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Sample records for resistance ktp crystal

  1. Nonlinear optical frequency conversion with KTP and BiBO crystals for lasers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potreck, Arne; Schröder, Helmut; Lammers, Melanie; Tzeremes, Georgios; Riede, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Within ESA's ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE missions Doppler-wind Lidar systems will be operated in the Earth's orbit to measure global wind profiles. The active instrument will be based on a Nd:YAG laser, frequency tripled by nonlinear optical crystals. Different crystals are therefore to compare and qualify in regard of their space acceptability. A dedicated set-up to measure the maximum conversion efficiencies and its stability during longterm operation for KTP crystals (SHG) and BiBO crystals (SHG and THG) is presented in this work. In order to detect gray-tracking and its influence on thermal lensing in situ, measurements with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and a co-aligned HeNe laser were performed. Conversion efficiencies were 76+/-3 % at SHG for KTP and BiBO crystals and 48+/-2 % at THG with a combination of two BiBO crystals. During longterm experiments of 60 million laser pulses, conversion efficiencies were demonstrated to be stable over time (+/-1 % at SHG with KTP and +/-2 % at THG with BiBO). The occurrence of gray-tracking was detected in the KTP crystal and the resulting thermal lensing with an exponential saturation over time was observed in situ.

  2. Femtosecond OPOs at 3 microns and beyond: Design and performance issues related to the crystal properties of KTP and similar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Holtom, G.R.; Crowell, R.A.; Cheng, L.K.

    1995-02-01

    Femtosecond optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), synchronously pumped by Ti:Sapphire lasers, operating in the near infrared (IR) region are an important light source now under active development. The authors report the results of Ti:Sapphire synchronously pumped noncritically phase matched femtosecond OPOs that are based upon several crystals from the KTP family. The newly developed nonlinear crystal niobium doped KTP (Nb:KTP) has a greater birefringence than undoped KTP and is shown to extend the wavelength farther into the mid-IR. The authors report the first operation of a femtosecond OPO utilizing the solid-solution grown crystal Nb:KTP. Additionally, it is shown that CTA is very useful in mid-IR angle tuned OPOs.

  3. Femtosecond fibre laser stabilisation to an optical frequency standard using a KTP electro-optic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Nyushkov, B N; Pivtsov, V S; Koliada, N A; Kaplun, A B; Meshalkin, A B

    2015-05-31

    A miniature intracavity KTP-based electro-optic phase modulator has been developed which can be used for effective stabilisation of an optical frequency comb of a femtosecond erbiumdoped fibre laser to an optical frequency standard. The use of such an electro-optic modulator (EOM) has made it possible to extend the working frequency band of a phase-locked loop system for laser stabilisation to several hundred kilohertz. We demonstrate that the KTP-based EOM is sufficiently sensitive even at a small optical length, which allows it to be readily integrated into cavities of femtosecond fibre lasers with high mode frequency spacings (over 100 MHz). (extreme light fields and their applications)

  4. A study of vacancy defects related to gray tracks in KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) using positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Li, Jing; Wang, Jiyang Jiang, Huaidong; Cao, Xingzhong; Yang, Jing

    2014-12-15

    For the first time to our knowledge, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) was used to study vacancy defects in KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) single crystals. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy combined with dielectric measurements identified the existence of oxygen vacancies and reflected the concentration of vacancy defects in three samples. The vacancy defects in KTP do not consist of monovacancies, but rather vacancy complexes. Doppler broadening indicates that the vacancy defects are distributed uniformly. A relationship is established where a crystal with a low oxygen vacancy concentration and a highly balanced stoichiometry has a higher resistance to gray track formation.

  5. [The IR spectroscopic study of hydrothermal synthetic KTP].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hao; Pei, Jing-Cheng; Qi, Li-Jian; Zhong, Zeng-Qiu

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper, different-generation hydrothermally grown KTP crystals were tested by the Nicolet 550 type FIR spectrometer with the reflective technique. They were studied on different crystal faces. Since the hydrothermally grown KTP crystal usually grows (100), (011) and (201) crystal faces, these faces were tested in different-generation products, and they were tested by two spectral wave bands, 2 000-4 000 and 400-2 000 cm(-1). The figures were compared with the flux-melt grown KTP crystal. In addition, making reference to the method of calculation about the consistence of OH- in quartz, the consistence of OH- in different -generation hydrothermally grown KTP crystals was estimated. In the hydrothermal grown KTP crystals, the stretching vibration of OH- shows distinct directivity characteristic. The absorption at [100] direction is obvious and the frequency is about 30 cm(-1) higher than the flux-melt grown KTP. Each new generation weakened the consistency of OH-, which restrained the growth of the KTP crystal. Accordingly, increasing the purity of rough materials plays a very important role in improving the quality of the crystals.

  6. Frequency doubling of a tunable ytterbium-doped fibre laser in KTP crystals phase-matched in the XY and YZ planes

    SciTech Connect

    Akulov, V A; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents an experimental study of frequency doubling of a tunable ytterbium-doped fibre laser in KTP crystals phase-matched in the XY and YZ planes. In the XY plane, we obtained continuous tuning in the range 528 - 540 nm through intracavity frequency doubling. The second-harmonic power reached 450 mW for 18 W of multimode diode pump power, which was five times higher in comparison with single-pass frequency doubling. In a single-pass configuration in the YZ plane, we obtained a wide tuning range (527 - 551 nm) in the green spectral region and a second-harmonic power of {approx}10 mW. The tuning range was only limited by the mechanical performance of the fibre Bragg grating and can potentially be extended to the entire lasing range of the ytterbium-doped fibre laser.

  7. Theoretical research of the spin-Hamiltonian parameters for two rhombic W5+ centers in KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal through a two-mechanism model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yang; Chen, Bo-Wei; Wei, Chen-Fu; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2016-09-01

    The high-order perturbation formulas based on the two-mechanism model are employed to calculate the spin-Hamiltonian parameters (g factors gi and hyperfine structure constants Ai, where i=x, y, z) for two approximately rhombic W5+ centers in KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal. In the model, both the widely-applied crystal-field (CF) mechanism concerning the interactions of CF excited states with the ground state and the generally-neglected charge-transfer (CT) mechanism concerning the interactions of CT excited states with the ground state are included. The calculated results agree with the experimental values, and the signs of constants Ai are suggested. The calculations indicate that (i) for the high valence state dn ions in crystals, the contributions to spin-Hamiltonian parameters should take into account both the CF and CT mechanisms and (ii) the large g-shifts |Δgi | (=|gi-ge |, where ge≈ 2.0023) for W5+ centers in crystals are due to the large spin-orbit parameter of free W5+ ion.

  8. KTP 532-nm laser treatment of leg telangiectases resistant to sclerotherapy: follow-up after one year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Ovidio

    2002-10-01

    Leg telangiectasias are venous, arterial and arteriovenous capillarya dilatations of the subpapillary dermal plexus, which is directly connected to the deep dermal plexus and indirectly through perforating to the subfascial saphenic and deep venous circulation. These angectasias are almost always indicators of varicose pathology. After accurage history taking and precise diagnosis they should be treated by sclerosis, but only after having verified possible saphenous ostial refluxes which must be eliminated first by surgical means. Laser photosclerosis is aimed at the small (red) residual, resistant and matting vessels. The 532nm lasers are irreplaceable because of the surface delicacy with which they vaporise selectively the telangiectatic and vascular malforming lesions of the face. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of the 532nm on leg angectasiae resistant to sclerotherapy. We used a laser 532nm Combi Zeiss, Jena in 20 cases selected for residual, resistant relapsing and matting leg telangiectasias (0,1 -1mm) on a total of 64 angectatic areas. The areas were cooled down with ice cubes for at least two minutes. 15 - 40 J/sq cm fluences, 10 - 50 msec. pulse durations and 1,5 mm spots were applied. As soon as the vessel blanched, it was cooled down for two further minutes. Four patients had positive results after one session only, twelve patients asked for a second session after 20 days, four patients were retouched for a third time. Follow up examinations were performed after 7-30 days and one year. In all cases the treatment was reported as painless. The immediate erythema was followed by microcrusting in 52 areas, which disappeared in 15-20 days. The one-year follow-up evidenced partial relapses in six patients and complete replases in four on a total of 30 areas (48%). Two patients had hypo-chromic micro-scars in three areas; two patients had four residual dyspigmented areas. Our results suggest that the use of the 532nm laser is justified in

  9. Nonlinear Cherenkov difference-frequency generation exploiting birefringence of KTP

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, R.; Du, L.; Wu, Y.; Hu, X. P. Zou, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S. N.; Sheng, Y.; Arie, A.

    2016-01-18

    In this letter, we demonstrate the realization of nonlinear Cherenkov difference-frequency generation (CDFG) exploiting the birefringence property of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystal. The pump and signal waves were set to be along different polarizations, thus the phase-matching requirement of CDFG, which is, the refractive index of the pump wave should be smaller than that of the signal wave, was fulfilled. The radiation angles and the intensity dependence of the CDFG on the pump wave were measured, which agreed well with the theoretical ones.

  10. Continuous wave Yb:YCOB cyan lasers with KTP as the sum-frequency converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ruijun; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Guang

    2015-12-01

    All-solid-state cyan laser at 500 nm range are reported based on a Yb:YCa4O(BO3)3 (Yb:YCOB) crystal and a type-II phase matched KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal. The 503 nm cyan laser is obtained by the sum-frequency mixing (SFM) of 974 nm pump wave and 1042 nm fundamental wave. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first cyan laser demonstrated with Yb-doped YCOB crystal. A dual-wavelength laser at 505 and 525 nm is also obtained, which origins from the simultaneous SFM and self-frequency doubling.

  11. Vibration Resistant Quartz Crystal Resonators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    Government indorsement or approval of commercial products or services referenced herein. Disposition Destroy this report when it is no loafer seeded ...FREQUENCY VS. CURRENT FOR ’SC’ CUT 65 CRYSTALS WITH DIFFERENT 0 ANGLES -lil- ’ i *^ y FIGURE NO, 31 31A 32 33A 33B 33C 3 3D 34 35A 35B...We have assumed a 10°C window as being adequate for most applications. . — • I I I I I I Use of X-rays to Measure Orientation Angles Two

  12. Is the KTP laser effective in tonsillectomy?

    PubMed

    Auf, I; Osborne, J E; Sparkes, C; Khalil, H

    1997-04-01

    Thirty-eight patients underwent a randomized double-blind trial using the KTP laser for tonsillectomy on one tonsil and standard dissection tonsillectomy on the other tonsil. Blood loss was less on the laser side. However, pain though initially slightly less on the laser side (days 1 and 2 post-operation) was worse on the laser side at 2 weeks due to delayed healing of the tonsillar bed. There were no primary or reactionary haemorrhages but a 15% incidence of secondary haemorrhage on the laser side.

  13. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  14. 80-W green KTP laser used in photoselective laser vaporization of the prostrate by frequency doubling of Yb 3+ -doped large-mode area fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hongxing; Li, Zhengjia

    2007-05-01

    Photoselective laser vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is the most promising method for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but KTP lasers used in PVP with lamp-pumped are low efficient .To increase the efficiency , we develop a 80-W, 400kHz, linearly polarized green laser based on a frequency-doubled fiber laser. A polarization-maintaining large-mode area (LMA) fiber amplifier generate polarized 1064nm fundamental wave by amplifying the seed signal from a composite Cr 4+:YAG-Nd 3+:YAG crystal fiber laser. The fundamental wave is injected into a KTP crystal with confined temperature management to achieve second harmonic generation (SHG). The overall electrical efficiency to the green portion of the spectrum is 10%.80-W maintenance-free long-lifetime KTP laser obtained can well satisfy the need of PVP.

  15. Laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Soms, L.; Marczak, J.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Perkowski, P.; Kedzierski, J.; Miszczyk, E.; Olifierczuk, M.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.

    2013-08-01

    There exists a problem in diagnostics of a dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose, the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. Such pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along an exactly the same optical path. In this case, the energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, several independent lasers have to be used. To form optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the energy of laser pulse through of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell (NLCC) of type LCNP2 with switching on time τON smaller than 5 μs might be applied. High laser damage resistance of NLCC and short τON can be fulfilled by preparation of liquid crystal cells with Liquid Crystal Mixture (LCM), well tuned to twisted nematic electro-optical effect, and well tuned all optical interfaces (Air - Antireflection - Quartz Plate - Electrode - Blocking Film - Aligning Layer - LCM - Aligning Layer - Blocking Film - Electrode - Quartz Plate - Antireflection - Air). In such LCNP2 cell, the transmission is higher than 97% at λ = 1.064 μm, as it is presented by Gooch and Tarry [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 8, 1575 (1975)]. The safe laser density energy is about 0.6 J/cm2 for a train of laser pulses (λ = 1.064 μm, pulse duration 10 ns FWHM, pulse repetition rate 100 pps, train duration 10 s), so the area of liquid crystal cell tolerating 3 J through it shall be as large as 5 cm2. Due to the presence of two blocking film layers between electrodes, LCNP2 can be driven by high voltages. Switching on time smaller than τON = 5 μs was obtained under 200 V switching voltage.

  16. Accurate X-ray diffraction studies of KTiOPO4 single crystals doped with niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, N. E.; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Verin, I. A.; Kharitonova, E. P.; Orlova, E. I.; Voronkova, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate doped with 4% of niobium (KTP:4%Nb) and 6% of niobium (KTP:6%Nb) are studied by accurate X-ray diffraction at room temperature. The niobium atoms are localized near the Ti1 and Ti2 atomic positions, and their positions are for the first time refined independent of the titanium atomic positions. Maps of difference electron density in the vicinity of K1 and K2 atomic positions are analyzed. It is found that in the structure of crystal KTP:4%Nb, additional positions of K atoms are located farther from the main positions and from each other than in KTP and KTP:6%Nb crystals. The nonuniform distribution of electron density found in the channels of the KTP:4%Nb structure is responsible for 20% increase in the signal of second harmonic generation.

  17. High-order Stokes generation in a KTP Raman laser pumped by a passively Q-switched ND:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maorong; Zhong, Kai; Mei, Jialin; Guo, Shibei; Xu, Degang; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-12-01

    High-order Stokes wave was observed in an x-cut KTP crystal based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) pumped by a passively Q-switched Nd:YLF laser with a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber. Output spectra including the fundamental wave at 1047 nm and six Stokes wavelengths at 1077 nm, 1110 nm, 1130 nm, 1143 nm, 1164 nm, 1180 nm based on two Raman frequency shift at 267.4 cm-1 and 693.0 cm-1 were obtained simultaneously. We also detected green light generation with output power of 12 mW from self frequency mixing in the KTP crystal. The maximum total output power reached 452 mW at the repetition frequency of 8.1 kHz, corresponding to the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 4.61% and pump-to-Raman conversion efficiency of 3.6%.

  18. Cation movement and phase transitions in KTP isostructures; X-ray study of sodium-doped KTP at 10.5 K.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Stefan T; Sobolev, Alexander N; Streltsov, Victor A

    2003-06-01

    An accurate structure model of sodium-doped potassium titanyl phosphate, (Na(0.114)K(0.886))K(TiO)(2)(PO(4))(2), has been determined at 10.5 K by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition to the low-temperature data, X-ray intensities have been collected at room temperature. When the temperature was decreased from room temperature to 10.5 K, both potassium cations moved 0.033 (2) A along the c-axis, i.e. in the polar direction within the rigid Ti-O-P network. This alkaline metal ion displacement can be related to the Abrahams-Jamieson-Kurtz T(C) criteria for oxygen framework ferroelectrics. Potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) is a well known material for second harmonic generation (SHG), and the influence of sodium dopant on the TiO(6) octahedral geometry and SHG is discussed. The material studied crystallizes in the space group Pna2(1) with Z = 4, a = 12.7919 (5), b = 6.3798 (4), c = 10.5880 (7) A, V = 864.08 (9) A(3), T = 10.5 (3) K and R = 0.023.

  19. High power, widely tunable dual-wavelength 2 μm laser based on intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dexian; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Shi, Wei; Zhong, Kai; Liu, Pengxiang; Yan, Chao; Mei, Jialin; Shi, Jia; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    We presented a high power, widely tunable narrowband 2 μm dual-wavelength source employing intracavity optical parametric oscillator with potassium titanium oxide phosphate (KTP) crystal. Two identical KTP crystals were oriented oppositely in the OPO cavity to compensate the walk-off effect. The output average power of dual-wavelength 2 μm laser was up to 18.18 W at 10 kHz with the peak power of 165 kW. The two wavelengths can be tuned in the range of 2070.7 nm to 2191.1 nm for ordinary light while in the range of 2190.7 nm to 2065.9 nm for extraordinary light with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) about 0.8 nm. The pulse width of the tunable laser was as narrow as 11 ns. The beam quality factor M 2 was less than 4 during wavelength tuning.

  20. Contacts for high-resistivity (Cd,Mn)Te crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska-Baran, M.; James, R.; Mycielski, A.; Kochanowska, D.; Szadkowski, A.J.; Jakiela, R.; Witkowska, B.; Kaliszek, W.; Domagala, J.; Lusakowska, E.; Domukhovski, V.; Dybko, K.; Cui, Y.; and James, R.B.

    2010-09-09

    Semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te crystals offer a material that may compete well with the commonly used (Cd,Zn)Te crystals for manufacturing large-area X- and gamma-ray detectors. The Bridgman growth method yields good quality, high-resistivity (10{sup 9} - 10{sup 10} {Omega} {center_dot} cm) crystals of (Cd,Mn)Te:V. Doping the as-grown crystals with the compensating agent vanadium ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) ensures their high resistivity; thereafter, annealing them in cadmium vapors reduces the number of cadmium vacancies. Applying the crystals as detectors necessitates having satisfactory electrical contacts. Accordingly, we explored various techniques of ensuring good electrical contacts to these semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te crystals, assessing metallic layers, monocrystalline semiconductor layers, and amorphous (or nanocrystalline) semiconductor layers. We found that ZnTe heavily doped ({approx} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) with Sb, and CdTe heavily doped ({approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) with In, proved satisfactory semiconductor contact layers. They subsequently enabled us to establish good contacts (with only narrow tunneling barriers) to the Au layer that usually constitutes the most external contact layer. We outline our technology of applying electrical contacts to semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te, and describe some important properties.

  1. Simultaneous dual-wavelength eye-safe KTP OPO intracavity pumped by a Nd:GYSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maorong; Zhong, Kai; Mei, Jialin; Guo, Shibei; Xu, Degang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous dual-wavelength intracavity pumped non-critical eye-safe optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is realized using a Nd:GYSGG laser crystal and a KTP nonlinear crystal. A folded cavity is used for thermal stability and mode matching, which greatly improves the output characteristics versus a linear cavity. The maximum output power of the 1562.1 nm/1567.4 nm dual-wavelength eye-safe laser is 750 mW at 10 kHz, corresponding to the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency, single-pulse-energy and peak power of 5.8%, 75 μJ and 22.7 kW. Such a dual-wavelength OPO provides a good laser source for remote sensing for CO and CO2 gases or difference frequency generation for terahertz wave at the important 0.65 THz band.

  2. Measurements of the operating characteristics of a 1064 nm pumped KTP RISTRA OPO.

    SciTech Connect

    Gimmestad, Gary; Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Wood, Jack; Roberts, David

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of the operating characteristics of a 1064 nm pumped potassium titanyl phosphte (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) were carried out at the Electro Optics Systems Laboratory of Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). The OPO was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and employs a nonplanar image-rotating geometry that is known by the acronym RISTRA, denoting Rotated Image Singly-Resonant Twisted RectAngle. The OPO was configured for pumping by the 1064 nm fundamental wavelength of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to generate a signal wavelength at 1627 nm and idler wavelength at 3074.8 nm. GTRI will be incorporate the OPO into a multi-wavelength lidar platform called the Integrated Atmospheric Characterization System (IACS). Prior to completion of the system design for the IACS platform, personnel at GTRI carried out a series of risk reduction experiments to measure the operating characteristics of the OPO. Sandia's role in this effort included technical assistance with numerical modeling of OPO performance, selection of nonlinear optical crystals, specification of cavity-mirror dielectric coatings, selection of vendors for optical components, and advice concerning integration of the RISTRA OPO into the IACS platform. This report describes results of the risk reduction measurements and it also provides some background information on the operating characteristics of RISTRA OPO's but is not intended to be a tutorial. A working knowledge of pulsed solid-state lasers, laser cavity modes, laser beam quality and beam propagation, and three-wave mixing in nonlinear crystals, is useful.

  3. Aluminum nitride bulk crystal growth in a resistively heated reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmau, Rafael Federico

    A resistively heated reactor capable of temperatures in excess of 2300°C was used to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk single crystals from an AlN powder source by physical vapor transport (PVT) in nitrogen atmosphere. AlN crystals were grown at elevated temperatures by two different methods. Self-seeded crystals were obtained by spontaneous nucleation on the crucible walls, while seeded growth was performed on singular and vicinal (0001) surfaces of silicon carbide (SiC) seeds. During self-seeded growth experiments a variety of crucible materials, such as boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum, rhenium, tantalum nitride, and tantalum carbide, were evaluated. These studies showed that the morphology of crystals grown by spontaneous nucleation strongly depends on the growth temperature and contamination in the reactor. Crucible selection had a profound effect on contamination in the crystal growth environment, influencing nucleation, coalescence, and crystal morphology. In terms of high-temperature stability and compatibility with the growth process, the best results for AlN crystal growth were obtained in crucibles made of sintered tantalum carbide or tantalum nitride. In addition, contamination from the commercially purchased AlN powder source was reduced by presintering the powder prior to growth, which resulted in a drastic reduction of nearly all impurities. Spontaneously grown single crystals up to 15 mm in size were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray topography, glow discharge mass spectrometry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Average dislocation densities were on the order of 103 cm -3, with extended areas virtually free of dislocations. High resolution rocking curves routinely showed peak widths as narrow as 7 arcsec, indicating a high degree of crystalline perfection. Low-temperature partially polarized optical reflectance measurements were used to calculate the crystal-field splitting parameter of AlN, Deltacr = -230 meV, and a low-temperature (1

  4. Resistive cooling circuits for charged particle traps using crystal resonators.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, T; Caspers, F; Doser, M; Kellerbauer, A; Pribyl, W

    2011-11-01

    The paper addresses a novel method to couple a signal from charged particles in a Penning trap to a high Q resonant circuit using a crystal resonator. Traditionally, the trap capacity is converted into a resonator by means of an inductance. The tuned circuit's Q factor is directly linked to the input impedance "seen" by the trapped particles at resonance frequency. This parallel resonance impedance is a measure of the efficiency of resistive cooling and thus it should be optimized. We propose here a commercially available crystal resonator since it exhibits a very high Q value and a parallel resonance impedance of several MΩ. The possibility to tune the parallel resonance frequency of the quartz results in filter behavior that allows covering a range of some tens of its 3dB bandwidth by means of tuning.

  5. Oxidation resistance and critical sulfur content of single crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smialek, J.L.

    1998-04-01

    Single crystal superalloys had greatly improved cyclic oxidation resistance when their sulfur content was reduced from impurity levels, typically 5--10 ppmw in past years, down to 1 ppmw or below currently. Excellent alumina scale adhesion has been documented for PWA 1480, PWA 1484, Rene`N5, Rene`N6, and CMSX 4, all without reactive element (Y) additions. Hydrogen annealing was used for effective desulfurization to below 0.1 ppmw, as well as for achieving controlled intermediate levels. This paper summarizes the direct relationship between cyclic oxidation behavior and sulfur content. An adhesion criterion has been proposed based on the concentration of sulfur needed to initiate spallation due to a monolayer of interfacial segregation. This suggests that a level down to {approximately}0.2 ppmw would be needed to maximize adhesion for a 1 mm thick sample. It is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R. Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  7. Some optical properties of KTP, LiIO3, and LiNbO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettemy, Donald J.; Harker, William C.; Lindholm, Glenn; Barnes, Norman P.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the absorption coefficient for KTP, LiIO3, and LiNbO3 are discussed. The variation of the refractive index with temperature has been measured for KTP and LiIO3. It is necessary to know both the absorption coefficient beta and the variation in the indexes of refraction with temperature change dn/dT to determine the average power limit of a nonlinear interaction. With the dn/dT information, it is also possible to estimate the temperature half width of any nonlinear interaction by calculating the variation of the phase-matching condition with temperature.

  8. KTP-532 laser tonsillectomy--a potential day-case procedure?

    PubMed

    Raine, N M; Whittet, H B; Marks, N J; Ryan, R M

    1995-06-01

    We report the results of a prospective pilot study of 54 adult patients undergoing tonsillectomy using the KTP-532 laser, designed to assess whether the technique would facilitate day-case adult tonsillectomy. Subjective and objective assessment at six hours post-operatively showed that only 43 per cent could, in our judgement, have been discharged at this interval. Furthermore, the overall complication rate was 31 per cent with a secondary haemorrhage rate of 19 per cent. We conclude that KTP-532 laser tonsillectomy as performed in this pilot study compares unfavourably with dissection tonsillectomy and we discuss possible reasons for this.

  9. Higher-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion with back-propagating idler using a submicron poled KTP waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkansky, Mark; Pruessner, Marcel W.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Kim, Mijin; Reintjes, J.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC) using periodically poled nonlinear optical crystals under the quasiphase- matching condition has found wide use in quantum optics. High efficiencies and good coupling to single-mode fibers resulted from using channel waveguides in crystals. It is often desirable to have a very narrow bandwidth for the signal and idler photons, but under the typical operating conditions, phase matching dictates the bandwidth of the SPDC to be of the order of <1 nm. This occurs because the co-propagating signal and idler photons are entangled, and an increase of the signal wave-vector is compensated by a decrease of the idler wave-vector. One way to reduce the bandwidth is by forming either external or internal cavities. Additionally, bandwidth reduction is possible without cavities when the signal and idler are counter-propagating, and the changes in the wave-vector with frequency are additive. To accomplish this a domain inversion on the wavelength scale is required. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate SPDC in one-dimensional KTP-based waveguides with sub-micron poling for forward and backward interactions. Some of the spectral features of the generated light are accounted for by mode coupling theory in periodically poled waveguides but other features are as yet not explained.

  10. Comparison of KTP, Thulium, and CO2 laser in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques: thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Kamalski, Digna M A; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Vincent, Robert; Trabelzini, Franco; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    High-speed thermal imaging enables visualization of heating of the vestibule during laser-assisted stapedotomy, comparing KTP, CO2, and Thulium laser light. Perforation of the stapes footplate with laser bears the risk of heating of the inner ear fluids. The amount of heating depends on absorption of the laser light and subsequent tissue ablation. The ablation of the footplate is driven by strong water absorption for the CO2 and Thulium laser. For the KTP laser wavelength, ablation is driven by carbonization of the footplate and it might penetrate deep into the inner ear without absorption in water. The thermal effects were visualized in an inner ear model, using two new techniques: (1) high-speed Schlieren imaging shows relative dynamic changes of temperatures up to 2 ms resolution in the perilymph. (2) Thermo imaging provides absolute temperature measurements around the footplate up to 40 ms resolution. The high-speed Schlieren imaging showed minimal heating using the KTP laser. Both CO2 and Thulium laser showed heating below the footplate. Thulium laser wavelength generated heating up to 0.6 mm depth. This was confirmed with thermal imaging, showing a rise of temperature of 4.7 (±3.5) °C for KTP and 9.4 (±6.9) for Thulium in the area of 2 mm below the footplate. For stapedotomy, the Thulium and CO2 laser show more extended thermal effects compared to KTP. High-speed Schlieren imaging and thermal imaging are complimentary techniques to study lasers thermal effects in tissue.

  11. KTP and Er:YAG laser dental bleaching comparison: a spectrophotometric, thermal and morphologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, C; Augros, C; Rocca, J P; Lagori, G; Fornaini, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results, in terms of temperature, colour change and morphology, of two different laser wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP). The lasers used were KTP (potassium-titanyl-phosphate) laser (λ = 532 nm (PD = 1.98 W/cm2)) and Er:YAG laser (λ = 2940 nm (PD = 2.54 W/cm2)). The bleaching gels used were PolaOffice 35% HP gel and PolaOffice+ 6% HP gel (SDI, Australia). Thirty-six extracted human teeth were selected and divided into two groups. For the 35% HP treatment, 18 teeth were randomly assigned to three subgroups: (1) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + KTP laser irradiation; (2) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation; and (3) HP gel + KTP laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation. The same protocol was used for the 6% HP bleaching treatment. The bleaching results were analysed by a spectrophotometer, the thermal elevation by K thermocouples and the enamel surface by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney test were performed, and the data were analysed using the software StatView and the free Web statistics tool BiostaTGV. The thermal elevation of the Er:YAG groups was higher than KTP, while only the group 35% HP gel vs. 35% HP gel + Er:YAG showed significant colour differences (p < 0.05). SEM photographs showed slight enamel surface morphologic alterations after bleaching treatment. The Er:YAG laser may improve the bleaching results of 35% HP even if it increases the gel temperature, when compared to the KTP laser.

  12. Compact high-repetition-rate terahertz source based on difference frequency generation from an efficient 2-μm dual-wavelength KTP OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jialin; Zhong, Kai; Wang, Maorong; Liu, Pengxiang; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2016-11-01

    A compact optical terahertz (THz) source was demonstrated based on an efficient high-repetition-rate doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) around 2 μm with two type-II phase-matched KTP crystals in the walk-off compensated configuration. The KTP OPO was intracavity pumped by an acousto-optical (AO) Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser and emitted two tunable wavelengths near degeneracy. The tuning range extended continuously from 2.068 μm to 2.191 μm with a maximum output power of 3.29 W at 24 kHz, corresponding to an optical-optical conversion efficiency (from 808 nm to 2 μm) of 20.69%. The stable pulsed dual-wavelength operation provided an ideal pump source for generating terahertz wave of micro-watt level by the difference frequency generation (DFG) method. A 7.84-mm-long periodically inverted quasi-phase-matched (QPM) GaAs crystal with 6 periods was used to generate a terahertz wave, the maximum voltage of 180 mV at 1.244 THz was acquired by a 4.2-K Si bolometer, corresponding to average output power of 0.6 μW and DFG conversion efficiency of 4.32×10-7. The acceptance bandwidth was found to be larger than 0.35 THz (FWHM). As to the 15-mm-long GaSe crystal used in the type-II collinear DFG, a tunable THz source ranging from 0.503 THz to 3.63 THz with the maximum output voltage of 268 mV at 1.65 THz had been achieved, and the corresponding average output power and DFG conversion efficiency were 0.9 μW and 5.86×10-7 respectively. This provides a potential practical palm-top tunable THz sources for portable applications.

  13. Clearing microvascular lesions of the true vocal fold with the KTP/532 laser.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Ming-Wang; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Su, Wan-Fu; Pai, Lu; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2003-06-01

    Although used for treating vascular malformations, KTP (532 nm) lasers have not been used to treat microvascular lesions of the vocal fold. The efficiency of KTP laser operation in the continuous mode with a 0.4- or 0.6-mm beam (1- to 2-W aim for 3 to 7 seconds delivering a total energy of 3 to 7 J) was studied retrospectively in patients with microvascular lesions of the vocal fold (n = 14). The perceptual acoustic, phonatory function, and videolaryngostroboscopic data were evaluated before and after operation in 10 patients. At follow-up (mean, 7 months), the results were excellent in all patients. Their phonatory function (jitter, shimmer, grade, breathiness, and roughness) significantly improved (p < .01). The videolaryngostroboscopic rating showed significant improvement in the amplitude of vocal fold vibration and excursion of the mucosal wave (p < .05). No postoperative recurrence or complications were noted. The KTP laser operation is a useful, cost-effective, and time-saving procedure and can be considered as an option in management of patients with microvascular lesions of the vocal fold, particularly those with repeated hemorrhages. Because the operation is easy (compared to other surgical methods) and has no major side effects, the prospect of total patient recovery is excellent.

  14. Luminescence and radiation resistance of undoped NaI crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiran, N. Boiaryntseva, I.; Gektin, A.; Gridin, S.; Shlyakhturov, V.; Vasuykov, S.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The performance of NaI scintillators depends on luminescence properties. • A criterion of crystals’ purity level is radiation colorability at room temperature. • The traces of the most dangerous impurities were detected. • Crucial role in efficiency of pure NaI scintillator play the crystal perfection. - Abstract: Undoped NaI single crystal is an excellent scintillator at low temperature. However, scintillation parameters of different quality crystals vary in a wide range, significantly exceeding measurement error. Experimental data demonstrate the features of luminescence, radiation induced coloration, and afterglow dependence on the quality of nominally pure crystals. It is found that defects level that allows to elucidate artefacts introduced by traces of harmful impurities corresponds to 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} that significantly overhead accuracy of chemical and absorption analysis. It is shown that special raw material treatment before and during the single crystal growth allows to reach NaI purity level that avoids impurities influence to the basic luminescence data.

  15. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  16. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  17. Abnormal drop in electrical resistivity with impurity doping of single-crystal Ag.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Min-Wook; Lee, Seunghun; Cho, Yong Chan; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Geun Woo; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Park, Chul Hong; Jeong, Se-Young

    2014-06-26

    Resistivity is an intrinsic feature that specifies the electrical properties of a material and depends on electron-phonon scattering near room temperature. Reducing the resistivity of a metal to its potentially lowest value requires eliminating grain boundaries and impurities, but to date few studies have focused on reducing the intrinsic resistivity of a pure metal itself. We could reduce the intrinsic resistivity of single-crystal Ag, which has an almost perfect structure, by impurity doping it with Cu. This paper presents our results: resistivity was reduced to 1.35 μΩ · cm at room temperature after 3 mol% Cu-doping of single-crystal Ag. Various mechanisms were examined in an attempt to explain the abnormal behavior.

  18. Abnormal drop in electrical resistivity with impurity doping of single-crystal Ag

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Min-Wook; Lee, Seunghun; Cho, Yong Chan; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Geun Woo; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Park, Chul Hong; Jeong, Se-Young

    2014-01-01

    Resistivity is an intrinsic feature that specifies the electrical properties of a material and depends on electron-phonon scattering near room temperature. Reducing the resistivity of a metal to its potentially lowest value requires eliminating grain boundaries and impurities, but to date few studies have focused on reducing the intrinsic resistivity of a pure metal itself. We could reduce the intrinsic resistivity of single-crystal Ag, which has an almost perfect structure, by impurity doping it with Cu. This paper presents our results: resistivity was reduced to 1.35 μΩ·cm at room temperature after 3 mol% Cu-doping of single-crystal Ag. Various mechanisms were examined in an attempt to explain the abnormal behavior. PMID:24965478

  19. Production and transformation of ring light beams by means of biaxial crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhevich, Anatol A.; Katranji, Evgeni G.; Mashchenko, Aleksander G.

    2001-03-01

    Universal method, permitting to form multi-ring light beams with a required quantity of rings from the circularly polarized Gaussian light beam, is proposed. This method permits to increase or decrease by 1 the order of an input beam wavefront screw dislocation, if beam has it. The method was realized by means of the optical scheme containing a biaxial crystal. Using biaxial KTP and (alpha) -HIO3 (iodic acid) crystals Bessel and multi-ring light beams with the first and the second order dislocations are obtained experimentally. The second harmonic generation by mono-, two- and four-ring light beams possessing WFSD1 in a nonlinear KTP crystal is studied experimentally.

  20. Intracavity optical parametric oscillator based on GTR-KTP driven by laser-diode end-pumped Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Fei; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Huang, Hai-Tao; He, Jing-Liang; Xu, Jin-Long; Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Qiu, Gang; Liu, Zong-Kai

    2010-07-01

    An efficient, eye-safe, high-repetition-rate, single-resonant intracavity optical parameter oscillator, driven by a laser-diode (LD) end-pumped acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 laser, based on high gray-trace resistance KTiPO 4 (GTR-KTP), was demonstrated. With a pump power of 13.8 W and frequency repetition rate of 40 kHz, the maximum power of 1.72 W with pulse width of 2.09 ns at signal wavelength 1572 nm is obtained. The corresponding peak power and single pulse energy is calculated to be 21 kW and 43 μJ, respectively. And the conversion efficiency from incident pump power at 808 nm to output power at signal wavelength 1572 nm is about 12.5%. The output instability is measured only to be 1% within 1 h.

  1. Light-Induced Resistance Effect Observed in Nano Au Films Covered Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Huang, Meizhen; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Hui; Jin, Kui-juan; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Zhenlin

    2015-09-09

    Tailoring resistance response using periodic nanostructures is one of the key issues in the current research. Two-dimensional colloidal crystals (CCs) structure is one of popular periodic nanospheres' structures and most of reports are focused on anomalous transmission of light or biomedical applications. In this work, a light-induced resistance effect is observed on silicon-based Au films covered CCs, featuring a remarkable resistance change as much as 56% and resistance switching characteristic. The diffusion and recombination of photocarriers is the crucial factor for this effect. This finding will expand photoelectricity functionality and be useful for future development of CC-based photoelectric devices.

  2. The Effect of Hydrogen Annealing on the Oxidation Resistance of Four EPM Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    2001-01-01

    Four single crystal EPM (enabling propulsion materials) developmental airfoil superalloys were hydrogen annealed at 1300 C for up to 100 hours to remove sulfur and improve oxidation resistance. Although the 1100 and 1150 C cyclic oxidation resistance was remarkably improved by annealing for 24 or 100 hours, the behavior was still considerably inferior to that of commercially available single crystal superalloys, especially those that are either Y-doped or hydrogen annealed. Excessive degradation in the developmental alloys appeared to be correlated with low Cr contents and, to a lesser extent, high Co and Re contents.

  3. Crystallographic anisotropy of the resistivity size effect in single crystal tungsten nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dooho; Moneck, Matthew; Liu, Xuan; Oh, Soong Ju; Kagan, Cherie R.; Coffey, Kevin R.; Barmak, Katayun

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates an anisotropic increase in resistivity with decreasing width in single crystal tungsten (W) nanowires having a height of 21 nm. Nanowire-widths were in the range of 15–451 nm, with the anisotropy observed for widths below 50 nm. The longitudinal directions of the nanowires coincided with the <100>, <110> and <111> orientations of the body centered cubic phase of W. The resistivity increase was observed to be minimized for the <111>-oriented single crystal nanowires, exhibiting a factor of two lower increase in resistivity at a width of ~15 nm, relative to the thin film resistivity (i.e., an infinitely wide wire). The observed anisotropy is attributed to crystallographic anisotropy of the Fermi velocity and the resultant anisotropy of the electron mean free path in W, and underscores the critical role of crystallographic orientation in nanoscale metallic conduction. PMID:24005230

  4. Crystallographic anisotropy of the resistivity size effect in single crystal tungsten nanowires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dooho; Moneck, Matthew; Liu, Xuan; Oh, Soong Ju; Kagan, Cherie R; Coffey, Kevin R; Barmak, Katayun

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates an anisotropic increase in resistivity with decreasing width in single crystal tungsten (W) nanowires having a height of 21 nm. Nanowire-widths were in the range of 15-451 nm, with the anisotropy observed for widths below 50 nm. The longitudinal directions of the nanowires coincided with the <100>, <110> and <111> orientations of the body centered cubic phase of W. The resistivity increase was observed to be minimized for the <111>-oriented single crystal nanowires, exhibiting a factor of two lower increase in resistivity at a width of ~15 nm, relative to the thin film resistivity (i.e., an infinitely wide wire). The observed anisotropy is attributed to crystallographic anisotropy of the Fermi velocity and the resultant anisotropy of the electron mean free path in W, and underscores the critical role of crystallographic orientation in nanoscale metallic conduction.

  5. Radiation resistance of nonlinear crystals at a wavelength of 9.55 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Voevodin, V G; Badikov, Valerii V; Geiko, L G; Geiko, P P; Ivashchenko, M V; Karapuzikov, A I; Sherstov, I V

    2001-12-31

    The results of radiation resistance measurements for twelve nonlinear crystals are presented. The crystals include the well-known nonlinear CdGeAs{sub 2}, ZnGeP{sub 2}, AgGaSe{sub 2}, GaSe, AgGaS{sub 2}, and Ag{sub 3}AsS{sub 3} crystals operating in the middle IR range, new mixed AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd{sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals, two-phase (orange and yellow) HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal, and the doped GaSe:In crystal. The mixed crystals and the two-phase HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal are transparent in the range from 0.4 - 0.5 to 11.5 - 14.5 {mu}m. The measurements were performed using a pulsed single-mode highly stability TEA CO{sub 2} laser with an output pulse duration of {approx}30 ns. The damage thresholds of new nonlinear AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd {sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals and of the HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal (the orange and yellow phases) were found to be 1.5 - 2.2 times higher than for the crystals operating in the middle IR range. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. Thermal characteristics of CO2, Argon, and KTP (Nd:YAG) ablated bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian J.; Neev, Joseph; Lee, Jon P.; Hashisaki, George T.; Berns, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    CO2 (10.6 micrometers ), Argon (514 nm), and KTP (Nd:YAG) (532 nm) are the lasers of choice for the stapedotomy operation. While each of these lasers is effective in surgically treating otosclerosis, few studies exist which compare the relative deleterious effects of these lasers in a model that is relevant to clinical practice and also based on the physics of laser- tissue interactions. This study focuses on surface temperature changes that occur in otic capsule, cortical, and lamellar bone when treated with clinical laser energy densities. Fresh porcine otic capsule, cortical, and lamellar bone were micromachined to a uniform thickness of 0.8 mm. A microspot manipulator was used for CO2, testing both continuous wave (CW) and super-pulse (SP) modes. A focused lens based system was used for argon, and a micro fiber was used for KTP. A Hg-Cd-Te infrared imaging system was used to measure temperature. Hot spot temperatures were recorded, as well as the full width-half maximum of the thermal disturbance at that time. The time for the hot spot to return to ambient temperature was also recorded. With visible wavelengths, the experiments were performed in the presence and absence of an initiator (black ink). Temperature elevations with CW CO2 were markedly elevated relative to SP mode. The CW irradiated tissue also required longer to cool. In both KTP and argon treated bone, minimal surface temperature elevation was recorded in the absence of an initiator. No surface modification was observed by light microscopy. In contrast, the addition of an initiator resulted in marked temperature elevations and significant surface carbonization with these visible wavelengths. The mechanisms of ablation and thermal conduction are discussed along with the clinical relevance of these findings.

  7. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Laroche, Fabrice; Schack, Lotte; Spaink, Herman; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices. The fold shares low structural similarity to known structures.

  8. A new tongue plate for use in oropharyngeal KTP laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Ayshford, C A; Kabbani, M; Reddy, T N

    2000-01-01

    The KTP laser is used in both uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and tonsillectomy. However the need to use laser guarded endotracheal tubes represents a sizeable expense to the procedure. The authors describe a modified tongue plate to the oropharyngeal gag that covers all of the endo-tracheal tube, thus enabling the safe use of a non-laser guarded, PVC endotracheal tube. In over a hundred such procedures there has been no laser-related complications. The authors consider that the one off cost of this tongue plate and gag allows a more cost-effective method for performing laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and tonsillectomy.

  9. Transparent laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell "LCNP3"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Dąbrowski, R.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Soms, L.; Olifierczuk, M.; Kędzierski, J.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.; Miszczyk, E.; Mrukiewicz, M.; Kowiorski, K.

    2014-09-01

    There exists the problem in diagnostics of dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. The energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, the pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along the same optical path. To form an optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the laser pulse energy of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell of type LCNP3, with switching on time τON smaller than 3 μs was applied.

  10. Low Resistivity - High Lifetime Single Crystal Silicon Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    were grown with (111) orientation. Wafers were cut from the seed and tang ends of these initial implanted ingots for resistivity, Sirtl etch, lifetime...elemental gallium into the seed end of the pre-purified rod, and then zoning through the rod in a single, dislocation-free pass. Zero defect ingots 1.25" in...contact (Ti-Ag) 7) Contact sinter (600 C) 8) Evaporate front contact grid pattern (Ti-Ag) 9) Apply Ta 205 AR coating -7 - The PNH cleaning technique

  11. Negative Resistance and Memory Effects in TlInSeS Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garni, Sabah Al

    2013-11-01

    Investigation of the switching phenomenon in TlInSeS single crystals revealed that its behaviour is typical of a memory switch. The switching process occurs symmetrically which, means it takes place with both polarities on the crystal. The current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of symmetrical Ag-TlInSeS-Ag structures exhibit two distinct regions: a high-resistance OFF-state and a low-resistance ON-state that has negative differential resistance (NDR). TlInSeS is a quaternary semiconductor that exhibits S-type CVC. The experimental results indicate that the switching phenomenon in our sample is very sensitive to temperature, illumination dose, and sample thickness. The switching parameters were observed under various ambient conditions. The present study is the first investigation of the switching phenomenon in TlInSeS. The data are presented alongside full theoretical curves that are drawn as guides for the eye.

  12. Good electrical contacts for high resistivity (Cd,Mn)Te crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska-Baran,M.; Mycielski, A.; Kochanowska, D.; Szadkowski, A. J.; Jakiela, r.; Witkowska, B.; Kaliszek, W.; Domagala, J.; Lusakowska, E.; Domukhovski, V.; Dybko, K.; Cui, Y.; James, R. B.

    2008-10-19

    We consider that semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te crystals may well successfully replace the commonly used (Cd,Zn)Te crystals as a material for manufacturing large-area X- and gamma-ray detectors. The Bridgman growth method yields good quality and high-resistivity (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} {Omega}-cm) crystals of (Cd,Mn)Te:V. Doping with vanadium ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}), which acts as a compensating agent, and annealing in cadmium vapors, which reduces the number of cadmium vacancies in the as-grown crystal, ensure this high resistivity. Detector applications of the crystals require satisfactory electrical contacts. Hence, we explored techniques of ensuring good electrical contacts to semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te crystals. Our findings are reported here. Before depositing the contact layers, we prepared an 'epi-ready' surface of the crystal platelet by a procedure described earlier for various tellurium-based II-VI compound crystals. A molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) apparatus was used to deposit various types of contact layers: Monocrystalline semiconductor layers, amorphous- and nanocrystalline semiconductor layers, and metal layers were studied. We employed ZnTe heavily doped ({approx} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) with Sb, and CdTe heavily doped ({approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) with In as the semiconductors to create contact layers that subsequently enable good contact (with a narrow, tunneling barrier) to the Au layer that usually is applied as the top contact layer. We describe and discuss the technology and some properties of the electrical contacts to semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te.

  13. Casting of undoped CdTe crystals with high electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, P.; Kawasaki, S.; Yamashita, S.; Usuki, Y.; Konagaya, Y.; Matada, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Fukuda, T.

    1995-04-01

    Undoped semi-insulating CdTe crystals with an as-grown shape similar to the device profile for radiation detection has been grown by casting and subsequent unidirectional solidification. Crystals with maximum electrical resistivity of 5.7 × 10 10 Ω · cm and an average value 5 × 10 9 Ω · cm have been grown in a die of uncoated fused silica. Neither Cd source nor an inert gas overpressure was employed in the growth container. No additional preparation steps were required before the analysis of their detection behaviour. First measurements of the integral X-ray response have been carried out.

  14. Multi-watt power blue light generation by intracavity sum- frequency-mixing in KTiOPO4 crystal.

    PubMed

    Haiyong, Zhu; Ge, Zhang; Chenghui, Huang; Yong, Wei; Lingxiong, Huang; Zhenqiang, Chen

    2008-03-03

    In this paper, a high power blue laser at 447 nm was obtained by intracavity sum-frequency-mixing of a diode-side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAlO(3)(Nd:YAP) laser operating at 1341.4 nm. A type-I critical phase matching LiB(3)O(5) (LBO) crystal and type-II critical phase matching KTiOPO(4) (KTP) crystal were used for second harmonic generation and third harmonic generation, respectively. The phase matching condition of the KTP crystal was researched. The results show that the KTP has superiority in intracavity sum-frequency-mixing blue light generation. 4.76 W blue light output was achieved at 4.6 kHz with the pulse width of 190ns. The fluctuation of output power was better than 3% at the output power of 4.76 W during half an hour.

  15. Enamel crystals of mice susceptible or resistant to dental fluorosis: an AFM study

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; BARBOSA, Carolina Silveira; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHANG, Sywe-Ren; LIU, Jun; CZAJKA-JAKUBOWSKA, Agata; CLARKSON, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the overall apatite crystals profile in the enamel matrix of mice susceptible (A/J strain) or resistant (129P3/J strain) to dental fluorosis through analyses by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Material and Methods Samples from the enamel matrix in the early stages of secretion and maturation were obtained from the incisors of mice from both strains. All detectable traces of matrix protein were removed from the samples by a sequential extraction procedure. The purified crystals (n=13 per strain) were analyzed qualitatively in the AFM. Surface roughness profile (Ra) was measured. Results The mean (±SD) Ra of the crystals of A/J strain (0.58±0.15 nm) was lower than the one found for the 129P3/J strain (0.66±0.21 nm) but the difference did not reach statistical significance (t=1.187, p=0.247). Crystals of the 129P3/J strain (70.42±6.79 nm) were found to be significantly narrower (t=4.013, p=0.0013) than the same parameter measured for the A/J strain (90.42±15.86 nm). Conclusion Enamel crystals of the 129P3/J strain are narrower, which is indicative of slower crystal growth and could interfere in the occurrence of dental fluorosis. PMID:25025555

  16. Low-Density, Creep-Resistant Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Smialek, James L.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2006-01-01

    Several recently formulated nickel-base superalloys have been developed with excellent high-temperature creep resistance, at lower densities than those of currently used nickel-base superalloys. These alloys are the latest products of a continuing effort to develop alloys that have even greater strength-to-weight ratios, suitable for use in turbine blades of aircraft engines. Mass densities of turbine blades exert a significant effect on the overall weight of aircraft. For a given aircraft, a reduction in the density of turbine blades enables design reductions in the weight of other parts throughout the turbine rotor, including the disk, hub, and shaft, as well as supporting structures in the engine. The resulting total reduction in weight can be 8 to 10 times that of the reduction in weight of the turbine blades. The approach followed in formulating these alloys involved several strategies for identifying key alloying elements and the range of concentration of each element to study. To minimize the number of alloys needed to be cast, a design-of--experiments methodology was adopted. A statistics-based computer program that models the effects of varying compositions of four elements, including effects of two-way interactions between elements, was used to test all possible alloys within the design space. The starting points for the computational analysis were three alloy compositions mandated by engineering consensus. After likewise identification of key alloying elements to vary and the allowed ranges of concentrations, the computer program then selects a minimum number of alloys within the design space to allow determination of effects for all four elements and their interactions.

  17. Crystal structure of the carbapenem intrinsic resistance protein CarG.

    PubMed

    Tichy, E M; Luisi, B F; Salmond, G P C

    2014-05-01

    In the Gram-negative enterobacterium Erwinia (Pectobacterium) and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid is mediated by the CarF and CarG proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure for the Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 carbapenem resistance protein CarG. This structure of CarG is the first in the carbapenem intrinsic resistance (CIR) family of resistance proteins from carbapenem-producing bacteria. The crystal structure shows the protein to form a homodimer, in agreement with results from analytical gel filtration. The structure of CarG does not show homology with any known antibiotic resistance proteins nor does it belong to any well-characterised protein structural family. However, it is a close structural homologue of the bacterial inhibitor of invertebrate lysozyme, PliI-Ah, with some interesting structural variations, including the absence of the catalytic site responsible for lysozyme inhibition. Both proteins show a unique β-sandwich fold with short terminal α-helices. The core of the protein is formed by stacked anti-parallel sheets that are individually very similar in the two proteins but differ in their packing interface, causing the splaying of the two sheets in CarG. Furthermore, a conserved cation binding site identified in CarG is absent from the homologue.

  18. Resistance switching in rejuvenated NaNbO3:Mn crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilch, Michal; Molak, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the resistance switching effect has been studied in NaNbO3:Mn crystals. Samples were rejuvenated in ambient air, below and above antiferroelectric phase transition. Dielectric spectroscopy has exhibited weak dispersion. The influence of annealing on the electronic structure has been determined with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Na2s, Nb3d, O1s, and Mn2p lines of the aged as-grown crystal and the rejuvenated samples spectra have been analyzed. Nb4+ states observed in the samples point to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the surface layer. Na ions migrate toward the surface due to rejuvenation. Switching from an insulator high-resistance state to a semiconductor medium resistance and finally to a metallic-type low-resistance state has been observed. The results are discussed within the framework of the extended defects model. We propose that the aliovalent Mn2+ dopant ions stabilize the oxygen vacancies and enable the resistive switching.

  19. Polarization and resistivity measurements of post-crystallization changes in amorphous Fe-B-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chattoraj, I.; Bhattamishra, A.K. . CRP Div.); Mitra, A. . MTP Div.)

    1993-09-01

    The effects of grain growth and compositional changes on the electrochemical behavior and the resistivity of amorphous iron-boron-silicon (Fe[sub 77.5]B[sub 15]Si[sub 7.5]) alloys after crystallization were studied. Deterioration of the protective passive film was observed, along with increased annealing. Potentiodynamic polarization provided excellent information about microstructural and chemical changes. It was concluded that electrochemical measurements could be used in conjunction with resistivity measurements in direct studies of grain growth and chemical changes occurring in different phases of the devitrified alloy.

  20. Relationship between the cathodoluminescence emission and resistivity in In doped CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, J.; Carcelen, V.; Dieguez, E.; Hidalgo, P.; Piqueras, J.; Vijayan, N.; Sochinskii, N. V.; Perez, J. M.

    2009-08-15

    Cadmium zinc telluride, CdZnTe, bulk single crystals doped with 10{sup 19} at./cm{sup 3} of indium in the initial melt were grown by vertical Bridgman technique. The samples were investigated by energy dispersive spectroscopy, cathodoluminiscence (CL), and current-voltage behavior at room temperature. The results shows that Cd and Te vacancy concentration depend on the indium and zinc concentrations. CL measurements indicate a relationship between radiative centers associated to Cd and Te vacancies and resistivity values.

  1. Urethral stricture vaporization with the KTP laser provides evidence for a favorable impact of laser surgery on wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Oswald, Michael; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gabbiani, Giulio; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the safety and efficacy of the KTP 532 laser to direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) in the management of urethral strictures. A total of 32 patients were randomized prospectively in this study, 14 DVIU and 18 KTP 532 laser. Patients were evaluated postoperatively with flowmetry and in the case of recurrence with cystourethrography at 3, 12, 24 weeks. With the KTP 532 laser complete symptomatic and uredynamic success was achieved in 15 (83%) patients at 12 and 24 weeks. Success rate was lower in the DVIU group with 9 (64%) patients at 12 weeks and 8 (57%) patients at 24 weeks. Mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 6 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3, 12 and 24 weeks with the KTP laser. With DVIU mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 5.5 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3 weeks followed by a steady decrease to 13 cc/s at 12 weeks and to 12 cc/s 24 weeks. No complication was observed in either group of patients. Our results confirm that stricture vaporization with the KTP 532 laser is a safe and efficient procedure. The better results after laser surgery make it also a valuable alternative in the endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures. These findings suggest a favorable influence of laser surgery on wound healing with less wound contraction and scarring. The lack of contraction of laser wounds might be related to the absence and the lack of organization of myofibroblasts in laser induced lesions.

  2. Optical property analysis of high-resistivity CZT:In single crystals before and after annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Jie, Wanqi

    2014-05-01

    In-doped CdZnTe:In (CZT:In) single crystals with high resistivity were annealed by an effective method containing Cd/Zn atmosphere annealing and Te atmosphere annealing. They were mainly measured by IR transmittance and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The results indicated Te inclusions were eliminated completely after annealing. Both of the resistivity and IR transmittance decreased notably after Cd/Zn atmosphere annealing, and then increased tremendously after Te atmosphere annealing. For PL measurements, (A0, X) disappeared, the intensity of (D0, X) peak increased, and FWHM was obviously reduced after annealing. These indicated the crystal quality was enhanced. The donor-acceptor pair peak decreased in annealed CZT:In crystal, which might be due to the dissociation of [VCd-InCd] complex and the remove of the impurities. Moreover, Dcomplex peak containing two peaks was caused by Cd vacancy-related (D1) and dislocation-related defects (D2) in as-grown crystal. However, after annealing, the intensities of D1 and D2 peaks decreased because of the compensation of Cd vacancies and the elimination of Te inclusions, respectively.

  3. Measuring anisotropic resistivity of single crystals using the van der Pauw technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borup, Kasper A.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Brown, David R.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iversen, Bo B.

    2015-07-01

    Anisotropy in properties of materials is important in materials science and solid-state physics. Measurement of the full resistivity tensor of crystals using the standard four-point method with bar shaped samples requires many measurements and may be inaccurate due to misalignment of the bars along crystallographic directions. Here an approach to extracting the resistivity tensor using van der Pauw measurements is presented. This reduces the number of required measurements. The theory of the van der Pauw method is extended to extract the tensor from parallelogram shaped samples with known geometry. Methods to extract the tensor for both known and unknown principal axis orientation are presented for broad applicability to single crystals. Numerical simulations of errors are presented to quantify error sources. Several benchmark experiments are performed on isotropic graphite samples to verify the internal consistency of the developed theory, test experimental precision, and characterize error sources. The presented methods are applied to a RuS b2 single crystal at room temperature and the results are discussed based on the error source analysis. Temperature resolved resistivities along the a and b directions are finally reported and briefly discussed.

  4. Influence of surface cracks on laser-induced damage resistance of brittle KH₂PO₄ crystal.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Chen, Mingjun; Liao, Wei; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong; Li, Mingquan

    2014-11-17

    Single point diamond turning (SPDT) currently is the leading finishing method for achieving ultra-smooth surface on brittle KH(2)PO(4) crystal. In this work, the light intensification modulated by surface cracks introduced by SPDT cutting is numerically simulated using finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The results indicate that the light intensification caused by surface cracks is wavelength, crack geometry and position dependent. Under the irradiation of 355 nm laser, lateral cracks on front surfaces and conical cracks on both front and rear surfaces can produce light intensification as high as hundreds of times, which is sufficient to trigger avalanche ionization and finally lower the laser damage resistance of crystal components. Furthermore, we experimentally tested the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) on both crack-free and flawed crystal surfaces. The results imply that brittle fracture with a series of surface cracks is the dominant source of laser damage initiation in crystal components. Due to the negative effect of surface cracks, the LIDT on KDP crystal surface could be sharply reduced from 7.85J/cm(2) to 2.33J/cm(2) (355 nm, 6.4 ns). In addition, the experiment of laser-induced damage growth is performed and the damage growth behavior agrees well with the simulation results of light intensification caused by surface cracks with increasing crack depths.

  5. Microstructure, growth mechanism and anisotropic resistivity of quasi-one-dimensional ZrTe5 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Pang, Bin; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Ye, Liwang; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The study of ZrTe5 is revived because theory predicts the quantum spin Hall effect in monolayer ZrTe5 and topological phase in bulk ZrTe5. To study the topological property of ZrTe5, the growth of large size and high-quality single crystals is the first and crucial step. Here, by mean of iodine (I2) transport agent, centimeter-sized ZrTe5 single crystals were successfully grown by the chemical vapor transport technique. The microstructure characterization reveals that grown ZrTe5 crystal has "stacking stripes of wood" morphology, and growth mechanism is proposed accordingly. The size of grown ZrTe5 crystals can be reached as large as 35×2×0.5 mm3, which enable us to measure the a-, b- and c- axis anisotropic resistance. Large and single crystalline ZrTe5 crystals provide a solid basis for exploring its topological phase.

  6. Pulp-temperature increases after selective ablation of caries by KTP:NdYAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammour, S.; Kowalyk, Kenneth; Valici, Ch.; Guillaume, Patrick

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this investigation is to define optimal parameters of KTP laser irradiation during caries removal. 12 decayed human teeth, recently extracted were used. Their rot canals were prepared for insertion of a thermocouple probe into the pulp chamber. The demineralized tissues have been colored by Acid Red 52 before proceeding to different conditions of irradiation. Pulpal temperature increases were found under the following parameters with 15 seconds continuous lasing: 400mw, 0.10 m sec pulse width, PRR

  7. Temperature rise after KTP:NdYAG laser irradiation as a root-planing complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammour, S.; Kowalyk, Kenneth; Valici, Ch.; Guillaume, Patrick

    1997-05-01

    The purposes of this study was to define the optimal irradiation conditions of a KTP:NdYAG laser after root planning treatment. The surfaces of 40 single-root human teeth were scaled with conventional tools before lasing. The pulpal temperature increase was measured by means of a thermocouple. The influence of variables of coloration by Acid Red 52, scanning speed, dentin thickness, and probe position, have been analyzed for a constant exposure time of 15 seconds. The temperature was below 3 C for the adjustments, power output: 400 mw, scanning speed of irradiation: 2 mm/sec., and Pw 0.10 m sec, PRR < 60 Hz or Pw: 0.12 m sec, PRR < 55 Hz.

  8. KTP laser and neutral red phototherapy of human squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    VanderWerf, Q M; Castro, D J; Nguyen, R D; Paiva, M B; Chao, K H; Santillanes, M E; Saxton, R E

    1997-03-01

    Neutral red (NR) is a cationic, nontoxic vital dye employed as a histologic stain for proliferating cells; it has been used clinically for photodynamic treatment of herpes simplex virus lesions. NR is selectively taken up and concentrated by mitotic cells, an important characteristic for more effective antineoplastic agents. In the present study, UCLA-SO-P3 human squamous carcinoma cells displayed minimal toxicity when incubated with up to 50 microg/ml NR in the absence of light. However, cells incubated with greater than 0.5 microg/ml NR followed by exposure to KTP laser light at 532 nm exhibited nearly 100% tumor cell death. The degree of cell toxicity was proportional to NR dose and laser light fluence. This study demonstrates that NR is an excellent cancer cell photosensitizer in vitro, and, after adding additional in vivo preclinical testing, may prove to be a useful agent in photodynamic destruction of head and neck tumors.

  9. ICME Design of a Castable, Creep-Resistant, Single-Crystal Turbine Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong; Snyder, David; Kozmel, Thomas; Kern, Chris; Saal, James E.; Berglund, Ida; Sebastian, Jason; Olson, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    To improve the efficiency of advanced power systems, integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) tools are being developed at QuesTek Innovations LLC for the design of high-performance alloys for gas turbine. In this article, we detail progress on the design of a low-Re, castable, creep-resistant, single-crystal Ni-based superalloy (QTSX). CALPHAD-based indicators for castability (liquid buoyancy) and creep resistance (γ' coarsening rate constant) were simultaneously employed to predict an optimum alloy composition. Component-level QTSX trail castings have been fabricated, and characterization of the castings has demonstrated freckle-free solidification and creep resistance comparable to CMSX4 and ReneN5, which validates this accelerated ICME approach.

  10. Transverse resistance in HoBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Ruslan V.; Khadzhai, Georgij Ya.; Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V.; Nazyrov, Zarif F.; Chroneos, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The transverse electrical resistance of HoBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals is investigated in the temperature range Tc - 300K for optimally-doped (Tc ≈ 91K) and oxygen-poor (Tc ≈ 51K) samples. With decreasing temperature, the resistivity of the optimally-doped samples has been found to transit from the regime of scattering on phonons and defects to the regime of “semiconductor” character and, near Tc, of the fluctuation conductivity. The oxygen-poor samples have been revealed to exhibit only a variable range hopping conductivity of “semiconductor” character, which near Tc transits into the fluctuation conductivity. A significant anisotropy of the residual resistivity and characteristics of the fluctuation conductivity is observed for samples of both types.

  11. Biopsy of Different Oral Soft Tissues Lesions by KTP and Diode Laser: Histological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Umberto; Russo, Claudia; Lo Giudice, Rossella; Visca, Paolo; Migliau, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Oral biopsy aims to obtain clear and safe diagnosis; it can be performed by scalpel or laser. The controversy in this latter application is the thermal alteration due to tissue heating. The aim of this study is the histological evaluation of margins of “in vivo” biopsies collected by diode and KTP lasers. Material and Methods. 17 oral benign lesions biopsies were made by diode 808 nm (SOL, DenMatItalia, Italy) and KTP 532 nm (SmartLite, DEKA, Italy). Samples were observed at OM LEICA DM 2000; margin alterations were evaluated through Leica Application Suite 3.4. Results. Epithelial and connective damages were assessed for each pathology with an average of 0.245 mm and a standard deviation of ±0.162 mm in mucoceles, 0.382 mm ± 0.149 mm in fibromas, 0.336 mm ± 0.106 mm in hyperkeratosis, 0.473 mm ± 0.105 mm in squamous hyperplasia, 0.182 mm in giant cell granuloma, and 0.149 mm in melanotic macula. Discussion. The histologic aspect of lesions influenced the response to laser, whereas the greater inflammation and cellularity were linked with the higher thermal signs. Many artifacts were also associated to histologic procedures. Conclusion. Both tested lasers permitted sure histologic diagnosis. However, it is suggested to enlarge biopsies of about 0.5 mm, to avoid thermal alterations, especially in inflammatory lesions like oral lichen planus. PMID:25405233

  12. Effects of Tooth Coating Material and Finishing Agent on Bleached Enamel Surfaces by KTP Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Ayumi; Masuda, Yoshiko Murakami; Teruo, Toko; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth coating material and finishing agent on bleached enamel surfaces after using KTP laser with 27% hydrogen peroxide. Background data: There have been few reports on the effects of tooth coating materials and finishing agents after bleaching. Methods: After 40 crowns of human extracted maxillary incisors were bleached by KTP laser, bleached enamels were finished with fluoride only or both of fluoride and nano-hydroxyapatite as a finishing agent. After application(s) of fluoride and/or finishing agent, the enamel surfaces were divided into 2 groups, which were covered with the coating material or without coating material. After application of coating materials, all specimens were kept for 2 weeks at 37°C of 100% humidity. After removing the coating material, color changing was measured and enamel surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: SEM observation of enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material showed the most flattered surface compared to other groups. By measuring the color changing, few color changing was observed on the enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agents and coating material. Conclusion: These results suggested that applications of fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material made the enamel-surfaces flattered and kept effects of bleaching, could prevent the re-coloration. After applications of fluoride gel and finishing agent, covering the bleached-enamel surfaces with the coating material enhanced the keeping whiteness. It would give the patients satisfaction of whiteness. PMID:24155557

  13. Purification, crystallization and data collection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sar2676, a pantothenate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Seetharamappa, Jaldappagari; Oke, Muse; Liu, Huanting; McMahon, Stephen A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Carter, Lester; Dorward, Mark; Zawadzki, Michal; Overton, Ian M.; van Niekirk, C. A. Johannes; Graham, Shirley; Botting, Catherine H.; Taylor, Garry L.; White, Malcolm F.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Coote, Peter J.; Naismith, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Sar2676, a pantothenate synthetase with a molecular weight of 31 419 Da from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has been expressed, purified and crystallized at 293 K. The protein crystallizes in a primitive triclinic lattice, with unit-cell parameters a = 45.3, b = 60.5, c = 117.6 Å, α = 87.2, β = 81.2, γ = 68.4°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution at the ESRF. Consideration of the likely solvent content suggested the asymmetric unit to contain four molecules. This has been confirmed by molecular-replacement phasing calculations, which give a solution with four monomers using a monomer of pantothenate synthetase from Escherichia coli (PDB code 1iho), which is 41% identical to Sar2676, as a search model. PMID:17554169

  14. X-Ray diffraction study of KTiOPO{sub 4} single crystals doped with hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, N. E. Verin, I. A.; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Orlova, E. I.; Voronkova, V. I.

    2011-05-15

    Single crystals of KTi{sub 1-x}Hf{sub x}OPO{sub 4} (x = 0.015(2), 0.035(1), and 0.128(1) are reinvestigated by precision X-ray diffraction at room temperature. It is found that the implantation of hafnium atoms in the crystal structure of KTiOPO{sub 4} does not lead to significant changes in the framework and affects only the positions of the potassium atoms in the channel. Our studies reveal the displacements of the potassium atoms from their main and additional positions in the structure of pure KTP in all three structures studied. The largest displacements from the K1 Prime and K1 Double-Prime additional positions are observed in the structure with x = 0.035. At this hafnium concentration, the occupancy of the main positions of potassium atoms decreases and the occupancy of the additional positions increases in relation to those in KTP. This redistribution of potassium atoms enhances the nonuniformity of distribution of the electron density in the vicinity of their positions, which is probably responsible for the increase in the nonlinear susceptibility of KTP crystals that contain 3.5% hafnium in relation to crystals of pure KTP.

  15. Analysis of shade, temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration during dental bleaching: in vitro study with the KTP and diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Lagori, G; Merigo, E; Meleti, M; Manfredi, M; Guidotti, R; Serraj, A; Vescovi, P

    2013-01-01

    Many dental bleaching techniques are now available, several of them using a laser source. However, the literature on the exact role of coherent light in the biochemical reaction of the whitening process is very discordant. The aims of this in vitro study were: (1) to compare two different laser sources, a KTP laser with a wavelength of 532 nm and a diode laser with a wavelength of 808 nm, during dental bleaching, and (2) to investigate the relationships among changes in gel temperature, tooth shade and hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration during laser irradiation. Altogether, 116 bovine teeth were bleached using a 30% HP gel, some of them with gel only and others with gel plus one of the two lasers (532 or 808 nm) at two different powers (2 and 4 W). The KTP laser produced a significant shade variation with a minimal temperature increase. The diode laser led to a higher temperature increase with a greater reduction in HP concentration, but the change in shade was only statistically significant with a power of 4 W. At a power of 2 W, the KTP laser caused a greater change in shade than the diode laser. No significant correlations were found among temperature, HP concentration and shade variation. The KTP laser appears to provide better results with less dangerous thermal increases than the diode laser. This might call into question most of the literature affirming that the action of laser bleaching is by increasing the gel temperature and, consequently, the speed of the redox reaction. Further study is required to investigate the correlations between the parameters investigated and efficacy of the bleaching process.

  16. Transverse resistance of YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals with different oxygen deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Vovk, R. V.; Nazyrov, Z. F.

    2015-11-01

    The resistivity of YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals across the layers was investigated in the temperature range Tc-300 K and in the range of δ corresponding to the change in Tc from 93 to 33 K. The temperature dependence of the resistivity is adequately described by an empirical expression, which includes "semiconductor" behavior and fluctuation conductivity in the three-dimensional Aslamazov-Larkin model near Tc. For high Tc, the charge carriers are scattered mainly by phonons. For low Tc, scattering by defects dominates; the coherence length ξab(0) and the electron-phonon interaction constant λ reach the values characteristic of conventional (low-temperature) superconductors with strong coupling. Heterogeneity of the samples causes anisotropy of Tc and variable-range hopping conductivity between different phases.

  17. Resistive switching behavior in single crystal SrTiO3 annealed by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xinqiang; Shuai, Yao; Wu, Chuangui; Luo, Wenbo; Sun, Xiangyu; Yuan, Ye; Zhou, Shengqiang; Ou, Xin; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-12-01

    Single crystal SrTiO3 (STO) wafers were annealed by XeCl laser (λ = 308 nm) with different fluences of 0.4 J/cm2, 0.6 J/cm2 and 0.8 J/cm2, respectively. Ti/Pt electrodes were sputtered on the surface of STO wafer to form co-planar capacitor-like structures of Pt/Ti/STO/Ti/Pt. Current-Voltage measurements show that the leakage current is enhanced by increasing laser fluence. Resistive switching behavior is only observed in the sample annealed by laser with relatively high fluence after an electro-forming process. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that the amount of oxygen vacancies increases with the increase of laser fluence. This work indicates resistive switching appears when enough oxygen vacancies are generated by the laser, which form conductive filaments under an external electric field.

  18. High-resistance liquid-crystal lens array for rotatable 2D/3D autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Jen, Tai-Hsiang; Ting, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2014-02-10

    A 2D/3D switchable and rotatable autostereoscopic display using a high-resistance liquid-crystal (Hi-R LC) lens array is investigated in this paper. Using high-resistance layers in an LC cell, a gradient electric-field distribution can be formed, which can provide a better lens-like shape of the refractive-index distribution. The advantages of the Hi-R LC lens array are its 2D/3D switchability, rotatability (in the horizontal and vertical directions), low driving voltage (~2 volts) and fast response (~0.6 second). In addition, the Hi-R LC lens array requires only a very simple fabrication process.

  19. Optical detector selection for 1.5-um KTP OPO atmospheric lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamidipudi, Priyavadan; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1999-05-01

    A 1.5 micron wavelength KTP OPO Lidar system has been developed and used to study the sensitivity and the system signal-to-noise ratio for hard target and atmospheric aerosol lidar returns. Optimization of the receiver system was studied that included the use of different sizes, types of detectors, and the effect of laser beam quality factor, M2, on the telescope overlap function. Detectors that were studied included several different sizes of InGaAs APDs, direct photodetectors, a transferred-electron intensified photodiode (TE-IPD), and a PMT. The influence of the diffraction or beam quality factor (M2) of the OPO laser was studied and found to have a significant influence on the overlap of the transmit and receiver field of view. This overlap function is also influenced by the size of the lidar detector since a large M2 value can overfill the detector/telescope field of view so that small (high speed) detectors may be subject to a large reduction in the lidar signal. The size of the photodiodes and APDs used in the initial OPO lidar experiments were of the order of 0.1 mm to 2 mm, while the TE-IPD and the PMT are larger in acceptance area. Some initial experimental measurements with the photodetectors and APD, and projected theoretical comparisons with the TE-IPD and PMT detectors have been made.

  20. Origins of low resistivity in Al ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2011-06-15

    The origins of low resistivity in Al ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are studied by combining Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The Al-ion implantation (peak concentration: 2.6 x 10{sup 20}cm{sup -3}) into ZnO is performed using a multiple-step energy. The resistivity decreases from {approx}10{sup 4{Omega}} cm for un-implanted ZnO to 1.4 x 10{sup -1{Omega}} cm for as-implanted, and reaches 6.0 x 10{sup -4{Omega}} cm for samples annealed at 1000 deg. C. RBS and NRA measurements for as-implanted ZnO suggest the existence of the lattice displacement of Zn (Zn{sub i}) and O (O{sub i}), respectively. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, the Zn{sub i} related defects remain and the O{sub i} related defects disappear. The origin of the low resistivity in the as-implanted sample is attributed to the Zn{sub i} ({approx}30 meV [Look et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2552 (1999)]). In contrast, the origin of the low resistivity in the sample annealed at 1000 deg. C is assigned to both of the Zn{sub i} related defects and the electrically activated Al donor. A new PL emission appears at around 3.32 eV after annealing at 1000 deg. C, suggesting electrically activated Al donors.

  1. Laser-Damage-Resistant Photoalignment Layers for High-Peak-Power Liquid Crystal Device Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Gan, J.; Mitchell, G.; Papernov, S.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-10-23

    Large-aperture liquid crystal (LC) devices have been in continuous use since 1995 as polarization control devices in the 40-TW, 351-nm, 60-beam OMEGA Nd:glass laser system at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The feasibility of using a noncontacting alignment method for high-peak-power LC laser optics by irradiation of a linearly photopolymerizable polymer with polarized UV light was recently investigated. These materials were found to have surprisingly large laser-damage thresholds at 1054 nm, approaching that of bare fused silica (30 to 60 J/cm^2). Their remarkable laser-damage resistance and ease in scalability to large apertures of these photoalignment materials, along with the ability to produce multiple alignment states by photolithographic patterning, opens new doorways for their application in LC devices for optics, photonics, and high-peak-power laser applications.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Protease-Resistant Core Domain of Yersinia Pestis Virulence Factor Yopr

    SciTech Connect

    Schubot,F.; Cherry, S.; Austin, B.; Tropea, J.; Waugh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete and translocate virulence factors into the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. One of the secreted virulence factors is YopR. Little is known about the function of YopR other than that it is secreted into the extracellular milieu during the early stages of infection and that it contributes to virulence. Hoping to gain some insight into the function of YopR, we determined the crystal structure of its protease-resistant core domain, which consists of residues 38--149 out of 165 amino acids. The core domain is composed of five {alpha}-helices that display unexpected structural similarity with one domain of YopN, a central regulator of type III secretion in Y. pestis. This finding raises the possibility that YopR may play a role in the regulation of type III secretion.

  3. Gallium hole traps in irradiated KTiOPO{sub 4}:Ga crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, V.; Meyer, M.; Malovichko, G.; Hunt, A. W.

    2014-12-07

    Nominally pure and gallium doped single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}) have been studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at low temperatures before and after irradiation. Irradiation with 20 MeV electrons performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature caused an appearance of electrons and holes. Gallium impurities act as hole traps in KTiOPO{sub 4} creating Ga{sup 4+} centers. Two different Ga{sup 4+} centers were observed, Ga1 and Ga2. The Ga1 centers are dominant in Ga-doped samples. For the Ga1 center, a superhyperfine structure with one nucleus with nuclear spin ½ was registered and attributed to the interaction of gallium electrons with a phosphorus nucleus or proton in its surrounding. In both Ga1 and Ga2 centers, Ga{sup 4+} ions substitute for Ti{sup 4+} ions, but with a preference to one of two electrically distinct crystallographic positions (site selective substitution). The Ga doping eliminates one of the shortcomings of KTP crystals—ionic conductivity of bulk crystals. However, this does not improve significantly the resistance of the crystals to electron and γ-radiation.

  4. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli originated MCR-1, a phosphoethanolamine transferase for Colistin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Menglong; Guo, Jiubiao; Cheng, Qipeng; Yang, Zhiqiang; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng; Hao, Quan

    2016-01-01

    MCR-1 is a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) transferase that modifies the pEtN moiety of lipid A, conferring resistance to colistin, which is an antibiotic belonging to the class of polypeptide antibiotics known as polymyxins and is the last-line antibiotic used to treat multidrug resistant bacterial infections. Here we determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1 (MCR-1-ED), which is originated in Escherichia coli (E. coli). MCR-1-ED was found to comprise several classical β-α-β-α motifs that constitute a “sandwich” conformation. Two interlaced molecules with different phosphorylation status of the residue T285 could give rise to two functional statuses of MCR-1 depending on the physiological conditions. MCR-1, like other known pEtN transferases, possesses an enzymatic site equipped with zinc binding residues. Interestingly, two zinc ions were found to mediate intermolecular interactions between MCR-1-ED molecules in one asymmetric unit and hence concatenation of MCR-1, allowing the protein to be oligomer. Findings of this work shall provide important insight into development of effective and clinically useful inhibitors of MCR-1 or structurally similar enzymes. PMID:27958270

  5. The use of the KTP laser in the management of hypertrophic tracheal mucosa and granulation tissue around Provox valve protheses.

    PubMed

    Smith, W K; Pfleiderer, A G

    2003-01-01

    The development of hypertrophic mucosa and granulation tissue around a tracheo-oesophageal fistula voice prosthesis is a commonly encountered problem occurring in 15-20 per cent of patients. Upsizing of the voice prosthesis as well as cautery (silver nitrate and electocautery) are used to counteract this problem to a varying degree of success. The use of the CO2 laser has been mentioned by some authors but details of the method and results have not been published. We report the successful use of the KTP laser for removing such granulations whilst retaining the valve and discuss the reasons why this method should be considered.

  6. Efficient high-peak-power and high-repetition-rate eye-safe laser using an intracavity KTP OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; He, G. Y.; Jiao, Z. X.; Wang, B.

    2015-03-01

    An efficient high-peak-power and high-repetition-rate intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser is demonstrated. We achieved 1.5 W output power of 1.5 μm at 10 kHz repetition rate with the pulse duration of 6 ns. The maximum peak power of 25 kW and the maximum pulse energy of 150 μJ have been obtained. The maximum conversion efficiency of 9.5% is achieved with respect to a laser diode power of 10.5 W.

  7. Thermal stability and crystallization kinetics of Cu-Zr-Al-Ag BMGs investigated with isothermal electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Fang; Cui, Xiao; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Zu, Fang-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    The thermal stability and crystallization kinetics of the Cu x Zr84- x Al8Ag8 ( x = 42, 40, 38, and 36) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were studied by measurement of isothermal electrical-resistance. As the composition becomes richer in Zr, the longer incubation time at the same relative annealing temperature, and the larger local activation energy needed to achieve the same crystallized volume-fraction, indicate improved thermal stability, which resists crystallization. The improved thermal stability is attributed to a denser atomic random-stacking structure and larger negative heat-of-mixing. During isothermal annealing processes, the four BMGs exhibited the same nucleation mechanism, which is a decreasing rate of nucleation over time. However, the crystal growth mechanisms of the four BMGs are different. The crystallization of the Cu36Zr48Al8Ag8 and Cu38Zr46Al8Ag8 BMGs is interface-controlled growth, contrasting with diffusion-controlled growth for the Cu40Zr44Al8Ag8 and Cu42Zr42Al8Ag8 alloys. The different growth modes may be caused by fluctuations in composition due to changes in the quantity and distribution of Cu-rich and Ag-rich regions.

  8. Low-power interstitial photocoagulation of uterine leiomyomas by KTP/YAG laser: a review of 50 consecutive cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Roxana

    1994-12-01

    Interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP), which is a new method of low power laser destruction of tumors, has been used to treat laparoscopically 50 consecutive patients with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas which were difficult or impossible to remove via laparoscopy. The KTP/YAG laser, with wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm respectively, was employed. Holes 2 cm apart were drilled with a 600 micrometers quartz laser fiber employing the KTP component at 8 W and subsequent coagulation of the surrounding myoma tissue was accomplished during the withdrawal of the fiber over the course of 10 - 30 s but using the YAG component at 8 W until the whole myoma had been treated. Thirty seven became symptom free and have remained so. Six were lost to follow up. Of 10 complaining of subfertility 4, in whom uterine myomas were the only etiological factor, have become pregnant. Seven patients required further treatment: Two were retreated because their myomas were excessively large and did not completely disappear with the initial ILP, 2 received further ILP because of the development of new myomas and 3 were subjected to laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy at patients' request (2 because of the development of new myomas and 1 because of the development of further endometriosis). Finally, in 7 cases, residual tumor or scar tissue was biopsied and examined for the presence of oestrogen and progesterone receptors. None was discovered and in 2 subsequent pregnancy did not cause further growth of residual myoma tissue.

  9. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) with the KTP 532 laser for the treatment of uterine adenomyosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Roxana; Chapman, Kenneth

    1997-05-01

    Adenomyosis is a condition in which the myometrium is infiltrated by endometrial glands and stroma. This results in myometrial hyperplasia, uterine enlargement and causes menorrhagia, dysmenorrhoea and dyspareunia for which there is no known cure other than hysterectomy. The success of LITT in the treatment of uterine leiomyomata suggested that this might also be effective for the treatment of adenomyosis. Initially LITT was carried out on patients with adenomyosis prior to hysterectomy, then on patients who had completed child-bearing and finally on those who desired a family. Not only were symptoms relieved but pregnancies occurred spontaneously. The KTP 532 nm component of the KTP/YAG laser, which is absorbed by red pigment, was used with a 600 micrometer fiber with a bare tip via a needle microstat at laparoscopy. Holes were drilled in the abnormal tissue 3 cm apart and the laser fiber then slowly withdrawn, the object being to coagulate the surrounding blood vessels and adenomyotic tissue. The number of joules required depended on the volume of tissue treated.

  10. "Broadband" Bioinformatics Skills Transfer with the Knowledge Transfer Programme (KTP): Educational Model for Upliftment and Sustainable Development.

    PubMed

    Chimusa, Emile R; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Masilela, Velaphi; Kumuthini, Judit

    2015-11-01

    A shortage of practical skills and relevant expertise is possibly the primary obstacle to social upliftment and sustainable development in Africa. The "omics" fields, especially genomics, are increasingly dependent on the effective interpretation of large and complex sets of data. Despite abundant natural resources and population sizes comparable with many first-world countries from which talent could be drawn, countries in Africa still lag far behind the rest of the world in terms of specialized skills development. Moreover, there are serious concerns about disparities between countries within the continent. The multidisciplinary nature of the bioinformatics field, coupled with rare and depleting expertise, is a critical problem for the advancement of bioinformatics in Africa. We propose a formalized matchmaking system, which is aimed at reversing this trend, by introducing the Knowledge Transfer Programme (KTP). Instead of individual researchers travelling to other labs to learn, researchers with desirable skills are invited to join African research groups for six weeks to six months. Visiting researchers or trainers will pass on their expertise to multiple people simultaneously in their local environments, thus increasing the efficiency of knowledge transference. In return, visiting researchers have the opportunity to develop professional contacts, gain industry work experience, work with novel datasets, and strengthen and support their ongoing research. The KTP develops a network with a centralized hub through which groups and individuals are put into contact with one another and exchanges are facilitated by connecting both parties with potential funding sources. This is part of the PLOS Computational Biology Education collection.

  11. The one year outcome after KTP laser vaporization of the prostate according to the calculated vaporized volume.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ja Hyeon; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Cho, Sung Yong; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new simple method for measuring the vaporized volume and to evaluate the outcome of high-power potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) photoselective laser vaporization. A total of 65 patients, with a mean age of 67.7 yr (range 53 to 85), were included in the primary analysis. The vaporized volume was calculated as the pre-operative volume minus the immediate post-operative volume plus the volume of the defect. For all patients, the subjective and objective parameters improved significantly after surgery. Six and 12 months after surgery, the group with a smaller vaporized volume (<15 g) had a lower reduction of the mean International Prostate Symptom Score (P=0.006 and P=0.004) and quality of life index (P=0.006 and P=0.004) when compared to the group with a greater vaporized volume (>or=15 g). There were no differences in the change of the maximum flow rate and post-void residual based on the vaporized volume. Our findings suggest that the subjective improvement, after a high-power KTP laser vaporization, may be dependent on the vaporized volume obtained after the procedure.

  12. Effects of low-molecular weight resist components on dissolution behavior of chemically amplified resists for extreme ultraviolet lithography studied by quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuyasu, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    It is challenging to implement extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography for mass production because the demands for the EUV resist materials are very strict. Under such circumstances, it is important in EUV resist design to clarify the dissolution behavior of the resist film into alkaline developer. In particular, the dissolution in exposed area of resist films is one of the most critical processes. However, the details in dissolution process of EUV resist have not been investigated thus far. In this study, the dissolution of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) polymer and PHS partially-protected with t-butoxycarbonyl group (t-BOC-PHS) with and without additives such as acid generator and amines was studied by using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method. The dissolution behavior of thin films was investigated by varying the exposure dose and the acid generator concentration from the standpoint of a systematic understanding of the effects of each resist component on dissolution kinetics. The dissolution speed became slower with increase of TPS-tf concentration in PHS and t-BOC-PHS. It is important for the EUV resist design to take into account the concentration of undecomposed PAG.

  13. A prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing the suitability of KTP laser tonsillectomy with conventional dissection tonsillectomy for day case surgery.

    PubMed

    Kothari, P; Patel, S; Brown, P; Obara, L; O'Malley, S

    2002-10-01

    Tonsillectomy using a KTP laser has been performed increasingly but is not a routinely practised technique in the UK. In the USA, tonsillectomy is often performed as a day case procedure but, here in the UK, it is still standard practice to admit patients for overnight stay. We present the largest prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial to date (151 patients) comparing KTP laser with standard dissection tonsillectomy and assess the suitability of both procedures for day case surgery. We found that there was significantly less peroperative haemorrhage if tonsillectomy was performed using the KTP laser, but it did cause more postoperative pain, more depression in mood and a higher rate of both reactionary and secondary haemorrhage, which was not significant when compared with conventional dissection. There was no difference in operating time, and over 40% of patients in each group needed overnight admission. We conclude that KTP laser tonsillectomy offers no benefit apart from less intraoperative bleeding over standard dissection tonsillectomy. Discharge from hospital after tonsillectomy was found to be unpredictable. Tonsillectomy is therefore an unsuitable procedure for planned surgery through a day unit, but approximately 58% of patients could be discharged on the same day from an extended day surgery unit, and the rest have one night in hospital.

  14. Metal induced crystallized poly-Si-based conductive bridge resistive switching memory device with one transistor and one resistor architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, Umesh; Huang, Chun-Yang; Kumar, Dayanand; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, the metal induced crystallization (MIC) process is used in the Si-based conductive bridging resistive random access memory (CBRAM) application. The amorphous Si (a-Si) is transformed to crystallized poly-silicon (poly-Si) at a low temperature by using Ni metal for inducing poly-Si to provide the resistive switching. The MIC process can produce a highly preferred orientation poly-Si film, which can create the exact paths or grain boundaries through the top and down electrodes in the present CBRAM device. The grain boundary in MIC poly-Si layer can confine the conductive filament of metal bridging growth in it, which can improve the switching fluctuation behavior in the nonvolatile memory application. Compared with the a-Si based device, a significant improvement in terms of resistive switching parameters such as stability and resistance distribution is demonstrated in the MIC poly-Si CBRAM device. Moreover, the well-behaved memory performance, such as high ON/OFF resistance ratio (4 order), a large AC endurance (106), and good retention characteristics (104 s at 125 °C) are achieved in the Cu/poly-Si/n+-Si CMOS compatible cross bar structure.

  15. Electrical resistance relaxation induced by high pressure in single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.

    2013-06-01

    An effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the electrical resistance in the ab-plane of single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ with oxygen deficiency is investigated. It is found that the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance is determined by the fluctuation conductivity near Tc and by the scattering of electrons by phonons in a normal state. A high pressure causes the redistribution of labile oxygen, increasing a phase separation. The depressuriazation is accompanied by relaxation processes in both the phonon and the electronic subsystems, the characteristic times of which are significantly different from each other.

  16. Highly resistive C-doped hydride vapor phase epitaxy-GaN grown on ammonothermally crystallized GaN seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwinska, Malgorzata; Piotrzkowski, Ryszard; Litwin-Staszewska, Elzbieta; Sochacki, Tomasz; Amilusik, Mikolaj; Fijalkowski, Michal; Lucznik, Boleslaw; Bockowski, Michal

    2017-01-01

    GaN crystals were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and doped with C. The seeds were high-structural-quality ammonothermally crystallized GaN. The grown crystals were highly resistive at 296 K and of high structural quality. High-temperature Hall effect measurements revealed p-type conductivity and a deep acceptor level in the material with an activation energy of 1 eV. This is in good agreement with density functional theory calculations based on hybrid functionals as presented by the Van de Walle group. They obtained an ionization energy of 0.9 eV when C was substituted for N in GaN and acted as a deep acceptor.

  17. Crystallization and Corrosion Resistance in Different Aqueous Solutions of Zr50.7Ni28Cu9Al12.3 Amorphous Alloy and Its Crystallization Counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wenjuan; Li, Boyu; Axinte, Eugen; Zhang, Zitang; Shang, Caiyun; Wang, Yan

    2017-02-01

    The Zr50.7Ni28Cu9Al12.3 amorphous alloy and its crystallization counterparts have been prepared using a melt spinning technique and proper annealing treatment. The as-annealed products at 768 K are amorphous composites consisting of a main amorphous phase and a few ZrO2 nanocrystals. The corrosion behaviors have been investigated in 0.5-M NaCl, 1-M HCl, and 0.5-M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that amorphous composites present the enhanced corrosion resistance in Cl- containing solutions due to the formation of compact passive films, which are promoted by an appropriate quantity of ZrO2 nanocrystals. Nevertheless, the relaxed samples possess good corrosion resistance in H2SO4 solution, which is attributed to the existence of Zr(Al, Ni)-rich protective film induced by the depletion of Cu. In addition, corrosion resistance of the tested alloys is relatively superior in H2SO4 solution, especially for pitting corrosion resistance, and inferior in HCl solution.

  18. The bleaching efficiency of KTP and diode 810 nm lasers on teeth stained with different substances: An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Lagori, G; Vescovi, P; Merigo, E; Meleti, M.; Fornaini, C

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bleaching efficiency of two different lasers (KTP and diode 810 nm) on teeth, randomly divided by means an Excel function (Microsoft Excel 2010 “Fx causale”) and stored in physiological solution, that were previously stained with different substances commonly considered as a cause of tooth discoloration, such as coffee, tea and red fruits and to investigate the role of laser irradiation in an experimental model, during the dental bleaching process. Methods: Three groups of 45 bovine teeth were created and immersed for one week in a solution of tea, coffee or red fruits respectively. Each group was divided into three sub-groups of fifteen teeth. One was bleached with a 30% hydrogen peroxide gel for 30 min only as control, another 15 teeth group was bleached with the gel plus 810 nm diode laser irradiation and the last group was bleached with the gel plus KTP irradiation. The lasers were applied in three cycles of 30 sec each with a power of 1.5 W localized on a 10 mm spot on the teeth. The temperature of the gel was checked during the bleaching procedure using a thermometer and the colour of each tooth was measured by a spectrophotometer. Results: Statistical analysis of the collected data was performed using Graph Pad Prism, version 6.01 software, Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's multiple comparison test and Mann-Whitney test. P value <0.0001 was considered extremely significant (***), P value between 0.001 to 0.01 very significant (**), P value between 0.01 to 0.05 significant (*) and P value >0.05 not significant (ns). By these tests diode laser was effective only at bleaching teeth stained with coffee meanwhile the KTP laser was efficient at bleaching teeth with coffee, tea and red fruits stains. Conclusion: This study suggests that a relation between the laser wavelength and the type of staining on the dental enamel and the efficacy of the whitening treatment exists. PMID:24771968

  19. Oxidation Resistance and Critical Sulfur Content of Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1997-01-01

    The high-temperature components of a jet turbine engine are made from nickel-base superalloys. These components must be able to withstand high stresses, fatigue, and corrosive reactions with high-temperature gases. Such oxidation resistance is associated with slow-growing Al2O3 scales that remain adherent to superalloy components after many thermal cycles. Historically, good oxidation resistance has been obtained by coating these components with Ni-Cr-Al-Y coatings, where small additions of yttrium (Y) were necessary for scale adhesion. Subsequently, it was found that the Y aids scale adhesion by preventing sulfur from segregating to the scale metal interface and thus preventing the sulfur from weakening the oxide-metal bonds. Y is a difficult element to incorporate in single-crystal superalloy castings, but it was shown in early work at the NASA Lewis Research Center that good adhesion could be obtained for low-sulfur, uncoated, singlecrystal superalloys, without Y additions. Low sulfur contents for these uncoated superalloys were achieved in the laboratory by a high-temperature hydrogen annealing process. This process allows segregation and surface cleaning of sulfur monolayers in a reducing environment. Another approach is to remove sulfur from the alloy in the melting process. The present study was designed to establish a guideline for the minimum level of desulfurization needed to achieve maximum performance. Coupons of various thicknesses of the superalloy PWA 1480 were hydrogen annealed at various times (8 to 100 hr) and temperatures (1000 to 1300 C), resulting in coupons with sulfur contents ranging from about 0.05 to 5 ppm. Cyclic oxidation tests at 1100 C were then used to assess adhesion and spalling. The weight change of one set of 20-mil (0.5-mm) samples, annealed for 20 hr at 1000, 1100, 1200, and 1300 C, is shown in the following figure. Clearly, the effect of the annealing temperature is quite dramatic in that the higher temperatures produced scales

  20. The crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa, an enzyme responsible for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Nurizzo, Didier; Shewry, Steven C; Perlin, Michael H; Brown, Scott A; Dholakia, Jaydev N; Fuchs, Roy L; Deva, Taru; Baker, Edward N; Smith, Clyde A

    2003-03-21

    A major factor in the emergence of antibiotic resistance is the existence of enzymes that chemically modify common antibiotics. The genes for these enzymes are commonly carried on mobile genetic elements, facilitating their spread. One such class of enzymes is the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (APH) family, which uses ATP-mediated phosphate transfer to chemically modify and inactivate aminoglycoside antibiotics such as streptomycin and kanamycin. As part of a program to define the molecular basis for aminoglycoside recognition and inactivation by such enzymes, we have determined the high resolution (2.1A) crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa (APH(3')-IIa) in complex with kanamycin. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using multiple models derived from the related aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-III enzyme (APH(3')-III), and refined to an R factor of 0.206 (R(free) 0.238). The bound kanamycin molecule is very well defined and occupies a highly negatively charged cleft formed by the C-terminal domain of the enzyme. Adjacent to this is the binding site for ATP, which can be modeled on the basis of nucleotide complexes of APH(3')-III; only one change is apparent with a loop, residues 28-34, in a position where it could fold over an incoming nucleotide. The three rings of the kanamycin occupy distinct sub-pockets in which a highly acidic loop, residues 151-166, and the C-terminal residues 260-264 play important parts in recognition. The A ring, the site of phosphoryl transfer, is adjacent to the catalytic base Asp190. These results give new information on the basis of aminoglycoside recognition, and on the relationship between this phosphotransferase family and the protein kinases.

  1. Characterization Study of Band Gap, Resistivity, Crystal Structure, and Phase Identification of CuInSe2 Ternary Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saing, Bungaran; Arto, Budi

    2016-01-01

    Characterization study of band gap, resistivity, crystal structure, and phase identification of CuInSe2 ternary alloy which is the synthesis result of Bridgman method by using modified simple single zone temperature, have been carried out. The phase identification and crystal structure of obtained polycrystal were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Then the X-ray diffractograms were analyzed by using crystallographic software package GSAS. Electrical resistivity and bandgap were measured by using Van der Pauw method. Identification and analysis of diffractogram show that ternary alloy of CuInSe2 has main phase of space group I ̅4 ad and lattice parameters a and c of 6,1173 A and 11,7144 Å respectively. The other coexisting phases were identified as CuIn5Se8 with the space group P ̅4 2 m and Se with the space group P3121. Result from the resistivity measurement shows the resistivity is between (1,596 - 9,666) × 10 -3Ωm, and Bandgap is around 1,03 - 1,61 eV.

  2. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  3. Origins of low resistivity and Ge donor level in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2013-12-04

    The energy level of Ge in Ge-ion implanted ZnO single crystals is studied by Hall-effect and photoluminescence (PL) methods. The variations in resistivity from ∼10{sup 3} Ωcm for un-implanted samples to ∼10{sup −2} Ωcm for as-implanted ones are observed. The resistivity is further decreased to ∼10{sup −3} Ωcm by annealing. The origins of the low resistivity are attributed to both the zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}) related defects and the electrical activated Ge donor. An activation energy of Ge donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 102 meV. In PL studies, the new peak at 372 nm (3.33 eV) related to the Ge donor is observed in 1000 °C annealed samples.

  4. Tissue effects of Nd:YAG, KTP, and FiberTomeTM lasers with varying fiber tips and power settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Snyder, Wendy J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Duffy, J. T.; Thomas, Reem; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Fry, Stephen M.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    This study compared the laser tissue effect of the Dornier FiberTomeTM system, the conventional Nd:YAG and the KTP laser on the stomach and liver. The cutting capabilities, thermal effects of the laser systems, as well as their dependence on power output and tissue type, were evaluated. A motorized fiber holder to maintain constant conditions (cutting speed fiber angle, and pressure) was developed. The results show that the cutting depth and cutting width are inversely proportional to the output level. The thermal damage remained constant as the output increased. Use of the FiberTomeTM system appears to be more advantageous than the conventional Nd:YAG laser in pigmented tissues, in the range of the parameters tested.

  5. “Broadband” Bioinformatics Skills Transfer with the Knowledge Transfer Programme (KTP): Educational Model for Upliftment and Sustainable Development

    PubMed Central

    Chimusa, Emile R.; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Masilela, Velaphi; Kumuthini, Judit

    2015-01-01

    A shortage of practical skills and relevant expertise is possibly the primary obstacle to social upliftment and sustainable development in Africa. The “omics” fields, especially genomics, are increasingly dependent on the effective interpretation of large and complex sets of data. Despite abundant natural resources and population sizes comparable with many first-world countries from which talent could be drawn, countries in Africa still lag far behind the rest of the world in terms of specialized skills development. Moreover, there are serious concerns about disparities between countries within the continent. The multidisciplinary nature of the bioinformatics field, coupled with rare and depleting expertise, is a critical problem for the advancement of bioinformatics in Africa. We propose a formalized matchmaking system, which is aimed at reversing this trend, by introducing the Knowledge Transfer Programme (KTP). Instead of individual researchers travelling to other labs to learn, researchers with desirable skills are invited to join African research groups for six weeks to six months. Visiting researchers or trainers will pass on their expertise to multiple people simultaneously in their local environments, thus increasing the efficiency of knowledge transference. In return, visiting researchers have the opportunity to develop professional contacts, gain industry work experience, work with novel datasets, and strengthen and support their ongoing research. The KTP develops a network with a centralized hub through which groups and individuals are put into contact with one another and exchanges are facilitated by connecting both parties with potential funding sources. This is part of the PLOS Computational Biology Education collection. PMID:26583922

  6. Domain wall orientation and domain shape in KTiOPO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Vaskina, E. M.; Pelegova, E. V.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kizko, O. V.; Ivanov, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Domain shape evolution and domain wall motion have been studied in KTiOPO4 (KTP) ferroelectric single crystals using complementary experimental methods. The in situ visualization of domain kinetics has allowed revealing: (1) qualitative change of the domain shape, (2) dependence of the domain wall velocity on its orientation, (3) jump-like domain wall motion caused by domain merging, (4) effect of domain shape stability. The model of domain wall motion driven by generation of elementary steps (kink-pair nucleation) and subsequent kink motion is presented. The decrease in the relative velocity of the approaching parallel domain walls is attributed to electrostatic interaction. The effect of polarization reversal induced by chemical etching is observed. The obtained results are important for the development of domain engineering in the crystals of KTP family.

  7. Improved resistance to wear and fatigue fracture in high pressure crystallized vitamin E-containing ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Beckos, Christine A. Godleski; Lozynsky, Andrew J.; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2013-01-01

    Higher crystallinity and extended chain morphology are induced in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in the hexagonal phase at temperatures and pressures above the triple point, resulting in improved mechanical properties. In this study, we report the effects of the presence of a plasticizing agent, namely vitamin E (α-tocopherol), in UHMWPE during high pressure crystallization. We found that this new vitamin E-blended and high pressure crystallized UHMWPE (VEHPE) has improved fatigue strength and wear resistance compared to virgin high pressure crystallized (HP) UHMWPE. This suggested different mechanisms of wear reduction and fatigue crack propagation resistance in UHMWPE. PMID:19135247

  8. Improved resistance to wear and fatigue fracture in high pressure crystallized vitamin E-containing ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Godleski Beckos, Christine A; Lozynsky, Andrew J; Malhi, Arnaz S; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2009-04-01

    Higher crystallinity and extended chain morphology are induced in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in the hexagonal phase at temperatures and pressures above the triple point, resulting in improved mechanical properties. In this study, we report the effects of the presence of a plasticizing agent, namely vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), in UHMWPE during high pressure crystallization. We found that this new vitamin E-blended and high pressure crystallized UHMWPE (VEHPE) has improved fatigue strength and wear resistance compared to virgin high pressure crystallized (HP) UHMWPE. This suggested different mechanisms of wear reduction and fatigue crack propagation resistance in UHMWPE.

  9. C-axis electrical resistivity of PrO1-aFaBiS2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Masanori; Miura, Akira; Watauchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-08-01

    The high anisotropy in RO1-aFaBiS2 (R denotes a rare-earth element) superconductors demonstrates their potential use as intrinsic Josephson junctions, considering the weak coupling among BiS2-PrO(F)-BiS2 (superconducting-normal-superconducting) layers along the c-axis. We grew PrO1-aFaBiS2 single crystals using CsCl/KCl flux. The superconducting anisotropies of the grown single crystals were estimated to be approximately 40-50 from the effective mass model. The c-axis transport properties were characterized using single-crystal s-shaped intrinsic Josephson junctions with a focused ion beam. Along the c-axis, the crystals showed zero resistivity at 2.7 K and a critical current density of 1.33 × 103 A/cm2 at 2.0 K. The current-voltage curve along the c-axis displayed hysteresis. The c-axis transport measurements under a magnetic field parallel to the ab-plane revealed a “lock-in” state due to the Josephson vortex flow, indicating that BiS2 superconductors are promising candidates for intrinsic Josephson junctions.

  10. Biopolymer microencapsulations of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal preparations for increased stability and resistance to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaolin; Sun, Zhongqin; He, Kanglai; Guo, Shuyuan

    2017-04-01

    Parasporal crystals synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been widely used as microbial pesticides because of their toxicity to the larval stages of specific insects. However, parasporal crystals can be damaged by environmental stresses, such as high temperature, ultraviolet radiation, and desiccation. To reduce environmental susceptibility of parasporal crystals and extend the duration of their activity, we developed a new type of protection by making microcapsules of crystals (MCs). The microcapsules were self-assembled by alternate deposition (layer by layer) of low-cost chitosan and sodium alginate (or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose) on the crystal surface. Crystal toxins (Cry1Ac) were released from microcapsules at pH values above 9.0. Bioassay results demonstrated that microencapsulated preparations had larvicidal toxicity equivalent to the non-encapsulated form. Microencapsuled crystals were protected from environmental stresses such as high temperature and desiccation. The results indicate that microcapsule protection can enhance the efficacy of Bt in pest control, especially to Lepidoptera larvae that have a alkaline midgut.

  11. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of FtsA from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Junso; Miyazaki, Yuma; Hirose, Mika; Nagao, Chioko; Mizohata, Eiichi; Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    FtsA from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A cocrystal with β-γ-imidoadenosine 5′-phosphate (AMPPNP; a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue) was grown using PEG 3350 as a precipitant at 293 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.3 Å at 100 K. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.31, b = 102.78, c = 105.90 Å, β = 96.54°. The calculated Matthews coefficient suggested that the asymmetric unit contained three or four monomers. PMID:23908037

  12. Stable Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GdVO4/KTP green laser with dual-loss-modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Yang, Kejian; Cheng, Kang; Zhang, Yan

    2010-08-20

    A diode-pumped dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:GdVO(4)/KTP green laser with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and GaAs saturable absorber is presented. The experimental results show that the stability and the peak power of the dual-loss-modulated QML Nd:GdVO(4)/KTP green laser are significantly improved. The pulse width of the Q-switched pulse envelope in the dual-loss-modulation QML green laser has a compression of 50% compared with that in the singly passively QML green laser with GaAs. By using a hyperbolic secant square function and considering the Gaussian distribution of the intracavity photon density, the coupled equations for diode-pumped dual-loss-modulated QML Nd:GdVO(4) green laser are given, and the numerical solutions of the equations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Crystal Structures of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 From Penicillin-Susceptible And -Resistant Strains of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Reveal An Unexpectedly Subtle Mechanism for Antibiotic Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.J.; Tomberg, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Nicholas, R.A.; Davies, C.

    2009-05-21

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for {beta}-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  14. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  15. Heat capacity, resistivity, and angular dependent magnetization studies of single crystal Nd1+ϵFe4B4 for ϵ≈17

    DOE PAGES

    Conner, Benjamin S.; Susner, Michael A.; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; ...

    2017-04-04

    Advances in crystal growth have allowed for synthesis of large single crystals of Nd1+ϵFe4B4, a well-known phase with a modulated structure. As a result we are able to report heat capacity and resistivity measurements on a single crystal Nd1+ϵFe4B4 sample with a distribution of ϵ that skews towards the solubility limit of Nd near ϵ ≈ 17. Heat capacity measurements show evidence of crystal field splitting at temperatures higher than the long-range ferromagnetic Curie temperature. Heat capacity, resistivity, and magnetization measurements all confirm a Curie temperature of 7 K which is lower than previously reported values in the Nd1+ϵFe4B4 system.more » Here, we also perform measurements of the angular dependence of the magnetization and discover behavior associated with the magnetic anisotropy that is inconsistent with the simple description previously proposed.« less

  16. Intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator driven by a KLM Nd:GGG laser with a single AO modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Yufei; Li, Tao; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Qiao, Wenchao

    2015-05-01

    An intracavity KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a Kerr lens mode-locking (KLM) Nd:GGG laser near 1062 nm with a single AO modulator was realized for the first time. The mode-locking pulses of the signal wave were obtained with a short duration of subnanosecond and a repetition rate of several kilohertz (kHz). Under a diode pump power of 8.25 W, a maximum output power of 104 mW at signal wavelength near 1569 nm was obtained at a repetition rate of 2 kHz. The highest pulse energy and peak power were estimated to be 80 μJ and 102 kW at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, respectively. The shortest pulse duration was measured to be 749 ps. By considering the Gaussian spatial distribution of the photon density and the Kerr-lens effect in the gain medium, a set of the coupled rate equations for QML intracavity optical parametric oscillator are given and the numerical simulations are basically fitted with the experimental results.

  17. High-speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging at 1.7 μm with a KTP-based OPO

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Jie; Yu, Qianhuan; Ma, Teng; Wang, Pu; Cao, Yingchun; Bruning, Rebecca S.; Qu, Yueqiao; Chen, Zhongping; Zhou, Qifa; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-01-01

    Lipid deposition inside the arterial wall is a hallmark of plaque vulnerability. Based on overtone absorption of C-H bonds, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) catheter is a promising technology for quantifying the amount of lipid and its spatial distribution inside the arterial wall. Thus far, the clinical translation of IVPA technology is limited by its slow imaging speed due to lack of a high-pulse-energy high-repetition-rate laser source for lipid-specific first overtone excitation at 1.7 μm. Here, we demonstrate a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP)-based optical parametric oscillator with output pulse energy up to 2 mJ at a wavelength of 1724 nm and with a repetition rate of 500 Hz. Using this laser and a ring-shape transducer, IVPA imaging at speed of 1 frame per sec was demonstrated. Performance of the IVPA imaging system’s resolution, sensitivity, and specificity were characterized by carbon fiber and a lipid-mimicking phantom. The clinical utility of this technology was further evaluated ex vivo in an excised atherosclerotic human femoral artery with comparison to histology. PMID:26601018

  18. The Crystal Structure at Room Temperature of Six Cast Heat-Resisting Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, Burt M.

    1947-01-01

    The crystal structures of alloys 61, X-40,X-50, 422-19, 6059, and Vitallium, derived from x-ray diffraction, are discussed. The alloys have been, or are being considered for use in gas turbine applications. The predominant phase was a solid solution of the face centered cubic type of the principal constituent elements.The lattice parameters were found to be between 3.5525 and 3.5662.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of a trypsin-resistant catalytic domain of human calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Roehrl, Michael H. A.; Xiao, Li; He, Xiuyun; Li, Haibin; Ge, Linhu; Shi, Bingyi

    2012-01-01

    Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, plays a key role in a number of cellular pathways, including T-cell activation, and is an important molecular target of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK506. To understand the structural basis underlying the activation of calcineurin by calmodulin, X-ray crystallography was employed to solve the three-dimensional structure of the free calcineurin catalytic domain (residues 20–347 of the A subunit). To accomplish this, a bacterially expressed glutathione S-­transferase (GST) fusion protein of the human calcineurin catalytic domain was first purified by GST-affinity chromatography. After limited digestion by trypsin, the catalytic domain (Cncat) was purified using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystallization of Cncat was achieved by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at pH 6.5 using PEG 6000 as precipitant. The diffraction results showed that the Cncat crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.6, b = 87.4, c = 112.0 Å. There are four Cncat molecules in the asymmetric unit, with 49.5% solvent content. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.87 Å resolution and a clear molecular-replacement solution was obtained. The active site of Cncat is open to the solvent channels in the crystal packing. PMID:22691791

  20. Modification of superconducting and resistive properties of HoBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals under application-removal of high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Kamchatna, S. N.; Chroneos, A.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a high hydrostatic pressure on the basal-plane electrical resistance along the twin boundaries in underdoped HoBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals is investigated. An enhancement of the phase segregation caused by the high-pressure-induced redistribution of the labile oxygen has been revealed. The temperature dependences of the electrical resistance above Tc can be approximated well within the framework of the model of s - d electron-phonon scattering.

  1. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  2. Effect of long aging on the resistivity properties of optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Samoilov, A. V.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the conducting properties in the basal ab-plane before and after a long time exposure in air atmosphere of the optimally oxygen doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals. Prolonged exposure leads to an increase of the effective scattering centers of the normal carriers. The excess conductivity in a wide temperature range has exponential temperature dependence and near the critical temperature is well described within the Aslamazov-Larkin theoretical model. The prolonged exposure increases to a great extent the temperature range of the implementation of the pseudogap state, narrowing the linear section of the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the ab-plane, ρab(Т).

  3. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  4. Crystallization kinetics and thermal resistance of bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumsorn, S.; Srisawat, N.; On, J. Wong; Pivsa-Art, S.; Hamada, H.

    2014-05-01

    Bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites were prepared in this study. Biodegradable poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) was blended with bamboo fiber in a twin screw extruder with varied bamboo content from 20-0wt%. PBS/bamboo fiber composites were fabricated by compression molding process. The effect of bamboo fiber contents on properties of the composites was investigated. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetic study of the composites was investigated based on Avrami equation. The kinetic parameters indicated that bamboo fiber acted as heterogeneous nucleation and enhanced crystallinity of the composites. Bamboo fiber was well dispersed on PBS matrix and good adhered with the matrix. Tensile strength of the composites slightly deceased with adding bamboo fiber. However, tensile modulus and impact strength of the composites increased when increasing bamboo fiber contents. It can be noted that bamboo fiber promoted crystallization and crystallinity of PBS in the composites. Therefore, the composites were better in impact load transferring than neat PBS, which exhibited improving on impact performance of the composites.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies to near-atomic resolution of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Benjamin R.; Dobson, Renwick C. J. Dogovski, Con; Jameson, Geoffrey B.; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2008-07-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme of the lysine-biosynthetic pathway, is a promising target for antibiotic development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis to 1.45 Å resolution of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant S. aureus is reported. In recent years, dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS; EC 4.2.1.52) has received considerable attention from both mechanistic and structural viewpoints. DHDPS is part of the diaminopimelate pathway leading to lysine, coupling (S)-aspartate-β-semialdehyde with pyruvate via a Schiff base to a conserved active-site lysine. In this paper, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, an important bacterial pathogen, are reported. The enzyme was crystallized in a number of forms, predominantly from PEG precipitants, with the best crystal diffracting to beyond 1.45 Å resolution. The space group was P1 and the unit-cell parameters were a = 65.4, b = 67.6, c = 78.0 Å, α = 90.1, β = 68.9, γ = 72.3°. The crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) was 2.34 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, with an estimated solvent content of 47% for four monomers per asymmetric unit. The structure of the enzyme will help to guide the design of novel therapeutics against the methicillin-resistant S. aureus pathogen.

  6. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative multiple antibiotic resistance repressor protein (MarR) from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Zhi-Le; Li, Juo-Ning; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Shr, Hui-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Gao, Fei Philip; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2005-07-01

    A putative repressor for the multiple antibiotic resistance operon from a plant pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å with good quality. The multiple antibiotic resistance operon (marRAB) is a member of the multidrug-resistance system. When induced, this operon enhances resistance of bacteria to a variety of medically important antibiotics, causing a serious global health problem. MarR is a marR-encoded protein that represses the transcription of the marRAB operon. Through binding with salicylate and certain antibiotics, however, MarR can derepress and activate the marRAB operon. In this report, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1739, a putative MarR repressor protein present in the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a Gram-negative bacterium causing major worldwide disease of cruciferous crops, are described. The XC1739 crystals diffracted to a resolution of at least 1.8 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.5, b = 54.2 and c = 139.5 Å, respectively. They contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit from calculation of the self-rotation function.

  7. Multicenter evaluation of crystal violet decolorization assay (CVDA) for rapid detection of isoniazid and rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Akbal, Ahmet Ugur; Bicmen, Can; Albay, Ali; Sig, Ali Korhan; Uzun, Meltem; Selale, Deniz Sertel; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Surucuoglu, Suheyla; Albayrak, Nurhan; Ucarman, Nilay; Ozkutuk, Aydan; Esen, Nuran; Ceyhan, Ismail; Ozyurt, Mustafa; Bektore, Bayhan; Aslan, Gonul; Delialioğlu, Nuran; Alp, Alpaslan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter study was to evaluate the performance of the crystal violet decolorization assay (CVDA) for detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). This study was performed in 11 centers in two phases. A total of 156 isolates were tested for INH and RIF resistance. In the phase I, 106 clinical isolates were tested in the Center 1–7. In the phase 2, 156 clinical isolates were tested in the center 1–6, center 8–11. Eighty six of 156 tested isolates were the same in phase I. Agreements were 96.2–96.8% for INH and 98.1–98.7% for RIF in the phase I-II, respectively. Mean time to obtain the results in the phase I was 14.3 ± 5.4 days. In the phase II, mean time to obtain the results was 11.6 ± 3.5 days. Test results were obtained within 14days for 62.3% (66/106) of isolates in the phase I and 81.4% (127/156) of isolates in the phase II. In conclusion, CVDA is rapid, reliable, inexpensive, and easy to perform for rapid detection of MDR-TB isolates. In addition, it could be adapted for drug susceptibility testing with all drugs both in developed and developing countries. PMID:27982061

  8. Can the KTP laser change the cementum surface of healthy and diseased teeth providing an acceptable root surface for fibroblast attachment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, Jason M.; Garnick, Jerry J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of our research is to determine the effects of KTP laser on root cementum and fibroblast attachment. Initial work has been completed in testing the effect of different energy levels on root surfaces. From these studies optimal energy levels were determined. In subsequent studies the working distance and exposure time required to obtain significant fibroblast attachment to healthy cementum surfaces were investigated. Results showed that lased cemental surfaces exhibited changes in surface topography which ranged from a melted surface to an apparent slight fusion of the surface of the covering smear layer. When the optimal energy level was used, fibroblasts demonstrate attachment on the specimens, resulting in the presence of a monolayer of cells on the control surfaces as well as on the surfaces lased with this energy level. The present study investigates the treatment of pathological root surfaces and calculus with a KTP laser utilizing these optimal parameters determine previously. Thirty single rooted teeth with advanced periodontal disease and ten healthy teeth were obtained, crowns were sectioned and roots split longitudinally. Forty test specimens were assigned into 1 of 4 groups; pathologic root--not lased, pathologic root--lased, root planed root and health root planed root. Human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on specimens and cultured for 24 hours. Specimens were processed for SEM. The findings suggest that with the KTP laser using a predetermined energy level applied to pathological root surfaces, the lased surfaces provided an unacceptable surface for fibroblast attachment. However, the procedural control using healthy root planed surfaces did demonstrate fibroblast attachment.

  9. Randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of Nd:YAG prostate ablation with or without KTP laser bladder neck incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Stephen; Gallegos, Christopher; Moisey, Clifford

    1997-05-01

    A randomized, double blind, power determined, prospective study compared patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing endoscopic laser ablation of prostate, ELAP, -- Group 1 -- to those with KTP bladder neck incision and ELAP -- Group 2. A dual wavelength Laserscope KPT/532TM laser was used with add/stat side-firing fibers. Post-operatively a urethral catheter was inserted, which was removed at 18 hours. Patients unable to void at this stage where then re-catheterized, discharged and readmitted two weeks later for catheter removal. Patients were followed up at three month intervals. Eighty eight patients were studied, pre-operatively there was no statistical difference between Group 1 and Group 2 in mean age, 68.0, 68.4 yrs; prostate size 28, 29 g; post void residual, PVR, 141, 126 ml; max flow rate, Qmax, 9.8, 9.4 ml/s; or AUA score 18.0, 20.4; respectively. Post-operatively 57% of Group 1 patients were able to void on catheter removal at 18 hours compared to 80% from Group 2; p less than 0.05, (chi) 2. After one month, two patients from Group 2 and one from Group 1 failed to void and required further surgery. At six months, data for Group 1 and 2 respectively: PVR equals 78.7, 61.4 ml, Qmax equals 16.2, 18.1 ml/s, AUA score equals 9.6, 6.38, p less than 0.005 for each. Group 2 had a significantly greater improvement in AUA7 score than Group 1.

  10. Low Density, High Creep Resistant Single Crystal Super Alloy for Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A. (Inventor); Gabb, Timothy P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nickel-base superalloy article for use in turbines has increased creep resistance and lower density. The superalloy article includes, as measured in % by weight, 6.0-12.0% Mo, 5.5-6.5%Al, 3.0-7.0% Ta, 0-15% Co, 2.0-6.0% Cr, 1.0-4.0% Re, 0-1.5% W, 0-1.5% Ru, 0-2.0% Ti, 0-3.0% Nb, 0-0.2% Hf, 0-0.02% Y, 0.001-0.005% B, 0.01-0.04% C, and a remainder including nickel plus impurities.

  11. Slurry sampling ETAAS determination of sodium impurities in optical crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate and potassium gadolinium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Detcheva, Albena; Gentscheva, Galia; Havezov, Ivan; Ivanova, Elisaveta

    2002-09-12

    Slurry sampling ETAAS was successfully applied to the determination of sodium impurities in single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) and potassium gadolinium tungstate (KGW). Platform atomizers coated with titanium carbide or tungsten carbide, respectively, were used in order to avoid sensitivity drift due to the changes in the composition and the structure of the platform surface. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for the KGW slurry (no matrix effects); analysis of KTP slurry required the standard additions method. The precision of the proposed method was better than 3% R.S.D. The results obtained by the present method showed a good agreement with those obtained by an independent method-flame AAS after sample digestion, which is an evidence for the good accuracy of the proposed method.

  12. Thermal contact resistance measurement at the interface between Yb:YAG crystal and WCu cooler at 80 K and 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, J.-L.; Gavory, B.; Courjaud, A.

    2016-11-01

    The thermal resistance at the interface between a Yb:YAG crystal and WCu cooler has been measured at 80 K and 300 K using a hot disk technique. Furthermore, the technique allows retrieving the thermal conductivity for both materials at the two investigated temperature. Those results lead to envisage the implementation of the hot disk technique as an efficient non-destructive and in-situ technique to evaluate the quality of the interface between the crystal and the cooler during the assembling process as well as a during the use of the laser along its lifetime.

  13. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Manuel; Traxler, Lukas; Salopek, Jasmina; Grabmayr, Herwig; Ebner, Andreas; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-25

    We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units). The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements.

  14. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Manuel; Traxler, Lukas; Salopek, Jasmina; Grabmayr, Herwig; Ebner, Andreas; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-01-01

    We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units). The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements. PMID:27231946

  15. Temperature-dependent resistivity in single crystals Na1-δFe1-xCox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, M. A.; Spyrison, N.; Cho, K.; Tan, G. T.; Yan, J. Q.; Dai, P. C.; Zhang, C. L.; Prozorov, R.

    2012-02-01

    Stoichiometric NaFeAs superconductor is representative of the slightly underdoped part of the doping phase diagram, with a sequence of tetragonal-to-orthorhombic, Ts 60 K, magnetic, Tm=45 K, and superconducting, Tc=12 K transitions. Doping level in the compound can be tuned with Co substitution of Fe, acting as electron donor. This doping suppresses structural and magnetic instabilities and induces superconductivity with Tc up to 25 K. Doping with Co allows for studying complete doping phase diagram. We performed systematic measurements of the temperature-dependent in-plane, ρa(T), and inter-plane, ρc(T), electrical resistivities in the compounds. At optimal doping, both ρa(T) and ρc(T) show close to T-linear temperature dependence above the superconducting Tc. With doping this dependence gradually evolves towards T^2. At much higher temperatures a slope-change is observed in ρa(T), which we relate with onset of carrier activation over a pseudogap.

  16. Synthesis, crystal growth, thermal and spectroscopic studies of acentric materials constructed from aminopyridines and 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovetc, Ilia M.; Draguta, Sergiu; Fokina, Maria I.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Denisyuk, Igor Yu

    2016-03-01

    A series of single co-crystals of non-centrosymmetric complexes of different mono- and diaminopyridines, namely 4-aminopyridine, 3,4-diaminopyridine, 2-amino-6-methylpyridine, 2,6-diaminopyridine, 2-aminopyridine, with 4-nitrophenol were grown by slow evaporation technique from solution at constant temperature. Optical transparency in the region of 300-1100 nm was found to be suitable for nonlinear optical applications with cut off wavelengths at 420-474 nm for these co-crystals. Single crystal X-ray analysis confirms the non-centrosymmetric packing. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis shows good thermal stability of the studied compounds with melting point at range 99-172 °C for different co-crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency has been measured on single crystals by comparative SHG technique relative to KTP crystal. The nonlinear optical coefficient of the compounds was found to be up to 39 pm/V.

  17. Protein-resistant properties of a chemical vapor deposited alkyl-functional carboxysilane coating characterized using quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Shyam V.; Yuan, Min; Narváez, Alfredo R.; Daghfal, David; Mattzela, James; Smith, David

    2016-02-01

    The protein-resistant properties of a chemical vapor deposited alkyl-functional carboxysilane coating (Dursan®) were compared to that of an amorphous fluoropolymer (AF1600) coating and bare 316L grade stainless steel by studying non-specific adsorption of various proteins onto these surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). A wash solution with nonionic surfactant, polyoxyethyleneglycol dodecyl ether (or Brij 35), facilitated 100% removal of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA), mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG), and normal human plasma proteins from the Dursan surface and of the adsorbed normal human plasma proteins from the AF1600 surface, whereas these proteins remained adsorbed on the bare stainless steel surface. Mechanical stress in the form of sonication demonstrated durability of the Dursan coating to mechanical wear and showed no negative impact on the coating's ability to prevent adsorption of plasma proteins. Surface delamination was observed in case of the sonicated AF1600 coating, which further led to adsorption of normal human plasma proteins.

  18. Investigation of dislocations in Nb-doped (100) SrTiO3 single crystals and their impacts on resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Li, Jianyong; Ito, Shun

    2016-11-01

    Nb-doped SrTiO3 showed interesting resistive switching phenomena, which could be modulated by either thermal treatment or doping level. The impacts of oxygen vacancies and dislocations on resistive switching were investigated by comparing the switching behaviors of as-prepared and air-annealed crystals with a variety of doping levels. It was found that both oxygen vacancies and dislocations may have effects on the switching depending on the doping level. It was dominated by oxygen vacancies for low doping and dislocations for high doping.

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of OXA-17, an extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase conferring severe antibiotic resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H. Sohn, S. G. Jung, H. I. An, Y. J. Lee, S. H.

    2013-07-15

    OXA-17, an extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase (ESBL) conferring severe antibiotic resistance, hydrolytically inactivates {beta}-lactam antibiotics, inducing a lack of eradication of pathogenic bacteria by oxyimino {beta}-lactams and not helping hospital infection control. Thus, the enzyme is a potential target for developing antimicrobial agents against pathogens producing ESBLs. OXA-17 was purified and crystallized at 298 K. X-ray diffraction data from OXA-17 crystal have been collected to 1.85 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal of OXA-17 belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.37, b = 101.12, and c = 126.07 A. Analysis of the packing density shows that the asymmetric unit probably contains two molecules with a solvent content of 54.6%.

  20. Expression, purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of OXA-17, an extended-spectrum β-lactamase conferring severe antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Sohn, S. G.; Jung, H. I.; An, Y. J.; Lee, S. H.

    2013-07-01

    OXA-17, an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) conferring severe antibiotic resistance, hydrolytically inactivates β-lactam antibiotics, inducing a lack of eradication of pathogenic bacteria by oxyimino β-lactams and not helping hospital infection control. Thus, the enzyme is a potential target for developing antimicrobial agents against pathogens producing ESBLs. OXA-17 was purified and crystallized at 298 K. X-ray diffraction data from OXA-17 crystal have been collected to 1.85 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal of OXA-17 belongs to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.37, b = 101.12, and c = 126.07 Å. Analysis of the packing density shows that the asymmetric unit probably contains two molecules with a solvent content of 54.6%.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of the TIR domains of three TIR-NB-LRR proteins that are involved in disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wan, Li; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Williams, Simon J; Ve, Thomas; Bernoux, Maud; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G; Dodds, Peter N; Kobe, Bostjan

    2013-11-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain that is found in both animal and plant immune receptors. The N-terminal TIR domain from the nucleotide-binding (NB)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) class of plant disease-resistance (R) proteins has been shown to play an important role in defence signalling. Recently, the crystal structure of the TIR domain from flax R protein L6 was determined and this structure, combined with functional studies, demonstrated that TIR-domain homodimerization is a requirement for function of the R protein L6. To advance the molecular understanding of the function of TIR domains in R-protein signalling, the protein expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analyses of the TIR domains of the Arabidopsis thaliana R proteins RPS4 (resistance to Pseudomonas syringae 4) and RRS1 (resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum 1) and the resistance-like protein SNC1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1) are reported here. RPS4 and RRS1 function cooperatively as a dual resistance-protein system that prevents infection by three distinct pathogens. SNC1 is implicated in resistance pathways in Arabidopsis and is believed to be involved in transcriptional regulation through its interaction with the transcriptional corepressor TPR1 (Topless-related 1). The TIR domains of all three proteins have successfully been expressed and purified as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. Plate-like crystals of the RPS4 TIR domain were obtained using PEG 3350 as a precipitant; they diffracted X-rays to 2.05 Å resolution, had the symmetry of space group P1 and analysis of the Matthews coefficient suggested that there were four molecules per asymmetric unit. Tetragonal crystals of the RRS1 TIR domain were obtained using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant; they diffracted X-rays to 1.75 Å resolution, had the symmetry of space group P4(1)2(1)2 or P4(3)2(1)2 and were most likely to contain one molecule per asymmetric

  2. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D.; Bigelow, Lance; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne E.; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Ma, Ming; Yang, Dong; Clancy, Shonda; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 angstrom, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics.

  3. High-power (80-w) KTP laser vaporization of the prostate in the management of urinary retention: long-term follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeman, M.; Nseyo, Unyime O.

    2004-07-01

    Introduction and Objectives: We have previously reported the use of high-powered photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) for patients in urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). PVP is a relatively new treatment for bladder outlet obstruction due to BPH, using laser energy to vaporize obstructing prostatic tissue. This study investigates the long-term follow up of patients treated with PVP for urinary retention. Materials and Methods: All participants signed informed consent, and were treated with high power 80 W quasi-continuous wave potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser. Ten patients underwent the procedure from December 2001 until the present. One patient was excluded from the study for failure to return for follow-up. Mean patient follow-up was nine months, maximum of twelve months. Results: The mean pre-operative gland size by trans-rectal ultrasound was 48 grams. Mean urethral length was 3.2 cm. Mean laser time was 48.2 minutes and the mean energy usage was 82.2 kJoules. There were no peri-operative complications such as sepsis or measurable postoperative bleeding. The preoperative AUA Symptom Score (AUASS) decreased from a mean of 22.6 preoperatively to 17 at nine months postoperatively (p = 0.032). The Quality of Life Score (QOL) decreased from 4.6 preoperatively to 3.25 at 12 months postoperatively (p = 0.26). The maximum urine flow rate increased from a mean of 7.7 cc/sec preoperatively to 14.5 cc/sec at six months follow-up (p = 0.03). Conclusions: This follow-up study suggests that HP-KTP has a durable response in patients treated specifically for retention. It significantly improved urine flow rate and symptom score, and had a trend towards improvement in subjective quality of life. HP-KTP prostatectomy should be considered in treating patients in retention, especially those with significant co-morbidities or taking anticoagulation.

  4. Relaxation of the normal electrical resistivity induced by high-pressure in strongly underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Nazyrov, Z. F.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of the normal electrical resistivity, induced by high-pressure in YBa2Cu3O6.45 single crystals. It is determined that the pressure affects to the phase composition of the sample. Under pressure phases with different (but similar) critical temperatures form. It is determined that the application-removal pressure process is completely reversible. Above Tc the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the layers' plane at different hydrostatic pressures can be approximated with high accuracy with the scattering of electrons by phonons model. With increasing pressure, the residual resistance is reduced and the contribution of intraband s-s scattering increases. Additionally, the role of the interband s-d scattering and the Debye temperature is enhanced.

  5. Passively Q-switched, intracavity frequency-doubled YVO{sub 4}/Nd : YVO{sub 4}/KTP green laser with a GaAs saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Gao

    2015-11-30

    A diode-pumped, passively Q-switched, intracavity frequency-doubled YVO{sub 4}/Nd : YVO{sub 4}/KTP green laser is realised using a GaAs saturable absorber. Two pieces of GaAs wafers are employed in the experiment. In using a 400-μm-thick GaAs wafer and an incident pump power of 10.5 W, the maximum output power of the passively Q-switched green laser is 362 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 84 kHz and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. When use is made of a 700-mm-thick GaAs wafer, the minimum pulse duration is 1.5 ns at a repetition rate of 67 kHz, pulse energy of 4.18 μJ and peak power of 2.8 kW. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. Four-fold symmetry of resistivity and flux pinning energy in Ba0.67K0.33BiO3+δ single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. F.; Tao, J.; Xu, X. B.; Qiu, L.; Yang, S. G.; Wang, Z. H.

    2017-01-01

    Ba0.67K0.33BiO3+δ single crystal with T c ˜ 26.4 K has been prepared by the molten salt electrochemical method. We observed a four-fold symmetry in the angular dependence of ab-plane resistance R (θ) at H = 0.5 T and T = 25.5 K for the first time. The data can be scaled by R = [R 1sin2(θ + 45°) + R 2cos2(θ + 45°) - R(90°)]|sin2θ| + R(90°). Although dip structure appears in R(θ) when the angles between the magnetic field direction and c-axis are 0°, 90°, 180° and 270°, respectively, the maximal position of resistance tilted away θ = 45° and θ = 135°, namely the angle difference between two peaks is 79° or 101°. This result indicates the superconducting Ba0.67K0.33BiO3+δ single crystal is probably an orthorhombic structure with distorted Bi-O octahedron. We consider that the angular dependence of resistivity comes from the superconducting energy gap with {{{d}}{x}}2{{}-{y}}2 pairing symmetry. The flux pinning energy for θ = 90° is higher than that for θ = 135° proves the existence of the anisotropic vortex pinning effect. The field dependence of flux pinning energy displays a power law, U ∝ H -α . The irreversibility line was also discussed.

  7. Investigation of the photoelectric component of the light-induced resistance-drop mechanism in SrTiO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shablaev, S. I.; Grachev, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    The results of the experimental observation of the photovoltage in a SrTiO3 crystal sample, which exhibits the light-induced resistance-drop effect, have confirmed the previously proposed model of the effect in its photoelectric part. However, in addition to the expected manifestation of the barrier photovoltage, one more source of photocurrent has been found. This source is attributed to the manifestation of the linear photogalvanic effect in the subsurface region of the crystal. It has been assumed that the main role in the generation of photogalvanic current can be played by dipole centers of the oxygen vacancy-triply charged titanium ion type, which are oriented by an electric field of the surface barrier.

  8. The molecular basis of vancomycin resistance in clinically relevant Enterococci: Crystal structure of d-alanyl-d-lactate ligase (VanA)

    PubMed Central

    Roper, David I.; Huyton, Trevor; Vagin, Alexei; Dodson, Guy

    2000-01-01

    d-alanine-d-lactate ligase from Enterococcus faecium BM4147 is directly responsible for the biosynthesis of alternate cell-wall precursors in bacteria, which are resistant to the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. The crystal structure has been determined with data extending to 2.5-Å resolution. This structure shows that the active site has unexpected interactions and is distinct from previous models for d-alanyl-d-lactate ligase mechanistic studies. It appears that the preference of the enzyme for lactate as a ligand over d-alanine could be mediated by electrostatic effects and/or a hydrogen-bonding network, which principally involve His-244. The structure of d-alanyl-d-lactate ligase provides a revised interpretation of the molecular events that lead to vancomycin resistance. PMID:10908650

  9. Analysis of paramagnetic point defects in potassium dihydrogen phosphate and potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Nelson Yovanny

    A series of paramagnetic defects have been characterized in KH2 PO4 (KDP) and KTiOPO4 (KTP) using optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and electron- nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. In KDP, one hole-like center and five electronlike centers were investigated. Spin-Hamiltonian parameters were obtained for the holelike center and two electronlike centers. The hole center consists of a hole trapped on an oxygen ion adjacent to a silicon impurity substituting for a phosphorus ion. The electron centers are oxygen vacancies with one trapped electron, i.e., they are (PO3)2- molecular units. Both the hole center and the electron centers can be formed at room temperature (or at 77 K) with x-rays or the fourth harmonic output (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. Their EPR spectra are best observed at room temperature. These defects are stable for several weeks at room temperature. Also, in KDP, an Fe3+ paramagnetic defect characterized in an earlier work was revisited and a complete set of spin-Hamiltonian parameters, including fourth order, were determined. In KTP crystals, three platinum centers and two silver centers were identified. The platinum centers were produced by exposure to 355 nm laser light or by irradiation with x-rays, while the silver centers were produced with x-rays only. Spin-Hamiltonian parameters were determined for the three platinum centers. One of these defects is assigned to a Pt3+ ion (3d7 ) substituting for a Ti4+; it is formed when a Pt 4+ ion traps an electron. The other two platinum centers are suggested to be hole traps, and are formed when a hole is trapped at a Pt0 atom substituting for a K+ ion, which results in a Pt + ion (3d9). A silver center was characterized in KTP using ENDOR. Silver was diffused into the crystal during a post-growth anneal. It is suggested that Ag+ ions occupy K+ sites and upon irradiation with x-rays trap a hole, thus becoming Ag2+ ions. The various Pt and Ag centers characterized in the

  10. Characterization of the lattice defects in Ge-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals by Rutherford Backscattering: Origins of low resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2013-07-01

    A Ge ion implantation using a multiple-step energy into ZnO bulk single crystals is performed (net concentration: 2.6 × 1020 cm-3). The origins of low resistivity of the Ge implanted ZnO samples are studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), photoluminescence (PL). The resistivity measured by Van der Pauw method decreases from ˜103 Ωcm for the un-implanted samples to 1.45 × 10-2 Ωcm for the as-implanted samples, originating from the lattice displacement of Zn (Zni) (˜30 meV [Look et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2552 (1999)]), the existence of which is revealed by the RBS measurements. In contrast, the 1000 °C annealed samples show the higher resistivity of 6.26 × 10-1 Ωcm, indicating that the Zni related defects decrease but still remain despite the annealing. A new PL emission appears at around 372 nm (3.33 eV) in the annealed samples, suggesting a Ge donor with an activation energy of 100 meV. This value corresponds to the activation energy (102 meV) of a Ge donor estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration. These results suggest that the resistivity in the 1000 °C annealed samples results from both the Zni related defects and the electrically activated Ge donor.

  11. Two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Cryptosporidium hominis reveal protein–ligand interactions including a structural basis for observed antifolate resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Amy C.

    2005-03-01

    An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of DHFR-TS from C. hominis reveals a possible structural basis for observed antifolate resistance in C. hominis DHFR. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals residue substitutions that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors. Cryptosporidium hominis is a protozoan parasite that causes acute gastrointestinal illness. There are no effective therapies for cryptosporidiosis, highlighting the need for new drug-lead discovery. An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) from C. hominis, determined at 2.8 and 2.87 Å resolution, reveals that the interactions of residues Ile29, Thr58 and Cys113 in the active site of C. hominis DHFR provide a possible structural basis for the observed antifolate resistance. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals active-site differences that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors.

  12. Spectrally Pure States at Telecommunications Wavelengths from Periodically Poled M TiO X O4 (M =K , Rb, Cs; X =P , As) Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Rui-Bo; Zhao, Pei; Deng, Peigang; Wu, Qing-Lin

    2016-12-01

    Significant successes have recently been reported in the study of the generation of a spectrally pure state in group-velocity-matched (GVM) nonlinear crystals. However, the GVM condition can be realized only in limited kinds of crystals and at limited wavelengths. Here, we investigate pure-state generation in the isomorphs of the PPKTP crystal: i.e., periodically poled RTP, KTA, RTA, and CTA crystals. By numerical simulation, we find that these crystals from the KTP family can generate pure photons with high spectral purity (over 0.8), wide tunability (more than 400 nm), and reasonable nonlinearity at a variety of wavelengths (from 1300 to 2100 nm). It is also discovered that the PPCTA crystal may achieve a purity of 0.97 at 1506 nm. This study may provide more and better choices for quantum-state engineering at telecom wavelengths.

  13. Characterization of vertical Au/β-Ga2O3 single-crystal Schottky photodiodes with MBE-grown high-resistivity epitaxial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    X, Z. Liu; C, Yue; C, T. Xia; W, L. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    High-resistivity β-Ga2O3 thin films were grown on Si-doped n-type conductive β-Ga2O3 single crystals by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Vertical-type Schottky diodes were fabricated, and the electrical properties of the Schottky diodes were studied in this letter. The ideality factor and the series resistance of the Schottky diodes were estimated to be about 1.4 and 4.6× 106 Ω. The ionized donor concentration and the spreading voltage in the Schottky diodes region are about 4 × 1018 cm-3 and 7.6 V, respectively. The ultra-violet (UV) photo-sensitivity of the Schottky diodes was demonstrated by a low-pressure mercury lamp illumination. A photoresponsivity of 1.8 A/W and an external quantum efficiency of 8.7 × 102% were observed at forward bias voltage of 3.8 V, the proper driving voltage of read-out integrated circuit for UV camera. The gain of the Schottky diode was attributed to the existence of a potential barrier in the i-n junction between the MBE-grown highly resistive β-Ga2O3 thin films and the n-type conductive β-Ga2O3 single-crystal substrate. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61223002) the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13111103700), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 2012018530003).

  14. Effect of high pressure on the electrical resistivity of optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals with unidirectional planar defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2013-08-01

    In the present work the effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 10 kbar on in-plane electrical resistivity of well-structured YBa2Cu3O7-δ (δ<0.15, Тс≈91 K, ΔТс≈0.3 K) single crystals was investigated. The influence of the twin boundaries on the electrical resistivity was minimized. The resistivities temperature dependences in the interval Тс up to 300 K can be approximated by taking into account the linear term at high temperatures and the fluctuation conductivity (Maki-Thompson model) near Тс. The parameters of the linear dependence of R(T) are decreasing as the pressure is increasing. Тс increases linearly when the pressure increases with the derivative dTc/dP≈0.080 K/kbar. Among the Maki-Thompson model parameters the inter-layer distance, d, can be considered to be independent from pressure, the transverse coherence length, ξc(0)∼0.1d.

  15. Electron-phonon interaction and thermal boundary resistance at the crystal-amorphous interface of the phase change compound GeTe

    SciTech Connect

    Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, Marco; Donadio, Davide; Sosso, Gabriele C.; Behler, Jörg

    2015-01-07

    Phonon dispersion relations and electron-phonon coupling of hole-doped trigonal GeTe have been computed by density functional perturbation theory. This compound is a prototypical phase change material of interest for applications in phase change non-volatile memories. The calculations allowed us to estimate the electron-phonon contribution to the thermal boundary resistance at the interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases present in the device. The lattice contribution to the thermal boundary resistance has been computed by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with an interatomic potential based on a neural network scheme. We find that the electron-phonon term contributes to the thermal boundary resistance to an extent which is strongly dependent on the concentration and mobility of the holes. Further, for measured values of the holes concentration and electrical conductivity, the electron-phonon term is larger than the contribution from the lattice. It is also shown that the presence of Ge vacancies, responsible for the p-type degenerate character of the semiconductor, strongly affects the lattice thermal conductivity of the crystal.

  16. Insights into the Mechanistic Basis of Plasmid-Mediated Colistin Resistance from Crystal Structures of the Catalytic Domain of MCR-1

    PubMed Central

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Yang, Qiu E.; Portal, Edward; Young, Tom; Li, Hui; Tooke, Catherine L.; Carvalho, Maria J.; Paterson, Neil G.; Brem, Jürgen; Niumsup, Pannika R.; Tansawai, Uttapoln; Lei, Lei; Li, Mei; Shen, Zhangqi; Wang, Yang; Schofield, Christopher J.; Mulholland, Adrian J; Shen, Jianzhong; Fey, Natalie; Walsh, Timothy R.; Spencer, James

    2017-01-01

    The polymixin colistin is a “last line” antibiotic against extensively-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, the mcr-1 gene was identified as a plasmid-mediated resistance mechanism in human and animal Enterobacteriaceae, with a wide geographical distribution and many producer strains resistant to multiple other antibiotics. mcr-1 encodes a membrane-bound enzyme catalysing phosphoethanolamine transfer onto bacterial lipid A. Here we present crystal structures revealing the MCR-1 periplasmic, catalytic domain to be a zinc metalloprotein with an alkaline phosphatase/sulphatase fold containing three disulphide bonds. One structure captures a phosphorylated form representing the first intermediate in the transfer reaction. Mutation of residues implicated in zinc or phosphoethanolamine binding, or catalytic activity, restores colistin susceptibility of recombinant E. coli. Zinc deprivation reduces colistin MICs in MCR-1-producing laboratory, environmental, animal and human E. coli. Conversely, over-expression of the disulphide isomerase DsbA increases the colistin MIC of laboratory E. coli. Preliminary density functional theory calculations on cluster models suggest a single zinc ion may be sufficient to support phosphoethanolamine transfer. These data demonstrate the importance of zinc and disulphide bonds to MCR-1 activity, suggest that assays under zinc-limiting conditions represent a route to phenotypic identification of MCR-1 producing E. coli, and identify key features of the likely catalytic mechanism. PMID:28059088

  17. Comment on "Refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Cecilio; Fragoso-López, Ana Belén

    2014-02-01

    In 2007 Yin, Zhang and Tian [1] [Yin et al., 2007] derived the expressions of the refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation. In the past we have researched about the simultaneous measurement of birefringence and optical activity in different crystals [2] [Hernández-Rodríguez et al., 2000], [3] [Hernández-Rodríguez and Gómez-Garrido, 2000], [4] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2003], [5] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2005] and [6] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2007], and recently, when we used their methods for the study of nonlinear crystals such as KTiOAsO4 (KTA) and KTiOPO4 (KTP), we found some errors in some expressions in their paper which were used by other authors [7] [Gao et al., 2003].

  18. INFLUENCE OF INTRINSIC PINNING ON THE RESISTIVE PROPERTIES OF YBa2Cu3O7-δ SINGLE CRYSTALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Samoilov, A. V.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of vortex matter in YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystal with unidirectional twin boundaries is studied experimentally in a wide range of velocities of the magnetic flux in a tilted magnetic field. It is determined that with the orientation of the magnetic field vector in the locality of the ab-plane, the dynamics of the magnetic flux near the melting temperature of the vortex lattice can be described by the Kim-Anderson model and as the temperature is lowered, by the theory of collective pinning on small-scale defects or by the vortex glass model. The intrinsic pinning caused by the layered crystal structure of the material has an impact on the dynamics of magnetic flux and this effect increases with the decreasing of the temperature.

  19. Distinct in-plane resistivity anisotropy in a detwinned FeTe single crystal: Evidence for a Hund's metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Juan; He, C.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, M.; Ge, Q. Q.; Ye, Z. R.; Chen, F.; Xie, B. P.; Feng, D. L.

    2013-09-01

    The in-plane resistivity anisotropy has been studied with the Montgomery method on the detwinned parent compound of the iron-based superconductor FeTe. The observed resistivity in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) direction is larger than that in the ferromagnetic (FM) direction, which is different from that observed in BaFe2As2 before. We show that the opposite resistivity anisotropy behavior in FeTe could be attributed to the strong Hund's rule coupling effects, which should be understood in a localized picture: Hund's rule coupling makes hopping along the FM direction easier than along the AFM direction in FeTe, similar to the colossal magnetoresistance observed in some manganites.

  20. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Evaluation of Carbon Interstitial in C-ion Implanted ZnO Bulk Single Crystals by a Nuclear Reaction Analysis Study: An Origin of Low Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Izawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Oga, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2011-12-23

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) of carbon-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals (carbon concentration: 1.5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), in conjunction with the channeling technique, using the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C and {sup 16}O(d,p){sup 17}O reactions shows the presence of the interstitial carbon (C{sub i}) and the occupancy of substitute sites of oxygen atoms. These results suggest that the variation in resistivity from the order of 10{sup 4} {Omega}cm(for un-implanted samples) to that of 10 {Omega}cm (for as-implanted ones) is attributed to the C{sub i} and/or its complex defects, which would act as a shallow donor in ZnO.

  2. Irreversibility of the martensitic transformation in Ni-Mn-In single crystal studied by resistivity under pressure and in situ optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcar, L.; Courtois, P.; Crouigneau, G.; Debray, J.; Bourgault, D.

    2014-10-01

    Optical observations under uniaxial pressure and in-situ resistivity measurements were undertaken in Ni-Mn-In single crystals as a function of temperature to study the thermal hysteresis of the martensitic transformation. The irreversibility of the isothermal transformation under pressure was clearly observed, and it was possible to stabilize the martensitic phase with large and coarsen variants by applying a pressure at a stable temperature Ms reached during cooling down (cooling branch of the hysteresis). When the uniaxial pressure is applied in the heating branch of the hysteresis, the martensitic transformation occurs in a complete reversible way as the hysteresis delimitates the metastability of the martensitic/austenitic phases and the energy barrier to overcome for the transformation. This procedure leads to a piezoresistance as large as 200%.

  3. Chloroplast-targeted expression of recombinant crystal-protein gene in cotton: an unconventional combat with resistant pests.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Sarfraz; Mohamed, Bahaeldeen Babiker; Shehzad, Kamran; Jamal, Adil; Shahid, Muhammad Naveed; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2013-07-10

    Plants transformed with single Bt gene are liable to develop insect resistance and this has already been reported in a number of studies carried out around the world where Bt cotton was cultivated on commercial scale. Later, it was envisaged to transform plants with more than one Bt genes in order to combat with resistant larvae. This approach seems valid as various Bt genes possess different binding domains which could delay the likely hazards of insect resistance against a particular Bt toxin. But it is difficult under field conditions to develop homozygous plants expressing all Bt genes equally after many generations without undergoing recombination effects. A number of researches claiming to transform plants from three to seven transgenes in a single plant were reported during the last decade but none has yet applied for patent of homozygous transgenic lines. A better strategy might be to use hybrid-Bt gene(s) modified for improved lectin-binding domains to boost Bt receptor sites in insect midgut. These recombinant-Bt gene(s) would express different lectin domains in a single polypeptide and it is relatively easy to develop homozygous transgenic lines under field conditions. Enhanced chloroplast-localized expression of hybrid-Bt gene would leave no room for insects to develop resistance. We devised and successfully applied this strategy in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and data up to T3 generation showed that our transgenic cotton plants were displaying enhanced chloroplast-targeted Cry1Ac-RB expression. Laboratory and field bioassays gave promising results against American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), pink bollworm (Pictinophora scutigera) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) that otherwise, were reported to have evolved resistance against Cry1Ac toxin. Elevated levels of hybrid-Bt toxin were confirmed by ELISA of chloroplast-enriched protein samples extracted from leaves of transgenic cotton lines. While, localization of recombinant Cry1Ac-RB protein in

  4. The simultaneous enhancement of photorefraction and optical damage resistance in MgO and Bi2O3 co-doped LiNbO3 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahuai; Kong, Yongfa; Liu, Shiguo; Chen, Muling; Chen, Shaolin; Zhang, Ling; Rupp, Romano; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-01-01

    For a long time that optical damage was renamed as photorefraction, here we find that the optical damage resistance and photorefraction can be simultaneously enhanced in MgO and Bi2O3 co-doped LiNbO3 (LN:Bi,Mg). The photorefractive response time of LN:Bi,Mg was shortened to 170 ms while the photorefractive sensitivity reached up to 21 cm2/J. Meanwhile, LN:Bi,Mg crystals could withstand a light intensity higher than 106  W/cm2 without apparent optical damage. Our experimental results indicate that photorefraction doesn’t equal to optical damage. The underground mechanism was analyzed and attributed to that diffusion dominates the transport process of charge carriers, that is to say photorefraction causes only slight optical damage under diffusion mechanism, which is very important for the practical applications of photorefractive crystals, such as in holographic storage, integrated optics and 3D display. PMID:26837261

  5. The simultaneous enhancement of photorefraction and optical damage resistance in MgO and Bi2O3 co-doped LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dahuai; Kong, Yongfa; Liu, Shiguo; Chen, Muling; Chen, Shaolin; Zhang, Ling; Rupp, Romano; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-02-01

    For a long time that optical damage was renamed as photorefraction, here we find that the optical damage resistance and photorefraction can be simultaneously enhanced in MgO and Bi2O3 co-doped LiNbO3 (LN:Bi,Mg). The photorefractive response time of LN:Bi,Mg was shortened to 170 ms while the photorefractive sensitivity reached up to 21 cm2/J. Meanwhile, LN:Bi,Mg crystals could withstand a light intensity higher than 106  W/cm2 without apparent optical damage. Our experimental results indicate that photorefraction doesn’t equal to optical damage. The underground mechanism was analyzed and attributed to that diffusion dominates the transport process of charge carriers, that is to say photorefraction causes only slight optical damage under diffusion mechanism, which is very important for the practical applications of photorefractive crystals, such as in holographic storage, integrated optics and 3D display.

  6. The simultaneous enhancement of photorefraction and optical damage resistance in MgO and Bi2O3 co-doped LiNbO3 crystals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dahuai; Kong, Yongfa; Liu, Shiguo; Chen, Muling; Chen, Shaolin; Zhang, Ling; Rupp, Romano; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-02-03

    For a long time that optical damage was renamed as photorefraction, here we find that the optical damage resistance and photorefraction can be simultaneously enhanced in MgO and Bi2O3 co-doped LiNbO3 (LN:Bi,Mg). The photorefractive response time of LN:Bi,Mg was shortened to 170 ms while the photorefractive sensitivity reached up to 21 cm(2)/J. Meanwhile, LN:Bi,Mg crystals could withstand a light intensity higher than 10(6)  W/cm(2) without apparent optical damage. Our experimental results indicate that photorefraction doesn't equal to optical damage. The underground mechanism was analyzed and attributed to that diffusion dominates the transport process of charge carriers, that is to say photorefraction causes only slight optical damage under diffusion mechanism, which is very important for the practical applications of photorefractive crystals, such as in holographic storage, integrated optics and 3D display.

  7. Combined resistivity and Hall effect study on NaFe1 -xRhxAs single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckel, Frank; Caglieris, Federico; Beck, Robert; Roslova, Maria; Bombor, Dirk; Morozov, Igor; Wurmehl, Sabine; Büchner, Bernd; Hess, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Electrical transport measurements are used to study the Rh-doped NaFeAs superconductor series with a focus on the tetragonal phase. The resistivity curvature has an anomalous temperature dependence evidencing in the phase diagram two crossover regions of changes in the scattering rate, the effective mass as well as of the charge carrier density. The first crossover region is directly connected to the structural transition and resembles the onset of resistivity anisotropy. The second crossover region can as well be deduced from the temperature-dependent Hall coefficient. A comparison to literature nuclear magnetic resonance data suggests this region to be connected with nematic fluctuations far above the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition.

  8. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Xia, Di

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space group P1), with unit-cell parameters a = 40.67, b = 44.91, c = 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  9. Effect of praseodymium on the electrical resistance of YВа2Сu3О7-δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2014-07-01

    The electrical resistivity in the ab-plane of the Y1-yPryВа2Сu3О7-δ single crystals with high degree of perfection in the interval of Тc - 300 K was investigated. The increasing of praseodymium content leads to the reduction of the critical temperature (Tc) from 92 to 30 K. The experimental results can be approximated by the expression, taking into account the scattering of electrons by phonons, defects, the fluctuation conductivity in the 3D Aslamazov-Larkin model, as well as the transition to a "semiconductor" type behavior of the resistivity at the high praseodymium concentrations. The concentration dependences of all fitting parameters indicate a structural transition in the region 0.35≤у≤0.43. In particular, the Debye temperature changes in this range from 350 to 550 K, and the transverse coherence length passes through a maximum ξС(0)≈5 Å. The concentration dependence of the critical temperature testifies the d-pairing of the BCS model.

  10. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  11. Hybrid Q-switched laser with MoS2 saturable absorber and AOM driven sub-nanosecond KTP-OPO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Junpeng; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2017-02-20

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials, especially transition-metal dichalcogenides, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2), have attracted great interests due to their exceptional optical properties as saturable absorbers in laser systems. In this work, at first, we presented a diode-pumped passively Q-switched laser with MoS2 saturable absorber (MoS2-SA). At an incident pump power of 6.54 W, a maximum output power of 1.15 W with a minimum pulse duration of 70.6 ns was obtained, which is the shortest pulse duration of diode pumped passively Q-switched laser with MoS2-SA to the best of our knowledge. Then, by using a hybrid Q-switched laser with a MoS2-SA and an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as pumping fundamental laser, a sub-nanosecond KTiOPO4 (KTP) based intracavity optical parametric oscillation (IOPO) was realized. With an incident pump power of 10.2 W and AOM repetition rate of 10 kHz, the maximum output power of 183 mW with minimum pulse duration of 850 ps was obtained. The experimental results indicate that the IOPO pumped by the hybrid Q-switched laser with AOM and MoS2-SA can generate signal wave with shorter pulse duration than those IOPOs pumped by hybrid Q-switched laser with AOM and Cr4+:YAG or single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absober (SWCNT-SA) or monolayer graphene SA.

  12. Hydrogen ion-implantation induced low resistive layer in KNbO3 bulk single crystal: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkawa, A.; Shibasaki, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Tanuma, C.; Kuriyama, K.

    2016-03-01

    Origins of low resistivity in H-ion implanted KNbO3 bulk single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak ion fluence: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into KNbO3 is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The sheet resistance decreases from ∼108 Ω/□ for an un-implanted KNbO3 sample to 2.33 × 105 Ω/□ for as-implanted, 2.29 × 105 Ω/□ for 100 °C annealed, and 4.25 × 105 Ω/□ for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively. The ERDA experiment using the 1.5 MeV-4He+ beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to around 60 nm. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 1.5 MeV helium beam is 5.1 × 1014 cm-2 for un-implanted KNbO3 sample, 5.6 × 1014 cm-2 for as-implanted, 3.4 × 1014 cm-2 for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively, indicating that a part of hydrogen is diffused out by annealing. The low resistive layer induced in H-ion implanted KNbO3 suggests the existence of a shallow energy level related to the complex defect consisting of hydrogen interstitial and the proton induced defect such as oxygen vacancy.

  13. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of NAD synthetase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arbade, Gajanan Kashinathrao; Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen that causes a wide range of infections. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in both hospital and community settings makes it imperative to characterize new drug targets to combat S. aureus infections. In this context, enzymes involved in NAD metabolism and synthesis are significant drug targets as NAD is a central player in several cellular processes. NAD synthetase catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, making it a crucial intermediate enzyme linked to the biosynthesis of several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes and antibiotics.

  14. Characterization of non-linear Potassium crystals in the Terahertz frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounaix, P.; Sarger, L.; Caumes, J. P.; Freysz, E.

    2004-12-01

    Systematic measurements of the dielectric properties of KDP, KNbO3, KTP and KTA non-linear crystals in the Terahertz (THz) spectral range are presented. The index of refraction and the absorption coefficients are measured between 0.1 and 1.5 THz for different crystallographic orientations. The data are deduced from an experimental set-up based on standard Terahertz time domain spectroscopy system at room temperature. These data, key parameters for the optimization of non-linear THz generation by optical rectification as well as electro-optic detection, are analysed in term of non-linear capabilities. We finally review different methods making possible to generate THz wave in these crystals and compare their characteristics.

  15. The Crystal Structure of Peroxiredoxin Asp f3 Provides Mechanistic Insight into Oxidative Stress Resistance and Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Falk; Bagramyan, Karine; Straßburger, Maria; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Hong, Teresa B; Bzymek, Krzysztof P; Williams, John C; Brakhage, Axel A; Kalkum, Markus

    2016-09-14

    Invasive aspergillosis and other fungal infections occur in immunocompromised individuals, including patients who received blood-building stem cell transplants, patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), and others. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by immune cells, which incidentally is defective in CGD patients, is considered to be a fundamental process in inflammation and antifungal immune response. Here we show that the peroxiredoxin Asp f3 of Aspergillus fumigatus inactivates ROS. We report the crystal structure and the catalytic mechanism of Asp f3, a two-cysteine type peroxiredoxin. The latter exhibits a thioredoxin fold and a homodimeric structure with two intermolecular disulfide bonds in its oxidized state. Replacement of the Asp f3 cysteines with serine residues retained its dimeric structure, but diminished Asp f3's peroxidase activity, and extended the alpha-helix with the former peroxidatic cysteine residue C61 by six residues. The asp f3 deletion mutant was sensitive to ROS, and this phenotype was rescued by ectopic expression of Asp f3. Furthermore, we showed that deletion of asp f3 rendered A. fumigatus avirulent in a mouse model of pulmonary aspergillosis. The conserved expression of Asp f3 homologs in medically relevant molds and yeasts prompts future evaluation of Asp f3 as a potential therapeutic target.

  16. The Crystal Structure of Peroxiredoxin Asp f3 Provides Mechanistic Insight into Oxidative Stress Resistance and Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Hillmann, Falk; Bagramyan, Karine; Straßburger, Maria; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Hong, Teresa B.; Bzymek, Krzysztof P.; Williams, John C.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Kalkum, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis and other fungal infections occur in immunocompromised individuals, including patients who received blood-building stem cell transplants, patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), and others. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by immune cells, which incidentally is defective in CGD patients, is considered to be a fundamental process in inflammation and antifungal immune response. Here we show that the peroxiredoxin Asp f3 of Aspergillus fumigatus inactivates ROS. We report the crystal structure and the catalytic mechanism of Asp f3, a two-cysteine type peroxiredoxin. The latter exhibits a thioredoxin fold and a homodimeric structure with two intermolecular disulfide bonds in its oxidized state. Replacement of the Asp f3 cysteines with serine residues retained its dimeric structure, but diminished Asp f3’s peroxidase activity, and extended the alpha-helix with the former peroxidatic cysteine residue C61 by six residues. The asp f3 deletion mutant was sensitive to ROS, and this phenotype was rescued by ectopic expression of Asp f3. Furthermore, we showed that deletion of asp f3 rendered A. fumigatus avirulent in a mouse model of pulmonary aspergillosis. The conserved expression of Asp f3 homologs in medically relevant molds and yeasts prompts future evaluation of Asp f3 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27624005

  17. Study program to improve the open-circuit voltage of low resistivity single crystal silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Matthei, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a 14 month program to improve the open circuit voltage of low resistivity silicon solar cells are described. The approach was based on ion implantation in 0.1- to 10.0-ohm-cm float-zone silicon. As a result of the contract effort, open circuit voltages as high as 645 mV (AMO 25 C) were attained by high dose phosphorus implantation followed by furnace annealing and simultaneous SiO2 growth. One key element was to investigate the effects of bandgap narrowing caused by high doping concentrations in the junction layer. Considerable effort was applied to optimization of implant parameters, selection of furnace annealing techniques, and utilization of pulsed electron beam annealing to minimize thermal process-induced defects in the completed solar cells.

  18. Anisotropy in the thermal hysteresis of resistivity and charge density wave nature of single crystal SrFeO3-δ: X-ray absorption and photoemission studies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S H; Solanki, R S; Wang, Y F; Shao, Y C; Lee, S H; Yao, C H; Du, C H; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Chin, Y Y; Tsai, H M; Chen, J-L; Pao, C W; Cheng, C-M; Chen, W-C; Lin, H J; Lee, J F; Chou, F C; Pong, W F

    2017-12-01

    The local electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality single crystal of SrFeO3-δ (δ~0.19) were studied using temperature-dependent x-ray absorption and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) to investigate the origin of anisotropic resistivity in the ab-plane and along the c-axis close to the region of thermal hysteresis (near temperature for susceptibility maximum, Tm~78 K). All experiments herein were conducted during warming and cooling processes. The Fe L 3,2-edge X-ray linear dichroism results show that during cooling from room temperature to below the transition temperature, the unoccupied Fe 3d e g states remain in persistently out-of-plane 3d 3z(2)-r(2) orbitals. In contrast, in the warming process below the transition temperature, they change from 3d 3z(2)-r(2) to in-plane 3d x(2)-y(2) orbitals. The nearest-neighbor (NN) Fe-O bond lengths also exhibit anisotropic behavior in the ab-plane and along the c-axis below Tm. The anisotropic NN Fe-O bond lengths and Debye-Waller factors stabilize the in-plane Fe 3d x(2)-y(2) and out-of-plane 3d 3z(2)-r(2) orbitals during warming and cooling, respectively. Additionally, a VB-PES study further confirms that a relative band gap opens at low temperature in both the ab-plane and along the c-axis, providing the clear evidence of the charge-density-wave nature of SrFeO3-δ (δ~0.19) single crystal.

  19. Blue light generation using periodically poled nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademian, Ali; Shiner, David

    2013-05-01

    We have studied blue light generation using SHG of IR light. We have used single pass waveguides and bulk crystals with buildup cavities. The nonlinear crystals used were periodically poled Lithium Niobate (LN) and Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (KTP). Each of these approaches had limitations with regards to the maximum power handling and the stability of operation. Currently we are working on a different crystal in a new buildup cavity to circumvent some of the previous difficulties resulting from photorefractive damage and excessive heating due to blue absorption. Our initial measurements show that Lithium Tantalite (LT) has higher photorefractive threshold and much lower blue absorption (2% vs 15% for 20 mm crystal length). The new buildup cavity incorporates a more convenient commercial piezo mirror translator for feedback control. The buildup cavity can be operated with a minimum of 6 V as opposed to the 1000 V previously. We are exploring the use of a single DSP (digital signal processor) to perform all the locking and electronic control functions of the cavity. We are studying the coupling and propagation properties of the IR beams more carefully to minimize cavity and coupling losses, particularly due to front wave distortion caused by mirrors and lenses used in the setup. To optimize our cavity and to make the best and simplest choice of optical elements possible, different commercial (off the shelf) lenses and mirrors have been evaluated experimentally in our setup. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1068868.

  20. MAGNETORESISTANCE AND HALL EFFECT IN SINGLE CRYSTALS OF ALUMINUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALUMINUM, *SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYSTALS, HALL EFFECT , IMPURITIES, LOW PRESSURE, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, SURFACE PROPERTIES.

  1. Infrared Attenuation Spectrum of Bulk High-Resistivity CdZnTe Single Crystal in Transparent Wavelength Region Between Electronic and Lattice Absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarugaku, Yuki; Kaji, Sayumi; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Sukegawa, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kataza, Hirokazu; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2017-01-01

    We report measurement of the internal attenuation coefficient, α _{att}, of a bulk high-resistivity cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) single crystal at wavelength, λ = 0.84-26 μm, to the unprecedentedly low level of α _{att} ˜ 0.001 cm^{-1}. This measurement reveals the spectral behavior for small attenuation in the infrared transparent region between the electronic and lattice absorptions. This result is essential for application of CdZnTe as an infrared transmitting material. Comparing the attenuation spectrum with model spectra obtained on the basis of Mie theory, we find that sub-micrometer-sized Te particles (inclusions) with a number density of approximately 10^{7.5-9} cm^{-3} are the principal source of the small attenuation observed at λ = 0.9-13 μm. In addition, we determine α _{att} = (7.7 ± 1.9) × 10^{-4} cm^{-1} at λ = 10.6 μm, which is valuable for CO_2 laser applications. Higher transparency can be achieved by reducing the number of inclusions rather than the number of precipitates. This study also demonstrates that high-accuracy measurement of CdZnTe infrared transmittance is a useful approach to investigating the number density of sub-micrometer-sized Te particles that cannot be identified via infrared microscopy.

  2. Resistive measurements of the pseudogap in lightly Pr-doped Y1-xPrxBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals under high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Ruslan V.; Khadzhai, Georgij Ya.; Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the basal-plane electrical conductivity of lightly Pr-doped Y1-xPrxBa2Cu3O7-δ (x ≤ 0.05) single crystals is investigated. The excess conductivity Δσ(T) in Y0.95Pr0.05Ba2Cu3O7-δ has been revealed to obey an exponential dependence in the wide temperature range Tc < T resistivity ρ(T).

  3. Crystal Structure and Activity Studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-Lactamase Reveal Its Critical Role in Resistance to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Cassidy, Craig; Sacchettini, James C.

    2006-01-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics are extremely effective in disrupting the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. However, they are ineffective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, due to the production of a β-lactamase enzyme encoded on the chromosome of M. tuberculosis that degrades these antibiotics. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated that deletion of the blaC gene, the only gene encoding a β-lactamase in M. tuberculosis, or inhibition of the encoded enzyme resulted in significantly increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. In this paper we present a biochemical and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis BlaC. Recombinant BlaC shows a broad range of specificity with almost equal penicillinase and cepholothinase activity. While clavulanate is a mechanism-based inhibitor to class A β-lactamase with high potency (typically Ki < 0.1 μM), it is a relatively poor inhibitor of the M. tuberculosis BlaC (Ki = 2.4 μM). The crystal structure of the enzyme, determined at a resolution of 1.7 Å, shows that the overall fold of the M. tuberculosis enzyme is similar to other class A β-lactamases. There are, however, several distinct features of the active site, such as the amino acid substitutions N132G, R164A, R244A, and R276E, that explain the broad specificity of the enzyme, relatively low penicillinase activity, and resistance to clavulanate. PMID:16870770

  4. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, N.; Rodenbücher, C.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Longo, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2014-08-14

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr{sub 1+x}Ti{sub 1+y}O{sub 3+(x+2y)}, STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350 °C, and a subsequent annealing at 600 °C in nitrogen. Films of 15 nm and 12 nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr] + [Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100 μm{sup 2} to 0.01 μm{sup 2}. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01 μm{sup 2} size with a 12 nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50 μA with

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization, data collection and preliminary biochemical characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sar2028, an aspartate/tyrosine/phenylalanine pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharamappa, Jaldappagari; Oke, Muse; Liu, Huanting; McMahon, Stephen A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Carter, Lester; Dorward, Mark; Zawadzki, Michal; Overton, Ian M.; Niekirk, C. A. Johannes van; Graham, Shirley; Botting, Catherine H.; Taylor, Garry L.; White, Malcolm F.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Coote, Peter J.; Naismith, James H.

    2007-05-01

    As part of work on S. aureus, the crystallization of Sar2028, a protein that is upregulated in MRSA, is reported. Sar2028, an aspartate/tyrosine/phenylalanine pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent aminotransferase with a molecular weight of 48 168 Da, was overexpressed in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared with a methicillin-sensitive strain. The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The protein crystallized in a primitive orthorhombic Laue group with unit-cell parameters a = 83.6, b = 91.3, c = 106.0 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Analysis of the systematic absences along the three principal axes indicated the space group to be P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. A complete data set was collected to 2.5 Å resolution.

  6. IncP-1β plasmids of Comamonas sp. and Delftia sp. strains isolated from a wastewater treatment plant mediate resistance to and decolorization of the triphenylmethane dye crystal violet.

    PubMed

    Stolze, Yvonne; Eikmeyer, Felix; Wibberg, Daniel; Brandis, Gerrit; Karsten, Christina; Krahn, Irene; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Viehöver, Prisca; Barsch, Aiko; Keck, Matthias; Top, Eva M; Niehaus, Karsten; Schlüter, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The application of toxic triphenylmethane dyes such as crystal violet (CV) in various industrial processes leads to large amounts of dye-contaminated sludges that need to be detoxified. Specific bacteria residing in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are able to degrade triphenylmethane dyes. The objective of this work was to gain insights into the genetic background of bacterial strains capable of CV degradation. Three bacterial strains isolated from a municipal WWTP harboured IncP-1β plasmids mediating resistance to and decolorization of CV. These isolates were assigned to the genera Comamonas and Delftia. The CV-resistance plasmid pKV29 from Delftia sp. KV29 was completely sequenced. In addition, nucleotide sequences of the accessory regions involved in conferring CV resistance were determined for plasmids pKV11 and pKV36 from the other two isolates. Plasmid pKV29 contains typical IncP-1β backbone modules that are highly similar to those of previously sequenced IncP-1β plasmids that confer antibiotic resistance, degradative capabilities or mercury resistance. The accessory regions located between the conjugative transfer (tra) and mating pair formation modules (trb) of all three plasmids analysed share common modules and include a triphenylmethane reductase gene, tmr, that is responsible for decolorization of CV. Moreover, these accessory regions encode other enzymes that are dispensable for CV degradation and hence are involved in so-far-unknown metabolic pathways. Analysis of plasmid-mediated degradation of CV in Escherichia coli by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight MS revealed that leuco crystal violet was the first degradation product. Michler's ketone and 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde appeared as secondary degradation metabolites. Enzymes encoded in the E. coli chromosome seem to be responsible for cleavage of leuco crystal violet. Plasmid-mediated degradation of triphenylmethane dyes such as CV

  7. Interplane resistivity of underdoped single crystals (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2(0<= x < 0.34)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanatar, M A; Straszheim, W E; Kim, Hyunsoo; Murphy, J; Spyrison, N; Blomberg, E C; Cho, K; Reid, J -Ph; Shen, Bing; Taillefer, Louis; Wen, Hai-Hu; Prozorov, R

    2014-04-01

    The temperature-dependent interplane resistivity ρc(T) was measured in the hole-doped iron arsenide superconductor (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 over a doping range from parent compound to optimal doping at Tc≈38 K, 0≤x≤0.34. The measurements were undertaken on high-quality single crystals grown from FeAs flux. The coupled magnetic/structural transition at TSM leads to a clear accelerated decrease of ρc(T) on cooling in samples with Tc<26 K (x<0.25). This decrease in the hole-doped material is in notable contrast to the increase in ρc(T) in the electron-doped Ba(Fe1-xCox)Fe 2As2 and isoelectron-substituted BaFe2(As1-xPx)2. TSM decreases very sharply with doping, dropping from Ts=71 K to zero on increase of Tc from approximately 25 to 27 K. ρc(T) becomes linear in T close to optimal doping. The broad crossover maximum in ρc(T), found in the parent BaFe2As2 at around Tmax~200 K, shifts to higher temperature ~250 K with doping of x=0.34. The maximum shows clear correlation with the broad crossover feature found in the temperature-dependent in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The evolution with doping of Tmax in (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 is in notable contrast with both the rapid suppression of Tmax found in Ba(Fe1-xTx)2As2 (T=Co,Rh,Ni,Pd) and its rapid increase in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2. This observation suggests that pseudogap features are much stronger in hole-doped than in electron-doped iron-based superconductors, revealing significant electron-hole doping asymmetry similar to that in the cuprates.

  8. Absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of KDP, KD(asterisk)P, BaB2O4, LiIO3, MgO:LiNbO3, and KTP measured by phase-matched second-harmonic generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckardt, Robert C.; Byer, Robert L.; Masuda, Hisashi; Fan, Yuan Xuan

    1990-01-01

    Both absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of six nonlinear materials measured by second-harmonic generation are discussed. A single-mode, injection-seeded, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with spatially filtered output was used to generate the 1.064-micron fundamental radiation. The following results were obtained: d36(KDP) = 0.38 pm/V, d36(KD/asterisk/P) = 0.37 pm/V, (parallel)d22(BaB2O4)(parallel) = 2.2 pm/V, d31(LiIO3) = -4.1 pm/V, d31(5 percentMgO:MgO LiNbO3) = -4.7 pm/V, and d(eff)(KTP) = 3.2 pm/V. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be better than 10 percent.

  9. Atomic crystals resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunsen; Zhang, David Wei; Zhou, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376093 and 61622401) and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFA0203900).

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization, data collection and preliminary biochemical characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sar2028, an aspartate/tyrosine/phenylalanine pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Seetharamappa, Jaldappagari; Oke, Muse; Liu, Huanting; McMahon, Stephen A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Carter, Lester; Dorward, Mark; Zawadzki, Michal; Overton, Ian M.; van Niekirk, C. A. Johannes; Graham, Shirley; Botting, Catherine H.; Taylor, Garry L.; White, Malcolm F.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Coote, Peter J.; Naismith, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Sar2028, an aspartate/tyrosine/phenylalanine pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent aminotransferase with a molecular weight of 48 168 Da, was overexpressed in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared with a methicillin-sensitive strain. The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The protein crystallized in a primitive orthorhombic Laue group with unit-cell parameters a = 83.6, b = 91.3, c = 106.0 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Analysis of the systematic absences along the three principal axes indicated the space group to be P212121. A complete data set was collected to 2.5 Å resolution. PMID:17565195

  11. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Other Parents Stories of Hope Crystal meth Crystal meth Story of Hope by giovanni January 3, ... about my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting ...

  12. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Home / Stories of Hope / Crystal meth Crystal meth Story Of Hope By giovanni January 3rd, 2013 ... my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting my ...

  13. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  14. Laser alexandrite crystals grown by horizontal oriented crystallization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, V. V.; Tsvetkov, E. G.; Yurkin, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    Comparative studies were performed for alexandrite crystals, Al 2BeO 4:Cr 3+, employed in solid state lasers and grown by the horizontal oriented crystallization (HOC) technique and alexandrite crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method. It was shown that the structural quality and possibilities of generation of stimulated emission HOC-crystals are similar to Cz-crystals, whereas their damage threshold is about three times higher. The obtained results and considerably lower cost price of HOC-alexandrite crystals prove their advantageous application in powerful laser systems, which require large laser rods with a higher resistance to laser beam. It is emphasized that application of HOC technique is promising for growth of laser crystals of other high-temperature oxide compounds.

  15. Response in soil of Cupriavidus necator and other copper-resistant bacterial predators of bacteria to addition of water, soluble nutrients, various bacterial species, or Bacillus thuringiensis spores and crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Casida, L.E. Jr. )

    1988-09-01

    Soil was incubated with various species of bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, or Bacillus thuringiensis spores and crystals. These were added to serve as potential prey for indigenous, copper-resistant, nonobligate bacterial predators of bacteria in the soil. Alternatively, the soil was incubated with soluble nutrients or water only to cause potential indigenous prey cells to multiply so the predator cells would multiply. All of these incubation procedures caused excessive multiplication of some gram-negative bacteria in soil. Even greater multiplication, however, often occurred for certain copper-resistant bacterial predators of bacteria that made up a part of the gram-negative response. Incubation of the soil with copper per se did not give these responses. In most cases, the copper-resistant bacteria that responded were Cupriavidus necator, bacterial predator L-2, or previously unknown bacteria that resembled them. The results suggest that, under various conditions of soil incubation, gram-negative bacterial predators of bacteria multiply and that several copper-resistant types among them can be detected, counted, and isolated by plating dilutions of the soil onto media containing excess copper.

  16. The crystal structure of Rv1347c, a putative antibiotic resistance protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals a GCN5-related fold and suggests an alternative function in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Card, G L; Peterson, N A; Smith, C A; Rupp, B; Schick, B M; Baker, E N

    2005-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB, is a devastating human pathogen. The emergence of multi-drug resistance in recent years has prompted a search for new drug targets and for a better understanding of mechanisms of resistance. Here we focus on the gene product of an open reading frame from M. tuberculosis, Rv1347c, which is annotated as a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase. The Rv1347c protein does not show this activity, however, and we show from its crystal structure, coupled with functional and bioinformatic data, that its most likely role is in the biosynthesis of mycobactin, the M. tuberculosis siderophore. The crystal structure of Rv1347c was determined by MAD phasing from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution (R = 0.227, R{sub free} = 0.257). The protein is monomeric, with a fold that places it in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) family of acyltransferases. Features of the structure are an acylCoA binding site that is shared with other GNAT family members, and an adjacent hydrophobic channel leading to the surface that could accommodate long-chain acyl groups. Modeling the postulated substrate, the N{sup {var_epsilon}}-hydroxylysine side chain of mycobactin, into the acceptor substrate binding groove identifies two residues at the active site, His130 and Asp168, that have putative roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  17. 1.1 MW peak power in doubly QML composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser with EO and Bi-GaAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Shixia; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui

    2016-02-22

    By simultaneously employing electro-optic (EO) modulator and Bi-doped GaAs, dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) multi-segment composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser is demonstrated with low repetition rate and high peak power. When the incident pump power is up to 6.93 W, only one mode-locking pulse underneath a Q-switching envelope is generated with sub-nanosecond pulse duration at one kilohertz repetition rate. An average output power of 445 mW and a pulse duration of 399 ps are obtained with the incident pump power of 11.13 W, corresponding to a peak power of 1.115 MW which is the highest one in doubly QML sub-nanosecond green laser by now. The laser characteristics are better than those obtained with EO and GaAs. The experimental results indicate that Bi-GaAs is a promising saturable absorber for dual-loss-modulated QML laser.

  18. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) with green light KTP laser in the management of symptomatic benign prostatic enlargement (BPE): does the anatomy of the TURP-like cavity predict the clinical outcome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime

    2005-04-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is evolving as an alternative outpatient surgical treatment to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in the management of patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hypertrophy/enlargement (BPH/BPE). The purported benefits of PVP include rapid vaporization of the prostate with an instant creation of TURP-like anatomic defect, an excellent hemostasis, shorter (<24 hours) duration of catheterization, short (< 24 hours) hospital stay, and quick return to work. We retrospectively reviewed the video clips of our cases to determine whether or not the anatomic appearance of the post-PVP prostatic cavity per se could predict clinical outcome. Forty-three, non-consecutive patients, diagnosed with symptomatic BPH have been treated with PVP using the 80W KTP laser and followed for at least 18 months (range 18-24). A majority (N=32) of the patients was enrolled under an Institutional Review Board approved multi-center protocol at the Hunter McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia. We reviewed the urodynamic parameters: AUA-SI, QOL, Qmax and PVR at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months postoperatively. We plan to present video documentations of the various anatomic appearances of the TURP-like prostatic cavity at the conclusion of the PVP treatment along with summaries of the short and long term clinical outcomes.

  19. Virtual Crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  20. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  1. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-04

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  2. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  3. Apoferritin crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Alexander Chernov, of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and based at Marshall Space Flight Center, is investigating why protein crystals grown in space are, in about 20 percent of cases, better-ordered than those grown on the ground. They are testing the idea that the amount of impurities trapped by space-grown crystals may be different than the amount trapped by crystals grown on Earth because convection is negligible in microgravity. The concentrations or impurities in many space-grown crystals turned out to be several times lower than that in the terrestrial ones, sometimes below the detection limit. The ground-based experiment also showed that the amount of impurities per unit volume of the crystals was usually higher than the amount per unit volume of the solution. This means that a growing crystal actually purifies the solution in its immediate vicinity. Here, an impurity depletion zone is created around apoferritin crystals grown in gel, imitating microgravity conditions.

  4. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  5. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  6. The electronic structure of RbTiOPO4 and the effects of the A-site cation substitution in KTiOPO4-family crystals.

    PubMed

    Atuchin, V V; Kesler, V G; Meng, Guangsi; Lin, Z S

    2012-10-10

    The electronic structure of RbTiOPO(4) has been investigated with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Detailed photoemission spectra of the element core levels have been recorded under excitation by nonmonochromatic Al Kα radiation (1486.6 eV). The chemical bonding parameters are compared to those reported for complex titanates and phosphates. The band structures of KTiOPO(4), RbTiOPO(4), K(0.535)R(0.465)TiOPO(4) and TlTiOPO(4) have been calculated by ab initio methods and compared to available experimental results. It is found that the band structure of KTP-type phosphate crystals is weakly dependent on the nature of the A-site (A=K, Rb, Tl) element.

  7. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  8. Creep of Oxide Single Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    literature data on Gd 3Ga5O1 2 (8) indicate that garnets may be highly deformation resistant at temperatures very close to their melting points...Data for Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Single Crystals Temperature Stress Creep Rate (sec 1 ) for Given Stress Direction (0C) (MPa) [111] [110] [100] 1650...Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Single Crystals," J.Mat.Sci., 17, 878-884 (1982). 9. B.M. Wanklyn, Clarendon Laboratory, personal communicaticn. 10. S.B. Austerman

  9. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  10. Probing the Influence of Stereoelectronic Effects on the Biophysical Properties of Oligonucleotides: Comprehensive Analysis of the RNA Affinity, Nuclease Resistance, and Crystal Structure of Ten 2'-O-Ribonucleic Acid Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Minasov, George; Tereshko, Valentina; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Teplova, Marianna; Inamati, Gopal B.; Lesnik, Elena A.; Owens, Steve R.; Ross, Bruce S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2010-03-05

    The syntheses of 10 new RNA 2'-O-modifications, their incorporation into oligonucleotides, and an evaluation of their properties such as RNA affinity and nuclease resistance relevant to antisense activity are presented. All modifications combined with the natural phosphate backbone lead to significant gains in terms of the stability of hybridization to RNA relative to the first-generation DNA phosphorothioates (PS-DNA). The nuclease resistance afforded in particular by the 2'-O-modifications carrying a positive charge surpasses that of PS-DNA. However, small electronegative 2'-O-substituents, while enhancing the RNA affinity, do not sufficiently protect against degradation by nucleases. Similarly, oligonucleotides containing 3'-terminal residues modified with the relatively large 2'-O-[2-(benzyloxy)ethyl] substituent are rapidly degraded by exonucleases, proving wrong the assumption that steric bulk will generally improve protection against nuclease digestion. To analyze the factors that contribute to the enhanced RNA affinity and nuclease resistance we determined crystal structures of self-complementary A-form DNA decamer duplexes containing single 2'-O-modified thymidines per strand. Conformational preorganization of substituents, favorable electrostatic interactions between substituent and sugar-phosphate backbone, and a stable water structure in the vicinity of the 2'-O-modification all appear to contribute to the improved RNA affinity. Close association of positively charged substituents and phosphate groups was observed in the structures with modifications that protect most effectively against nucleases. The promising properties exhibited by some of the analyzed 2'-O-modifications may warrant a more detailed evaluation of their potential for in vivo antisense applications. Chemical modification of RNA can also be expected to significantly improve the efficacy of small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Therefore, the 2'-O-modifications introduced here may benefit the

  11. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  12. Crystal clear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    A semiconductor is usually opaque to any light whose photon energy is larger than the semiconductor bandgap. Nature Photonics spoke to Stephen Durbin about how to render GaAs semiconductor crystals transparent using intense X-ray pulses.

  13. Nonlinear optical crystal development for laser wavelength shifting at AFRL Materials Directorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernelius, Nils C.; Hopkins, Frank K.; Ohmer, M. C.

    1999-06-01

    Our objective is to develop crystals that shift the light from well developed laser sources to application specific wavelengths which may be tunable. Military applications extend across the entire spectrum from ultraviolet through the far-infrared but our greatest interest has been in materials for the mid-IR (3-5 μm) and far-IR (8-12 μm) atmospheric windows. Our primary applications that drive crystal development are infrared countermeasures and remote sensing of chemical and biological warfare agents. To achieve these results we have pursued two tracks: birefringent bulk materials and quasi-phase-matched structures. Birefringent studies include the grey track problem in KTiOPO4 (KTP) plus growth of its isomorphs, KTIOAsO4 (KTA), RbTiOAsO4 (RTA), CsTiOAsO4 (CTA), and KxRb1-xTiOPO4 (KRTA); chalcopyrites: ZnGeP2, CdGeAs2, AgGaS2, AgGaSe2, AgGa(1-x)InxSe2, AgGaTe2; plus GaSE, and HgGa2S4. A small portion of the effort is pursuing UV materials, the foremost being the borates MM'(B3O5)3 where M=Sr, Ba, Pb; M'=Li,Na. Previously, work was done on LiB3O5 (LBO), β-bonding (GaAs), by periodic poling (LiNbO3, LiTaO3, KTP, BaTiO3) and by periodic doping. Th cover the 4.5-5.0 μm band, work is being done on RTA and Pb{MgxNbyTi1-x-y}O3 (PMNT). For periodic poling in the 8-12 μm region studies are being made on CGC (CsGeCl3), CGB (CsGeBr3), Tl3PbBr5, Tl4PbI6 and Tl4HgI6. QPM can also be obtained using total internal reflection devices (GaAs, ZnSe).

  14. Effect of Long Aging on the Resistivity Properties of Aluminum Doped YBa2Cu3- y Al y O7- δ Single Crystals with a Given Twin Boundary Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the conducting properties in the basal ab-plane before and after a long time exposure in air atmosphere of aluminum doped YBa2Cu3- y Al y O7- δ single crystals. Prolonged exposure leads to an increase of the effective scattering centers of the normal carriers. The excess conductivity in a wide temperature range has exponential temperature dependence and near the critical temperature ( T c ) can be adequately described within the Aslamazov-Larkin theoretical model. Nevertheless, the description of the excess conductivity through the relation , can be interpreted in terms of the mean-field theory, where T ∗ is the mean field temperature of the superconducting transition and the temperature dependence of the pseudo-gap is satisfactorily described by the BEC-BCS crossover theory. It is determined that the prolonged exposure increases significantly the temperature range of the implementation of the pseudogap state, thus narrowing the linear section of the resistivity dependence ρ ab ( T).

  15. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  16. Industry needs for silicon crystals and standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, K. E.

    1981-01-01

    The trend of the device fabrication industry requirement for larger crystals is reviewed. The ranges of properties and uniformities measurement standards needed for resistivity (four-point probe and spreading resistance) and for the chemical composition of oxygen and carbon impurities are presented.

  17. Mechanical and thermal studies of metronidazole crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramukutty, S.; Jeyasudha, R.; Ramachandran, E.

    2013-10-01

    Single crystals of metronidazole have been synthesized natural evaporation method. The grown crystal has been confirmed using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Mechanical behavior has been determined using Vickers hardness measurement. Work-hardening coefficient and Newtonian resistance pressure of the crystal have been estimated. Kinetic analysis of the thermogravimetric data has been carried out by using Coats-Redfern relation. Activation energy, frequency factor and order of reaction have been also calculated. The Arrhenius equation for metronidazole is k = 0.38 × 108 e-76.679/ RT mol-1 s-1. Thermodynamic parameters have been also determined.

  18. SYMMETRICAL LASER CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL GROWTH , SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), LASERS, SYNTHESIS, FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS , FLUORESCENCE, IMPURITIES, BARIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONATES...STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, TITANATES, STANNATES, SAMARIUM, MANGANESE, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, OXIDES, SINGLE CRYSTALS .

  19. Therapeutic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  20. Comparing Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Janet; Hoiberg, Karen; Chumbley, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This standard lesson on identifying salt and sugar crystals expands into an opportunity for students to develop their observation, questioning, and modeling skills. Although sugar and salt may look similar, students discovered that they looked very different under a magnifying glass and behaved differently when dissolved in water. In addition,…

  1. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  2. Interconnection between zero resistance and magnetic irreversibility temperatures in the hole doped Y0.9Ca0.1Ba2Cu3O7-δ single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, D. G.; Vieira, V. N.; Dias, F. T.; da Silva, D. L.; Jaeckel, S.; Pureur, P.; Schaf, J.

    2014-12-01

    We report on ac magnetoresistance, R(T,H) and ZFC [MZFC(T)] and FCC [MFCC(T)] dc magnetizations measurements of the a hole doped Y0.9Ca0.1Ba2Cu3O7-δ single crystal with the propose of to disclose the correlation between the zero resistance, TR0(H) and the magnetic irreversibility, Tirr(H) temperatures. The R(T,H) measurements were performed with a PPMS with the measurement current density applied parallel to the sample ab plane. The MZFC(T) and MFCC(T) measurements were performed with a commercial SQUID magnetometer. For the both measurements H <= 50kOe were applied parallel to the c axis of the sample. The contrasting of the Tirr(H) and TR0(H) data profile at H-T diagram shows that for H <= 5kOe the TR0(H) data falls systematically underneath of the Tirr(H) data and for H > 5kOe the TR0(H) data matches to the Tirr(H) data. We attributed to the establishment of a superconducting granular scenario provided for Ca doping as responsible for the observation of these features. At this scenario, Tirr(H) and TR0(H) do not depend of the same parts of the sample. While the Tirr(H) depends on well coupled grain clusters the TR0(H) depends on grain arrays traversing the whole sample. The granular aspect of this result is discussed at the light of the superconducting glass theories.

  3. Site selective substitution Pt for Ti in KTiOPO{sub 4}:Ga crystals revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, V.; Meyer, M.; Jorgensen, J.; Malovichko, G.; Hunt, A. W.

    2014-07-28

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at low temperatures has been used to characterize potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}) single crystals grown by different techniques. Irradiation with 20 MeV electrons performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature caused an appearance of electrons and holes. Platinum impurities act as electron traps in KTiOPO{sub 4} creating Pt{sup 3+} centers. Two different Pt{sup 3+} centers were observed, Pt(A) and Pt(D). The Pt(A) centers are dominant in undoped samples, whereas Pt(D)—in Ga-doped KTP crystals. Superhyperfine structure registered for Pt(D) centers was attributed to interactions of platinum electrons with {sup 39}K and two {sup 31}P nuclei in their surroundings. In both Pt(A) and Pt(D) centers, Pt{sup 3+} ions substitute for Ti{sup 4+} ions, but with a preference to one of two electrically distinct crystallographic positions. The site selective substitution can be controlled by the Ga-doping.

  4. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  5. Nonlinear methods of generation of eye-safe radiation: periodically polled crystals PPLN and PPKTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendzian, Waldemar

    2003-10-01

    We present the results of investigations on OPO systems, operating at the 'eye safe' region λ=1.5-1.6μm. The peak power of 0.65 MW with 1.9-mJ energy at 1572 nm-wavelngth was demonstrated in a simple singly resonant OPO intracavity pumped by passively Q-switched Nd:YAG slab laser with 300 W quasi-cw diode array as a pump unit. The KTP crystal, of 5×5×20 mm3 size, 'x-cut' for non-critically phase-matched parametric generation at the signal wavelength of 1572 nm, was used as nonlinear converter. The five-fold shortening of signal pusle duration with respect to 1064-nm pump radiation was observed. The conversion efficiency of 44% with respect to 1064-nm pump energy and 3.8% with respect to diode pump energy was demonstrated. As a pump source for the extracavity OPO with PPLN (Λ=29.6 μm) the diode pumped acousto-optically q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser of 2.5-W average power was used. The conversion efficiency of 43% was demonstrated. The pulses of 110 μJ energy, 7.8 ns duration and up to 10 kHz repetition rate were obtained. The signal wavelengh was temperature tuned from 1.510 μm to 1.560 μm.

  6. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  7. Interfacial supersaturation, secondary nucleation, and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Clifford Y.; Wu, Jenn-Fang; Rousseau, Ronald W.

    1992-02-01

    A theory describing the source of nuclei in secondary nucleation is presented and used to rationalize experimental data from the literature, some of which had appeared to be conflicting. The theory rests on a model in which an adsorption layer consisting of clusters of growth units of varying size is formed on the surface of growing crystals. The existence of the layer is related to the two-resistance model of crystal growth; by varying system conditions, the relative importance of the two resistances is altered and thereby changes the interfacial supersaturation even though overall supersaturation remains constant. Interracial supersaturation and contact energy determine kinetics in a system dominated by contact nucleation.

  8. Crystallization of Yttrium and Samarium Aluminosilicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Diana C.; Prado, Miguel O.

    Aluminosilicate glasses containing samarium and yttrium (SmAS and YAS glasses) exhibit high glass transition temperatures, corrosion resistance, and glass stability on heating which make them useful for technological applications. Yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres are currently being used for internal selective radiotherapy of liver cancer. During the preparation process, crystallization needs to be totally or partially avoided depending on the final application. Thus knowing the crystallization kinetics can help to prevent or avoid it, by designing a proper thermal pathway. In this work we studied the crystallization kinetics of YAS and SmAS glasses. It was found that both, YAS and SmAS glasses crystallize from the surface. SmAS glass presented lower densities of nucleation sites. The results also showed that the crystal growth apparent enthalpy is larger for SmAS glasses.

  9. Crystallization process

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  10. Characterization of zinc selenide single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhardt, Rosario A.

    1996-01-01

    ZnSe single crystals of high quality and low impurity levels are desired for use as substrates in optoelectronic devices. This is especially true when the device requires the formation of homoepitaxial layers. While ZnSe is commercially available, it is at present extremely expensive due to the difficulty of growing single crystal boules with low impurity content and the resultant low yields. Many researchers have found it necessary to heat treat the crystals in liquid Zn in order to remove the impurities, lower the resistivity and activate the photoluminescence at room temperature. The physical vapor transport method (PVT) has been successfully used at MSFC to grow many single crystals of II-VI semiconducting materials including ZnSe. The main goal at NASA has been to try to establish the effect of gravity on the growth parameters. To this effect, crystals have been grown vertically upwards or horizontally. Both (111) and (110) oriented ZnSe crystals have been obtained via unseeded PVT growth. Preliminary characterization of the horizontally grown crystals has revealed that Cu is a major impurity and that the low temperature photoluminescence spectra is dominated by the copper peak. The ratio of the copper peak to the free exciton peak is being used to determine variations in composition throughout the crystal. It was the intent of this project to map the copper composition of various crystals via photoluminescence first, then measure their electrical resistivity and capacitance as a function of frequency before proceeding with a heat treatment designed to remove the copper impurities. However, equipment difficulties with the photoluminescence set up, having to establish a procedure for measuring the electrical properties of the as-grown crystals and time limitations made us re-evaluate the project goals. Vertically grown samples designated as ZnSe-25 were chosen to be measured electrically since they were not expected to show as much variation in their

  11. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  12. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  13. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  14. Germanium Resistance Thermometer For Subkelvin Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.

    1993-01-01

    Improved germanium resistance thermometer measures temperatures as small as 0.01 K accurately. Design provides large area for electrical connections (to reduce electrical gradients and increase sensitivity to changes in temperatures) and large heat sink (to minimize resistance heating). Gold pads on top and bottom of germanium crystal distribute electrical current and flow of heat nearly uniformly across crystal. Less expensive than magnetic thermometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's) otherwise used.

  15. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  16. On-line monitoring of the crystallization process: relationship between crystal size and electrical impedance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Yao, Jun; Wang, Mi

    2016-07-01

    On-line monitoring of crystal size in the crystallization process is crucial to many pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industrial applications. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the on-line monitoring of the cooling crystallization process of L-glutamic acid (LGA) using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS method can be used to monitor the growth of crystal particles relying on the presence of an electrical double layer on the charged particle surface and the polarization of double layer under the excitation of alternating electrical field. The electrical impedance spectra and crystal size were measured on-line simultaneously by an impedance analyzer and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), respectively. The impedance spectra were analyzed using the equivalent circuit model and the equivalent circuit elements in the model can be obtained by fitting the experimental data. Two equivalent circuit elements, including capacitance (C 2) and resistance (R 2) from the dielectric polarization of the LGA solution and crystal particle/solution interface, are in relation with the crystal size. The mathematical relationship between the crystal size and the equivalent circuit elements can be obtained by a non-linear fitting method. The function can be used to predict the change of crystal size during the crystallization process.

  17. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  18. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-04

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  20. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  1. High purity, low dislocation GaAs single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T.; Holmes, D. E.; Kirkpatrick, C. G.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid encapsulated Czochralski crystal growth techniques for producing undoped, high resistivity, low dislocation material suitable for device applications is described. Technique development resulted in reduction of dislocation densities in 3 inch GaAs crystals. Control over the melt stoichiometry was determined to be of critical importance for the reduction of twinning and polycrystallinity during growth.

  2. EPR and ENDOR studies of point defects in the nonlinear optical crystals rubidium titanium oxide phosphate and potassium titanium oxide arsenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongquan

    Four studies of point defects RbTiOPO4 and KTiOAsO4 crystals are described in this dissertation. In the first study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electronnuclear double resonance (ENDOR) are used to characterize the complex hyperfine patterns exhibited by the primary radiation-induced trapped hole center in single crystals of RbTiOPO4 (commonly referred to as RTP). These defects are produced at 77 K by irradiating with x rays, and they are destroyed by raising the temperature above approximately 170 K. In this center, the hole resides on a bridging oxygen ion located between two titanium ions and is stabilized by a nearby rubidium vacancy. Hyperfine splittings from interactions with one rubidium neighbor and one phosphorus neighbor are resolved in the EPR spectra. The ENDOR spectra show one larger phosphorus interaction and four smaller phosphorus interactions. Principal values and principal axis directions for this larger phosphorus interaction are obtained from the ENDOR angular dependence. In the second study, the dominant Ti3+ trapped electron center in flux-grown RbTiOPO4 crystals is characterized using EPR and ENDOR. This center is produced during an x-ray irradiation at room temperature when a Ti4+ ion traps an electron and becomes a Ti3+ ion, and it is best studied in the 30 to 40 K range. The EPR spectrum contains a three-line hyperfine pattern from two nearly equivalent neighboring 31P nuclei, along with hyperfine lines from the 47,49Ti nuclei. The g matrix, determined from the angular dependence of the EPR spectrum, has principal values of 1.819, 1.889, and 1.947. Hyperfine matrices for four 31P nuclei are obtained from the angular dependence of the ENDOR spectrum (two of these are resolved in the EPR spectrum). The proposed model for this defect is a Ti3+ ion adjacent to an oxygen vacancy. Analogies are made to a similar Ti3+ center in KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystals. In the third study, the primary trapped hole and trapped electron centers in

  3. Molecular tectonics: from crystals to crystals of crystals.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Gabriela; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2013-12-11

    The in situ combination of M(II) cations (Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) with 2,4,6-pyridinetricarboxylic acid as a ligand, a bisamidinium dication as a H-bond donor tecton and NaOH leads to the formation of anionic metal complexes ML2(2-) and their interconnection into isomorphous 3D H-bonded networks displaying different colours which were used as preformed seed crystals for the formation of crystals of crystals by 3D epitaxial growth.

  4. Drilling technique for crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, T.; Miyagawa, I.

    1977-01-01

    Hole-drilling technique uses special crystal driller in which drill bit rotates at fixed position at speed of 30 rpm while crystal slowly advances toward drill. Technique has been successfully applied to crystal of Rochell salt, Triglycine sulfate, and N-acetyglycine. Technique limits heat buildup and reduces strain on crystal.

  5. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  6. Apparatus and Methods Using Highly Optically Dispersive Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-02

    e.g., semicon- ductor compounds (e.g., CdSSe), nonlinear crystals (e.g., KTP, BBO, LiN03), crystals (e.g., Ruby, Alexandrite ); e) integrated...e.g., KTP, BBO, LiN03), crystals (e.g., Ruby, Alexandrite ), and 50 other known solid media. 5) Integrated lightwave structures; the dispersion can

  7. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  8. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Analysis of Single-Crystal, Nickel-Based Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. R.; Arakere, N. K.

    2000-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue-induced failures in turbine and turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Single-crystal nickel turbine blades are used because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities. Single-crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant and complicating factor. A fatigue failure criterion based on the maximum shear stress amplitude on the 24 octahedral and 6 cube slip systems is presented for single-crystal nickel superalloys (FCC crystal). This criterion greatly reduces the scatter in uniaxial fatigue data for PWA 1493 at 1,200 F in air. Additionally, single-crystal turbine blades used in the Space Shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump are modeled using a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model. This model accounts for material orthotrophy and crystal orientation. Fatigue life of the blade tip is computed using FE stress results and the failure criterion that was developed. Stress analysis results in the blade attachment region are also presented. Results demonstrate that control of crystallographic orientation has the potential to significantly increase a component's resistance to fatigue crack growth without adding additional weight or cost.

  9. Microhardness studies of sulfamic acid single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh Kumar, A.; Joseph, Cyriac; Paulose, Reshmi; R, Rajesh; Joseph, Georgekutty; Louis, Godfrey

    2015-02-01

    Vicker's microhardness study of (100), (010) and (001) faces of a non-linear optical crystal sulfamic acid have been reported. Single crystals of sulfamic acid have been grown by slow evaporation method. The load dependence of the Vickers microhardness of sulfamic acid crystal were investigated and analyzed from the stand point of various theoretical models. Crystal samples in a, b and c-axes exhibit reverse indentation effect which is best described by Meyer's law, Hays-Kendall's approach and proportional specimen resistance (PSR) models. The negative values of load dependent quantities in Hays-Kendall's approach and PSR model suggest that the origin of indentation size effect is associated with the process of relaxation of indentation stresses.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-06-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  11. Sub-Kelvin resistance thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device capable of accurate temperature measurement down to 0.01 K of a particular object is discussed. The device is comprised of the following: a heat sink wafer; a first conducting pad bonded near one end of the heat sink wafer; a second conducting pad bonded near the other end of the heat sink wafer; and an oblong doped semiconductor crystal such as germanium. The oblong doped semiconductor crystal has a third conducting pad bonded on its bottom surface with the oblong doped semiconductor crystal bonded to the heat sink wafer by having the fourth conducting pad bonded to the first conducting pad. A wire is bonded between the second and third conducting pads. Current and voltage wires bonded to the first and second conducting pads measure the change in resistance of the oblong doped semiconductor crystal; this indicates the temperature of the object whose temperature is to be measured.

  12. Low temperature magnetic transitions of single crystal HoBi

    SciTech Connect

    Fente, A.; Suderow, H.; Vieira, S.; Nemes, N. M.; García-Hernández, M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2013-10-01

    We present resistivity, specific heat and magnetization measurements in high quality single crystals of HoBi, with a residual resistivity ratio of 126. We find, from the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, an antiferromagnetic transition at 5.7 K, which evolves, under magnetic fields, into a series of up to five metamagnetic phases.

  13. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  14. Photorefractive effect in CdMnTe:V Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pour, K. M.; Chattopadahyay, K.; Chen, H.; Chen, K. T.; Morgan, S.; Burger, A.

    1998-01-01

    We present two-wave mixing result obtained with a CdMnTe:V crystal. A photorefractive gain coefficient of 0.20 /cm was observed at 633 nm with the signal-to-pump ratio being of the order of 10(exp -3). This crystal was grown by vertical Bridgman Technique and doped with Vanadium during the growth. The crystal were of good optical quality and showed high resistivity. Room temperature absorption and low temperature photoluminescence studies comparing the band edge and defect center at the doped and undoped CdMnTe crystal will also be discussed.

  15. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, N. K.; Swanson, G.

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Single crystal nickel turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines throughout industry because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493, PWA 1484, RENE' N-5 and CMSX-4. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. Single crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. The failure modes of single crystal turbine blades are complicated to predict due to the material orthotropy and variations in crystal orientations. Fatigue life estimation of single crystal turbine blades represents an important aspect of durability assessment. It is therefore of practical interest to develop effective fatigue failure criteria for single crystal nickel alloys and to investigate the effects of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientation on fatigue life. A fatigue failure criterion based on the maximum shear stress amplitude /Delta(sub tau)(sub max))] on the 24 octahedral and 6 cube slip systems, is presented for single crystal nickel superalloys (FCC crystal). This criterion reduces the scatter in uniaxial LCF test data considerably for PWA 1493 at 1200 F in air. Additionally, single crystal turbine blades used in the alternate advanced high-pressure fuel turbopump (AHPFTP/AT) are modeled using a large-scale three-dimensional finite element model. This finite element model is capable of accounting for material orthotrophy and variation in primary and secondary crystal orientation. Effects of variation in crystal orientation on blade stress response are studied based on 297

  16. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets ...

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections caused by such bacteria untreatable. Resistance in tuberculosis (TB) WHO estimates that, in 2014, there were about 480 000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a form of tuberculosis that is ...

  18. Whence Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Metzger, Rosemarie; Swenson, Brian R.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Antimicrobial resistance results from a complex interaction between pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, antimicrobial pressure, and genes, which together comprise the total body of potential resistance elements. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the importance of antimicrobial pressure on the development of resistance in a single surgical intensive care unit. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively collected dataset of all intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections in surgical and trauma patients over a 6-y period at a single hospital. Resistant gram-negative pathogens (rGNR) included those resistant to all aminoglycosides, quinolones, penicillins, cephalosporins, or carbapenems; resistant gram-positive infections (rGPC) included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Each resistant infection was evaluated for prior or concomitant antibiotic use, previous treatment for the same (non-resistant) organism, and concurrent infection with the same organism (genus and species, although not necessarily resistant) in another ICU patient. Results: Three hundred and thirty resistant infections were identified: 237 rGNR and 93 rGPC. Infections with rGNR occurred frequently while receiving antibiotic therapy (65%), including the sensitive form of the subsequent resistant pathogen (42.2%). Infections with rGPC were also likely to occur on antimicrobial therapy (50.6%). Treatment of a different patient for an infection with the same resistant pathogen in the ICU at the time of diagnosis, implying potential patient-to-patient transmission occurred more frequently with rGNR infections (38.8%). Conclusion: Antimicrobial pressure exerts a substantial effect on the development of subsequent infection. Our data demonstrate a high estimated rate of de novo emergence of resistance after treatment, which appears to be more common than patient-to-patient transmission. These data support

  19. Apparatus for growing crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J. (Inventor); Witt, August F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for growing crystals from a melt employing a heat pipe, consisting of one or more sections, each section serving to control temperature and thermal gradients in the crystal as it forms inside the pipe.

  20. Crystal structure and prediction.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  1. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  2. Crystal Structure and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Tejender S.; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R.

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  3. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  4. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  5. Apparatus for mounting crystal

    DOEpatents

    Longeway, Paul A.

    1985-01-01

    A thickness monitor useful in deposition or etching reactor systems comprising a crystal-controlled oscillator in which the crystal is deposited or etched to change the frequency of the oscillator. The crystal rests within a thermally conductive metallic housing and arranged to be temperature controlled. Electrode contacts are made to the surface primarily by gravity force such that the crystal is substantially free of stress otherwise induced by high temperature.

  6. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  7. CRYSTAL FILTER TEST SET

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL FILTERS, *HIGH FREQUENCY, *RADIOFREQUENCY FILTERS, AMPLIFIERS, ELECTRIC POTENTIAL, FREQUENCY, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , INSTRUMENTATION, RADIOFREQUENCY, RADIOFREQUENCY AMPLIFIERS, TEST EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS

  8. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  9. Food Crystalization and Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food Crystalization and Eggs Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. USDA Agricultural Research Service Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit Athens, Georgia, USA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov Sugar, salt, lactose, tartaric acid and ice are examples of constituents than can crystallize in foods. Crystallization in a foo...

  10. Artistic Crystal Creations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In this inquiry-based, integrative art and science activity, Grade 5-8 students use multicolored Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystallizing solutions to reveal beautiful, cylindrical, 3-dimensional, needle-shaped structures. Through observations of the crystal art, students analyze factors that contribute to crystal size and formation, compare…

  11. Annealing macromolecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hanson, B Leif; Bunick, Gerard J

    2007-01-01

    The process of crystal annealing has been used to improve the quality of diffraction from crystals that would otherwise be discarded for displaying unsatisfactory diffraction after flash cooling. Although techniques and protocols vary, macromolecular crystals are annealed by warming the flash-cooled crystal, then flash cooling it again. To apply macromolecular crystal annealing, a flash-cooled crystal displaying unacceptably high mosaicity or diffraction from ice is removed from the goniometer and immediately placed in cryoprotectant buffer. The crystal is incubated in the buffer at either room temperature or the temperature at which the crystal was grown. After about 3 min, the crystal is remounted in the loop and flash cooled. In situ annealing techniques, where the cold stream is diverted and the crystal allowed to warm on the loop prior to flash cooling, are variations of annealing that appears to work best when large solvent channels are not present in the crystal lattice or the solvent content of the crystal is relatively low.

  12. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  13. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  14. Improving marginal crystals.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charles W; Riès-Kautt, Madeleine

    2007-01-01

    The physical chemistry of crystal growth can help to identify directions in which to look for improved crystal properties. In this chapter, we summarize how crystal growth depends on parameters that can be controlled experimentally, and relate them to the tools available for optimizing a particular crystal form for crystal shape, volume, and diffraction quality. Our purpose is to sketch the conceptual basis of optimization and to provide sample protocols derived from those foundations. We hope to assist even those who chose not to use systematic methods by enabling them to carry out rudimentary optimization searches armed with a better understanding of how the underlying physical chemistry operates.

  15. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  16. Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  17. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  18. Investigation of substitution effects and the phase transition in type-I clathrates Rb{sub x}Cs{sub 8-x}Sn{sub 44}square{sub 2} (1.3<=x<=2.1) using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, heat capacity and electrical resistivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Faessler, Thomas F.; Gold, Christian; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang; Kume, Tetsuji; Shimizu, Hiroyasu

    2009-10-15

    The substitution of cations in Rb{sub x}Cs{sub 8-x}Sn{sub 44}square{sub 2}(1.3<=x<=2.1) is reported. The compounds crystallize at room temperature in the space group la3-bard adopting the type-I clathrate 2x2x2 superstructure with partly ordered framework vacancies (square), whereas at higher temperatures they transform to the primitive, more disordered modification (space group Pm3-barn). The guest atom distributions in the Sn cages on the Rb: Cs ratios is studied by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction for Rb{sub 2.1(1)}Cs{sub 5.8(1)}Sn{sub 44} at T=293 K (1), Rb{sub 1.42(8)}Cs{sub 6.58(8)}Sn{sub 44} at T=293 K (2a), Rb{sub 1.46(5)}Cs{sub 6.54(5)}Sn{sub 44} at T=373 K (2b) and Rb{sub 1.32(8)}Cs{sub 6.68(8)}Sn{sub 44} at T=293 K (3). The structural order-disorder phase transition influences the electrical resistivity. The hysteresis observed for the electrical resistivity in combination with the symmetric shape of the specific heat anomaly suggests that the transformation is of first-order type and is characterized by an entropy change of about 2.5 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum for the low-temperature modification of 2 is also reported. - Graphical Abstract: The effects of substitution of cations in the type-I clathrates Rb{sub x}Cs{sub 8-x}Sn{sub 44} (1.3<=x<=2.1) are reported. The distribution of the guests in the Sn cages under different reaction stoichiometries and annealing times is studied by X-ray diffraction. A structural phase transition in Rb{sub 1.4}Cs{sub 6.6}Sn{sub 44} at 333-363 K affects significantly the electrical resistivity and heat capacity.

  19. Crystal Polymorphism and Multiple Crystal Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Dario; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Polito, Marco

    This chapter discusses the phenomenon of polymorphism in organic and organometallic compounds. Polymorphism is first introduced and then, to give the work some context, background information is given concerning properties and techniques for characterizing the solid phases. In particular, desolvation and interconverstion are examined, and the gas-solid reactions are presented as a successful route to obtaining new crystalline phases. Co-crystal definition is then described and the problem in distinguishing co-crystals and salts is evaluated.

  20. Between Crystal and Glass: Thermal Transport in C60 Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Simon; Kumar, Sushant; McGaughey, Alan

    Molecular crystals of the fullerene C60 and its derivatives [e.g., phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)] are candidate materials for use in photovoltaics and thermoelectrics. In thermoelectrics, their usefulness is due in part to their exceptionally low thermal conductivities (0.4 W/m-K for C60 and 0.05 W/m-K for PCBM) at room temperature. Little is known regarding the microscopic physics underlying these low thermal conductivities. An important question is whether thermal transport in the C60 molecular crystal is (i) crystal-like, where energy is transported as collective vibrations of the centers of mass of the molecules, or (ii) amorphous-like, where energy diffuses from molecule to molecule. We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Green-Kubo method to probe this question by predicting the relative contributions of crystal-like and amorphous-like transport to the thermal conductivity of the C60 molecular crystal. To isolate crystal-like transport, we perform simulations on C60 crystals where molecular rotations and intra-molecular vibrations are prohibited. To isolate amorphous-like transport, we fix the centers of mass of the molecules. We compare the MD results to predictions from a fully diffusive network resistance model. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant DMR-1507325).

  1. Resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cag, Yasemin; Caskurlu, Hulya; Fan, Yanyan; Cao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    By definition, the terms sepsis and septic shock refer to a potentially fatal infectious state in which the early administration of an effective antibiotic is the most significant determinant of the outcome. Because of the global spread of resistant bacteria, the efficacy of antibiotics has been severely compromised. S. pneumonia, Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas are the predominant pathogens of sepsis and septic shock. It is common for E. coli, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas to be resistant to multiple drugs. Multiple drug resistance is caused by the interplay of multiple resistance mechanisms those emerge via the acquisition of extraneous resistance determinants or spontaneous mutations. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), carbapenemases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and quinolone resistance determinants are typically external and disseminate on mobile genetic elements, while porin-efflux mechanisms are activated by spontaneous modifications of inherited structures. Porin and efflux mechanisms are frequent companions of multiple drug resistance in Acinetobacter and P. aeruginosa, but only occasionally detected among E. coli and Klebsiella. Antibiotic resistance became a global health threat. This review examines the major resistance mechanisms of the leading microorganisms of sepsis. PMID:27713884

  2. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  3. Bioperformance of shape memory alloy single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yahia, L'h; Manceur, A; Chaffraix, P

    2006-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) represent a large family of alloys that show unique characteristics. They have been exploited in several fields for diverse applications. For the last 20 years, these alloys and more particularly Ni-Ti alloys have revolutionized the field of metallic biomaterials. Applications in the biomedical area are multiple and these materials improve significantly the quality of the diagnostics, treatments and surgeries. To our knowledge, most devices are made of SMAs in the polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, the single crystal form shows several promising advantages especially concerning its mechanical performances. In this paper we describe the advantages, advances and limits of using different SMA single crystals for biomedical applications, including biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. We also discuss the low response time of classical thermal SMAs as well as the new advances in research on magnetic SMA single crystals.

  4. Structural, thermal and optical properties of KTi(0.92)La(0.08)OPO4 and KTi(0.94)Nd(0.06)OPO4.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana; Ramasamy, P

    2015-10-05

    KTi0.92La0.08OPO4 (KTP:La) and KTi0.94Nd0.06OPO4 (KTP:Nd) single crystals are grown using high temperature top seeded flux growth technique. The strain derived from doping is calculated from Williamson-Hall relation. The packing structure and lattice parameter of the grown crystals are analyzed using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The bonding, distortion and change in inter-atomic distances by strain effects of doping are assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Thermal stabilities of grown crystals are evaluated by specific heat capacity measurement. Pronounced high specific heat capacity is recorded as 1.16 J/gK at 498 K for KTP:Nd. Second harmonic generation intensities are measured for KTP:Nd and KTP:La single crystal.

  5. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  6. Antarctic stratospheric ice crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, J.; Toon, O. B.; Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Verma, S.

    1989-01-01

    Ice crystals were replicated over the Palmer Peninsula at approximately 72 deg S on six occasions during the 1987 Airboirne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The sampling altitude was between 12.5 and 18.5 km (45-65 thousand ft pressure altitude) with the temperature between 190 and 201 K. The atmosphere was subsaturated with respect to ice in all cases. The collected crystals were predominantly solid and hollow columns. The largest crystals were sampled at lower altitudes where the potential temperature was below 400 K. While the crystals were larger than anticipated, their low concentration results in a total surface area that is less than one tenth of the total aerosol surface area. The large ice crystals may play an important role in the observed stratospheric dehydration processes through sedimentation. Evidence of scavenging of submicron particles further suggests that the ice crystals may be effective in the removal of stratospheric chemicals.

  7. Protein crystallization in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, S; Shibata, K; Morita, Y

    1997-12-01

    A space experiment involving protein crystallization was conducted in a microgravity environment using the space shuttle "Endeavour" of STS-47, on a 9-day mission from September 12th to 20th in 1992. The crystallization was carried out according to a batch method, and 5 proteins were selected as flight samples for crystallization. Two of these proteins: hen egg-white lysozyme and co-amino acid: pyruvate aminotransferase from Pseudomonas sp. F-126, were obtained as single crystals of good diffraction quality. Since 1992 we have carried out several space experiments for protein crystallization aboard space shuttles and the space station MIR. Our experimental results obtained mainly from hen egg-white lysozyme are described below, focusing on the effects of microgravity on protein crystal growth.

  8. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent. Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:18429252

  9. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent . Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:22045560

  10. Polycrystalline configurations that maximize electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, Vincenzo; Milton, Graeme W.

    A lower bound on the effective conductivity tensor of polycrystalline aggregates formed from a single basic crystal of conductivity σ was recently established by Avellaneda. Cherkaev, Lurie and Milton. The bound holds for any basic crystal, but for isotropic aggregates of a uniaxial crystal, the bound is achieved by a sphere assemblage model of Schulgasser. This left open the question of attainability of the bound when the crystal is not uniaxial. The present work establishes that the bound is always attained by a rather large class of polycrystalline materials. These polycrystalline materials, with maximal electrical resistivity, are constructed by sequential lamination of the basic crystal and rotations of itself on widely separated length scales. The analysis is facilitated by introducing a tensor S = 0( 0I + σ) -1 where 0 > 0 is chosen so that Tr S = 1. This tensor s is related to the electric field in the optimal polycrystalline configurations.

  11. Managing Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag, John W.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents some considerations and ideas for managing students' resistance. They are organized around four topics: the impact of context on behavior, the importance of being comprehensive and nonrestrictive in behavior, the adaptive function of resistant behavior, and the benefit of joining children in their frame of reference.…

  12. Inhomogeneities in single crystals of cuprate oxide superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorjani, K.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Adrian, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    The next stage in the evolution of experimental research on the high temperature superconductors will require high quality single crystals and epitaxially grown crystalline films. However, inhomogeneities and other defects are not uncommon in single crystals of cuprate oxide superconductors, so a corollary requirement will be a reliable method for judging the quality of these materials. The application of magnetically modulated resistance methods in this task is briefly described and illustrated.

  13. Engineered liquid crystal anchoring energies with nanopatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gear, Christopher; Diest, Kenneth; Liberman, Vladimir; Rothschild, Mordechai

    2015-01-26

    The anchoring energy of liquid crystals was shown to be tunable by surface nanopatterning of periodic lines and spaces. Both the pitch and height were varied using hydrogen silsesquioxane negative tone electron beam resist, providing for flexibility in magnitude and spatial distribution of the anchoring energy. Using twisted nematic liquid crystal cells, it was shown that this energy is tunable over an order of magnitude. These results agree with a literature model which predicts the anchoring energy of sinusoidal grooves.

  14. Phononic crystal devices

    DOEpatents

    El-Kady, Ihab F [Albuquerque, NM; Olsson, Roy H [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-10

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  15. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  16. Automation in biological crystallization.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  17. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  18. Liquid crystal optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-01

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  19. Heroin crystal nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy.

  20. Automation in biological crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Stewart, Patrick; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given. PMID:24915074

  1. Crystals in magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M.

    2011-12-01

    Differentiation processes in igneous systems are one way in which the diversity of igneous rocks is produced. Traditionally, magmatic diversity is considered as variations in the overall chemical composition, such as basalt and rhyolite, but I want to extend this definition to include textural diversity. Such textural variations can be manifested as differences in the amount of crystalline (and immiscible liquid) phases and in the origin and identity of such phases. One important differentiation process is crystal-liquid separation by floatation or decantation, which clearly necessitates crystals in the magma. Hence, it is important to determine if magmas in chambers (sensu lato) have crystals. The following discussion is framed in generalities - many exceptions occur. Diabase (dolerite) dykes are a common, widespread result of regional mafic magmatism. The rims of most diabase dykes have few or no phenocrysts and crystals in the cores are commonly thought to have crystallized in place. Hence, this major mafic magmatic source did not have crystals, although compositional diversity of these dykes is commonly explained by crystal-liquid separation. This can be resolved if crystallisation was on the walls on the magma chamber. Similarly, most flood basalts are low in crystals and separation of those that are present cannot always explain the observed compositional diversity. Crystal-rich flows do occur, for example the 'Giant Plagioclase Basalts' of the Deccan series, but the crystals are thought to form or accumulate in a crystal-rich zone beneath the roof of the chamber - the rest of the chamber probably has few crystals. Some magmas from Hawaii contain significant amounts of olivine crystals, but most of these are deformed and cannot have crystallised in the chamber. In this case the crystals are thought to grow as the magma passes through a decollement zone. They may have grown on the walls or been trapped by filters. Basaltic andesite ignimbrites generally have

  2. Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (APCF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication contains articles entitled: (1) Crystallization of EGFR-EGF; (2) Crystallization of Apocrustacyanin C1; (3) Crystallization and X-ray Analysis of 5S rRNA and the 5S rRNA Domain A; (4) Growth of Lysozyme Crystals at Low Nucleation Density; (5) Comparative Analysis of Aspartyl tRNA-synthetase and Thaumatin Crystals Grown on Earth and In Microgravity; (6) Lysosome Crystal Growth in the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility Monitored via Mach-Zehnder Interferometry and CCD Video; (7) Analysis of Thaumatin Crystals Grown on Earth and in Microgravity; (8) Crystallization of the Nucleosome Core Particle; (9) Crystallization of Photosystem I; (10) Mechanism of Membrane Protein Crystal Growth: Bacteriorhodopsin-mixed Micelle Packing at the Consolution Boundary, Stabilized in Microgravity; (11) Crystallization in a Microgravity Environment of CcdB, a Protein Involved in the Control of Cell Death; and (12) Crystallization of Sulfolobus Solfataricus

  3. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  4. Resisting HRD's Resistance to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and research; analyze the research on HRD and diversity over a ten-year period; discuss HRD's resistance to diversity; and offer some recommendations for a more authentic…

  5. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  6. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  7. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  8. Interface resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkkonen, Juha

    1983-11-01

    Interface resistance is studied by using the Landauer formula which relates the resistance to the quantum mechanical transmission coefficient. A simple rederivation of the Landauer formula is given. Using a step-like potential barrier as a model for the metal-semiconductor contact an analytical expression for the effective Richardson constant is derived. As an other application the grain boundary resistance in polycrystalline semiconductors is studied. The short-range potential fluctuation associated with the grain boundary is described by a rectangular potential barrier. The results for the grain boundary limited mobility cover both the strong and weak scattering regimes.

  9. Resistivity analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, Michael R.; Bruce, Victoria J.; Ring, Rosalinda M.; Cole, Edward Jr. I.; Hawkins, Charles F.; Tangyungong, Paiboon

    2006-06-13

    According to an example embodiment of the present invention a semiconductor die having a resistive electrical connection is analyzed. Heat is directed to the die as the die is undergoing a state-changing operation to cause a failure due to suspect circuitry. The die is monitored, and a circuit path that electrically changes in response to the heat is detected and used to detect that a particular portion therein of the circuit is resistive. In this manner, the detection and localization of a semiconductor die defect that includes a resistive portion of a circuit path is enhanced.

  10. Crystals for stellar spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandropoulos, N. G.; Cohen, G. G.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal evaluation as it applies to instrumentation employed in X-ray astronomy is reviewed, and some solutions are offered to problems that are commonly encountered. A general approach for selecting the most appropriate crystals for a given problem is also suggested. The energy dependence of the diffraction properties of (002) PET, (111) Ge, (101) ADP, (101) KAP, and (001) RAP are reported.

  11. Walkout in Crystal City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Greg

    2009-01-01

    When students take action, they create change that extends far beyond the classroom. In this article, the author, who was a former teacher from Crystal City, Texas, remembers the student walkout that helped launch the Latino civil rights movement 40 years ago. The Crystal City student walkout remains a high point in the history of student activism…

  12. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  13. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  14. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  15. Bioengineered magnetic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, O.; Sarua, A.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we report on the successful application of a protein crystallization technique to fabricate a three-dimensionally ordered array of magnetic nanoparticles, i.e. a novel type of metamaterial with unique magnetic properties. We utilize ferritin protein cages for the template-constrained growth of superparamagnetic nanoparticles of magnetite/maghemite Fe3O4-γ-Fe2O3 (magnetoferritin), followed by thorough nanoparticle bioprocessing and purification, and finally by protein crystallization. Protein crystallization is driven by the natural response of proteins to the supersaturation of the electrolyte, which leads to spontaneous nucleation and 3D crystal growth. Within a short period of time (hours to days) we were able to grow functional crystals on the meso-scale, with sizes of the order of tens, up to a few hundred micrometres. We present initial magnetic and Raman spectroscopy characterization results for the obtained 3D arrays of magnetic nanoparticles.

  16. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  17. Piezoelectric crystals generate NMR-like signals for rapid spectrometer troubleshooting.

    PubMed

    Emery, Samuel B; Conradi, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Use of frequency-control quartz crystals for the generation of NMR-like signals via the piezoelectric effect is discussed. Such crystals are inexpensive and cover a wide range of RF frequencies. The crystal is connected to the spectrometer through a 30dB attenuator. Excitation by single, short RF pulses results in time domain signals similar to NMR FIDs. We show that the crystal should be shunted by a low resistance for largest Q (longest T2). By using odd higher overtones, the crystals were made to resonate at the high operating frequencies typical of modern spectrometers, here up to 630MHz. The performance of precision manufactured crystals is particularly better at high frequencies, compared to mass production crystals. The abundant and stable signal provided by the piezoelectric crystals yields a simple method for troubleshooting and testing NMR spectrometers.

  18. Potential productivity benefits of float-zone versus Czochralski crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, T.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient mass production of single-crystal silicon is necessary for the efficient silicon solar arrays needed in the coming decade. However, it is anticipated that there will be difficulty growing such volumes of crystals using conventional Czochralski (Cz) methods. While the productivity of single crystals might increase with a crystal diameter increase, there are two obstacles to the mass production of large diameter Czochralski crystals, the long production cycle due to slow growth rate and the high heat requirements of the furnaces. Also counterproductive would be the large resistivity gradient along the growth direction of the crystals due to impurity concentration. Comparison between Float zone (FZ) and Cz crystal growth on the basis of a crystal 150 mm in diameter is on an order of two to four times in favor of the FZ method. This advantage results from high growth rates and steady-state growth while maintaining a dislocation-free condition and impurity segregation.

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... penicillin was the treatment of choice for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) , a human pathogen that can cause life-threatening ... skin, blood, bone, heart, and other vital organs; S. aureus resistance to penicillin rapidly evolved in the 1950s. ...

  20. Lantibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Draper, Lorraine A; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2015-06-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry.

  1. Lantibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lorraine A.; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  2. Crystallization of macromolecular complexes: combinatorial complex crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Graille, Marc; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste

    2001-11-01

    The usefulness of antibody complexation, as a way of increasing the chances of crystallization needs to be re-evaluated after many antibody complexes have been crystallized and their structure determined. It is somewhat striking that among these, only a small number is a complex with a large protein antigen. The problem is that the effort of raising, cleaving and purifying an Fab is rewarded only by an extra chance of getting crystals; depending on the relative likelihood of crystallization of the complexed and uncomplexed protein. The example of the complex between HIV gp120, CD4 and an Fab fragment from a neutralizing antibody suggests that further complexation of an antigen-antibody complex with a third protein could, by increasing the number of possible combinations, improve the likelihood of crystallization. We propose the use of Ig-binding proteins as a way of extending the method from HIV gp120 to all proteins for which there are monoclonal antibodies. We discuss this technique, combinatorial complex crystallization (CCC), as part of a multi-component system for the enhancement of crystallization of macromolecular complexes. The method makes use of single Ig-binding domains from Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA), Peptostreptococcus magnus protein L (PpL) and the streptococcal protein G (SpG). The generality of the method depends on the ability of these domains to interact with a large repertoire of antibodies without affecting antigen binding. There is strong evidence to suggest that these Ig-binding domains bind outside the antigen-combining site of the antibody without perturbing antigen binding. It is clear from the crystal structure of the single SpG domain complexed with an Fab that the interaction involves mainly the immunoglobulin CH1 domain, a region not involved in antigen recognition. We have recently determined the structure of the complex between a human Fab and the domain D from SpA and found that steric hindrance is unlikely even for large

  3. Evaluation of the Quality of Sapphire Using X-Ray Rocking Curves and Double-Crystal X-Ray Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    hard, high-strength, chemically resistant optical windows; and sub- srates for the growth of epitaxial films. The quality of a sapphire crystal can... crystal diffractometer. Single- crystal sapphire may be grown by a variety of different methods, of which the more common are Verneuil (flame fusion...Linear features (L), which may represent slight variations in lattice parameter along the crystal growth front, or dislocation networks, ad small

  4. Shaped Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatartchenko, Vitali A.

    Crystals of specified shape and size (shaped crystals) with controlled crystal growth (SCG) defect and impurity structure have to be grown for the successful development of modern engineering. Since the 1950s many hundreds of papers and patents concerned with shaped growth have been published. In this chapter, we do not try to enumerate the successful applications of shaped growth to different materials but rather to carry out a fundamental physical and mathematical analysis of shaping as well as the peculiarities of shaped crystal structures. Four main techniques, based on which the lateral surface can be shaped without contact with the container walls, are analyzed: the Czochralski technique (CZT), the Verneuil technique (VT), the floating zone technique (FZT), and technique of pulling from shaper (TPS). Modifications of these techniques are analyzed as well. In all these techniques the shape of the melt meniscus is controlled by surface tension forces, i.e., capillary forces, and here they are classified as capillary shaping techniques (CST). We look for conditions under which the crystal growth process in each CST is dynamically stable. Only in this case are all perturbations attenuated and a crystal of constant cross section shaping technique (CST) grown without any special regulation. The dynamic stability theory of the crystal growth process for all CST is developed on the basis of Lyapunov's dynamic stability theory. Lyapunov's equations for the crystal growth processes follow from fundamental laws. The results of the theory allow the choice of stable regimes for crystal growth by all CST as well as special designs of shapers in TPS. SCG experiments by CZT, VT, and FZT are discussed but the main consideration is given to TPS. Shapers not only allow crystal of very complicated cross section to be grown but provide a special distribution of impurities. A history of TPS is provided later in the chapter, because it can only be described after explanation of the

  5. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  6. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Craig D.; Smith, H. Wilson; Vijay-Kumar, Senadhi; Senadhi, Shobha E.; Ealick, Steven E.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystals of most proteins or other biological macromolecules are poorly ordered and diffract to lower resolutions than those observed for most crystals of simple organic and inorganic compounds. Crystallization in the microgravity environment of space may improve crystal quality by eliminating convection effects near growing crystal surfaces. A series of 11 different protein crystal growth experiments was performed on U.S. Space Shuttle flight STS-26 in September 1988. The microgravity-grown crystals of gamma-interferon D1, porcine elastase, and isocitrate lyase are larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  7. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  8. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  9. Aluminum Nitride Crystal Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    increase the growth rate of AiN crystals from the vapor phase, and some new experiments to test this model conjecture are needed. if one’could operate...walls is much less severe,, and hence the crucible lifetime is about 88 times greater than for the -slycrystalline tungsten. In an effort to test this...added H2 to increase the growth rate is a better idea. One growth run, W253, Was made to test the single-crystal crucible method. The crystal from

  10. Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model for polymorphic crystallization (i.e., initial and final phases with identical compositions), which includes time-dependent nucleation and cluster-size-dependent growth rates, is developed and tested by fits to experimental data. Model calculations are used to assess the validity of two of the more common approaches for the analysis of crystallization data. The effects of particle size on transformation kinetics, important for the crystallization of many systems of limited dimension including thin films, fine powders, and nanoparticles, are examined.

  11. Crystallization on prestructured seeds.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The crystallization transition of an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid in the presence of small prestructured seeds is studied with transition path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the homogeneous crystallization, clusters of a few particles arranged into a face- and body-centered cubic structure enhance the crystallization, while icosahedrally ordered seeds do not change the reaction rate. We identify two distinct nucleation regimes-close to the seed and in the bulk. Crystallites form close to the face- and body-centered structures and tend to stay away from the icosahedrally ordered seeds.

  12. Crystals in light.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Bart; Freudenthal, John; Gunn, Erica

    2010-05-18

    We have made images of crystals illuminated with polarized light for almost two decades. Early on, we abandoned photosensitive chemicals in favor of digital electrophotometry with all of the attendant advantages of quantitative intensity data. Accurate intensities are a boon because they can be used to analytically discriminate small effects in the presence of larger ones. The change in the form of our data followed camera technology that transformed picture taking the world over. Ironically, exposures in early photographs were presumed to correlate simply with light intensity, raising the hope that photography would replace sensorial interpretation with mechanical objectivity and supplant the art of visual photometry. This was only true in part. Quantitative imaging accurate enough to render the separation of crystalloptical quantities had to await the invention of the solid-state camera. Many pioneers in crystal optics were also major figures in the early history of photography. We draw out the union of optical crystallography and photography because the tree that connects the inventors of photography is a structure unmatched for organizing our work during the past 20 years, not to mention that silver halide crystallites used in chemical photography are among the most consequential "crystals in light", underscoring our title. We emphasize crystals that have acquired optical properties such as linear birefringence, linear dichroism, circular birefringence, and circular dichroism, during growth from solution. Other crystalloptical effects were discovered that are unique to curiously dissymmetric crystals containing embedded oscillators. In the aggregate, dyed crystals constitute a generalization of single crystal matrix isolation. Simple crystals provided kinetic stability to include guests such as proteins or molecules in excited states. Molecular lifetimes were extended for the preparation of laser gain media and for the study of the photodynamics of single

  13. Swimming in a crystal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aidan T; Vladescu, Ioana D; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Lintuvuori, Juho S; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-07

    We study catalytic Janus particles and Escherichia coli bacteria swimming in a two-dimensional colloidal crystal. The Janus particles orbit individual colloids and hop between colloids stochastically, with a hopping rate that varies inversely with fuel (hydrogen peroxide) concentration. At high fuel concentration, these orbits are stable for 100s of revolutions, and the orbital speed oscillates periodically as a result of hydrodynamic, and possibly also phoretic, interactions between the swimmer and the six neighbouring colloids. Motile E. coli bacteria behave very differently in the same colloidal crystal: their circular orbits on plain glass are rectified into long, straight runs, because the bacteria are unable to turn corners inside the crystal.

  14. Single crystals of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Cartier, N; Domard, A; Chanzy, H

    1990-10-01

    Lamellar single crystals of chitosan were prepared at 125 degrees C by adding ammonia to a low DP fraction of chitosan dissolved in water. The crystals gave sharp electron diffraction diagrams which could be indexed in an orthorhombic P2(1)2(1)2(1) unit cell with a = 8.07 A, b = 8.44 A, c = 10.34 A. The unit cell contained two anti-parallel chitosan chains and no water molecules. It was found that cellulose microfibrils from Valonia ventricosa could act as nuclei for inducing the crystallization of chitosan on cellulose. This produced a shish-kebab morphology.

  15. Molecules in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  16. Theory of Behavior of Ionized Hydrogen in GaSb Crystal Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    carrier concentration and the resistivity were measured on the treated wafers in the first step using the van der Pauw method. Then the layers of about 10... der Pauw method at room temperature, with an accuracy of about ±8%. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The crystals were grown from the same starting material...acetone and finally in distilled water several times. The free carrier concentration, mobility and resistivity of each crystal were measured using the van

  17. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Fatigue Failure of Single Crystal Nickel Base Turbine Blade Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2000-01-01

    High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas-turbine engines is a pervasive problem affecting a wide range of components and materials. HCF is currently the primary cause of component failures in gas turbine aircraft engines. Turbine blades in high performance aircraft and rocket engines are increasingly being made of single crystal nickel superalloys. Single-crystal Nickel-base superalloys were developed to provide superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys previously used in the production of turbine blades and vanes. Currently the most widely used single crystal turbine blade superalloys are PWA 1480/1493 and PWA 1484. These alloys play an important role in commercial, military and space propulsion systems. PWA1493, identical to PWA1480, but with tighter chemical constituent control, is used in the NASA SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) alternate turbopump, a liquid hydrogen fueled rocket engine. Objectives for this paper are motivated by the need for developing failure criteria and fatigue life evaluation procedures for high temperature single crystal components, using available fatigue data and finite element modeling of turbine blades. Using the FE (finite element) stress analysis results and the fatigue life relations developed, the effect of variation of primary and secondary crystal orientations on life is determined, at critical blade locations. The most advantageous crystal orientation for a given blade design is determined. Results presented demonstrates that control of secondary and primary crystallographic orientation has the potential to optimize blade design by increasing its resistance to fatigue crack growth without adding additional weight or cost.

  18. Growth of Sr2CuO3+ δ superconductor single crystals at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wen; Liu, QingQing; Liu, Liang; Kakeshita, Teruhisa; Uchida, Shinichi; Jin, ChangQing

    2013-04-01

    We have successfully synthesized Sr2CuO3+ δ single crystals under high pressure and high temperature for the first time. The structure analysis show that this material crystallizes into tetragonal structure isostructural La2CuO4 with single CuO2 plane. The magnetic susceptibility as well as resistance measurements indicates that the bulk superconductivity with the critical transition temperature 37 K is achieved in the crystal.

  19. The Crystal Hotel: A Microfluidic Approach to Biomimetic Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wang, Yun-Wei; Ihli, Johannes; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Li, Shunbo; Walshaw, Richard; Chen, Li; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-12-02

    A "crystal hotel" microfluidic device that allows crystal growth in confined volumes to be studied in situ is used to produce large calcite single crystals with predefined crystallographic orientation, microstructure, and shape by control of the detailed physical environment, flow, and surface chemistry. This general approach can be extended to form technologically important, nanopatterned single crystals.

  20. Color changing plasmonic surfaces utilizing liquid crystal (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Daniel; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-09-01

    Plasmonic structural color has recently garnered significant interest as an alternative to the organic dyes standard in print media and liquid crystal displays. These nanostructured metallic systems can produce diffraction limited images, be made polarization dependent, and exhibit resistance to color bleaching. Perhaps even more advantageous, their optical characteristics can also be tuned, post-fabrication, by altering the surrounding media's refractive index parallel to the local plasmonic fields. A common material with which to achieve this is liquid crystal. By reorienting the liquid crystal molecules through external electric fields, the optical resonances of the plasmonic filters can be dynamically controlled. Demonstrations of this phenomenon, however, have been limited to modest shifts in plasmon resonance. Here, we report a liquid crystal-plasmonic system with an enhanced tuning range through the use of a shallow array of nano-wells and high birefringent liquid crystal. The continuous metallic nanostructure maximizes the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal while also allowing full reorientation of the liquid crystal upon an applied electric field. Sweeping over structural dimensions and voltages results in a color palette for these dynamic reflective pixels that can further be exploited to create color tunable images. These advances make plasmonic-liquid crystal systems more attractive candidates for filter, display, and other tunable optical technologies.

  1. Shaping Crystal-Crystal Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiyu; van Anders, Greg; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Previous computational and experimental studies have shown self-assembled structure depends strongly on building block shape. New synthesis techniques have led to building blocks with reconfigurable shape and it has been demonstrated that building block reconfiguration can induce bulk structural reconfiguration. However, we do not understand systematically how this transition happens as a function of building block shape. Using a recently developed ``digital alchemy'' framework, we study the thermodynamics of shape-driven crystal-crystal transitions. We find examples of shape-driven bulk reconfiguration that are accompanied by first-order phase transitions, and bulk reconfiguration that occurs without any thermodynamic phase transition. Our results suggest that for well-chosen shapes and structures, there exist facile means of bulk reconfiguration, and that shape-driven bulk reconfiguration provides a viable mechanism for developing functional materials.

  2. Androgen resistance.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  3. Computer Modeling of Crystallization and Crystal Size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenta, R. V.

    2002-05-01

    The crystal size distribution of an igneous rock has been shown to be related to the crystallization kinetics. In order to better understand crystallization processes, the nucleation and growth of crystals in a closed system is modeled computationally and graphically. Units of volume analogous to unit cells are systematically attached to stationary crystal nuclei. The number of volume units attached to each crystal per growth stage is proportional to the crystal size insuring that crystal dimensional growth rates are constant regardless of their size. The number of new crystal nuclei per total system volume that form in each growth stage increases exponentially Cumulative crystal size distributions (CCSD) are determined for various stages of crystallization (30 percent, 60 pct, etc) from a database generated by the computer model, and each distribution is fit to an exponential function of the same form. Simulation results show that CCSD functions appear to fit the data reasonably well (R-square) with the greatest misfit at 100 pct crystallization. The crystal size distribution at each pct crystallization can be obtained from the derivative of the respective CCSD function. The log form of each crystal size distribution (CSD) is a linear function with negative slope. Results show that the slopes of the CSD functions at pcts crystallization up to 90 pct are parallel, but the slope at 100 pct crystallization differs from the others although still in approximate alignment. We suggest that real crystallization of igneous rocks may show this pattern. In the early stages of crystallization crystals are far apart and CSD's are ideal as predicted by theory based on growth of crystals in a brine. At advanced stages of crystallization growth collision boundaries develop between crystals. As contiguity increases crystals become blocked and inactive because they can no longer grow. As crystallization approaches 100 pct a significant number of inactive crystals exist resulting in

  4. No warmup crystal oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    During warmup, crystal oscillators often show a frequency offset as large as 1 part in 10 to the 5th power. If timing information is transferred to the oscillator and then the oscillator is allowed to warmup, a timing error greater than 1 millisecond will occur. For many applications, it is unsuitable to wait for the oscillator to warmup. For medium accuracy timing requirements where overall accuracies in the order of 1 millisecond are required, a no warmup crystal concept was developed. The concept utilizes two crystal oscillator, used sequentially to avoid using a crystal oscillator for timing much higher frequency accuracy once warmed up. The accuracy achieved with practical TCXOs at initial start over a range of temperatures is discussed. A second design utilizing two oven controlled oscillators is also discussed.

  5. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  6. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  7. Crystal-Clear Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondris-Crawford, Renate J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides diagrams to aid in discussing polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) technology. Equipped with a knowledge of PDLC, teachers can provide students with insight on how the gap between basic science and technology is bridged. (ZWH)

  8. Crystallization behavior of anorthite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The growth rate of anorthite crystals from the melt is studied as a function of temperature with undercooling in the ranges 52-152 and 402-652 degrees C. The triclinic form is invariably observed as the crystallization product, growth is preferentially in the c direction, and the interface morphology is faceted. Significant growth rate anisotropy is indicated. The maximum growth rate of anorthite from the melt is higher than for anorthite-rich lunar compositions. Recent computer studies are combined with experimental data to estimate the heat of fusion of anorthite as 28000-45000 cal/mol; the corresponding range for entropy of fusion is (7.8-12)R (where R is the gas constant). The observations and kinetic data support Jackson's predictions concerning materials with large entropies of fusion and his suggestion that entropy of fusion is an important parameter for characterizing the crystal-liquid interface and the nature of the crystallization process.

  9. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  10. Shaping Crystals using Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie; Mackiewicz, Kristian

    2016-11-01

    Electrophoresis is size and shape independent as stressed by Morrison in his seminal paper. Here we present an original approach to reshape colloidal crystals using an electric field as a carving tool.

  11. Properties of salt-grown uranium single crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J. C.; Hanrahan, R. J.; Hults, W. L.; Lashley, J. C.; Manley, M. E.; Mielke, C. H.; Smith, J. L.; Thoma, D. J.; Clark, R. G.; Hamilton, A. R.; O'Brien, J. L.; Gay, E. C.; Lumpkin, N. E.; McPheeters, C. C.; Willit, J.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Touton, S.; Woodfield, B. F.; Lang, B. E.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana

    2001-01-01

    Recently single crystals of {alpha}-uranium were grown from a liquid salt bath. The electrical, magnetic and thermal properties of these crystals have been surveyed. The ratio of the room temperature resistivity of these crystals to the saturation value at low temperature is three times larger than any previously reported demonstrating that the crystals are of higher purity and quality than those in past work. The resistive signatures of the CDW transitions at 43, 37 and 22 K are obvious to the naked eye. The transition at 22 K exhibits temperature hysteresis that increases with magnetic field. In addition the superconducting transition temperature from resistivity is 820 mK and the critical field is 80 mT. Contrary to earlier work where the Debye temperature ranged from 186 to 218 K, the Debye temperature extracted from the heat capacity is 254 K in good agreement with the predicted value of 250 K. Magnetoresistance, Hall effect and magnetic susceptibility measurements are underway. In time, measurements made on these crystals may help us to understand the origin of superconductivity and its relation to the CDW transitions in pure uranium.

  12. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  13. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  14. Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Bellamy, Henry D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many ways of judging a good crystal. Which we use depends on the qualities we seek. For gemstones size, clarity and impurity levels (color) are paramount. For the semiconductor industry purity is probably the most important quality. For the structural crystallographer the primary desideratum is the somewhat more subtle concept of internal order. In this chapter we discuss the effect of internal order (or the lack of it) on the crystal's diffraction properties.

  15. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    81/2X 11- 10 -9 .8 display using a large advertising alphanimeric ( TCI ) has been added to the front of the optical box used in the F-4 aircraft for HUD...properties over a wide range of tempera - tures, including normal room temperature. What are Liquid Crystals? Liquid crystals have been classified in three...natic fanctions and to present data needed for the semi- automatic and manual control of system functions. Existing aircraft using CRT display

  16. Crystal growth of drug materials by spherical crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó-Révész, P.; Hasznos-Nezdei, M.; Farkas, B.; Göcző, H.; Pintye-Hódi, K.; Erős, I.

    2002-04-01

    One of the crystal growth processes is the production of crystal agglomerates by spherical crystallization. Agglomerates of drug materials were developed by means of non-typical (magnesium aspartate) and typical (acetylsalicylic acid) spherical crystallization techniques. The growth of particle size and the spherical form of the agglomerates resulted in formation of products with good bulk density, flow, compactibility and cohesivity properties. The crystal agglomerates were developed for direct capsule-filling and tablet-making.

  17. Engineering Crystal Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Preshit; Kuvadia, Zubin B.; Doherty, Michael F.

    2013-07-01

    Crystallization is an important separation and particle formation technique in the manufacture of high-value-added products. During crystallization, many physicochemical characteristics of the substance are established. Such characteristics include crystal polymorph, shape and size, chemical purity and stability, reactivity, and electrical and magnetic properties. However, control over the physical form of crystalline materials has remained poor, due mainly to an inadequate understanding of the basic growth and dissolution mechanisms, as well as of the influence of impurities, additives, and solvents on the growth rate of individual crystal faces. Crystal growth is a surface-controlled phenomenon in which solute molecules are incorporated into surface lattice sites to yield the bulk long-range order that characterizes crystalline materials. In this article, we describe some recent advances in crystal morphology engineering, with a special focus on a new mechanistic model for spiral growth. These mechanistic ideas are simple enough that they can be made to work and accurate enough that they are useful.

  18. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  19. Mechanism of Insect Resistance to the Microbial Insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rie, J.; McGaughey, W. H.; Johnson, D. E.; Barnett, B. D.; van Mellaert, H.

    1990-01-01

    Receptor binding studies show that resistance of a laboratory-selected Plodia interpunctella strain to a Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) is correlated with a 50-fold reduction in affinity of the membrane receptor for this protein. The strain is sensitive to a second type of ICP that apparently recognizes a different receptor. Understanding the mechanism of resistance will provide strategies to prevent or delay resistance and hence prolong the usefulness of B. thuringiensis ICPs as environmentally safe insecticides.

  20. Resistive Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed text on resistive networks was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as part of a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series, this one being Number 3. (DH)

  1. Sodium doping in ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, N. S. Lynn, K. G.

    2015-01-12

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with sodium by thermal diffusion. Positron annihilations spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies, to >6 μm deep in the bulk. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurement shows the diffusion of sodium up to 8 μm with concentration (1–3.5) × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}. Broad photoluminescence excitation peak at 3.1 eV, with onset appearance at 3.15 eV in Na:ZnO, is attributed to an electronic transition from a Na{sub Zn} level at ∼(220–270) meV to the conduction band. Resistivity in Na doped ZnO crystals increases up to (4–5) orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis and Its Pesticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schnepf, E.; Crickmore, N.; Van Rie, J.; Lereclus, D.; Baum, J.; Feitelson, J.; Zeigler, D. R.; Dean, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    During the past decade the pesticidal bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been the subject of intensive research. These efforts have yielded considerable data about the complex relationships between the structure, mechanism of action, and genetics of the organism’s pesticidal crystal proteins, and a coherent picture of these relationships is beginning to emerge. Other studies have focused on the ecological role of the B. thuringiensis crystal proteins, their performance in agricultural and other natural settings, and the evolution of resistance mechanisms in target pests. Armed with this knowledge base and with the tools of modern biotechnology, researchers are now reporting promising results in engineering more-useful toxins and formulations, in creating transgenic plants that express pesticidal activity, and in constructing integrated management strategies to insure that these products are utilized with maximum efficiency and benefit. PMID:9729609

  3. Characterization of gallium telluride crystals grown from graphite crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Hayes, Timothy; Muzykov, Peter G.; Krishna, Ramesh; Das, Sandip; Sudarshan, Tangali S.; Ma, Shuguo

    2010-08-01

    In this work we investigated a new method of growing detector grade large GaTe layered chalcogenide single crystals. GaTe ingots (2" in diameter and about 10 cm in length) were grown by a novel method using graphite crucible by slow crystallization from melt of high purity (7N) Ga and Te precursors in argon atmosphere. GaTe samples from the monocrystalline area of the ingot have been cleaved mechanically and characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis by x-rays (EDAX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), xray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission line matrix method (TLM), resistivity measurements using van der Pauw technique, Hall Effect and Capacitance-Voltage measurements. Our investigations reveal high potential for developing superior quality GaTe crystals using this growth technique for growing large volume inexpensive GaTe single crystals for nuclear radiation detectors.

  4. Mercuric iodide crystals obtained by solvent evaporation using ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugucioni, J. C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-04-01

    Millimeter-sized mercuric iodide crystals were fabricated by the solvent evaporation technique using pure ethanol as a solvent. Three different conditions for solution evaporation were tested: (i) in the dark at room temperature; (ii) in the presence of light at room temperature and (iii) in an oven at 40 °C. Morphology, structure, optical and electrical properties were investigated using several techniques. Crystals fabricated in the dark show better properties and stability than others, possibly because the larger the energy of the system, the larger the number of induced growth defects. The crystals fabricated in the dark have adequate structure for higher resistivity and activation energy close to half the optical band-gap, as desired. With proper encapsulation these crystals might be good candidates for the development of ionizing radiation sensors.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-01-01

    9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å. PMID:16511108

  6. Crystal Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful for scientific and commercial applications for the determination of process parameters to optimize crystal growth conditions.

  7. Introduction to protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid–liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies. PMID:24419610

  8. Crystal Ball Functional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnick, David

    2016-09-01

    The A2 collaboration of the MAinz MIkrotron is dedicated to studying meson production and nucleon structure and behavior via photon scattering. The photons are made via bremsstrahlung process and energy-tagged using the Glasgow Photon tagger. The photon beam then interacts in a variety of targets: cryogenic, polarized or solid state, and scattered particles deposit their energy within the NaI crystals. Scintillators are able to give results on particles energy and time. Events are reconstructed by combining information from the Tagging spectrometer, the Crystal Ball detector, the TAPS forward wall spectrometer, a Cherenkov detector, and multi-wire proportional chambers. To better understand the detector and experimental events, a live display was built to show energies deposited in crystals in real-time. In order to show a range of energies and particles, addressable LEDs that are individually programmable were used. To best replicate the Crystal Ball, 3D printing technology was employed to build a similar highly segmented icosahedron that can hold each LED, creating a 3D representation of what photons see during experiments. The LEDs were controlled via Arduino microcontroller. Finally, we implemented the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System to grab live event data, and a simple program converts this data in to color and crystal number data that is able to communicate with the Arduino. Using these simple parts, we can better visualize and understand the tools used in nuclear physics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  9. Crystal growth, characterization, and testing of Cd0.9Zn0.1Te single crystals for radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Noblitt, Caleb; Choi, Michael; Rauh, R. D.; Roy, Utpal N.; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold; Holcomb, David E.; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes our recent research in growing large single crystals of Cd0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT) by the vertical Bridgman technique using in-house processed zone refined precursor materials (Cd, Zn, and Te). The grown semi-insulating CZT crystals have shown high promise for high-resolution room-temperature radiation detectors due to their high dark resistivity (~1010 Ωcm), reasonably good charge transport properties [(μτ)e = (2-5) x 10-3 cm2/V] and low cost. The grown CZT single crystals (~2.5 cm diameter and up to 10 cm long) have demonstrated a very low radial Zn concentration deviation, low dislocation densities and Te precipitate/inclusions, and high infrared transmission. Details of the CZT single crystal growth, their physical and chemical analysis, surface processing, nuclear radiation detector fabrication, and testing of these devices are also presented.

  10. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  11. Crystal growth and anisotropy of high temperature thermoelectric properties of yttrium borosilicide single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M. Anwar; Tanaka, Isao; Tanaka, Takaho; Khan, A. Ullah; Mori, Takao

    2016-01-15

    We studied thermoelectric properties of YB{sub 41}Si{sub 1.3} single crystals grown by the floating zone method. The composition of the grown crystal was confirmed by electron probe micro-analysis. We have determined the growth direction for the first time for these borosilicides, and discovered relatively large anisotropy in electrical properties. We measured the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient along [510] (the growth direction) and [052] directions and we found that this crystal exhibits strong electrical anisotropy with a maximum of more than 8 times. An interesting layered structural feature is revealed along [510] with dense boron cluster layers and yttrium layers, with conductivity enhanced along this direction. We obtained 3.6 times higher power factor along [510] compared to that along [052]. Although the ZT of the present system is low, anisotropy in the thermoelectric properties of a boride was reported for the first time, and can be a clue in developing other boride systems also. - Graphical abstract: The growth direction ([510]) was determined for the first time in YB{sub 41}Si{sub 1.3} single crystals and revealed an interesting layered feature of boron clusters and metal atoms, along which the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power factor was strongly enhanced. - Highlights: • We have grown YB{sub 41}Si{sub 1.3} single crystals by the floating zone method. • Growth direction of [510] determined for first time in REB{sub 41}Si{sub 1.2}. • Electrical resistivity was strongly anisotropic with possible enhancement along metal layers. • The obtained power factor along [510] is 3.6 times higher than that along [052].

  12. Fatigue Failure Criteria for Single Crystal Nickel Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.

    1999-01-01

    High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) induced failures in aircraft gas-turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades is a pervasive problem. Single crystal turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines throughout industry and NASA because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. Single-crystal materials have highly orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the pan geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. The failure modes of single crystal turbine blades is complicated to predict due to the material orthotropy and variations in crystal orientations. A fatigue failure criteria based on the maximum shear stress amplitude [delta t max] on the 30 slip systems, is presented for single crystal nickel superalloys (FCC crystal). This criteria reduces the scatter in uniaxial LCF test data, for four different specimen orientations, for PWA 1484 at 1200 F in air, quite well. A power law curve fit of the failure parameter, delta t max, vs. cycles to failure is presented.

  13. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-01-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity—the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice—but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals. PMID:27734829

  14. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  15. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  16. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-10-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity--the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice--but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.

  17. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  18. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  19. Microgravity crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Advanced finite element models are used to study three-dimensional, time-dependent flow and segregation in crystal growth systems. In this image of a prototypical model for melt and crystal growth, pathlines at one instant in time are shown for the flow of heated liquid silicon in a cylindrical container. The container is subjected to g-jitter disturbances along the vertical axis. A transverse magnetic field is applied to control them. Such computations are extremely powerful for understanding melt growth in microgravity where g-jitter drives buoyant flows. The simulation is part of the Theoretical Analysis of 3D, Transient Convection and Segregation in Microgravity Bridgman Crystal Growth investigation by Dr. Jeffrey J. Derby of the University of Mirnesota, Minneapolis.

  20. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOEpatents

    Destefan, Dennis E.; Stompro, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  1. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  2. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  3. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell (standing), Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC),and Marc Pusey of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) use a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for marcromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of marcromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystalized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  4. Antimicrobial properties of analgesic kyotorphin peptides unraveled through atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Marta M.B.; Franquelim, Henri G.; Torcato, Ines M.; Ramu, Vasanthakumar G.; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R.; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New kyotorphin derivatives have antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic force microscopy show membrane disturbing effects of KTP-NH{sub 2} and IbKTP-NH{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer None of the KTP derivatives are hemolytic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The minimal peptidic sequence with antimicrobial activity is Tyr-Arg, if amidated. -- Abstract: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates as alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the treatment of resistant pathogens. In the last decades, new AMPs have been found from the cleavage of intact proteins with no antibacterial activity themselves. Bovine hemoglobin hydrolysis, for instance, results in AMPs and the minimal antimicrobial peptide sequence was defined as Tyr-Arg plus a positively charged amino acid residue. The Tyr-Arg dipeptide alone, known as kyotorphin (KTP), is an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide but has no antimicrobial activity itself. In previous studies new KTP derivatives combining C-terminal amidation and Ibuprofen (Ib) - KTP-NH{sub 2}, IbKTP, IbKTP-NH{sub 2} - were designed in order to improve KTP brain targeting. Those modifications succeeded in enhancing peptide-cell membrane affinity towards fluid anionic lipids and higher analgesic activity after systemic injection resulted therefrom. Here, we investigated if this affinity for anionic lipid membranes also translates into antimicrobial activity because bacteria have anionic membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that KTP derivatives perturbed Staphylococcus aureus membrane structure by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. In addition, these peptides bind to red blood cells but are non-hemolytic. From the KTP derivatives tested, amidated KTP proves to be the most active antibacterial agent. The combination of analgesia and antibacterial activities with absence of toxicity is highly appealing from the clinical point of view

  5. Dynamically controlled crystallization method and apparatus and crystals obtained thereby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnowitz, Leonard (Inventor); Steinberg, Emanuel (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for dynamically controlling the crystallization of proteins including a crystallization chamber or chambers for holding a protein in a salt solution, one or more salt solution chambers, two communication passages respectively coupling the crystallization chamber with each of the salt solution chambers, and transfer mechanisms configured to respectively transfer salt solution between each of the salt solution chambers and the crystallization chamber. The transfer mechanisms are interlocked to maintain the volume of salt solution in the crystallization chamber substantially constant. Salt solution of different concentrations is transferred into and out of the crystallization chamber to adjust the salt concentration in the crystallization chamber to achieve precise control of the crystallization process.

  6. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter ... Prevention, Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial ... To prevent antimicrobial resistance, you and your healthcare ...

  7. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  8. Exotic crystal superstructures of colloidal crystals in confinement.

    PubMed

    Fontecha, Ana Barreira; Schöpe, Hans Joachim

    2008-06-01

    Colloidal model systems have been used for over three decades for investigating liquids, crystals, and glasses. Colloidal crystal superstructures have been observed in binary systems of repulsive spheres as well as oppositely charged sphere systems showing structures well known from atomic solids. In this work we study the structural transition of colloidal crystals under confinement. In addition to the known sequence of crystalline structures, crystal superstructures with dodecagonal and hexagonal symmetry are observed in one component systems. These structures have no atomic counterpart.

  9. REFINEMENT OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF GUANIDINIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE HEXAHYDRATE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS, * CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*GUANIDINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), SULFATES, HYDRATES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  10. Study of the growth atmosphere effect on optical and scintillation characteristics of large CsI(TI) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panova, A. N.; Goriletsky, V. I.; Grinyova, T. B.; Shakhova, K. V.; Vinograd, E. L.

    1999-03-01

    In contrast to the traditional growth method of large scintillation alkali halide crystals - in an inert atmosphere, CsI(TI) crystals have been grown in CO 2 atmosphere favoring changes of their impurity composition. Absorption and scintillation characteristics of crystals obtained have been studied in comparison to those grown in the inert gas medium. Effect of different radiation doses on variations in optical and scintillation characteristics has been studied for CsI(TI) crystals grown by various techniques. CsI(TI) crystals grown in CO 2 atmosphere are found to exhibit a higher radiation resistance and a faster restoration of their basic characteristics.

  11. Heat transfer from protein crystals: implications for flash-cooling and X-ray beam heating.

    PubMed

    Kriminski, S; Kazmierczak, M; Thorne, R E

    2003-04-01

    Three problems involving heat transfer from a protein crystal to a cooling agent are analyzed: flash-cooling in a cold nitrogen- or helium-gas stream, plunge-cooling into liquid nitrogen, propane or ethane and crystal heating in a cold gas stream owing to X-ray absorption. Heat transfer occurs by conduction inside the crystal and by convection from the crystal's outer surface to the cooling fluid. For flash-cooling in cold gas streams, heat transfer is limited by the rate of external convection; internal temperature gradients and crystal strains during cooling are very small. Helium gas provides only a threefold improvement in cooling rates relative to nitrogen because its much larger thermal conductivity is offset by its larger kinematic viscosity. Characteristic cooling times vary with crystal size L as L(3/2) and theoretical estimates of these times are consistent with experiments. Plunge-cooling into liquid cryogens, which can give much smaller convective thermal resistances provided that surface boiling is eliminated, can increase cooling rates by more than an order of magnitude. However, the internal conduction resistance is no longer negligible, producing much larger internal temperature gradients and strains that may damage larger crystals. Based on this analysis, factors affecting the success of flash-cooling experiments can be ordered from most to least important as follows: (1) crystal solvent content and solvent composition, (2) crystal size and shape, (3) amount of residual liquid around the crystal, (4) cooling method (liquid plunge versus gas stream), (5) choice of gas/liquid and (6) relative speed between cooling fluid and crystal. Crystal heating by X-ray absorption on present high-flux beamlines should be small. For a fixed flux and illuminated area, heating can be reduced by using crystals with areas normal to the beam that are much larger than the beam area.

  12. Role of crystal arrangement on the mechanical performance of enamel.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Wang, Raorao; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2012-10-01

    The superior mechanical properties of enamel, such as excellent penetration and crack resistance, are believed to be related to the unique microscopic structure. In this study, the effects of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystallite orientation on the mechanical behavior of enamel have been investigated through a series of multiscale numerical simulations. A micromechanical model, which considers the HAP crystal arrangement in enamel prisms, the hierarchical structure of HAP crystals and the inelastic mechanical behavior of protein, has been developed. Numerical simulations revealed that, under compressive loading, plastic deformation progression took place in enamel prisms, which is responsible for the experimentally observed post-yield strain hardening. By comparing the mechanical responses for the uniform and non-uniform arrangement of HAP crystals within enamel prisms, it was found that the stiffness for the two cases was identical, while much greater energy dissipation was observed in the enamel with the non-uniform arrangement. Based on these results, we propose an important mechanism whereby the non-uniform arrangement of crystals in enamel rods enhances energy dissipation while maintaining sufficient stiffness to promote fracture toughness, mitigation of fracture and resistance to penetration deformation. Further simulations indicated that the non-uniform arrangement of the HAP crystals is a key factor responsible for the unique mechanical behavior of enamel, while the change in the nanostructure of nanocomposites could dictate the Young's modulus and yield strength of the biocomposite.

  13. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  14. Crystal forms of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Soon; Sohn, Young-Taek

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the existence of polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs of naproxen and the transformation of crystal forms. Four crystal forms of naproxen have been isolated by recrystallization and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetric analysis. The differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry patterns of the four crystal forms were different respectively. In the dissolution studies in pH 6.8 ± 0.05 buffer equilibrated at 37 ± 0.5°C, the solubility of four crystal forms was similar (within the error range). After storage of 1 month at 0% RH (silica gel, 20°C), 52% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)Cr(2)O(7.2)H(2)O/20°C) and 95% RH (saturated solution of Na(2)HPO(4)/20°C), Form 2 and Form 4 were transformed to Form 1, but Form 3 and Form 1 were not transformed and they were shown to have a good physical stability at room temperature for 1 month.

  15. Pyrrolidinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Nockemann, Peter; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Driesen, Kris; Görller-Walrand, Christiane; Binnemans, Koen; Cardinaels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium cations have been used for the design of ionic liquid crystals, including a new type of uranium-containing metallomesogen. Pyrrolidinium salts with bromide, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, thiocyanate, tetrakis(2- thenoyltrifluoroacetonato)europate(III) and tetrabromouranyl counteranions were prepared. For the bromide salts and tetrabromouranyl compounds, the chain length of the alkyl group C(n)H(2n+1) was varied from eight to twenty carbon atoms (n = 8, 10-20). The compounds show rich mesomorphic behaviour: highly ordered smectic phases (the crystal smectic E phase and the uncommon crystal smectic T phase), smectic A phases, and hexagonal columnar phases were observed, depending on chain length and anion. This work gives better insight into the nature and formation of the crystal smectic T phase, and the molecular requirements for the appearance of this highly ordered phase. This uncommon tetragonal mesophase is thoroughly discussed on the basis of detailed powder X-ray diffraction experiments and in relation to the existing literature. Structural models are proposed for self-assembly of the molecules within the smectic layers. In addition, the photophysical properties of the compounds containing a metal complex anion were investigated. For the uranium-containing mesogens, luminescence can be induced by dissolving them in an ionic liquid matrix. The europium-containing compound shows intense red photoluminescence with high colour purity.

  16. Laser schlieren crystal monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B. (Inventor); Johnston, Mary H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the state of a crystal which is suspended in a solution is described which includes providing a light source for emitting a beam of light along an optical axis. A collimating lens is arranged along the optical axis for collimating the emitted beam to provide a first collimated light beam consisting of parallel light rays. By passing the first collimated light beam through a transparent container, a number of the parallel light rays are deflected off the surfaces of said crystal being monitored according to the refractive index gradient to provide a deflected beam of deflected light rays. A focusing lens is arranged along optical axis for focusing the deflected rays towards a desired focal point. A knife edge is arranged in a predetermined orientation at the focal point; and a screen is provided. A portion of the deflected beam is blocked with the knife edge to project only a portion of the deflected beam. A band is created at one edge of the image of the crystal which indicates the state of change of the surface of the crystal being monitored.

  17. Ferroelectric liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Paul K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A ferroelectric liquid crystal display device employs capacitance spoiling layers to minimize unneeded capacitances created by crossovers of X and Y address lines and to accurately define desired capacitances. The spoiler layers comprise low dielectric constant layers which space electrodes from the ferroelectric at crossover points where capacitance is not needed for device operation.

  18. The Crystal Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    In past issues of this journal, the late H. R. Crane wrote a long series of articles under the running title of "How Things Work." In them, Dick dealt with many questions that physics teachers asked themselves, but did not have the time to answer. This article is my attempt to work through the physics of the crystal set, which I thought…

  19. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  20. Poet Lake Crystal Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This September 19, 2016 letter from EPA approves the petition from Poet Biorefining-Lake Crystal, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel (D-code 6) RINs under the RFS

  1. Crystal Ball Replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajamian, John

    2016-09-01

    The A2 collaboration of the Institute for Nuclear Physics of Johannes Gutenberg University performs research on (multiple) meson photoproduction and nucleon structure and dynamics using a high energy polarized photon beam at specific targets. Particles scattered from the target are detected in the Crystal Ball, or CB. The CB is composed of 672 NaI crystals that surround the target and can analyze particle type and energy of ejected particles. Our project was to create a replica of the CB that could display what was happening in real time on a 3 Dimensional scale replica. Our replica was constructed to help explain the physics to the general public, be used as a tool when calibrating each of the 672 NaI crystals, and to better analyze the electron showering of particles coming from the target. This poster will focus on the hardware steps necessary to construct the replica and wire the 672 programmable LEDS in such a way that they can be mapped to correspond to the Crystal Ball elements. George Washington NSF Grant.

  2. Materials discovery through crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new materials and associated desirable properties has been a driving force behind chemical innovation for centuries. When we look at some of the many recent technological advances, and how widespread and significant their impact has been, we appreciate how much they have relied on new materials. The increase in hard drive storage capacity due to new giant magneto-resistive materials, the ever-shrinking cell phone due to improved microwave dielectric materials, the enhancement in lithium battery storage capacity due to new intercalation materials, or the improved capacitor due to new ferroelectric materials are all excellent examples. How were these materials discovered? While there is no single answer, in all cases there was a First-Material, the archetype in which the phenomenon was first observed, the one that led to further investigations and the subsequent preparation of improved 2nd or 3rd generation materials. It is this First-Material, the archetype, that was discovered - often via crystal growth.

  3. Controlling Chirality of Entropic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Pablo F; Karas, Andrew S; Schultz, Benjamin A; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-10-09

    Colloidal crystal structures with complexity and diversity rivaling atomic and molecular crystals have been predicted and obtained for hard particles by entropy maximization. However, thus far homochiral colloidal crystals, which are candidates for photonic metamaterials, are absent. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that chiral polyhedra exhibiting weak directional entropic forces self-assemble either an achiral crystal or a chiral crystal with limited control over the crystal handedness. Building blocks with stronger faceting exhibit higher selectivity and assemble a chiral crystal with handedness uniquely determined by the particle chirality. Tuning the strength of directional entropic forces by means of particle rounding or the use of depletants allows for reconfiguration between achiral and homochiral crystals. We rationalize our findings by quantifying the chirality strength of each particle, both from particle geometry and potential of mean force and torque diagrams.

  4. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  5. Dichroism in Helicoidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Nichols, Shane M; Arteaga, Oriol; Freudenthal, John; Paula, Froilanny; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Kahr, Bart

    2016-09-21

    Accounting for the interactions of light with heterogeneous, anisotropic, absorbing, optically active media is part of the characterization of complex, transparent materials. Stained biological structures in thin tissue sections share many of these features, but systematic optical analyses beyond the employ of the simple petrographic microscopes have not be established. Here, this accounting is made for polycrystalline, spherulitic bundles of twisted d-mannitol lamellae grown from melts containing light-absorbing molecules. It has long been known that a significant percentage of molecular crystals readily grow as helicoidal ribbons with mesoscale pitches, but a general appreciation of the commonality of these non-classical crystal forms has been lost. Helicoidal crystal twisting was typically assayed by analyzing refractivity modulation in the petrographic microscope. However, by growing twisted crystals from melts in the presence of dissolved, light-absorbing molecules, crystal twisting can be assayed by analyzing the dichroism, both linear and circular. The term "helicoidal dichroism" is used here to describe the optical consequences of anisotropic absorbers precessing around radii of twisted crystalline fibrils or lamellae. d-Mannitol twists in two polymorphic forms, α and δ. The two polymorphs, when grown from supercooled melts in the presence of a variety of histochemical stains and textile dyes, are strongly dichroic in linearly polarized white light. The bis-azo dye Chicago sky blue is modeled because it is most absorbing when parallel and perpendicular to the radial axes in the respective spherulitic polymorphs. Optical properties were measured using Mueller matrix imaging polarimetry and simulated by taking into account the microstructure of the lamellae. The optical analysis of the dyed, patterned polycrystals clarifies aspects of the mesostructure that can be difficult to extract from bundles of tightly packed fibrils.

  6. Studies of Cubic Ice Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-11

    the nitrate ion concentration in the ice. We hypothesize that Br- was oxidized to bromine (Br2), hypobromous acid (HOBr), or bromic acid (HBr03). The...Crystals grown from solutions of ammonium carbonate at -16°C 35 10 Crystals grown from solutions of sulfuric acid at -16°C 36 11 Ice crystal aspect ratios...elaborate crystals. When we compare this with the results of Workman and Reynolds for acid solutions, which all yielded negligible freezing potentials, we

  7. Crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates: Floating zone process and ultra rapid crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofiev, A.; Yan, X.; Ikeda, M.; Löffler, S.; Paschen, S.

    2014-09-01

    We studied the crystal growth process of type-I transition metal clathrates in two different regimes: a regime of moderate cooling rate, realized with the floating zone technique, and a regime of ultra rapid cooling, realized by the melt spinning technique. In the former regime, bulk Ba8AuxSi46-x and Ba8Cu4.8GaxGe41.2-x single crystals were grown. We investigated segregation effects of the constituting elements by measurements of the composition profiles along the growth direction. The compositional non-uniformity results in a spatial variation of the electrical resistivity which is discussed as well. Structural features of clathrates and their extremely low thermal conductivities imply specifics in growth behavior which manifest themselves most pronouncedly in a rapid crystallization process. Our melt spinning experiments on Ba8Au5Si41 and Ba8Ni3.5Si42.5 (and earlier on some other clathrates) have revealed surprisingly large grains of at least 1 μm. Because of the anomalously high growth rate of the clathrate phase the formation of impurity phases is considerably kinetically suppressed. We present our scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations of melt spun samples and discuss structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the unusual clathrate nucleation and crystallization.

  8. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  9. Growing Crystals for Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Unidirectional solidification yields bulk crystals with compositional homogeneity. Unidirectionaly crystal-growth furnace assembly travels vertically so crystal grows upward from bottom tapered end of ampoule. Separately controlled furnaces used for hot (upper) and cold (lower) zones. New process produces ingots with radial compositional homogeneity suitable for fabricating infrared detectors.

  10. Physical vapor transport crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoel, Dave W.; Anderson, Elmer; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Cheng, H. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this research are two-fold: to study effective means of growing ZnSe crystals of good optical quality and to determine the advantages of growing such crystals in microgravity. As of this date the optimal conditions for crystal growth have not been determined. However, successful growth runs were made in two furnances and the results are given.

  11. Chiral Crystallization of Ethylenediamine Sulfate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koby, Lawrence; Ningappa, Jyothi B.; Dakesssian, Maria; Cuccia, Louis A.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the crystallization of achiral ethylenediamine sulfate into large chiral crystals that are ideal for polarimetry studies and observation using Polaroid sheets are presented. This experiment is an ideal undergraduate experiment, which clearly demonstrates the chiral crystallization of an achiral molecule.

  12. A Few Good Crystals Please

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the challenge of macromolecular crystal growth for structure determination is obtaining an appropriate number of crystals with a crystal volume suitable for X-ray analysis. In this respect an understanding of the effect of solution conditions on macromolecule nucleation rates is advantageous. This study investigated the effects of solution conditions on the nucleation rate and final crystal size of two crystal systems; tetragonal lysozyme and glucose isomerase. Batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentration and incubated at set temperatures over one week. The number of crystals per well with their size and axial ratios were recorded and correlated with solution conditions. Duplicate experiments indicate the reproducibility of the technique. Results for each system showing the effect of supersaturation, incubation temperature and solution pH on nucleation rates will be presented and discussed. In the case of lysozyme, having optimized solution conditions to produce an appropriate number of crystals of a suitable size, a batch of crystals were prepared under exactly the same conditions. Fifty of these crystals were analyzed by x-ray techniques. The results indicate that even under the same crystallization conditions, a marked variation in crystal properties exists.

  13. Small Business Innovations (Crystal Components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Scientific Materials Corporation, Bozeman, MT developed the SciMax line of improved Nd:Yag crystals under an Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center. They reduced the amount of water trapped in the crystals during growth to improve the optical quality and efficiency. Applications of the crystals include fiber optics, telecommunications, welding, drilling, eye surgery and medical instrumentation.

  14. Crystal Engineering of Hand-Twisted Helical Crystals.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhankar; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2017-02-08

    A strategy is outlined for the design of hand-twisted helical crystals. The starting point in the exercise is the one-dimensional (1D) plastic crystal, 1,4-dibromobenzene, which is then changed to a 1D elastic crystal, exemplified by 4-bromophenyl 4'-chlorobenzoate, by introduction of a molecular synthon -O-CO- in lieu of the supramolecular synthon Br···Br in the precursor. The 1D elastic crystals are next modified to two-dimensional (2D) elastic crystals, of the type 4-bromophenyl 4'-nitrobenzoate where the halogen bonding and C-H···O hydrogen bonding are well-matched. Finally, varying the interaction strengths in these 2D elastic crystals gives plastic crystals with two pairs of bendable faces but without slip planes. Typical examples are 4-chlorophenyl and 4-bromophenyl 4'-nitrobenzoate. This type of 2D plasticity represents a new type of bendable crystals in which plastic behavior is seen with a fair degree of isotropic character in the crystal packing. The presence of two sets of bendable faces, generally orthogonal to each other, allows for the possibility of hand-twisting of the crystals to give grossly helical morphologies. Accordingly, we propose the name hand-twisted helical crystals for these substances.

  15. Improving the Quality of Protein Crystals Using Stirring Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Niino, Ai; Takano, Kazufumi; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Warizaya, Masaichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-04-01

    Recent reports state that a high magnetic field improves the crystal quality of bovine adenosine deaminase (ADA) with an inhibitor [Kinoshita et al.: Acta Cryst. D59 (2003) 1333]. In this paper, we examine the effect of stirring solution on ADA crystallization using a vapor-diffusion technique with rotary and figure-eight motion shakers. The probability of obtaining high-quality crystals is increased with stirring in a figure-eight pattern. Furthermore, rotary stirring greatly increased the probability of obtaining high-quality crystals, however, nucleation time was also increased. The crystal structure with the inhibitor was determined at a high resolution using a crystal obtained from a stirred solution. These results indicate that stirring with simple equipment is as useful as the high magnetic field technique for protein crystallization.

  16. Thermal Resistance of Transferred-Silicon-Nanomembrane Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, D P; Aksamija, Z; Rath, A; Voyles, P M; Lagally, M G; Eriksson, M A

    2015-12-18

    We report measurements of the interfacial thermal resistance between mechanically joined single crystals of silicon, the results of which are up to a factor of 5 times lower than any previously reported thermal resistances of mechanically created interfaces. Detailed characterization of the interfaces is presented, as well as a theoretical model incorporating the critical properties determining the interfacial thermal resistance in the experiments. The results demonstrate that van der Waals interfaces can have very low thermal resistance, with important implications for membrane-based micro- and nanoelectronics.

  17. Extreme Nonlinear Optics With Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 446: 233...Mallouk, “ Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst...Williams, B. Lewis and T. Mallouk, “Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic

  18. Crystallization-induced properties from morphology-controlled organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Park, Chibeom; Park, Ji Eun; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2014-08-19

    During the past two decades, many materials chemists have focused on the development of organic molecules that can serve as the basis of cost-effective and flexible electronic, optical, and energy conversion devices. Among the potential candidate molecules, metal-free or metal-containing conjugated organic molecules offer high-order electronic conjugation levels that can directly support fast charge carrier transport, rapid optoelectric responses, and reliable exciton manipulation. Early studies of these molecules focused on the design and synthesis of organic unit molecules that exhibit active electrical and optical properties when produced in the form of thin film devices. Since then, researchers have worked to enhance the properties upon crystallization of the unit molecules as single crystals provide higher carrier mobilities and exciton recombination yields. Most recently, researchers have conducted in-depth studies to understand how crystallization induces property changes, especially those that depend on specific crystal surfaces. The different properties that depend on the crystal facets have been of particular interest. Most unit molecules have anisotropic structures, and therefore produce crystals with several unique crystal facets with dissimilar molecular arrangements. These structural differences would also lead to diverse electrical conductance, optical absorption/emission, and even chemical interaction properties depending on the crystal facet investigated. To study the effects of crystallization and crystal facet-dependent property changes, researchers must grow or synthesize crystals of highly conjugated molecules that have both a variety of morphologies and high crystallinity. Morphologically well-defined organic crystals, that form structures such as wires, rods, disks, and cubes, provide objects that researchers can use to evaluate these material properties. Such structures typically occur as single crystals with well-developed facets with

  19. Plenum type crystal growth process

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals are grown in a tank which is divided by a baffle into a crystal growth region above the baffle and a plenum region below the baffle. A turbine blade or stirring wheel is positioned in a turbine tube which extends through the baffle to generate a flow of solution from the crystal growing region to the plenum region. The solution is pressurized as it flows into the plenum region. The pressurized solution flows back to the crystal growing region through return flow tubes extending through the baffle. Growing crystals are positioned near the ends of the return flow tubes to receive a direct flow of solution.

  20. Protein Crystals Grown in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A collage of protein and virus crystals, many of which were grown on the U.S. Space Shuttle or Russian Space Station, Mir. The crystals include the proteins canavalin; mouse monoclonal antibody; a sweet protein, thaumatin; and a fungal protease. Viruses are represented here by crystals of turnip yellow mosaic virus and satellite tobacco mosaic virus. The crystals are photographed under polarized light (thus causing the colors) and range in size from a few hundred microns in edge length up to more than a millimeter. All the crystals are grown from aqueous solutions and are useful for X-ray diffraction analysis. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  1. Plenum type crystal growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, K.E.

    1990-12-31

    Crystals are grown in a tank which is divided by a baffle into a crystal growth region above the baffle and a plenum region below the baffle. A turbine blade or stirring wheel is positioned in a turbine tube which extends through the baffle to generate a flow of solution from the crystal growing region to the plenum region. The solution is pressurized as it flows into the plenum region. The pressurized solution flows back to the crystal growing region through return flow tubes extending through the baffle. Growing crystals are positioned near the ends of the return flow tubes to receive a direct flow of solution.

  2. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of dielectric strontium titanium oxynitride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Takuya; Sahashi, Akira; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we show a fabrication method and the dielectric properties of strontium titanium oxynitride (SrTiO3:N) single crystals. Oxynitride single crystals were prepared by annealing SrTiO3 single crystals in gaseous ammonia. SrTiO3:N was assumed to have the chemical composition SrTiO3-3xN2x, which contained oxygen vacancies. To reduce the number of oxygen vacancies, SrTiO3 crystals co-doped with nitrogen and niobium (SrTiO3:N,Nb) were fabricated. The semiconducting Nb-doped SrTiO3 crystals changed to dielectric N,Nb-codoped SrTiO3 crystals with a resistivity of 6 × 1012 Ω·cm with annealing in gaseous ammonia. XPS measurement indicated that niobium doping was effective for increasing the amount of dopant nitrogen. The dielectric permittivity increased with the amount of dopant nitrogen, indicating the effectivity of nitrogen doping for increasing the dielectric permittivity of perovskite oxides.

  4. Nanobody Mediated Crystallization of an Archeal Mechanosensitive Channel

    PubMed Central

    Löw, Christian; Yau, Yin Hoe; Pardon, Els; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Wåhlin, Lisa; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Moberg, Per; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Steyaert, Jan; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels (MS) are integral membrane proteins and allow bacteria to survive sudden changes in external osmolarity due to transient opening of their pores. The efflux of cytoplasmic osmolytes reduces the membrane tension and prevents membrane rupture. Therefore these channels serve as emergency valves when experiencing significant environmental stress. The preparation of high quality crystals of integral membrane proteins is a major bottleneck for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Crystallization chaperones based on various protein scaffolds have emerged as promising tool to increase the crystallization probability of a selected target protein. So far archeal mechanosensitive channels of small conductance have resisted crystallization in our hands. To structurally analyse these channels, we selected nanobodies against an archeal MS channel after immunization of a llama with recombinant expressed, detergent solubilized and purified protein. Here we present the characterization of 23 different binders regarding their interaction with the channel protein using analytical gel filtration, western blotting and surface plasmon resonance. Selected nanobodies bound the target with affinities in the pico- to nanomolar range and some binders had a profound effect on the crystallization of the MS channel. Together with previous data we show that nanobodies are a versatile and valuable tool in structural biology by widening the crystallization space for highly challenging proteins, protein complexes and integral membrane proteins. PMID:24205053

  5. Macromolecular crystal growing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Herren, Blair J. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Yost, Vaughn H. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A macromolecular crystal growing system especially designed for growing crystals in the low gravity of space as well as the gravity of earth includes at least one tray assembly, a carrier assembly which receives the tray, and a refrigeration-incubation module in which the carrier assembly is received. The tray assembly includes a plurality of sealed chambers with a plastic syringe and a plug means for the double tip of the syringe provided therein. Ganging mechanisms operate the syringes and plugs simultaneously in a precise and smooth operation. Preferably, the tray assemblies are mounted on ball bearing slides for smooth operation in inserting and removing the tray assemblies into the carrier assembly. The plugging mechanism also includes a loading control mechanism. A mechanism for leaving a syringe unplugged is also provided.

  6. CRYSTAL/FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), under funding from NASA, participated in the CRYSTAL/FACE field campaign in July, 2002 with measurements of cirrus cloud hydrometeors in the size range from 0.5 to 1600 microns. The measurements were made with the DMT Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) that was flown on NASA's WB57F. With the exception of the first research flight when the data system failed two hours into the mission, the measurement system performed almost flawlessly during the thirteen flights. The measurements from the CAPS have been essential for interpretation of cirrus cloud properties and their impact on climate. The CAPS data set has been used extensively by the CRYSTAL/FACE investigators and as of the date of this report, have been included in five published research articles, 10 conference presentations and six other journal articles currently in preparation.

  7. Liquid crystals in tribology.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-09-18

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered.

  8. Crystal growth and characterization of Hg-based chalcogenide compounds (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yihui; Lin, Wenwen; Syrigos, Jonathan C.; Wang, Peng Li; Islam, Saiful M.; McCall, Kyle M.; Kostina, Svetlana S.; Liu, Zhifu; Wessels, Bruce W.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two Hg-based chalcogenides were investigated in detail to reveal their potential capability of radiation detection at room temperature (RT). Cs2Hg6S7, with a bandgap of 1.63 eV, which is designed by the dimensional reduction theory proposed by our group, were prepared and characterized. α-HgS, with a bandgap of 2.10 eV, as a precursor used for the ternary compound synthesis, was also proposed and further investigated. For Cs2Hg6S7, the crystals tended to crystallize into needle form with small grains. Here, the conditions of Bridgman melt growth were optimized to obtain relatively large single crystals. The slight excess of Cs2S as a fluxing agent during growth was found to facilitate better crystallization and large grains. Interestingly, no inclusion or secondary phase was found in the as-grown single crystals. The improvement of bulk resistivity from 10^6 Ωcm to 10^8 Ωcm was also achieved through the control of stoichiometry during crystal growth. For α-HgS crystals, both physical vapor transport and chemical vapor transport methods have been applied. By modifying the transport temperature and transport agent, single crystal with size about 3x1.5 mm^2 was grown with resistivity higher than 10^11 Ωcm. Photoluminescence (PL) revealed that multiple peaks observed in the 1.6-2.3 eV range and excitonic peak from for α-HgS single crystals were observed indicating good crystalline quality. Finally, the planar detectors for both crystals were tested under Co57 gamma ray source. Both of the crystals showed reasonable gamma ray response, while α-HgS crystals could respond at a relatively higher counting rate.

  9. Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    87 6.2 Outgassing experiments o......... 88 6.3 Electropolishing ......... 95 6.4 Leaks in the TMXO package...machinable and sealing properties. After considering the thermal and mech- anical characteristics of many materials, nickel was selected. Table 7 gives...and the nickel type used in this program. TABLE 7. CHARACTERISTICS OF CRYSTAL ENCLOSURES Old copper Alumina* Nickel enclosures enclosures enclosure

  10. Nematic liquid crystal bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Susannah; Ellis, Perry; Vallamkondu, Jayalakshmi; Danemiller, Edward; Vernon, Mark; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We study the effects of confining a nematic liquid crystal between two parallel glass plates with homeotropic boundary conditions for the director at all bounding surfaces. We find that the free surface of the nematic bridge is a surface of constant mean curvature. In addition, by changing the distance between the plates and the contact angle with the glass plates, we transition between loops and hedgehogs that can be either radial or hyperbolic.

  11. The Crystal Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2014-04-01

    In past issues of this journal, the late H. R. Crane wrote a long series of articles under the running title of "How Things Work." In them, Dick dealt with many questions that physics teachers asked themselves, but did not have the time to answer. This article is my attempt to work through the physics of the crystal set, which I thought I knew, but actually did not.

  12. Diamond drumhead crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziej, Tomasz; Vodnala, Preeti; Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-thin (< 100 um) diamond single crystals are essential for the realization of numerous next generation x-ray optical devices. Fabrication and handling of such ultra-thin crystal components without introducing damage and strain is a challenge. Drumhead crystals, monolithic crystal structures comprised of a thin membrane furnished with a surrounding solid collar would be a solution for the proper handling ensuring mechanically stable and strain-free mount of the membranes with efficient thermal transport. However, diamond being one of the hardest and chemically inert materials poses insurmountable difficulties in the fabrication. Here we report on a successful manufacturing of the diamond drumhead crystals using picosecond laser milling. Subsequent temperature treatment appears to be crucial for the membranes to become defect-free and unstrained, as revealed by x-ray double-crystal topography on an example of drumhead crystals with 1-mm in diameter and 28 um to 47 um-thick membranes in the (100) orientation.

  13. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  14. Crystallization of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryo; Nakamura, Shota; Yoshida, Takuya; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2007-05-01

    Human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase has been crystallized using microseeding methods and X-ray diffraction data have been collected at 2.0 Å resolution. In the NAD biosynthetic pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase; EC 2.4.2.12) plays an important role in catalyzing the synthesis of nicotinamide mononucleotide from nicotinamide and 5′-phosphoribosyl-1′-pyrophosphate. Because the diffraction pattern of the initally obtained crystals was not suitable for structure analysis, the crystal quality was improved by successive use of the microseeding technique. The resultant crystals diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.56, b = 106.40, c = 82.78 Å. Here, the crystallization of human NMPRTase is reported in the free form; the crystals should be useful for inhibitor-soaking experiments on the enzyme.

  15. Modern trends in technical crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matz, G.

    1980-04-01

    Interesting and significant developments have occurred in the last decade in both crystallization equipment and in the theory of crystallization process. In the field of technical crystallization new crystallizers have been developed and computer modelling has become important in scaling up and in the achievement of increased performance. The DP-Kristaller developed by Escher-Wyss-Tsukishima, the Brodie purifier, the sieve tray column having dancing balls, the automated multiple crystallization process due to Mützenberg and Saxer and the double belt cooler, all of which represent technical developments, are described in the first section. The second part of the paper reviews computer modelling of the fluidized bed crystallizer, chemical precipitation, flaking and prilling. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the impact of technical crystallization processes on environmental protection.

  16. A creep mechanism for metal single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cuitino, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we present a mechanism of creep for metal single crystals. This creep mechanism is consistent with the hardening mechanism in metals single crystals, i.e. forest hardening. Hardening in metals is mainly due to the resistance to the dislocation motion opposed by obstacles. In single crystals, obstacles are generated by dislocation segments crossing the glide plane (forest dislocations). When a dislocation is released from an obstacle, it moves until stopped at the following obstacle inducing plastic deformation. It has been proposed as a mechanisms of creep that obstacles can be overcome by dislocation climb. However, the kind of obstacles remains in planes parallel to the gliding plane. Thus, the dislocation segment after climb is still stopped at the same obstacle and unable to glide, unless, a second jog moving in the forest dislocation meets simultaneously with the jog in the gliding segment. In this case, the gliding segment can move by the height of the forest jog. The gliding area is proportional to this height and the distance between obstacles. We call this mechanism of glide by congruent climb. Creep rate depends on the jog density and jog velocity. For a well-annealed material the number of jogs is relatively low. As plastic deformation proceeds, new jogs are formed by mainly two mechanisms: dislocation intersection and double cross slip. For a crystal undergoing single slip, the cross-slip contribution dominates jog generation, since dislocation intersections are relatively rare due to the low forest dislocation density. The situation is reversed for multiple glide as a consequence of the rapid dislocation multiplication which takes place in the active slip systems, which results in a high rate of dislocation intersection. The number of cross slip events and dislocation intersections can be readily estimated by our dislocation model of plastic deformation. Jog velocity is determined based on vacancy diffusion along the dislocation core.

  17. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; LeBaron, N.; Bertin, P.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Roche, J.

    2009-03-10

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF{sub 2} crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF{sub 2} samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from {sup 60}Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice - radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again - for each of these four PbF{sub 2} samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  18. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  19. Cholesterol crystal embolism (atheroembolism).

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Chiara; Jeannin, Guido; Sottini, Laura; Dallera, Nadia; Scolari, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolism, known as atheroembolic disease, is caused by showers of cholesterol crystals from an atherosclerotic plaque that occludes small arteries. Embolization can occur spontaneously or as an iatrogenic complication from an invasive vascular procedure (angiography or vascular surgery) and after anticoagulant therapy. The atheroembolism can give rise to different degrees of renal impairment. Some patients show a moderate loss of renal function, others severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Renal outcome can be variable: some patients deteriorate or remain on dialysis, some improve and some remain with chronic renal impairment. Clinically, three types of atheroembolic renal disease have been described: acute, subacute or chronic. More frequently a progressive loss of renal function occurs over weeks. Atheroembolization can involve the skin, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. The diagnosis is difficult and controversial for the protean extrarenal manifestations. In the past, the diagnosis was often made post-mortem. In the last 10 yrs, awareness of atheroembolic renal disease has improved. The correct diagnosis requires the clinician to be alert. The typical patient is a white male aged >60 yrs with a history of hypertension, smoking and arterial disease. The presence of a classic triad (precipitating event, renal failure and peripheral cholesterol crystal embolization) suggests the diagnosis. This can be confirmed by a biopsy of the target organs. A specific treatment is lacking; however, it is an important diagnosis to make because an aggressive therapeutic approach can be associated with a more favorable clinical outcome.

  20. Quartz crystal fabrication facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, R. J.

    1980-05-01

    The report describes the design and operation of a five chamber, interconnected vacuum system, which is capable of cleaning, plating, and sealing precision quartz crystal units in ceramic flatpack enclosures continuously in a high vacuum environment. The production rate design goal was 200 units per eight hour day. A unique nozzle beam gold deposition source was developed to operate for extended periods of time without reloading. The source puts out a narrow beam of gold typically in the order of 2 1/2 deg included cone angle. Maximum deposition rates are in the order of 400 a/min at 5.5 in. 'throw' distance used. Entrance and exit air lock chambers expedite the material throughput, so that the processing chambers are at high vacuum for extended periods of time. A stainless steel conveyor belt, in conjunction with three vacuum manipulators, transport the resonator components to the various work stations. Individual chambers are normally separated from each other by gate valves. The crystal resonators, mounted in flatpack frames but unplated, are loaded into transport trays in a lid-frame-lid sequency for insertion into the system and exit as completed crystal units. The system utilizes molybdenum coated ball bearings at essentially all friction surfaces. The gold sources and plating mask heads are equipped with elevators and gate valves, so that they can be removed from the system for maintenance without exposing the chambers to atmosphere.

  1. Cholesterol crystal embolism (atheroembolism)

    PubMed Central

    VENTURELLI, CHIARA; JEANNIN, GUIDO; SOTTINI, LAURA; DALLERA, NADIA; SCOLARI, FRANCESCO

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolism, known as atheroembolic disease, is caused by showers of cholesterol crystals from an atherosclerotic plaque that occludes small arteries. Embolization can occur spontaneously or as an iatrogenic complication from an invasive vascular procedure (angiography or vascular surgery) and after anticoagulant therapy. The atheroembolism can give rise to different degrees of renal impairment. Some patients show a moderate loss of renal function, others severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Renal outcome can be variable: some patients deteriorate or remain on dialysis, some improve and some remain with chronic renal impairment. Clinically, three types of atheroembolic renal disease have been described: acute, subacute or chronic. More frequently a progressive loss of renal function occurs over weeks. Atheroembolization can involve the skin, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. The diagnosis is difficult and controversial for the protean extrarenal manifestations. In the past, the diagnosis was often made post-mortem. In the last 10 yrs, awareness of atheroembolic renal disease has improved. The correct diagnosis requires the clinician to be alert. The typical patient is a white male aged >60 yrs with a history of hypertension, smoking and arterial disease. The presence of a classic triad (precipitating event, renal failure and peripheral cholesterol crystal embolization) suggests the diagnosis. This can be confirmed by a biopsy of the target organs. A specific treatment is lacking; however, it is an important diagnosis to make because an aggressive therapeutic approach can be associated with a more favorable clinical outcome. PMID:21977265

  2. On dewetting of thin films due to crystallization (crystallization dewetting).

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehran; Rahimzadeh, Amin; Eslamian, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    Drying and crystallization of a thin liquid film of an ionic or a similar solution can cause dewetting in the resulting thin solid film. This paper aims at investigating this type of dewetting, herein termed "crystallization dewetting", using PbI2 dissolved in organic solvents as the model solution. PbI2 solid films are usually used in X-ray detection and lead halide perovskite solar cells. In this work, PbI2 films are fabricated using spin coating and the effect of major parameters influencing the crystallization dewetting, including the type of the solvent, solution concentration, drying temperature, spin speed, as well as imposed vibration on the substrate are studied on dewetting, surface profile and coverage, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Simplified hydrodynamic governing equations of crystallization in thin films are presented and using a mathematical representation of the process, it is phenomenologically demonstrated that crystallization dewetting occurs due to the absorption and consumption of the solution surrounding a growing crystal. Among the results, it is found that a low spin speed (high thickness), a high solution concentration and a low drying temperature promote crystal growth, and therefore crystallization dewetting. It is also shown that imposed vibration on the substrate can affect the crystal size and crystallization dewetting.

  3. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  4. Boron Arsenide and Boron Phosphide for High Temperature and Luminescent Devices. [semiconductor devices - crystal growth/crystal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth of boron arsenide and boron phosphide in the form of bulk crystals and epitaxial layers on suitable substrates is discussed. The physical, chemical, and electrical properties of the crystals and epitaxial layers are examined. Bulk crystals of boron arsenide were prepared by the chemical transport technique, and their carrier concentration and Hall mobility were measured. The growth of boron arsenide crystals from high temperature solutions was attempted without success. Bulk crystals of boron phosphide were also prepared by chemical transport and solution growth techniques. Techniques required for the fabrication of boron phosphide devices such as junction shaping, diffusion, and contact formation were investigated. Alloying techniques were developed for the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts to boron phosphide. Four types of boron phosphide devices were fabricated: (1) metal-insulator-boron phosphide structures, (2) Schottky barriers; (3) boron phosphide-silicon carbide heterojunctions; and (4) p-n homojunctions. Easily visible red electroluminescence was observed from both epitaxial and solution grown p-n junctions.

  5. Pressure-induced superconductivity in Bi single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yufeng; Wang, Enyu; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2017-01-01

    Measurements on resistivity and magnetic susceptibility have been carried out for Bi single crystals under pressures up to 10.5 GPa. The temperature dependent resistivity shows a semimetallic behavior at ambient and low pressures (below about 1.6 GPa). This is followed by an upturn of resistivity in the low temperature region when the pressure is increased, which is explained as a semiconductor behavior. This feature gradually gets enhanced up to a pressure of about 2.52 GPa. Then a nonmonotonic temperature dependent resistivity appears upon further increasing pressure, which is accompanied by a strong suppression to the low temperature resistivity upturn. Simultaneously, a superconducting transition occurs at about 3.92 K under a pressure of about 2.63 GPa. With further increasing pressure, a second superconducting transition emerges at about 7 K under about 2.8 GPa. For these two superconducting states, the superconductivity induced magnetic screening volumes are quite large. As the pressure further increases to 8.1 GPa, we observe the third superconducting transition at about 8.2 K. The resistivity measurements under magnetic field allow us to determine the upper critical fields μ0Hc 2 of the superconducting phases. The upper critical field for the phase with Tc=3.92 K is extremely low. Based on the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg (WHH) theory, the estimated value of μ0Hc 2 for this phase is about 0.103 T, while the upper critical field for the phase with Tc=7 K is very high with a value of about 4.56 T. Finally, we present a pressure dependent phase diagram of Bi single crystals. Our results reveal the interesting and rich physics in bismuth single crystals under high pressure.

  6. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Kenneth L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  7. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kenneth L.

    2009-02-17

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  8. Growth and characterization of pure and Cadmium chloride doped KDP Crystals grown by gel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaivani, M. S.; Asaithambi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Crystal growth technology provides an important basis for many industrial branches. Crystals are the unrecognized pillars of modern technology. Without crystals, there is no electronic industry, no photonic industry, and no fiber optic communications. Single crystals play a major role and form the strongest base for the fast growing field of engineering, science and technology. Crystal growth is an interdisciplinary subject covering physics, chemistry, material science, chemical engineering, metallurgy, crystallography, mineralogy, etc. In past few decades, there has been a keen interest on crystal growth processes, particularly in view of the increasing demand of materials for technological applications. Optically good quality pure and metal doped KDP crystals have been grown by gel method at room temperature and their characterization have been studied. Gel method is a much uncomplicated method and can be utilized to synthesize crystals which are having low solubility. Potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate KH2PO4 (KDP) continues to be an interesting material both academically and industrially. KDP is a representative of hydrogen bonded materials which possess very good electro - optic and nonlinear optical properties in addition to interesting electrical properties. Due to this interesting properties, we made an attempt to grow pure and cadmium chloride doped KDP crystals in various concentrations (0.002, 0.004, 0.006, 0.008 and 0.010) using gel method. The grown crystals were collected after 20 days. We get crystals with good quality and shaped. The dc electrical conductivity (resistance, capacitance and dielectric constant) values were measured at frequencies in the range of 1 KHZ and 100 HZ of pure and cadmium chloride added crystal with a temperature range of 400C to 1300C using simple two probe setup with Q band digital LCR meter present in our lab. The electrical conductivity increases with increase of temperature. The dielectric constants of metal doped KDP

  9. Resistivity of Rotated Graphite-Graphene Contacts.

    PubMed

    Chari, Tarun; Ribeiro-Palau, Rebeca; Dean, Cory R; Shepard, Kenneth

    2016-07-13

    Robust electrical contact of bulk conductors to two-dimensional (2D) material, such as graphene, is critical to the use of these 2D materials in practical electronic devices. Typical metallic contacts to graphene, whether edge or areal, yield a resistivity of no better than 100 Ω μm but are typically >10 kΩ μm. In this Letter, we employ single-crystal graphite for the bulk contact to graphene instead of conventional metals. The graphite contacts exhibit a transfer length up to four-times longer than in conventional metallic contacts. Furthermore, we are able to drive the contact resistivity to as little as 6.6 Ω μm(2) by tuning the relative orientation of the graphite and graphene crystals. We find that the contact resistivity exhibits a 60° periodicity corresponding to crystal symmetry with additional sharp decreases around 22° and 39°, which are among the commensurate angles of twisted bilayer graphene.

  10. Discrete breathers in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu A.; Velarde, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems, in addition to traveling waves, support vibrational defect-localized modes. It turned out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Since the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, it is only through the special choice of initial conditions that a group of nodes can be found on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), will be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of the small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically conserve its vibrational energy forever provided no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery in them of DBs was only a matter of time. It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems support both traveling waves and vibrational defect-localized modes. It turns out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Because the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, only a special choice of the initial conditions allows selecting a group of nodes on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), can be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically preserve its vibrational energy forever if no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery of DBs in them was only a matter of time. Experimental studies of DBs encounter major technical difficulties, leaving atomistic computer simulations as the primary investigation tool. Despite

  11. Method for detecting superconducting stripes in high-temperature superconductors based on nonlinear resistivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Rodrigo A; Martin, Ivar

    2011-09-16

    We theoretically study the effect that stripelike superconducting inclusions would have on the nonlinear resistivity in single crystals. Even if the stripe orientation varies throughout the sample between two orthogonal directions due to twinning, we predict that there should be a universal dependence of the nonlinear resistivity on the angle between the applied current and the crystal axes. This prediction can be used to test the existence of superconducting stripes at and above the superconducting transition temperature in cuprate superconductors.

  12. Unifying the crystallization behavior of hexagonal and square crystals with the phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Zheng, Chen; Jing, Zhang; Yongxin, Wang; Yanli, Lu

    2016-03-01

    By employing the phase-field-crystal models, the atomic crystallization process of hexagonal and square crystals is investigated with the emphasis on the growth mechanism and morphological change. A unified regime describing the crystallization behavior of both crystals is obtained with the thermodynamic driving force varying. By increasing the driving force, both crystals (in the steady-state) transform from a faceted polygon to an apex-bulged polygon, and then into a symmetric dendrite. For the faceted polygon, the interface advances by a layer-by-layer (LL) mode while for the apex-bulged polygonal and the dendritic crystals, it first adopts the LL mode and then transits into the multi-layer (ML) mode in the later stage. In particular, a shift of the nucleation sites from the face center to the area around the crystal tips is detected in the early growth stage of both crystals and is rationalized in terms of the relation between the crystal size and the driving force distribution. Finally, a parameter characterizing the complex shape change of square crystal is introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 54175378, 51474176, and 51274167), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7261), and the Doctoral Foundation Program of Ministry of China (Grant No. 20136102120021).

  13. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  14. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  15. Actuation of liquid crystal elastomers reprocessed with carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Martin; Zalar, Boštjan; Remškar, Maja; Žumer, Slobodan; Finkelmann, Heino

    2006-12-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers are currently of great interest due to their large thermally stimulated changes in shape. Here the authors show that by using an existing network and conducting carbon nanoparticles dispersed in a solvent with high swelling capability, a surface integrated layer can be created. This layer allows the effective resistivity to be reduced from highly insulating to usable values for electrical actuation and withstands large changes in geometrical shape both in contraction and expansion. Utilizing a resistive "Joule" heating effect, the reprocessed system shows a 150% length change and can be cycled beyond 10kcycles.

  16. HPVB AND HPVZM SHAPED GROWTH OF CDZNTE, CDSE AND ZNSE CRYSTALS.

    SciTech Connect

    KOLESNIKOV,N.N.; JAMES,R.B.; BERZIGIAROVA,N.S.; KULAKOV,M.P.

    2002-07-07

    High-pressure Bridgman (HPVB) and vertical zone melting (HPVZM) growth processes have been applied for the manufacturing of Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (x = 0.04-0.2), CdSe and ZnSe crystal tapes with sizes up to 120 x 120 x 12 mm. The influences of the technological parameters describing the growth processes on the crystal quality and some selected material properties are discussed. The dependence of the inclusion (bubbles) content on the deviation from melt stoichiometry is determined. A method for growing plates with low content of inclusions is described. High-resistivity crystal tapes of undoped CdZnTe (10{sup 10} Ohm x cm), CdSe (10{sup 11} Ohm x cm) and ZnSe (>10{sup 11} Ohm x cm) were prepared. The possibility of tape growth on oriented seeds is shown for the example of CdSe. The primary differences between HPVB and HPVZM results are described. The main HPVZM advantage for II-VI compound crystal growth is the possibility of obtaining crystals with more stoichiometric composition or with a controlled deviation from stoichiometry. Hence, HPVZM is preferable for growing high-resistivity II-VI crystals with low inclusion content and possibly with better transport properties. Keywords for this report are: Crystal growth, shaped crystal growth, ZnSe, CdSe, CdZnTe, CZT, HPVB, Bridgman, HPVZM, zone melting, radiation detectors.

  17. Additive manufacturing of micrometric crystallization vessels and single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Halevi, Oded; Jiang, Hui; Kloc, Christian; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    We present an all-additive manufacturing method that is performed at mild conditions, for the formation of organic single crystals at specific locations, without any photolithography prefabrication process. The method is composed of two steps; inkjet printing of a confinement frame, composed of a water soluble electrolyte. Then, an organic semiconductor solution is printed within the confinement to form a nucleus at a specific location, followed by additional printing, which led to the growth of a single crystal. The specific geometry of the confinement enables control of the specific locations of the single crystals, while separating the nucleation and crystal growth processes. By this method, we printed single crystals of perylene, which are suitable for the formation of OFETs. Moreover, since this method is based on a simple and controllable wet deposition process, it enables formation of arrays of single crystals at specific locations, which is a prerequisite for mass production of active organic elements on flexible substrates. PMID:27830827

  18. Additive manufacturing of micrometric crystallization vessels and single crystals.

    PubMed

    Halevi, Oded; Jiang, Hui; Kloc, Christian; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-11-10

    We present an all-additive manufacturing method that is performed at mild conditions, for the formation of organic single crystals at specific locations, without any photolithography prefabrication process. The method is composed of two steps; inkjet printing of a confinement frame, composed of a water soluble electrolyte. Then, an organic semiconductor solution is printed within the confinement to form a nucleus at a specific location, followed by additional printing, which led to the growth of a single crystal. The specific geometry of the confinement enables control of the specific locations of the single crystals, while separating the nucleation and crystal growth processes. By this method, we printed single crystals of perylene, which are suitable for the formation of OFETs. Moreover, since this method is based on a simple and controllable wet deposition process, it enables formation of arrays of single crystals at specific locations, which is a prerequisite for mass production of active organic elements on flexible substrates.

  19. Additive manufacturing of micrometric crystallization vessels and single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, Oded; Jiang, Hui; Kloc, Christian; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-11-01

    We present an all-additive manufacturing method that is performed at mild conditions, for the formation of organic single crystals at specific locations, without any photolithography prefabrication process. The method is composed of two steps; inkjet printing of a confinement frame, composed of a water soluble electrolyte. Then, an organic semiconductor solution is printed within the confinement to form a nucleus at a specific location, followed by additional printing, which led to the growth of a single crystal. The specific geometry of the confinement enables control of the specific locations of the single crystals, while separating the nucleation and crystal growth processes. By this method, we printed single crystals of perylene, which are suitable for the formation of OFETs. Moreover, since this method is based on a simple and controllable wet deposition process, it enables formation of arrays of single crystals at specific locations, which is a prerequisite for mass production of active organic elements on flexible substrates.

  20. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-01-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 microns, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 microns), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 micron-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale- Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11micron and 23 micron crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial

  1. Preparation and properties of metallic, superhard rhenium diboride crystals.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jonathan B; Nguyen, Sandy L; Rasool, Haider I; Wright, Jeffrey A; Brown, Stuart E; Kaner, Richard B

    2008-12-17

    Single crystals of ReB(2) have been prepared from an aluminum flux under inert gas flow. The crystals are typically 1-3 mm in diameter and 500 microm thick, growing along the [002] direction with a distinct hexagonal morphology. Vickers microhardness and nanoindentation testing indicate that the (002) plane possesses the highest hardness with measured values of 40.5 and 36.4 GPa, respectively. The elastic anisotropy was examined and the indentation moduli of the basal plane and an (hk0) plane of unknown indices are 675 and 510 GPa, respectively. Four-probe electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that ReB(2) is the hardest material known to exhibit metallic behavior. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the crystals are stable in air up to 1000 degrees C due to the formation of a protective boron oxide coating.

  2. Single Crystal Synthesis and STM Studies of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrientos, Alfonso

    1997-01-01

    This is a final report for the work initiated in September of 1994 under the grant NAG8-1085 - NASA/OMU, on the fabrication of bulk and single crystal synthesis, specific heat measuring and STM studies of high temperature superconductors. Efforts were made to fabricate bulk and single crystals of mercury based superconducting material. A systematic thermal analysis on the precursors for the corresponding oxides and carbonates were carried out to synthesized bulk samples. Bulk material was used as seed in an attempt to grow single crystals by a two-step self flux process. On the other hand bulk samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, We studied the specific heat behavior in the range from 80 to 300 K. Some preliminary attempts were made to study the atomic morphology of our samples. As part of our efforts we built an ac susceptibility apparatus for measuring the transition temperature of our sintered samples.

  3. Crystal nephropathies: mechanisms of crystal-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Crystals can trigger a wide range of kidney injuries that can lead to acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal colic or nephrocalcinosis, depending on the localization and dynamics of crystal deposition. Studies of the biology of crystal handling by the kidney have shown that the formation of different crystals and other microparticles and the associated mechanisms of renal damage share molecular mechanisms, such as stimulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome or direct cytotoxicity through activation of the necroptosis signalling pathway. By contrast, crystal granuloma formation is limited to chronic crystallopathies that lead to chronic kidney disease and renal fibrosis. Here, we discuss current understanding of the pathomechanisms underlying the different types of crystal-induced kidney injury and propose a classification of crystal nephropathies based on the localization of crystal deposits in the renal vasculature (type 1), the nephron (type 2), or the draining urinary tract (type 3). Further exploration of the molecular mechanisms of crystal-induced kidney injury and renal remodelling might aid the development of innovative cures for these diseases.

  4. Dynamically controlled crystallization method and apparatus and crystals obtained thereby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnowitz, Leonard (Inventor); Steinberg, Emanuel (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for dynamically controlling the crystallization of molecules including a crystallization chamber (14) or chambers for holding molecules in a precipitant solution, one or more precipitant solution reservoirs (16, 18), communication passages (17, 19) respectively coupling the crystallization chamber(s) with each of the precipitant solution reservoirs, and transfer mechanisms (20, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28) configured to respectively transfer precipitant solution between each of the precipitant solution reservoirs and the crystallization chamber(s). The transfer mechanisms are interlocked to maintain a constant volume of precipitant solution in the crystallization chamber(s). Precipitant solutions of different concentrations are transferred into and out of the crystallization chamber(s) to adjust the concentration of precipitant in the crystallization chamber(s) to achieve precise control of the crystallization process. The method and apparatus can be used effectively to grow crystals under reduced gravity conditions such as microgravity conditions of space, and under conditions of reduced or enhanced effective gravity as induced by a powerful magnetic field.

  5. Growth and electric properties of CdGa 2Se 4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinaka, Hiromichi; Uemura, Akira; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Crystals of CdGa 2Se 4 were grown from the melt by the Bridgman method. Homogeneous red crystals (about 7 x 7 x 4 mm 3) were obtained when presynthesized CdGa 2Se 4 or a mixture of the binary compounds of CdSe and Ga 2Se 3 was used as a starting material. The dependence of crystal quality, transmittance, and dark resistivity on the composition of the starting materials was investigated. Measurements of Hall voltage and resistivity were made under illumination at various temperatures. The electron mobility of crystals grown from presynthesized CdGa 2Se 4 is 58 cm 2/V·s at room temperature.

  6. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  7. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  8. Polymerizable ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Jazkewitsch, Olga; Ritter, Helmut

    2009-09-17

    Polymerizable vinylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) that contain mesogenic coumarin and biphenyl units, respectively, have been synthesized. The N-alkylation of N-vinylimidazole with bromoalkylated mesogenic units 7-(6-bromohexyloxy)coumarin (1) and 4,4'-bis(6-bromohexyloxy)biphenyl (2) was then carried out. The thermal behavior of the obtained ILs 3 and 4 was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. These measurements showed that the attached mesogenic units induce the self-assembly of ILs and, therefore, the occurrence of liquid crystalline phases. Subsequently, the ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) 3 and 4 were polymerized by a free-radical mechanism.

  9. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  10. Crystallization in detergent performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoes, D.; Van Landschoot, R. C.; Van Rosmalen, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various polymeric additives on the crystallization of CaCO 3 in simple soda-based detergent formulations were investigated. The adherence of CaCO 3 on cotton, a great disadvantage of soda-based detergents, was significantly diminished by copolymers of polystyrene sulfonates. A mechanism in which these additives promote the nucleation of CaCO 3 is proposed. Polyacrylates cause an increasing adherence of CaCO 3 on cotton, because the chains adsorb on cotton and CaCO 3

  11. Crystallization of fluorozirconate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Doremus, Robert H.; Bruce, A. J.; Moynihan, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The crystallization of a number of glasses of the fluorozirconate family has been studied (using powder X-ray diffraction and DSC) as a function of time and temperature of heating. The main crystalline phases were beta BaZrF6 and beta BaZr2F10. Stable and metastble transformations to the low-temperature alpha phases were also investigated. The size of crystallites in fully devitrified glasses was calculated (from line broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks) to be about 60 nm.

  12. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  13. Liquid crystals for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniewicz, A.; Gniewek, A.; Parka, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe application of liquid crystals in optical imaging and processing. Electrically and optically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulators are key elements in real-time holographic devices. Their implementation for beam steering and hologram formation is briefly discussed. The Joint Fourier transform optical correlator for pattern recognition is presented as well as the use of liquid crystals for the adaptive optics purposes is discussed.

  14. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  15. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  16. The electrical characterizations of selenium (Se) doped gallium antimony (GaSb) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhari, Rashmi; Deshpande, Manisha; Maske, Dilip; Gadkari, Dattatray

    2016-05-01

    The growth of Se doped GaSb bulk crystal is carried out using Vertical directional solidification (VDS) technique. High purity Gallium and Antimony is taken as source material and selenium as doping material. From grown ingot substrate were obtained in wafer form using diamond cutter. The electrical characteristics such as Hall measurement is used to find the carrier concentration and mobility, while Van der pauw for measuring resistivity of the sample The GaSb:Se sample shows high resistivity and mobility. The grown crystal was detached from the ampoule wall with high crystal quality. The measured resistivity of GaSb:Se is 9.9×10-3ohm-cm, the mobility is 1464cm3/Vsec and carrier concentration is 5.08×1017 per cm3.

  17. 2D Crystal Semiconductors New Materials for GHz-THz Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-02

    frequency operation. 4) Identify methods to improve carrier transport in 2D Crystal semiconductors. 5) Compare FETs made from naturally occuring and... chemically synthesized 2D Crystal semic???ductors. 6) Elucidate the effect of contact resistance, and gauge the challenges for GHz-THz electronics by... chemical doping, which involved replac- ing a small number of atoms of the 3-D semiconductor by those with higher or lower valence. The next advance

  18. Purification, growth, and characterization of Zn(x)Cd(1-x)Se crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberman, E.; Burger, A.; Chen, W.; Henderson, D. O.; Morgan, S. H.; Springer, John M.; Yao, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The purification of starting materials which were used in the growth of Zn(x)Cd(1-x)Se (x = 0.2) single crystals using the traveling solution method (TSM) is reported. Up to 13 cm long single crystals and as grown resistivities of 6 x 10(exp 12) ohm/cm could be achieved. Infrared and Raman spectra of Zn(0.2)Cd(0.8)Se are also presented and discussed.

  19. Crystal Chemistry of Melanite Garnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dawn Marie

    1999-01-01

    This original project resulted in a detailed crystal chemical data map of a titanium rich garnet (melanite) suite that originates from the Crowsnest Volcanics of Alberta Canada. Garnet is typically present during the partial melting of the earth's mantle to produce basalt. Prior studies conducted at Youngstown State University have yielded questions as to the crystal structure of the melanite. In the Studies conducted at Youngstown State University, through the use of single crystal x-ray diffraction, the c-axis appears to be distorted creating a tetragonal crystal instead of the typical cubic crystal of garnets. The micro probe was used on the same suite of titanium rich garnets as used in the single crystal x-ray diffraction. The combination of the single crystal x-ray research and the detailed microprobe research will allow us to determine the exact crystal chemical structure of the melanite garnet. The crystal chemical data was gathered through the utilization of the SX100 Electron Probe Micro Analyzer. Determination of the exact chemical nature may prove useful in modeling the ultramafic source rock responsible for the formation of the titanium rich lunar basalts.

  20. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  1. Quartz-crystal-oscillator hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measuring device, which eliminates complex and expensive optical components by electronically sensing dewpoint of water vapor in gas, employs piezoelectric crystal oscillator, supportive circuitry, temperature regulators, and readout.

  2. Surface Relaxation in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boutet, S.; Robinson, I. K.; Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on (111) growth faces of crystals of the Cellular iron-storage protein horse spleen ferritin. Crystal Trunkation Rods (CTR) were measured. A fit of the measured profile of the CTR revealed a surface roughness of 48 +/- 4.5 A and a top layer spacing contraction of 3.9 +/- 1.5%. In addition to the peak from the CTR, the rocking curves of the crystals displayed unexpected extra peaks. Multiple-scattering is demonstrated to account for them. Future applications of the method could allow the exploration of hydration effects on the growth of protein crystals.

  3. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOEpatents

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  4. Towards the Understanding of Resistance Mechanisms in Clinically Isolated Trimethoprim-resistant, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Lombardo, M; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutics such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has become an increasing problem in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant strains reveal a double mutation, H30N/F98Y, in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to develop novel and effective therapeutics against these resistant strains, we evaluated a series of propargyl-linked antifolate lead compounds for inhibition of the mutant enzyme. For the propargyl-linked antifolates, the F98Y mutation generates minimal (between 1.2- and 6-fold) losses of affinity and the H30N mutation generates greater losses (between 2.4- and 48-fold). Conversely, trimethoprim affinity is largely diminished by the F98Y mutation (36-fold) and is not affected by the H30N mutation. In order to elucidate a mechanism of resistance, we determined a crystal structure of a complex of this double mutant with a lead propargyl-linked antifolate. This structure suggests a resistance mechanism consistent both for the propargyl-linked class of antifolates and for trimethoprim that is based on the loss of a conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond.

  5. Better photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly - and fundamentally - broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more 'special" than previously thought. Applications of such special fibers have not been hard to find. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available using air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. However, commercial success demands more than just a fiber and an application. The useful properties of the fibers need to be optimized for the specific application. This tutorial will describe some of the basic physics and technology behind these photonic crystal fibers (PCF's), illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  6. Sonofragmentation of Ionic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Na; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2017-02-24

    Mechanochemistry deals with the interface between the chemical and the mechanical worlds and explores the physical and chemical changes in materials caused by an input of mechanical energy. As such, the chemical and physical effects of ultrasound, i.e., sonochemistry, are forms of mechanochemistry. In this paper, the fragmentation of ionic crystals during ultrasonic irradiation of slurries has been quantitatively investigated: the rate of fragmentation depends strongly on the strength of the materials (as measured by Vickers hardness or by Young's modulus). This is a mechanochemical extension of the Bell-Evans-Polanyi Principle or Hammond's Postulate: activation energies for solid fracture correlate with binding energies of solids. Sonofragmentation is unaffected by slurry loading or liquid vapor pressure, but is suppressed by increasing liquid viscosity. The mechanism of the particle breakage is consistent with a direct interaction between the shockwaves created by the ultrasound (through acoustic cavitation) and the solid particles in the slurry. Fragmentation is proposed to occur from defects in the solids induced by compression-expansion, bending, or torsional distortions of the crystals.

  7. Crystal structure of triclopyr.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri-chloro-pyridin-2-yl)-oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π-π inter-actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter-molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4).

  8. Crystal structure of triclopyr

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri­chloro­pyridin-2-yl)­oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb­oxy­lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 2(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π–π inter­actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter­molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  9. Crystal Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Braverman, Joshua B.; Harrison, Mark J.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Newby, Jason

    2013-09-26

    Stand-off detection is one of the most important radiation detection capabilities for arms control and the control of illicit nuclear materials. For long range passive detection one requires a large detector and a means of “seeing through” the naturally occurring and varying background radiation, i.e. imaging. Arguably, Compton imaging is the best approach over much of the emission band suitable for long range detection. It provides not only imaging, but more information about the direction of incidence of each detected gamma-ray than the alternate approach of coded-aperture imaging. The directional information allows one to reduce the background and hence improve the sensitivity of a measurement. However, to make an efficient Compton imager requires localizing and measuring the simultaneous energy depositions when gamma-rays Compton scatter and are subsequently captured within a single, large detector volume. This concept has been demonstrated in semi-conductor detectors (HPGe, CZT, Si) but at ~ $1k/cm3 these materials are too expensive to build the large systems needed for standoff detection. Scintillator detectors, such as NaI(Tl), are two orders of magnitude less expensive and possess the energy resolution required to make such an imager. However, they do not currently have the ability to localize closely spaced, simultaneous energy depositions in a single large crystal. In this project we are applying a new technique that should, for the first time ever, allow cubic-millimeter event localization in a bulk scintillator crystal.

  10. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered. PMID:19865534

  11. Frustrated polymer crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, B.; Strasbourg, 67083

    1997-03-01

    Several crystal structures or polymorphs of chiral or achiral polymers and biopolymers with three fold conformation of the helix have been found to conform to a common and -with one exception(Puterman, M. et al, J. Pol. Sci., Pol. Phys. Ed., 15, 805 (1977))- hitherto unsuspected packing scheme. The trigonal unit-cell contains three isochiral helices; the azimuthal setting of one helix differs significantly from that of the other two, leading to a so-called frustrated packing scheme, in which the environment of conformationally identical helices differs. Two variants of the frustrated scheme are analyzed. Similarities with frustrated two dimensional magnetic systems are underlined. Various examples of frustration in polymer crystallography are illustrated via the elucidation or reinterpretation of crystal phases or polymorphs of polyolefins, polyesters, cellulose derivatives and polypeptides. Structural manifestations (including AFM evidence) and morphological consequences of frustration are presented, which help diagnose the existence of this original packing of polymers.(Work done with L. Cartier, D. Dorset, S. Kopp, T. Okihara, M. Schumacher, W. Stocker.)

  12. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  13. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  14. Glasses crystallize rapidly at free surfaces by growing crystals upward.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Zhu, Lei; Kearns, Kenneth L; Ediger, Mark D; Yu, Lian

    2011-04-12

    The crystallization of glasses and amorphous solids is studied in many fields to understand the stability of amorphous materials, the fabrication of glass ceramics, and the mechanism of biomineralization. Recent studies have found that crystal growth in organic glasses can be orders of magnitude faster at the free surface than in the interior, a phenomenon potentially important for understanding glass crystallization in general. Current explanations differ for surface-enhanced crystal growth, including released tension and enhanced mobility at glass surfaces. We report here a feature of the phenomenon relevant for elucidating its mechanism: Despite their higher densities, surface crystals rise substantially above the glass surface as they grow laterally, without penetrating deep into the bulk. For indomethacin (IMC), an organic glass able to grow surface crystals in two polymorphs (α and γ), the growth front can be hundreds of nanometers above the glass surface. The process of surface crystal growth, meanwhile, is unperturbed by eliminating bulk material deeper than some threshold depth (ca. 300 nm for α IMC and less than 180 nm for γ IMC). As a growth strategy, the upward-lateral growth of surface crystals increases the system's surface energy, but can effectively take advantage of surface mobility and circumvent slow growth in the bulk.

  15. Single-crystal silicon optical fiber by direct laser crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Lei, Shiming; Yu, Shih -Ying; Cheng, Hiu Yan; Liu, Wenjun; Poilvert, Nicolas; Xiong, Yihuang; Dabo, Ismaila; Mohney, Suzanne E.; Badding, John V.; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-12-05

    Semiconductor core optical fibers with a silica cladding are of great interest in nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics applications. Laser crystallization has been recently demonstrated for crystallizing amorphous silicon fibers into crystalline form. Here we explore the underlying mechanism by which long single-crystal silicon fibers, which are novel platforms for silicon photonics, can be achieved by this process. Using finite element modeling, we construct a laser processing diagram that reveals a parameter space within which single crystals can be grown. Utilizing this diagram, we illustrate the creation of single-crystal silicon core fibers by laser crystallizing amorphous silicon deposited inside silica capillary fibers by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The single-crystal fibers, up to 5.1 mm long, have a very welldefined core/cladding interface and a chemically pure silicon core that leads to very low optical losses down to ~0.47-1dB/cm at the standard telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm). Furthermore, tt also exhibits a photosensitivity that is comparable to bulk silicon. Creating such laser processing diagrams can provide a general framework for developing single-crystal fibers in other materials of technological importance.

  16. Single-crystal silicon optical fiber by direct laser crystallization

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Lei, Shiming; Yu, Shih -Ying; ...

    2016-12-05

    Semiconductor core optical fibers with a silica cladding are of great interest in nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics applications. Laser crystallization has been recently demonstrated for crystallizing amorphous silicon fibers into crystalline form. Here we explore the underlying mechanism by which long single-crystal silicon fibers, which are novel platforms for silicon photonics, can be achieved by this process. Using finite element modeling, we construct a laser processing diagram that reveals a parameter space within which single crystals can be grown. Utilizing this diagram, we illustrate the creation of single-crystal silicon core fibers by laser crystallizing amorphous silicon deposited inside silica capillarymore » fibers by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The single-crystal fibers, up to 5.1 mm long, have a very welldefined core/cladding interface and a chemically pure silicon core that leads to very low optical losses down to ~0.47-1dB/cm at the standard telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm). Furthermore, tt also exhibits a photosensitivity that is comparable to bulk silicon. Creating such laser processing diagrams can provide a general framework for developing single-crystal fibers in other materials of technological importance.« less

  17. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  18. High-Purity Germanium Crystals Study for Underground Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Yang, Gang; Gavoni, Jayesh; Wang, Guojian; Mei, Hao; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The main characterization is the measurement of electrical properties such as carrier concentration, carrier mobility, resistivity of germanium crystal, as well as to identify whether the crystal is n-type or p-type. Van der pauw Hall effect measurement is conducted at room temperature and 77 K separately for measuring electrical properties for shallow level impurities. The results show that the ionized impurity level of crystals grown in our lab has reached about 1010 /cm3. The accumulated data are applied with theoretical analysis. The study of mobility reveals the different scattering mechanisms involved with impurities and lattice vibrations of the crystal. Theoretical calculations have been performed with reasonable parameter assumption and then compared with experimental data. It is found that neutral impurity concentration constrains mobility at 77 K while ionized impurity is within the acceptable range (below 1012/cm3) in germanium crystals. Mobility can increase significantly when neutral impurity concentration is below 1014/cm3. Therefore, a large reduction of neutral impurity is a desirable approach for obtaining larger mobility, which would improve timing response of germanium detectors. Sponsored by Department of Energy- DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the State of South Dakota.

  19. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  20. Crystallization kinetics of the borax decahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyhan, A. A.; Sahin, Ö.; Bulutcu, A. N.

    2007-03-01

    The growth and dissolution rates of borax decahydrate have been measured as a function of supersaturation for various particle sizes at different temperature ranges of 13 and 50 °C in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed crystallizer. The values of mass transfer coefficient, K, reaction rate constant, kr and reaction rate order, r were determined. The relative importances of diffusion and integration resistance were described by new terms named integration and diffusion concentration fraction. It was found that the overall growth rate of borax decahydrate is mainly controlled by integration (reaction) steps. It was also estimated that the dissolution region of borax decahydrate, apart from other materials, is controlled by diffusion and surface reaction. Increasing the temperature and particle size cause an increase in the values of kinetic parameters ( Kg, kr and K). The activation energies of overall, reaction and mass transfer steps were determined as 18.07, 18.79 and 8.26 kJmol -1, respectively.