions, Γ. For the capillary tube experiments the potentials generated when Γ < ≈ 0.5 were equal to or slightly less than those for single-phase flow, while for the porous medium the potentials were always greater than those for single-phase flow. When Γ > ≈ 0.5 for both kinds of flow systems Γ had a profound effect on streaming potential and reached a pronounced maximum when 0.94 < Γ < 0.99. The implications of these streaming potentials for geothermal exploration and delineation of geothermal reservoirs is also discussed in the paper. 7 figs., 10 refs.

  10. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  11. Recovering the inflationary potential

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Michael S.

    1993-08-06

    A procedure is developed for the recovery of the inflationary potential owl the interval that affects astrophysical scales. The amplitudes of the scalar and tensor metric perturbations and their power-spectrum indices, which can in principle be inferred from large-angle CBR anisotropy experiments and other cosmological data, determine the value of the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives. From these, the inflationary potential can be reconstructed in a Taylor series and the consistency of the inflationary hypothesis tested. A number of examples are presented, and the effect of observational uncertainties is discussed.

  12. These Plants Have Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Describes a learning-cycle approach to teach a lesson exploring the biotic potential of plants. Discusses the phases of learning: exploration, concept invention, and application. Lists five resources. (JRH)

  13. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  14. The preference for potential.

    PubMed

    Tormala, Zakary L; Jia, Jayson S; Norton, Michael I

    2012-10-01

    When people seek to impress others, they often do so by highlighting individual achievements. Despite the intuitive appeal of this strategy, we demonstrate that people often prefer potential rather than achievement when evaluating others. Indeed, compared with references to achievement (e.g., "this person has won an award for his work"), references to potential (e.g., "this person could win an award for his work") appear to stimulate greater interest and processing, which can translate into more favorable reactions. This tendency creates a phenomenon whereby the potential to be good at something can be preferred over actually being good at that very same thing. We document this preference for potential in laboratory and field experiments, using targets ranging from athletes to comedians to graduate school applicants and measures ranging from salary allocations to online ad clicks to admission decisions.

  15. California's potential volcanic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

  16. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horticultural Review allows extensive reviews of the state of the knowledge on certain topics or crops. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential, is outlined with an Introduction, Botany, Horticulture, Propagation, Uses and Conclusion sections. This review compiles literature from around the w...

  17. Constant potential pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of constant potential pulse polarography, In which all pulses are to be the same potential, is presented theoretically and evaluated experimentally. The response obtained is in the form of a faradaic current wave superimposed on a constant capacitative component. Results obtained with a computer-controlled system exhibit a capillary response current similar to that observed In normal pulse polarography. Calibration curves for Pb obtained using a modified commercial pulse polarographic instrument are in good accord with theoretical predictions.

  18. Celestial mechanics - Potential torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klat, A. I.; Marchal, C.

    1981-01-01

    The mutual potential of two solid bodies is a function of the six parameters defining the relative position of these two bodies; it is not a function of only either three or five parameters as it is implicitly assumed in most studies. The sixth parameter, the potential torsion, is related to the orientation of the two bodies around the axis of the two centers; its influence is small. An upper limit is given.

  19. Potential risks of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalova, Totka; Louda, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the design and manipulation of materials at the nanometer scale such that novel or enhanced properties emerge. It is a new area of knowledge that promises a dazzling array of opportunities in areas as diverse as manufacturing, energy, health care, and waste treatment. But while the ability to develop nanomaterials and incorporate them into products is advancing rapidly, our understanding of the potential environmental, health, and safety effects of nanomaterials — and of the most effective ways to manage such effects — has proceeded at a much slower pace. Because of the novel properties that emerge at the nano scale, nanomaterials may require more and different information than called for under traditional risk management systems. And given the enormous commercial and societal benefits that may potentially come from this technology, it is likely that nanomaterials, and the products and other applications containing them, will be widely produced and used. Therefore it is especially important to understand and minimize the potential risks.

  20. Estimating earthquake potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The hazards to life and property from earthquakes can be minimized in three ways. First, structures can be designed and built to resist the effects of earthquakes. Second, the location of structures and human activities can be chosen to avoid or to limit the use of areas known to be subject to serious earthquake hazards. Third, preparations for an earthquake in response to a prediction or warning can reduce the loss of life and damage to property as well as promote a rapid recovery from the disaster. The success of the first two strategies, earthquake engineering and land use planning, depends on being able to reliably estimate the earthquake potential. The key considerations in defining the potential of a region are the location, size, and character of future earthquakes and frequency of their occurrence. Both historic seismicity of the region and the geologic record are considered in evaluating earthquake potential

  1. Ancestry, Temporality, and Potentiality

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I examine the variety of ways potential is articulated, entailed, and produced in how the field of cancer genetics is being constituted as a domain of transnational research and an emerging site of health-care intervention in southern Brazil. Drawing on analysis of fieldwork in Brazilian cancer-genetics clinics, I explore how different expressions of potential come to inform dynamically the pursuit of prevention, care, and research as diversely scaled investments for those working and living with cancer-genetics knowledge and technologies. It illustrates how specific temporalities help to constitute and “abductively” frame the meaning of these different potentials particularly as this relates to a focus on ancestry. Colonial histories of migration, the embodied effects of dietary habits, or the moral failings of near and distant ancestors as well as promissory futures and the contingency of lived lives become at different times templates for identifying, materializing, and transforming how the potential of cancer genetics in Brazil is articulated. Potential is also expressed through an idiom of “choice” in different efforts to situate participation in cancer-genetics research as prevention or to negotiate access to basic public health. I explore how these expressions of cancer genetics as potential powerfully yet unevenly work to sustain knowledge practices as well as propel patients and their families into fledgling domains of clinical practice and scientific research. At the same time there is always an “excess of meaning” in these endeavors that make visible lines of fracture and disjuncture in collective efforts to make future histories of and from the pursuit of cancer genetics in southern Brazil. PMID:25018561

  2. Hyperon-nucleus potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, C. B.; Gal, A.

    We review models for the interaction of baryons ( N, Λ, Σ and Ξ) with nuclei, emphasizing the underlying meson exchange picture. Starting from a phenomenological one boson exchange model (the Nijmegen potential, as an example) which accounts for the available NN, ΛN and ΣN two-body scattering data, we show how to construct the effective baryon-nucleon interaction ( G-matrix). Employing the folding model, we then obtain the many-body potentials for bound states in terms of the nuclear density and the appropriate spin-isospin weighted G-matrices. The models we emphasize most impose SU(3) constraints on baryon-baryon coupling constants SU(3) is broken through the use of physical masses), although we also compare with rough estimates based on quark model relations between coupling constants. We stress the essential unity and economy of such models, in which nucleon and hyperon-nucleus potentials are intimately related via SU(3), and the connection between the two-body and many-body potentials is preserved. We decompose the nuclear potentials into central and spin-orbit parts, each of which is isospin dependent. For nucleons, the microscopic origin of the isospin dependent Lane potential V1 N is clarified. For Λ and Σ hyperons, the one boson exchange model with SU(3) constraints leads to one-body spin-orbit strengths VLSB which are relatively weak ( VLSΛ ≈ 1.5-2 MeV, VLSΣ ≈ 2.5-;3 MeV, compared to VLSN ≈ 7-9 MeV). We demonstrate the interplay between symmetric and antisymmetric two-body spin-orbit forces which give rise to these results, as well as the special role of K and K ∗ exchange for hyperons. We contrast these results with predictions based on the naive quark model. From S and P-wave two-body interactions, a Lane potential for the Σ of depth V1 Σ ≈ 50-60 MeV is predicted although this result is somewhat uncertain. For the Ξ, the nuclear potential is very different in various models for the two-body interaction based on SU(3) or the quark

  3. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  4. Five Potential Crises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futurist, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Five areas that have great potential for becoming crises in the future are described: a warming of the earth's climate, changing weather patterns and growing seasons; water shortage; the decay of the physical infrastructure, e.g., decay of roads, bridges; breakdown of the international monetary and trading system; and nuclear warfare. (Author/RM)

  5. Exploration potential of Albania

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, M.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Albania is rich in natural resources, especially crude oil and natural gas. It has far greater petroleum reserves for its size than any other country in Eastern Europe. The nation consists of three principal geologic provinces. Strongly folded upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata comprise the Sub-Pelagonian and Pelagonian massifs in the northeast Albania. The search for oil and gas in the future is likely to be concentrated in the coastal basins and offshore in the relatively shallow waters of the Adriatic Sea. Hydrocarbons have been trapped onshore in anticlines and tilted fault blocks, primarily in lenticular upper Miocene sandstones and in Helvetian limestones. Exploration for stratigraphic and other nonstructural traps may represent the best potential for future discoveries onshore. Albania's greatest oil and gas potential is probably in the Albanian shelf of the Durres basin, offshore. No wells have ever been drilled offshore, and exploration is confined to a limited, nearshore seismic survey. Recent access to Albanian data suggests most published regional interpretations are many years out of date. Albania's offshore potential includes several zones of hydrocarbon generation in Mesozoic to Paleogene strata. Potential reservoirs include Neogene flysch sandstones and Mesozoic platform carbonates. Albania has recently invited foreign oil companies to apply for offshore exploration rights. As Albania is opened to foreign investment in the petroleum sector, there is little doubt that modern seismic techniques and the deliberate search for subtle traps may be expected to lead to substantial new discoveries.

  6. Forecasting Potential Crises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, William P.

    1984-01-01

    By foreseeing the possibility of crisis, we can plan how to respond. Five potential crisis areas are identified and possible consequences discussed. The areas are the warming of the earth; water shortage; collapse of the physical infrastructure, e.g., decay of roads; global financial crisis; and the threat of nuclear war. (Author/RM)

  7. Germany's power potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the potential market for independent power projects in Germany after the reunification. The topics discussed in the article include legal questions, pricing regulations, pollution regulations, energy efficiency regulations, the carbon tax, the market for modernization of power plants and construction of new capacity, and the future outlook.

  8. California's potential volcanic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, P.

    1989-01-01

    This is a summary of "Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California' (USGS Bulletin No. 1847: price $4.75). The chief areas of danger are Lassen Peak, Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake Highland in the north; Clear Lake, Mono Lake and Long Valley in the centre; and Owen's River-Death Valley, Amboy Crater and the Saltan Butter in the south of the State. -A.Scarth

  9. Vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.

    2011-10-15

    A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

  10. Nanoparticle ζ -potentials.

    PubMed

    Doane, Tennyson L; Chuang, Chi-Hung; Hill, Reghan J; Burda, Clemens

    2012-03-20

    For over half a century, alternating electric fields have been used to induce particle transport, furnishing the ζ-potential of analytes with sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers. Concurrent advances in nanotechnology have provided new materials for catalysis, self-assembly, and biomedical applications, all of which benefit from a thorough understanding of particle surface charge. Therefore, the measurement of the ζ-potential via electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) has become essential for nanoparticle (NP) research. However, the interpretation of NP electrophoretic mobility, especially that of ligand-coated NPs, can be a complex undertaking. Despite the inherent intricacy of these data, key concepts from colloidal science can help to distill valuable information from ELS. In this Account, we adopt PEGylated Au NPs as an illustrative example to explore extensions of the classical theories of Smoluchowski, Hückel, and Henry to more contemporary theories for ligand-coated NP systems such as those from Ohshima, and Hill, Saville, and Russel. First, we review the basic experimental considerations necessary to understand NP electrophoretic mobility, identifying when O'Brien and White's numerical solution of the standard electrokinetic model should be adopted over Henry's closed-form analytical approximation. Next, we explore recent developments in the theory of ligand-coated particle electrophoresis, and how one can furnish accurate and meaningful relationships between measured NP mobility, ζ-potential, and surface charge. By identifying key ligand-coated NP parameters (e.g., coating thickness, permeability, molecular mass, and hydrodynamic segment size), we present a systematic method for quantitatively interpreting NP electrophoretic mobility. In addition to reviewing theoretical foundations, we describe our recent results that examine how the unique surface curvature of NPs alters and controls their properties. These data provide

  11. Measuring management potential.

    PubMed

    Kee, C C; Johnson, J Y; Foley, B J; Harvey, S S; Leonard, T; Russell, C; Saunders, J; Williams, J

    1996-06-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to instruments that may be used to measure management potential in persons being considered for administrative positions. Instruments that measure aspects of leadership, power, personality, conflict, and organizational climate are discussed. An overview of each instrument is provided as well as data on the type of test, time to complete, cost, and purchasing information. While objective tests such as these are useful in assessing individual suitability for management positions, we advise that they be used prudently and judiciously.

  12. Wnt signaling potentiates nevogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pawlikowski, Jeff S.; McBryan, Tony; van Tuyn, John; Drotar, Mark E.; Hewitt, Rachael N.; Maier, Andrea B.; King, Ayala; Blyth, Karen; Wu, Hong; Adams, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferation arrest associated with an altered secretory pathway (senescence-associated secretory phenotype). Cellular senescence is also a tumor suppressor mechanism, to which both proliferation arrest and senescence-associated secretory phenotype are thought to contribute. The melanocytes within benign human nevi are a paradigm for tumor-suppressive senescent cells in a premalignant neoplasm. Here a comparison of proliferating and senescent melanocytes and melanoma cell lines by RNA sequencing emphasizes the importance of senescence-associated proliferation arrest in suppression of transformation. Previous studies showed that activation of the Wnt signaling pathway can delay or bypass senescence. Consistent with this, we present evidence that repression of Wnt signaling contributes to melanocyte senescence in vitro. Surprisingly, Wnt signaling is active in many senescent human melanocytes in nevi, and this is linked to histological indicators of higher proliferative and malignant potential. In a mouse, activated Wnt signaling delays senescence-associated proliferation arrest to expand the population of senescent oncogene-expressing melanocytes. These results suggest that Wnt signaling can potentiate nevogenesis in vivo by delaying senescence. Further, we suggest that activated Wnt signaling in human nevi undermines senescence-mediated tumor suppression and enhances the probability of malignancy. PMID:24043806

  13. Evoked Potential Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingli; Boutros, Nash N.; Jansen, Ben H.

    2008-01-01

    An unsupervised correlation-based clustering method was developed to assess the trial-to-trial variability of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). The method first decomposes single trials into three frequency bands, each containing activity primarily associated with one of the three major AEP components, i.e., P50, N100 and P200. Next, single-trial evoked potentials with similar post-stimulus characteristics are clustered and selectively averaged to determine the presence or absence of an AEP component. The method was evaluated on actual AEP and spontaneous EEG data collected from 25 healthy participants using a paradigm in which pairs of identical tones were presented, with the first stimulus (S1) presented 0.5 s before the second stimulus (S2). Homogeneous, well-separated clusters were obtained and substantial AEP variability was found. Also, there was a trend for S2 to produce fewer ‘complete’ (and significantly smaller) responses than S1. Tests conducted on spontaneous EEG produced similar clusters as obtained from EP data, but significantly fewer stimuli produced responses containing all three EP components than seen in AEP data. These findings suggest that the clustering method presented here performs adequately to assess trial-to-trial EP variability. Also, the results suggest that the sensory gating observed in normal controls may be caused by the fact that the second stimulus generates fewer ‘responsive’ trials than the first stimulus, thus resulting in smaller ensemble averages. PMID:19103222

  14. Industrial potential of lipoxygenases.

    PubMed

    Heshof, Ruud; de Graaff, Leo H; Villaverde, Juan J; Silvestre, Armando J D; Haarmann, Thomas; Dalsgaard, Trine K; Buchert, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are iron- or manganese-containing oxidative enzymes found in plants, animals, bacteria and fungi. LOXs catalyze the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to the corresponding highly reactive hydroperoxides. Production of hydroperoxides by LOX can be exploited in different applications such as in bleaching of colored components, modification of lipids originating from different raw materials, production of lipid derived chemicals and production of aroma compounds. Most application research has been carried out using soybean LOX, but currently the use of microbial LOXs has also been reported. Development of LOX composition with high activity by heterologous expression in suitable production hosts would enable full exploitation of the potential of LOX derived reactions in different applications. Here, we review the biological role of LOXs, their heterologous production, as well as potential use in different applications. LOXs may fulfill an important role in the design of processes that are far more environmental friendly than currently used chemical reactions. Difficulties in screening for the optimal enzymes and producing LOX enzymes in sufficient amounts prevent large-scale application so far. With this review, we summarize current knowledge of LOX enzymes and the way in which they can be produced and applied.

  15. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  16. On quantum potential dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Struyve, Ward

    2015-01-01

    Non-relativistic de Broglie-Bohm theory describes particles moving under the guidance of the wave function. In de Broglie's original formulation, the particle dynamics is given by a first-order differential equation. In Bohm's reformulation, it is given by Newton's law of motion with an extra potential that depends on the wave function—the quantum potential—together with a constraint on the possible velocities. It was recently argued, mainly by numerical simulations, that relaxing this velocity constraint leads to a physically untenable theory. We provide further evidence for this by showing that for various wave functions the particles tend to escape the wave packet. In particular, we show that for a central classical potential and bound energy eigenstates the particle motion is often unbounded. This work seems particularly relevant for ways of simulating wave function evolution based on Bohm's formulation of the de Broglie-Bohm theory. Namely, the simulations may become unstable due to deviations from the velocity constraint.

  17. Characterization of bioelectric potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Wheeler, Kevin R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Method and system for recognizing and characterizing bioelectric potential or electromyographic (EMG) signals associated with at least one of a coarse gesture and a fine gesture that is performed by a person, and use of the bioelectric potentials to enter data and/or commands into an electrical and/or mechanical instrument. As a gesture is performed, bioelectric signals that accompany the gesture are subjected to statistical averaging, within selected time intervals. Hidden Markov model analysis is applied to identify hidden, gesture-related states that are present. A metric is used to compare signals produced by a volitional gesture (not yet identified) with corresponding signals associated with each of a set of reference gestures, and the reference gesture that is closest to the volitional gesture is identified. Signals representing the volitional gesture are analyzed and compared with a database of reference gestures to determine if the volitional gesture is likely to be one of the reference gestures. Electronic and/or mechanical commands needed to carry out the gesture may be implemented at an interface to control an instrument. Applications include control of an aircraft, entry of data from a keyboard or other data entry device, and entry of data and commands in extreme environments that interfere with accurate entry.

  18. Ground potential rise monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachery W.; Zevenbergen, Gary A.

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  19. Action potential in charophytes.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary Jane

    2007-01-01

    The plant action potential (AP) has been studied for more than half a century. The experimental system was provided mainly by the large charophyte cells, which allowed insertion of early large electrodes, manipulation of cell compartments, and inside and outside media. These early experiments were inspired by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) work on the squid axon and its voltage clamp techniques. Later, the patch clamping technique provided information about the ion transporters underlying the excitation transient. The initial models were also influenced by the HH picture of the animal AP. At the turn of the century, the paradigm of the charophyte AP shifted to include several chemical reactions, second messenger-activated channel, and calcium ion liberation from internal stores. Many aspects of this new model await further clarification. The role of the AP in plant movements, wound signaling, and turgor regulation is now well documented. Involvement in invasion by pathogens, chilling injury, light, and gravity sensing are under investigation.

  20. Intrinsic anion oxidation potentials.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Anions of lithium battery salts have been investigated by electronic structure calculations with the objective to find a computational measure to correlate with the observed (in)stability of nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes vs oxidation often encountered in practice. Accurate prediction of intrinsic anion oxidation potentials is here made possible by computing the vertical free energy difference between anion and neutral radical (Delta Gv) and further strengthened by an empirical correction using only the anion volume as a parameter. The 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set, the VSXC functional, and the C-PCM SCRF algorithm were used. The Delta Gv calculations can be performed using any standard computational chemistry software. PMID:17078600

  1. Schwanniomyces: a potential superyeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ingledew, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1977, when our quest to determine the industrial potential of the genus Schwanniomyces began, little was known about this microbe. The genus was first described by Kloecker in 1909, after the isolation in the Antilles of Schwanniomyces occidentalis. A number of biological descriptions (see Ferreira and Phaff) and other species were also described. In addition, it was known that close to 100 yeasts were able to assimilate at least part of the starch molecule. Then, Augustin et al. and Costamagna et al. reported the ability of Schwanniomyces spp. to produce extracellular alpha-amylase and utilize starch. Later discoveries would indicate that both alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were present, and from then on, research with the yeast Schwanniomyces would become very competitive - especially in Canada and Europe. (Refs. 53).

  2. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Hydrocarbon potential of Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Achnin, H.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1988-08-01

    Morocco lies at the junction of the African and Eurasian plates and carries a record of their movements since the end of the Precambrian. Four structural regions with basins and troughs can be identified: Saharan (Tarfaya-Ayoun and Tindouf basins); Anti-Atlas (Souss and Ouarzazate troughs and Boudnib basin); the Essaouria, Doukkala, Tadla, Missour, High Plateau, and Guercif basins; and Meseta and Rif (Rharb and Pre-Rif basins). The targets in the Tindouf basin are Paleozoic, Cambrian, Ordovician (clastics), Devonian (limestones), and Carboniferous reservoirs sourced primarily by Silurian shales. In the remaining basins, excluding the Rharb, the reservoirs are Triassic detritals, limestones at the base of the Lias and Dogger, Malm detritals, and sandy horizons in the Cretaceous. In addition to the Silurian, potential source rocks include the Carboniferous and Permo-Carboniferous shales and clays; Jurassic shales, marls, and carbonates; and Cretaceous clays. In the Rharb basin, the objectives are sand lenses within the Miocene marls. The maturation level of the organic matter generally corresponds to oil and gas. The traps are stratigraphic (lenses and reefs) and structural (horsts and folds). The seals in the pre-Jurassic rocks are shales and evaporites; in the younger rocks, shales and marl. Hydrocarbon accumulations have been found in Paleozoic, Triassic, Liassic, Malm, and Miocene rocks.

  4. Monitoring soil productive potential.

    PubMed

    Tongway, D

    1995-01-01

    Desertification involves the loss of soil productive potential, but a means of assessing and monitoring the progress of desertification on the soil has been elusive. Soil is so varied and complex that methods of assessing condition are too slow, tedious, and expensive for routine use. Moreover, differences in soil type can be confused with soil condition. This paper presents a structured method of assessing soil condition. This method is based on recognizing and classifying soil surface features and examining soil properties that reflect the status of the processes of erosion, infiltration, and nutrient cycling. Published in the form of a user manual, the method has the following three stages: (1) defining the geomorphic setting of the site, (2) recognizing patch/interpatch associations and the mode of erosion at the landscape scale, and (3) assessing soil surface condition ratings in quadrats sited within the landscape pattern patches. Stage 3 is achieved by observing each of 11 features in the field and classifying their status according to detailed fieldnotes and photographs. The method applies to a wide range of soil types and biogeographical regimes and has proven to be repeatable among observers and quickly transferred to new observers.

  5. Identifying potential academic leaders

    PubMed Central

    White, David; Krueger, Paul; Meaney, Christopher; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles among academic family medicine faculty. Design Web-based survey. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants A total of 687 faculty members. Main outcome measures Variables related to respondents’ willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Results Of all 1029 faculty members invited to participate in the survey, 687 (66.8%) members responded. Of the respondents, 596 (86.8%) indicated their level of willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Multivariable analysis revealed that the predictors associated with willingness to take on leadership roles were as follows: pursuit of professional development opportunities (odds ratio [OR] 3.79, 95% CI 2.29 to 6.27); currently holding at least 1 leadership role (OR 5.37, 95% CI 3.38 to 8.53); a history of leadership training (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.78); the perception that mentorship is important for one’s current role (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.40 to 3.60); and younger age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Conclusion Willingness to undertake new or additional leadership roles was associated with 2 variables related to leadership experiences, 2 variables related to perceptions of mentorship and professional development, and 1 demographic variable (younger age). Interventions that support opportunities in these areas might expand the pool and strengthen the academic leadership potential of faculty members. PMID:27331226

  6. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Phani; Khanum, Farhath

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain's chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology. PMID:23055633

  7. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Phani; Khanum, Farhath

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain's chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology. PMID:23055633

  8. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of

  9. Scattering theory for arbitrary potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A.S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A.T.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.

    2005-09-15

    The fundamental quantities of potential scattering theory are generalized to accommodate long-range interactions. Definitions for the scattering amplitude and wave operators valid for arbitrary interactions including potentials with a Coulomb tail are presented. It is shown that for the Coulomb potential the generalized amplitude gives the physical on-shell amplitude without recourse to a renormalization procedure.

  10. Potential-Based Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew; Murayama, Kou; Kobeisy, Ahmed; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-based achievement goals use one's own intrapersonal trajectory as a standard of evaluation, and this intrapersonal trajectory may be grounded in one's past (past-based goals) or one's future potential (potential-based goals). Potential-based goals have been overlooked in the literature to date. Aims: The primary aim of the present…

  11. Introduction to SC-Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin; Christianto, Victor

    2011-03-01

    A new type of potential for nucleus, which is different from Coulomb potential or Yukawa potential, is introduced. This new called Smarandache-Christianto potential may have effect for radius range within r = 5-10 fm. For experimental verification of this potential, we find possible applications in the context of Condensed Matter Nuclear reaction. According to Takahashi's research, it is more likely to get condensed matter nuclear reaction using cluster of deuterium (4D) rather than using D+D reaction (as in hot-fusion, in this process Coulomb barrier is very high). In recent work, Takahashi shows that in the TSC framework it is also possible to do CMNS reaction not only with DDDD, but also with DDDH, DDHH, DHHH, or HHHH, where the reaction can be different. In other words, TSC can be a mixture of heavy and light water (as in neutrosophic logic). More interestingly, his EQPET/TSC (tetrahedra symmetric condensate) model, Takahashi can predict a new potential called STTBA (sudden-tall thin barrier approximate) which includes negative potential (reverse potential) and differs from Coulomb potential. The SC-potential, which has sinusoidal form, can be viewed as a generalization of Takahashi's TSC/STTBA potential.

  12. Generalized factorization and isospectral potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, D.; Roy, P.

    2011-05-15

    It is shown that the method of using excited-state wave functions in constructing exactly solvable potentials as suggested by Berger and Ussembayev [Phys. Rev. A 82, 022121 (2010)] can be generalized further. Using this method, exactly solvable potentials related to the harmonic oscillator and some other potentials are obtained. The nonlinear symmetry algebras underlying the harmonic-oscillator models are also obtained explicitly.

  13. Orbits in a logarithmic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hooverman, R. H.

    2014-04-15

    The characteristics of charged particle orbits in the logarithmic electrostatic potential field surrounding a straight conducting wire at a fixed potential are investigated. The equations of motion of an electron in a logarithmic potential are derived, the limiting cases are considered, and the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion are presented along with sketches of a few representative orbits. (C.E.S.)

  14. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-05-05

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

  15. Plasmas: Diversity, pervasiveness and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1998-01-01

    When considered inclusively, plasma science and technology encompass immense diversity, pervasiveness and potential: diversity through numerous topical areas (see list of nearly 200 in Table II); pervasiveness with examples covering the full range of energy, time and spatial scale; and potential through innumerable current and future applications.

  16. Limiting Spectra from Confining Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Simmons, L. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The author explains that, for confining potentials and large quantum numbers, the bound-state energies rise more rapidly as a function of n the more rapidly the potential rises with distance. However, the spectrum can rise no faster than n squared in the nonrelativistic case, or n in the relativistic case. (Author/GA)

  17. Working with Potentially Assaultive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdach, Allison D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines potentially assaultive or preassaultive client and suggests some ways to minimize the risk of assault by such clients. Data for the article are from author's 10-year experience in providing social work services on acute psychiatric ward in large public medical center. Reviews potentially assaultive client conditions of panic, rage,…

  18. Electrical potentials in stomatal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Saftner, R.A.; Raschke, K.

    1981-06-01

    Guard cells of several species, but predominantly Commelina communis, were impaled by micropipette electrodes and potential differences measured that occurred between cell compartments and the flowing bathing medium. The wall developed a Donnan potential that was between -60 and -70 millivolt in 30 millimolar KC1 at pH 7. The density of the fixed charges ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 molar; its dependence on pH was almost identical with the titration curve of authentic polygalacturonic acid. The vacuolar potential of guard cells of Commelina communis L., Zea mays L., Nicotiana glauca Graham, Allium cepa L., and Vicia faba L. was between -40 and -50 millivolt in 30 millimolar KCl when stomata were open and about -30 millivolt when stomata were closed. The vacuolar potential of guard cells of C. communis was almost linearly related to stomatal aperture and responded to changes in the ionic strength in the bathing medium in a Nernstian manner. No specificity for any alkali ion (except Li/sup +/), ammonium, or choline appeared. Lithium caused hyperpolarization. Calcium in concentrations between 1 and 100 millimolar in the medium led to stomatal closure, also caused hyperpolarization, and triggered transient oscillations in the intracellular potential. Gradients in the electrical potential existed across stomatal complexes with open pores. When stomata closed, these gradients almost disappeared or slightly reverted; all epidermal cells were then at potentials near -30 millivolt in 30 millimolar KCl.

  19. Full potential multiple scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    MacLaren, J.M.

    1994-10-20

    A practical method for performing self-consistent electronic structure calculations based upon full-potential multiple-scattering theory is presented. Solutions to the single site Schroedinger equation are obtained by solving coupled channel integral equations for a potential which is analytically continued out to the circumscribing sphere. This potential coincides with the full cell potential inside each atomic cell. Scattering matrices and wavefunctions for the full cell potential are obtained from surface Wronskian relations. The charge density is obtained from the single particle Green`s function. This Green`s function is computed using the cell scattering matrices and wavefunctions using the layer multiple scattering theory. Self consistent solutions require a solution at each iteration to the Poisson equation. The Poisson equation is solved using a variational cellular method. In the approach a local solution to each cell is augmented by adding a series of regular harmonics (solutions to Laplace`s equation). Minimizing the coulomb energy, subject to continuity of the potential across all cell boundary provides an expression for the coefficients of the regular harmonics. This method is applied to BCC Nb. Calculated properties converge well in angular momentum and show comparable accuracy to full potential linearized muffin-tin orbital calculations.

  20. Screening extremophiles for bioconversion potentials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Peeples, Tonya L

    2006-01-01

    A screening protocol was developed and implemented to evaluate extremophiles, in particular hyperthermophiles and thermoacidophiles, for their capacity to transform starch-based feedstocks to high-value organic acids and solvents. Screening results of 14 extremophiles showed promising growth and biotransformation potentials. In particular, Hyperthermus butylicus, Thermococcus litoralis, and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were identified as producers of both organic acids and solvents under the screening protocol. The screening effort presented here represents an important step toward realization of biotransformation potentials of extremophiles, potentially improving upon biomass-based processes.

  1. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs.

  2. Designing potentials by sculpturing wires

    SciTech Connect

    Della Pietra, Leonardo; Aigner, Simon; Groth, Soenke; Hagen, Christoph von; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Bar-Joseph, Israel; Lezec, Henri J.

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic trapping potentials for atoms on atom chips are determined by the current flow in the chip wires. By modifying the shape of the conductor we can realize specialized current flow patterns and therefore microdesign the trapping potentials. We have demonstrated this by nano-machining an atom chip using the focused ion beam technique. We built a trap, a barrier, and using a Bose-Einstein Condensate as a probe we showed that by polishing the conductor edge the potential roughness on the selected wire can be reduced. Furthermore, we give different other designs and discuss the creation of a one-dimensional magnetic lattice on an atom chip.

  3. Confining potential in momentum space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Kahana, David E.; Maung, Khin Maung

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for the solution in momentum space of the bound state problem with a linear potential in r space. The potential is unbounded at large r leading to a singularity at small q. The singularity is integrable, when regulated by exponentially screening the r-space potential, and is removed by a subtraction technique. The limit of zero screening is taken analytically, and the numerical solution of the subtracted integral equation gives eigenvalues and wave functions in good agreement with position space calculations.

  4. The reconstruction of inflationary potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianmang; Gao, Qing; Gong, Yungui

    2016-07-01

    The observational data on the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background constraints the scalar spectral tilt ns and the tensor to scalar ratio r which depend on the first and second derivatives of the inflaton potential. The information can be used to reconstruct the inflaton potential in the polynomial form up to some orders. However, for some classes of potentials, ns and r behave as ns(N) and r(N) universally in terms of the number of e-folds N. The universal behaviour of ns(N) can be used to reconstruct a class of inflaton potentials. By parametrizing one of the parameters ns(N), ɛ(N) and φ(N), and fitting the parameters in the models to the observational data, we obtain the constraints on the parameters and reconstruct the classes of the inflationary models which include the chaotic inflation, T-model, hilltop inflation, s-dual inflation, natural inflation and R2 inflation.

  5. The Educational Potential of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    1974-01-01

    In viewing technology as any explicit set of procedures that provides a reliable solution to some problem rather than as hardware solutions, the author attempted to assess the educational potential of technology. (Author/RK)

  6. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  7. Effective potential and quadratic divergences

    SciTech Connect

    Einhorn, M.B. ); Jones, D.R.T. )

    1992-12-01

    We use the effective potential to give a simple derivation of Veltman's formula for the quadratic divergence in the Higgs self-energy. We also comment on the effect of going beyond the one-loop approximation.

  8. Potentials Unlimited: A Summer Happening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croskery, Beverly; Marten, Mary Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    The article describes Potentials Unlimited, a summer camp program for gifted intermediate grade students in Cincinnati, Ohio. Aspects covered include priorities in selecting curricular activities and some of the camp activities themselves. (DLS)

  9. Zika: Fighting a Potential Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-08-01

    As Zika became an emerging threat, Texas scrambled to coordinate a prevention-and-response strategy against potential local transmission. TMA urged lawmakers in Washington, D.C., to agree on a funding package to combat the spread of Zika.

  10. Noncommutative potential theory: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide an introduction to Noncommutative Potential Theory as given at I.N.D.A.M.-C.N.R.S. "Noncommutative Geometry and Applications" Lectures, Villa Mondragone-Frascati June 2014.

  11. Propagator for finite range potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-12-15

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown.

  12. Analytical multikinks in smooth potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, G. P.; Correa, R. A. C.; de Souza Dutra, A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we present an approach that can be systematically used to construct nonlinear systems possessing analytical multikink profile configurations. In contrast with previous approaches to the problem, we are able to do it by using field potentials that are considerably smoother than the ones of the doubly quadratic family of potentials. This is done without losing the capacity of writing exact analytical solutions. The resulting field configurations can be applied to the study of problems from condensed matter to braneworld scenarios.

  13. Economic potential of inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

  14. MODELING WORLD BIOENERGY CROP POTENTIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Kensuke; Hanasaki, Naota; Kanae, Shinjiro

    Bioenergy is regarded as clean energy due to its characteristics and expected to be a new support of world energy de¬mand, but there are few integrated assessments of the potential of bioenergy considering sustainable land use. We esti¬mated the global bioenergy potential with an integrated global water resources model, the H08. It can simulate the crop yields on global-scale at a spatial resolution of 0.50.5. Seven major crops in the world were considered; namely, maize, sugar beet, sugar cane, soybean, rapeseed, rice, and wheat, of which the first 5 are commonly used to produce biofuel now. Three different land-cover types were chosen as potential area for cultivation of biofuel-producing crop: fallow land, grassland, and portion of forests (excluding areas sensitive for biodiversity such as frontier forest). We attempted to estimate the maximum global bioenergy potential and it was estimated to be 1120EJ. Bioenergy potential depends on land-use limitations for the protection of bio-diversity and security of food. In another condition which assumed more land-use limitations, bioenergy potential was estimated to be 70-233EJ.

  15. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  16. [Evoked potentials and inhalation anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Thiel, A; Russ, W; Hempelmann, G

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials can be affected by various factors including volatile anaesthetics. These effects have to be considered in order to give correct interpretations of the obtained data. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and auditory evoked potentials (AEP) will show strong alterations under general anaesthesia whereas brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are slightly affected. The effects of nitrous oxide, halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane on somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) after median nerve stimulation were studied in 35 healthy adult patients. pCO2 and tympanic membrane temperature were held constant. Simultaneous cervical and cortical SEP recording was performed using surface electrodes. After induction of anaesthesia SEP were recorded during normoventilation with 100% oxygen and after inhalation of 66.6% nitrous oxide. 10 patients received halothane at inspired concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0%. After nitrous oxide had been replaced by oxygen, halothane was reduced in steps of 0.5%. SEP were recorded at the end of each period (15 min). Equipotent doses of enflurane or isoflurane were administered to 15 and 10 patients, respectively. Nitrous oxide depressed early cortical SEP amplitude. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane caused dose dependent increases of latencies. Reduction of amplitude was most pronounced with isoflurane. Using high doses of enflurane in oxygen cortical SEP showed unusual high amplitudes associated with marked increases of latencies. Even under high concentrations of volatile anaesthetics cervical SEP were minimally affected. The effects of anaesthetic gases have to be considered when SEP are recorded intraoperatively.

  17. Streaming potential measurements of biosurfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wagenen, R. A.; Andrade, J. D.; Hibbs, J. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A technique based on the measurement of streaming potentials has been developed to evaluate the electrokinetic region of the cell periphery. This approach is feasible for cell lines propagated in in-vitro cell cultures in monolayer form. The advantage of this system is that cells may be evaluated in the living state atttached to a substrate; it is not necessary to subject the cells to enzymatic, chemical, or mechanical trauma required to obtain monodisperse suspensions which are then normally evaluated by microelectrophoresis. In this manner, it should be possible to study the influence of substrate and environmental factors on the charge density and potential at the cell periphery. The apparatus and procedure are described as well as some results concerning the electrokinetic potential of borosilicate capillaries as a function of ionic strength, pH, and temperature. The effect that turbulence and entrance flow conditions have on accurate streaming-potential measurements is discussed. The electrokinetic potential of BALB/c 3T12 fibroblasts has been quantified as a function of pH, ionic strength, glutaraldehyde fixation, and Giemsa staining.

  18. Effective knowledge-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrada, Evandro; Melo, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Empirical or knowledge-based potentials have many applications in structural biology such as the prediction of protein structure, protein-protein, and protein-ligand interactions and in the evaluation of stability for mutant proteins, the assessment of errors in experimentally solved structures, and the design of new proteins. Here, we describe a simple procedure to derive and use pairwise distance-dependent potentials that rely on the definition of effective atomic interactions, which attempt to capture interactions that are more likely to be physically relevant. Based on a difficult benchmark test composed of proteins with different secondary structure composition and representing many different folds, we show that the use of effective atomic interactions significantly improves the performance of potentials at discriminating between native and near-native conformations. We also found that, in agreement with previous reports, the potentials derived from the observed effective atomic interactions in native protein structures contain a larger amount of mutual information. A detailed analysis of the effective energy functions shows that atom connectivity effects, which mostly arise when deriving the potential by the incorporation of those indirect atomic interactions occurring beyond the first atomic shell, are clearly filtered out. The shape of the energy functions for direct atomic interactions representing hydrogen bonding and disulfide and salt bridges formation is almost unaffected when effective interactions are taken into account. On the contrary, the shape of the energy functions for indirect atom interactions (i.e., those describing the interaction between two atoms bound to a direct interacting pair) is clearly different when effective interactions are considered. Effective energy functions for indirect interacting atom pairs are not influenced by the shape or the energy minimum observed for the corresponding direct interacting atom pair. Our results

  19. Nonsingular van der Waals potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Marlow, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Universal, spherical, nonsingular van der Waals interactions including retardation effect are developed for atoms and small molecules through a semiclassical field approach. Consideration of the finite molecular size effect removes the short-distance singular behavior inherent in the widely used potentials obtained from the point-molecule approximation. Physical arguments lead to the molecular size parameter a (in atomic units) as 1/a=1.25(I/IH)1/2, except for a system that involves at least an atom or a molecule with very different first and second ionization potentials, and for such a system the above numerical factor 1.25 is replaced by unity. Here I and IH are the first ionization potentials for the atom or molecule considered and for a hydrogen atom, respectively. The nonsingular potentials have been tested for the following representative systems: H2 (3Σ+u), He2, Ar2, NaK (3Σ+), LiHg (2Σ+), He-HF, Ne-HF, HF-HF, and Ar-HCl. Very good agreement has been found for each of the systems. Based on the above systems studied, an empirical relation has been obtained between the parameter b in the Born-Mayer repulsive potential Ae-bR and the molecular size parameters (a1 and a2). Applying this relation to dozens of systems with known b from either self-consistent-field calculations or experiments, surprisingly good agreements have been obtained. By the same token, another empirical formula is obtained that relates the van der Waals minimum well parameter Rm to the molecular size parameters (a1 and a2) and the first ionization potentials (Ix and Iy) of interacting species. Again, very good agreements have been achieved in comparison with dozens of systems with known experimental Rm's.

  20. Anisotropic inflation with general potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, JiaMing; Huang, XiaoTian; Qiu, TaoTao

    2016-04-01

    Anomalies in recent observational data indicate that there might be some "anisotropic hair" generated in an inflation period. To obtain general information about the effects of this anisotropic hair to inflation models, we studied anisotropic inflation models that involve one vector and one scalar using several types of potentials. We determined the general relationship between the degree of anisotropy and the fraction of the vector and scalar fields, and concluded that the anisotropies behave independently of the potentials. We also generalized our study to the case of multi-directional anisotropies.

  1. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, J G; Rosengren, S M; Welgampola, M S

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency potential evoked through activation of vestibular receptors using sound or vibration. It is generated by modulated electromyographic signals either from the sternocleidomastoid muscle for the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) or the inferior oblique muscle for the ocular VEMP (oVEMP). These reflexes appear to originate from the otolith organs and thus complement existing methods of vestibular assessment, which are mainly based upon canal function. This review considers the basis, methodology, and current applications of the cVEMP and oVEMP in the assessment and diagnosis of vestibular disorders, both peripheral and central. PMID:27638068

  2. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  3. Antioxidant potential of Lactuca sativa.

    PubMed

    Garg, Munish; Garg, Chanchal; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Suresh, B

    2004-07-01

    The present study is based on the evaluation of antioxidant potential of a well known plant Lactuca sativa. Methanolic leaf extract was investigated for in vitro inhibition of oxidative damage induced by UV-radiations to the salmonella typhi bacteria and in vivo effect on the production of body enzymes i.e. catalase and superoxide dismutase. The lipid peroxidation masurement was also done in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in blood and brain of male albino wistar rats. The plant extract has shown significant antioxidant potential both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22557144

  4. Potential hazards of fumigant residues.

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, L

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of fumigants (primarily ethylene dibromide, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, ethylene oxide, symdibromotetetrachloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorovos, carbon tetrachloride, methyl bromide) as well as their degradation products in foodstuffs and soil have been examined mainly in regard to the potential mutagenicity of their residues. PMID:789068

  5. Quantum mechanics without potential function

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaidari, A. D.; Ismail, M. E. H.

    2015-07-15

    In the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, one starts by proposing a potential function that models the physical system. The potential is then inserted into the Schrödinger equation, which is solved for the wavefunction, bound states energy spectrum, and/or scattering phase shift. In this work, however, we propose an alternative formulation in which the potential function does not appear. The aim is to obtain a set of analytically realizable systems, which is larger than in the standard formulation and may or may not be associated with any given or previously known potential functions. We start with the wavefunction, which is written as a bounded infinite sum of elements of a complete basis with polynomial coefficients that are orthogonal on an appropriate domain in the energy space. Using the asymptotic properties of these polynomials, we obtain the scattering phase shift, bound states, and resonances. This formulation enables one to handle not only the well-known quantum systems but also previously untreated ones. Illustrative examples are given for two- and three-parameter systems.

  6. Synthesis of potential mescaline antagonists.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, F; Nieforth, K A

    1976-10-01

    1-[2-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-pyrroline, 2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, N-n-propylmescaline, N-cyclopropylmethylmescaline, and N-allylmescaline were synthesized as potential mescaline antagonists. The ability of these compounds to antagonize mescaline-induced disruption of swim behavior is also given.

  7. Zika: Fighting a Potential Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    As Zika became an emerging threat, Texas scrambled to coordinate a prevention-and-response strategy against potential local transmission. TMA urged lawmakers in Washington, D.C., to agree on a funding package to combat the spread of Zika. PMID:27532808

  8. Potential Entrepreneurs Learn Managerial Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joey; Jolley, Freddie Sue

    1979-01-01

    Describes a business education program for potential entrepreneurs in Arkansas secondary schools called Junior Executive Training (JET). JET includes management principles, investments, parliamentary procedure, banking, consumer education, business law, note taking, dictation and transcription, memory training, public speaking, human relations,…

  9. Expert Systems: Instructional Design Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Joellyn; Grabinger, R. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Description of the components of expert systems highlights their potential uses in the field of instructional design. Uses of expert systems are described for determining the cost-effectiveness of instructional media; as instructional management aids; as job aids; in helping to diagnose student problems; and as student feedback/evaluation systems.…

  10. LHC Physics Potential versus Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.

  11. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  12. Energies of Screened Coulomb Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    This article shows that, by applying the Hellman-Feynman theorem alone to screened Coulomb potentials, the first four coefficients in the energy series in powers of the perturbation parameter can be obtained from the unperturbed Coulomb system. (Author/HM)

  13. Membrane Potentials at Zero Current

    PubMed Central

    Sandblom, John P.; Eisenman, George

    1967-01-01

    The possibility has been examined that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for V0, the total membrane potential at zero current, can be derived with constant permeability ratios from a thermodynamic treatment. The flux equations have been integrated under zero current conditions subject only to the restriction that the total membrane potential should be independent of internal concentration profiles, which is the requirement for the premeability ratios to be phenomenological constants, independent of solution conditions. No assumptions have been made concerning the electric potential profile. It was found that a constant permeability ratio can only be characteristic of systems satisfying certain relationships between ionic conductances and chemical potentials. From these relationships it was possible to define the permeability ratio in terms of the thermodynamic properties of the membrane quite generally and to identify the permeability ratio as the product of mobility ratio and ratio of partition coefficients. Moreover, the ionic conductance ratio at any point in the membrane has been shown to be expressable explicitly in terms of the permeability ratio and the activities of an external solution which would be in equilibrium with the point under consideration. Lastly, a number of conclusions have been reached regarding the range of applicability of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation with constant permeability ratios. PMID:6035122

  14. Evolutionary potential games on lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Borsos, István

    2016-04-01

    Game theory provides a general mathematical background to study the effect of pair interactions and evolutionary rules on the macroscopic behavior of multi-player games where players with a finite number of strategies may represent a wide scale of biological objects, human individuals, or even their associations. In these systems the interactions are characterized by matrices that can be decomposed into elementary matrices (games) and classified into four types. The concept of decomposition helps the identification of potential games and also the evaluation of the potential that plays a crucial role in the determination of the preferred Nash equilibrium, and defines the Boltzmann distribution towards which these systems evolve for suitable types of dynamical rules. This survey draws parallel between the potential games and the kinetic Ising type models which are investigated for a wide scale of connectivity structures. We discuss briefly the applicability of the tools and concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics. Additionally the general features of ordering phenomena, phase transitions and slow relaxations are outlined and applied to evolutionary games. The discussion extends to games with three or more strategies. Finally we discuss what happens when the system is weakly driven out of the "equilibrium state" by adding non-potential components representing games of cyclic dominance.

  15. Potential Theory for Directed Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Lü, Linyuan; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering factors underlying the network formation is a long-standing challenge for data mining and network analysis. In particular, the microscopic organizing principles of directed networks are less understood than those of undirected networks. This article proposes a hypothesis named potential theory, which assumes that every directed link corresponds to a decrease of a unit potential and subgraphs with definable potential values for all nodes are preferred. Combining the potential theory with the clustering and homophily mechanisms, it is deduced that the Bi-fan structure consisting of 4 nodes and 4 directed links is the most favored local structure in directed networks. Our hypothesis receives strongly positive supports from extensive experiments on 15 directed networks drawn from disparate fields, as indicated by the most accurate and robust performance of Bi-fan predictor within the link prediction framework. In summary, our main contribution is twofold: (i) We propose a new mechanism for the local organization of directed networks; (ii) We design the corresponding link prediction algorithm, which can not only testify our hypothesis, but also find out direct applications in missing link prediction and friendship recommendation. PMID:23408979

  16. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  17. High Potentials: A CEO Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Jeanine

    2007-01-01

    Finding high potentials has been identified as one of the major challenges for society and for higher education. But how does one find the talented individuals who will design the future of society? Can and should universities cooperate or compete with business and industry for these talents? Three CEOs reflect on this worldwide competition for…

  18. Potential-pH Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    1982-01-01

    Potential-pH diagrams show the domains of redoxpotential and pH in which major species are most stable. Constructing such diagrams provides students with opportunities to decide what species must be considered, search literature for equilibrium constants and free energies of formation, and practice in using the Nernst equation. (Author/JN)

  19. Revisiting double Dirac delta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zafar; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Mayank; Sharma, Vibhu

    2016-07-01

    We study a general double Dirac delta potential to show that this is the simplest yet still versatile solvable potential to introduce double wells, avoided crossings, resonances and perfect transmission (T = 1). Perfect transmission energies turn out to be the critical property of symmetric and anti-symmetric cases wherein these discrete energies are found to correspond to the eigenvalues of a Dirac delta potential placed symmetrically between two rigid walls. For well(s) or barrier(s), perfect transmission (or zero reflectivity, R(E)) at energy E=0 is non-intuitive. However, this has been found earlier and called the ‘threshold anomaly’. Here we show that it is a critical phenomenon and we can have 0≤slant R(0)\\lt 1 when the parameters of the double delta potential satisfy an interesting condition. We also invoke a zero-energy and zero curvature eigenstate (\\psi (x)={Ax}+B) of the delta well between two symmetric rigid walls for R(0)=0. We resolve that the resonant energies and the perfect transmission energies are different and they arise differently.

  20. The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to

  1. Potential alternative approaches to xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mou, Lisha; Chen, Fengjiao; Dai, Yifan; Cai, Zhiming; Cooper, David K C

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing worldwide shortage of organs and cells for transplantation in patients with end-stage organ failure or cellular dysfunction. This shortage could be resolved by the transplantation of organs or cells from pigs into humans. What competing approaches might provide support for the patient with end-stage organ or cell failure? Four main approaches are receiving increasing attention - (i) implantable mechanical devices, although these are currently limited almost entirely to devices aimed at supporting or replacing the heart, (ii) stem cell technology, at present directed mainly to replace absent or failing cells, but which is also fundamental to progress in (iii) tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, in which the ultimate aim is to replace an entire organ. A final novel potential approach is (iv) blastocyst complementation. These potential alternative approaches are briefly reviewed, and comments added on their current status and whether they are now (or will soon become) realistic alternative therapies to xenotransplantation.

  2. Liquefaction potential index: Field assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toprak, S.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    Cone penetration test (CPT) soundings at historic liquefaction sites in California were used to evaluate the predictive capability of the liquefaction potential index (LPI), which was defined by Iwasaki et al. in 1978. LPI combines depth, thickness, and factor of safety of liquefiable material inferred from a CPT sounding into a single parameter. LPI data from the Monterey Bay region indicate that the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction is 58 and 93%, respectively, when LPI equals or exceeds 5 and 15. LPI values also generally correlate with surface effects of liquefaction: Decreasing from a median of 12 for soundings in lateral spreads to 0 for soundings where no surface effects were reported. The index is particularly promising for probabilistic liquefaction hazard mapping where it may be a useful parameter for characterizing the liquefaction potential of geologic units.

  3. Potential bacteremia in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Hoekelman, R; Lewin, E B; Shapira, M B; Sutherland, S A

    1979-10-01

    The potential consequences of bacteremia are considerable in all infants but particularly in those from 3 to 24 months of age with temperatures of 38.3 degrees C or more. Physicians have been advised to scrutinize these patients carefully with a variety of diagnostic tests and to treat their conditions vigorously if bacteremia is seriously considered or proved. We undertook to determine how often primary care pediatric practitioners encounter such patients "at risk" for bacteremia. Among the practices of nine pediatricians in Monroe County, New York, involving 220 practice days throughout 1977 and 4,151 patient visits, we found 145 instances of potential bacteremia. Depending, then, on the season of the year, practitioners may face this diagnostic and management dilemma as often as once each day. Therefore, laboratory means for determining those infants at highest risk for bacteremia or for rapidly diagnosing bacteremia will need to be readily available to practitioners.

  4. Cubosomes: remarkable drug delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Karami, Zahra; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Cubosomes are nanostructured liquid crystalline particles, made of certain amphiphilic lipids in definite proportions, known as biocompatible carriers in drug delivery. Cubosomes comprise curved bicontinuous lipid bilayers that are organized in three dimensions as honeycombed structures and divided into two internal aqueous channels that can be exploited by various bioactive ingredients, such as chemical drugs, peptides and proteins. Owing to unique properties such as thermodynamic stability, bioadhesion, the ability of encapsulating hydrophilic, hydrophobic and amphiphilic substances, and the potential for controlled release through functionalization, cubosomes are regarded as promising vehicles for different routes of administration. Based on the most recent reports, this review introduces cubosomes focusing on their structure, preparation methods, mechanism of release and potential routes of administration. PMID:26780385

  5. Virulence Potential of Fusogenic Orthoreoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peter K.C.; Lai, Mary Y.Y.; Leung, Peter C.K.; Wong, Kitty K.Y.; Lee, W.Y.; Lim, Wilina W.L.

    2012-01-01

    Several severe respiratory virus infections that have emerged during the past decade originated in animals, including bats. In Indonesia, exposure to bats has been associated with increased risk of acquiring orthoreovirus infection. Although orthoreovirus infections are mild and self-limiting, we explored their potential for evolution into a more virulent form. We used conventional virus culture, electron microscopy, and molecular sequencing to isolate and identify orthoreoviruses from 3 patients in whom respiratory tract infection developed after travel to Indonesia. Virus characterization by plaque-reduction neutralization testing showed antigenic similarity, but sequencing of the small segment genes suggested virus reassortment, which could lead to increased virulence. Bats as a reservoir might contribute to virus evolution and genetic diversity, giving orthoreoviruses the potential to become more virulent. Evolution of this virus should be closely monitored so that prevention and control measures can be taken should it become more virulent. PMID:22608100

  6. Pharmacological potential of cerium oxidenanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celardo, Ivana; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in pharmacology to improve or create ex novo therapies. Cerium oxidenanoparticles (nanoceria), well-known as catalysts, possess an astonishing pharmacological potential due to their antioxidant properties, deriving from a fraction of Ce3+ ions present in CeO2. These defects, compensated by oxygen vacancies, are enriched at the surface and therefore in nanosized particles. Reactions involving redox cycles between the Ce3+ and Ce4+oxidation states allow nanoceria to react catalytically with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, mimicking the behavior of two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, potentially abating all noxious intracellularreactive oxygen species (ROS) via a self-regenerating mechanism. Hence nanoceria, apparently well tolerated by the organism, might fight chronic inflammation and the pathologies associated with oxidative stress, which include cancer and neurodegeneration. Here we review the biological effects of nanoceria as they emerge from in vitro and in vivo studies, considering biocompatibility and the peculiar antioxidant mechanisms.

  7. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  8. Mismatch Negativity: Translating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Juanita; Harms, Lauren; Schall, Ulrich; Michie, Patricia T.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential has become a valuable tool in cognitive neuroscience. Its reduced size in persons with schizophrenia is of unknown origin but theories proposed include links to problems in experience-dependent plasticity reliant on N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors. In this review we address the utility of this tool in revealing the nature and time course of problems in perceptual inference in this illness together with its potential for use in translational research testing animal models of schizophrenia-related phenotypes. Specifically, we review the reasons for interest in MMN in schizophrenia, issues pertaining to the measurement of MMN, its use as a vulnerability index for the development of schizophrenia, the pharmacological sensitivity of MMN and the progress in developing animal models of MMN. Within this process we highlight the challenges posed by knowledge gaps pertaining to the tool and the pharmacology of the underlying system. PMID:24391602

  9. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage.

  10. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage. PMID:22932387

  11. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  12. Nanobiocatalysis and Its Potential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Grate, Jay W.; Wang, Ping

    2008-11-01

    Nanobiocatalysis with enzymes incorporated into nanostructured materials have emerged as a rapidly growing area. Structures including nanoporous media, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, and nanoparticles have been found to be efficient in manipulating the nanoscale environment of the enzyme and thus promising exciting advances in many areas of enzyme technology. This review will describe these recent developments in nanobiocatalysis and their potential applications in various fields such as trypsin digestion in proteomic analysis, antifouling, biofuel cells, and biosensors.

  13. Torsion potential works in rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsushi; Yamato, Takahisa; Kakitani, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the role of protein environment of rhodopsin and the intramolecular interaction of the chromophore in the cis-trans photoisomerization of rhodopsin by means of a newly developed theoretical method. We theoretically produce modified rhodopsins in which a force field of arbitrarily chosen part of the chromophore or the binding pocket of rhodopsin is altered. We compare the equilibrium conformation of the chromophore and the energy stored in the chromophore of modified rhodopsins with those of native rhodopsins. This method is called site-specific force field switch (SFS). We show that this method is most successfully applied to the torsion potential of rhodopsin. Namely, by reducing the twisting force constant of the C11=C12 of 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin to zero, we found that the equilibrium value of the twisting angle of the C11=C12 bond is twisted in the negative direction down to about -80 degrees. The relaxation energy obtained by this change amounts to an order of 10 kcal/mol. In the case that the twisting force constant of the other double bond is reduced to zero, no such large twisting of the bond happens. From these results we conclude that a certain torsion potential is applied specifically to the C11=C12 bond of the chromophore in the ground state of rhodopsin. This torsion potential facilitates the bond-specific cis-trans photoisomerization of rhodopsin. This kind of the mechanism is consistent with our torsion model proposed by us more than a quarter of century ago. The origin of the torsion potential is analyzed in detail on the basis of the chromophore structure and protein conformation, by applying the SFS method extensively.

  14. Potential formulation of sleep dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. J. K.; Robinson, P. A.

    2009-02-01

    A physiologically based model of the mechanisms that control the human sleep-wake cycle is formulated in terms of an equivalent nonconservative mechanical potential. The potential is analytically simplified and reduced to a quartic two-well potential, matching the bifurcation structure of the original model. This yields a dynamics-based model that is analytically simpler and has fewer parameters than the original model, allowing easier fitting to experimental data. This model is first demonstrated to semiquantitatively match the dynamics of the physiologically based model from which it is derived, and is then fitted directly to a set of experimentally derived criteria. These criteria place rigorous constraints on the parameter values, and within these constraints the model is shown to reproduce normal sleep-wake dynamics and recovery from sleep deprivation. Furthermore, this approach enables insights into the dynamics by direct analogies to phenomena in well studied mechanical systems. These include the relation between friction in the mechanical system and the timecourse of neurotransmitter action, and the possible relation between stochastic resonance and napping behavior. The model derived here also serves as a platform for future investigations of sleep-wake phenomena from a dynamical perspective.

  15. Fibrogenic potential of welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Stern, R M; Pigott, G H; Abraham, J L

    1983-02-01

    A search of 3600 indexed pathology cases has disclosed pulmonary fibrosis in 29 welders. Scanning electron microscopy of biopsy material revealed macrophages laden with inorganic particulates which have characteristics compatible with welding aerosols. In order to establish a possible relationship between fibrotic reaction and welding-fume exposure, the fibrogenic potential fo some 11 different welding fumes and metallic aerosols, considered to be reference standard surrogates for the commonly used welding technologies and applications responsible for 70% of welders exposure, were screened using the Rat Peritoneal Macrophage in vitro bioassay. Only one class of fumes, that from the manual metal arc welding of stainless steel, showed distinct fibrogenic potential. This fume is, however, not common to more than four or five of the heretofore 90 cases of pulmonary fibrosis reported among welders. Thus, although insoluble Cr(VI) is probably the active fibrogen in stainless steel fumes, an etiological factor common to all fibrogenic welding exposures must be sought. It is tentatively proposed to be NO2, a potential experimental in vivo fibrogen copiously produced by certain welding processes and ubiquitous at low concentrations in the welding environment.

  16. Resolution in Photovoltaic Potential Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Coors, V.; Zlatanova, S.; Oosterom, P. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an analysis of the effect of the various types of resolution involved in photovoltaic potential computation is presented. To calculate solar energy incident on a surface, shadow from surrounding buildings has been considered. The incident energy on a surface has been calculated taking the orientation, tilt and position into consideration. Different sky visibility map has been created for direct and diffuse radiation and only the effect of resolution of the factors has been explored here. The following four resolutions are considered: 1. temporal resolution (1, 10, 60 minutes time interval for calculating visibility of sun), 2. object surface resolution (0.01, 0.1, 0.375, 0.75, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 m2 as maximum triangle size of a surface to be considered), 3. blocking obstacle resolution (number of triangles from LoD1, LoD2, or LoD3 CityGML building models), and 4. sky resolution (ranging from 150 to 600 sky-patches used to divide the sky-dome). Higher resolutions result in general in more precise estimation of the photovoltaic potential, but also the computation time is increasing, especially as realizes that this computation has to be done for every building with its object surface (both roofs and façades). This paper is the first in depth analysis ever of the effect of resolution and will help to configure the proper settings for effective photovoltaic potential computations.

  17. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  18. Prodigiosin and its potential applications.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2015-09-01

    Since a decade, there has been a strong consumer demand for more natural products. This has augmented inclination towards substitution of synthetic colorants with natural pigments. Natural pigments not only have the capacity to increase the marketability of products, they also demonstrate valuable biological activities as antioxidants and anticancer agents. There is a long history of exploitation of natural products produced by bacteria as sources of pharmaceutically important, bioactive compounds. Among natural pigments, pigments from microbial sources are potentially suitable alternatives to synthetic pigments. The red pigment prodigiosin (PG) has unusual properties, which have long been documented. The red-pigmented prodiginines are bioactive secondary metabolites produced by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Prodigiosins are characterized by a common pyrrolyl pyrromethene skeleton, and the biological role of these pigments in the producer organisms remains unclear. Bacterial prodigiosins and their synthetic derivatives are effective proapoptotic agents against various cancer cell lines, with multiple cellular targets including multi-drug resistant cells with little or no toxicity towards normal cell lines. However, research into the biology of pigment production will stimulate interest in the bioengineering of strains to synthesize useful prodiginine derivatives. This review article highlights the characteristics and potential applications of prodigiosin pigment from Serratia as prodigiosins are real potential therapeutic drugs.

  19. Optical Potential Field Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical system for creating a potential field map of a bounded two dimensional region containing a goal location and an arbitrary number of obstacles. The potential field mapping system has an imaging device and a processor. Two image writing modes are used by the imaging device, electron deposition and electron depletion. Patterns written in electron deposition mode appear black and expand. Patterns written in electron depletion mode are sharp and appear white. The generated image represents a robot's workspace. The imaging device under processor control then writes a goal location in the work-space using the electron deposition mode. The black image of the goal expands in the workspace. The processor stores the generated images, and uses them to generate a feedback pattern. The feedback pattern is written in the workspace by the imaging device in the electron deposition mode to enhance the expansion of the original goal pattern. After the feedback pattern is written, an obstacle pattern is written by the imaging device in the electron depletion mode to represent the obstacles in the robot's workspace. The processor compares a stored image to a previously stored image to determine a change therebetween. When no change occurs, the processor averages the stored images to produce the potential field map.

  20. [Vestibular evoked potentials in people].

    PubMed

    Fraczkowski, K; Pośpiech, L; Orendorz-Fraczkowska, K

    1997-01-01

    In the article had been presented the structure and functioning of a prototype system for stimulation and registration vestibular evoked potentials, and the first recording of evoked vestibular potentials (VsEPs) in human beings. This system consist of a original stimulator accelerated for the stimulation of vestibular organ, modul registratory VsEPs as well as string elements and synchronizing stimulation with recording. IMB PC 486 is quickly process of investigation with help of standard interface and a original computer programme. Vestibular organ had been evoked by 200 to 500 cyclicly repealed angular decelerations of 4000 degrees/s2. During investigation white noise was used for masking to avoid the evoking of auditory potentials. Seven of the examined healthy persons (including one deaf person whose vestibular organ was not damaged) had registered a response consisting of several waves with vertex positive peaks. The first two waves P1 and P2 with the mean value 2.02 ms and 5.6 ms are most often during in the 10 ms. The registered deaf persons response does not differ from the record of healthy persons. PMID:9518319

  1. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  2. New oilseeds boast feedstock potential

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-24

    Researchers in the United States are investigating the chemical potential of the Chinese tallow tree and the buffalo gourd. It is estimated that the Houston area of Texas could yield up to 70lb of seeds per tree per year. The oily component of the seed is recovered by solvent extraction and the product may some day compete with petroleum-based waxes or fats. In contrast to the Chinese tallow tree, which grows near swamps and marshes, the buffalo gourd is a desert plant. Experiments are underway aimed at improving the yield of the plant by hybridization and other genetic manipulations, and also to come up with an efficient harvesting technique.

  3. Potential Energy Curves for CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Irwin; Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the Chi (sup 1) Epsilon (sup plus), alpha (sup 3) II (sub r), alpha prime (sup 3) epsilon (sup plus), d (sup 3) delta, e (sup 3) Epsilon (sup minus), Alpha (sup 1) II, and Beta (sup 1) Epsilon (sup plus), electronic states of the CO molecule have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The curve for the A III state will have to bend sharply in the range between 1.9 and 2.1 angstroms or it will have to pass through a maximum to reach the proper dissociation limit.

  4. Potential Markers in Cardiac Hypertrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Fulgheri, Gabriele; Wicinski, Michal; Grzesk, Elzbieta; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Grześk, Grzegorz; Darwish, Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed based on medical history of patient (symptoms and family history), physical examination, results of echocardiogram and in some situations additionally ECG or chest-X-ray results. Currently used non-invasive diagnostic methods, could be complemented by biochemical tests. In this review some emerging potential biomarkers such as: osteopontin, ST-2 receptor, osteoprotegerin, neopterin, urocortins, growth differentiation factor 15 and urotensin II are described. In current article human and non human investigations have been reviewed, since rat is most commonly used model in experimental cardiology and gives important foundations to clinical knowledge.

  5. Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Sarmento-Neto, José Ferreira; do Nascimento, Lázaro Gomes; Felipe, Cícero Francisco Bezerra; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-12-23

    Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases, and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from 31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.

  6. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i V{sub 0} + j W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}∈R , W{sub 0}∈C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  7. Ethnography: principles, practice and potential.

    PubMed

    Draper, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Ethnography is a methodology that is gaining popularity in nursing and healthcare research. It is concerned with studying people in their cultural context and how their behaviour, either as individuals or as part of a group, is influenced by this cultural context. Ethnography is a form of social research and has much in common with other forms of qualitative enquiry. While classical ethnography was characteristically concerned with describing 'other' cultures, contemporary ethnography has focused on settings nearer to home. This article outlines some of the underlying principles and practice of ethnography, and its potential for nursing and healthcare practice.

  8. Enterotoxigenic potential of Staphylococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Becker, K; Keller, B; von Eiff, C; Brück, M; Lubritz, G; Etienne, J; Peters, G

    2001-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) caused by enterotoxigenic staphylococci is one of the main food-borne diseases. In contrast to Staphylococcus aureus, a systematic screening for the enterotoxins has not yet been performed on the genomic level for the coagulase-positive species S. intermedius. Therefore, the enterotoxigenic potential of 281 different veterinary (canine, n = 247; equine, n = 23; feline, n = 9; other, n = 2) and 11 human isolates of S. intermedius was tested by using a multiplex PCR DNA-enzyme immunoassay system targeting the staphylococcal enterotoxin genes sea, seb, sec, sed, and see. Molecular results were compared by in vitro testing of enterotoxin production by two immunoassays. A total of 33 (11.3%) S. intermedius isolates, including 31 (12.6%) canine isolates, 1 equine isolate, and 1 human isolate, tested positive for the sec gene. In vitro production of the respective enterotoxins was detected in 30 (90.9%) of these isolates by using immunological tests. In contrast, none of 65 veterinary specimen-derived isolates additionally tested and comprising 13 (sub)species of coagulase-negative staphylococci were found to be enterotoxigenic. This study shows on both molecular and immunological levels that a substantial number of S. intermedius isolates harbor the potential for enterotoxin production. Since evidence for noninvasive zoonotic transmission of S. intermedius from animal hosts to humans has been documented, an enterotoxigenic role of this microorganism in SFP via contamination of food products may be assumed. PMID:11722906

  9. Curcumin: therapeutical potential in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Giannotti, Rossella; Plateroti, Andrea Maria; Pascarella, Antonia; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid of the popular Indian spice turmeric (Curcuma longa). In the last 50 years, in vitro and in vivo experiments supported the main role of polyphenols and curcumin for the prevention and treatment of many different inflammatory diseases and tumors.The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor properties of curcumin are due to different cellular mechanisms: this compound, in fact, produces different responses in different cell types. Unfortunately, because of its low solubility and oral bioavailability, the biomedical potential of curcumin is not easy to exploit; for this reason more attention has been given to nanoparticles and liposomes, which are able to improve curcumin's bioavailability. Pharmacologically, curcumin does not show any dose-limiting toxicity when it is administered at doses of up to 8 g/day for three months. It has been demonstrated that curcumin has beneficial effects on several ocular diseases, such as chronic anterior uveitis, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and dry eye syndrome. The purpose of this review is to report what has so far been elucidated about curcumin properties and its potential use in ophthalmology. PMID:24323538

  10. Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Raudzens, P A

    1982-01-01

    Sensory EPs were recorded intraoperatively in 173 neurosurgical procedures (71 VEPs, 66 BAEPs, and 31 SSEPs) to evaluate the utility of this technique. EPs could be safely recorded in all cases, but the yield of useful results varied with each sensory modality. BAEPs were recorded reliably in 100% of the cases and intraoperative latency changes accurately predicted postoperative hearing deficits in 10%. Potential hearing deficits were detected in another 15%. BAEP changes were associated with brainstem dysfunction in only one case. VEP changes were difficult to interpret intraoperatively because of contamination by a high degree of variability and both false negative and false positive results. Changes in VEP amplitudes related to surgical manipulation of the optic chiasm were only suggested. SSEP changes were recorded reliably in only 75% of the cases and no correlations between SSEP changes and postoperative sensory function were established. Again, intraoperative amplitude attenuation of the SSEP waveform with surgical manipulation only suggested a potential sensory deficit. Intraoperative EP monitoring is a valuable technique that provides a functional analysis of the sensory nervous system during surgical procedures. Specific sensory stimuli and improved data analysis will increase the utility of this CNS monitor.

  11. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. PMID:24006213

  12. Curcumin: therapeutical potential in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Giannotti, Rossella; Plateroti, Andrea Maria; Pascarella, Antonia; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid of the popular Indian spice turmeric (Curcuma longa). In the last 50 years, in vitro and in vivo experiments supported the main role of polyphenols and curcumin for the prevention and treatment of many different inflammatory diseases and tumors.The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor properties of curcumin are due to different cellular mechanisms: this compound, in fact, produces different responses in different cell types. Unfortunately, because of its low solubility and oral bioavailability, the biomedical potential of curcumin is not easy to exploit; for this reason more attention has been given to nanoparticles and liposomes, which are able to improve curcumin's bioavailability. Pharmacologically, curcumin does not show any dose-limiting toxicity when it is administered at doses of up to 8 g/day for three months. It has been demonstrated that curcumin has beneficial effects on several ocular diseases, such as chronic anterior uveitis, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and dry eye syndrome. The purpose of this review is to report what has so far been elucidated about curcumin properties and its potential use in ophthalmology.

  13. Leptin: a potential novel antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin-Yun; Kim, Chung Sub; Frazer, Alan; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-31

    Leptin, a hormone secreted from adipose tissue, was originally discovered to regulate body weight. The localization of the leptin receptor in limbic structures suggests a potential role for leptin in emotional processes. Here, we show that rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress and chronic social defeat exhibit low leptin levels in plasma. Systemic leptin treatment reversed the hedonic-like deficit induced by chronic unpredictable stress and improved behavioral despair dose-dependently in the forced swim test (FST), a model widely used for screening potential antidepressant efficacy. The behavioral effects of leptin in the FST were accompanied by increased neuronal activation in limbic structures, particularly in the hippocampus. Intrahippocampal infusion of leptin produced a similar antidepressant-like effect in the FST as its systemic administration. By contrast, infusion of leptin into the hypothalamus decreased body weight but had no effect on FST behavior. These findings suggest that: (i) impaired leptin production and secretion may contribute to chronic stress-induced depression-like phenotypes, (ii) the hippocampus is a brain site mediating leptin's antidepressant-like activity, and (iii) elevating leptin signaling in brain may represent a novel approach for the treatment of depressive disorders. PMID:16423896

  14. Three problems in potential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, N. L.

    1982-05-01

    There are three problems in plane potential flow, each treated separately. The collapse from rest of a mound of ideal fluid, under its own weight on an infinite horizontal plane, was approached in two different ways. An initial time problem for circular arc mounds was solved by conformal mapping and Green's functions. Initial displacements were computed. Secondly, the mound was assumed to be shallow and shallow water analysis was pursued. By appealing to the two approaches it was determined that the velocity potential is not analytic in time at the contact point and higher order shallow water solution will be lacking exponentially small terms. The classical problem of semi-infinite flow past a sinusoidal wall was attacked in two ways. One was to extend the small perturbation series in dimensionless wall height to fiftieth order by computer. The other approach was by direct variation using Kelvin's theorem of minimum kinetic energy. The method reduced the problem to solving a linear algebraic system. The problem of periodically forced (by free surface pressure or a base wall) free surface flow was attacked by the method of multiple scales. The two cases studied were that either, the forcing phenomena's temporal frequency wavelength combination lie on or near the dispersion curve for linear gravity waves, or that the double of it did.

  15. Recovery Potential After Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Rüdiger J.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In acute stroke, the major factor for recovery is the early use of thrombolysis aimed at arterial recanalization and reperfusion of ischemic brain tissue. Subsequently, neurorehabilitative training critically improves clinical recovery due to augmention of postlesional plasticity. Neuroimaging and electrophysiology studies have revealed that the location and volume of the stroke lesion, the affection of nerve fiber tracts, as well as functional and structural changes in the perilesional tissue and in large-scale bihemispheric networks are relevant biomarkers of post-stroke recovery. However, associated disorders, such as mood disorders, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases, may induce secondary cerebral changes or aggravate the functional deficits and, thereby, compromise the potential for recovery. PMID:26617568

  16. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  17. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies.

  18. Relativity, potential energy, and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    This paper is an exploration of the concept of energy, illuminated by the transformative insights of the special theory of relativity. Focusing on potential energy (PE), it will be shown that PE as presently defined is in conflict with the tenets of special relativity. Even though PE remains an indispensable theoretical device its actual physicality is questionable. Moreover its ontological status is quite different from that of both kinetic energy and mass, a significant point that is not widely appreciated. We will establish that PE is a theoretical concept as opposed to an empirical one; it is a descriptor of mass-energy without a detectable physical presence of its own. PE is a measure of energy stored, it is not the energy stored.

  19. Zeta potential in ceramic industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecuit, M.

    1984-01-01

    Deflocculation, electrical conductivity and zeta potential (ZP) are studied for the addition of 0 to 10000 ppm Na2SiO3 deflocculator to slips obtained from three argillaceous materials (kaolin d'Arvor, ball clay Hyplas 64, and/or Granger Clay No. 10). The quantity of Na2SO3 required to deflocculate a slip is independent of the density but differes for each clay. The ZP is directly related to the density of the slip. The higher the ZP the more stable a slip is; the value of the ZP of a mixture does not follow a simple law but the electrical resistance of a mixture does follow a simple additive law. The ZP appears to have linear relation with the specific surface of the argillaceous material.

  20. Fertility Potential in Adult Hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Sher Singh; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Vyas, Nachiket; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypospadias is a congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract characterized by abnormal location of the external urethral meatus over ventral aspect of penis. The ideal time to correct primary hypospadias is when aged 6-12 months. However, in some developing countries, such as ours, this anomaly may be left untreated until adulthood. There are multiple risk factors responsible for development of this anomaly, out of which paternal sub fertility is one of them. As the child grows into adulthood, fertility status becomes an important issue, frequently raised by patients. Aim To evaluate the fertility potential of adult hypospadiac patients and to rule out the effect of age of surgical correction over fertility potential. Materials and Methods Seventy three adult patients of hypospadias were prospectively evaluated, out of which 43 were operated during adulthood. All patients underwent measurement of penile length and circumference in both flaccid and erect positions along with testicular volume, serum LH, FSH and testosterone and semen analysis. A set of questionnaire was given to all the patients which included assessment of erectile function (IIEF-5), ejaculatory function, strength of libido and level of satisfaction after sexual intercourse. Results were compared with an age matched control group of 70 healthy person. Results Out of 73 patients with a mean age of 23.73 years, 14(19.17%) had proximal and rest 59(80.82%) had distal type of hypospadias. Mean penile length in both type of hypospadiac patients under both flaccid and erect conditions (7.92±1.33 and 9.62±1.31cm) were significantly shorter than those of control (10.78±0.94 and 13.15±1.15 cm) (p<0.001). In spite of short penile length, the level of satisfaction of all patients and their partner after penetrating intercourse were comparable to control (p>0.05). The strength of libido (p>0.05) was comparable with control in both type of hypospadiac patients; however IIEF-5 scores was poor in

  1. Biomedical electronics: potentialities and problems.

    PubMed

    LEDLEY, R S; LUSTED, L B

    1962-01-19

    The present annual expenditure in the biomedical sciences, now less than 2 percent of the funds appropriated for defense, must be significantly increased if the great gain that can result from the adequate application of electronic technology in biomedical science is to be realized. Such use of electronics in biomedical science holds promise of tremendous advances in the study of the origins of the life processes; it may result in spectacular advances in medical science, which could have a definite effect on individual health and longevity; it might pave the way for the discovery and development of whole new technologies based on intimate knowledge of biological processes. Great strides can be made in surmounting the major obstacles by combating apathy, through making the public and the industrial community aware of the potentialities of modern biomedical research, and by giving scientists adequate cross-disciplinary training and using the abilities of those so trained (1).

  2. Misonidazole and potentially lethal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Korbelik, M.; Palcic, B.; Skov, K.; Skarsgard, L.

    1982-03-01

    The existence of potentially lethal damage (PLD) is demonstrated in exponentially growing CHO cells exposed to misonidazole in hypoxia. The method of hypertonic post-treatment of cells was used in these studies. Misonidazole-induced PLD differs in many characteristics from radiation-induced PLD.The repair kinetics of misonidazole-induced PLD are much slower than for the repair of radiation-induced PLD (hours vs. minutes). No significant repair of misonidazole-induced PLD took place at 25/sup 0/C. Other differences are discussed. Hypertonic post-treatment of irradiated cells which had been pre-incubated with misonidazole to non-toxic levels, gave survival data consistent with the interpretation that no radiation PLD can be induced in such cells.

  3. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowart, C.G.; Notz, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents the results of a fully documented peer review of DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, Characteristics of Potential Repository Wastes''. The peer review was chaired and administered by oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and was conducted in accordance with OCRWM QA procedure QAAP 3.3 Peer Review'' for the purpose of quailing the document for use in OCRWM quality-affecting work. The peer reviewers selected represent a wide range of experience and knowledge particularly suitable for evaluating the subject matter. A total of 596 formal comments were documented by the seven peer review panels, and all were successfully resolved. The peers reached the conclusion that DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, is quality determined and suitable for use in quality-affecting work.

  4. Gas flow in barred potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sormani, Mattia C.; Binney, James; Magorrian, John

    2015-05-01

    We use a Cartesian grid to simulate the flow of gas in a barred Galactic potential and investigate the effects of varying the sound speed in the gas and the resolution of the grid. For all sound speeds and resolutions, streamlines closely follow closed orbits at large and small radii. At intermediate radii shocks arise and the streamlines shift between two families of closed orbits. The point at which the shocks appear and the streamlines shift between orbit families depends strongly on sound speed and resolution. For sufficiently large values of these two parameters, the transfer happens at the cusped orbit as hypothesized by Binney et al. over two decades ago. For sufficiently high resolutions, the flow downstream of the shocks becomes unsteady. If this unsteadiness is physical, as appears to be the case, it provides a promising explanation for the asymmetry in the observed distribution of CO.

  5. The potential of renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the U.S. DOE national labs were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the labs. As a result of that meeting, interlabor teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead lab was designated for each core lab team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply; What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications. The results are presented of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy.

  6. Friedmann equation with quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Siong, Ch'ng Han; Radiman, Shahidan; Nikouravan, Bijan

    2013-11-27

    Friedmann equations are used to describe the evolution of the universe. Solving Friedmann equations for the scale factor indicates that the universe starts from an initial singularity where all the physical laws break down. However, the Friedmann equations are well describing the late-time or large scale universe. Hence now, many physicists try to find an alternative theory to avoid this initial singularity. In this paper, we generate a version of first Friedmann equation which is added with an additional term. This additional term contains the quantum potential energy which is believed to play an important role at small scale. However, it will gradually become negligible when the universe evolves to large scale.

  7. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  8. The potential of the internet.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jamie J; McDowell, Sarah E

    2012-06-01

    The internet and the World Wide Web have changed the ways that we function. As technologies grow and adapt, there is a huge potential for the internet to affect drug research and development, as well as many other aspects of clinical pharmacology. We review some of the areas of interest to date and discuss some of the potential areas in which internet-based technology can be exploited. Information retrieval from the web by health-care professionals is common, and bringing evidence-based medicine to the bedside affects the care of patients. As a primary research tool the web can provide a vast array of information in generating new ideas or exploring previous research findings. This has facilitated systematic reviewing, for example. The content of the web has become a subject of research in its own right. The web is also widely used as a research facilitator, including enhancement of communication between collaborators, provision of online research tools (such as questionnaires, management of large scale multicentre trials, registration of clinical trials) and distribution of information. Problems include information overload, ignorance of early data that are not indexed in databases, difficulties in keeping web sites up to date and assessing the validity of information retrieved. Some web-based activities are viewed with suspicion, including analysis by pharmaceutical companies of drug information to facilitate direct-to-consumer advertising of novel pharmaceuticals. Use of these technologies will continue to expand in often unexpected ways. Clinical pharmacologists must embrace internet technology and include it as a key priority in their research agenda.

  9. Zeta potential control for electrophoresis cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Zeta potential arises from fact that ions tend to be adsorbed on surface of cell walls. This potential interfaces with electric field sensed by migrating particles and degrades resolution of separation. By regulating sign and magnitude of applied potential induced charge can be used to increase or decrease effective wall zeta potential.

  10. Potential Clinical Use of Kisspeptin.

    PubMed

    Prague, Julia K; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, kisspeptins--peptide products of varying lengths encoded by the KISS1 gene--have been found to be key regulators of normal reproductive function throughout life in animals and humans. By activating the kisspeptin receptor [previously known as orphan G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54)], they elicit an effect on the central gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. Administration of kisspeptin by either the subcutaneous or intravenous route potently stimulates endogenous gonadotropin hormone release in healthy men and women as well as in animals. Kisspeptin also stimulates endogenous release of gonadotropins in subfertile as well as healthy volunteers, and therefore it has potential as a novel therapeutic agent in reproductive disorders. Further human studies have shown that chronic, high-dose administration of kisspeptin causes desensitisation with rapid subsequent suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and therefore high-dose long-acting analogues may have a clinical role in treating sex hormone-dependent malignancies. By further elucidating the intricacies and mechanisms of the kisspeptin signalling system, and the tissues it acts on during different phases of the reproductive timeline (including during puberty, fertility, pregnancy and menopause), pharmacologic analogues could become clinically useful.

  11. Hypothyroidism Affects Olfactory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Świdziński, Teodor; Czerniejewska-Wolska, Hanna; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Owecki, Maciej; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Frankowska, Anna; Łącka, Katarzyna; Glapiński, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Szaniec, Zofia; Świdziński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background. Objective electrophysiological methods for investigations of the organ of smell consist in recordings of olfactory cortex responses to specific, time restricted odor stimuli. In hypothyroidism have impaired sense of smell. Material and Methods. Two groups: control of 31 healthy subjects and study group of 21 with hypothyroidism. The inclusion criterion for the study group was the TSH range from 3.54 to 110 μIU/mL. Aim. Assessment of the latency time of evoked responses from the olfactory nerve N1 and the trigeminal nerve N5 using two smells of mint and anise in hypothyroidism. Results. The smell perception in subjective olfactory tests was normal in 85% of the hypothyroid group. Differences were noticed in the objective tests. The detailed intergroup analysis of latency times of recorded cortical responses PN5 and PN1 performed by means between the groups of patients with overt clinical hypothyroidism versus subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.05) whereas no such differences were found between the control group versus subclinical hypothyroidism group (p > 0.05). Conclusion. We can conclude that registration of cortex potentials at irritation of olfactory and trigeminal nerves offers possibilities for using this method as an objective indicator of hypothyroidism severity and prognostic process factor. PMID:27656655

  12. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  13. [Intraoperative Visual Evoked Potential Monitoring].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hironobu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) is recorded from the back of the head, which is elicited by retinal stimulation transmitted through optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract lateral geniculate body, optic radiation and finally cortical visual area. VEP monitoring did not prevail since 1990s because marked intra-individual difference and instability of VEP recording limited the clinical usefulness under inhalation anesthetic management and techniques of VEP monitoring at the time. However, recent advances in techniques including a new light-stimulating device consisting of high-luminosity LEDs and induction of electroretinography to ascertain the arrival of the stimulus at the retina provided better conditions for stable VEP recording under general anesthesia. In addition, the introduction of total intravenous anesthesia using propofol is important for the successful VEP recordings because inhaled anesthetics have suppressive effect on VEP waveform. Intraoperative VEP has been considered to monitor the functional integrity of visual function during neurosurgical procedures, in which the optic pathway is at a risk of injury. Intraoperative VEP monitoring may allow us to detect reversible damage to the visual pathway intraoperatively and enable us to prevent permanent impairment.

  14. Honours education: releasing leadership potential.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Angela J

    2003-01-01

    There is debate within the nursing profession in regard to determining the best approach to Leadership development for the new millennium. Should nursing adopt career pathways Like other disciplines that enable individuals to develop leadership potential in a timely fashion? St. Francis Xavier University (StFXU), the number one ranked undergraduate school in the country (DeMont 2002), has established an innovative strategy that promotes Leadership development at the undergraduate level. It has launched a special stream of its BScN program that culminates in an honours degree. The program, the first of its type in Canada, is designed to produce nursing leaders and scholars who will possess the core competencies required for leadership in diverse environments. This paper discusses the role of honours education in nursing, describes the curriculum and related Learning activities in the StFXU honours program and explores the benefits and challenges that an honours program has to offer. The findings will benefit nurse leaders in educational and practice settings, professional organizations and policy arenas who are interested in influencing the development of leadership in nursing. PMID:14717509

  15. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Notz, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the spent fuels and other wastes that will be disposed of in a geologic repository. The two major sources of these materials are commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized high-level waste (HLW). Other wastes that may require long-term isolation include non-LWR spent fuels and miscellaneous sources such as activated metals. Detailed characterizations are required for all of these potential repository wastes. These characterizations include physical, chemical, and radiological properties. The latter must take into account decay as a function of time. This information has been extracted from primary data sources, evaluated, and assembled in a Characteristics Data Base which provides data in four formats: hard copy standard reports, menu-driven personal computer (PC) data bases, program-level PC data bases, and mainframe computer files. The Characteristics Data Base provides a standard set of self-consistent data to the various areas of responsibility including systems integration and waste stream analysis, storage, transportation, and geologic disposal. The data will be used for design studies, evaluation of alternatives, and system optimization by OCRWM and supporting contractors. 7 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  17. Hypothyroidism Affects Olfactory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Świdziński, Teodor; Czerniejewska-Wolska, Hanna; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Owecki, Maciej; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Frankowska, Anna; Łącka, Katarzyna; Glapiński, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Szaniec, Zofia; Świdziński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background. Objective electrophysiological methods for investigations of the organ of smell consist in recordings of olfactory cortex responses to specific, time restricted odor stimuli. In hypothyroidism have impaired sense of smell. Material and Methods. Two groups: control of 31 healthy subjects and study group of 21 with hypothyroidism. The inclusion criterion for the study group was the TSH range from 3.54 to 110 μIU/mL. Aim. Assessment of the latency time of evoked responses from the olfactory nerve N1 and the trigeminal nerve N5 using two smells of mint and anise in hypothyroidism. Results. The smell perception in subjective olfactory tests was normal in 85% of the hypothyroid group. Differences were noticed in the objective tests. The detailed intergroup analysis of latency times of recorded cortical responses PN5 and PN1 performed by means between the groups of patients with overt clinical hypothyroidism versus subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.05) whereas no such differences were found between the control group versus subclinical hypothyroidism group (p > 0.05). Conclusion. We can conclude that registration of cortex potentials at irritation of olfactory and trigeminal nerves offers possibilities for using this method as an objective indicator of hypothyroidism severity and prognostic process factor.

  18. Cellulase recovery: Problems and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Lee, N.E.

    1989-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose may become commercially feasible if the enzyme is recovered and reused. The use of immobilized cellobiohydrolase (CBH) and endoglucanase (EG) does not appear feasible since the substrate itself is insoluble. Since the ..beta..-glucosidase (BG) component of cellulase acts upon soluble substrates it has the potential to be immobilized, used, and reused in this form. The problem of CBH and EG recovery has been tackled by examining their ability to be adsorbed to inorganically-based kieselguhr Macrosorb granules which can be used repeatedly for cellulase adsorption. The kinetics of the adsorption of Trichoderma reesei C30 cellulase protein to DEAE-Macrosorb are described and these Macrosorb particles have been used to recover cellulase from Avicel and steam-exploded aspen wood hydrolysates. The problem of ..beta..-glucosidase recovery could be achieved by immobilizing it onto an affinity material such as concanavalin A from which this enzyme is difficult to elute. Cellulase adsorbed onto lignocellulosic residues at the completion of hydrolysis can be eluted from the residue using a protein denaturant. Reactivation of the denatured enzyme may be possible. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Potential Refinement of the ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chopo

    The ICRF analysis and data represented the state of the art in global extragalactic X/S band microwave astrometry in 1995. Similar analysis has been used to extend the ICRF with subsequent data consistent with the original catalog. Since 1995 there have been considerable advances in the geodetic/astrometric VLBI data set and analysis that would significantly improve the systematic errors stability and density of the next realization of the ICRS when the decision is made to take this step. In particular data acquired since 1990 including extensive use of the VLBA are of higher quality and astrometric utility because of changes in instrumentation schedule design and networks as well as specifically astrometric intent. The IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry) continues a systematic extension of the astrometric data set. Sufficient data distribution exists to select a better set of defining sources. Improvements in troposphere modeling will minimize known systematic astrometric errors while accurate modeling and estimation of station effects from loading and nonlinear motions should permit the reintegration of the celestial and terrestrial reference frames with Earth orientation parameters though a single VLBI solution. The differences between the current ICRF and the potential second realization will be described

  20. Potential refinement of the ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2005-01-01

    The ICRF analysis and data represented the state of the art in global extragalactic X/S band microwave astrometry in 1995. Similar analysis has been used to extend the ICRF with subsequent data consistent with the original catalog. Since 1995 there have been considerable advances in the geodetic/astrometric VLBI data set and analysis that would significantly improve the systematic errors stability and density of the next realization of the ICRS when the decision is made to take this step. In particular data acquired since 1990 including extensive use of the VLBA are of higher quality and astrometric utility because of changes in instrumentation schedule design and networks as well as specifically astrometric intent. The IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry) continues a systematic extension of the astrometric data set. Sufficient data distribution exists to select a better set of defining sources. Improvements in troposphere modeling will minimize known systematic astrometric errors while accurate modeling and estimation of station effects from loading and nonlinear motions should permit the reintegration of the celestial and terrestrial reference frames with Earth orientation parameters though a single VLBI solution. The differences between the current ICRF and the potential second realization will be described.

  1. Thymoquinone and its therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Darakhshan, Sara; Bidmeshki Pour, Ali; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine has attracted great attention in the recent years and is increasingly used as alternatives to chemical drugs. Several lines of evidence support the positive impact of medicinal plants in the prevention and cure of a wide range of diseases. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the most abundant constituent of the volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds and most properties of N sativa are mainly attributed to TQ. A number of pharmacological actions of TQ have been investigated including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-histaminic, anti-microbial and anti-tumor effects. It has also gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and neuroprotective activities. In addition, positive effects of TQ in cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, reproductive disorders and respiratory ailments, as well as in the treatment of bone complications as well as fibrosis have been shown. In addition, a large body of data shows that TQ has very low adverse effects and no serious toxicity. More recently, a great deal of attention has been given to this dietary phytochemical with an increasing interest to investigate it in pre-clinical and clinical researches for assessing its health benefits. Here we report on and analyze numerous properties of the active ingredient of N. sativa seeds, TQ, in the context of its therapeutic potentials for a wide range of illnesses. We also summarize the drug's possible mechanisms of action. The evidence reported sugests that TQ should be developed as a novel drug in clinical trials. PMID:25829334

  2. Can nanotechnology potentiate photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Dai, Tianhong; Chung, Hoon; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Chiang, Long Y.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill cancer cells and infectious microorganisms. Due to the tendency of most photosensitizers (PS) to be poorly soluble and to form nonphotoactive aggregates, drug-delivery vehicles have become of high importance. The nanotechnology revolution has provided many examples of nanoscale drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to PDT. These include liposomes, lipoplexes, nanoemulsions, micelles, polymer nanoparticles (degradable and nondegradable), and silica nanoparticles. In some cases (fullerenes and quantum dots), the actual nanoparticle itself is the PS. Targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides can be used to increase specificity. Gold and silver nanoparticles can provide plasmonic enhancement of PDT. Two-photon excitation or optical upconversion can be used instead of one-photon excitation to increase tissue penetration at longer wavelengths. Finally, after sections on in vivo studies and nanotoxicology, we attempt to answer the title question, “can nano-technology potentiate PDT?” PMID:26361572

  3. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  4. Topological insulators in random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Andreas; Fehske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities on the two-dimensional surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs). Modeling weak and strong TIs using a generic four-band Hamiltonian, which allows for a breaking of inversion and time-reversal symmetries and takes into account random local potentials as well as the Zeeman and orbital effects of external magnetic fields, we compute the local density of states, the single-particle spectral function, and the conductance for a (contacted) slab geometry by numerically exact techniques based on kernel polynomial expansion and Green's function approaches. We show that bulk disorder refills the surface-state Dirac gap induced by a homogeneous magnetic field with states, whereas orbital (Peierls-phase) disorder preserves the gap feature. The former effect is more pronounced in weak TIs than in strong TIs. At moderate randomness, disorder-induced conducting channels appear in the surface layer, promoting diffusive metallicity. Random Zeeman fields rapidly destroy any conducting surface states. Imprinting quantum dots on a TI's surface, we demonstrate that carrier transport can be easily tuned by varying the gate voltage, even to the point where quasibound dot states may appear.

  5. Potential seaways across West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, David G.; Barnes, David K. A.; Fretwell, Peter T.; Bingham, Robert G.

    2011-10-01

    The West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) has long been considered vulnerable to rapid retreat and today parts are rapidly losing ice. Projection of future change in WAIS is, however, hampered by our poor understanding of past changes, especially during interglacial periods that could be analogs for the future, but which undoubtedly provide an opportunity for testing predictive models. We consider how ice-loss would open seaways across WAIS; these would likely alter Southern Ocean circulation and climate, and would broadly define the de-glacial state, but they may also have left evidence of their existence in the coastal seas they once connected. We show the most likely routes for such seaways, and that a direct seaway between Weddell and Ross seas, which did not pass through the Amundsen Sea sector, is unlikely. Continued ice-loss at present rates would open seaways between Amundsen and Weddell seas (A-W), and Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas (A-B), in around one thousand years. This timescale indicates potential future vulnerability, but also suggests seaways may have opened in recent interglacial periods. We attempt to test this hypothesis using contemporary bryozoan species assemblages around Antarctica, concluding that anomalously high similarity in assemblages in the Weddell and Amundsen seas supports recent migration through A-W. Other authors have suggested opening of seaways last occurred during Marine Isotope Stage 7a (209 ka BP), but we conclude that opening could have occurred in MIS 5e (100 ka BP) when Antarctica was warmer than present and likely contributed to global sea levels higher than today.

  6. The potential of micromagnetic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart; Béguin, Annemarieke; Fabian, Karl; Reith, Pim; Rastogi, Ankur; Barnhoorn, Auke; Hilgenkamp, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Methods to derive paleodirections or paleointensities from rocks currently rely on measurements of bulk samples (typically ~10 cc). The process of recording and storing magnetizations as function of temperature, however, differs for grains of various sizes and chemical compositions. Most rocks, by their mere nature, consist of assemblages of grains varying in size, shape, and chemistry. When dealing with lavas, this differing magnetic behaviour often hampers paleointensity experiments; while occasionally a reliable paleodirection is obscured (e.g. Coe et al. (2014)). If we would be able to isolate the contribution of each magnetic grain in a sample to the bulk magnetic moment of that sample, a wealth of opportunities for highly detailed magnetic analysis would be opened, possibly leading to an entirely new approach in retrieving paleomagnetic signals from complex mineralogies. Firstly, the distribution and volume of the remanence carrying grains in the sample must be assessed; this is done using a MicroCT scanner capable of detecting grains >1 micron. Secondly, the magnetic stray field perpendicular to the surface of a thin sample is measured using a high-resolution DC SQUID microscope. A mathematical inversion of these measurements yields the isolated direction and magnitude of the magnetic moment of individual grains in the sample. Here we show the results of inversions on a synthetic sample that was magnetised under different angles with respect to the scanned surface. Computational limitations constrain us to inverting only up to tens of grains at the same time. Besides presenting new results of the first successful non-destructive micromagnetic tomography study, we will discuss the current potential and limitations of this technique.

  7. Membrane potential and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Brackenbury, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane potential (Vm), the voltage across the plasma membrane, arises because of the presence of different ion channels/transporters with specific ion selectivity and permeability. Vm is a key biophysical signal in non-excitable cells, modulating important cellular activities, such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the multiplicities of various ion channels/transporters expressed on different cells are finely tuned in order to regulate the Vm. It is well-established that cancer cells possess distinct bioelectrical properties. Notably, electrophysiological analyses in many cancer cell types have revealed a depolarized Vm that favors cell proliferation. Ion channels/transporters control cell volume and migration, and emerging data also suggest that the level of Vm has functional roles in cancer cell migration. In addition, hyperpolarization is necessary for stem cell differentiation. For example, both osteogenesis and adipogenesis are hindered in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) under depolarizing conditions. Therefore, in the context of cancer, membrane depolarization might be important for the emergence and maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), giving rise to sustained tumor growth. This review aims to provide a broad understanding of the Vm as a bioelectrical signal in cancer cells by examining several key types of ion channels that contribute to its regulation. The mechanisms by which Vm regulates cancer cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation will be discussed. In the long term, Vm might be a valuable clinical marker for tumor detection with prognostic value, and could even be artificially modified in order to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:23882223

  8. Renewable energy potential in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa Guzman, Jose Luis

    2008-12-01

    Renewable energy flows are very large in comparison with humankind's use of energy. In principle, all our energy needs, both now and into the future, can be met by energy from renewable sources. After many years trying to develop the alternative energy potential of Colombia, a major effort is principally being made since 2000 to explore and assess the renewable resources of the entire country. Until 2000, the availability of conventional energy sources in Colombia prevented renewable energy exploration from reaching a higher level. However, the extreme energy crisis of 1992 - 1993 alerted the authorities and the community to the necessity for exploring alternative energy sources. This energy study is a general approach to the current and future renewable energy scenario of Colombia. It was prepared in response to the increased interest around the world and in particular in Colombia to develop its non-fossil energy prospective. It, therefore, represents a working document giving an initial impression of the possible scale of the main renewables sources as a response to the concern about energy security and fossil fuel dependence problems. The assumptions made and calculations reported may therefore be subject to revision as more information becomes available. The aim of this dissertation is not only to improve the public understanding and discussion of renewable energy matters in Colombia but also to stimulate the development and application of renewable energy, wherever they have prospects of economic viability and environmental acceptability. To achieve such goal this paper reviews several renewable technologies, their availability, contribution and feasibility in Colombia.

  9. Potentials in a nonuniform quantum dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Jamil, M.

    2009-03-15

    Using the quantum hydrodynamic model for quantum magnetoplasmas, the Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah shielding potential and the far-field dynamical wake potential in a quantum dusty plasma with a nonuniform density and ambient static magnetic field have been investigated in detail. The short-range screening potential different from the symmetric Debye-Hueckel potential and the long-range oscillatory wake potential are found to be significantly affected by the nonuniformities in the density and the static magnetic field. The far-field oscillatory wake-field potential can explain attraction among the same polarity charges leading to the possible ordered structures or coagulation in the inhomogeneous quantum dusty magnetoplasma.

  10. Therapeutic potential of atmospheric neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Tatje, Jennifer; Biffi, Katia; Leschi, Delphine; Briançon, Jérome; Marcovici, Céline Lantieri

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive type of primary brain tumour in humans. It has a very poor prognosis despite multi-modality treatments consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recently, a new treatment has been proposed – Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) – which exploits the interaction between Boron-10 atoms (introduced by vector molecules) and low energy neutrons produced by giant accelerators or nuclear reactors. Methods The objective of the present study is to compute the deposited dose using a natural source of neutrons (atmospheric neutrons). For this purpose, Monte Carlo computer simulations were carried out to estimate the dosimetric effects of a natural source of neutrons in the matter, to establish if atmospheric neutrons interact with vector molecules containing Boron-10. Results The doses produced (an average of 1 μGy in a 1 g tumour) are not sufficient for therapeutic treatment of in situ tumours. However, the non-localised yet specific dosimetric properties of 10B vector molecules could prove interesting for the treatment of micro-metastases or as (neo)adjuvant treatment. On a cellular scale, the deposited dose is approximately 0.5 Gy/neutron impact. Conclusion It has been shown that BNCT may be used with a natural source of neutrons, and may potentially be useful for the treatment of micro-metastases. The atmospheric neutron flux is much lower than that utilized during standard NBCT. However the purpose of the proposed study is not to replace the ordinary NBCT but to test if naturally occurring atmospheric neutrons, considered to be an ionizing pollution at the Earth's surface, can be used in the treatment of a disease such as cancer. To finalize this study, it is necessary to quantify the biological effects of the physically deposited dose, taking into account the characteristics of the incident particles (alpha particle and Lithium

  11. Potential risks of pharmacy compounding.

    PubMed

    Gudeman, Jennifer; Jozwiakowski, Michael; Chollet, John; Randell, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacy compounding involves the preparation of customized medications that are not commercially available for individual patients with specialized medical needs. Traditional pharmacy compounding is appropriate when done on a small scale by pharmacists who prepare the medication based on an individual prescription. However, the regulatory oversight of pharmacy compounding is significantly less rigorous than that required for Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs; as such, compounded drugs may pose additional risks to patients. FDA-approved drugs are made and tested in accordance with good manufacturing practice regulations (GMPs), which are federal statutes that govern the production and testing of pharmaceutical products. In contrast, compounded drugs are exempt from GMPs, and testing to assess product quality is inconsistent. Unlike FDA-approved drugs, pharmacy-compounded products are not clinically evaluated for safety or efficacy. In addition, compounded preparations do not have standard product labeling or prescribing information with instructions for safe use. Compounding pharmacies are not required to report adverse events to the FDA, which is mandatory for manufacturers of FDA-regulated medications. Some pharmacies engage in activities that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional pharmacy compounding, such as large-scale production of compounded medications without individual patient prescriptions, compounding drugs that have not been approved for use in the US, and creating copies of FDA-approved drugs. Compounding drugs in the absence of GMPs increases the potential for preparation errors. When compounding is performed on a large scale, such errors may adversely affect many patients. Published reports of independent testing by the FDA, state agencies, and others consistently show that compounded drugs fail to meet specifications at a considerably higher rate than FDA-approved drugs. Compounded sterile preparations pose the additional risk

  12. Analytic three-loop static potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Roman N.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present analytic results for the three-loop static potential of two heavy quarks. The analytic calculation of the missing ingredients is outlined, and results for the singlet and octet potential are provided.

  13. The Neurotoxic Potential of Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expanding development and production of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have diverse and far-reaching potential benefits in consumer products, food, drugs, medical devices and for enhancing environmental cleanup and remediation. The knowledge of potential implications of ENMs...

  14. The Potentialities of Man and Anthropomaximology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuznetsov, V. V.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses trends in research on human athletic potential. Anthropomaximology, an approach developed in the USSR to study the reserve potential of healthy people and the methods for realizing it under conditions of maximum effort, is described. (AM)

  15. Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160769.html Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria Infections, diarrhea and ... HealthDay News) -- There's a new concern about smokeless tobacco -- those products can harbor several species of potentially ...

  16. Green roofs: potential at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, Elena M

    2009-01-01

    strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

  17. Two applications of potential vorticity thinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    The phenomena of dissipative destabilization of external Rossby waves and the acceleration of the zonal mean jet during baroclinic life cycles are described in terms of potential vorticity. The main principle of the potential temperature variations at rigid boundaries have the same effect on the interior flow as do sheets of potential vorticity located just within the boundaries. It is noted that the potential vorticity theory is useful for understanding the dynamical behavior of meterological phenomena.

  18. Potential Evapotranspiration on Tutuila, American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scott K.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Nullet, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Data from nine widely distributed climate stations were used to assess the distribution of potential evapotranspiration on the tropical South Pacific island of Tutuila, American Samoa. Seasonal patterns of climate data in this study differed in detail from available long-term data because the monitoring period of each station in this study was only 1 to 5 years, but overall climate conditions during the monitoring period (1999-2004) are representative of normal conditions. Potential evapotranspiration shows a diurnal pattern. On average, potential evapotranspiration in the daytime, when net radiation is the dominant controlling factor, constitutes 90 percent or more of the total daily potential evapotranspiration at each station. Positive heat advection from the ocean contributes to potential evapotranspiration at at least one station, and possibly other stations, in this study. Seasonal variation of potential evapotranspiration is linked to seasonal daylight duration. Spatial variation of potential evapotranspiration, however, is linked primarily to orographic cloud cover. Potential evapotranspiration on Tutuila is lowest in the interior of the island, where rainfall is higher, cloud cover is more frequent, and net radiation is lower than along the coasts. Potential evapotranspiration is highest along the southern and eastern coasts of the island, where rainfall is lower and cloud cover less frequent. The gradient from areas of high to low potential evapotranspiration is steepest in November and December, when island-wide potential evapotranspiration is highest, and less steep in June and July, when island-wide potential evapotranspiration is lowest. Comparison of potential evapotranspiration to rainfall indicates that evapotranspiration processes on Tutuila have the potential to remove from 23 to 61 percent of the water brought by rainfall. In lower-rainfall coastal locations, potential evapotranspiration can be 50 percent or more of rainfall, whereas in higher

  19. Nucleon Optical Potential in Brueckner Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Wasi

    2008-10-13

    Recent results of g-matrix calculation of the nucleon optical potential are presented and their predictions are compared with experimental data for Sn-isotopes. Corrections to spin-orbit part of the potential are discussed. Extension of Bethe's method to calculate three nucleon interaction effects in the nucleon optical potential is presented.

  20. Nonrelativistic quark-antiquark potential for mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeb, H.; Fiedeldey, H.; Sofianos, S. A.; Lipperheide, R.; de la Ripelle, M. Fabre

    1990-02-01

    A flavour- and nearly model-independent quark-antiquark potential has been determined by fitting the masses of the vector mesons. The uncertainties in the potential, obtained by an error analysis of the fitting procedure, clearly indicate that the spectra of known mesons determine the potential only between r = 0.7 fm and r = 1.8 fm.

  1. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    PubMed

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  2. Relationship between supersymmetry and solvable potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Fred; Ginocchio, Joseph N.; Khare, Avinash

    1987-10-01

    We investigate whether a general class of solvable potentials, the Natanzon potentials (those potentials whose solutions are hypergeometric functions), and their supersymmetric partner potentials are related by a discrete reparametrization invariance called ``shape invariance'' discovered by Genden- shtein. We present evidence that this is not the case in general. Instead we find that the Natanzon class of potentials is not the most general class of solvable potentials but instead belongs to a wider class of potentials generated by supersymmetry and factorization whose eigenfunctions are sums of hypergeometric functions. The series of Hamiltonians, together with the corresponding supersymmetric charges form the graded Lie algebra sl(1/1)⊗SU(2). We also present a strategy for solving, in a limited domain, the discrete reparametrization invariance equations connected with ``shape invariance.''

  3. Indoor radon risk potential of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of radon risk potential in the State of Hawaii indicates that the potential for Hawaii is low. Using a combination of factors including geology, soils, source-rock type, soil-gas radon concentrations, and indoor measurements throughout the state, a general model was developed that permits prediction for various regions in Hawaii. For the nearly 3,100 counties in the coterminous U.S., National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data was the primary input factor. However, NURE aerorad data was not collected in Hawaii, therefore, this study used geology and soil type as the primary and secondary components of potential prediction. Although the radon potential of some Hawaiian soils suggests moderate risk, most houses are built above ground level and the radon soil potential is effectively decoupled from the house. Only underground facilities or those with closed or recirculating ventilation systems might have elevated radon potential. ?? 2005 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  4. Potentiation and Overshadowing in Pavlovian Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    The present experiments addressed a fundamental discrepancy in the Pavlovian conditioning literature concerning responding to a target cue following compound reinforced training with another cue of higher salience. Experiment 1 identified one determinant of whether the target cue will be overshadowed or potentiated by the more salient cue, namely contiguity between compound CS termination and US presentation. Overshadowing and potentiation were observed with delay and trace procedures, respectively. Experiments 2-3 contrasted elemental and configural explanations of potentiation. Both experiments supported a configural account. Experiments 3 and 4, by manipulating prior learning experiences to bias subjects to encode the same compound elementally or configurally, demonstrated decreased potentiation and overshadowing, respectively. Overall, these experiments demonstrate potentiation with non-taste stimuli and identify one variable that determines whether overshadowing or potentiation will occur. Moreover, they show that prior experiences can determine how a compound is encoded and are compatible with the idea of flexible encoding as a principle of information processing. PMID:19594280

  5. Understanding Vertical Jump Potentiation: A Deterministic Model.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Lamont, Hugh S; Moir, Gavin L

    2016-06-01

    This review article discusses previous postactivation potentiation (PAP) literature and provides a deterministic model for vertical jump (i.e., squat jump, countermovement jump, and drop/depth jump) potentiation. There are a number of factors that must be considered when designing an effective strength-power potentiation complex (SPPC) focused on vertical jump potentiation. Sport scientists and practitioners must consider the characteristics of the subject being tested and the design of the SPPC itself. Subject characteristics that must be considered when designing an SPPC focused on vertical jump potentiation include the individual's relative strength, sex, muscle characteristics, neuromuscular characteristics, current fatigue state, and training background. Aspects of the SPPC that must be considered for vertical jump potentiation include the potentiating exercise, level and rate of muscle activation, volume load completed, the ballistic or non-ballistic nature of the potentiating exercise, and the rest interval(s) used following the potentiating exercise. Sport scientists and practitioners should design and seek SPPCs that are practical in nature regarding the equipment needed and the rest interval required for a potentiated performance. If practitioners would like to incorporate PAP as a training tool, they must take the athlete training time restrictions into account as a number of previous SPPCs have been shown to require long rest periods before potentiation can be realized. Thus, practitioners should seek SPPCs that may be effectively implemented in training and that do not require excessive rest intervals that may take away from valuable training time. Practitioners may decrease the necessary time needed to realize potentiation by improving their subject's relative strength. PMID:26712510

  6. Verification of the SLC wake potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.; Weiland, T.

    1983-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole wake potentials is essential for SLC. These wake potentials were previously computed by the modal method. The time domain code TBCI allows independent verification of these results. This comparison shows that the two methods agree to within 10% for bunch lengths down to 1 mm. TBCI results also indicate that rounding the irises gives at least a 10% reduction in the wake potentials.

  7. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-02-25

    Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability benefits, and the range of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States.

  8. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site.

  9. Multiple valued floating potentials of Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Cheol-Hee; Hershkowitz, N.; Cho, M. H.; Intrator, T.; Diebold, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that Langmuir probes can have three different floating potentials in plasmas produced by a hot filament discharge in a multi-dipole device when the primary and secondary electron currents are comparable. The measured floating potential depends on the probe's initial condition - the most negative and the least negative potentials are found to be stable and the in-between value is found to be unstable. Results are compared to a simple theoretical model.

  10. Shape invariant potentials in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhya, R.; Sree Ranjani, S.; Kapoor, A.K.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the shape invariance property of a potential in one dimension. We show that a simple ansatz allows us to reconstruct all the known shape invariant potentials in one dimension. This ansatz can be easily extended to arrive at a large class of new shape invariant potentials in arbitrary dimensions. A reformulation of the shape invariance property and possible generalizations are proposed. These may lead to an important extension of the shape invariance property to Hamiltonians that are related to standard potential problems via space time transformations, which are found useful in path integral formulation of quantum mechanics.

  11. Ion trapping and separation using potential wells

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.

    2000-01-04

    A new mode of operation for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been demonstrated that uses potential wells to trap and separate ions by their mobility. This mode of operation has been made feasible by the improvements in personal computers that now allow real-time control of the potentials on ring electrodes in the IMS drift tube. This mode of operation does not require a shutter grid and allows the accumulation of ions in the potential well to enhance the ion signal. Loss of ions from the potential well is controlled by the radial electric fields required by Gauss's law.

  12. Current and potential distributions in corrosion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Current and potential distribution calculations in corrosion are reviewed. The mathematical methods used, and the specific results for galvanic corrosion, cathodic protection, and localized corrosion are described.

  13. Membrane Potential Generated by Ion Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Morita, Sachi

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) equation fully explains membrane potential behavior. The fundamental facet of the GHK equation lies in its consideration of permeability of membrane to ions, when the membrane serves as a separator for separating two electrolytic solutions. The GHK equation describes that: variation of membrane permeability to ion in accordance with ion species results in the variation of the membrane potential. However, nonzero potential was observed even across the impermeable membrane (or separator) separating two electrolytic solutions. It gave rise to a question concerning the validity of the GHK equation for explaining the membrane potential generation. In this work, an alternative theory was proposed. It is the adsorption theory. The adsorption theory attributes the membrane potential generation to the ion adsorption onto the membrane (or separator) surface not to the ion passage through the membrane (or separator). The computationally obtained potential behavior based on the adsorption theory was in good agreement with the experimentally observed potential whether the membrane (or separator) was permeable to ions or not. It was strongly speculated that the membrane potential origin could lie primarily in the ion adsorption on the membrane (or separator) rather than the membrane permeability to ions. It might be necessary to reconsider the origin of membrane potential which has been so far believed explicable by the GHK equation. PMID:24957176

  14. Exam Question Exchange: Potential Energy Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Presents three examination questions, graded in difficulty, that explore the topic of potential energy surfaces using a diagrammatic approach. Provides and discusses acceptable solutions including diagrams. (CW)

  15. Fuel production potential of several agricultural crops

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, D.A.; Buchanan, W.; Bradford, B.N.

    1984-11-01

    Data collected on starch and sugar crops indicate that sweet potato and sweet sorghum have the best potential for alcohol production in the TVA area. Of the oil crops evaluated in this series of experiments only sunflower and okara appear to offer potential in the Tennessee Valley for oil production for fuel or other uses. 21 tabs.

  16. Potentials of Rubella Deaf-Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    Potentials of three classifications of rubella deaf blind children are discussed. Potentials for children at the middle trainable level and below are discussed for the areas of communication skills, daily living skills, mobility and orientation, vocational effort, and self-control and social interaction. For children in the upper trainable through…

  17. Electrical Potentials during Gravitropism in Bean Epicotyls

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Kazuyuki; Toko, Kiyoshi; Ezaki, Shu; Hayashi, Kenshi; Yamafuji, Kaoru

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring simultaneously the surface electrical potentials along epicotyl was developed to study the largely bending situation by gravity. Potentials increased on the upper side and decreased on the lower side after the horizontal placement. The time course of electrical changes consisted of two components which correspond to growth movements observed during gravitropism. PMID:16668370

  18. Radon-hazard potential of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.D.; Solomon, B.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas formed by decay of uranium, and occurs in nearly all geologic materials. Although radon has been shown to be a significant cause of lung cancer in miners, the health hazard from accumulation of radon gas in buildings has only recently been recognized. Indoor-radon hazards depend on both geologic and non-geologic factors. Although non-geologic factors such as construction type, weather, and lifestyles are difficult to measure, geologic factors such as uranium concentration, soil permeability, and depth to ground water can be quantified. Uranium-enriched geologic materials, such as black shales, marine sandstones, and certain granitic, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks, are generally associated with a high radon-hazard potential. Impermeable soil or shallow ground water impedes radon movement and is generally associated with a low radon-hazard potential. A numerical rating system based on these geologic factors has been developed to map radon-hazard potential in Utah. A statewide map shows that the radon-hazard potential of Utah is generally moderate. Assessments of hazard potential from detailed field investigations correlate well with areas of this map. Central Utah has the highest radon-hazard potential, primarily due to uranium-enriched Tertiary volcanic rocks. The radon-hazard potential of eastern Utah is moderate to high, but is generally restricted by low uranium levels. Western Utah, where valley basins with impermeable soils and shallow ground water are common, has the lowest radon-hazard potential.

  19. Potential for seepage erosion of landslide dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, W.; Schuster, R.L.; Sabol, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The failure potential of the debris-avalanche dam at Castle Lake near Mount St. Helens, Washington, by three processes of seepage erosion (1) Heave; (2) piping; and (3) internal erosion, is examined. Results indicated that the dam is stable against piping but potentially locally unstable against heave. -from Authors

  20. Population Characteristics of Potential Satellite Campus Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landini, Albert J.

    This document presents a method of determining the best location for a potential satellite campus by predetermining the population characteristics of its potential students. The question is approached as a marketing problem with a geographical orietation. The test site for this project was Pierce College in the Los Angeles Comunity College…

  1. State and Local Revenue Potential 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quindry, Kenneth E.

    This report contains the results of an extensive study into State and local tax revenue potentials for the 15 Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) States. It identifies, on a State-by-State basis, both the degree of current use and the potential for increased use of (1) general and selective sales and gross receipts taxes, (2) death and gift…

  2. Asymptotic iteration approach to supersymmetric bistable potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftci, H.; Özer, O.; P., Roy

    2012-01-01

    We examine quasi exactly solvable bistable potentials and their supersymmetric partners within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). It is shown that the AIM produces excellent approximate spectra and that sometimes it is found to be more useful to use the partner potential for computation. We also discuss the direct application of the AIM to the Fokker—Planck equation.

  3. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    2005-09-28

    This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

  4. Chemical Potentials and Activities: An Electrochemical Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, T. L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which explores the effects of adding inert salts to electrolytic cells and demonstrates the difference between concentration and chemical activity. Examines chemical potentials as the driving force of reactions. Provides five examples of cell potential and concentration change. (JM)

  5. On solvable Dirac equation with polynomial potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowiak, Tomasz

    2011-01-15

    One-dimensional Dirac equation is analyzed with regard to the existence of exact (or closed-form) solutions for polynomial potentials. The notion of Liouvillian functions is used to define solvability, and it is shown that except for the linear potentials the equation in question is not solvable.

  6. Human Potential Education and Public Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Jerry L.

    The human potential movement the encourages growth beyond the conventional definitions of a normal or successful life. This movement is entering into a new phase characterized by carefully integrated sequences of the best human potential exercises, put together in a program that enables individuals to take a deep, personal look at their lives.…

  7. The Potential of Statement-Posing Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kai-Lin

    2010-01-01

    This communication aims at revealing the potential of statement-posing tasks to facilitate students' thinking and strategies of understanding proof. Besides outlining the background of statement-posing tasks, four points were advanced as potential benefits of the tasks: (1) focusing on the logic of arguments in addition to the meaning of…

  8. Resonances for Symmetric Two-Barrier Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the accurate calculation of bound-state and resonance energies for one-dimensional potentials. We calculate the shape resonances for symmetric two-barrier potentials and compare them with those coming from the Siegert approximation, the complex scaling method and the box-stabilization method. A comparison of the…

  9. On the Generalized Potential of Inertial Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siboni, S.

    2009-01-01

    The generalized potential of the inertial forces acting on a holonomic system in an accelerated reference frame is derived in a way which admits a simple physical interpretation. It is shown that the generalized potential refers to all the inertial forces and, apart from the very special case of a uniformly rotating frame, it is impossible to…

  10. Streaming potential near a rotating porous disk.

    PubMed

    Prieve, Dennis C; Sides, Paul J

    2014-09-23

    Theory and experimental results for the streaming potential measured in the vicinity of a rotating porous disk-shaped sample are described. Rotation of the sample on its axis draws liquid into its face and casts it from the periphery. Advection within the sample engenders streaming current and streaming potential that are proportional to the zeta potential and the disk's major dimensions. When Darcy's law applies, the streaming potential is proportional to the square of the rotation at low rate but becomes invariant with rotation at high rate. The streaming potential is invariant with the sample's permeability at low rate and is proportional to the inverse square of the permeability at high rate. These predictions were tested by determining the zeta potential and permeability of the loop side of Velcro, a sample otherwise difficult to characterize; reasonable values of -56 mV for zeta and 8.7 × 10(-9) m(2) for the permeability were obtained. This approach offers the ability to determine both the zeta potential and the permeability of materials having open structures. Compressing them into a porous plug is unnecessary. As part of the development of the theory, a convenient formula for a flow-weighted volume-averaged space-charge density of the porous medium, -εζ/k, was obtained, where ε is the permittivity, ζ is the zeta potential, and k is the Darcy permeability. The formula is correct when Smoluchowski's equation and Darcy's law are both valid.

  11. YouTube: Educational Potentials and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Troy; Cuthrell, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    The instructional potential of video technology in the classroom is promising, especially in light of the 21st Century Learning Framework (Siegle, 2009). Studies show positive gains in student outcomes as a result of the integration of video technology in instruction. This article explores potential uses of YouTube as an instructional aid in…

  12. Cardiovascular effects of potential occupational hazards.

    PubMed

    Goldhaber, S Z

    1983-12-01

    Cardiovascular effects of potential occupational hazards have received relatively little attention. The major inhalant occupational exposures of concern are carbon disulfide, nitrates, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Occupational exposure to certain trace metals may also be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects. Of concern is potential toxicity from cobalt, antimony, lead, cadmium and arsenic. Potential physical hazards exist in association with noise, heat and radiofrequency radiation. In most instances, the data are suggestive rather than conclusive. Further epidemiologic studies with careful control for potentially complicating factors, such as baseline differences in blood pressure, cigarette smoking habits and age, are needed. In some areas where epidemiologic studies have provided clues, the mechanisms of action of potential occupational hazards require further basic scientific investigation.

  13. Spacecraft potential control on ISEE-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonfalone, A.; Pedersen, A.; Fahleson, U. V.; Faelthammar, C. G.; Mozer, F. S.; Torbert, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Active control of the potential of the ISEE-1 satellite by the use of electron guns is reviewed. The electron guns contain a special cathode capable of emitting an electron current selectable between 10 to the -8th power and 10 to the -3rd power at energies from approximately .6 to 41 eV. Results obtained during flight show that the satellite potential can be stabilized at a value more positive than the normally positive floating potential. The electron guns also reduce the spin modulation of the spacecraft potential which is due to the aspect dependent photoemission of the long booms. Plasma parameters like electron temperature and density can be deduced from the variation of the spacecraft potential as a function of the gun current. The effects of electron beam emission on other experiments are briefly mentioned.

  14. Transonic Flow Computations Using Nonlinear Potential Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation describes the state of transonic flow simulation using nonlinear potential methods for external aerodynamic applications. The presentation begins with a review of the various potential equation forms (with emphasis on the full potential equation) and includes a discussion of pertinent mathematical characteristics and all derivation assumptions. Impact of the derivation assumptions on simulation accuracy, especially with respect to shock wave capture, is discussed. Key characteristics of all numerical algorithm types used for solving nonlinear potential equations, including steady, unsteady, space marching, and design methods, are described. Both spatial discretization and iteration scheme characteristics are examined. Numerical results for various aerodynamic applications are included throughout the presentation to highlight key discussion points. The presentation ends with concluding remarks and recommendations for future work. Overall. nonlinear potential solvers are efficient, highly developed and routinely used in the aerodynamic design environment for cruise conditions. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. QCD sign problem for small chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Splittorff, K.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2007-06-01

    The expectation value of the complex phase factor of the fermion determinant is computed in the microscopic domain of QCD at nonzero chemical potential. We find that the average phase factor is nonvanishing below a critical value of the chemical potential equal to half the pion mass and vanishes exponentially in the volume for larger values of the chemical potential. This holds for QCD with dynamical quarks as well as for quenched and phase quenched QCD. The average phase factor has an essential singularity for zero chemical potential and cannot be obtained by analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential or by means of a Taylor expansion. The leading order correction in the p-expansion of the chiral Lagrangian is calculated as well.

  16. Simple Exercises to Flatten your Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Westphal, Alexander; /DESY /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We show how backreaction of the inflaton potential energy on heavy scalar fields can flatten the inflationary potential, as the heavy fields adjust to their most energetically favorable configuration. This mechanism operates in previous UV-complete examples of axion monodromy inflation - flattening a would-be quadratic potential to one linear in the inflaton field - but occurs more generally, and we illustrate the effect with several examples. Special choices of compactification minimizing backreaction may realize chaotic inflation with a quadratic potential, but we argue that a flatter potential such as power-law inflation V({phi}) {proportional_to} {phi}{sup p} with p < 2 is a more generic option at sufficiently large values of {phi}.

  17. Potential evaluation in soil-side environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chmilar, J.F.; Holtsbaum, W.B. )

    1994-03-01

    The traditional method for determining the status of cathodic protection (CP) for underground pipelines is by measuring pipe-electrolyte (pipe-to-soil) potentials. In the past, this measurement often was assumed to be a pure DC voltage because the reading between the reference electrode and the structure was steady when measured by a galvanometer-type instrument. Many pipelines now are recognized to be under the influence of a variety of potential sources in addition to that from CP rectifiers. An understanding of these potentials is necessary. The average'' DC pipe-electrolyte potential, the actual waveform from an oscilloscope measurement in field applications, and their uses in the measurement of instant-off polarized potentials are addressed.

  18. Spike potentials recorded from the insect photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    NAKA, K I; EGUCHI, E

    1962-03-01

    Slow and spike potentials were recorded from single cells in the receptor layer of the compound eye of the drone of the honeybee. From electron microscopic observation of the drone ommatidium, it was concluded that the response had been recorded from the retinula cell. The following hypothesis is suggested for the initiation of spike potentials in the drone compound eye: Photic stimulation results in a decrease in the resistance of all or part of the retinula cell membrane, giving rise to the retinal action potential. The retinal action potential causes outflow of the current through the proximal process of the cell. This depolarizing current initiates spike potentials in the proximal process or axon of the retinula cell which are recorded across the soma membrane of the retinula cell.

  19. Maximizing the hyperpolarizability poorly determines the potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschek, Rolfe; Atherton, Timothy; Lesnefsky, Joseph; Wiggers, Greg

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the non-linear response of materials to an electric field, characterized by quantities such as the first hyperpolarizibility β , is a mattter of importance for applications. We optimized the zero frequency β of a one-dimensional potential well containing a single electron by freely adjusting the shape of that potential. It is shown that with careful optimization the maximum hyperpolarizability converges quickly with increasing numbers of parameters in the potential to approximately 0.708951 of the proven upper bound. The Hessian of β at the maximum makes it clear that there is a very wide range of nearby, nearly optimal potentials: with several measures of differences between potentials, this Hessian has only two large eigenvalues with the others diminishing quickly. The optimum potentials are substantially different and more affected by small eigenvectors than the wavefunctions. Thus, wavefunctions are superior for describing the conditions that optimize the hyperpolarizability. Prospects for a concise description of the two important constraints on near-optimum potentials and wavefunctions are discussed.

  20. Characteristics of cardiac action potentials in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J

    1989-01-01

    Standard microelectrode techniques were used to record action potentials from single atrial, ventricular and Purkinje fibers of hearts taken from three species of marsupial (Macropus rufus, Macropus robustus and Macropus eugenii) and from dogs, sheep and guinea-pigs. The major electrophysiological parameters of marsupial potentials were qualitatively similar to the values for placental mammals. The grouped data for ventricular action potentials from studies on 6 adult male red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were (mean +/- SD): Resting potential -69.5 +/- 5.0 mV; action potential amplitude 92.7 +/- 5.7 mV; action potential duration (to 90% repolarization): 182.5 +/- 17.5 ms; maximum rate of depolarization: 196.5 +/- 80.1 V/s. The major point of difference was the short duration of the red kangaroo ventricular action potential compared to those of the placental mammals, and compared to atrial cells from the kangaroos. It is suggested that this explains the short QT interval reported by others for kangaroo electrocardiograms, and that it may also be implicated in the high frequency of sudden death previously noted in these animals.

  1. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    PubMed

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program. PMID:10902065

  2. Potential operator exposure to procymidone in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Capri, E; Alberici, R; Glass, C R; Minuto, G; Trevisan, M

    1999-10-01

    Recent legislation in the European Union requires regulators of member states to carry out risk assessments using data for actual or potential operator exposure, or estimates of exposure from models. However, the existing models have few datasets from studies carried out on greenhouse or indoor crops, particularly in southern Europe. In this study potential dermal and inhalatory exposures were measured in two trials in Italian greenhouses. The total potential dermal operator exposure of the applicator, measured with a whole-body passive dosimetry method, was 15.4 and 37.1 mL/h of the diluted pesticide mixture. The majority of the contamination was on the hands and on the lower part of the coverall. Approximately 0. 003% of the active ingredient (ai) applied to the crop area contaminated the coverall worn by the operator. The potential dermal exposure during the mixing and loading phase accounted for 6-8% of the total potential dermal exposure during the whole process. Inhalation exposure accounted for only 0.05-0.07% of the total potential operator exposure. Model predictions of the potential operator exposure using a modified version of the German model overestimate the mixing-loading exposure while underestimating the application exposure. These data are evidence that the estimation coefficient set for hand-held application to ornamental and horticultural crops may be inadequate for the agronomic conditions of southern Europe. PMID:10552831

  3. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    PubMed

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program.

  4. On locally and nonlocally related potential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviakov, Alexei F.; Bluman, George W.

    2010-07-01

    For any partial differential equation (PDE) system, a local conservation law yields potential equations in terms of some potential variable, which normally is a nonlocal variable. The current paper examines situations when such a potential variable is a local variable, i.e., is a function of the independent and dependent variables of a given PDE system, and their derivatives. In the case of two independent variables, a simple necessary and sufficient condition is presented for the locality of such a potential variable, and this is illustrated by several examples. As a particular example, two-dimensional reductions of equilibrium equations for fluid and plasma dynamics are considered. It is shown that such reductions with respect to helical, axial, and translational symmetries have conservation laws which yield local potential variables. This leads to showing that the well-known Johnson-Frieman-Kruskal-Oberman (JFKO) and Bragg-Hawthorne (Grad-Shafranov) equations are locally related to the corresponding helically and axially symmetric PDE systems of fluid/plasma dynamics. For the axially symmetric case, local symmetry classifications and arising invariant solutions are compared for the original PDE system and the Bragg-Hawthorne (potential) equation. The potential equation is shown to have additional symmetries, denoted as restricted symmetries. Restricted symmetries leave invariant a family of solutions of a given PDE system but not the whole solution manifold, and hence are not symmetries of the given PDE system. Corresponding reductions are shown to yield solutions, which are not obtained as invariant solutions from local symmetry reduction.

  5. Static quark potential in three flavor QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; Sugar, Bob

    2000-08-01

    We study the effects of dynamical quarks on the static quark potential at distances shorter than those where string breaking is expected. Quenched calculations and calculations with three flavors of dynamical quarks are done on sets of lattices with the lattice spacings matched within about one percent. The effect of the sea quarks on the shape of the potential is clearly visible. We investigate the consequences of these effects in a very crude model, namely solving Schroedinger's equation in the resulting potential. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Arabian plate hydrocarbon geology and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Beydoun, Z.R.

    1991-01-01

    This book provides a thought-provoking, succinct presentation of the geologic evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the world's most prolific petroleum province. The fascinating subjects discussed and documented include: What are the unique geologic factors that make the Middle East such a prolific province Where are the future Mesozoic and Tertiary plays What is the virtually untapped potential of the Paleozoic section What are the play potentials for underexplored areas such as Jordan, Syria, Yemen How are deeper drilling results shaping and modifying concepts of the Arabian plate history and pointing the way to future hydrocarbon targets

  7. Coherent states for exactly solvable potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Shreecharan, T.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Banerji, J.

    2004-01-01

    A general algebraic procedure for constructing coherent states of a wide class of exactly solvable potentials, e.g., Morse and Poeschl-Teller, is given. The method, a priori, is potential independent and connects with earlier developed ones, including the oscillator-based approaches for coherent states and their generalizations. This approach can be straightforwardly extended to construct more general coherent states for the quantum-mechanical potential problems, such as the nonlinear coherent states for the oscillators. The time evolution properties of some of these coherent states show revival and fractional revival, as manifested in the autocorrelation functions, as well as, in the quantum carpet structures.

  8. Potential of renewable and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with application potential of clean alternative renewable energy sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical energy in Tomsk Oblast as well as main energy sources of existing energy system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering potential of renewable and alternative energy sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high potential of alternative and renewable energy sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.

  9. Wave Energy Potential in the Latvian EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beriņš, J.; Beriņš, J.; Kalnačs, J.; Kalnačs, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with one of the alternative forms of energy - sea wave energy potential in the Latvian Exclusice Economic Zone (EEZ). Results have been achieved using a new method - VEVPP. Calculations have been performed using the data on wave parameters over the past five years (2010-2014). We have also considered wave energy potential in the Gulf of Riga. The conclusions have been drawn on the recommended methodology for the sea wave potential and power calculations for wave-power plant pre-design stage.

  10. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  11. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  12. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  13. Atomistic potentials for palladium-silver hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X. W.

    2013-06-01

    New embedded-atom method potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the miscibility gap and increasing the likelihood of hydrogen atoms occupying tetrahedral interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites.

  14. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  15. Emotion Potentiated Startle in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Elizabeth C.; Cordeiro, Lisa; Chavez, Alyssa D.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Hessl, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Social avoidance and anxiety are prevalent in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and are potentially mediated by the amygdala, a brain region critical for social behavior. Unfortunately, fMRI investigation of the amygdala in FXS is limited by the difficulties experienced by intellectually impaired and anxious participants. We investigated the relationship between social avoidance and emotion-potentiated startle, a probe of amygdala activation, in children and adolescents with FXS, developmental disability without FXS (DD), and typical development. Individuals with FXS or DD demonstrated significantly reduced potentiation to fearful faces than a typically developing control group (p<.05). However, among individuals with FXS, social avoidance correlated positively with fearful-face potentiation (p<.05). This suggests that general intellectual disability blunts amygdalar response, but differential amygdala responsiveness to social stimuli contributes to phenotypic variability among individuals with FXS. PMID:24816942

  16. Zeta potential measurement of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Moulin, P; Roques, H

    2003-05-01

    The problem of scaling, which one finds in industrial heat exchangers, particularly in atmospheric coolers in nuclear power stations, depends on calcium carbonate deposits from fresh water. To better understand this phenomenon, we have examined the eventual implication of superficial electric charge of precipitated crystal nuclei. After a bibliographical review showing a fundamental divergence from already published results, this paper describes an experimental plant to measure the zeta potential in controlled conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium, oversaturation, or undersaturation of a CaCO(3)-H(2)O-CO(2) system taking into account simultaneously the three phases: gas, liquid, and solid. The zeta potential is measured by a crystalline-plug method with calcite or aragonite crystals. The potential cancels at thermodynamic equilibrium and is always negative for other conditions, in particular for oversaturation where the possibility of scaling exists. The analysis of these results suggests that the potential determining ions of the system are Ca(2+) and HCO(-)(3).

  17. Neuroticism, extraversion and slow brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Lolas, F; de Andraca, I

    1977-01-01

    Peak amplitude and area under the curve of average vertex slow potentials recorded during the foreperiod of a reaction time task were found to discriminate between high- and low-neuroticism subjects, defined according to the Eysenck Personality Inventory. High-neuroticism subjects developed smaller peak amplitude, greater area and longer reaction times, presenting a high extinction rate when the imperative stimulus was omitted. Differences between extraverts and introverts were found within the low-neuroticism group and for area values, extraverts exhibiting larger area. A significant interaction effect of extraversion and neuroticism on slow-potential parameters was evidenced. Results are interpreted in terms of heightened arousal and disrupted focused attention in high-neuroticism subjects. Although evolutionary indexes of slow potentials could differentiate between extraverts and introverts, further work using inhibition indicators is needed to further clarify the differences between them. The data reported also suggest that different aspects of overt behavior would be associated diversely with slow-potential parameters.

  18. Auditory evoked potentials and transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Barwood, T J; Empson, J A; Lister, S G; Tilley, A J

    1978-11-01

    Auditory evoked potentials to tone stimuli were recorded from 8 practised meditators before, during, and after meditation, and also during light sleep. No consistent changes were noted between baseline and meditating AEPs, or between meditating and sleep AEPs.

  19. Potential Optimization Software for Materials (POSMat)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Jackelyn A.; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Yilmaz, Dundar E.; Liang, Tao; Tao; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-06-01

    The Potential Optimization Software for Materials package (POSMat) is presented. POSMat is a powerful tool for the optimization of classical empirical interatomic potentials for use in atomic scale simulations, of which molecular dynamics is the most ubiquitous. Descriptions of the empirical formalisms and targetable properties available are given. POSMat includes multiple tools, including schemes and strategies to aid in the optimization process. Samples of the inputs and outputs are given as well as an example for fitting an MgO Buckingham potential, which illustrates how the targeted properties can influence the results of a developed potential. Approaches and tools for the expansion of POSMat to other interatomic descriptions and optimization algorithms are described.

  20. The onset of plasma potential locking

    DOE PAGES

    Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-06-22

    In this study, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behaviormore » will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.« less

  1. Remarks on the Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çapak, M.; Gönül, B.

    2016-06-01

    More recently, comprehensive applications of approximate analytical solutions of the Woods-Saxon (WS) potential in closed form for the five-dimensional Bohr Hamiltonian have appeared [M. Çapak, D. Petrellis, B. Gönül and D. Bonatsos, J. Phys. G 42, 95102 (2015)] and its comparison to the data for many different nuclei has clearly revealed the domains for the success and failure in case of using such potential forms to analyze the data related to the nuclear structure within the frame of the collective model. Gaining confidence from this work, the exact solvability of the WS type potentials in lower dimensions for the bound states having zero angular momentum is carefully reviewed to finalize an ongoing discussion in the related literature which clearly shows that such kind of potentials have no analytical solutions even for ℓ = 0 case.

  2. Universal method for computation of electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, D

    2005-05-15

    A computational approach to determine electrostatic interaction and gravitational potentials by performing direct numerical integration is presented. The potential is expanded using finite-element functions of arbitrary order. The method does not involve any solutions of systems of linear equations. The potential is instead obtained as a sum of differential contributions. Thus, no boundary conditions for the potential are needed. It is computationally efficient and well suited for parallel computers, since the innermost loops constitute matrix multiplications and the outer ones can be used as parallel indices. Without using prescreening or other computational tricks to speed up the calculation, the algorithm scales as N4/3 where N denotes the grid size.

  3. TRMM Animation of Flood Potential from Haiyan

    NASA Video Gallery

    TRMM animation of flood potential from Nov. 2 to Nov. 12 shows the movement of Tropical Storm 30W, Typhoon Krosa and Super-Typhoon Hainan. Yellow is low, orange is medium, and red is high. Credit: ...

  4. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  5. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  6. Potential Hazards of Plastics Used in Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedlecke, Jerome T.

    1972-01-01

    This paper discusses the thermoplastic and thermosetting resins presently being used by the artist, and the potential for exposure to the toxic chemicals and other hazards during the development of his creative work. (Author)

  7. Probiotics as potential antioxidants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vijendra; Shah, Chandni; Mokashe, Narendra; Chavan, Rupesh; Yadav, Hariom; Prajapati, Jashbhai

    2015-04-15

    Probiotics are known for their health beneficial effects and are established as dietary adjuncts. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects. In this view, there is interest to find the potential probiotic strains that can exhibit antioxidant properties along with health benefits. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that probiotics exhibit antioxidant potential. In this view, consumption of probiotics alone or foods supplemented with probiotics may reduce oxidative damage, free radical scavenging rate, and modification in activity of crucial antioxidative enzymes in human cells. Incorporation of probiotics in foods can provide a good strategy to supply dietary antioxidants, but more studies are needed to standardize methods and evaluate antioxidant properties of probiotics before they can be recommended for antioxidant potential. In this paper, the literature related to known antioxidant potential of probiotics and proposing future perspectives to conduct such studies has been reviewed. PMID:25808285

  8. Potential Evaporation in North America Through 2100

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the projected increase in potential evaporation through the year 2100, relative to 1980, based on the combined results of multiple climate models. The maximum increase across N...

  9. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  10. Potential Health Effects from Groundwater Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyer, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the growing awareness of potential toxicological effects of synthetic organic chemicals contaminating groundwater. Problems concerning pesticides, chlorination, epidemiologic studies, cancer, nephrotoxicity, and considerations of risk are addressed. Additional research in this area is advocated. (DH)

  11. Search for dark energy potentials in quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromachi, Yusuke; Okabayashi, Akira; Okada, Daiki; Hara, Tetsuya; Itoh, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    The time evolution of the equation of state w for quintessence models with a scalar field as dark energy is studied up to the third derivative big (d^3w/da^3big ) with respect to the scale factor a, in order to predict future observations and specify the scalar potential parameters with the observables. The third derivative of w for general potential V is derived and applied to several types of potentials. They are the inverse power law big (V=M^{4+α }/Q^{α }big ), the exponential big (V=M^4exp {β M/Q}big ), the mixed big (V=M^{4+γ }exp {β M/Q}/Q^{γ }big ), the cosine big (V=M^4[cos (Q/f)+1]big ), and the Gaussian types big (V=M^4exp big {-Q^2/σ ^2big }big ), which are prototypical potentials for the freezing and thawing models. If the parameter number for a potential form is n, it is necessary to find at least n+2 independent observations to identify the potential form and the evolution of the scalar field (Q and dot {Q}). Such observations would be the values of Ω _Q, w, dw/da,ldots , dw^n/da^n. From these specific potentials, we can predict the n+1 and higher derivatives of w: dw^{n+1}/da^{n+1},ldots . Since four of the abovementioned potentials have two parameters, it is necessary to calculate the third derivative of w for them to estimate the predicted values. If they are tested observationally, it will be understood whether the dark energy can be described by a scalar field with this potential. At least it will satisfy the necessary conditions. Numerical analysis for d^3w/da^3 is performed with some specified parameters in the investigated potentials, except for the mixed one. It becomes possible to distinguish the potentials by accurately observing dw/da and d^2w/da^2 for some parameters.

  12. The potential uses of operational earthquake forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Ned; Jordan, Thomas; Jones, Lucille; Michael, Andrew; Blanpied, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a workshop held to explore the potential uses of operational earthquake forecasting (OEF). We discuss the current status of OEF in the United States and elsewhere, the types of products that could be generated, the various potential users and uses of OEF, and the need for carefully crafted communication protocols. Although operationalization challenges remain, there was clear consensus among the stakeholders at the workshop that OEF could be useful.

  13. Leuloplakia - Review of A Potentially Malignant Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abidullah, Mohammed; Gaddikeri, Kavitha; Raghoji, Swetha; Ravishankar T, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    Leukoplakias are oral white lesions that have not been diagnosed as any other specific disease. They are grouped under premalignant lesions, now redesignated as potentially malignant disorders. Their significance lies in the fact that they have propensity for malignant transformation at a higher rate when compared to other oral lesions. This article reviews aetiology, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, histopathologic features, malignant potential and treatment of oral leukoplakia. PMID:25302287

  14. BB Potentials in Quenched Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold; Kostas Orginos; Martin J. Savage

    2007-12-01

    The potentials between two B-mesons are computed in the heavy-quark limit using quenched lattice QCD at $m_\\pi\\sim 400~{\\rm MeV}$. Non-zero central potentials are clearly evident in all four spin-isospin channels, (I,s_l) = (0,0) , (0,1) , (1,0) , (1,1), where s_l is the total spin of the light degrees of freedom. At short distance, we find repulsion in the $I\

  15. Perturbation Theory for Superfluid in Nonuniform Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshida, Shinji; Kato, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Perturbation theory of superfluid fraction in terms of nonuniform potential is constructed. We find that the coefficient of the leading term is determined by the dynamical structure factor or density fluctuation of the system. The results for the ideal Bose gas and the interacting Bose system with linear dispersion are consistent to implications from Landau's criterion. We also find that the superfluidity of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with K>2 is shown to be stable against nonuniform potential.

  16. Missing solution in a Cornell potential

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L.B.; Castro, A.S. de

    2013-11-15

    Missing bound-state solutions for fermions in the background of a Cornell potential consisting of a mixed scalar–vector–pseudoscalar coupling is examined. Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed. -- Highlights: •The Dirac equation with scalar–vector–pseudoscalar Cornell potential is investigated. •The isolated solution from the Sturm–Liouville problem is found. •Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed.

  17. Dirac particle in a pseudoscalar potential

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Matias; Zentella-Dehesa, Arturo

    1996-02-20

    We study the problem of a Dirac particle with a pseudoscalar interaction in the potential approximation. It is shown how nonperturbative relativistic solutions arise. The case of the central pseudoscalar potential is explicitly worked out also in a closed form. The angular functions are worked out in general for this central case. Finally for the special case of the spherical well the radial solutions are shown to behave like Bessel-type functions.

  18. Dirac particle in a pseudoscalar potential

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, M.; Zentella-Dehesa, A.

    1996-02-01

    We study the problem of a Dirac particle with a pseudoscalar interaction in the potential approximation. It is shown how nonperturbative relativistic solutions arise. The case of the central pseudoscalar potential is explicitly worked out also in a closed form. The angular functions are worked out in general for this central case. Finally for the special case of the spherical well the radial solutions are shown to behave like Bessel-type functions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. [Measurements of electric membrane potentials in lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Kowal, E; Malofiejew, M; Kostrzewska, A

    1975-01-01

    The interior of vital lymphocytes, as opposed to their outer environment, has a negative electric potential (rest potential), the magnitude of which depends on the potassium ion concentration of the extracellular medium. The bioelectric phenomena at the lymphocyte are determined not only by the functional state of the cell membrane, but also by the milieu of the blood cells which includes also the adsorbed proteins and lipids. PMID:1199616

  20. Programmable Potentials: Approximate N-body potentials from coarse-level logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Gunjan S.; Mohr, Ryan; Mezić, Igor

    2016-09-01

    This paper gives a systematic method for constructing an N-body potential, approximating the true potential, that accurately captures meso-scale behavior of the chemical or biological system using pairwise potentials coming from experimental data or ab initio methods. The meso-scale behavior is translated into logic rules for the dynamics. Each pairwise potential has an associated logic function that is constructed using the logic rules, a class of elementary logic functions, and AND, OR, and NOT gates. The effect of each logic function is to turn its associated potential on and off. The N-body potential is constructed as linear combination of the pairwise potentials, where the “coefficients” of the potentials are smoothed versions of the associated logic functions. These potentials allow a potentially low-dimensional description of complex processes while still accurately capturing the relevant physics at the meso-scale. We present the proposed formalism to construct coarse-grained potential models for three examples: an inhibitor molecular system, bond breaking in chemical reactions, and DNA transcription from biology. The method can potentially be used in reverse for design of molecular processes by specifying properties of molecules that can carry them out.

  1. Programmable Potentials: Approximate N-body potentials from coarse-level logic

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Gunjan S.; Mohr, Ryan; Mezić, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a systematic method for constructing an N-body potential, approximating the true potential, that accurately captures meso-scale behavior of the chemical or biological system using pairwise potentials coming from experimental data or ab initio methods. The meso-scale behavior is translated into logic rules for the dynamics. Each pairwise potential has an associated logic function that is constructed using the logic rules, a class of elementary logic functions, and AND, OR, and NOT gates. The effect of each logic function is to turn its associated potential on and off. The N-body potential is constructed as linear combination of the pairwise potentials, where the “coefficients” of the potentials are smoothed versions of the associated logic functions. These potentials allow a potentially low-dimensional description of complex processes while still accurately capturing the relevant physics at the meso-scale. We present the proposed formalism to construct coarse-grained potential models for three examples: an inhibitor molecular system, bond breaking in chemical reactions, and DNA transcription from biology. The method can potentially be used in reverse for design of molecular processes by specifying properties of molecules that can carry them out. PMID:27671683

  2. Hydrogen Utilization Potential in Subsurface Sediments.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rishi R; Glombitza, Clemens; Nickel, Julia C; Anderson, Chloe H; Dunlea, Ann G; Spivack, Arthur J; Murray, Richard W; D'Hondt, Steven; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico) with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product, or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen and allows qualitative detection of microbial activity irrespective of the predominant electron-accepting process. Because the method only requires samples frozen immediately after recovery, the assay can be used for identifying microbial activity in subsurface ecosystems without the need to preserve live material. We measured potential hydrogen oxidation rates in all samples from multiple depths at several sites that collectively span a wide range of environmental conditions and biogeochemical zones. Potential activity normalized to total cell abundance ranges over five orders of magnitude and varies, dependent upon the predominant terminal electron acceptor. Lowest per-cell potential rates characterize the zone of nitrate reduction and highest per-cell potential rates occur in the methanogenic zone. Possible reasons for this relationship to predominant electron acceptor include (i) increasing importance of fermentation in successively deeper biogeochemical zones and (ii) adaptation of H2ases to successively higher concentrations of H2 in successively deeper zones. PMID:26858697

  3. Fixman compensating potential for general branched molecules

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhinandan; Kandel, Saugat; Wagner, Jeffrey; Larsen, Adrien; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    The technique of constraining high frequency modes of molecular motion is an effective way to increase simulation time scale and improve conformational sampling in molecular dynamics simulations. However, it has been shown that constraints on higher frequency modes such as bond lengths and bond angles stiffen the molecular model, thereby introducing systematic biases in the statistical behavior of the simulations. Fixman proposed a compensating potential to remove such biases in the thermodynamic and kinetic properties calculated from dynamics simulations. Previous implementations of the Fixman potential have been limited to only short serial chain systems. In this paper, we present a spatial operator algebra based algorithm to calculate the Fixman potential and its gradient within constrained dynamics simulations for branched topology molecules of any size. Our numerical studies on molecules of increasing complexity validate our algorithm by demonstrating recovery of the dihedral angle probability distribution function for systems that range in complexity from serial chains to protein molecules. We observe that the Fixman compensating potential recovers the free energy surface of a serial chain polymer, thus annulling the biases caused by constraining the bond lengths and bond angles. The inclusion of Fixman potential entails only a modest increase in the computational cost in these simulations. We believe that this work represents the first instance where the Fixman potential has been used for general branched systems, and establishes the viability for its use in constrained dynamics simulations of proteins and other macromolecules. PMID:24387353

  4. Hydrogen Utilization Potential in Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Rishi R.; Glombitza, Clemens; Nickel, Julia C.; Anderson, Chloe H.; Dunlea, Ann G.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Murray, Richard W.; D'Hondt, Steven; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico) with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product, or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen and allows qualitative detection of microbial activity irrespective of the predominant electron-accepting process. Because the method only requires samples frozen immediately after recovery, the assay can be used for identifying microbial activity in subsurface ecosystems without the need to preserve live material. We measured potential hydrogen oxidation rates in all samples from multiple depths at several sites that collectively span a wide range of environmental conditions and biogeochemical zones. Potential activity normalized to total cell abundance ranges over five orders of magnitude and varies, dependent upon the predominant terminal electron acceptor. Lowest per-cell potential rates characterize the zone of nitrate reduction and highest per-cell potential rates occur in the methanogenic zone. Possible reasons for this relationship to predominant electron acceptor include (i) increasing importance of fermentation in successively deeper biogeochemical zones and (ii) adaptation of H2ases to successively higher concentrations of H2 in successively deeper zones. PMID:26858697

  5. Gridded state maps of wind electric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. N.; Elliott, D. L.; Gower, G. L.

    1992-10-01

    Estimates of wind electric potential and available windy land area in the contiguous United States, calculated in 1991, were revised by incorporating actual data on the distribution of environmental exclusion areas where wind energy development would be prohibited or severely restricted. The new gridded data base with actual environmental exclusion areas, in combination with a 'moderate' land-use scenario, is the basis for developing the first gridded maps of available windy land and wind electric potential. Gridded maps for the 48 contiguous states show the estimated windy land area and electric potential for each grid cell (1/40 latitude by 1/30 longitude). These new maps show the distribution of the estimated wind electric potential and available windy land within an individual state, unlike previous national maps that only show estimates of the total wind electric potential for the state as a whole. While changes for some individual states are fairly large (in percentage), on a national basis, the estimated windy land area and wind electric potential are only about 1 - 2 percent higher than estimated in 1991.

  6. Statistical systems with nonintegrable interaction potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    Statistical systems composed of atoms interacting with each other trough nonintegrable interaction potentials are considered. Examples of these potentials are hard-core potentials and long-range potentials, for instance, the Lennard-Jones and dipolar potentials. The treatment of such potentials is known to confront several problems, e.g., the impossibility of using the standard mean-field approximations, such as Hartree and Hartree-Fock approximations, the impossibility of directly introducing coherent states, the difficulty in breaking the global gauge symmetry, which is required for describing Bose-Einstein condensed and superfluid systems, the absence of a correctly defined Fourier transform, which hampers the description of uniform matter as well as the use of local-density approximation for nonuniform systems. A novel iterative procedure for describing such systems is developed, starting from a correlated mean-field approximation, allowing for a systematic derivation of higher orders, and meeting no problems listed above. The procedure is applicable to arbitrary systems, whether equilibrium or nonequilibrium. The specification for equilibrium systems is presented. The method of extrapolating the expressions for observable quantities from weak coupling to strong coupling is described.

  7. Comparative study of silicon empirical interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamane, H.; Halicioglu, T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1992-07-01

    We have performed a comparative study of six classical many-body potentials for silicon (Pearson, Takai, Halicioglu, and Tiller; Biswas and Hamann; Stillinger and Weber; Dodson, Tersoff 2, and Tersoff 3). Extensive static calculations have been performed using these potentials on Sin clusters (n=2-6), bulk point defects, elastic constants, polytypes, pressure-induced phase transformations, and surfaces [(111), (100), and (110)]. Similarities and differences between the six potentials have been identified, and their transferability as well as their accuracy with respect to experiment and first-principles methods have been assessed. In general, all of these potentials do a relatively poor job of modeling the energetics of small clusters as well as the various reconstructions of the Si(111) surface. They provide a fair to good description of the properties of bulk diamond cubic silicon, its intrinsic defects, and the Si(100) surface. Besides the fact that none of them models π bonding, their inability to be more transferable lies in their inadequate description of the angular forces. Each potential has its strengths and limitations, but none of them appears to be clearly superior to the others, and none is totally transferrable. However, despite their shortcomings we feel that some of these potentials will be useful in large-scale simulations of materials-related problems. They can give valuable insights into phenomena that are otherwise intractable to investigate either experimentally or via first-principles methods.

  8. Statistical systems with nonintegrable interaction potentials.

    PubMed

    Yukalov, V I

    2016-07-01

    Statistical systems composed of atoms interacting with each other trough nonintegrable interaction potentials are considered. Examples of these potentials are hard-core potentials and long-range potentials, for instance, the Lennard-Jones and dipolar potentials. The treatment of such potentials is known to confront several problems, e.g., the impossibility of using the standard mean-field approximations, such as Hartree and Hartree-Fock approximations, the impossibility of directly introducing coherent states, the difficulty in breaking the global gauge symmetry, which is required for describing Bose-Einstein condensed and superfluid systems, the absence of a correctly defined Fourier transform, which hampers the description of uniform matter as well as the use of local-density approximation for nonuniform systems. A novel iterative procedure for describing such systems is developed, starting from a correlated mean-field approximation, allowing for a systematic derivation of higher orders, and meeting no problems listed above. The procedure is applicable to arbitrary systems, whether equilibrium or nonequilibrium. The specification for equilibrium systems is presented. The method of extrapolating the expressions for observable quantities from weak coupling to strong coupling is described. PMID:27575076

  9. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Bertha Alvarez

    2007-01-01

    One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential.First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed.Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus. PMID:17509146

  10. Determination of interionic potentials in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Conradson, S.D.; Leon, J.M.; Bridges, F.

    1996-04-01

    The rationale underlying materials by design is that properties are determined by structure so that if the relationships between structure and properties are understood, an appropriate material can be designed and fabricated to meet any set of criteria. Since ion-ion potentials determine state transformations and reactivity, they are essential to the entire concept of materials and molecules by design. Virtually all of the important state-to-state processes undergone by molecules (excitation, relaxation, ionization, dissociation, and combination) and the selection among these different pathways are determined by the ion-ion potentials and the resulting degree of overlap between molecular vibrational states for different electronic and atomic configurations. Although the depths of these potentials can be obtained from thermodynamic data and the separations between the vibronic states from spectroscopic measurements, the use of these potentials in the ab initio calculation of state-transformation outcomes is limited by the absence of any direct method for determining their extent and shape. The authors have recently developed a generalization of x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and a related set of experimental and analysis procedures that, in principle, will allow them to obtain such potentials from XAFS data. They have undertaken the analysis of temperature-dependent XAFS data of Cu, Ag, and Au to test the accuracy of existing analytical forms (the Morse potential for metals) in predicting the details of pair distributions and to determine the range of validity of a temperature-independent effective pair-potential approximation. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  11. Relationships between Depression and High Intellectual Potential

    PubMed Central

    Weismann-Arcache, Catherine; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes to analyse the relationships between depression and high intellectual potential through a multidisciplinary and original approach. Based on their respective experience in psychology and child psychiatry, the authors will focus their analysis on creative potential. First, relationships between creativity (literary, artistic, or scientific creativity) and melancholy (“melancholy” comes from the Greek words for “black” (“melas”) and “bile” (“khole”)) will be examined from antiquity to modern times. Aristotle introduced a quantitative factor, asserting that levels of melancholy and black bile are positively correlated; however, under a given threshold of black bile, it can give rise to an exceptional being. Second, the case study of Blaise Pascal (scientific and philosophical creativity associated with major depressive episodes from childhood) will be presented and discussed. This case study sheds light on the paradoxical role of depression in the overinvestment in intellectual and creative spheres as well as on the impact of traumatic events on high intellectual potential. Third, observations will be reported based on a study conducted on 100 children with high intellectual potential (6–12 years old). Finally, based on these different levels of analysis, it appears that heterogeneity of mental functioning in children with high intellectual potential is at the center of the creative process and it has related psychological vulnerability. PMID:22645671

  12. Direct reconstruction of the quintessence potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlén, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David

    2005-10-01

    We describe an algorithm which directly determines the quintessence potential from observational data, without using an equation of state parametrization. The strategy is to numerically determine observational quantities as a function of the expansion coefficients of the quintessence potential, which are then constrained using a likelihood approach. We further impose a model selection criterion, the Bayesian Information Criterion, to determine the appropriate level of the potential expansion. In addition to the potential parameters, the present day quintessence field velocity is kept as a free parameter. Our investigation contains unusual model types, including a scalar field moving on a flat potential, or in an uphill direction, and is general enough to permit oscillating quintessence field models. We apply our method to the “gold“ Type Ia supernovae sample of Riess et al. [A. G. Riess (Supernova Search Team Collaboration), Astrophys. J.ASJOAB0004-637X 607, 665 (2004)]10.1086/383612 confirming the pure cosmological constant model as the best description of current supernovae luminosity-redshift data. Our method is optimal for extracting quintessence parameters from future data.

  13. Direct reconstruction of the quintessence potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlen, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David

    2005-10-15

    We describe an algorithm which directly determines the quintessence potential from observational data, without using an equation of state parametrization. The strategy is to numerically determine observational quantities as a function of the expansion coefficients of the quintessence potential, which are then constrained using a likelihood approach. We further impose a model selection criterion, the Bayesian Information Criterion, to determine the appropriate level of the potential expansion. In addition to the potential parameters, the present day quintessence field velocity is kept as a free parameter. Our investigation contains unusual model types, including a scalar field moving on a flat potential, or in an uphill direction, and is general enough to permit oscillating quintessence field models. We apply our method to the 'gold' Type Ia supernovae sample of Riess et al. [A. G. Riess et al. (Supernova Search Team Collaboration), Astrophys. J. 607, 665 (2004)] confirming the pure cosmological constant model as the best description of current supernovae luminosity-redshift data. Our method is optimal for extracting quintessence parameters from future data.

  14. California’s potential volcanic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, P.

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S Geological Survey (USGS) publication. the 17-page bulletin, "Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California," gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. Although no quantitative probabilities are attached to any of the potential volcanic hazards, the USGS bulletin warns that "sooner or later a volcano in California will erupt again and the ever-expanding use of area near volcnoes increases the potential impact of an eruption on the state's economy and on the health and safety of its citizens. 

  15. Fetal growth potential and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2004-02-01

    Although the association of fetal growth restriction and adverse pregnancy outcomes is well known, lack of sensitivity limits its clinical value. To a large extent, this limitation is a result of traditionally used method to define growth restriction by comparing fetal or birth weight to population norms. The use of population norms, by virtue of their inability to fully consider individual variation, results in high false positive and negative rates. An alternative, calculating fetal individually optimal growth potential, based on physiological determinants of individual growth, is superior in predicting adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Impairment of fetal growth potential identifes some adverse pregnancy outcomes that are not associated with growth restrction defined by population norms. When compared with traditional population-based norms, fetal growth potential is a better predictor of several important adverse outcomes of pregnancy which include: stillbirth, neonatal mortality and morbidity, and long-term adverse neonatal outcomes like neonatal encephalopathy, cerebral palsy and cognitive abilities. Impairment of individual growth potential is also strongly associated with spontaneous preterm delivery. Although definitive interventional trials have not been conducted as yet to validate the clinical value of fetal growth potential, many observational studies, conducted in various populations, indicate its significant promise in this respect.

  16. Interpolation effects in tabulated interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, M.; Whalen, S. M.; Elliott, R. S.; Tadmor, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    Empirical interatomic potentials are widely used in atomistic simulations due to their ability to compute the total energy and interatomic forces quickly relative to more accurate quantum calculations. The functional forms in these potentials are sometimes stored in a tabulated format, as a collection of data points (argument-value pairs), and a suitable interpolation (often spline-based) is used to obtain the function value at an arbitrary point. We explore the effect of these interpolations on the potential predictions by calculating the quasi-harmonic thermal expansion and finite-temperature elastic constant of a one-dimensional chain compared with molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that some predictions are affected by the choice of interpolation regardless of the number of tabulated data points. Our results clearly indicate that the interpolation must be considered part of the potential definition, especially for lattice dynamics properties that depend on higher-order derivatives of the potential. This is facilitated by the Knowledgebase of Interatomic Models (KIM) project, in which both the tabulated data (‘parameterized model’) and the code that interpolates them to compute energy and forces (‘model driver’) are stored and given unique citeable identifiers. We have developed cubic and quintic spline model drivers for pair functional type models (EAM, FS, EMT) and uploaded them to the OpenKIM repository (https://openkim.org).

  17. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Solving Potential Games With Dynamical Constraint.

    PubMed

    Ye, Maojiao; Hu, Guoqiang

    2016-05-01

    We solve N -player potential games with dynamical constraint in this paper. Potential games with stable dynamics are first considered followed by one type of potential games without inherently stable dynamics. Different from most of the existing Nash seeking methods, we provide an extremum seeking-based method that does not require explicit information on the game dynamics or the payoff functions. Only measurements of the payoff functions are needed in the game strategy synthesis. Lie bracket approximation is used for the analysis of the proposed Nash seeking scheme. A singularly semi-globally practically uniformly asymptotically stable result is presented for potential games with stable dynamics and an ultimately bounded result is provided for potential games without inherently stable dynamics. For first-order perturbed integrator-type dynamics, we employ an extended-state observer to deal with the disturbance such that better convergence is achievable. Stability of the closed-loop system is proven and the ultimate bound is quantified. Numerical examples are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  19. Screening Action Potentials: The Power of Light

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials reflect the concerted activity of all electrogenic constituents in the plasma membrane during the excitation of a cell. Therefore, the action potential is an integrated read out and a promising parameter to detect electrophysiological failures or modifications thereof in diagnosis as well as in drug screens. Cellular action potentials can be recorded by optical approaches. To fulfill the pre-requirements to scale up for, e.g., pharmacological screens the following preparatory work has to be provided: (i) model cells under investigation need to represent target cells in the best possible manner; (ii) optical sensors that can be either small molecule dyes or genetically encoded potential probes need to provide a reliable read out with minimal interaction with the naive behavior of the cells and (iii) devices need to be capable to stimulate the cells, read out the signals with the appropriate speed as well as provide the capacity for a sufficient throughput. Here we discuss several scenarios for all three categories in the field of cardiac physiology and pharmacology and provide a perspective to use the power of light in screening cardiac action potentials. PMID:21847381

  20. Relationships between Depression and High Intellectual Potential.

    PubMed

    Weismann-Arcache, Catherine; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes to analyse the relationships between depression and high intellectual potential through a multidisciplinary and original approach. Based on their respective experience in psychology and child psychiatry, the authors will focus their analysis on creative potential. First, relationships between creativity (literary, artistic, or scientific creativity) and melancholy ("melancholy" comes from the Greek words for "black" ("melas") and "bile" ("khole")) will be examined from antiquity to modern times. Aristotle introduced a quantitative factor, asserting that levels of melancholy and black bile are positively correlated; however, under a given threshold of black bile, it can give rise to an exceptional being. Second, the case study of Blaise Pascal (scientific and philosophical creativity associated with major depressive episodes from childhood) will be presented and discussed. This case study sheds light on the paradoxical role of depression in the overinvestment in intellectual and creative spheres as well as on the impact of traumatic events on high intellectual potential. Third, observations will be reported based on a study conducted on 100 children with high intellectual potential (6-12 years old). Finally, based on these different levels of analysis, it appears that heterogeneity of mental functioning in children with high intellectual potential is at the center of the creative process and it has related psychological vulnerability.

  1. Effective potential in density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Amovilli, C

    2004-10-01

    In the previous paper it was shown that in the ground state the diagonal of the spin independent second-order density matrix n can be determined by solving a single auxiliary equation of a two-particle problem. Thus the problem of an arbitrary system with even electrons can be reduced to a two-particle problem. The effective potential of the two-particle equation contains a term v(p) of completely kinetic origin. Virial theorem and hierarchy of equations are derived for v(p) and simple approximations are proposed. A relationship between the effective potential u(p) of the shape function equation and the potential v(p) is established.

  2. Techniques for Measuring Surface Potentials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2015-01-01

    Materials exposed to the space plasma environment charge to a net potential relative to the ambient plasma. The charging process is due to differential currents to the material surface that results in a net surface charge density. While this process is termed "spacecraft surface charging" when applied to aerospace hardware, it also applies to the surfaces of astronomical objects in direct contact with the space plasma environment including a number of planetary bodies, asteroids, and dust particles. The ability to measure surface potentials is important to many techniques used in conducting fundamental heliospheric science, spacecraft engineering operations, and space technology development activities. This presentation provides a survey of current technologies used to measure surface potentials of spacecraft and planetary bodies with examples of their application to space science and technology programs.

  3. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  4. Potential biological activity of acacia honey.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Ibrahim, Mohammed A; Sallau, Abdullahi B; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Aimola, Idown A; Malami, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in functional foods-based research have increasingly become an area of major interest because it affects human health and activities. Functional foods are classes of foods with health promoting and disease preventing properties in addition to multiple nutritional values and of such type is honey. Acacia honey is a type of honey produced by bees (Apis mellifera) fed on Acacia flowers, hence the name. This review focuses on the potential biological activities of Acacia honey which includes quality, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, antiproliferative and neurological properties at in vitro and in vivo levels. Based on our review, Acacia honey used from various researches is of high purity, contains some bioactive compounds ranging from vitamins, phenolics, flavonoids and fatty acids. It's highly nutritional with strong antioxidant and immuno-modulatory potentials which may therefore be considered a potential candidate for both cancer prevention and treatment. Neurologically, it may be considered as a viable therapeutic agent in the management of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Effective potential in density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Amovilli, C

    2004-10-01

    In the previous paper it was shown that in the ground state the diagonal of the spin independent second-order density matrix n can be determined by solving a single auxiliary equation of a two-particle problem. Thus the problem of an arbitrary system with even electrons can be reduced to a two-particle problem. The effective potential of the two-particle equation contains a term v(p) of completely kinetic origin. Virial theorem and hierarchy of equations are derived for v(p) and simple approximations are proposed. A relationship between the effective potential u(p) of the shape function equation and the potential v(p) is established. PMID:15473719

  6. Numerical matrix method for quantum periodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vot, Felipe; Meléndez, Juan J.; Yuste, Santos B.

    2016-06-01

    A numerical matrix methodology is applied to quantum problems with periodic potentials. The procedure consists essentially in replacing the true potential by an alternative one, restricted by an infinite square well, and in expressing the wave functions as finite superpositions of eigenfunctions of the infinite well. A matrix eigenvalue equation then yields the energy levels of the periodic potential within an acceptable accuracy. The methodology has been successfully used to deal with problems based on the well-known Kronig-Penney (KP) model. Besides the original model, these problems are a dimerized KP solid, a KP solid containing a surface, and a KP solid under an external field. A short list of additional problems that can be solved with this procedure is presented.

  7. On Effective Potential in Tortoise Coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjali, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we study the field dynamics in Tortoise coordinate where the equation of motion of a scalar can be written as Schrodinger-like form. We obtain a general form for effective potential by finding the Schrodinger equation for scalar and spinor fields and study its global behavior in some black hole backgrounds in three dimension such as BTZ black holes, new type black holes and black holes with no horizon. Especially, we study the asymptotic behavior of potential at infinity, horizons and origin and find that its asymptotic in BTZ and new type solution is completely different from that of vanishing horizon solution. In fact, potential for vanishing horizon goes to a fixed quantity at infinity, while in BTZ and new type black hole we have an infinite barrier.

  8. Antimatter Production at a Potential Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Reddy, Dhanireddy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current antiproton production techniques rely on high-energy collisions between beam particles and target nuclei to produce particle and antiparticle pairs, but inherently low production and capture efficiencies render these techniques impractical for the cost-effective production of antimatter for space propulsion and other commercial applications. Based on Dirac's theory of the vacuum field, a new antimatter production concept is proposed in which particle-antiparticle pairs are created at the boundary of a steep potential step formed by the suppression of the local vacuum fields. Current antimatter production techniques are reviewed, followed by a description of Dirac's relativistic quantum theory of the vacuum state and corresponding solutions for particle tunneling and reflection from a potential barrier. The use of the Casimir effect to suppress local vacuum fields is presented as a possible technique for generating the sharp potential gradients required for particle-antiparticle pair creation.

  9. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  10. Bubble nucleation for flat potential barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Lars Gerhard; Steinhardt, Paul Joseph

    1989-05-01

    We have studied false vacuum decay for effective potentials in which the false vacuum is separated from the true vacuum by a ``flat'' potential barrier. By flat, we mean that, near the top of the barrier, the potential varies quartically, rather than quadratically with the field (to leading order). We have discovered several new types of bubble solutions. One type reduces in the flat space-time limit to the mathematical solution introduced by Lee and Weinberg to describe ``tunneling without barriers.'' Based on our analysis, though, we propose a significantly different interpretation of the curved space solution. We numerically study these solutions (plus the Hawking-Moss solution) for a toy model to examine how the dominant tunneling mode may change as a function of parameters. We propose a variant of the new inflationary scenario based on these results.

  11. Bond order potential module for LAMMPS

    2012-09-11

    pair_bop is a module for performing energy calculations using the Bond Order Potential (BOP) for use in the parallel molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. The bop pair style computes BOP based upon quantum mechanical incorporating both sigma and pi bondings. By analytically deriving the BOP pair bop from quantum mechanical theory its transferability to different phases can approach that of quantum mechanical methods. This potential is extremely effective at modeling 111-V and II-VI compounds such asmore » GaAs and CdTe. This potential is similar to the original BOP developed by Pettifor and later updated by Murdock et al. and Ward et al.« less

  12. Nanoparticles and cars - analysis of potential sources

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Urban health is potentially affected by particle emissions. The potential toxicity of nanoparticles is heavily debated and there is an enormous global increase in research activity in this field. In this respect, it is commonly accepted that nanoparticles may also be generated in processes occurring while driving vehicles. So far, a variety of studies addressed traffic-related particulate matter emissions, but only few studies focused on potential nanoparticles. Therefore, the present study analyzed the literature with regard to nanoparticles and cars. It can be stated that, to date, only a limited amount of research has been conducted in this area and more studies are needed to 1) address kind and sources of nanoparticles within automobiles and to 2) analyse whether there are health effects caused by these nanoparticles. PMID:22726351

  13. Exploring the potential of public proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    Vaudel, Marc; Verheggen, Kenneth; Csordas, Attila; Ræder, Helge; Berven, Frode S.; Martens, Lennart; Vizcaíno, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    In a global effort for scientific transparency, it has become feasible and good practice to share experimental data supporting novel findings. Consequently, the amount of publicly available MS‐based proteomics data has grown substantially in recent years. With some notable exceptions, this extensive material has however largely been left untouched. The time has now come for the proteomics community to utilize this potential gold mine for new discoveries, and uncover its untapped potential. In this review, we provide a brief history of the sharing of proteomics data, showing ways in which publicly available proteomics data are already being (re‐)used, and outline potential future opportunities based on four different usage types: use, reuse, reprocess, and repurpose. We thus aim to assist the proteomics community in stepping up to the challenge, and to make the most of the rapidly increasing amount of public proteomics data. PMID:26449181

  14. Potential runoff-contributing areas in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2000-01-01

    This digital spatial data set provides information on the spatial distribution of potential runoff-contributing areas in the State of Kansas. Potential runoff-contributing areas were estimated collectively for the processes of infiltration-excess overland flow and saturation-excess overland flow. For infiltration-excess overland flow, various rainfall-intensity and soil-permeability values were used. For saturation-excess overland flow, antecedent soil-moisture conditions and a topographic wetness index were used. The digital data sets used in the analysis included 1:24,000-scale soils data and a 100-meter-resolution digital elevation model. The data set of potential runoff-contributing areas is in grid (raster) format with a grid-cell size of 10,000 square meters.

  15. Remote sensing of potential aircraft icing areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Nakhtigalova, Daria P.; Shelekhov, Alexander P.; Shelekhova, Evgeniya A.; Baranov, Nikolay A.; Kizhner, Lubov I.

    2015-11-01

    Remote sensing technique of detection of potential aircraft icing areas based on temperature profile measurements, using meteorological temperature profiler, and the data of the Airfield Measuring and Information System (AMIS-RF), was proposed, theoretically described and experimentally validated during the field project in 2012 - 2013 in the Tomsk Bogashevo Airport. Spatial areas of potential aircraft icing were determined using the RAP algorithm and Godske formula. The equations for the reconstruction of profiles of relative humidity and dew point using data from AMIS-RF are given. Actual data on the aircraft icing for the Tomsk Bogashevo Airport on 11 October 2012 and 17 March 2013 are presented in this paper. The RAP algorithm and Godske formula show similar results for the location of spatial areas of potential icing. Though, the results obtained using the RAP algorithm are closer to the actual data on the icing known from aircraft crew reports.

  16. Crystallization for a Brenner-like Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Brittan; Esedoǧlu, Selim; Smereka, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Graphene is a carbon molecule with the structure of a honeycomb lattice. We show how this structure can arise in two dimensions as the minimizer of an interaction energy with two-body and three-body terms. In the engineering literature, the Brenner potential is commonly used to describe the interactions between carbon atoms. We consider a potential of Stillinger-Weber type that incorporates certain characteristics of the Brenner potential: the preferred bond angles are 180° and all interactions have finite range. We show that the thermodynamic limit of the ground state energy per particle is the same as that of a honeycomb lattice. We also prove that, subject to periodic boundary conditions, the minimizers are translated versions of the honeycomb lattice.

  17. The identification of potential cadaveric organ donors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J F; McCosker, C J; Hibberd, A D; Chapman, J R; Compton, J S; Mahony, J F; Mohacsi, P J; MacDonald, G J; Spratt, P M

    1995-02-01

    Most Australian transplantation programs are severely restricted in their activities by a limited availability of cadaveric donor organs. To investigate possible reasons for this problem, an audit was undertaken over three 12-month periods of all deaths in 13 hospitals in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. From 7406 deaths, 271 patients were classified as having been realistic, medically suitable potential donors. Of these, only 60 (22%) became actual donors. In the other 211 patients, donation did not occur because of unsuccessful resuscitation (30%), permission refusal by relatives (34%), and failure to identify or support the potential donors (36%). If the impediments to organ donation which were identified in this study could be overcome, allowing a greater number of potential donors to become actual donors, the chronic shortage of cadaveric donor organs for transplantation could be at least partly relieved.

  18. Constant-force approach to discontinuous potentials.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2013-06-01

    Aiming to approach the thermodynamical properties of hard-core systems by standard molecular dynamics simulation, we propose setting a repulsive constant-force for overlapping particles. That is, the discontinuity of the pair potential is replaced by a linear function with a large negative slope. Hence, the core-core repulsion, usually modeled with a power function of distance, yields a large force as soon as the cores slightly overlap. This leads to a quasi-hardcore behavior. The idea is tested for a triangle potential of short range. The results obtained by replica exchange molecular dynamics for several repulsive forces are contrasted with the ones obtained for the discontinuous potential and by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo. We found remarkable agreements for the vapor-liquid coexistence densities as well as for the surface tension.

  19. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  20. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, J. A.; Martin, S.; Panferov, V.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare the obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  1. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  2. Origin of growth-induced water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, H.; Boyer, J.S.

    1987-03-01

    The authors developed a new method to measure the solute concentration in the apoplast of stem tissue involving pressurizing the roots of intact seedlings (Glycine max (L.) Merr. or Pisum sativum L.), collecting a small amount of exudate from the surface of the stem under saturating humidities, and determining the osmotic potential of the solution with a micro-osmometer capable of measuring small volumes (0.5 microliter). In the elongating region, the apoplast concentrations were very low (equivalent to osmotic potentials of -0.03 to -0.04 megapascal) and negligible compared to the water potential of the apoplast (-0.15 to -0.30 megapascal) measured directly by isopiestic psychrometry in intact plants. Most of the apoplast water potential consisted of a negative pressure that could be measured with a pressure chamber (-0.15 to -0.28 megapascal). Tests showed that earlier methods involving infiltration of intercellular spaces or pressurizing cut segments caused solute to be released to the apoplast and resulted in spuriously high concentrations. These results indicate that, although a small amount of solute is present in the apoplast, the major component is a tension that is part of a growth-induced gradient in water potential in the enlarging tissue. The gradient originates from the extension of the cell walls, which prevents turgor from reaching its maximum and creates a growth-induced water potential that causes water to move from the xylem at a rate that satisfies the rate of enlargement. The magnitude of the gradient implies that growing tissue contains a large resistance to water movement.

  3. Skeletonization of Gridded Potential-Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Morozov, I. B.

    2012-12-01

    A new approach to skeletonization was developed for gridded potential-field data. Generally, skeletonization is a pattern-recognition technique allowing automatic recognition of near-linear features in the images, measurement of their parameters, and analyzing them for similarities. Our approach decomposes the images into arbitrarily-oriented "wavelets" characterized by positive or negative amplitudes, orientation angles, spatial dimensions, polarities, and other attributes. Orientations of the wavelets are obtained by scanning the azimuths to detect the strike direction of each anomaly. The wavelets are connected according to the similarities of these attributes, which leads to a "skeleton" map of the potential-field data. In addition, 2-D filtering is conducted concurrently with the wavelet-identification process, which allows extracting parameters of background trends and reduces the adverse effects of low-frequency background (which is often strong in potential-field maps) on skeletonization.. By correlating the neighboring wavelets, linear anomalies are identified and characterized. The advantages of this algorithm are the generality and isotropy of feature detection, as well as being specifically designed for gridded data. With several options for background-trend extraction, the stability for identification of lineaments is improved and optimized. The algorithm is also integrated in a powerful processing system which allows combining it with numerous other tools, such as filtering, computation of analytical signal, empirical mode decomposition, and various types of plotting. The method is applied to potential-field data for the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, in a study area which extends from southern Saskatchewan into southwestern Manitoba. The target is the structure of crystalline basement beneath Phanerozoic sediments. The examples illustrate that skeletonization aid in the interpretation of complex structures at different scale lengths. The results

  4. Analytic Models of Plausible Gravitational Lens Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2007-05-04

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modeled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasizing that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential.We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modeled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  5. Therapeutic potential of cannabis-related drugs.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen P H

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I will consider the dual nature of Cannabis and cannabinoids. The duality arises from the potential and actuality of cannabinoids in the laboratory and clinic and the 'abuse' of Cannabis outside the clinic. The therapeutic areas currently best associated with exploitation of Cannabis-related medicines include pain, epilepsy, feeding disorders, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. As with every other medicinal drug of course, the 'trick' will be to maximise the benefit and minimise the cost. After millennia of proximity and exploitation of the Cannabis plant, we are still playing catch up with an understanding of its potential influence for medicinal benefit. PMID:26216862

  6. Fly Ash Characteristics and Carbon Sequestration Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Amonette, James E.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Daniels, William L.

    2007-07-20

    Concerns for the effects of global warming have lead to an interest in the potential for inexpensive methods to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). One of the proposed methods is the sequestration of carbon in soil though the growth of crops or forests.4,6 If there is an economic value placed on sequestration of carbon dioxide in soil there may be an an opportunity and funding to utilize fly ash in the reclamation of mine soils and other degraded lands. However, concerns associated with the use of fly ash must be addressed before this practice can be widely adopted. There is a vast extent of degraded lands across the world that has some degree of potential for use in carbon sequestration. Degraded lands comprise nearly 2 X 109 ha of land throughout the world.7 Although the potential is obviously smaller in the United States, there are still approximately 4 X 106 ha of degraded lands that previously resulted from mining operations14 and an additional 1.4 X 108 ha of poorly managed lands. Thus, according to Lal and others the potential is to sequester approximately 11 Pg of carbon over the next 50 years.1,10 The realization of this potential will likely be dependent on economic incentives and the use of soil amendments such as fly ash. There are many potential benefits documented for the use of fly ash as a soil amendment. For example, fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, HCO3-, Cl- and basic cations, although some effects are notably decreased in high-clay soils.8,13,9 The potential is that these effects will promote increased growth of plants (either trees or grasses) and result in greater carbon accumulation in the soil than in untreated degraded soils. This paper addresses the potential for carbon sequestration in soils amended with fly ash and examines some of the issues that should be considered in planning this option. We describe retrospective studies of soil carbon accumulation on

  7. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  8. Potential liability for transfusion-associated AIDS.

    PubMed

    Miller, P J; O'Connell, J; Leipold, A; Wenzel, R P

    1985-06-21

    Statistical evidence for the transmission of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) through blood and blood products is cited, and the potential legal ramifications for blood suppliers are discussed. An AIDS victim could bring a claim against a hospital or blood bank on the contention that the facility had supplied an unfit product for patient use. Remedies for recovery in such a case might be based on a breach of implied warranties, strict liability, or negligence. Precautions which blood suppliers and physicians can take to reduce the potential for liability are suggested.

  9. Analysis of potential helicopter vibration reduction concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, A. J.; Davis, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of analytical investigations to develop, understand, and evaluate potential helicopter vibration reduction concepts are presented in the following areas: identification of the fundamental sources of vibratory loads, blade design for low vibration, application of design optimization techniques, active higher harmonic control, blade appended aeromechanical devices, and the prediction of vibratory airloads. Primary sources of vibration are identified for a selected four-bladed articulated rotor operating in high speed level flight. The application of analytical design procedures and optimization techniques are shown to have the potential for establishing reduced vibration blade designs through variations in blade mass and stiffness distributions, and chordwise center-of-gravity location.

  10. [Online-gambling - new hazard potential?].

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Kurosch; Yazdi, Karin

    2014-12-01

    Since the new American psychiatric classification, DSM V, was released, bringing together substance-related disorders and gambling disorder into one chapter, the addictive potential of gambling and sports wagering is beyond all question. Even the neurobiological processes of the brain show similarities in all addictive disorders. Gambling is more and more shifted into the cyberspace owing to the global expansion of the internet. The addictive potential of online-gambling seems to be higher than offline, though, which is also reflected by the patient population of the outpatient clinic for gambling addiction in Linz. This fact poses a challenge for the persons affected, therapists, gambling providers, legislator the society as a whole.

  11. The maturation of ovulatory potential in man.

    PubMed

    Kulin, H E

    1980-01-01

    The maturation of the potential for ovulation in man is reviewed in the light of recent data quantitating gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in the prepubertal child. The primary limitations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are seen as related to feedback control mechanisms. Based on preliminary data obtained in patients with gonadal dysgenesis, a hypothesis which links positive and negative feedback maturation is proposed. The development of full reproductive potential in man is clearly a process which extends over a decade or more.

  12. Therapeutic potential of cannabis-related drugs.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen P H

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I will consider the dual nature of Cannabis and cannabinoids. The duality arises from the potential and actuality of cannabinoids in the laboratory and clinic and the 'abuse' of Cannabis outside the clinic. The therapeutic areas currently best associated with exploitation of Cannabis-related medicines include pain, epilepsy, feeding disorders, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. As with every other medicinal drug of course, the 'trick' will be to maximise the benefit and minimise the cost. After millennia of proximity and exploitation of the Cannabis plant, we are still playing catch up with an understanding of its potential influence for medicinal benefit.

  13. Origin of auroral electric potential structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Y. T.

    Available observational data and theoretical models of the formation of auroral electric potential structures are reviewed. It is shown that the principle of arc formation in the aurora can also be applied to other geomagnetic configurations, in order to construct a comprehensive theory of discrete auroral arcs. According to the theory, the completion of the field-aligned current circuit in the aurora can lead to downward parallel electric fields in the return current from the central region of discrete arc potential. It is pointed out that evidence for downward parallel electric field signatures has been collected within the last year.

  14. Nanoparticle interaction potentials constructed by multiscale computation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng K; Hua, Chi C

    2010-06-14

    The van der Waals (vdW) potentials governing macroscopic objects have long been formulated in the context of classical theories, such as Hamaker's microscopic theory and Lifshitz's continuum theory. This work addresses the possibility of constructing the vdW interaction potentials of nanoparticle species using multiscale simulation schemes. Amorphous silica nanoparticles were considered as a benchmark example for which a series of (SiO(2))(n) (n being an integer) has been systematically surveyed as the potential candidates of the packing units that reproduce known bulk material properties in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. This strategy led to the identification of spherical Si(6)O(12) molecules, later utilized as the elementary coarse-grained (CG) particles to compute the pair interaction potentials of silica nanoparticles ranging from 0.62 to 100 nm in diameter. The model nanoparticles so built may, in turn, serve as the children CG particles to construct nanoparticles assuming arbitrary sizes and shapes. Major observations are as follows. The pair interaction potentials for all the investigated spherical silica nanoparticles can be cast into a semiempirical, generalized Lennard-Jones 2alpha-alpha potential (alpha being a size-dependent, large integral number). In its reduced form, we discuss the implied universalities for the vdW potentials governing a certain range of amorphous nanoparticle species as well as how thermodynamic transferability can be fulfilled automatically. In view of future applications with colloidal suspensions, we briefly evaluated the vdW potential in the presence of a "screening" medium mimicking the effects of electrical double layers or grafting materials atop the nanoparticle core. The general observations shed new light on strategies to attain a microscopic control over interparticle attractions. In future perspectives, the proposed multiscale computation scheme shall help bridge the current gap between the modeling of

  15. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  16. [Age changes in early somatosensory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1986-06-01

    There are characteristic age-related changes in the cervical and early cortical somatosensory potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the median nerve. At an age of 40 to 50 years the latencies of the potential components and the transit times start increasing progressively. Moreover, there is an attenuation of the cervical and an enhancement of the cortical components with age. Considering the presumed neuronal basis of the bioelectric phenomena the changes are discussed in connection with aging processes of the spinal ganglion cells, cortical pyramidal cells and the locus coeruleus. PMID:3017682

  17. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  19. Allelopathic potential of Rapanea umbellata leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Paula; Imatomi, Maristela; Varela, Rosa M; Molinillo, José M G; Lacret, Rodney; Gualtieri, Sonia C J; Macías, Francisco A

    2013-08-01

    The stressful conditions associated with the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) environment were supposed to favor higher levels of allelochemicals in Rapanea umbellata from this ecosystem. The allelopathic potential of R. umbellata leaf extracts was studied using the etiolated wheat coleoptile and standard phytotoxicity bioassays. The most active extract was selected to perform a bioassay-guided isolation, which allowed identifying lutein (1) and (-)-catechin (2) as potential allelochemicals. Finally, the general bioactivity of the two compounds was studied, which indicated that the presence of 1 might be part of the defense mechanisms of this plant. PMID:23939802

  20. Potentially Ineffective Care: Time for Earnest Reexamination

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, William L.; Sales, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    The rising costs and suboptimal quality throughout the American health care system continue to invite critical inquiry, and practice in the intensive care unit setting is no exception. Due to their relatively large impact, outcomes and costs in critical care are of significant interest to policymakers and health care administrators. Measurement of potentially ineffective care has been proposed as an outcome measure to evaluate critical care delivery, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act affords the opportunity to reshape the care of the critically ill. Given the impetus of the PPACA, systematic formal measurement of potentially ineffective care and its clinical, economic, and societal impact merits timely reconsideration. PMID:24804088

  1. Potential Toxic Effects of Nano-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Chen, Hongzheng; Shi, Minmin; Wu, Gang; Fujita, Daisuke; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2013-09-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials in industrial and consumer products has aroused global concern regarding their potential impact on environment and human health. A number of studies on the effects of nanomaterials in in vitro and in vivo systems have been shown that some nanomaterials are potentially toxic. We address the understanding of the link of physicochemical characteristics of some nano-oxides including SiO2, TiO2, and ZnO to the observed toxic effects. Understanding the contribution of physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials to toxic effects would allow safety to be built into the design of nanomaterials and their applications, to allow their safe integration into products.

  2. Pacesetter potential of the human gastroduodenal junction

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, H. L.; Kwong, N. K.; Brown, B. H.; Whittaker, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The pacesetter potential of the gastric antrum and proximal duodenum has been recorded in man by electrodes placed under the serosal coat of the gut. The typical 3 cycle/min of the stomach was found to be conducted across the pylorus into the first part of the duodenum at a rate (2 cm/sec) about four times as fast as its conduction in the more proximal antrum (0·5 cm/sec). A 3 cycle/min pacesetter potential could be detected as far distally in the duodenum as 10 cm from the pylorus. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 7 PMID:5574794

  3. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2015-12-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  4. Multiple scattering theory for space filling potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W.H. ); Brown, R.G. . Dept. of Physics); Nesbet, R.K. . Almaden Research Center)

    1990-01-01

    Multiple scattering theory (MST) provides an efficient technique for solving the wave equation for the special case of muffin-tin potentials. Here MST is extended to treat space filling non-muffin tin potentials and its validity, accuracy and efficiency are tested by application of the two dimensional empty lattice test. For this test it is found that the traditional formulation of MST does not coverage as the number of partial waves is increased. A simple modification of MST, however, allows this problem to be solved exactly and efficiently. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. A laboratory investigation of potential double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1987-01-01

    In a triple plasma device, the injection of electron current from the source chamber to the target chamber causes the formation of a potential double layer. At a low current density, the space charge of the injected current produces a virtual cathode-type potential double layer. This double layer is stable, and various wave instabilities are observed to associate with this double layer. As the current density is increased, the double layer becomes unstable, and a moving double layer results. As the current density is increased further, the enhanced ionization causes the neutralization of the space charge of the electron beam, and the beam plasma discharge is ignited.

  6. A laboratory investigation of potential double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1987-01-01

    In a triple plasma device, the injection of electron current from the source chamber to the target chamber causes the formation of a potential double layer. At a low current density, the space charge of the injected current produces a virtual cathode-type potential double layer. This double layer is stable and various wave instabilities are observed to associate with this double layer. As the current density is increased, the double layer becomes unstable and a moving double layer results. As the current density is increased further, the enhanced ionization causes the neutralization of the space charge of the electron beam and the 'beam plasma discharge' is ignited.

  7. Elastic scattering using an artificial confining potential.

    PubMed

    Mitroy, J; Zhang, J Y; Varga, K

    2008-09-19

    The discrete energies of a scattering Hamiltonian calculated under the influence of an artificial confining potential of almost arbitrary functional form can be used to determine its phase shifts. The method exploits the result that two short-range Hamiltonians having the same energy will have the same phase shifts upon removal of the confining potential. An initial verification is performed on a simple model problem. Then the stochastic variational method is used to determine the energies of the confined e(-)-He(2)S(e) system and thus determine the low energy phase shifts.

  8. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  9. Kähler potentials for Planck inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: m.scalisi@rug.nl

    2013-11-01

    We assess which Kähler potentials in supergravity lead to viable single-field inflationary models that are consistent with Planck. We highlight the role of symmetries, such as shift, Heisenberg and supersymmetry, in these constructions. Also the connections to string theory are pointed out. Finally, we discuss a supergravity model for arbitrary inflationary potentials that is suitable for open string inflation and generalise it to the case of closed string inflation. Our model includes the recently discussed supergravity reformulation of the Starobinsky model of inflation as well as an interesting alternative with comparable predictions.

  10. Model potential calculations of lithium transitions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, T. C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1972-01-01

    Semi-empirical potentials are constructed that have eigenvalues close in magnitude to the binding energies of the valence electron in lithium. The potentials include the long range polarization force between the electron and the core. The corresponding eigenfunctions are used to calculate dynamic polarizabilities, discrete oscillator strengths, photoionization cross sections and radiative recombination coefficients. A consistent application of the theory imposes a modification on the transition operator, but its effects are small for lithium. The method presented can be regarded as a numerical generalization of the widely used Coulomb approximation.

  11. Potential energy function for the hydroperoxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, W.J.; Hase, W.L.

    1987-03-12

    A switching function formalism is used to derive an analytic potential energy surface for the O + OH in equilibrium HO/sub 2/ in equilibrium H + O/sub 2/ reactive system. Both experimental and ab initio data are used to derive parameters for the potential energy surface. Trajectory calculations for highly excited HO/sub 2/ are performed on this surface. From these trajectories quasi-periodic eigentrajectories are found for vibrational levels near the HO/sub 2/ dissociation threshold with small amounts of quanta in the OH stretch mode and large amounts of quanta in the OO stretch mode.

  12. On the origins of dorsal root potentials.

    PubMed

    LLOYD, D P C; McINTYRE, A K

    1949-03-20

    The "dorsal root potential" consists of five successive deflections designated for convenience, D.R.I, II, III, IV, and V. Of these, D.R.V alone constitutes the dorsal root potential of prior description. A study has been made of the general properties of those deflections not previously described. Dorsal root potentials are electrotonic extensions into the extramedullary root segment, the result of electrical interactions within the cord comparable to those that have been studied in peripheral nerve. Although the anatomical and electrical conditions of interaction are infinitely more complex in the cord than in nerve, it is seen that the fact of parallel distribution of primary afferent fibers pertaining to neighboring dorsal roots provides a sufficient anatomical basis for qualitative analysis in the first approximation of dorsal root potentials. An extension of the theory of interaction between neighboring nerve fibers has been made to include an especial case of interaction between fibers orientated at right angles to one another. The predictions have been tested in a nerve model and found correct. Given this elaboration, and the stated anatomical propositions, existing knowledge of interaction provides an adequate theoretical basis for an elementary understanding of dorsal root potentials. The study of general properties and the analysis of dorsal root potentials have led to the formulation of certain conclusions that follow. D.R.I, II, and III record the electrotonic spread of polarization resulting from the external field of impulses conducted in the intramedullary segment and longitudinal trajects of primary afferent fibers. D.R.IV arises in part as the result of activity in primary afferent fibers, and in part as the result of activity in secondary neurons. In either case the mode of production is the same, and the responsible agent is residual negativity in the active collaterals, or, more precisely, the external field of current flow about the

  13. The scattering phase shifts of the Hulthén-type potential plus Yukawa potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyewumi, K. J.; Oluwadare, O. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Hulthén-type potential is perturbed by adding the Yukawa potential. By applying a short-range approximation to the Schrödinger equation containing this model via standard method, the scattering state solutions and the corresponding phase shifts were obtained. Our numerical calculations and graphical solutions show the dependencies of scattering phase shifts on Yukawa potential constant A, asymptotic wave number k, screening parameter α and angular momentum quantum number l.

  14. The I' potential of the brain-stem auditory-evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Moore, E J; Semela, J J; Rakerd, B; Robb, R C; Ananthanarayan, A K

    1992-01-01

    We have consistently recorded a positive wave which precedes wave I, and is called I', within the human brain-stem auditory-evoked potential. It is postulated that I' represents initial neural activity of the auditory nerve, which presumably has as its origin auditory nerve dendrites. Thus, I' may represent a summed far-field dendritic potential from currents of excitatory postsynaptic potentials. We report latency and amplitude values of I'.

  15. Cable TV's Potential for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Elinor

    1972-01-01

    Because of its potential for bringing together many formats, with its flexibility for production and experimentation, cable TV may be seen as a kind of umbrella system to meet some of the needs of teachers for in-service training. (Author)

  16. The Transformative Potential of Counseling Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshmand, Lisa Tsoi

    2004-01-01

    Transformative learning and development in adult education, as defined in humanistic and critical perspectives, are examined. The transformative potential of counseling education is explored in this article in terms of: (1) program philosophy; (2) pedagogy and curricular features; and (3) student outcomes. Challenges for a transformative approach…

  17. Vector Potential, Electromagnetic Induction and "Physical Meaning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, G.

    2010-01-01

    A forgotten experiment by Andre Blondel (1914) proves, as held on the basis of theoretical arguments in a previous paper, that the time variation of the magnetic flux is not the cause of the induced emf; the physical agent is instead the vector potential through the term [equation omitted] (when the induced circuit is at rest). The "good…

  18. Air Pollution Potential from Electroplating Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Philip

    Measurements were made of emission rates from electroplating operations considered to have maximum air pollution potential. Sampling was performed at McClellan and additional data from a previous survey at Hill Air Force Base was used. Values obtained were extremely low. Based on existing Federal standards, no collectors are specifically required…

  19. The potential for chemical evolution on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J. I.; Welch, C.

    2002-01-01

    Sampling of organics to determine oxygen content, extent of acetylene polymerization, existence of chiral molecules and enantiomeric excesses, and searches for specific polymer products, would be of interest in assessing how organic chemistry evolves toward biochemistry. Such efforts would require fairly sophisticated chemical analyses from landed missions. This paper examines this chemistry and the potential instruments that could distinguish chemical evolution.

  20. Development of Creative Potential of Cinema Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Ilinaa, Elena L.; Latkin, Aleksander N.; Koshelevava, Anna I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem indicated in the article is caused by the fact that under current conditions it is necessary to offer high-quality and demanded tourist products, formed at the combination of various industries on the basis of wide application of creative potential of different industries, including tourism and cinema, a harmonious…

  1. Electrical surface potential of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Zoya; Rodenstein, Mathias; Döhner, Jana; Eng, Lukas M; Amrein, Matthias

    2006-11-21

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixed lipid protein substance of defined composition that self-assembles at the air-lung interface into a molecular film and thus reduces the interfacial tension to close to zero. A very low surface tension is required for maintaining the alveolar structure. The pulmonary surfactant film is also the first barrier for airborne particles entering the lung upon breathing. We explored by frequency modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) the structure and local electrical surface potential of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) films. BLES is a clinically used surfactant replacement and here served as a realistic model surfactant system. The films were distinguished by a pattern of molecular monolayer areas, separated by patches of lipid bilayer stacks. The stacks were at positive electrical potential with respect to the surrounding monolayer areas. We propose a particular molecular arrangement of the lipids and proteins in the film to explain the topographic and surface potential maps. We also discuss how this locally variable surface potential may influence the retention of charged or polar airborne particles in the lung.

  2. Potentially hazardous waste produced at home

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of waste generation household consisting of biological material and to investigate the knowledge presented by those responsible for the generation of waste in the home environment on the potential health risk human and environmental. Method It is a quantitative survey performed in Parque Capuava, Santo André (SP). The questionnaire was administered by the community employers and nursing students during the consultation with nursing supervision through interview question/answer. The exclusion criteria were patients who were not in the area served by the Basic Health Unit which covers the area of Pq Capuava. The sample was consisted of 99 persons and the data collection a questionnaire was used. Results We observed that 63.3% of people said to use disposables, with the majority (58.7%) of these use the public collection as the final destination of these materials. It was reported that 73.7% of those surveyed reported having knowledge about the risk of disease transmission. Public awareness of the importance of proper packaging and disposal of potentially hazardous household waste may contribute significantly to the preservation of human and environmental health and this procedure can be performed and supervised by professional nurses. Conclusion We suggest implementation of workshops for community health workers and the general population in order to enhance their knowledge about the storage and disposal of potentially infectious waste generated at home, thereby reducing the potential risk of disease transmission by improper management. PMID:23806043

  3. On the GIBBS thermodynamic potential of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, Rainer; Hagen, Eberhard

    Free Enthalpy, the GIBBS thermodynamic potential G(S,t,p) of seawater, has been recomputed including the sound speed equation of DEL GROSSO (1974), temperatures of maximum density (TMD) of CALDWELL (1978), freezing point depression measurements of DOHERTY and KESTER (1974), rederived limiting laws and ice properties, and an extended set of dilution heat data of BROMLEY (1968) and MILLERO, HANSEN and HOFF (1973). As a new reference state, the standard ocean state has been chosen. The resulting average deviations are 0.0006 kg m -3 for pure water density at 1 atm, 0.002 kg m -3 for seawater density at 1 atm, 0.02 m/s for sound speed, 0.01 J kgK -1 for heat capacity at 1 atm, 0.4 kJ kg -1 for dilution heats, 0.002°C for freezing points, and 0.04°C for TMDs. Resulting pressure-dependent freezing points are in good agreement with experiments and UNESCO (1978) formulas. Enthalpy as thermodynamic potential has been explicitly determined for easy computation of potential temperature, potential density, and sound speed. All functions are expressed in the new International Temperature Scale ITS-90.

  4. Auditory and visual evoked potentials during hyperoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. B. D.; Strawbridge, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental study of the auditory and visual averaged evoked potentials (AEPs) recorded during hyperoxia, and investigation of the effect of hyperoxia on the so-called contingent negative variation (CNV). No effect of hyperoxia was found on the auditory AEP, the visual AEP, or the CNV. Comparisons with previous studies are discussed.

  5. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  6. Tendencies and Prospects in Building Educational Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamova, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Global competition, which has become more acute with the onset of the world financial and economic crisis, is forcing countries to look for resources by means of which the crisis can be overcome and national economies will receive a new impetus of development. It is the growth of the educational potential that constitutes the component of the…

  7. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  8. Random Walk Method for Potential Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A local Random Walk Method (RWM) for potential problems governed by Lapalace's and Paragon's equations is developed for two- and three-dimensional problems. The RWM is implemented and demonstrated in a multiprocessor parallel environment on a Beowulf cluster of computers. A speed gain of 16 is achieved as the number of processors is increased from 1 to 23.

  9. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  10. Distance Learning: New Technology and New Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Julie Davis

    1991-01-01

    Some common questions that state legislators have about how distance learning can work in their states are explored. Distance learning, once considered strictly a rural education strategy, is now recognized to have the potential to provide solutions to some of the problems states face in delivering quality education to all students. A distance…

  11. Wind erosion potential following application of biosolids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of biosolids to agricultural land has the potential to improve soil health and crop production. These benefits could also possibly reduce the threat of wind erosion in arid and semiarid regions. Therefore, we assessed the impact of biosolids on wind erosion of agricultural land at Li...

  12. [Potential radiation hazard in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Guilabert, Nadine; Ricard, Marcel; Chamoulaud, Karen; Mazelier, Carole; Schlumberger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine uses unsealed radioisotopes. The potential radiation hazards depend on the amount of radioactivity administered and the type of radionucleide. Thus, radiation safety instructions will minimize radiation exposure and contamination as low as reasonably achievable. National nuclear safety authority requires rules, regulations and exposure limits for both patients and workers. Good practices and training staff contribute to optimize the radioprotection. PMID:25842441

  13. The Kid Underneath: Discovering Hidden Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Edna C.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, a youth who is transformed from a troublemaker to a model student offers his advice on what it takes to reclaim kids like himself. Sections include: (1) The Outside Will; (2) Will Unfolding; (3) The Transition; (4) Potential Realized; (5) A Conversation with the Inside Kid; and (6) Suggestions from the Inside Kid.

  14. Marketing Potential of Advanced Breeding Clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of reducing sugars during cold storage of potato tubers is a serious and costly problem for producers and processors. The degree to which cultivars accumulate reducing sugars during storage determines their processing and market potential. Cultivars or advanced breeding lines with...

  15. Marketing potential of advanced breeding clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of reducing sugars during cold storage of potato tubers is a serious and costly problem for producers and processors. The degree to which cultivars accumulate reducing sugars during storage determines their processing and market potential. Cultivars or advanced breeding lines with...

  16. Wind energy in China: Estimating the potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiahai

    2016-07-01

    Persistent and significant curtailment has cast concern over the prospects of wind power in China. A comprehensive assessment of the production of energy from wind has identified grid-integrated wind generation potential at 11.9–14% of China's projected energy demand by 2030.

  17. Bohr Hamiltonian with time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, L.; Hassanabadi, H.; Sobhani, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, Bohr Hamiltonian has been studied with the time-dependent potential. Using the Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method appropriate dynamical invariant for this Hamiltonian has been constructed and the exact time-dependent wave functions of such a system have been derived due to this dynamical invariant.

  18. Staging the Future--Potentializing the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerg, Helle

    2013-01-01

    This article frames a qualitative analysis of how a particular actualization of independent project work may be understood as a "pedagogy of potentialization" that relies on schooling the desire to learn as creation and (self-)transgression. The framework for analyzing school as an affective space draws on conceptualizations of affect,…

  19. Efficient surface reconstruction using generalized coulomb potentials.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel, geometrically adaptive method for surface reconstruction from noisy and sparse point clouds, without orientation information. The method employs a fast convection algorithm to attract the evolving surface towards the data points. The force field in which the surface is convected is based on generalized Coulomb potentials evaluated on an adaptive grid (i.e., an octree) using a fast, hierarchical algorithm. Formulating reconstruction as a convection problem in a velocity field generated by Coulomb potentials offers a number of advantages. Unlike methods which compute the distance from the data set to the implicit surface, which are sensitive to noise due to the very reliance on the distance transform, our method is highly resilient to shot noise since global, generalized Coulomb potentials can be used to disregard the presence of outliers due to noise. Coulomb potentials represent long-range interactions that consider all data points at once, and thus they convey global information which is crucial in the fitting process. Both the spatial and temporal complexities of our spatially-adaptive method are proportional to the size of the reconstructed object, which makes our method compare favorably with respect to previous approaches in terms of speed and flexibility. Experiments with sparse as well as noisy data sets show that the method is capable of delivering crisp and detailed yet smooth surfaces.

  20. Implicit Assumptions in High Potentials Recruitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posthumus, Jan; Bozer, Gil; Santora, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Professionals of human resources (HR) use different criteria in practice than they verbalize. Thus, the aim of this research was to identify the implicit criteria used for the selection of high-potential employees in recruitment and development settings in the pharmaceutical industry. Design/methodology/approach: A semi-structured…

  1. Aerospace Power Technology for Potential Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    Aerospace technology that is being developed for space and aeronautical applications has great potential for providing technical advances for terrestrial power systems. Some recent accomplishments arising from activities being pursued at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Centers is described in this paper. Possible terrestrial applications of the new aerospace technology are also discussed.

  2. The Potential of Perspectivism for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jacob V.

    2013-01-01

    Many science teachers are presented with the challenge of characterizing science as a dynamic, human endeavour. Perspectivism, as a hermeneutic philosophy of science, has the potential to be a learning tool for teachers as they elucidate the complex nature of science. Developed earlier by Nietzsche and others, perspectivism has recently re-emerged…

  3. Positive lithiation potential on functionalized Graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv Kumar; Raghani, Pushpa

    2015-03-01

    Designing lithium batteries with high capacities is major challenge in the field of energy storage. As an alternative to the conventional graphitic anode with a capacity of ~372 mAhg-1 , we look at the adsorption of lithium on 2D graphene oxide (GO) sheets. We have included van-der-waal's interaction in our calculation and compared with literature showing its importance in Li binding on Graphene sheets. In comparison to the negative lithiation potential in prestine graphene sheets, we were able to get positive lithiation potential by introducing functional groups such as epoxy(-O-) and hydroxyl(-OH) on graphene. Also the non-stoichiometic nature of GO provides better potential to increase the lithiation potential in compare to the defects induced graphene 2D sheet. Dramatic charge redistribution within the sheet due to presence of highly electronegative oxygen plays an important role in increasing the capacity. Financial support from Research Corporation's Cottrell College Science award and National Science Foundation's CAREER award (DMR-1255584). Computational facilities provided by HPC center of Idaho National Laboratory.

  4. Spatial resolution in vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.

    2014-03-15

    The experimental spatial resolution of vector potential photoelectron microscopy is found to be much higher than expected because of the cancellation of one of the expected contributions to the point spread function. We present a new calculation of the spatial resolution with support from finite element ray tracing, and experimental results.

  5. General Potential Theory of Arbitrary Wing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, T; Garrick, I E

    1934-01-01

    This report gives the exact treatment of the problem of determining the 2-dimensional potential flow around wing sections of any type. The treatment is based directly on the solution of this problem as advanced by Theodorsen in NACA-TR-411. The problem condenses into the compact form of an integral equation capable of yielding numerical solutions by a direct process.

  6. Mapping Potential Croplands in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, T. J.; Gibbs, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    There is a growing debate about land availability in the U.S., with some proponents of biofuels suggesting a nearly endless supply of land for production, while others claim we have already reached "peak land". Until now, however, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of the extent and location of uncultivated land suitable for crop production in the U.S. We created the first spatially-explicit database of Potentially Available Cropland (PAC) in the United States by fusing NASS's Cropland Data Layer with data from the U.S. Census and Census of Agriculture, Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) data, and databases of public, private, and protected areas, while implementing rule-based decisions derived from stakeholder interviews. We considered all potential cropland, including idle land, pastureland, and areas of turf lawn that could be used for production. We then used the output maps to estimate maximum production potential and associated carbon debt for the U.S. under a range of scenarios. Preliminary results suggest that fully cultivating all PAC could increase U.S. annual corn grain production by 16 - 48 % and more than double current U.S. vegetable production. However, several economic, social, and physical constraints as well as ecological tradeoffs limit the practical expansion onto these lands. Our results will provide needed inputs to project national and global agricultural production potential, constrain estimates of direct and indirect land use change, and inform agricultural and energy policy.

  7. Ionic requirements for arterial action potential

    PubMed Central

    Keatinge, W. R.

    1968-01-01

    1. Strips of smooth muscle from common carotid arteries of sheep were electrically quiescent in solution containing Na 148 mM and Ca 2·5 mM. 2. When Ca was removed they became electrically active. Addition of low concentrations of Ca (0·025-0·075 mM) or Mg (0·025-0·750 mM) stopped their activity while ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (EDTA) (1·25 mM) accelerated it. 3. Replacement of Na by Tris or choline stopped the activity in Ca-free solution. After partial replacement of Na electrical activity could be restored by lowering the resting potential but after complete replacement of Na it could not. 4. In the presence of Ca (2·5 mM) small spikes could sometimes be induced after 20 min in Na-free Tris solution by lowering the resting potential by an increase in the external K concentration. 5. The results indicate that the depolarizing current of action potentials in this smooth muscle was largely carried by Na, although a little may have been carried by Ca in Ca-containing solutions. 6. The arteries in general resembled striated muscle rather than intestinal smooth muscle in these respects, but unlike striated muscle their action potentials were not stopped by tetrodotoxin. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5639765

  8. Potential Economic Benefits of Consumer Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Allen R.; And Others

    A study explored the potential economic impacts of a large and successful national program of consumer education. Following a literature review, a qualitative analysis was performed on a wide range of topics. The topics pertained to information and the process of consumer choice, the role of advertising, consumer sovereignty and the supply system,…

  9. The Power and Potential of Primary Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Denise N.; Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2012-01-01

    Using primary sources with students has untapped potential for expanding and deepening the reading experiences of elementary and middle grade students. Primary sources expands teachers' palette of reading materials, allows students to connect more closely to topics for learning, and deepens their understanding of the past. This article argues for…

  10. Emotion Potentiated Startle in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Elizabeth C.; Cordeiro, Lisa; Chavez, Alyssa D.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Hessl, David

    2014-01-01

    Social avoidance and anxiety are prevalent in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and are potentially mediated by the amygdala, a brain region critical for social behavior. Unfortunately, functional brain resonance imaging investigation of the amygdala in FXS is limited by the difficulties experienced by intellectually impaired and anxious participants. We…

  11. FELS FOUNDATION PROJECT FOR DEVELOPING YOUTH POTENTIAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, ROBERT A.; AND OTHERS

    THE OPERATION OF THE FELS FOUNDATION PROJECT FOR DEVELOPING YOUTH POTENTIAL IN HANFORD, CALIFORNIA, IS DESCRIBED. OF GENERAL CONCERN WAS THE PREPARATION OF CULTURALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN FOR SCHOOL EXPERIENCES AND FOR FUTURE EMPLOYMENT. A MAJOR GOAL WAS TO IMPROVE THE SELF-IMAGE OF THE CHILDREN AND TO ASSIST THE PARENTS AND CHILDREN IN PROVIDING…

  12. Spontaneous Biliteracy: Examining Latino Students' Untapped Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Luz Reyes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cultural deficit theories have long been debunked, yet Spanish continues to be treated as an impediment to Latinos' school success. With over 5 million emerging bilinguals, of which approximately 75% are Spanish speakers, Latinos' biliteracy potential should be examined as a means to support their learning. This article focuses on the spontaneous…

  13. Geothermal Energy Potential in Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryde, Philip R.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews types of geothermal energy sources in the western states, including hot brine systems and dry steam systems. Conversion to electrical energy is a major potential use of geothermal energy, although it creates environmental disruptions such as noise, corrosion, and scaling of equipment. (AV)

  14. Student Human Potential: Going beyond the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sylvia Ann

    The expansion of human potential and the accompanying increase in self-esteem and self-actualization is the key to emotional and physical health, social relations, learning problems, self-discipline, and future survival. Self-knowledge, obtained through such measures as keeping records of moods and through biomechanical devices, can enable…

  15. Pine nuts: the mycobiota and potential mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Weidenbörner, M

    2001-05-01

    The mycobiota of pine nuts was investigated. In total, 1832 fungi belonging to 31 species and 15 genera (Ascomycota, 2; Zygomycota, 3; mitosporic fungi, 10) could be isolated. Cladosporium spp. dominated the mycobiota with 685 isolations followed by Phoma macrostoma with 351 isolations. Overall, 16 potentially mycotoxigenic species were present on pine nuts.

  16. Expanding Worldwide Awareness of Creative Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellen, Hans G.; Urban, Klaus K.

    1989-01-01

    The article proposes the Test for Creative Thinking-Drawing Production as an appropriate culture-fair assessment to identifying creative potential worldwide. Fifteen sample drawings of children from around the world, all based on the same original stimuli, are provided. (DB)

  17. Gravitational potential: real-life results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium surface of a large body of water is a gravitational equipotential. However, that does not imply that in a local region of increased gravitational field g the height h of the water surface will be lower to keep the potential gh constant, in contrast to a recent claim to that effect.

  18. Health Promoting Schools: Consensus, Strategies, and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Gagnon, Faith A.; Stewart, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011 colloquium at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study where 40 people from five continents came together to share their global and regional experience surrounding…

  19. Potential Health Hazards of Video Display Terminals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William E.; And Others

    In response to a request from three California unions to evaluate potential health hazards from the use of video display terminals (VDT's) in information processing applications, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a limited field investigation of three companies in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Area. A…

  20. Macroscopic strain potentials in nonlinear porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; Zhuping, Huang

    2003-02-01

    By taking a hollow sphere as a representative volume element (RVE), the macroscopic strain potentials of porous materials with power-law incompressible matrix are studied in this paper. According to the principles of the minimum potential energy in nonlinear elasticity and the variational procedure, static admissible stress fields and kinematic admissible displacement fields are constructed, and hence the upper and the lower bounds of the macroscopic strain potential are obtained. The bounds given in the present paper differ so slightly that they both provide perfect approximations of the exact strain potential of the studied porous materials. It is also found that the upper bound proposed by previous authors is much higher than the present one, and the lower bounds given by Cocks is much lower. Moreover, the present calculation is also compared with the variational lower bound of Ponte Castañeda for statistically isotropic porous materials. Finally, the validity of the hollow spherical RVE for the studied nonlinear porous material is discussed by the difference between the present numerical results and the Cocks bound.

  1. Potential for cogeneration in distillation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mix, T.W.

    1983-02-01

    Distillation represents a major consumer of energy in the United States and is a good sump for a cogeneration facility because it represents a condensing load. The potential for cogeneration in the distillation industries (chemical plants and oil refineries) is evaluated based on discussions with knowledgeable individuals in major chemical and petroleum refining companies, in architect/engineer firms and in utilities,as well as on a review of the literature. The total potential for cogeneration in that time frame in which the price of gas and oil escalates to three to four times the price of coal is estimated as ranging from 2600 to 3750 MW in the petroleum refining industry, is estimated as 900 MW in the electrochemical industry, and as 2440 MW in the remainder of the chemical industry. Gas turbine/waste heat boiler cogeneration systems are projected as being installed in California, gas turbine with combined cycle systems are seen as being installed in the electrochemical industry, and coal-fired back-pressure steam turbine cogeneration systems are seen as being installed in the remainder of the chemical and petroleum refinery installations. The Texas Gulf coast area is seen as having the largest potential for cogeneration, but significant potential exists in California as well. Coal is seen as the dominant cogeneration fuel and the average cogeneration plant size is projected as large, with over 500,000 labs/hr of steam flow and more than 50 MW cogenerated electric power.

  2. Quantifying the transmission potential of pandemic influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowell, Gerardo; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    This article reviews quantitative methods to estimate the basic reproduction number of pandemic influenza, a key threshold quantity to help determine the intensity of interventions required to control the disease. Although it is difficult to assess the transmission potential of a probable future pandemic, historical epidemiologic data is readily available from previous pandemics, and as a reference quantity for future pandemic planning, mathematical and statistical analyses of historical data are crucial. In particular, because many historical records tend to document only the temporal distribution of cases or deaths (i.e. epidemic curve), our review focuses on methods to maximize the utility of time-evolution data and to clarify the detailed mechanisms of the spread of influenza. First, we highlight structured epidemic models and their parameter estimation method which can quantify the detailed disease dynamics including those we cannot observe directly. Duration-structured epidemic systems are subsequently presented, offering firm understanding of the definition of the basic and effective reproduction numbers. When the initial growth phase of an epidemic is investigated, the distribution of the generation time is key statistical information to appropriately estimate the transmission potential using the intrinsic growth rate. Applications of stochastic processes are also highlighted to estimate the transmission potential using similar data. Critically important characteristics of influenza data are subsequently summarized, followed by our conclusions to suggest potential future methodological improvements.

  3. Yield potential of pigeon pea cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield potential of twelve vegetable pigeon pea (Cajanus cajun) cultivars was evaluated at two locations in eastern Kenya during 2012 and 2013 cropping years. Pigeon pea pod numbers, seeds per pod, seed mass, grain yield and shelling percentage were quantified in three replicated plots, arranged in a...

  4. The Aging Mind: Potential and Limits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that research on aging mind has moved from simple growth versus decline view to conception of joint consideration of potential and limits. Sees this development illustrated by research on two categories of cognitive functioning: the cognitive mechanics (comparable to fluid intelligence) and cognitive pragmatics (comparable to crystallized…

  5. Liquid oxygen cooled bearing ignition potential assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Arthur T.; Goode, Brian K.; Owen, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump bearings have shown evidence of heavy oxidation on the surfaces of the balls and races. Extensive analyses were performed to assess the ignition potential in the bearing system during normal and off-nominal operation. Test programs and analyses were used to determine the bearing thermal condition and bearing material ignition characteristics.

  6. Information entropy of conditionally exactly solvable potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, D.; Roy, P.

    2011-03-15

    We evaluate Shannon entropy for the position and momentum eigenstates of some conditionally exactly solvable potentials which are isospectral to harmonic oscillator and whose solutions are given in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials. The Bialynicki-Birula-Mycielski inequality has also been tested for a number of states.

  7. Reader, Text, Translation, and Interpretive Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollerup, Cay; And Others

    No matter what pains translators take to produce a target-language text "identical" to the source-language text, criticism and/or translation of an original literary work cannot be the same in different language communities. That translation may change potentialities in the textual experience is particularly obvious in literature with a strong…

  8. Kindergarten Readiness Skills: Predictors of Academic Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlings, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between school readiness skills as measured by the Missouri KIDS and academic potential in reading and math as measured by the scores on the CTP4 in grades 2-4 in a private, independent school. This study identified which school readiness skills most accurately predict the need for…

  9. Portable Micros: Potentials for Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    Description of portable microcomputers discusses design features of Tandy TRS-80, Nippon Electric Company PC-8200, Epson HX-20, Texas Instruments TI CC 40, and Convergent Technologies' Workslate and provides several caveats and recommendations to those making purchasing decisions. Potential uses for portable microcomputers in education are also…

  10. The National Potential of Home Equity Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    Examined the potential effects of converting home equity into spendable income using "reverse mortgages." Analysis revealed that reverse mortgage loans could have a substantial impact on the budgets of many elderly homeowners, with impressive percentage increases in income and decreases in poverty rates. (Author/ABB)

  11. Educational Potential of Northern Canadian Native Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, R.S.

    Evidence presented in this paper indicates the existence of both general intellectual potential and differential abilities of Eskimo and Indian-Metis pupils in contrast to White classmates. A factor analytic technique is described which was used to treat data obtained from a sample of more than 1,800 students. One conclusion of the study is that a…

  12. Assessment of the allergenic potential of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Betts, Catherine J; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2003-04-11

    The development of novel foods, including foods derived from genetically modified plants, has generated considerable interest in the design and application of appropriate safety assurance measures. A specific focus of attention has been on allergenicity, and in particular the need to determine whether the products of novel genes introduced into food plants have the potential to cause allergic sensitisation. Among the approaches applied currently are considerations of whether a new protein has structural, sequence and/or antigenic similarities with known food allergens, and whether or not it displays resistance to digestion within a simulated gastric fluid, or by pepsin. Although such data are useful in an overall hazard assessment, they are neither individually, nor collectively, able to provide a direct evaluation of inherent sensitising potential. For this reason there is a need to develop and apply appropriate animal models that will offer a more holistic view of sensitising activity. Several methods have been suggested, but as yet none has been evaluated fully or validated. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and in this article an experimental approach using BALB/c strain mice in which animals are exposed to the test protein via systemic (intraperitoneal, or in certain circumstances, intradermal) administration is described. Inherent sensitising potential is measured as a function of induced IgE antibody responses. Experience to date is encouraging and the data available reveal that this method is able to distinguish between proteins of different allergenic potential.

  13. Evaluating Potential Health Risks in Relocatable Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katchen, Mark; LaPierre, Adrienne; Charlin, Cary; Brucker, Barry; Ferguson, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Only limited data exist describing potential exposures to chemical and biological agents when using portable classrooms or outlining how to assess and reduce associated health risks. Evaluating indoor air quality involves examining ventilating rates, volatile organic compounds, and microbiologicals. Open communication among key stakeholders is…

  14. The action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1988-04-01

    The intention of this investigation was to acquire more concise information about the nature of the action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis and the different types of cells generating and conducting it. It is shown by microelectrode measurements that, besides the sensory cells, all the major tissues of the trap lobes are excitable, firing action potentials with pronounced after-hyperpolarizations. The action potentials are strictly dependent on Ca(2+). Their peak depolarizations are shifted 25-27 mV in a positive direction after a tenfold increase in external Ca(2+) concentration. Perfusions with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1 mM LaCl3 completely inhibit excitability. Magnesium ions only slightly affect the peak depolarizations but considerably prolong action potentials. Sodium azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol also abolish excitation, probably by reducing the intracellular ATP concentration. Furthermore, it is tested whether the sensory cells can be distinguished from the other cells of the trap by their electrical behaviour. The resting potentials of sensory cells (-161±7 mV) and mesophyll cells (-155±8 mV) are of the same magnitude. Changes in external ion concentrations affect resting and action potentials in both cell types in a similar way. Additional freeze-fracture studies of both cell types reveal similar numbers and distributions of intramembrane particles on the fracture faces of the plasma membrane, which is most likely the mechanosensor. These findings stress the view that the high mechanosensitivity of the sensory hair results from its anatomy and not from a specialized perception mechanism. It is proposed that trap closure is triggered by a rise in the cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) or a Ca(2+)-activated regulatory complex, which must exceed a threshold concentration. Since the Ca(2+) influx during a single action potential does not suffice to reach this threshold, at least two stimulations

  15. Evaluation of groundwater potential using geospatial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Abdul-Aziz; Govindu, Vanum; Nigusse, Amare Gebre Medhin

    2016-06-01

    The issue of unsustainable groundwater utilization is becoming increasingly an evident problem and the key concern for many developing countries. One of the problems is the absence of updated spatial information on the quantity and distribution of groundwater resource. Like the other developing countries, groundwater evaluation in Ethiopia has been usually conducted using field survey which is not feasible in terms of time and resource. This study was conducted in Northern Ethiopia, Wollo Zone, in Gerardo River Catchment district to spatially delineate the groundwater potential areas using geospatial and MCDA tools. To do so, eight major biophysical and environmental factors like geomorphology, lithology, slope, rainfall, land use land cover (LULC), soil, lineament density and drainage density were considered. The sources of these data were satellite image, digital elevation model (DEM), existing thematic maps and metrological station data. Landsat image was used in ERDAS Imagine to drive the LULC of the area, while the geomorphology, soil, and lithology of the area were identified and classified through field survey and digitized from existing maps using the ArcGIS software. The slope, lineament and drainage density of the area were derived from DEM using spatial analysis tools. The rainfall surface map was generated using the thissen polygon interpolation. Finally, after all these thematic maps were organized, weighted value determination for each factor and its field value was computed using IDRSI software. At last, all the factors were integrated together and computed the model using the weighted overlay so that potential groundwater areas were mapped. The findings depicted that the most potential groundwater areas are found in the central and eastern parts of the study area, while the northern and western parts of the Gerado River Catchment have poor potential of groundwater availability. This is mainly due to the cumulative effect of steep topographic and

  16. Drought, Climate Change and Potential Agricultural Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, J.; Herrera-Estrada, J. E.; Caylor, K. K.; Wood, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    Drought is a major factor in agricultural productivity, especially in developing regions where the capacity for water resources management is limited and climate variability ensures that drought is recurrent and problematic. Recent events in East Africa are testament to this, where drought conditions that have slowly developed over multiple years have contributed to reduced productivity and ultimately food crises and famine. Prospects for the future are not promising given ongoing problems of dwindling water supplies from non-renewable sources and the potential for increased water scarcity and increased drought with climate change. This is set against the expected increase in population by over 2 billion people by 2050 and rise in food demand, coupled with changes in demographics that affect food choices and increases in non-food agriculture. In this talk we discuss the global variability of drought over the 20th century and recent years, and the projected changes over the 21st century, and how this translates into changes in potential agricultural productivity. Drought is quantified using land surface hydrological models driven by a hybrid reanalysis-observational meteorological forcing dataset. Drought is defined in terms of anomalies of hydroclimatic variables, in particular precipitation, evaporation and soil moisture, and we calculate changes in various drought characteristics. Potential agricultural productivity is derived from the balance of precipitation to crop water demand, where demand is based on potential evaporation and crop coefficients for a range of staple crops. Some regional examples are shown of historic variations in drought and potential productivity, and the estimated water deficit for various crops. The multitude of events over the past decade, including heat waves in Europe, fires in Russia, long-term drought in northern China, southeast Australia, the Western US and a series of droughts in the Amazon and Argentina, hint at the influence of

  17. Mapping ecosystem services potential in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depellegrin, Daniel; Misiune, Ieva; Pereira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) are understood as the benefits that humans get from ecosystems functions. They are divided in providing, regulating, supporting and cultural. The correct management of ES is fundamental to achieve sustainable development goals. A good assessment of ES potential can be obtained using GIS techniques, in order to have a spatial dimension of ES distribution. This will help to have a better territorial planning, improve ES capacity, and have more benefits. ES potential analysis can be carried out based on the ES matrix developed by Burkhard et al. (2009). This method is based on the attribution a rank from 0 to 5 (0= no capacity to 5=very high relevant capacity) to the land use classes of the corine land cover (CLC). This represents an important advantage since a determined land use can be related with a certain number of services. The objective of this work is to Map the ES potential in Lithuania. The results showed that Lithuania has a high potential for regulating services, followed by cultural and provisioning services. Urban areas provide a very small amount of services, contrary to forest, where the highest potential is observed. The most comon land covers in Lithuania are non-irrigated arable land, complex cultivation patterns, mixed and coniferous forest. Total and regulating and cultural ES had dispersed pattern showing that they are scattered in the territory. They are located mainly in forested and coastal areas. In relation to provisioning services they had a clustered distribution, and they were mainly observed in the central part of Lithuania. References Burkhard B, Kroll F, Müller F, Windhorst W. 2009. Landscapes' capacities to provide ecosystem services - a concept for land-cover based assessments. Landsc. Online. 15:1-22

  18. An eddy closure for potential vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ringler, Todd D

    2009-01-01

    The Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is extended to include a direct influence in the momentum equation. The extension is carried out in two stages; an analysis of the inviscid system is followed by an analysis of the viscous system. In the inviscid analysis the momentum equation is modified such that potential vorticity is conserved along particle trajectories following a transport velocity that includes the Bolus velocity in a manner exactly analogous to the continuity and tracer equations. In addition (and in contrast to traditional GM closures), the new formulation of the inviscid momentum equation results in a conservative exchange between potential and kinetic forms of energy. The inviscid form of the eddy closure conserves total energy to within an error proportional to the time derivative of the Bolus velocity. The hypothesis that the viscous term in the momentum equation should give rise to potential vorticity being diffused along isopycnals in a manner analogous to other tracers is examined in detail. While the form of the momentum closure that follows from a strict adherence to this hypothesis is not immediately interpretable within the constructs of traditional momentum closures, three approximations to this hypothesis results in a form of dissipation that is consistent with traditional Laplacian diffusion. The first two approximations are that relative vorticity, not potential vorticity, is diffused along isopyncals and that the flow is in approximate geostrophic balance. An additional approximation to the Jacobian term is required when the dissipation coefficient varies in space. More importantly, the critique of this hypothesis results in the conclusion that the viscosity parameter in the momentum equation should be identical to the tradition GM closure parameter {Kappa}. Overall, we deem the viscous form of the eddy closure for potential vorticity as a viable closure for use in ocean circulation models.

  19. Exploration potential of offshore northern California basins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    A series of exploratory wells was drilled in the northern California offshore basins in the 1960s following leasing of federal tracts off northern California, Oregon, and Washington. The drilling, although encountering numerous oil shows, was considered at the time to indicate low prospectivity in an area that extended as far south as the offshore Santa Maria basin. However, subsequent major discoveries in this decade in the offshore Santa Maria basin, such as the Point Arguello field, indicate that these offshore basins may be highly prospective exploration targets. Many of the key features of Monterey production in central and southern California are also present in the offshore basins of northern California. A new 5-year leasing plan has scheduled leasing in the northern California OCS starting in early 1989. The first basins on the schedule, the Point Arena and Eel River basins, differ in some respects. The Point Arena basin is more typical of a Monterey basin, with the potential for fractured chert reservoirs and organic-rich sections, deep burial of basinal sections to enhance the generation of higher gravity oils, and complex folding and faulting. The Eel River basin is more clastic-rich in its gas-producing, onshore extension. Key questions in the Eel River basin include whether the offshore, more distal stratigraphy will include Monterey-like biogenic sediments, and whether the basin has oil potential in addition to its proven gas potential. The Outer Santa Cruz basin shares a similar stratigraphy, structure, and hydrocarbon potential with the Point Arena basin. The Santa Cruz-Bodega basin, also with a similar stratigraphy, may have less exploration potential because erosion has thinned the Monterey section in parts of the basin.

  20. Statically screened ion potential and Bohm potential in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Schoof, Tim; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-10-15

    The effective potential Φ of a classical ion in a weakly correlated quantum plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature is well described by the random phase approximation screened Coulomb potential. Additionally, collision effects can be included via a relaxation time ansatz (Mermin dielectric function). These potentials are used to study the quality of various statically screened potentials that were recently proposed by Shukla and Eliasson (SE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165007 (2012)], Akbari-Moghanjoughi (AM) [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022103 (2015)], and Stanton and Murillo (SM) [Phys. Rev. E 91, 033104 (2015)] starting from quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. Our analysis reveals that the SE potential is qualitatively different from the full potential, whereas the SM potential (at any temperature) and the AM potential (at zero temperature) are significantly more accurate. This confirms the correctness of the recently derived [Michta et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 55, 437 (2015)] pre-factor 1/9 in front of the Bohm term of QHD for fermions.

  1. Scattering solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation for a step potential with hyperbolic tangent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Clara

    2014-09-01

    We solve the Klein-Gordon equation for a step potential with hyperbolic tangent potential. The scattering solutions are derived in terms of hypergeometric functions. The reflection coefficient R and transmission coefficient T are calculated, we observed superradiance and transmission resonances.

  2. MAGNETOMETRY, SELF-POTENTIAL, AND SEISMIC - ADDITIONAL GEOPHYSICAL METHODS HAVING POTENTIALLY SIGNIFICANT FUTURE UTILIZATION IN AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods can provide important information in agricultural settings, and the use of these techniques are becoming more and more widespread. Magnetrometry, self-potential, and seismic are three geophysical methods, all of which have the potential for substantial future use in agriculture, ...

  3. A novel potential: the interlayer potential for the fcc (111) plane family.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fu-Yang; Chen, Nan-Xian; Shen, Jiang; Vitos, Levente

    2012-02-01

    We propose a novel interlayer potential, which is different from usual interatomic potentials. The interlayer potential represents the interaction between atomic layers in a layered material. Based on the Chen-Möbius inversion method in combination with ab initio calculations, the interlayer interactions are obtained for the face centered cubic (fcc) (111) planes. In order to check the validity of our interlayer potential, we calculate the intrinsic stacking fault energy (γ(sf)) and the surface energy (γ(s)) of five metals: Al, Ni, Cu, Ag and Au. The predicted γ(sf) and γ(s) values are compared with the theoretical results obtained from direct calculations and also with the available experimental data. Using the interlayer potentials, we also investigate the phonon dispersion and phonon density of state in the fcc (111) plane family of the considered metals.

  4. Acousto-optically generated potential energy landscapes: potential mapping using colloids under flow.

    PubMed

    Juniper, Michael P N; Besseling, Rut; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Dullens, Roel P A

    2012-12-17

    Optical potential energy landscapes created using acousto-optical deflectors are characterized via solvent-driven colloidal particles. The full potential energy of both single optical traps and complex landscapes composed of multiple overlapping traps are determined using a simple force balance argument. The potential of a single trap is shown to be well described by a Gaussian trap with stiffness found to be consistent with those obtained by a thermal equilibrium method. We also obtain directly the depth of the well, which (as with stiffness) varies with laser power. Finally, various complex systems ranging from double-well potentials to random landscapes are generated from individually controlled optical traps. Predictions of these landscapes as a sum of single Gaussian wells are shown to be a good description of experimental results, offering the potential for fully controlled design of optical landscapes, constructed from single optical traps.

  5. Biosensoric potential of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás; Rákhely, Gábor; Czeller, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Recent progress in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has highlighted the potential of these devices to be used as biosensors. The advantages of MFC-based biosensors are that they are phenotypic and can function in either assay- or flow-through formats. These features make them appropriate for contiguous on-line monitoring in laboratories and for in-field applications. The selectivity of an MFC biosensor depends on the applied microorganisms in the anodic compartment where electron transfer (ET) between the artificial surface (anode) and bacterium occurs. This process strongly determines the internal resistance of the sensoric system and thus influences signal outcome and response time. Despite their beneficial characteristics, the number of MFC-based biosensoric applications has been limited until now. The aim of this mini-review is to turn attention to the biosensoric potential of MFCs by summarizing ET mechanisms on which recently established and future sensoric devices are based.

  6. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schroedinger equation must be solved. Our approach starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wave functions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Dynamical electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. With this approach, we are able to provide chemically useful predictions of the energetics for many systems. A second aspect of this program is the development of techniques to fit multi-dimensional potential surfaces to convenient, global, analytic functions that can then be used in dynamics calculations.

  7. Matching universal behavior with potential models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, R.; Deltuva, A.; Gattobigio, M.; Kievsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    Two-, three-, and four-boson systems are studied close to the unitary limit using potential models constructed to reproduce the minimal information given by the two-body scattering length a and the two-body binding energy or virtual-state energy E2. The particular path used to reach the unitary limit is given by varying the potential strength. In this way the energy spectrum in the three- and four-boson systems is computed. The lowest-energy states show finite-range effects absorbed in the construction of level functions that can be used to study real systems. Higher-energy levels are free from finite-range effects, therefore the corresponding level functions tend to the zero-range universal function. Using this property, a zero-range equation for the four-boson system is proposed and the four-boson universal function is computed.

  8. Perils and potentials in qualitative psychology.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2015-06-01

    Famously, Ebbinghaus declared that psychology has a long past, but only a short history. Psychology, as something implicit to human conduct, is as old as the human race, but the science, as an explicit investigative reflection upon that conduct, is a recent invention. Within the short history of psychology, we find an even shorter history of qualitative psychology specifically. Although most founding fathers (Freud, Piaget, Bartlett etc.) worked as "qualitative psychologists", they found no need to thematize their methods of inquiry in this manner. Since around 1980, however, a field has established itself that can be called qualitative psychology. In this paper, I discuss how this field can move sensibly into the future, and I highlight two perils and two potentials. The perils stem from neo-positivism and a threatening "McDonaldization" of qualitative research, while the potentials are related to proliferation of new forms of inquiry and a transcending of disciplinary boundaries. PMID:25537956

  9. Nuclear waste disposal: potential property value impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hageman, R.K.

    1981-10-01

    Hedonic price theory was employed to show that although negative impacts on property values may occur due to perceived risks of locating proximate to nuclear facilities or waste transport routes, these impacts may be over-shadowed by offsetting effects. The possibility of property value impacts occurring in combination tends to confound results derived from statistical property value studies, and an effort was made in the analysis to collect data on potential property value impacts through interviews based on systematic group judgement. The approach succeeded in identifying instances where property value loss has been claimed, and in some cases the loss was attributed to the fear generated by proximity to potential nuclear hazards. The lack of evidence does not allow for conclusions. (JMT)

  10. Potential Modulation on Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Niu, Yu; Viana, A S; Correia, Jorge P; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical-total internal reflection ellipsometry (EC-TIRE) has been proposed as a technique to observe the redox reactions on the electrode surface due to its high phase sensitivity to the electrolyte/electrode interface. In this paper, we mainly focus on the influence of the potential modulation on the TIRE response. The analysis suggests that both dielectric constant variation of gold and the electric double layer transformation would modulate the reflection polarization of the surface. For a nonfaradaic process, the signal of TIRE would be proportional to the potential modulation. To testify the analysis, linear sweep voltammetry and open circuit measurement have been performed. The results strongly support the system analysis. PMID:26889871

  11. Neopterin as a potential cytoprotective brain molecule.

    PubMed

    Ghisoni, Karina; Martins, Roberta de Paula; Barbeito, Luis; Latini, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Neopterin, a byproduct of the tetrahydrobiopterin de novo pathway, is found in increased levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma and significantly increases upon damage, infection or during immune system activation. The production of this compound seems almost restricted to the monocyte/macrophage linage cells, in response to interferon-γ stimulation. However, it is unclear whether and which nervous cells are able to synthesize neopterin, respond to any stressor applied extracellularly, or even the role of the compound in the central nervous system. Here we propose a potential cytoprotective role of neopterin in the brain, and show evidence that cultured rat astrocytes are responsive to the molecule; the pterin elicited increased hemeoxygenase-1 cellular content and decreased oxidative stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. Further studies are needed to clarify neopterin's cytoprotective effects in the central nervous system, and its potential role in different neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:26476490

  12. The Stark effect in linear potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z > 0 and V(z) = ∞ for z < 0) and the symmetric linear potential (given by V(z) = F|z|). We show how straightforward use of the most obvious properties of the Airy function solutions and simple Taylor expansions gives closed form results for the Stark shifts in both systems. These exact results are then compared to other approximation techniques, such as perturbation theory and WKB methods. These expressions add to the small number of closed-form descriptions available for the Stark effect in model quantum mechanical systems.

  13. Theoretical determinations of ionization potentials of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. F.; Yu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of nine conformers of dopamine in the gas phase are determined using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 methods and high level ab initio HF method with 6-311++G** basis set, respectively. And the nine stable cationic states have been found in the ionization process of dopamine. Vertical ionization potentials of nine conformers of dopamine are calculated using the older outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) calculations at 6-311++G** basis set. Vibrational frequencies and infrared spectrum intensities of G1b and G1b+ at B3LYP/6-311++G** level are discussed.

  14. [Online-gambling - new hazard potential?].

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Kurosch; Yazdi, Karin

    2014-12-01

    Since the new American psychiatric classification, DSM V, was released, bringing together substance-related disorders and gambling disorder into one chapter, the addictive potential of gambling and sports wagering is beyond all question. Even the neurobiological processes of the brain show similarities in all addictive disorders. Gambling is more and more shifted into the cyberspace owing to the global expansion of the internet. The addictive potential of online-gambling seems to be higher than offline, though, which is also reflected by the patient population of the outpatient clinic for gambling addiction in Linz. This fact poses a challenge for the persons affected, therapists, gambling providers, legislator the society as a whole. PMID:25377378

  15. Potential flow about elongated bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1936-01-01

    This report presents a method of solving the problem of axial and transverse potential flows around arbitrary elongated bodies of revolution. The solutions of Laplace's equation for the velocity potentials of the axial and transverse flows, the system of coordinates being an elliptic one in a meridian plane, are given. The theory is applied to a body of revolution obtained from a symmetrical Joukowsky profile, a shape resembling an airship hull. The pressure distribution and the transverse-force distribution are calculated and serve as examples of the procedure to be followed in the case of an actual airship. A section on the determination of inertia coefficients is also included in which the validity of some earlier work is questioned.

  16. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  17. Formation of v-shaped potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1983-06-01

    The V-shaped potential structures formed by the injection of a non-neutral electron current into a cold background plasma were simulated numerically. The injection disturbs the initial quasi-neutral plasma, leading to the excitation of strong turbulences which heat the plasma. This leads to expulsion of the plasma from the simulation region. Due to ambipolar electric fields the current injection is interrupted and the initial background plasma is extracted from the system. A particle composition with the characteristics of the two plasma reservoirs now represents the plasma in the simulation region. The interaction of the electron beam with this plasma excites turbulences of smaller amplitudes. A nearly constant time averaged potential drop with nonstationary distribution develops across the system. Single and multiple double layers may form for the duration of one ion plasma period.

  18. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  19. Potential seen on Australia's Bonaparte exploration acreage

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.; Miyazaki, S. )

    1994-09-12

    Two of the offshore areas recently released for exploration bids by the Australian government are NT94-1 and NT94-2 covering 23,000 sq km in the oil producing Bonaparte basin off northwestern Australia 300 km northwest of Darwin. Three wells have been drilled in the two areas, including Evans Shoal-1 which made a gas discovery currently considered to be non-commercial. The results of a study by the Australian Bureau of Resource Sciences (BRS) have been synthesized into the Evans Shoal Area Bulletin and Data Base. BRS interprets the available geochemical and maturation data to indicate that potential source rocks are present in the Jurassic Plover formation and Flamingo group and the Cretaceous Bathurst Island group. The paper describes the area geology, play types, and gas and oil potential.

  20. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  1. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  2. Introduction to wakefields and wake potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    What are wakefields and wake potentials, and why are these concepts useful in the physics of linear accelerators and storage rings We approach this question by first reviewing the basic physical concepts which underlie the mathematical formalism. We then present a summary of the various techniques that have been developed to make detailed calculations of wake potentials. Finally, we give some applications to current problems of interest in accelerator physics. No attempt at completeness can be made in an introductory article of modest length. Rather, we try to give a broad overview and to list key references for more detailed study. It will also be apparent that the last chapter on this subject, with all the loose ends neatly tied up, has yet to be written. There are subtle points, there are controversial questions, and active calculations to resolve these questions are continuing at the time of this writing. 61 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Strained Hydrocarbons as Potential Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A storable combination of high-energy hypergolic fuel and oxidizer is advantageous to the future of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). The combination will allow an increase in energy per unit volume of fuel and eliminate the need for an external ignition system. Strained systems have been studied as potential high-density fuels. Adding hypergolic functional groups, such as amino groups, to these hydrocarbons will potentially allow auto ignition of strained systems with hydrogen peroxide. Several straight chain amines and their strained counterparts containing an equivalent number of carbon atoms have been purchased and synthesized. These amines provide initial studies to determine the effects of fuel vapor pressure, strain energy, fuel miscibility, and amine substitution upon fuel ignition time and hypergolicity with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizer.

  4. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  5. Blocking of potentiation of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hall, Geoffrey; Rodriguez, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We present a theory of latent inhibition based on the Pearce-Hall (Pearce & Hall, 1980) model for classical conditioning. Its central features are (1) that the associability of a stimulus declines as it comes to predict its consequences and (2) that nonreinforced exposure to a stimulus engages an associative learning process that makes the stimulus an accurate predictor of its consequences (in this case, the occurrence of no event). A formalization of this theory is shown to accommodate the finding that preexposure in compound with another cue can potentiate latent inhibition to the target cue. It further predicts that preexposure to the added cue will eliminate the potentiation effect. An experiment using rats and the flavor-aversion procedure confirmed this prediction.

  6. Baby Skyrme models without a potential term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Jennifer; Haberichter, Mareike; Krusch, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    We develop a one-parameter family of static baby Skyrme models that do not require a potential term to admit topological solitons. This is a novel property as the standard baby Skyrme model must contain a potential term in order to have stable soliton solutions, though the Skyrme model does not require this. Our new models satisfy an energy bound that is linear in terms of the topological charge and can be saturated in an extreme limit. They also satisfy a virial theorem that is shared by the Skyrme model. We calculate the solitons of our new models numerically and observe that their form depends significantly on the choice of parameter. In one extreme, we find compactons while at the other there is a scale invariant model in which solitons can be obtained exactly as solutions to a Bogomolny equation. We provide an initial investigation into these solitons and compare them with the baby Skyrmions of other models.

  7. Perils and potentials in qualitative psychology.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2015-06-01

    Famously, Ebbinghaus declared that psychology has a long past, but only a short history. Psychology, as something implicit to human conduct, is as old as the human race, but the science, as an explicit investigative reflection upon that conduct, is a recent invention. Within the short history of psychology, we find an even shorter history of qualitative psychology specifically. Although most founding fathers (Freud, Piaget, Bartlett etc.) worked as "qualitative psychologists", they found no need to thematize their methods of inquiry in this manner. Since around 1980, however, a field has established itself that can be called qualitative psychology. In this paper, I discuss how this field can move sensibly into the future, and I highlight two perils and two potentials. The perils stem from neo-positivism and a threatening "McDonaldization" of qualitative research, while the potentials are related to proliferation of new forms of inquiry and a transcending of disciplinary boundaries.

  8. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  9. Beaked whale auditory evoked potential hearing measurements.

    PubMed

    Cook, Mandy L H; Varela, René A; Goldstein, Juli D; McCulloch, Stephen D; Bossart, Gregory D; Finneran, James J; Houser, Dorian; Mann, David A

    2006-05-01

    Several mass strandings of beaked whales have recently been correlated with military exercises involving mid-frequency sonar highlighting unknowns regarding hearing sensitivity in these species. We report the hearing abilities of a stranded juvenile beaked whale (Mesoplodon europaeus) measured with auditory evoked potentials. The beaked whale's modulation rate transfer function (MRTF) measured with a 40-kHz carrier showed responses up to an 1,800 Hz amplitude modulation (AM) rate. The MRTF was strongest at the 1,000 and 1,200 Hz AM rates. The envelope following response (EFR) input-output functions were non-linear. The beaked whale was most sensitive to high frequency signals between 40 and 80 kHz, but produced smaller evoked potentials to 5 kHz, the lowest frequency tested. The beaked whale hearing range and sensitivity are similar to other odontocetes that have been measured.

  10. Probing quintessence potential with future cosmological surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2014-03-01

    Quintessence, a scalar field model, has been proposed to account for the acceleration of the Universe at present. We discuss how accurately quintessence models are discriminated by future cosmological surveys, which include experiments of CMB, galaxy clustering, weak lensing, and the type Ia SNe surveys, by making use of the conventional parameterized dark energy models. We can see clear differences between the thawing and the freezing quintessence models at more than 1σ (2σ) confidence level as long as the present equation of state for quintessence is away from -1 as wXgtrsim-0.95(-0.90). However, it is found to be difficult to probe the effective mass squared for the potential in thawing models, whose signs are different between the quadratic and the cosine-type potentials. This fact may require us to invent a new estimator to distinguish quintessence models beyond the thawing and the freezing ones.

  11. Investigation of immiscible systems and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markworth, A. J.; Oldfield, W.; Duga, J.; Gelles, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The droplet coalescence kinetics at 0 g and 1 g were considered for two systems which contained liquid droplets in a host liquid. One of these (Al-In) typified a system containing a liquid phase miscibility gap and the order (oil-water) a mixture of two essentially insoluble liquids. A number of coalescence mechanisms potentially prominent at low g in this system were analyzed and explanations are presented for the observed unusual stability of the emulsion. Ground base experiments were conducted on the coalescence of In droplets in and Al-In alloy during cooling through the miscibility gap at different cooling rates. These were in qualitative agreement with the computer simulation. Potential applications for systems with liquid phase miscibility gaps were explored. Possibilities included superconductors, electrical contact materials, superplastic materials, catalysts, magnetic materials, and others. The role of space processing in their production was also analyzed.

  12. Bacteriocins: Recent Trends and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Bali, Vandana; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manab B; Kennedy, John F

    2016-01-01

    In the modern era, there is great need for food preservation in both developing and developed countries due to increasing demand for extending shelf life and prevention of spoilage of food material. With the emergence of new pathogens and ability of micro-organisms to undergo changes, exploration of new avenues for the food preservation has gained importance. Moreover, awareness among consumers regarding harmful effects of chemical preservatives has been increased. Globally, altogether there is increasing demand by consumers for chemical-free and minimal processed food products. Potential of bacteriocin and its application in reducing the microbiological spoilages and in the preservation of food is long been recognized. Bacteriocins are normally specific to closely related species without disrupting the growth of other microbial populations. A number of applications of bacteriocin have been reported for humans, live stock, aquaculture etc. This review is focused on recent trends and applications of bacteriocins in different areas in addition to their biopreservative potential.

  13. Global dynamics in the singular logarithmic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Cristina; Font, Andreea

    2003-07-01

    We present an analytical description of the motion in the singular logarithmic potential of the form Phi = ln surdx21/b2 + x22, a potential which plays an important role in the modelling of triaxial systems (such as elliptical galaxies) or bars in the centres of galaxy discs. In order to obtain information about the motion near the singularity, we resort to McGehee-type transformations and regularize the vector field. In the axis-symmetric case (b = 1), we offer a complete description of the global dynamics. In the non-axis-symmetric case (b < 1), we prove that all orbits, with the exception of a negligible set, are centrophobic and retrieve numerically partial aspects of the orbital structure.

  14. Bertrand spacetimes as Kepler/oscillator potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Ángel; Enciso, Alberto; Herranz, Francisco J.; Ragnisco, Orlando

    2008-08-01

    Perlick's classification of (3 + 1)-dimensional spherically symmetric and static spacetimes \\big({\\cal M},\\eta=-{\\frac{1}{V}} {d} t^2+g\\big) for which the classical Bertrand theorem holds (Perlick V 1992 Class. Quantum Grav. 9 1009) is revisited. For any Bertrand spacetime ({\\cal M},\\eta) the term V(r) is proven to be either the intrinsic Kepler Coulomb or the harmonic oscillator potential on its associated Riemannian 3-manifold (M, g). Among the latter 3-spaces (M, g) we explicitly identify the three classical Riemannian spaces of constant curvature, a generalization of a Darboux space and the Iwai Katayama spaces generalizing the MIC Kepler and Taub NUT problems. The key dynamical role played by the Kepler and oscillator potentials in Euclidean space is thus extended to a wide class of three-dimensional curved spaces.

  15. Dynamic Aspects of Cochlear Microphonic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; van der Heijden, Marcel

    2011-11-01

    Cochlear microphonic potentials were recorded from the Mongolian gerbil in response to low-frequency auditory stimuli. Provided that contamination of the potentials by the phase-locked neurophonic is avoided, these recordings can be interpreted "as if recorded from a single outer hair cell". It is found that the instantaneous I/O-curves resemble the well-known Boltzmann activation curve. The dynamic aspect of the I/O-curves does reveal hysteresis and a level-dependent gain that is not observed in static measures of these curves. We explore a model that simulates CM generation from hair cell populations, but find it inadequate to reproduce the data. Rather, there seem to be fast, adaptive mechanisms probably at the level of the transduction channels themselves.

  16. Cratering reservoir potential by impact cratering

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.H.

    1996-12-31

    Impact craters are gaining increasing acceptance and value as sites for potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. Nevertheless, such structures are often difficult to interpret and assess because their physical expressions from physical data have few exposed terrestrial analogs for comparison. Observational, theoretical, and experimental studies directed - toward understanding the nature of well-preserved craters on other planets, however, establish a two-dimensional template for understanding and interpreting the three-dimensional view, critical or assessing hydrocarbon potentials. But terminology often used in describing an impact structure needs to be placed in a process context. Impact craters are not produced instantaneously but evolve through time. The process occurs in three different stages of formation corresponding to the transfer of kinetic energy: compression, excavation, and modification. The compression stage roughly corresponds to the time required for transfer of energy from impactor to target and is reflected in the formation of a central penetration zone in smaller craters and the central uplift in larger craters often called the {open_quotes}central plug, diapir, brecciated core, or distributed zone{close_quotes}. The excavation stage occurs as the cratering flow field draws material downward near the center and outward from the cavity. Traps are created stratigraphically inside (shock-disrupted rock and depositional capping) or outside (inverted stratigraphy, fractured/fault target, porous ejecta) as well as structurally inside (uplift, wall terraces) or outside (concentric listric faults or seismically triggered failure). Larger complex craters create greater potential traps. Consequently, potential reserve can be created during each stage but the most important criteria remains the realtors motto: location, location, location!

  17. Cratering reservoir potential by impact cratering

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Impact craters are gaining increasing acceptance and value as sites for potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. Nevertheless, such structures are often difficult to interpret and assess because their physical expressions from physical data have few exposed terrestrial analogs for comparison. Observational, theoretical, and experimental studies directed - toward understanding the nature of well-preserved craters on other planets, however, establish a two-dimensional template for understanding and interpreting the three-dimensional view, critical or assessing hydrocarbon potentials. But terminology often used in describing an impact structure needs to be placed in a process context. Impact craters are not produced instantaneously but evolve through time. The process occurs in three different stages of formation corresponding to the transfer of kinetic energy: compression, excavation, and modification. The compression stage roughly corresponds to the time required for transfer of energy from impactor to target and is reflected in the formation of a central penetration zone in smaller craters and the central uplift in larger craters often called the [open quotes]central plug, diapir, brecciated core, or distributed zone[close quotes]. The excavation stage occurs as the cratering flow field draws material downward near the center and outward from the cavity. Traps are created stratigraphically inside (shock-disrupted rock and depositional capping) or outside (inverted stratigraphy, fractured/fault target, porous ejecta) as well as structurally inside (uplift, wall terraces) or outside (concentric listric faults or seismically triggered failure). Larger complex craters create greater potential traps. Consequently, potential reserve can be created during each stage but the most important criteria remains the realtors motto: location, location, location

  18. Global evaluation of biofuel potential from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Moody, Jeffrey W; McGinty, Christopher M; Quinn, Jason C

    2014-06-10

    In the current literature, the life cycle, technoeconomic, and resource assessments of microalgae-based biofuel production systems have relied on growth models extrapolated from laboratory-scale data, leading to a large uncertainty in results. This type of simplistic growth modeling overestimates productivity potential and fails to incorporate biological effects, geographical location, or cultivation architecture. This study uses a large-scale, validated, outdoor photobioreactor microalgae growth model based on 21 reactor- and species-specific inputs to model the growth of Nannochloropsis. This model accurately accounts for biological effects such as nutrient uptake, respiration, and temperature and uses hourly historical meteorological data to determine the current global productivity potential. Global maps of the current near-term microalgae lipid and biomass productivity were generated based on the results of annual simulations at 4,388 global locations. Maximum annual average lipid yields between 24 and 27 m(3)·ha(-1)·y(-1), corresponding to biomass yields of 13 to 15 g·m(-2)·d(-1), are possible in Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Saudi Arabia. The microalgae lipid productivity results of this study were integrated with geography-specific fuel consumption and land availability data to perform a scalability assessment. Results highlight the promising potential of microalgae-based biofuels compared with traditional terrestrial feedstocks. When water, nutrients, and CO2 are not limiting, many regions can potentially meet significant fractions of their transportation fuel requirements through microalgae production, without land resource restriction. Discussion focuses on sensitivity of monthly variability in lipid production compared with annual average yields, effects of temperature on productivity, and a comparison of results with previous published modeling assumptions.

  19. MIS silicon solar cells: potential advantages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheek, G.; Mertens, R.

    1981-05-01

    Recent progress with silicon solar cells based on the MIS or SIS structure is reviewed. To be competitive with pn junction technology in the near term, these cells must be much cheaper or have a higher efficiency in a production environment. Apparently, the minority carrier MIS cells have the greatest potential for large-scale applications. The data currently indicate that all types of MIS/SIS cells have some inherent instability problems.

  20. Anticancer potential of selected Fallopia Adans species

    PubMed Central

    OLARU, OCTAVIAN TUDOREL; VENABLES, LUANNE; VAN DE VENTER, MARYNA; NITULESCU, GEORGE MIHAI; MARGINA, DENISA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the anticancer potential of three species belonging to the Fallopia genus (Polygonaceae): Fallopia convolvulus (F. convolvulus, Fallopia dumetorum (F. dumetorum) and Fallopia aubertii (F. aubertii). For this purpose, crude extracts were obtained and characterized for their phenolic and flavonoid total content and examined for their anticancer activity on three tumor cell lines: breast cancer (MCF7), colon carcinoma (Caco-2) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. The cytotoxic potential of the three species was assessed by MTT assay, cell cycle analysis and by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The acute toxicity of the extracts was evaluated using one in vitro cell model (Vero cells, an African Green monkey kidney cell line) and two invertebrate in vivo models (Daphnia magna and Artemia salina). The highest total phenolic and flavonoid content was found in the F. aubertii flower extracts. The cytotoxic effects of the extracts from F. aubertii and F. convolvulus on all three cell lines were examined at concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 µg/ml. G2/M cell cycle arrest was induced by all the extracts, and a significant increase in the subG1 cell population was observed. The hydroethanolic extract from the flowers of F. aubertii induced cell apoptosis more rapidly than the other extracts. The MMP indicates the involvement of the mitochondria in the induction of apoptosis. A positive correlation between the total phenolic content of the extracts and the IC50 values against the HeLa cells was also noted. None of the extracts exhibited significantly toxic effects. Considering the antitumor potential of F. aubertii and F. convolvulus, these two species may represent a good source of plant extracts with anticancer properties. PMID:26622671

  1. Additional potential for older, Antrim Shale wells

    SciTech Connect

    Frantz, J.H. Jr.; Hopkins, C.W.; Hill, D.G.

    1995-09-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been performing evaluations to estimate the recompletion and restimulation potential in older, Antrim Shale wells. The recompletion potential is two-fold: (1) wells that can be deepened to the productive Norwood interval, and (2) wells with Upper Antrim potential. There are also numerous restimulation candidates due to sand flowback and/or other problems. The Antrim Shale is an organic-rich naturally fractured formation which produces both gas and water. Operators today typically complete the Lachine and Norwood intervals but many older wells were not drilled deep enough to encounter to Norwood. We performed an evaluation to determine the optimal deepening method using actual and simulated data. We estimate there are over 500 deepening candidates with total potential reserve additions of 50 Bscf. The Upper antrim formation can be added in approximately 1,500 existing wells throughout several counties. This interval is uphole from the Lachine and Norwood. In this phase of the project, we collected production and reservoir data from several Upper Antrim tests across the basin. We estimate the Upper Antrim could add total new reserves of 100 to 200 Bscf from al the recompletion candidates across the basin. In the restimulation evaluation, we developed a novel injection test unit to help operators identify the best restimulation candidates in a cost effective manner. The injection test determines if an effective hydraulic fracture is connected to the wellbore. Based on 60 test wells, we estimate the restimulations could add 50 to 200 Bscf of future reserves from the 500 to 1,000 candidate wells.

  2. Capturing the Interaction Potential of Amyloidogenic Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Javid, Nadeem; Vogtt, Karsten; Winter, Roland; Krywka, Christina; Tolan, Metin

    2007-07-13

    Experimentally derived static structure factors obtained for the aggregation-prone protein insulin were analyzed with a statistical mechanical model based on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential. The data reveal that the protein self-assembles into equilibrium clusters already at low concentrations. Furthermore, striking differences regarding interaction forces between aggregation-prone proteins such as insulin in the preaggregated regime and natively stable globular proteins are found.

  3. The optical potential on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; MeiBner, Ulf -G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-06-08

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Luscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Luscher formalism. Furthermore, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  4. Cubanes: Super explosives and potential pharmaceutical intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashir-Hashemi, A.

    1994-01-01

    The cubane molecule, in which eight carbon atoms are locked in a cubic framework, shows great potential for both military and pharmaceutical applications. Octanitrocubane, with a predicted density of 2.1 g/cc and strain energy of more than 165 kcal/mol, is considered to be the 'super-explosive', while cubane derivatives submitted to the National Institutes of Health for preliminary biological activity screening have displayed promising anti-cancer and anti-HIV activity.

  5. Potential Energy Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.

  6. The potential health risk of titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruinan; Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Lingxin; Yan, Bing

    2012-04-15

    Widespread use of titania nanoparticles (TNPs) has caused a significant release of TNPs into the environment, increasing human exposure to TNPs. The potential toxicity of TNPs has become an urgent concern. Various models have been used to evaluate the toxic effects of TNPs, but the relationship between TNPs' toxicity and physicochemical properties is largely unknown. This review summarizes relevant reports to support the development of better predictive toxicological models and the safe future application of TNPs.

  7. Spiral inflation with Coleman-Weinberg potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2015-03-01

    We apply the idea of spiral inflation to the Coleman-Weinberg potential and show that inflation matching our observations well is allowed for a symmetry-breaking scale ranging from an intermediate scale to a grand unified theory (GUT) scale even if the quartic coupling λ is of O (0.1 ). The tensor-to-scalar ratio can be of O (0.01 ) in the case of GUT-scale symmetry breaking.

  8. Nonlocal soliton scattering in random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Armando; Residori, Stefania; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate the transport behaviour of nonlocal spatial optical solitons when launched in and interacting with propagation-invariant random potentials. The solitons are generated in nematic liquid crystals; the randomness is created by suitably engineered illumination of planar voltage-biased cells equipped with a photosensitive wall. We find that the fluctuations follow a super-diffusive trend, with the mean square displacement lowering for decreasing spatial correlation of the noise.

  9. Electrochemical potential of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin.

    PubMed

    Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira de; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Souza, Sandra Rodrigues de; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-06-01

    This work reports the isolation of Microgramma vaccinifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) and the determination of electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺ and human type O erythrocytes. MvRL showed the highest specific hemagglutinating activity with human type O erythrocytes and showed a single polypeptide band of 17 kDa on SDS-PAGE. MvRL hemagglutinating activity was neutralized after dialysis with EDTA, and addition of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ restored the activity. Electrochemical potentials of MvRL in the presence of 100 mM Ca²⁺ (882 mV) and 60 mM Mg²⁺ (1051 mV) were higher (p<0.05) than in the presence of only 0.15 M NaCl (247 mV), indicating that the electrochemical system was sensitive to structural and physico-chemical changes promoted by these ions. MvRL potential did not change in the presence of type O erythrocytes. The electrochemical system was able to detect changes in electrochemical potentials of MvRL promoted by Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, even in a complex environment (human serum supplemented with 40 and 60mM of these ions). The study reveals that the stimulatory effect of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ on hemagglutinating activity may be linked to conformational change and/or alterations in surface charge distribution of MvRL. PMID:22197266

  10. Global evaluation of biofuel potential from microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Jeffrey W.; McGinty, Christopher M.; Quinn, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    In the current literature, the life cycle, technoeconomic, and resource assessments of microalgae-based biofuel production systems have relied on growth models extrapolated from laboratory-scale data, leading to a large uncertainty in results. This type of simplistic growth modeling overestimates productivity potential and fails to incorporate biological effects, geographical location, or cultivation architecture. This study uses a large-scale, validated, outdoor photobioreactor microalgae growth model based on 21 reactor- and species-specific inputs to model the growth of Nannochloropsis. This model accurately accounts for biological effects such as nutrient uptake, respiration, and temperature and uses hourly historical meteorological data to determine the current global productivity potential. Global maps of the current near-term microalgae lipid and biomass productivity were generated based on the results of annual simulations at 4,388 global locations. Maximum annual average lipid yields between 24 and 27 m3·ha−1·y−1, corresponding to biomass yields of 13 to 15 g·m−2·d−1, are possible in Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Saudi Arabia. The microalgae lipid productivity results of this study were integrated with geography-specific fuel consumption and land availability data to perform a scalability assessment. Results highlight the promising potential of microalgae-based biofuels compared with traditional terrestrial feedstocks. When water, nutrients, and CO2 are not limiting, many regions can potentially meet significant fractions of their transportation fuel requirements through microalgae production, without land resource restriction. Discussion focuses on sensitivity of monthly variability in lipid production compared with annual average yields, effects of temperature on productivity, and a comparison of results with previous published modeling assumptions. PMID:24912176

  11. Global evaluation of biofuel potential from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Moody, Jeffrey W; McGinty, Christopher M; Quinn, Jason C

    2014-06-10

    In the current literature, the life cycle, technoeconomic, and resource assessments of microalgae-based biofuel production systems have relied on growth models extrapolated from laboratory-scale data, leading to a large uncertainty in results. This type of simplistic growth modeling overestimates productivity potential and fails to incorporate biological effects, geographical location, or cultivation architecture. This study uses a large-scale, validated, outdoor photobioreactor microalgae growth model based on 21 reactor- and species-specific inputs to model the growth of Nannochloropsis. This model accurately accounts for biological effects such as nutrient uptake, respiration, and temperature and uses hourly historical meteorological data to determine the current global productivity potential. Global maps of the current near-term microalgae lipid and biomass productivity were generated based on the results of annual simulations at 4,388 global locations. Maximum annual average lipid yields between 24 and 27 m(3)·ha(-1)·y(-1), corresponding to biomass yields of 13 to 15 g·m(-2)·d(-1), are possible in Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Saudi Arabia. The microalgae lipid productivity results of this study were integrated with geography-specific fuel consumption and land availability data to perform a scalability assessment. Results highlight the promising potential of microalgae-based biofuels compared with traditional terrestrial feedstocks. When water, nutrients, and CO2 are not limiting, many regions can potentially meet significant fractions of their transportation fuel requirements through microalgae production, without land resource restriction. Discussion focuses on sensitivity of monthly variability in lipid production compared with annual average yields, effects of temperature on productivity, and a comparison of results with previous published modeling assumptions. PMID:24912176

  12. The Stark Effect in Linear Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z greater than 0 and V(z) = [infinity] for z less than 0) and the symmetric linear potential…

  13. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  14. Glutaraldehyde: a potential health risk to nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.A.; Kachuba, J.B.

    1992-06-01

    This article discusses the potential toxicity of glutaraldehyde, a chemical commonly used in endoscopy units. The literature review cites adverse health effects experienced by workers exposed to glutaraldehyde. The sampling methodology for glutaraldehyde relative to the Occupational Safety and Health standard for glutaraldehyde is presented. Air monitoring should be performed to assess employee exposure to airborne glutaraldehyde in endoscopy departments. Recommendations for reducing exposure to glutaraldehyde in endoscopy units are included.

  15. Hospital Charges of Potentially Preventable Pediatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sam; Kuo, Dennis Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Reducing the number of preventable hospitalizations represents a possible source of healthcare savings. However, the current literature lacks a description of the extent of potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations. The study objectives are to (1) identify the charges and (2) demographic characteristics associated with potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations. Methods Secondary analysis of the 2006 Kids’ Inpatient Database (weighted N=7,558,812). ICD-9-CM codes for 16 previously validated pediatric ambulatory care-sensitive (ACS) conditions identified potentially preventable hospitalizations; seven additional conditions reflected updated care guidelines. Outcome variables included number of admissions, hospitalization days, and hospital charges. Demographic and diagnostic variables associated with an ACS condition were compared with regression analyses using appropriate person-level weights. Results Pediatric ACS hospitalizations totaled $4.05B in charges and 1,087,570 hospitalization days in 2006. Two respiratory conditions—asthma and bacterial pneumonia—comprised 48.4% of ACS hospital charges and 46.7% of ACS hospitalization days. In multivariate analysis, variables associated with an ACS condition included: male gender (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.07–1.13); race/ethnicity of black (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.16–1.27) or Hispanic (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06–1.18); and emergency department (ED) as admission source (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.27–1.48). Conclusions Respiratory conditions comprised the largest proportion of potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations, totaling as much as $1.96B in hospital charges. Children hospitalized with an ACS condition tend to be male, non-white, and admitted through the ED. Future research to prevent pediatric hospitalizations should examine targeted interventions in the primary care setting, specifically around respiratory conditions and minority populations. PMID:22922047

  16. The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zifferero, M.

    1993-04-01

    With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

  17. Radicals: Reactive Intermediates with Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This Perspective illustrates the defining characteristics of free radical chemistry, beginning with its rich and storied history. Studies from our laboratory are discussed along with recent developments emanating from others in this burgeoning area. The practicality and chemoselectivity of radical reactions enable rapid access to molecules of relevance to drug discovery, agrochemistry, material science, and other disciplines. Thus, these reactive intermediates possess inherent translational potential, as they can be widely used to expedite scientific endeavors for the betterment of humankind. PMID:27631602

  18. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  19. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  20. Health insurance exchanges bring potential opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M Orry; Eggbeer, Bill

    2012-11-01

    The introduction of the state health insurance exchanges, as provided for in the Affordable Care Act, has many strategic implications for healthcare providers: Unprecedented transparency; The "Walmart Effect", with patients playing a greater role as healthcare consumers; A rise in narrow networks spurred by low prices and narrow geographies; The potential end of the cross subsidy of Medicare and Medicaid by commercial plans; The possible end of not-for-profit status for hospitals

  1. Nonpolynomial potentials with deformable topological structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chumbes, Augusto E. R.; Hott, Marcelo B.

    2010-02-15

    We construct models of self-interacting scalar fields whose Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfeld solutions exhibit kink profiles which can be continuously deformed into two kinks by varying one of the parameters of the self-interacting potential. The effective models are obtained from other models with two interacting scalar fields. The effective models are then applied in a brane-world scenario where we analyze the consequences of the thicker branes in the warped geometry and in the localization of gravity.

  2. Electrode contamination effects of retarding potential analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, H. K.; Oyama, K.-I.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The electrode contamination in electrostatic analyzers such as Langmuir probes and retarding potential analyzers (RPA) is a serious problem for space measurements. The contamination layer acts as extra capacitance and resistance and leads to distortion in the measured I-V curve, which leads to erroneous measurement results. There are two main effects of the contamination layer: one is the impedance effect and the other is the charge attachment and accumulation due to the capacitance. The impedance effect can be reduced or eliminated by choosing the proper sweeping frequency. However, for RPA the charge accumulation effect becomes serious because the capacitance of the contamination layer is much larger than that of the Langmuir probe of similar dimension. The charge accumulation on the retarding potential grid causes the effective potential, that ions experience, to be changed from the applied voltage. Then, the number of ions that can pass through the retarding potential grid to reach the collector and, thus, the measured ion current are changed. This effect causes the measured ion drift velocity and ion temperature to be changed from the actual values. The error caused by the RPA electrode contamination is expected to be significant for sounding rocket measurements with low rocket velocity (1-2 km/s) and low ion temperature of 200-300 K in the height range of 100-300 km. In this paper we discuss the effects associated with the RPA contaminated electrodes based on theoretical analysis and experiments performed in a space plasma operation chamber. Finally, the development of a contamination-free RPA for sounding rocket missions is presented.

  3. Potential antitumor mechanisms of phenothiazine drugs.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2013-11-01

    In this study, three kinds of phenothiazine drugs were analyzed to explore their potential antitumor mechanisms. First, target proteins that could interact with chlorpromazine, fluphenazine and trifluoperazine were predicted. Then, the target proteins of the three drugs were intersected. Cell signaling pathway enrichment and related disease enrichment were conducted for the intersected proteins to extract the enrichment categories associated with tumors. By regulation network analysis of the protein interactions, the mechanisms of action of these target proteins in tumor tissue were clarified, thus confirming the potential antitumor mechanisms of the phenothiazine drugs. The final results of cell signaling pathway enrichment and related disease enrichment showed that the categories with the highest score were all found in tumors. Target proteins belonging to the tumor category included signaling pathway members such as Wnt, MAPK and retinoic acid receptor. Moreover, another target protein, MAPK8, could indirectly act on target proteins CDK2, IGF1R, GSK3B, RARA, FGFR2 and MAPK10, thereby affecting tumor cell division and proliferation. Therefore, phenothiazine drugs may have potential antitumor effects, and tumor-associated target proteins play important roles in the process of cell signaling transduction cascades.

  4. Sunflower: a potential fructan-bearing crop?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Noël, Giselle M A; Dosio, Guillermo A A; Puebla, Andrea F; Insani, Ester M; Tognetti, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    Grain filling in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mainly depends on actual photosynthesis, being the contribution of stored reserves in stems (sucrose, hexoses, and starch) rather low. Drought periods during grain filling often reduce yield. Increasing the capacity of stem to store reserves could help to increase grain filling and yield stability in dry years. Fructans improve water uptake in soils at low water potential, and allow the storage of large amount of assimilates per unit tissue volume that can be readily remobilized to grains. Sunflower is a close relative to Jerusalem artichoke (H. tuberosus L.), which accumulates large amounts of fructan (inulin) in tubers and true stems. The reason why sunflower does not accumulate fructans is obscure. Through a bioinformatics analysis of a sunflower transcriptome database, we found sequences that are homologous to dicotyledon and monocotyledon fructan synthesis genes. A HPLC analysis of stem sugar composition revealed the presence of low amounts of 1-kestose, while a drastic enhancement of endogenous sucrose levels by capitulum removal did not promote 1-kestose accumulation. This suggests that the regulation of fructan synthesis in this species may differ from the currently best known model, mainly derived from research on Poaceae, where sucrose acts as both a signaling molecule and substrate, in the induction of fructan synthesis. Thus, sunflower might potentially constitute a fructan-bearing species, which could result in an improvement of its performance as a grain crop. However, a large effort is needed to elucidate how this up to now unsuspected potential could be effectively expressed.

  5. Inflationary potentials from the exact renormalisation group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Kraljić, David; Svanes, Eirik Eik

    2016-08-01

    We show that an inflationary slow-roll potential can be derived as an IR limit of the non-perturbative exact renormalisation group equation for a scalar field within the mean-field approximation. The result follows without having to specify a Lagrangian in the UV, which we take to be somewhere below the Planck scale to avoid discussing quantum gravity effects. We assume that the theory contains a scalar mode with suppressed coupling to other fields, and that higher derivative couplings are suppressed. In this framework the exact RG equation becomes a one-dimensional Schrödinger equation, which we solve. The effective IR potential is then dominated by the eigen-states of the RG Hamiltonian with the highest eigenvalues. We find that these potentials can generically give rise to slow-roll inflation, which is fully consistent with recent observations. As an example of how the proposed renormalisation group procedure works, we perform an explicit calculation in the ϕ4 theory in an appendix.

  6. Representation of the earth's gravitational potential.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinti, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The paper represents the earth's gravitational potential V, outside a sphere bounding the earth, by means of its difference from the author's spheroidal potential. The difference is in turn represented as arising from a surface density on the sphere bounding the earth. Because of the slow decrease with order n of the normalized coefficients in the spherical harmonic expansion of V, the density anomalies from which the higher coefficients arise must occur in regions close to the earth's surface. The surface density is thus an idealization of the product of the density anomaly and the crustal thickness. Values of surface density are computed from potential coefficients obtained from two sources, Rapp and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. The two sources give qualitative agreement for the values of surface density and for its contour map. The numerical values obtained for surface density are compatible with the idea that the responsible density anomalies are reasonably small, i.e., less than 0.05 g/cu cm, and occur in the crust alone.

  7. Plants' Metabolites as Potential Antiobesity Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gooda Sahib, Najla; Saari, Nazamid; Ismail, Amin; Khatib, Alfi; Mahomoodally, Fawzi; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-related complications are on the increase both in the developed and developing world. Since existing pharmaceuticals fail to come up with long-term solutions to address this issue, there is an ever-pressing need to find and develop new drugs and alternatives. Natural products, particularly medicinal plants, are believed to harbor potential antiobesity agents that can act through various mechanisms either by preventing weight gain or promoting weight loss amongst others. The inhibition of key lipid and carbohydrate hydrolyzing and metabolizing enzymes, disruption of adipogenesis, and modulation of its factors or appetite suppression are some of the plethora of targeted approaches to probe the antiobesity potential of medicinal plants. A new technology such as metabolomics, which deals with the study of the whole metabolome, has been identified to be a promising technique to probe the progression of diseases, elucidate their pathologies, and assess the effects of natural health products on certain pathological conditions. This has been applied to drug research, bone health, and to a limited extent to obesity research. This paper thus endeavors to give an overview of those plants, which have been reported to have antiobesity effects and highlight the potential and relevance of metabolomics in obesity research. PMID:22666121

  8. Marine bioactives and potential application in sports.

    PubMed

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Gemello, Eugenio; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2014-04-30

    An enriched diet with antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic compounds, has always been suggested to improve oxidative stress, preventing related diseases. In this respect, marine natural product (MNP), such as COX inhibitors, marine steroids, molecules interfering with factors involved in the modulation of gene expression (such as NF-κB), macrolides, many antioxidant agents, thermogenic substances and even substances that could help the immune system and that result in the protection of cartilage, have been recently gaining attention. The marine world represents a reserve of bioactive ingredients, with considerable potential as functional food. Substances, such as chitin, chitosan, n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and bioactive peptides, can provide several health benefits, such as the reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. In addition, new marine bioactive substances with potential anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and thermogenic capacity may provide health benefits and performance improvement, especially in those who practice physical activity, because of their increased free radical and Reacting Oxygen Species (ROS) production during exercise, and, particularly, in athletes. The aim of this review is to examine the potential pharmacological properties and application of many marine bioactive substances in sports.

  9. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport. PMID:22782543

  10. Potential of carbon nanotubes in algal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lambreva, Maya Dimova; Lavecchia, Teresa; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Antal, Taras Kornelievich; Orlanducci, Silvia; Margonelli, Andrea; Rea, Giuseppina

    2015-09-01

    A critical mass of knowledge is emerging on the interactions between plant cells and engineered nanomaterials, revealing the potential of plant nanobiotechnology to promote and support novel solutions for the development of a competitive bioeconomy. This knowledge can foster the adoption of new methodological strategies to empower the large-scale production of biomass from commercially important microalgae. The present review focuses on the potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance photosynthetic performance of microalgae by (i) widening the spectral region available for the energy conversion reactions and (ii) increasing the tolerance of microalgae towards unfavourable conditions occurring in mass production. To this end, current understanding on the mechanisms of uptake and localization of CNTs in plant cells is discussed. The available ecotoxicological data were used in an attempt to assess the feasibility of CNT-based applications in algal biotechnology, by critically correlating the experimental conditions with the observed adverse effects. Furthermore, main structural and physicochemical properties of single- and multi-walled CNTs and common approaches for the functionalization and characterization of CNTs in biological environment are presented. Here, we explore the potential that nanotechnology can offer to enhance functions of algae, paving the way for a more efficient use of photosynthetic algal systems in the sustainable production of energy, biomass and high-value compounds.

  11. How potentially predictable are midlatitude ocean currents?

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Masami; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Sasaki, Hideharu; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Predictability of atmospheric variability is known to be limited owing to significant uncertainty that arises from intrinsic variability generated independently of external forcing and/or boundary conditions. Observed atmospheric variability is therefore regarded as just a single realization among different dynamical states that could occur. In contrast, subject to wind, thermal and fresh-water forcing at the surface, the ocean circulation has been considered to be rather deterministic under the prescribed atmospheric forcing, and it still remains unknown how uncertain the upper-ocean circulation variability is. This study evaluates how much uncertainty the oceanic interannual variability can potentially have, through multiple simulations with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model driven by the observed interannually-varying atmospheric forcing under slightly different conditions. These ensemble "hindcast" experiments have revealed substantial uncertainty due to intrinsic variability in the extratropical ocean circulation that limits potential predictability of its interannual variability, especially along the strong western boundary currents (WBCs) in mid-latitudes, including the Kuroshio and its eastward extention. The intrinsic variability also greatly limits potential predictability of meso-scale oceanic eddy activity. These findings suggest that multi-member ensemble simulations are essential for understanding and predicting variability in the WBCs, which are important for weather and climate variability and marine ecosystems. PMID:26831954

  12. How potentially predictable are midlatitude ocean currents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Masami; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Sasaki, Hideharu; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2016-02-01

    Predictability of atmospheric variability is known to be limited owing to significant uncertainty that arises from intrinsic variability generated independently of external forcing and/or boundary conditions. Observed atmospheric variability is therefore regarded as just a single realization among different dynamical states that could occur. In contrast, subject to wind, thermal and fresh-water forcing at the surface, the ocean circulation has been considered to be rather deterministic under the prescribed atmospheric forcing, and it still remains unknown how uncertain the upper-ocean circulation variability is. This study evaluates how much uncertainty the oceanic interannual variability can potentially have, through multiple simulations with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model driven by the observed interannually-varying atmospheric forcing under slightly different conditions. These ensemble “hindcast” experiments have revealed substantial uncertainty due to intrinsic variability in the extratropical ocean circulation that limits potential predictability of its interannual variability, especially along the strong western boundary currents (WBCs) in mid-latitudes, including the Kuroshio and its eastward extention. The intrinsic variability also greatly limits potential predictability of meso-scale oceanic eddy activity. These findings suggest that multi-member ensemble simulations are essential for understanding and predicting variability in the WBCs, which are important for weather and climate variability and marine ecosystems.

  13. How potentially predictable are midlatitude ocean currents?

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Masami; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Sasaki, Hideharu; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Predictability of atmospheric variability is known to be limited owing to significant uncertainty that arises from intrinsic variability generated independently of external forcing and/or boundary conditions. Observed atmospheric variability is therefore regarded as just a single realization among different dynamical states that could occur. In contrast, subject to wind, thermal and fresh-water forcing at the surface, the ocean circulation has been considered to be rather deterministic under the prescribed atmospheric forcing, and it still remains unknown how uncertain the upper-ocean circulation variability is. This study evaluates how much uncertainty the oceanic interannual variability can potentially have, through multiple simulations with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model driven by the observed interannually-varying atmospheric forcing under slightly different conditions. These ensemble “hindcast” experiments have revealed substantial uncertainty due to intrinsic variability in the extratropical ocean circulation that limits potential predictability of its interannual variability, especially along the strong western boundary currents (WBCs) in mid-latitudes, including the Kuroshio and its eastward extention. The intrinsic variability also greatly limits potential predictability of meso-scale oceanic eddy activity. These findings suggest that multi-member ensemble simulations are essential for understanding and predicting variability in the WBCs, which are important for weather and climate variability and marine ecosystems. PMID:26831954

  14. The osteogenic potential of human bone callus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weiqi; He, Wei; Yang, Wanlei; Li, Jianlei; Yang, Zhifan; Lu, Xuanyuan; Qin, An; Qian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bone callus, generated during fracture healing, is commonly discarded during surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic potential of bone callus and its possible use as autograft material for patients needing bone grafts. Histology, immunohistochemistry, micro-computed tomography, and biomechanics were performed to examine osteogenic cells, osteoinductive factors, and the osteoconductive structure of bone callus. Alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts, osteoinductive factors (including BMP2, FGF2, TGFB1, and IGF1), and a porous structure were found in bone callus. Early-stage callus (within 3 months after fracture) presented significantly improved osteogenic properties compared to medium- (3–9 months) and late-stage (longer than 9 months) callus. The results revealed that bone callus induced new bone formation in a nude mouse model. Early-stage callus showed better performance to medium- and late-stage callus in the induction of new bone formation at both 8 and 12 weeks. These findings indicated that bone callus, especially early-stage callus, possesses osteogenic potential and can potentially serve as an alternative source of material for bone grafts. PMID:27796345

  15. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  16. Science Teacher Leaders: Exploring Practices and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, John Kevin

    It has become standard practice for teachers to step into the role of "teacher leaders" and perform a variety of curriculum, instruction and assessment tasks for schools and school districts. The literature regarding these Ohio K-12 teacher leaders, who may perform these tasks in addition to or in lieu of regular teaching assignments, rarely includes a disciplinary focus. In this exploratory, descriptive study the results of a web-based survey containing both closed and open-ended items were used in an inquiry into teacher leaders working with the discipline of science. Data from Ohio teachers responding to the survey were used first to create a standard profile for science teacher leaders. Descriptive statistics and correlations were then performed on quantitative survey data to explore science teacher leader tasks and factors that influence task performance. Analysis of data included descriptions of sense of purpose for their role held by these science teacher leaders. Results indicate that science teacher leaders appear to embrace their role as advocates for science and have great potential for implementing science education reform as well as other science-related school initiatives. Aligning performance, administrative oversight, impact on student achievement and teacher training concerning tasks science teacher leaders are expected to perform would enhance this potential. However, science teacher leaders face challenges to realizing that potential due to ambiguity of their leadership role, the breadth of tasks they tend to perform and lack of alignment between task and outcomes.

  17. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe dos Santos; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  18. Calculating the potential to emit particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vaart, D.R. van der

    1996-09-01

    As the implementation of the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act, and Title V in particular, continues, questions regarding the calculation of a facility`s potential to emit continue to surface. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided limited guidance decisions, although many are still being made during Title V implementation. This paper discusses what is meant by PM-10 and the validity of using sieve analysis in estimating particulate emissions. Title V of the Clean Air Amendments of 1990, and the accompanying regulations in 40 CFR Part 70, defines a major source subject to Title V by calculating its potential emissions of all regulated pollutants, both criteria and hazardous air pollutants. For PM, the threshold emission rate is 100 tons per year (tpy) for applicability to Title V. Much discussion has ensued regarding a definition of PM for the purpose of determining a facility`s potential to emit. Recently, EPA provided guidance which indicated that only PM-10 should be considered for making this determination although many states regulate larger particles through their state implementation plan (SIP) as a surrogate for PM-10.

  19. Sextic potential for \\gamma -rigid prolate nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buganu, P.; Budaca, R.

    2015-10-01

    The equation of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian with a sextic oscillator potential is solved for γ -rigid prolate nuclei. The associated shape phase space is reduced to three variables which are exactly separated. The angular equation has the spherical harmonic functions as solutions, while the β equation is converted to the quasi-exactly solvable case of the sextic oscillator potential with a centrifugal barrier. The energies and the corresponding wave functions are given in closed form and depend, up to a scaling factor, on a single parameter. The {0}+ and {2}+ states are exactly determined, having an important role in the assignment of some ambiguous states for the experimental β bands. Due to the special properties of the sextic potential, the model can simulate, by varying the free parameter, a shape phase transition from a harmonic to an anharmonic prolate β -soft rotor crossing through a critical point. Numerical applications are performed for 39 nuclei: {}98-108Ru, {}{100,102}Mo, {}116-130Xe, {}{132,134}Ce, {}146-150Nd, {}{150,152}Sm, {}{152,154}Gd, {}{154,156}Dy, 172Os, {}180-196Pt, 190Hg and 222Ra. The best candidates for the critical point are found to be 104Ru and {}{120,126}Xe, followed closely by 128Xe, 172Os, 196Pt and 148Nd.

  20. Brown adipose tissue and its therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lidell, M E; Betz, M J; Enerbäck, S

    2014-10-01

    Obesity and related diseases are a major cause of human morbidity and mortality and constitute a substantial economic burden for society. Effective treatment regimens are scarce, and new therapeutic targets are needed. Brown adipose tissue, an energy-expending tissue that produces heat, represents a potential therapeutic target. Its presence is associated with low body mass index, low total adipose tissue content and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Knowledge about the development and function of thermogenic adipocytes in brown adipose tissue has increased substantially in the last decade. Important transcriptional regulators have been identified, and hormones able to modulate the thermogenic capacity of the tissue have been recognized. Intriguingly, it is now clear that humans, like rodents, possess two types of thermogenic adipocytes: the classical brown adipocytes found in the interscapular brown adipose organ and the so-called beige adipocytes primarily found in subcutaneous white adipose tissue after adrenergic stimulation. The presence of two distinct types of energy-expending adipocytes in humans is conceptually important because these cells might be stimulated and recruited by different signals, raising the possibility that they might be separate potential targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we will discuss important features of the energy-expending brown adipose tissue and highlight those that may serve as potential targets for pharmacological intervention aimed at expanding the tissue and/or enhancing its function to counteract obesity.